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Sample records for age prostate-specific antigen

  1. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  2. Variation in Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening in Men Aged 80 and Older in Fee-for-Service Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Bynum, Julie; Song, Yunjie; Fisher, Elliott

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine the rate of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in men aged 80 and older in Medicare and to examine geographic variation in screening rates across the U.S. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study of variation across hospital referral regions using administrative data. SETTING National random sample in fee-for-service Medicare. PARTICIPANTS Medicare beneficiaries aged 80 and older in 2003. MEASUREMENTS Percentage of men aged 80 and older screened using the PSA test. RESULTS The national rate of PSA screening in men aged 80 and older was 17.2%, but there was wide variation across regions (<2–38%). Higher PSA screening in a region was positively associated with greater total costs (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.49, P<.001), greater intensive care unit use at the end of life (r = 0.46, P<.001), and greater number of unique physicians seen (r = 0.36, P<.001). PSA screening was negatively associated with proportion of beneficiaries using a primary care physician as opposed to a medical subspecialist for the predominance of ambulatory care (r = −0.38, P<.001). CONCLUSION PSA screening in men aged 80 and older is common practice, although its frequency is highly variable across the United States. Its association with fragmented physician care and aggressive end-of-life care may reflect less reliance on primary care and consequent difficulty informing patients of the potential harms and low likelihood of benefit of this procedure. PMID:20345867

  3. Eosinophilic prostatitis and prostatic specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Miller, P D; Holmes, S A; Christmas, T J; Kirby, R S

    1992-01-01

    Eosinophilic prostatitis is a rare form of abacterial prostatitis with uncertain aetiology. Its clinical presentation, like other types of abacterial prostatitis, commonly mimics carcinoma of the prostate. Transrectal ultrasound may be helpful in the diagnosis of prostatitis but histological confirmation is necessary. Prostatic specific antigen has been widely used in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with prostatic carcinoma. High levels of this antigen (greater than 30 micrograms/l) have been claimed to be highly specific for prostate cancer, although lesser elevations may also occur in patients with large benign prostate glands and in bacterial prostatitis. We report 3 patients with histologically proven eosinophilic prostatitis and high levels of prostatic specific antigen. This diagnosis may closely mimic carcinoma of the prostate and must be excluded by histological examination of biopsy material before treatment for presumed prostate carcinoma is initiated.

  4. Age and Prostate-Specific Antigen Level Prior to Diagnosis Predict Risk of Death from Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    MacKintosh, F. Roy; Sprenkle, Preston C.; Walter, Louise C.; Rawson, Lori; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Morrell, Christopher H.; Kattan, Michael W.; Nawaf, Cayce B.; Neville, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    A single early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level has been correlated with a higher likelihood of prostate cancer diagnosis and death in younger men. PSA testing in older men has been considered of limited utility. We evaluated prostate cancer death in relation to age and PSA level immediately prior to prostate cancer diagnosis. Using the Veterans Affairs database, we identified 230,081 men aged 50–89 years diagnosed with prostate cancer and at least one prior PSA test between 1999 and 2009. Prostate cancer-specific death over time was calculated for patients stratified by age group (e.g., 50–59 years, through 80–89 years) and PSA range at diagnosis (10 ranges) using Kaplan–Meier methods. Risk of 10-year prostate cancer mortality across age and PSA was compared using log-rank tests with a Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing. 10.5% of men diagnosed with prostate cancer died of cancer during the 10-year study period (mean follow-up = 3.7 years). Higher PSA values prior to diagnosis predict a higher risk of death in all age groups (p < 0.0001). Within the same PSA range, older age groups are at increased risk for death from prostate cancer (p < 0.0001). For PSA of 7–10 ng/mL, cancer-specific death, 10 years after diagnosis, increased from 7% for age 50–59 years to 51% for age 80–89 years. Men older than 70 years are more likely to die of prostate cancer at any PSA level than younger men, suggesting prostate cancer remains a significant problem among older men (even those aged 80+) and deserves additional study. PMID:27446803

  5. Reference Ranges of Age-Related Prostate-Specific Antigen in Men without Cancer from Beijing Area

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Shun-Xin; Lin, Qian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background To determine the normal ranges of serum age-related prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in men from Beijing area without cancer. Methods In this cross sectional study, form April 2010 to October 2011, 1611 healthy men undergoing a routine health check-up in our hospital and all men received three examinations including serum PSA test, digital rectal ex-amination and transrectal ultrasound. Men with any two abnormal results of the three examinations were undergone a prostate biopsy. Men with any two normal results of the three examinations or with negative biopsy were defined as men without cancer. Men with a prior history of prostate cancer/surgery or with urinary tract infection/obstruction were excluded. 1572 men without cancer were recruited into the study finally and were stratified into 10-year age groups: 40 to 49, 50 to 59, 60 to 69, 70 to 79, and older than 80. Results The median PSA value (95th percentile range) was 0.506(1.565), 1.04(2.920), 1.16(4.113), 1.34(5.561)and 2.975 (7.285) for each age group respectively, and the 25th percentile to 75 percentile was 0.343 to 0.923, 0.663 to 1.580, 0.693 to 2.203, 0.789 to 2.368 and 1.188 to 4.295 respectively. The serum PSA value is directly correlated with age (r=0.314, P<0.001). Conclusions Use the age-related range for PSA increases the sensitivity in younger men and decreases the biopsy rate in older patients. PMID:26171333

  6. Long Distance Bicycle Riding Causes Prostate-Specific Antigen to Increase in Men Aged 50 Years and Over

    PubMed Central

    Mejak, Sandra L.; Bayliss, Julianne; Hanks, Shayne D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether bicycle riding alters total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) serum concentrations in healthy older men. Methods 129 male participants, ranging in age from 50 to 71 years (mean 55 years), rode in a recreational group bicycle ride of between 55 and 160 kilometers. Blood samples for tPSA analysis were drawn within 60 minutes before starting, and within 5 minutes after completing the ride. The pre-cycling and post-cycling tPSA values were log transformed for normality and compared using paired t-tests. Linear regression was used to assess the relationship between changes in tPSA with age and distance cycled. Results Bicycle riding caused tPSA to increase by an average of 9.5% (95% CI = 6.1–12.9; p<0.001) or 0.23 ng/ml. The number of participants with an elevated tPSA (using the standard PSA normal range cut-off of 4.0 ng/ml) increased from two pre-cycle to six post-cycle (or from five to eight when using age-based normal ranges). Univariate linear regression analysis revealed that the change in tPSA was positively correlated with age and the distance cycled. Conclusions Cycling causes an average 9.5% increase in tPSA, in healthy male cyclists ≥50 years old, when measured within 5 minutes post cycling. We considered the increase clinically significant as the number of participants with an elevated PSA, according to established cut-offs, increased post-ride. Based on the research published to date, the authors suggest a 24–48 hour period of abstinence from cycling and ejaculation before a PSA test, to avoid spurious results. PMID:23418500

  7. PROSTATE SPECIFIC MEMBRANE ANTIGEN-BASED IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Anand, Alok; Deh, Kofi; Tagawa, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy affecting men in North America. Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management as much as imaging performed for other common cancers. Given the lack of specificity in conventional imaging techniques, one possible solution is to screen for PC specific antigenic targets and generate agents able to specifically bind. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in PC tissue, with low levels of expression in the small intestine, renal tubular cells and salivary gland. The first clinical agent for targeting PSMA was 111In-capromab, involving an antibody recognizing the internal domain of PSMA. The second- and third-generation humanized PSMA binding antibodies have the potential to overcome some of the limitations inherent to capromab pendetide i.e. inability to bind to live PC cells. One example is the humanized monoclonal antibody J591 (Hu mAb J591) that was developed primarily for therapeutic purposes but also has interesting imaging characteristics including the identification of bone metastases in PC. The major disadvantage of use of mAb for imaging is slow target recognition and background clearance in an appropriate timeframe for diagnostic imaging. Urea-based compounds such as small molecule inhibitors may also present promising agents for PC imaging with SPECT and PET. Two such small-molecule inhibitors targeting PSMA, MIP-1072 and MIP-1095, have exhibited high affinity for PSMA. The uptake of 123I-MIP-1072 and 123I-MIP-1095 in PC xenografts have imaged successfully with favorable properties amenable to human trials. While advances in conventional imaging will continue, Ab and small molecule imaging exemplified by PSMA targeting have the greatest potential to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22658884

  8. Attachment and health care utilization among middle-aged and older African-descent men: dismissiveness predicts less frequent digital rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen screening.

    PubMed

    Consedine, Nathan S; Tuck, Natalie L; Fiori, Katherine L

    2013-09-01

    Although health care utilization occurs in interpersonal contexts, little is known regarding how interpersonal preferences or styles among patients may be relevant. A small body of work has identified links between attachment-a dispositional style of relating to others-and patterns of health care use. The current report examined how attachment characteristics predicted the frequency of digital rectal exam and prostate-specific antigen testing in a sample of African-descent men. Four hundred and fourteen African-descent men aged 45 to 70 years completed measures of prostate screening and attachment, together with measures of traditional predictors of screening (demographics, insurance, family history, physician variables, knowledge, perceived risk, and accessibility). Consistent with predictions, dismissiveness-the most common relational style among older men-predicted less frequent prostate-specific antigen testing and digital rectal examination. However, attachment security-a comfort with intimate relationships-also predicted lower screening frequency. Identifying the interpersonal characteristics predicting screening may help identify men at risk of suboptimal health care use and guide the development of interventions suited to the normative relational preferences of current cohorts of older, African-descent men.

  9. Predictors of mortality after prostate-specific antigen failure

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Anthony V. . E-mail: adamico@lroc.harvard.edu; Kantoff, Phillip; Loffredo, Marian; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Loffredo, Brittany; Chen Minghui

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: We identified factors associated with the length of survival after prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 81 of 206 men enrolled on a randomized trial evaluating external-beam radiation therapy (RT) with or without androgen suppression therapy (AST) and who experienced PSA failure. Salvage AST was administered at a PSA level of {approx}10 ng/mL as per protocol. Cox regression was used to determine factors associated with length of survival after PSA failure. Results: A PSA DT (doubling time) <6 months (p = 0.04) and age at the time of PSA failure (p = 0.009) were significantly associated with length of survival. By 5 years, 35% and 65% of all-cause mortality was from prostate cancer in men whose age at PSA failure was 75 or higher vs. <75, respectively. Across all ages, 0%, 4%, as compared with 63% of men, were estimated to die of prostate cancer within 5 years after PSA failure if their PSA DT was >12, 6-12, or <6 months, respectively. Conclusions: Advanced age and a PSA DT <6 months at the time of PSA failure are associated with a significantly shorter survival.

  10. Prostate-Specific Antigen: Nonspecific in Deceased Organ Donors.

    PubMed

    Pabisiak, K; Ostrowski, M; Kram, A; Safranow, K; Myślak, M; Sieńko, J; Sulikowski, T; Ciechanowski, K

    2016-06-01

    Currently, there is no clear position regarding the donation of organs from donors with prostate carcinoma (CaP) in European countries, except Italy. The lengthening of life expectancy increases the probability of prostate cancer among potential organ donors. The concentration of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >2 ng/mL at 60 years of age is related to the increasing possibility of identifying an advanced form of CaP. In recent years in Poland, the recommendation has been to determine tumor markers in potential donors. In the first year of the recommendation, 10% of potential male cadaveric donors were disqualified in West Pomerania, Poland, on the basis of elevated PSA levels (>10 ng/mL). To avoid reduction of the actual donor pool, each potential male donor reported to the center since January 2010 undergoes a routine histologic evaluation of the whole prostate, regardless of the PSA level, before organ implantation. In the study group (N = 52), histopathologic evaluation revealed 6 cases of CaP (12%). In CaP positive group Gleason score range from 2+2 to 3+4. In CaP donors PSA level have been noticed in range 1.79 ng/mL - 7.66 ng/mL. There was no correlation between histologically confirmed CaP and the PSA level. PMID:27496408

  11. Experience with prostate-specific antigen in prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Bach, D

    1991-01-01

    A total of 71 prostatic tumour patients and 45 prostatic adenoma patients were tested for prostate-specific antigen (PSA), immunological prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) concentration as well as serum prostatic phosphatase (SPP) and enzymic serum phosphatase. It was found among untreated patients that PSA showed the highest percentage of pathologic affection in each stage. PSA, on the evidence of clearance test in the initial days of therapy and after a follow-up period of several months, gave a good picture of the course that the disease had taken.

  12. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Avid Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Vamadevan, Shankar; Shetty, Deepa; Le, Ken; Bui, Chuong; Mansberg, Robert; Loh, Han

    2016-10-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate recurrent prostatic malignancy due to its high specificity. A 75-year-old man with a previous history of treated prostate cancer 3 years earlier presented with rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT which demonstrated a PSMA-avid focus in the neck of the pancreas. Triple-phase abdominal CT demonstrated enhancement in the arterial phase and to a lesser extent the venous phase of a soft tissue mass in the neck of the pancreas. Cytological and histopathological examination of the soft tissue mass confirmed a low-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.

  13. Relationship between prostate-specific antigen levels and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Endo, Fumiyasu; Hattori, Kazunori; Muraishi, Osamu

    2014-07-01

    We examined the association between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and daily mean ambient temperature on the day of the test in healthy men who had three annual checkups. We investigated 9,694 men who visited a hospital for routine health checkups in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Although the means and medians of ambient temperature for the three years were similar, the mode in 2008 (15.8 °C) was very different from those in 2007 and 2009 (22.4 °C and 23.2 °C). After controlling for age, body mass index, and hematocrit, a multiple regression analysis revealed a U-shaped relationship between ambient temperature and PSA in 2007 and 2009 ( P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively), but not in 2008 ( P = 0.779). In 2007, PSA was 13.5 % higher at 5 °C and 10.0 % higher at 30 °C than that at 18.4 °C (nadir). In 2009, PSA was 7.3 % higher at 5 °C and 6.8 % at 30 °C compared with the level at 17.7 °C (nadir). In logistic regression analysis, a U-shaped relationship was found for the prevalence of a higher PSA (> 2.5 ng/mL) by ambient temperature, with the lowest likelihood of having a high PSA at 17.8 °C in 2007 ( P = 0.038) and 15.5 °C in 2009 ( P = 0.033). When tested at 30 °C, there was a 57 % excess risk of having a high PSA in 2007 and a 61 % higher risk in 2009 compared with those at each nadir temperature. We found a U-shaped relationship between PSA and ambient temperature with the lowest level of PSA at 15-20 °C.

  14. Prostate-Specific Antigen: Any Successor in Sight?

    PubMed Central

    Obort, Aniebietabasi S; Ajadi, Mary B; Akinloye, Oluyemi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States and other parts of the world. The lifetime risk of being diagnosed with PCa is approximately 16%. At present, the only widely accepted screening tools for PCa are prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal examination. PSA is known to be prostate specific, but not PCa specific, and hence lacks the sensitivity to detect a large number of tumors, especially during the early stages. The PSA level is also known to be affected by many factors, such as medication, inflammation (benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis), and urologic manipulation; hence, the controversy regarding the appropriate level of serum PSA that should trigger a biopsy or have clinical relevance to prostate metastases. Attempts to determine the level of prostate cells in peripheral blood by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction did not significantly improve cancer diagnosis or predict postoperative failure. Therefore, the search continues for a novel biomarker or a panel of markers as well as other possible interventions to improve the use of PSA. This article reviews several possibilities. PMID:24223021

  15. Salivary duct carcinoma secreting prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    James, G K; Pudek, M; Berean, K W; Diamandis, E P; Archibald, B L

    1996-08-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a 30 kDa glycoprotein serine protease that shows high tissue specificity for prostatic tissue, both benign and malignant. However, recent reports have shown that a variety of normal and neoplastic tissue types express PSA immunohistochemically. In addition, rare instances of the secretion of PSA by nonprostatic cancers have been reported in the literature. The authors present a case of salivary duct carcinoma associated with elevated serum levels of PSA. Both the primary tumor and metastases stained positively with anti-PSA monoclonal antibodies, but were negative with antibodies directed against prostate-specific acid phosphatase. Elevated serum PSA levels were confirmed with three different immunoassay methods. A peak serum level of 140 micrograms/L was measured and this correlates with levels of PSA associated with metastatic prostatic carcinoma. High performance liquid chromatography with a molecular sieve column characterized the serum PSA into both free protein (approximately 20%) and protein bound to alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (PSA-ACT)(approximately 80%). Molecular weights of the free PSA and PSA-ACT subfractions were 27-31 kDa and 100-110 kDa, respectively.

  16. The current state of prostate-specific antigen testing.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ryan; Hornberger, Brad

    2016-09-01

    Since prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing was approved in 1994, the incidence of metastasis and mortality from prostate cancer have significantly decreased. However, PSA screening for prostate cancer has limitations and few large randomized controlled trials have been conducted to determine the mortality benefit of PSA screening. Two studies that have been conducted are the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) screening trial and the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). These were the two main studies the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) used in its recommendation against prostate cancer screening in 2012. However, new evidence has demonstrated that the PLCO trial had significant limitations and the results of the ERSPC trial were more significant than previously thought. This article describes the strengths and weaknesses of the USPSTF's recommendation, along with current guidelines for prostate cancer screening. PMID:27575906

  17. Effect of ejaculation on Serum Prostate-Specific Antigen concentration

    PubMed Central

    Tarhan, Fatih; Demir, Kadir; Orçun, Asuman; Madenci, Ozlem Cakır

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Abstract Purpose:To evaluate the effect of ejaculation on serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations in patients with lower urinary tract symptom (LUTS). Materials and Methods Our study includes 98 men (62 study and 36 control). After three days of sexual abstinence, blood samples were drawn for the measurement of baseline PSA levels. Then the patients were told to ejaculate. One, 5, 24 and 72 hours after ejaculation, serum total (tPSA), free (fPSA) and complexed PSA (cPSA) levels were measured. Serum PSA sampling was performed at the same intervals in the control group without ejaculation. Results The mean age in study and control groups patients were 59.03±0.99 years, 61.14±1.30 years, respectively. In the study group, changes in tPSA and fPSA levels after ejaculation were found statistically significant while changes in cPSA levels and f/tPSA ratios were not significant (p=0.016, p=0.0003, p=0.176, and p=0.173, respectively). Baseline values showed significant differences with 1st and 5th hours. No significant changes in tPSA, fPSA, cPSA levels and f/tPSA values were found in control group (p=0.223, p=0.224, p=0.444, and p=0.718, respectively). The changes in the number of patients exceeding the cutoff values after ejaculation were not statistically significant for tPSA, cPSA, and f/tPSA ratio. Conclusions In this study, ejaculation increased tPSA and fPSA concentrations but it didn’t have a significant effect on serum cPSA levels and f/tPSA ratios. However, recent ejaculation may affect the biopsy indication at least near cut off PSA values. Further studies are needed to explain the mechanisms of alterations in the concentration of PSA. PMID:27286109

  18. African Americans' Perceptions of Prostate-Specific Antigen Prostate Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jaimie C.; Vines, Anissa I.; Carlisle, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released a hotly debated recommendation against prostate-specific antigen testing for all men. The present research examines African Americans' beliefs about their susceptibility to prostate cancer (PCa) and the effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen testing in the context of the…

  19. Prostate-specific membrane antigen-based imaging.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Joseph R; Akhtar, Naveed H; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Anand, Alok; Deh, Kofi; Tagawa, Scott T

    2013-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common noncutaneous malignancy affecting men in North America. Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of CaP does not contribute to patient management as much as imaging performed for other common cancers. Given the lack of specificity in conventional imaging techniques, one possible solution is to screen for CaP-specific antigenic targets and generate agents able to specifically bind. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in CaP tissue, with low levels of expression in the small intestine, renal tubular cells, and salivary gland. The first clinical agent for targeting PSMA was (111)In-capromab, involving an antibody recognizing the internal domain of PSMA. The second- and third-generation humanized PSMA binding antibodies have the potential to overcome some of the limitations inherent to capromab penditide (i.e., inability to bind to live CaP cells). One example is the humanized monoclonal antibody J591 (Hu mAb J591) that was developed primarily for therapeutic purposes but also has interesting imaging characteristics, including the identification of bone metastases in CaP. The major disadvantage of use of mAb for imaging is slow target recognition and background clearance in an appropriate time frame for diagnostic imaging. Urea-based compounds, such as small molecule inhibitors may also present promising agents for CaP imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Two such small-molecule inhibitors targeting PSMA, MIP-1072, and MIP-1095 have exhibited high affinity for PSMA. The uptake of (123)I-MIP-1072 and (123)I-MIP-1095 in CaP xenografts have imaged successfully with favorable properties amenable to human trials. While advances in conventional imaging will continue, Ab and small molecule imaging exemplified by PSMA targeting have the greatest potential to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity.

  20. Free Prostate-Specific Antigen Provides More Precise Data on Benign Prostate Volume Than Total Prostate-Specific Antigen in Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon; Park, Jae Young; Shim, Ji Sung; Kim, Jae Heon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA) and free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) for the estimation of prostate volume (PV) in pathologically-proven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients. Methods From January 2010 to March 2013, 165 Korean men with a PSA less than 10 ng/mL who were diagnosed without prostate cancer by prostate biopsy were enrolled. Patients were classified into three age groups: ≤60, 61-70, and >70 years old. The results were organized to estimate and compare the ability of serum tPSA and fPSA to assess the PV. Results Enrolled patients had a median age of 63.5 years (44 to 80), a median tPSA of 5.72 ng/mL, a median fPSA of 0.98 ng/mL and a median PV of 53.68 mL, respectively. Among the associations between tPSA, fPSA, age, and PV, the highest correlation was verified between fPSA and PV (r=0.377, P<0.0001); the correlation coefficient between tPSA and PV was much lower (r=0.262, P<0.001). All stratified age cohorts showed the same findings. The ROC curves (for PV greater than 30, 40, and 50 mL) showed that fPSA (area under the curve [AUC]=0.781, 0.718, and 0.700) outperformed tPSA (AUC=0.657, 0.583, and 0.67) in its ability to predict clinically significant PV enlargement. Conclusion Both tPSA and fPSA significantly correlated with PV in Korean men, while the correlation efficiency between fPSA and PV was more powerful. fPSA may be a useful tool in making therapeutic decisions and follow-up management in BPH patients. PMID:23869271

  1. Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Before and After Elimination of Factors That Can Confound the Prostate-Specific Antigen Level

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jessica J.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Loffredo, Marian; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity, like PSA level, can be confounded. In this study, we estimated the impact that confounding factors could have on correctly identifying a patient with a PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 50 men with newly diagnosed PC comprised the study cohort. We calculated and compared the false-positive and false-negative PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y rates for all men and those with low-risk disease using two approaches to calculate PSA velocity. First, we used PSA values obtained within 18 months of diagnosis; second, we used values within 18 months of diagnosis, substituting the prebiopsy PSA for a repeat, nonconfounded PSA that was obtained using the same assay and without confounders. Results: Using PSA levels pre-biopsy, 46% of all men had a PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y; whereas this value declined to 32% when substituting the last prebiopsy PSA for a repeat, nonconfounded PSA using the same assay and without confounders. The false-positive rate for PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y was 43% as compared with a false-negative rate of PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y of 11% (p = 0.0008) in the overall cohort. These respective values in the low-risk subgroup were 60% and 16.7% (p = 0.09). Conclusion: This study provides evidence to explain the discordance in cancer-specific outcomes among groups investigating the prognostic significance of PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y, and highlights the importance of patient education on potential confounders of the PSA test before obtaining PSA levels.

  2. Reduction of prostate cancer mortality in Tyrol, Austria, after introduction of prostate-specific antigen testing.

    PubMed

    Oberaigner, Willi; Horninger, Wolfgang; Klocker, Helmut; Schönitzer, Dieter; Stühlinger, Wolf; Bartsch, Georg

    2006-08-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze in detail the time trend in prostate cancer mortality in the population of Tyrol, Austria. In Tyrol, prostate-specific antigen tests were introduced in 1988-1989 and, since 1993, have been offered to all men aged 45-74 years free of charge. More than three quarters of all men in this age group had at least one such test in the last decade. The authors applied the age-period-cohort model by Poisson regression to mortality data covering more than three decades, from 1970 to 2003. For Tyrol, the full model with age and period and cohort terms fit fairly well. Period terms showed a significant reduction in prostate cancer mortality in the last 5 years, with a risk ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.98) for Tyrol; for Austria without Tyrol, no effect was seen, with a risk ratio of 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.05). Each was compared with the mortality rate in the period 1989-1993. Although the results of randomized screening trials are not expected until 2008-2010, these findings support the evidence that prostate-specific antigen testing offered to a population free of charge can reduce prostate cancer mortality.

  3. Auger Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Hobbs, Robert; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shen, Colette J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Auger electron emitters such as 125I have a high linear energy transfer and short range of emission (<10 μm), making them suitable for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We used a highly specific small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) to deliver 125I to prostate cancer cells. Methods The PSMA-targeting Auger emitter 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-125I-iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (125I-DCIBzL) was synthesized. DNA damage (via phosphorylated H2A histone family member X staining) and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA−) PC3 flu human prostate cancer cells after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL. Subcellular drug distribution was assessed with confocal microscopy using a related fluorescent PSMA-targeting compound YC-36. In vivo antitumor efficacy was tested in nude mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP or PSMA− PC3 flu flank xenografts. Animals were administered (intravenously) 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-DCIBzL, 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-NaI, an equivalent amount of nonradiolabeled DCIBzL, or saline. Results After treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells exhibited increased DNA damage and decreased clonogenic survival when compared with PSMA− PC3 flu cells. Confocal microscopy of YC-36 showed drug distribution in the perinuclear area and plasma membrane. Animals bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors had significant tumor growth delay after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, with only 1 mouse reaching 5 times the initial tumor volume by 60 d after treatment, compared with a median time to 5 times volume of less than 15 d for PSMA− PC3 flu tumors and all other treatment groups (P = 0.002 by log-rank test). Conclusion PSMA-targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with the Auger emitter 125I-DCIBzL yielded highly specific antitumor efficacy in vivo, suggesting promise for treatment of prostate cancer micrometastases. PMID:26182968

  4. Non-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Avid Metastatic Lung Nodule From Primary Prostatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Deepa; Loh, Han; Bui, Chuong; Mansberg, Robert; Hadjashrafi, Amirazin; Do, Viet

    2016-10-01

    Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate recurrent prostatic malignancy due to its high specificity. A 56-year-old man with previous history of treated prostate cancer 4 years earlier presented with rising prostate-specific antigen level and underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT, which demonstrated an enlarging pulmonary nodule without PSMA avidity. The pulmonary nodule, however, showed moderate uptake on a corresponding FDG PET/CT study, suspicious of primary lung malignancy. Cytological and histopathological examination of the pulmonary nodule confirmed a metastatic deposit from ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma, an uncommon variant of prostatic malignancy.

  5. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Niraj H.; Kamrava, Mitchell; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Steinberg, Michael; Demanes, Jeffrey

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To characterize the magnitude and kinetics of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounces after high-dose-rate (HDR) monotherapy and determine relationships between certain clinical factors and PSA bounce. Methods and Materials: Longitudinal PSA data and various clinical parameters were examined in 157 consecutive patients treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. We used the following definition for PSA bounce: rise in PSA ≥threshold, after which it returns to the prior level or lower. Prostate-specific antigen failure was defined per the Phoenix definition (nadir +2 ng/mL). Results: A PSA bounce was noted in 67 patients (43%). The number of bounces per patient was 1 in 45 cases (67%), 2 in 19 (28%), 3 in 2 (3%), 4 in 0, and 5 in 1 (1%). The median time to maximum PSA bounce was 1.3 years, its median magnitude was 0.7, and its median duration was 0.75 years. Three patients (2%) were noted to have PSA failure. None of the 3 patients who experienced biochemical failure exhibited PSA bounce. In the fully adjusted model for predicting each bounce, patients aged <55 years had a statistically significant higher likelihood of experiencing a bounce (odds ratio 2.22, 95% confidence interval 1.38-3.57, P=.001). There was also a statistically significant higher probability of experiencing a bounce for every unit decrease in Gleason score (odds ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.04, P=.045). Conclusions: A PSA bounce occurs in a significant percentage of patients treated with HDR monotherapy, with magnitudes varying from <1 in 28% of cases to ≥1 in 15%. The median duration of bounce is <1 year. More bounces were identified in patients with lower Gleason score and age <55 years. Further investigation using a model to correlate magnitude and frequency of bounces with clinical variables are under way.

  6. Association of prostate specific antigen concentration with lifestyle characteristics in Korean men.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hee-Yeon; Park, Hyosoon; Kwon, Min-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the relationships between demographics, lifestyle characteristics, and serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentration and examined the population-based distribution of total PSA by age among 2,246 Korean men with a median age of 45 years. We obtained data about demographic and lifestyle characteristics based on self-reporting using a questionnaire. We also performed physical examinations, anthropometric measurements, and biochemical measurements. The PSA concentration increased with age and there was a significant difference in total PSA concentration between the age groups of 21-60 years and >60 years. Age>60 years, height≥1.8 m, a low frequency of alcohol consumption, and taking nutritional supplements showed a significantly increased odds ratio for increased PSA when 3.0 ng/ mL was chosen as the PSA cut-off level. Smoking status, BMI, percent body fat, diabetes mellitus, fatty liver, herbal medicine use, vitamin use, and diet were not significantly associated with total PSA regardless of the cut-off level. When interpreting a single PSA test, height, alcohol consumption, and nutritional supplement use should be considered, in addition to age. PMID:23317241

  7. Repeated spurious elevation of serum prostate-specific antigen values solved by chemiluminescence analysis: A possible interference by heterophilic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bayó, Miquel; Muñoz-Rodríguez, Jesús; Bellido, Jose Antonio; Abascal-Junquera, Jose María; Hannaoui, Naim; Banús, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Heterophilic antibodies are human immunoglobulins directed against various animal antigens. They can produce false-positive results in the analysis of different tumor markers, including prostate-specific antigen. This interference can lead to misdiagnosis, unnecessary tests, and overtreatment in some cases. We present herein the case of a 52-year-old man with repeated spurious elevation of prostate-specific antigen, reaching levels of 108.7 ng/mL, that were suspected to be caused by heterophilic antibodies. The interference was solved by changing the analysis technique. Real values of prostate-specific antigen were less than 1 ng/mL. PMID:26568798

  8. Body composition and serum prostate-specific antigen: review and findings from Flint Men's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L; Faerber, Gary J; Morgenstern, Hal; Werny, David; Wojno, Kirk; Halstead-Nussloch, Bronwen; Cooney, Kathleen A

    2008-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that obesity is associated with lower serum prostate-specific antigen levels, perhaps influencing the recommendation for prostate biopsy and potentially explaining part of the observed poorer prognosis among obese men. African-American men have the greatest rates of prostate cancer and are more likely to die of the disease, making early detection a priority in this group. We present findings from the Flint Men's Health Study, a study of African-American men, that are consistent with most studies suggesting that overweight men have prostate-specific antigen levels that are 0.15 to 0.30 ng/mL lower than those who are not overweight. We have coupled our results with a systematic review of publications in this area.

  9. Anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen-based radioimmunotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Scott T; Beltran, Himisha; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Osborne, Joseph; Matulich, Dan; Petrillo, Kristen; Parmar, Sarojben; Nanus, David M; Bander, Neil H

    2010-02-15

    Despite recent advances, advanced prostate cancer is suboptimally responsive to current chemotherapeutic agents. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy that targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) shows promise and is an area of active investigation. J591 is a deimmunized IgG monoclonal antibody developed to target the extracellular domain of PSMA. Preclinical and early phase clinical studies using radiolabeled J591 have demonstrated efficacy in targeting tumor cells and decreasing levels of prostate-specific antigen. Radiolabeled J591 is well-tolerated, nonimmunogenic, and can be administered in multiple doses. The dose-limiting toxicity is reversible myelosuppression with little nonhematologic toxicity. Future studies will include approaches to optimize patient selection and incorporate novel strategies to improve the success of anti-PSMA radioimmunotherapy.

  10. Issues on standardization of immunoassays for prostate-specific antigen: a review.

    PubMed

    Graves, H C

    1993-12-01

    The proposed use of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for annual screening of men over age 50 will require careful standardization of the various commercial immunoassays to allow year-to-year comparisons for individual patients. Some current PSA assays give significantly different results on testing the same sample. The standardization process will require several steps. First, a primary antigen standard should be purified from seminal plasma (a convenient source), using a reproducible technique. The modified Sensabaugh-Blake purification of PSA yields a suitable pure antigen. Next, PSA values need to be assigned to PSA-containing serum samples. These secondary serum-based reference materials can be used by manufacturers and regulatory agencies to develop and monitor the performance of PSA assays. In serum, 2 forms of PSA are detected immunologically: a free form (M(r) = 30 kD) and a form complexed with alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (M(r) = 100 kD). Different immunoassays for PSA detect these 2 forms in different molar ratios. The most promising approach to this problem is to select a reference immunoassay that detects both forms of PSA in equal molar ratios. A series of samples containing various and known levels of naturally occurring serum PSA can then serve as secondary serum-based reference materials for calibration of other commercial PSA immunoassays. Equimolar standardization is a useful method for any set of assays that detect free and bound forms of a ligand in differing molar ratios. The technical simplicity and power of this approach should allow early agreement on standardization of PSA immunoassays and will greatly assist PSA screening programs for prostate cancer now in progress.

  11. Early prostate-specific antigen changes and the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Botchorishvili, George; Matikainen, Mika P.; Lilja, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To delineate how recent findings on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) can improve prediction of risk, detection, and prediction of clinical endpoints of prostate cancer (PCa). Recent findings The widely used PSA cut-point of 4.0 ng/ml increasingly appears arbitrary, but no cut-point achieves both high sensitivity and high specificity. The accuracy of detecting PCa can be increased by additional predictive factors and combinations of markers. Evidence implies that a panel of kallikrein markers improves the specificity and reduces costs by eliminating unnecessary biopsies. Large, population-based studies have provided evidence that PSA can be used to predict PCa risk many years in advance, improve treatment selection and patient care, and predict the risk of complications and disease recurrence. However, definitive evidence is currently lacking as to whether PSA screening lowers PCa -specific mortality. Summary PSA is still the main tool for early detection, risk stratification, and monitoring of PCa. However, PSA values are affected by many technical and biological factors. Instead of using a fixed PSA cut-point, using statistical prediction models and considering the integration additional markers may be able to improve and individualize PCa diagnostics. A single PSA measurement at early middle age can predict risk of advanced PCa decades in advance and stratify patients for intensity of subsequent screening. PMID:19318948

  12. Postoperative Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Independently Predicts for Failure of Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Presti, Joseph C.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Identification of patients most likely to benefit from salvage radiotherapy (RT) using postoperative (postop) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics. Methods and Materials: From 1984 to 2004, 81 patients who fit the following criteria formed the study population: undetectable PSA after radical prostatectomy (RP); pathologically negative nodes; biochemical relapse defined as a persistently detectable PSA; salvage RT; and two or more postop PSAs available before salvage RT. Salvage RT included the whole pelvic nodes in 55 patients and 4 months of total androgen suppression in 56 patients. The median follow-up was >5 years. All relapses were defined as a persistently detectable PSA. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis were performed for all clinical, pathological, and treatment factors predicting for biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS). Results: There were 37 biochemical relapses observed after salvage RT. The 5-year bRFS after salvage RT for patients with postop prostate-specific antigen velocity {<=}1 vs. >1 ng/ml/yr was 59% vs. 29%, p = 0.002. In multivariate analysis, only postop PSAV (p = 0.0036), pre-RT PSA level {<=}1 (p = 0.037) and interval-to-relapse >10 months (p = 0.012) remained significant, whereas pelvic RT, hormone therapy, and RT dose showed a trend (p = {approx}0.06). PSAV, but not prostate-specific antigen doubling time, predicted successful salvage RT, suggesting an association of zero-order kinetics with locally recurrent disease. Conclusions: Postoperative PSA velocity independently predicts for the failure of salvage RT and can be considered in addition to high-risk features when selecting patients in need of systemic therapy following biochemical failure after RP. For well-selected patients, salvage RT can achieve high cure rates.

  13. Discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen, and some proposals to optimize prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Shinkan; Ando, Ryosuke; Koda, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    The discoveries and application of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have been much appreciated because PSA-based screening has saved millions of lives of prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Historically speaking, Flocks et al first identified antigenic properties in prostate tissue in 1960. Then, Barnes et al detected immunologic characteristics in prostatic fluid in 1963. Hara et al characterized γ-semino-protein in semen in 1966, and it has been proven to be identical to PSA. Subsequently, Ablin et al independently reported the presence of precipitation antigens in the prostate in 1970. Wang et al purified the PSA in 1979, and Kuriyama et al first applied an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for PSA in 1980. However, the positive predictive value with a cutoff figure of 4.0 ng/mL appeared substantially low (∼30%). There are overdiagnoses and overtreatments for latent/low-risk PCa. Controversies exist in the PCa mortality-reducing effects of PSA screening between the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) and the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. For optimizing PCa screening, PSA-related items may require the following: 1) adjustment of the cutoff values according to age, as well as setting limits to age and screening intervals; 2) improving test performance using doubling time, density, and ratio of free: total PSA; and 3) fostering active surveillance for low-risk PCa with monitoring by PSA value. Other items needing consideration may include the following: 1) examinations of cell proliferation and cell cycle markers in biopsy specimens; 2) independent quantification of Gleason grading; 3) developing ethnicity-specific staging nomograms based on tumor stage, PSA value, and Gleason score; 4) delineation of the natural history; 5) revisiting the significance of the androgen/testosterone hypothesis; and 6) devoting special attention to individuals with a certain genetic predisposition. Finally

  14. Immunohistochemical characterization of 53 monoclonal antibodies to prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Nap, M; van der Kwast, T M

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-three antibodies submitted to the ISOBM TD-3 Workshop on the prostate specific antigen (PSA) were evaluated for their reactivity in frozen and formalin fixed tissue from benign hyperplastic prostate and salivary gland tissue. Only 13/53 antibodies showed clear reactivity in both frozen and paraffin sections, while some antibodies appeared to react only in formalin-fixed paraffin sections. Many antibodies showed extensive nonspecific reactivity in tissue sections. These results highlight the fact that the number of monoclonal antibodies suitable for immunohistochemical detection of PSA is still relatively limited.

  15. Efficacy of lower cut off value of serum prostate specific antigen in diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M M; Alam, A K M K; Habib, A K M K; Rahman, H; Hossain, A K M S; Salam, M A; Rahman, S

    2012-12-01

    Indications of prostate biopsy are high serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) value and or abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) findings. Although serum PSA value of 4 ng/ml is the most commonly used threshold for recommending prostate biopsy, significant proportion of men harbor prostate cancer even when their serum PSA values are less than 4.0 ng/ml. Therefore present study was designed to determine the performance status of serum PSA in lower cut-off values. This hospital based prospective study was conducted in the Department of Urology of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and Comfort Nursing Home Pvt. Ltd, Dhaka from July 2009 to October 2010. Two hundred six male patients aged over 50 years having lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and serum PSA more than 2.5 ng/ml were prepared for prostate biopsy. Trans rectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsy was done. The test statistics used to analyze the data were descriptive statistics, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, ROC curve. For all analytical tests, the level of significance was set at 0.05 and p < 0.05 was considered significant. In 2.5-4 serum PSA range, 28.26% (13 out of 46) of all malignancy were found, which would be missed if we take cut off value 4. At 2.5 PSA cut-off, Sensitivity 91.3%, Specificity 14.37%, PPV 23.46%, NPV 85.18%, Efficacy 31.55%. At 4 PSA cut-off value, Sensitivity 71.73%, Specificity 46.25%, PPV 27.73%, NPV 85.05%, Efficacy 51.94%. So it can be concluded that, for early diagnosis of prostate cancer cut-off value of serum PSA of 2.5 ng/ml can be recommended as an indication for prostate biopsy.

  16. Local prostate cancer radiotherapy after prostate-specific antigen progression during primary hormonal therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The outcome of patients after radiotherapy (RT) for localized prostate cancer in case of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression during primary hormonal therapy (HT) is not well known. Methods A group of 27 patients presenting with PSA progression during primary HT for local prostate cancer RT was identified among patients who were treated in the years 2000–2004 either using external-beam RT (EBRT; 70.2Gy; n=261) or Ir-192 brachytherapy as a boost to EBRT (HDR-BT; 18Gy + 50.4Gy; n=71). The median follow-up period after RT was 68 months. Results Median biochemical recurrence free (BRFS), disease specific (DSS) and overall survival (OS) for patients with PSA progression during primary HT was found to be only 21, 54 and 53 months, respectively, with a 6-year BRFS, DSS and OS of 19%, 41% and 26%. There were no significant differences between different RT concepts (6-year OS of 27% after EBRT and 20% after EBRT with HDR-BT). Considering all 332 patients in multivariate Cox regression analysis, PSA progression during initial HT, Gleason score>6 and patient age were found to be predictive for lower OS (p<0.001). The highest hazard ratio resulted for PSA progression during initial HT (7.2 in comparison to patients without PSA progression during primary HT). PSA progression and a nadir >0.5 ng/ml during initial HT were both significant risk factors for biochemical recurrence. Conclusions An unfavourable prognosis after PSA progression during initial HT needs to be considered in the decision process before local prostate radiotherapy. Results from other centres are needed to validate our findings. PMID:23227960

  17. Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Wolters, Tineke; Savage, Caroline J.; Cronin, Angel M.; O’Brien, M. Frank; Pettersson, Kim; Roobol, Monique J.; Aus, Gunnar; Scardino, Peter T.; Hugosson, Jonas; Schröder, Fritz H.; Lilja, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) over time (ie, PSA velocity [PSAV]) aid prostate cancer detection. Some guidelines do incorporate PSAV cut points as an indication for biopsy. Objective To evaluate whether PSAV enhances prediction of biopsy outcome in a large, representative, population-based cohort. Design, setting, and participants There were 2742 screening-arm participants with PSA <3 ng/ml at initial screening in the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer in Rotterdam, Netherlands, or Göteborg, Sweden, and who were subsequently biopsied during rounds 2[en]6 due to elevated PSA. Measurements Total, free, and intact PSA and human kallikrein 2 were measured for 1[en]6 screening rounds at intervals of 2 or 4 yr. We created logistic regression models to predict prostate cancer based on age and PSA, with or without free-to-total PSA ratio (%fPSA). PSAV was added to each model and any enhancement in predictive accuracy assessed by area under the curve (AUC). Results and limitations PSAV led to small enhancements in predictive accuracy (AUC of 0.569 vs 0.531; 0.626 vs 0.609 if %fPSA was included), although not for high-grade disease. The enhancement depended on modeling a nonlinear relationship between PSAV and cancer. There was no benefit if we excluded men with higher velocities, which were associated with lower risk. These results apply to men in a screening program with elevated PSA; men with prior negative biopsy were not evaluated in this study. Conclusions In men with PSA of about ≥3 ng/ml, we found little justification for formal calculation of PSAV or for use of PSAV cut points to determine biopsy. Informal assessment of PSAV will likely aid clinical judgment, such as a sudden rise in PSA suggesting prostatitis, which could be further evaluated before biopsy. PMID:19682790

  18. All care, but whose responsibility? Community juries reason about expert and patient responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Degeling, Chris; Carter, Stacy M; Rychetnik, Lucie

    2016-09-01

    General practitioners have implicitly been given responsibility for guiding men's decisions about prostate-specific antigen-based screening for prostate cancer, but patients' expectations of the bounds of this responsibility remain unclear. We sought to explore how well-informed members of the public allocate responsibilities in prostate-specific antigen screening decision-making. In 2014, we convened two Community juries in Sydney, Australia, to address questions related to the content and timing of information provision and respective roles of patients and general practitioners in screening decisions. Participants in the first jury were of mixed gender and of all ages (n = 15); the participants in the second jury were all male and of screening age (n = 12). Both juries were presented with balanced factual evidence on the harms and benefits of prostate-specific antigen screening and expert perspectives on ethico-legal aspects of consent in medical practice. In their deliberations, jurors agreed that general practitioners should take responsibility for informing men of the options, risks and benefits of prostate-specific antigen testing, but arrived at different positions on whether or not general practitioners should also guide screening decisions. Jurors also disagreed on how much and when general practitioners should provide detailed information about biopsies and treatments. These responses suggest that for prostate-specific antigen testing, there is a public expectation that both the allocation of responsibility between general practitioners and their male patients, and the level of information provided will be tailored to individual men. In the presence of expert uncertainty, a well-informed public may have reason to embrace or resist shared decision-making processes. PMID:27491944

  19. Preclinical evaluation of a monoclonal antibody (3C6) specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Regino, C.A.S.; Wong, K.J.; Milenic, D.E.; Holmes, E.H.; Garmestani, K.; Choyke, P.L.; Brechbiel, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    Better tumor markers are needed for early diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer, and for monitoring therapeutic response than the currently used prostate specific antigen (PSA). Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is highly expressed on the surface of prostatic epithelial cells making it a good target for prostate cancer. In this study, mAb 3C6, specific for the extracellular epitope of PSMA, was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo for PSMA-targeting. Immunoreactivity and specificity of mAb 3C6 was evaluated by flow cytometry using prostate cell lines expressing PSMA such as LNCaP and 22Rv1 and a cell line, DU145, that expresses very little PSMA. 3C6 was conjugated with the acyclic CHX-A” DTPA chelate, radiolabeled with 111In, and its in vitro and in vivo properties were assessed. The biodistribution of the radioimmunoconjugate evaluated in athymic mice bearing xenografts of three human prostate carcinoma cell lines shows high uptake after 72 hr in LNCaP tumors (%ID/g 22.93 ± 6.32) and 22Rv1 (%ID/g 10.44 ± 2.32) in contrast to low uptake by the DU145 tumors (%ID/g 4.27 ± 0.37). Planar γ-scintigraphic images obtained for xenografted tumor bearing mice demonstrated targeting for PSMA positive tumors suggesting possible applications in imaging and for targeted radiation therapy. PMID:20047017

  20. Investigation of contactless detection using a giant magnetoresistance sensor for detecting prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuecheng; Zhi, Shaotao; Lei, Chong; Zhou, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a contactless detection method for detecting prostate specific antigen with a giant magnetoresistance sensor. In contactless detection case, the prostate specific antigen sample preparation was separated from the sensor that prevented the sensor from being immersed in chemical solvents, and made the sensor implementing in immediately reuse without wash. Experimental results showed that applied an external magnetic field in a range of 50 Oe to 90 Oe, Dynabeads with a concentration as low as 0.1 μg/mL can be detected by this system and could give an approximate quantitation to the logarithmic of Dynabeads concentration. Sandwich immunoassay was employed for preparing PSA samples. The PSA capture was implemented on a gold film modified with a self-assembled monolayer and using biotinylated secondary antibody against PSA and streptavidinylated Dynabeads. With DC magnetic field in the range of 50 to 90 Oe, PSA can be detected with a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL. Samples spiked with different concentrations of PSA can be distinguished clearly. Due to the contactless detection method, the detection system exhibited advantages such as convenient manipulation, reusable, inexpensive, small weight. So, this detection method was a promising candidate in biomarker detection, especially in point of care detection. PMID:27379844

  1. Body Mass Index and Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Efstathiou, Jason A. Skowronski, Rafi Y.; Coen, John J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. Results: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m{sup 2} (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m{sup 2}), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m{sup 2}, 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m{sup 2}, and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m{sup 2} or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p 0.0006). Conclusions: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment

  2. National Evidence on the Use of Shared Decision Making in Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening

    PubMed Central

    Han, Paul K. J.; Kobrin, Sarah; Breen, Nancy; Joseph, Djenaba A.; Li, Jun; Frosch, Dominick L.; Klabunde, Carrie N.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Recent clinical practice guidelines on prostate cancer screening using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test (PSA screening) have recommended that clinicians practice shared decision making—a process involving clinician-patient discussion of the pros, cons, and uncertainties of screening. We undertook a study to determine the prevalence of shared decision making in both PSA screening and nonscreening, as well as patient characteristics associated with shared decision making. METHODS A nationally representative sample of 3,427 men aged 50 to 74 years participating in the 2010 National Health Interview Survey responded to questions on the extent of shared decision making (past physician-patient discussion of advantages, disadvantages, and scientific uncertainty associated with PSA screening), PSA screening intensity (tests in past 5 years), and sociodemographic and health-related characteristics. RESULTS Nearly two-thirds (64.3%) of men reported no past physician-patient discussion of advantages, disadvantages, or scientific uncertainty (no shared decision making); 27.8% reported discussion of 1 to 2 elements only (partial shared decision making); 8.0% reported discussion of all 3 elements (full shared decision making). Nearly one-half (44.2%) reported no PSA screening, 27.8% reported low-intensity (less-than-annual) screening, and 25.1% reported high-intensity (nearly annual) screening. Absence of shared decision making was more prevalent in men who were not screened; 88% (95% CI, 86.2%–90.1%) of nonscreened men reported no shared decision making compared with 39% (95% CI, 35.0%–43.3%) of men undergoing high-intensity screening. Extent of shared decision making was associated with black race, Hispanic ethnicity, higher education, health insurance, and physician recommendation. Screening intensity was associated with older age, higher education, usual source of medical care, and physician recommendation, as well as with partial vs no or full shared

  3. Gold Nanoparticle Based Activatable Probe for Sensing Ultra-Low Levels of Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dingbin; Huang, Xinglu; Wang, Zhantong; Jin, Albert; Sun, Xiaolian; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Fu; Ma, Ying; Niu, Gang; HightWalker, Angela R.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    It is still in high demand to develop extremely sensitive and accurate clinical tools for biomarkers of interest for early diagnosis and monitoring of diseases. In this report, we present a highly sensitive and compatible gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based fluorescence activatable probe for sensing ultra-low levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patient serum samples. The limit of detection of the newly-developed probe for PSA was pushed down to 0.032 pg/mL, which is more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of the conventional fluorescence probe. The ultrahigh sensitivity of this probe was attributed to the high loading efficiency of the dyes on AuNP surfaces and high fluorescence quenching unquenching abilities of the dye-AuNP pairs. The efficiency and robustness of this probe was investigated in patient serum samples, demonstrating the great potential of this probe in real-world applications. PMID:23683064

  4. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  5. Anti-Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen-based Radioimmunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Scott T.; Beltran, Himisha; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Osborne, Joseph; Matulich, Dan; Petrillo, Kristen; Parmar, Sarojben; Nanus, David M.; Bander, Neil H.

    2009-01-01

    Despite recent advances, advanced prostate cancer is suboptimally responsive to current chemotherapeutic agents. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy that targets prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) shows promise and is an area of active investigation. J591 is a deimmunized IgG monoclonal antibody developed to target the extracellular domain of PSMA. Preclinical and early phase clinical studies utilizing radiolabeled J591 have demonstrated efficacy in targeting tumor cells and decreasing levels of PSA. Radiolabeled J591 is well-tolerated, non-immunogenic, and can be administered in multiple doses. The dose limiting toxicity is reversible myelosuppression with little non-hematologic toxicity. Future studies will include approaches to optimize patient selection and incorporate novel strategies to improve the success of anti-PSMA radioimmunotherapy. PMID:20127956

  6. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy Induces Rapid Cytoskeletal Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiancheng; Wu, Lisa Y.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), an established enzyme-biomarker for prostate cancer, has attracted considerable attention as a target for imaging and therapeutic applications. We aimed to determine the effects of PSMA-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) on cytoskeletal networks in prostate cancer cells. PSMA-targeted PDT resulted in rapid disruption of microtubules (α-/β-tubulin), microfilaments (actin), and intermediate filaments (cytokeratin 8/18) in the cytoplasm of LNCaP cells. The collapse of cytoplasmic microtubules and the later nuclear translocation of α-/β-tubulin were the most dramatic alternation. It is likely that these early changes of cytoskeletal networks are partly involved in the initiation of cell death. PMID:20452720

  7. Application of fluorescent substrates to the in situ detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Gooch, James; Daniel, Barbara; Frascione, Nunzianda

    2014-07-01

    The forensic identification of body fluids frequently presents an important source of genetic material and investigative interpretation. However, presumptive testing techniques presently employed in the discrimination of biological fluids are subject to criticism for poor specificity, lack of fluid localisation ability and detrimental effects on DNA recovery rates. The recognition of fluid-specific biomarkers by fluorogenic substrates may provide a novel resolution to these issues but research has yet to establish any pertinent in situ fluid detection applicability. This study therefore utilises a fluorogenic substrate (Mu-HSSKLQ-AFC) specific to the seminal protein prostate specific antigen in an effort to detect human semen deposited on a number of surfaces typical to criminal investigation. The ability of fluorescent fluorogenic substrates to simultaneously identify and visualise biological fluids in situ is demonstrated for the first time, whilst the production of complete STR profiles from fluid sources is also confirmed to be completely unaffected by substrate application.

  8. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After Permanent Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy-An Australian Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R.; Smith, Ryan; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Matheson, Bronwyn; Royce, Peter; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 'bounces' after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy to review the relationship to biochemical control and correlate both clinical and dosimetric variables. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 194 hormone-naive patients with a follow-up of {>=}3 years. Four bounce definitions were applied: an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL (definition I), {>=}0.4 ng/mL (definition II), {>=}15% (definition III), and {>=}35% (definition IV) of a previous value with spontaneous return to the prebounce level or lower. Results: Using definition I, II, III, and IV, a bounce was detected in 50%, 34%, 11%, and 9% of patients, respectively. The median time to onset was 14-16 months, the duration was 12-21.5 months, and the magnitude of the increase was 0.5-2 ng/mL. A magnitude of >2 ng/mL, fulfilling the criteria for biochemical failure (BF) according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Phoenix definition, was detected in 11.3%, 16.9%, 47.6%, and 50% using definitions I, II, III, and IV, respectively; 11 patients (5.7%) had true BF. The PSA bounces occurred earlier than BF (p < 0.001). The prediction of BF remains controversial and is probably unrelated to biochemical control. The only statistically significant factor predictive of a PSA bounce was younger age (definitions I and II). Conclusion: PSA bounces are common after brachytherapy. All definitions resulted in a high number of false-positive calls for BF during the first 2 years. The definition of an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL should be preferred because of the lowest number of false-positive results for BF. Patients experiencing a PSA bounce during the first 2 years after brachytherapy should undergo surveillance every 3-6 months. Additional investigations are recommended for elevated postimplant PSA levels that have not corrected by 3 years of follow-up.

  9. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT: False-Positive Results due to Sarcoidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Robert M.; Djannatian, Manoutschehr; Czech, Norbert; Nitsche, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 72-year-old male patient who developed sarcoidosis of the mediastinal lymph nodes, the liver, and the prostate 11 years ago. Seven years later, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate by laser due to hematuria. Pathology of the resected chips showed a ‘granulomatous prostatitis with epitheloid cells’. Malignancy was histologically excluded at that time. Four years later, he was diagnosed with an undifferentiated prostate carcinoma, with a Gleason score of 5 + 4 = 9. After initiation of antihormonal therapy, he underwent radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, which revealed a pT3b pN1 carcinoma with infiltrated resection margins. Three months later, the prostate-specific antigen level was 1.4 ng/ml, and a local recurrence was suspected by ultrasound; consequently, a 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT was performed. This examination seemed to confirm the local recurrence, a right pelvic lymph node metastasis, and a hepatic metastasis. However, ultrasound with contrast medium could not confirm the metastatic spread to the liver. In palliative intention, radiotherapy of the pelvis was done. After 50 Gy, the supposed recurrence had markedly shrunk, and an additional boost dose with 16.2 Gy was applied. Two years later, the patient is still free of disease. Due to this clinical development, we doubt the diagnosis of a fulminant progression of the prostate cancer as suspected by PSMA-PET/CT. Instead, we suspect a recurrence of the previously proven sarcoidosis leading to false-positive results. Our focus in this report is on the interaction between PSMA-PET/CT and sarcoidosis. Another report on a case of sarcoidosis of the spleen seems to confirm this possibility [Kobe et al: Clin Nucl Med 2015;40: 897–898]. PMID:27721768

  10. Dietary Lycopene, Angiogenesis, and Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study in the Prostate-Specific Antigen Era

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of lycopene in prostate cancer prevention remains controversial. We examined the associations between dietary lycopene intake and prostate cancer, paying particular attention to the influence of prostate-specific antigen screening, and evaluated tissue biomarkers in prostate cancers in relation to lycopene intake. Methods Among 49898 male health professionals, we obtained dietary information through questionnaires and ascertained total and lethal prostate cancer cases from 1986 through January 31, 2010. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry were used to assess tumor biomarker expression in a subset of men. Two-sided χ2 tests were used to calculate the P values. Results Higher lycopene intake was inversely associated with total prostate cancer and more strongly with lethal prostate cancer (top vs bottom quintile: HR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.56 to 0.94; P trend = .04). In a restricted population of screened participants, the inverse associations became markedly stronger (for lethal prostate cancer: HR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.29 to 0.75; P trend = .009). Comparing different measures of dietary lycopene, early intake, but not recent intake, was inversely associated with prostate cancer. Higher lycopene intake was associated with biomarkers in the cancer indicative of less angiogenic potential. Conclusions Dietary intake of lycopene was associated with reduced risk of lethal prostate cancer and with a lesser degree of angiogenesis in the tumor. Because angiogenesis is a strong progression factor, an endpoint of lethal prostate cancer may be more relevant than an endpoint of indolent prostate cancer for lycopene in the era of highly prevalent prostate-specific antigen screening. PMID:24463248

  11. Marked Response to 177Lu Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Treatment in Patient With Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soydal, Cigdem; Ozkan, Elgin; Akyurek, Serap; Kucuk, Nuriye Ozlem

    2016-02-01

    We present pretreatment Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT and posttreatment Lu-PSMA whole-body scintigraphy images of a 60-year-old patient with metastatic prostate cancer who is dramatically responding to Lu-PSMA treatment. PMID:26505861

  12. Marked Response to 177Lu Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Treatment in Patient With Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soydal, Cigdem; Ozkan, Elgin; Akyurek, Serap; Kucuk, Nuriye Ozlem

    2016-02-01

    We present pretreatment Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT and posttreatment Lu-PSMA whole-body scintigraphy images of a 60-year-old patient with metastatic prostate cancer who is dramatically responding to Lu-PSMA treatment.

  13. Prostate-specific antigen and hormone receptor expression in male and female breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostate carcinoma is among the most common solid tumors to secondarily involve the male breast. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP) are expressed in benign and malignant prostatic tissue, and immunohistochemical staining for these markers is often used to confirm the prostatic origin of metastatic carcinoma. PSA expression has been reported in male and female breast carcinoma and in gynecomastia, raising concerns about the utility of PSA for differentiating prostate carcinoma metastasis to the male breast from primary breast carcinoma. This study examined the frequency of PSA, PSAP, and hormone receptor expression in male breast carcinoma (MBC), female breast carcinoma (FBC), and gynecomastia. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for PSA, PSAP, AR, ER, and PR was performed on tissue microarrays representing six cases of gynecomastia, thirty MBC, and fifty-six FBC. Results PSA was positive in two of fifty-six FBC (3.7%), focally positive in one of thirty MBC (3.3%), and negative in the five examined cases of gynecomastia. PSAP expression was absent in MBC, FBC, and gynecomastia. Hormone receptor expression was similar in males and females (AR 74.1% in MBC vs. 67.9% in FBC, p = 0.62; ER 85.2% vs. 68.5%, p = 0.18; and PR 51.9% vs. 48.2%, p = 0.82). Conclusions PSA and PSAP are useful markers to distinguish primary breast carcinoma from prostate carcinoma metastatic to the male breast. Although PSA expression appeared to correlate with hormone receptor expression, the incidence of PSA expression in our population was too low to draw significant conclusions about an association between PSA expression and hormone receptor status in breast lesions. PMID:20863373

  14. Prostate-specific antigen testing in Ontario: reasons for testing patients without diagnosed prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, P S; Goel, V; Williams, J I; Iscoe, N A

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test has been increasing rapidly in Canada since its introduction in 1988. The reasons for using the PSA test in patients without known prostate cancer are unclear. This paper reports on the first study in Canada to use physician records to assess the use of PSA testing. METHODS: A questionnaire was mailed to physicians attending 475 patients without diagnosed prostate cancer. The patients were randomly selected from 2 laboratory databases of PSA test records in the greater Toronto area during 1995. The physicians were asked to consult their patient records to avoid recall bias. Information obtained included physician's specialty, patient's age at time of PSA test and reason(s) for the test. RESULTS: There were 264 responses (56%), of which 240 (91%) were usable. Of these 240, 63% (95% confidence interval [Cl] 58%-70%) indicated that the test was conducted to screen for prostate cancer, 40% (95% Cl 34%-47%) said it was to investigate urinary symptoms, and 33% (95% Cl 27%-40%) responded that it was a follow-up to a medical procedure or drug therapy. More than one reason was permitted. Of 151 responses indicating screening as one reason for testing, 64% (95% Cl 56%-72%) stated that it was initiated by the patient, and 73% (95% Cl 65%-80%) stated that it was part of a routine examination. For 19%, both investigation of symptoms and screening asymptomatic patients were given as reasons for testing, and for another 19% both follow-up of a medical procedure and screening were given as reasons. Screening was recorded as a reason for testing far more commonly for patients seen by family physicians and general practitioners than for patients seen by urologists (67% v. 29%, p < 0.001). In contrast, the use of PSA testing to diagnose urinary symptoms was more common for patients seen by urologists than for those seen by family physicians and general practitioners (52% v. 37%, p = 0.044). No significant difference was

  15. Parallel optical read-out of micromechanical pillars applied to prostate specific membrane antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Tardivo, Martina; Toffoli, Valeria; Fracasso, Giulio; Borin, Daniele; Dal Zilio, Simone; Colusso, Andrea; Carrato, Sergio; Scoles, Giacinto; Meneghetti, Moreno; Colombatti, Marco; Lazzarino, Marco

    2015-10-15

    Micro and nanomechanical resonators represent a promising platform for proteins label-free detection because of their extreme sensitivity, fast response and low cost. Micro-pillars are columnar resonators that can be easily arranged in dense arrays of several thousand sensors in a squared mm. To exploit such a large density, however, a method for tracking independently micropillars resonance frequency is required. Here we present a detection method based on CCD imaging and software image analysis, which can measure the resonance frequency of tens of pillars in parallel. Acquiring simultaneously the frequency shift of up to 40 sensors and applying a proper statistical analysis, we were able to overcome the variability of the single measures improving the device sensitivity at low analyte concentration range. As a proof of concept, this method has been tested for the detection of a tumor marker, the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA). Pillars have been functionalized with an antibody against PSMA. The tumor marker (PSMA) has been detected in a range of concentrations between 300 pM and 100 nM, in buffer and in diluted bovine serum. The sensitivity of our method was limited only by the affinity constant of the antigen-antibody recognition. Moreover, this detection technique demonstrated to be effective in the 1-6 nM range, which is the window of PSMA concentration of clinical interest.

  16. Prostate specific antigen gene expression in androgen insensitive prostate carcinoma subculture cell line.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ke-Hung; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chung, Li-Chuan; Chao, Chun-Hsiang; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2008-01-01

    A novel prostate cancer cell line (PC-J) was isolated from an androgen independent non-prostate specific antigen (non-PSA) producing carcinoma cell line. The homologous correlation between PC-J and PC-3 was determined by short tandem repeat analysis. The PSA promoter activity was detected by transient expression assay in the PC-J and LNCaP cells but not in androgen insensitive PC-3 cells. When the PC-J cells were cotransfected with androgen receptor, androgen receptor coactivators and PSA reporter vector cells, the reporter assays indicated that nuclear receptor coactivator 4 (NCOA4) but not androgen receptor activator 24 (ARA24) increased the sensitivity and maximum stimulation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-inducing PSA promoter activity. The RT-PCR assays revealed that the expression of several tumor markers, including interleukin-6, prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), prostate epithelium-specific Ets transcription factor (PDEF) and matriptase, was lower in the PC-J cells than in the PC-3 cells. This cell model elucidated the regulation of PSA expression and enabled comparison of the gene profile at different stages of metastasis in prostatic carcinoma.

  17. Prostate-specific antigen testing in inner London general practices: are those at higher risk most likely to get tested?

    PubMed Central

    Nderitu, Paul; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Ashworth, Mark; Mathur, Rohini; Hull, Sally; Dudek, Alexandra; Chowdhury, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between factors influencing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing prevalence including prostate cancer risk factors (age, ethnicity, obesity) and non-risk factors (social deprivation and comorbidity). Setting A cross-sectional database of 136 inner London general practices from 1 August 2009 to 31 July 2014. Participants Men aged ≥40 years without prostate cancer were included (n=150 481). Primary outcome Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the association between PSA testing and age, ethnicity, social deprivation, body mass index (BMI) and comorbidity while adjusting for age, benign prostatic hypertrophy, prostatitis and tamsulosin or finasteride use. Results PSA testing prevalence was 8.2% (2013–2014), and the mean age was 54 years (SD 11). PSA testing was positively associated with age (OR 70–74 years compared to 40–44 years: 7.34 (95% CI 6.82 to 7.90)), ethnicity (black) (OR compared to white: 1.78 (95% CI 1.71 to 1.85)), increasing BMI and cardiovascular comorbidity. Testing was negatively associated with Chinese ethnicity and with increasing social deprivation. Conclusions PSA testing among black patients was higher compared to that among white patients, which differs from lower testing rates seen in previous studies. PSA testing was positively associated with prostate cancer risk factors and non-risk factors. Association with non-risk factors may increase the risk of unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:27406644

  18. PET Imaging in Prostate Cancer: Focus on Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with emerging radiopharmaceuticals promises accurate staging of primary disease, restaging of recurrent disease, detection of metastatic lesions and, ultimately, for predicting the aggressiveness of disease. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-characterized imaging biomarker of PCa. Because PSMA levels are directly related to androgen independence, metastasis and progression, PSMA could prove an important target for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for PET. Preclinical data for new PSMA-based radiotracers are discussed and include new 89Zr- and 64Cu-labeled anti-PSMA antibodies and antibody fragments, 64Cu-labeled aptamers, and 11C-, 18F-, 68Ga-, 64Cu-, and 86Y-labeled low molecular weight inhibitors of PSMA. Several of these agents, namely 68Ga-HBED-CC conjugate 15, 18F-DCFBC 8, and BAY1075553 are particularly promising, each having detected sites of PCa in initial clinical studies. These early clinical results suggest that PET/CT using PSMA-targeted agents, especially with compounds of low molecular weight, will make valuable contributions to the management of PCa. PMID:23590171

  19. Rising prostate-specific antigen values during neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy: The importance of monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Niblock, Paddy; Pickles, Tom . E-mail: tpickles@bccancer.bc.ca

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in patients receiving neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (N-ADT) before external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From prospectively collected data, we identified 182 patients who received between 3 and 12 months of N-ADT before definitive external beam radiotherapy and who had at least three PSA readings during the neoadjuvant period. One hundred fifty patients had PSA values that continued to fall (Non-Rise group), but 32 had a PSA value that started to rise (Rise group). The two groups were compared by Mann-Whitney U and Pearson chi-square tests. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses were performed for time to treatment failure, cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The median follow-up was 62.5 months for the Non-Rise group and 53 months for the Rise group. Patients who sustained a PSA rise during the N-ADT period had a shorter time to PSA relapse (p = 0.013), poorer CSS (p = 0.027), and poorer OS (p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis confirms the significance of a PSA rise during the N-ADT period for CSS (p = 0.035) and OS (p = 0.038). Conclusions:: A subset of patients treated with N-ADT develop a rising PSA profile that likely represents early androgen resistance. They have significantly worse outcome.

  20. Construction of novel electrochemical immunosensor for detection of prostate specific antigen using ferrocene-PAMAM dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Çevik, Emre; Bahar, Özlem; Şenel, Mehmet; Abasıyanık, M Fatih

    2016-12-15

    In this study, an immunosensor was designed to utilize for the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on three different generations (G1, G2 and G3) of ferrocene (Fc) cored polyamidiamine dendrimers (Fc-PAMAM) gold (Au) electrode. The self-assembled monolayer principle (SAM) was used to fabricate the sensitive, selective and disposable immunosensor electrodes. In electrode fabrication cysteamine (Cys) was the first agent covalently linked on the Au electrode surface. Immobilized redox center (ferrocene) cored PAMAM dendrimers served as a layer for the further binding of biological components. The monoclonal antibody of PSA (anti-PSA) was covalently immobilized on dendrimers which were attached onto the modified Au surface (Au/Cys/Fc-PAMAMs/anti-PSA). PSA levels were quantitatively analyzed by using electrochemical differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) whose lowest detection limit was calculated as 0.001ngmL(-1). The Au/Cys/FcPAMAM/anti-PSA immunosensor showed excellent performance for PSA at the pulse amplitude; 50mV and the scan rate; 10mV/s in a wide linear concentration range of 0.01ng-100ngmL(-1). Analytical performance and specificity assays were carried out using human serum and different proteins.

  1. Evaluating Quantum Dot Performance in Homogeneous FRET Immunoassays for Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Bhuckory, Shashi; Lefebvre, Olivier; Qiu, Xue; Wegner, Karl David; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2016-01-01

    The integration of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) into homogeneous Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) immunoassay kits for clinical diagnostics can provide significant advantages concerning multiplexing and sensitivity. Here we present a facile and functional QD-antibody conjugation method using three commercially available QDs with different photoluminescence (PL) maxima (605 nm, 655 nm, and 705 nm). The QD-antibody conjugates were successfully applied for FRET immunoassays against prostate specific antigen (PSA) in 50 µL serum samples using Lumi4-Tb (Tb) antibody conjugates as FRET donors and time-gated PL detection on a KRYPTOR clinical plate reader. Förster distance and Tb donor background PL were directly related to the analytical sensitivity for PSA, which resulted in the lowest limits of detection for Tb-QD705 (2 ng/mL), followed by Tb-QD655 (4 ng/mL), and Tb-QD605 (23 ng/mL). Duplexed PSA detection using the Tb-QD655 and Tb-QD705 FRET-pairs demonstrated the multiplexing ability of our immunoassays. Our results show that FRET based on QD acceptors is suitable for multiplexed and sensitive biomarker detection in clinical diagnostics. PMID:26861327

  2. Aptamer-MIP hybrid receptor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Tamboli, Vibha; Harniman, Robert L; Estrela, Pedro; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L

    2016-01-15

    This study reports the design and evaluation of a new synthetic receptor sensor based on the amalgamation of biomolecular recognition elements and molecular imprinting to overcome some of the challenges faced by conventional protein imprinting. A thiolated DNA aptamer with established affinity for prostate specific antigen (PSA) was complexed with PSA prior to being immobilised on the surface of a gold electrode. Controlled electropolymerisation of dopamine around the complex served to both entrap the complex, holding the aptamer in, or near to, it's binding conformation, and to localise the PSA binding sites at the sensor surface. Following removal of PSA, it was proposed that the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) cavity would act synergistically with the embedded aptamer to form a hybrid receptor (apta-MIP), displaying recognition properties superior to that of aptamer alone. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate subsequent rebinding of PSA to the apta-MIP surface. The apta-MIP sensor showed high sensitivity with a linear response from 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml of PSA and a limit of detection of 1pg/ml, which was three-fold higher than aptamer alone sensor for PSA. Furthermore, the sensor demonstrated low cross-reactivity with a homologous protein (human Kallikrein 2) and low response to human serum albumin (HSA), suggesting possible resilience to the non-specific binding of serum proteins.

  3. Portable smartphone quantitation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in a fluoropolymer microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana I; Gehlot, Poonam; Sidapra, Kalpita; Edwards, Alexander D; Reis, Nuno M

    2015-08-15

    We present a new, power-free and flexible detection system named MCFphone for portable colorimetric and fluorescence quantitative sandwich immunoassay detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). The MCFphone is composed by a smartphone integrated with a magnifying lens, a simple light source and a miniaturised immunoassay platform, the Microcapillary Film (MCF). The excellent transparency and flat geometry of fluoropolymer MCF allowed quantitation of PSA in the range 0.9 to 60 ng/ml with<7% precision in 13 min using enzymatic amplification and a chromogenic substrate. The lower limit of detection was further improved from 0.4 to 0.08 ng/ml in whole blood samples with the use of a fluorescence substrate. The MCFphone has shown capable of performing rapid (13 to 22 min total assay time) colorimetric quantitative and highly sensitive fluorescence tests with good %Recovery, which represents a major step in the integration of a new generation of inexpensive and portable microfluidic devices with commercial immunoassay reagents and off-the-shelf smartphone technology.

  4. Portable smartphone quantitation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in a fluoropolymer microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Ana I; Gehlot, Poonam; Sidapra, Kalpita; Edwards, Alexander D; Reis, Nuno M

    2015-08-15

    We present a new, power-free and flexible detection system named MCFphone for portable colorimetric and fluorescence quantitative sandwich immunoassay detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA). The MCFphone is composed by a smartphone integrated with a magnifying lens, a simple light source and a miniaturised immunoassay platform, the Microcapillary Film (MCF). The excellent transparency and flat geometry of fluoropolymer MCF allowed quantitation of PSA in the range 0.9 to 60 ng/ml with<7% precision in 13 min using enzymatic amplification and a chromogenic substrate. The lower limit of detection was further improved from 0.4 to 0.08 ng/ml in whole blood samples with the use of a fluorescence substrate. The MCFphone has shown capable of performing rapid (13 to 22 min total assay time) colorimetric quantitative and highly sensitive fluorescence tests with good %Recovery, which represents a major step in the integration of a new generation of inexpensive and portable microfluidic devices with commercial immunoassay reagents and off-the-shelf smartphone technology. PMID:25775968

  5. Construction of novel electrochemical immunosensor for detection of prostate specific antigen using ferrocene-PAMAM dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Çevik, Emre; Bahar, Özlem; Şenel, Mehmet; Abasıyanık, M Fatih

    2016-12-15

    In this study, an immunosensor was designed to utilize for the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on three different generations (G1, G2 and G3) of ferrocene (Fc) cored polyamidiamine dendrimers (Fc-PAMAM) gold (Au) electrode. The self-assembled monolayer principle (SAM) was used to fabricate the sensitive, selective and disposable immunosensor electrodes. In electrode fabrication cysteamine (Cys) was the first agent covalently linked on the Au electrode surface. Immobilized redox center (ferrocene) cored PAMAM dendrimers served as a layer for the further binding of biological components. The monoclonal antibody of PSA (anti-PSA) was covalently immobilized on dendrimers which were attached onto the modified Au surface (Au/Cys/Fc-PAMAMs/anti-PSA). PSA levels were quantitatively analyzed by using electrochemical differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) whose lowest detection limit was calculated as 0.001ngmL(-1). The Au/Cys/FcPAMAM/anti-PSA immunosensor showed excellent performance for PSA at the pulse amplitude; 50mV and the scan rate; 10mV/s in a wide linear concentration range of 0.01ng-100ngmL(-1). Analytical performance and specificity assays were carried out using human serum and different proteins. PMID:27641479

  6. Expression and purification of recombinant active prostate-specific antigen from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sujin; Lee, Seong-Wook

    2007-05-01

    Human prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a 33 kDa serine protease with comprehensive homology to glandular kallikrein, is secreted from prostatic tissue into the seminal fluid and enters into the circulation. The level of PSA increases in the serum of patients with prostatic cancer and hence is widely employed as a marker of the disease status. In particular, an enzymatically active PSA that is a form cleaved at the N-terminal seven-amino-acids prosequence, APLILSR, of proPSA may play an important roll in the progression of prostate cancer. Thus, the presence of the active form would selectively discriminate the cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this study, we developed a convenient purification method for the acquisition of active PSA and proPSA. Recombinant proPSA and active PSA were expressed directly in Escherichia coli, easily and efficiently isolated from inclusion bodies, refolded, and purified. Moreover, the enzymatic activity of the recombinant active PSA was confirmed as serine protease using chromogenic chymotrypsin substrate. This purified active PSA could be further applied to scrutinize the biological or conformational characteristics of the protein and to develop specific diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents against prostate cancer.

  7. Prostate-specific membrane antigen as a target for cancer imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    KIESS, A. P.; BANERJEE, S. R.; MEASE, R. C.; ROWE, S. P.; RAO, A.; FOSS, C. A.; CHEN, Y.; YANG, X.; CHO, S. Y.; NIMMAGADDA, S.; POMPER, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a molecular target whose use has resulted in some of the most productive work toward imaging and treating prostate cancer over the past two decades. A wide variety of imaging agents extending from intact antibodies to low-molecular-weight compounds permeate the literature. In parallel there is a rapidly expanding pool of antibody-drug conjugates, radiopharmaceutical therapeutics, small-molecule drug conjugates, theranostics and nanomedicines targeting PSMA. Such productivity is motivated by the abundant expression of PSMA on the surface of prostate cancer cells and within the neovasculature of other solid tumors, with limited expression in most normal tissues. Animating the field is a variety of small-molecule scaffolds upon which the radionuclides, drugs, MR-detectable species and nanoparticles can be placed with relative ease. Among those, the urea-based agents have been most extensively leveraged, with expanding clinical use for detection and more recently for radiopharmaceutical therapy of prostate cancer, with surprisingly little toxicity. PSMA imaging of other cancers is also appearing in the clinical literature, and may overtake FDG for certain indications. Targeting PSMA may provide a viable alternative or first-line approach to managing prostate and other cancers. PMID:26213140

  8. Fluorescence of prostate-specific antigen as measured with a portable 1D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong C.; Jeong, Jin H.; Jeong, Dong S.; Kim, Young M.; Oh, Sang W.; Choi, Eui Y.; Kim, Jae H.; Nahm, Kie B.

    2005-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an androgen-dependent glycoprotein protease (M.W. 33 kDa) and a member of kallikrein super-family of serine protease, and has chymotrypsin-like enzymatic activity. It is synthesized by the prostate epithelial cells and found in the prostate gland and seminal plasma as a major protein. It is widely used as a clinical marker for diagnosis, screening, monitoring and prognosis of prostate cancer. In normal male adults, the concentration of PSA in the blood is below 4 ng/ml and this value increases in patients with the prostate cancer or the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) due to its leakage into the circulatory system. As such, systematic monitoring of the PSA level in the blood can provide critical information about the progress of the prostatic disease. We have developed a compact integral system that can quantitatively measure the concentration of total PSA in human blood. This system utilizes the fluorescence emitted from the dye molecules attached to PSA molecules after appropriate immunoassay-based processing. Developed for the purpose of providing an affordable means of fast point-of-care testing of the prostate cancer, this system proved to be able to detect the presence of the PSA at the level of 0.18 ng/ml in less than 12 minutes, with the actual measurement taking less than 2 minutes. The design concept for this system is presented together with the result for a few representative samples.

  9. Velocity and doubling time of prostate-specific antigen: mathematics can matter.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Edward; Aslan, Mihaela; Ko, John; Wells, Carolyn K; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Concato, John

    2016-02-01

    Changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values are often reported as velocity or doubling time. We compared the association of these two calculations-at the time of PSA failure after primary treatment for prostate cancer-with prostate cancer mortality. From a source population of 1313 US Veterans with prostate cancer, including 623 treated with curative intent, the study population included 242 men experiencing biochemical failure, 81 after surgery and 161 after radiation therapy. Clinically relevant calculations of PSA velocity (linear slope) and PSA doubling time (logarithmic slope) were assessed for their association with 11-16 years of mortality from prostate cancer. Death due to prostate cancer occurred in 52/242 (21.5%) men. Among men receiving surgery, PSA velocity ≥1.0 ng/mL/year was associated with increased prostate cancer mortality (HR=4.2, p value=0.037), whereas doubling time ≤12 months did not confer risk (HR=1.0, p value=0.95). Conversely, among patients receiving radiation therapy, doubling time ≤12 months was associated with increased prostate cancer mortality (HR=2.4, p value=0.049), but velocity did not confer a statistically significant risk (HR=3.8, p value=0.19). When assessing risk of prostate cancer mortality, PSA velocity can be more predictive after surgery and PSA doubling time can be more predictive after radiation therapy. PMID:26767890

  10. ‘It's a maybe test’: men's experiences of prostate specific antigen testing in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rhodri; Edwards, Adrian GK; Elwyn, Glyn; Watson, Eila; Grol, Richard; Brett, Jo; Austoker, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing in primary care is an important and contentious issue. Due to concerns about the test and the value of early detection, countries such as the UK advocate ‘informed choice’ instead of population screening. It is not known whether this policy is actually adhered to in primary care. Furthermore, little is known of the experiences of men who face this decision. Aim To explore the experiences, understanding, and views of men who considered or undertook PSA testing in UK primary care. Design of study Qualitative interview-based study. Setting Primary care, Wales, UK. Method Semi-structured one-to-one interviews were conducted with 28 men, representing a range of clinical outcomes. Transcripts were coded and subjected to thematic analysis. Results Three themes were identified: the decision-making context, the locus of decision making, and uncertainty related to the PSA test. Conclusion The decision to undertake PSA testing was affected by both social and media factors and it did not appear to be a patient-led decision. The decision created considerable uncertainty for men and this uncertainty persisted after the test, even if the result was normal. Raised PSA led to further investigations and this exacerbated the uncertainty. Anxiety and regret were consequences of this uncertainty. PMID:17394734

  11. Velocity and doubling time of prostate-specific antigen: mathematics can matter.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Edward; Aslan, Mihaela; Ko, John; Wells, Carolyn K; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Concato, John

    2016-02-01

    Changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values are often reported as velocity or doubling time. We compared the association of these two calculations-at the time of PSA failure after primary treatment for prostate cancer-with prostate cancer mortality. From a source population of 1313 US Veterans with prostate cancer, including 623 treated with curative intent, the study population included 242 men experiencing biochemical failure, 81 after surgery and 161 after radiation therapy. Clinically relevant calculations of PSA velocity (linear slope) and PSA doubling time (logarithmic slope) were assessed for their association with 11-16 years of mortality from prostate cancer. Death due to prostate cancer occurred in 52/242 (21.5%) men. Among men receiving surgery, PSA velocity ≥1.0 ng/mL/year was associated with increased prostate cancer mortality (HR=4.2, p value=0.037), whereas doubling time ≤12 months did not confer risk (HR=1.0, p value=0.95). Conversely, among patients receiving radiation therapy, doubling time ≤12 months was associated with increased prostate cancer mortality (HR=2.4, p value=0.049), but velocity did not confer a statistically significant risk (HR=3.8, p value=0.19). When assessing risk of prostate cancer mortality, PSA velocity can be more predictive after surgery and PSA doubling time can be more predictive after radiation therapy.

  12. Human kallikrein 3 (prostate specific antigen) and human kallikrein 5 expression in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Darling, M R; Tsai, S; Jackson-Boeters, L; Daley, T D; Diamandis, E P

    2006-01-01

    The human kallikrein 5 protein (hK5) is expressed in many normal tissues, most notably in skin, breast, salivary gland and esophagus. It has also been shown to be a potential biomarker for breast, ovarian and testicular cancer. Human kallikrein 3 (hK3; prostate-specific antigen) is the most useful marker for adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. The aim of this study was to determine whether hK3 and hK5 are expressed in salivary gland tissues and salivary gland tumors (both benign and malignant), in order to compare normal with tumor tissues. Pleomorphic adenomas, adenoid cystic carcinomas, polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas, acinic cell carcinomas, mucoepidermoid carcinomas and adenocarcinomas not otherwise specified of both minor and major salivary glands were examined. The results of this study indicate that most salivary gland tumors do not show high levels of expression of hK5. Staining was most prominent in keratinizing epithelia in pleomorphic adenomas. hK3 is not expressed in salivary gland tumors.

  13. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time and survival in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Loberg, Robert D; Fielhauer, Jeffery R; Pienta, Brian A; Dresden, Scott; Christmas, Patty; Kalikin, Linda M; Olson, Karin B; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2003-12-29

    The relation between tumor kinetics and disease progression in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) has not been well described. Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer is characterized by detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after treatment and occurs in approximately 30% of patients after therapy for apparent localized disease. An increase in PSA almost always occurs before clinical evidence of disease. The ability to identify early biochemical failure in patients to assess disease aggressiveness and guide changes in treatment needs to be examined. We examined serial PSA data from 249 patients with metastatic disease to assess PSA doubling time (PSADT) in hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC) and HRPC states. In a subset of patients, the relation of PSADT to Gleason score and survival was studied. PSADT decreased from 37.5 +/- 4.5 weeks to 15.6 +/- 1.6 weeks (mean +/- SEM) in patients with HNPC versus HRPC. In this small study, PSADT did not correlate with Gleason score, survival from start of hormonal treatment, length of time receiving hormone therapy, or survival in the HRPC state. The decrease in PSADT with disease state may help provide insight into understanding the biology of late-stage disease.

  14. Crystal structure of human prostate-specific antigen in a sandwich antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Stura, Enrico A; Muller, Bruno H; Bossus, Marc; Michel, Sandrine; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Ducancel, Frédéric

    2011-12-01

    Human prostate-specific antigen (PSA or human kallikrein-related peptidase 3) present in small quantities in the sera of healthy men becomes elevated in prostate cancer (PCa) and other prostate disorders. The ability to identify the free PSA fraction associated with PCa could increase the reliability of the PSA diagnostic test. Here we present the crystal structure of human PSA from seminal fluid in a sandwich complex with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). MAb 5D5A5 captures total PSA with exceptionally high affinity, and mAb 5D3D11 selectively discriminates between free PSA subforms that are more abundant in sera from patients with PCa. Although the antigen is not of seric origin, several insights into cancer diagnosis can be discerned from this complex. MAb 5D3D11 recognizes a PSA conformation different from that previously reported. Interacting with the kallikrein loop, the PSA N-linked glycan attached to asparagine 61 is an uncommonly complex sialated triantennary chain. O-linked glycosylation is observed at threonine 125. The description of how PSA subforms in prostatic fluid can be discriminated using pairs of antibodies is a first step in the design of new strategies that are capable of real discrimination among PSA subforms, which will lead to the formulation of more reliable diagnostic tests. In a companion article [Muller, B. H., Savatier, A., L'Hostis, G., Costa, N., Bossus, M., Michel, S., et al. (2011). In vitro affinity maturation of an anti-PSA antibody for prostate cancer diagnostic assay. J. Mol. Biol.], we describe engineering efforts to improve the affinity of mAb 5D3D11, a first step towards such goal. PMID:22037582

  15. Extended use of Prostate Health Index and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen in Chinese men with prostate specific antigen 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Peter Ka-Fung; Teoh, Jeremy Yuen-Chun; Lee, Wai-Man; Yee, Chi-Hang; Chan, Eddie Shu-Yin; Hou, See-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the extended use of Prostate Health Index (PHI) and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen (%p2PSA) in Chinese men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination (DRE). Materials and Methods All consecutive Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE who agreed for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided 10-core prostate biopsy were recruited. Blood samples were taken immediately before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. The performances of total PSA (tPSA), %free-to-total PSA (%fPSA), %p2PSA, and PHI were compared using logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic, and decision curve analyses (DCA). Results From 2008 to 2015, 312 consecutive Chinese men were included. Among them, 53 out of 312 (17.0%) men were diagnosed to have prostate cancer on biopsy. The proportions of men with positive biopsies were 6.7% in PHI<35, 22.8% in PHI 35–55, and 54.5% in PHI>55 (chi-square test, p<0.001). The area under curves (AUC) of the base model including age, tPSA and status of initial/repeated biopsy was 0.64. Adding %p2PSA and PHI to the base model improved the AUC to 0.79 (p<0.001) and 0.78 (p<0.001), respectively, and provided net clinical benefit in DCA. The positive biopsy rates of Gleason 7 or above prostate cancers were 2.2% for PHI<35, 7.9% for PHI 35–55, and 36.4% for PHI>55 (chi-square test, p<0.001). By utilizing the PHI cutoff of 35 to men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE, 57.1% (178 of 312) biopsies could be avoided. Conclusions Both PHI and %p2PSA performed well in predicting prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer. The use of PHI and %p2PSA should be extended to Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE. PMID:27617315

  16. Extended use of Prostate Health Index and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen in Chinese men with prostate specific antigen 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Peter Ka-Fung; Teoh, Jeremy Yuen-Chun; Lee, Wai-Man; Yee, Chi-Hang; Chan, Eddie Shu-Yin; Hou, See-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the extended use of Prostate Health Index (PHI) and percentage of [-2]pro-prostate-specific antigen (%p2PSA) in Chinese men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10–20 ng/mL and normal digital rectal examination (DRE). Materials and Methods All consecutive Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE who agreed for transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided 10-core prostate biopsy were recruited. Blood samples were taken immediately before TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. The performances of total PSA (tPSA), %free-to-total PSA (%fPSA), %p2PSA, and PHI were compared using logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic, and decision curve analyses (DCA). Results From 2008 to 2015, 312 consecutive Chinese men were included. Among them, 53 out of 312 (17.0%) men were diagnosed to have prostate cancer on biopsy. The proportions of men with positive biopsies were 6.7% in PHI<35, 22.8% in PHI 35–55, and 54.5% in PHI>55 (chi-square test, p<0.001). The area under curves (AUC) of the base model including age, tPSA and status of initial/repeated biopsy was 0.64. Adding %p2PSA and PHI to the base model improved the AUC to 0.79 (p<0.001) and 0.78 (p<0.001), respectively, and provided net clinical benefit in DCA. The positive biopsy rates of Gleason 7 or above prostate cancers were 2.2% for PHI<35, 7.9% for PHI 35–55, and 36.4% for PHI>55 (chi-square test, p<0.001). By utilizing the PHI cutoff of 35 to men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE, 57.1% (178 of 312) biopsies could be avoided. Conclusions Both PHI and %p2PSA performed well in predicting prostate cancer and high grade prostate cancer. The use of PHI and %p2PSA should be extended to Chinese men with PSA 10–20 ng/mL and normal DRE.

  17. Single chip SPR and fluorescent ELISA assay of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Breault-Turcot, J; Poirier-Richard, H-P; Couture, M; Pelechacz, D; Masson, J-F

    2015-12-01

    A multi-channel system combining fluidics and micropatterned plasmonic materials with wavelength interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence detection was integrated from the combination of a small and motorized fluorescence microscope mounted on a portable 4-channel SPR instrument. The SPR and fluorescent measurements were performed based on the same detection area in a multi-channel fluidic, with a sensing scheme for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) consisting of a sandwich assay with a capture anti-PSA immobilized onto the SPR sensor and a detection anti-PSA modified with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In this dual-detection instrument, fluorescence was measured from the solution side of the micropatterned gold film, while the interface between the glass prism and the gold film served to interrogate the SPR response. The SPR sensors were comprised of microhole arrays fabricated by photolithography to enhance the instrumental response for PSA detection by approximately a factor of 2 to 3 and they were coated with a self-assembled monolayer of a peptide (3-MPA-HHHDD-OH) to minimize nonspecific adsorption. PSA was successfully detected at clinical concentrations from 10 pM to 50 nM with this integrated system in a single assay lasting 12 minutes, almost centering on the desired range for PSA diagnostic tests (>4 ng mL(-1) or >150 pM). The combination of two robust techniques in a single chip and instrument has led to a simple and effective assay that can be carried out on a small and portable instrument providing rapid biodetection of an important cancer biomarker with a dynamic range of nearly 4 orders of magnitude in the clinical range.

  18. Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Stephanie E; Sjölander, Arvid; Tillander, Annika; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Bälter, Katarina

    2016-07-01

    High Body mass index (BMI) has been directly associated with risk of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer. One possible explanation may be an effect of BMI on serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). To study the association between BMI and serum PSA as well as prostate cancer risk, a large cohort of men without prostate cancer at baseline was followed prospectively for prostate cancer diagnoses until 2015. Serum PSA and BMI were assessed among 15,827 men at baseline in 2010-2012. During follow-up, 735 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer with 282 (38.4%) classified as high-grade cancers. Multivariable linear regression models and natural cubic linear regression splines were fitted for analyses of BMI and log-PSA. For risk analysis, Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and natural cubic Cox regression splines producing standardized cancer-free probabilities were fitted. Results showed that baseline Serum PSA decreased by 1.6% (95% CI: -2.1 to -1.1) with every one unit increase in BMI. Statistically significant decreases of 3.7, 11.7 and 32.3% were seen for increasing BMI-categories of 25 < 30, 30 < 35 and ≥35 kg/m(2), respectively, compared to the reference (18.5 < 25 kg/m(2)). No statistically significant associations were seen between BMI and prostate cancer risk although results were indicative of a positive association to incidence rates of high-grade disease and an inverse association to incidence of low-grade disease. However, findings regarding risk are limited by the short follow-up time. In conclusion, BMI was inversely associated to PSA-levels. BMI should be taken into consideration when referring men to a prostate biopsy based on serum PSA-levels.

  19. Power-free chip enzyme immunoassay for detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum.

    PubMed

    Adel Ahmed, Heba; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2013-11-15

    A power-free, portable "Chip EIA" was designed to render the popular Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) more suitable for point-of-care testing. A number of microfluidic platforms have enabled miniaturization of the conventional microtitre plate ELISA, however, they require external pumping systems, valves, and electric power supply. The Chip EIA platform has eliminated the need for pumps and valves through utilizing a simple permanent magnet and magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles act as solid support to capture the target and are then moved through chambers harboring different reagents necessary to perform a sandwich ELISA. The use of magnetic nanoparticles increases the volume-to-surface ratio reducing the assay time to 30 min. Changing the color of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrate to green indicates a positive result. In addition, a quantitative read-out was obtained through the use of cellphone camera imaging and analyzing the images using Matlab®. Cell phones, including smart ones, are readily available almost everywhere. The Chip EIA device was used to assay total prostate specific antigen (tPSA) in 19 serum samples. The PSA Chip EIA was tested for accuracy, precision, repeatability, and the results were correlated to the commercial Beckman Colter, Hybritech immunoassay® for determination of tPSA in serum samples with a Pearson correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.96). The lower detection limit of the PSA Chip EIA was 3.2 ng/mL. The assay has 88.9% recovery and good reproducibility (% CV of 6.5). We conclude that the developed Chip EIA can be used for detection of protein biomarkers in biological specimens.

  20. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-mediated laminin proteolysis generates a pro-angiogenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Conway, Rebecca E; Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Nováková, Zora; Richardson, Spencer M; Rodrick, Tori C; Fuentes, Julio L; Richardson, Noah H; Attalla, Jonathan; Stewart, Samantha; Fahmy, Beshoy; Barinka, Cyril; Ghosh, Mallika; Shapiro, Linda H; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-10-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane-bound glutamate carboxypeptidase expressed in a number of tissues. PSMA participates in various biological functions depending on the substrate available in the particular tissue; in the brain, PSMA cleaves the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate to regulate release of key neurotransmitters, while intestinal PSMA cleaves polyglutamated peptides to supply dietary folate. PSMA expression is also progressively upregulated in prostate cancer where it correlates with tumor progression as well as in tumor vasculature, where it regulates angiogenesis. The previous research determined that PSMA cleavage of small peptides generated via matrix metalloprotease-mediated proteolysis of the extracellular matrix protein laminin potently activated endothelial cells, integrin signaling and angiogenesis, although the specific peptide substrates were not identified. Herein, using enzymatic analyses and LC/MS, we unequivocally demonstrate that several laminin-derived peptides containing carboxy-terminal glutamate moieties (LQE, IEE, LNE) are bona fide substrates for PSMA. Subsequently, the peptide products were tested for their effects on angiogenesis in various models. We report that LQ, the dipeptide product of PSMA cleavage of LQE, efficiently activates endothelial cells in vitro and enhances angiogenesis in vivo. Importantly, LQE is not cleaved by an inactive PSMA enzyme containing an active site mutation (E424S). Endothelial cell activation by LQ was dependent on integrin beta-1-induced activation of focal adhesion kinase. These results characterize a novel PSMA substrate, provide a functional rationale for the upregulation of PSMA in cancer cells and tumor vasculature and suggest that inhibition of PSMA could lead to the development of new angiogenic therapies. PMID:27387982

  1. The relationship between prostate-specific antigen and prostate cancer risk: the Prostate Biopsy Collaborative Group

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Cronin, Angel M.; Roobol, Monique J.; Hugosson, Jonas; Jones, J. Stephen; Kattan, Michael W.; Klein, Eric; Hamdy, Freddie; Neal, David; Donovan, Jenny; Parekh, Dipen J.; Ankerst, Donna; Bartsch, George; Klocker, Helmut; Horninger, Wolfgang; Benchikh, Amine; Salama, Gilles; Villers, Arnauld; Freedland, Steve J.; Moreira, Daniel M.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The relationship between prostate specific antigen (PSA) level and prostate cancer risk remains subject to fundamental disagreements. We hypothesize that the risk of prostate cancer on biopsy for a given PSA level is affected by identifiable characteristics of the cohort under study. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We used data from 5 European and 3 US cohorts of men undergoing biopsy for prostate cancer; six were population-based studies and two were clinical cohorts. The association between PSA and prostate cancer was calculated separately for each cohort using locally-weighted scatterplot smoothing. RESULTS The final data set included 25,772 biopsies and 8,503 cancers. There were gross disparities between cohorts with respect to both the prostate cancer risk at a given PSA level and the shape of the risk curve. These disparities were associated with identifiable differences between cohorts: for a given PSA level, a greater number of biopsy cores increased risk of cancer (odds ratio for >6 vs. 6 core biopsy 1.35; 95% C.I. 1.18, 1.54; p<0.0005); recent screening led to a smaller increase in risk per unit change in PSA (p=0.001 for interaction term) and US cohorts had higher risk than the European cohorts (2.14; 95% C.I. 1.99, 2.30; p<0.0005). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that the relationship between PSA and risk of a positive prostate biopsy varies, both in terms of the probability of prostate cancer at a given PSA value and the shape of the risk curve. This poses challenges to the use of PSA-driven algorithms to determine whether biopsy is indicated. PMID:20736330

  2. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-mediated laminin proteolysis generates a pro-angiogenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Conway, Rebecca E; Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Nováková, Zora; Richardson, Spencer M; Rodrick, Tori C; Fuentes, Julio L; Richardson, Noah H; Attalla, Jonathan; Stewart, Samantha; Fahmy, Beshoy; Barinka, Cyril; Ghosh, Mallika; Shapiro, Linda H; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-10-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane-bound glutamate carboxypeptidase expressed in a number of tissues. PSMA participates in various biological functions depending on the substrate available in the particular tissue; in the brain, PSMA cleaves the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate to regulate release of key neurotransmitters, while intestinal PSMA cleaves polyglutamated peptides to supply dietary folate. PSMA expression is also progressively upregulated in prostate cancer where it correlates with tumor progression as well as in tumor vasculature, where it regulates angiogenesis. The previous research determined that PSMA cleavage of small peptides generated via matrix metalloprotease-mediated proteolysis of the extracellular matrix protein laminin potently activated endothelial cells, integrin signaling and angiogenesis, although the specific peptide substrates were not identified. Herein, using enzymatic analyses and LC/MS, we unequivocally demonstrate that several laminin-derived peptides containing carboxy-terminal glutamate moieties (LQE, IEE, LNE) are bona fide substrates for PSMA. Subsequently, the peptide products were tested for their effects on angiogenesis in various models. We report that LQ, the dipeptide product of PSMA cleavage of LQE, efficiently activates endothelial cells in vitro and enhances angiogenesis in vivo. Importantly, LQE is not cleaved by an inactive PSMA enzyme containing an active site mutation (E424S). Endothelial cell activation by LQ was dependent on integrin beta-1-induced activation of focal adhesion kinase. These results characterize a novel PSMA substrate, provide a functional rationale for the upregulation of PSMA in cancer cells and tumor vasculature and suggest that inhibition of PSMA could lead to the development of new angiogenic therapies.

  3. Evaluation of a two-site immunoradiometric assay for measuring noncomplexed (free) prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Cuny, C; Pham, L; Kramp, W; Sharp, T; Soriano, T F

    1996-08-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in men is present as two different molecular forms separable by gel-filtration chromatography (GFC). We have evaluated a two-site IRMA that measures only the noncomplexed (free) form of PSA (F-PSA). Verification that the F-PSA assay measures solely F-PSA was obtained by assaying GFC-fractionated serum samples with both the F-PSA IRMA and a commercial PSA assay that measures total PSA (T-PSA: F-PSA plus alpha 1-antichymotrypsin-complexed PSA). The F-PSA assay detected only the 30-kDa peak corresponding to the free form of PSA, whereas the T-PSA assay detected two peaks: complexed PSA at approximately 90 kDa and F-PSA at approximately 30 kDa. The F-PSA assay had an analytical detection limit of 0.03 microgram/L and a measuring range up to 50 micrograms/L. The intraassay CV was 1.7-10% in the concentration range of 0.2-30 micrograms/L. The interassay CV was 3.4-12.5% in the same concentration range. Dilution and recovery studies showed no significant deviation from linearity across the assay range. The assay was insensitive to interference from hemoglobin, bilirubin, and total lipids up to concentrations of 5, 0.2, and 10 g/L, respectively. No significant loss of immunological activity (analyte stability) was seen day-to-day ( < or = 5) or after repeated freeze/thaw ( < or = 5) cycles. We conclude that the F-PSA IRMA is an accurate, precise, and reliable tool for measuring F-PSA in human serum. PMID:8697584

  4. DNA Ploidy Measured on Archived Pretreatment Biopsy Material May Correlate With Prostate-Specific Antigen Recurrence After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira; MacAulay, Calum; Hayes, Malcolm; Korbelik, Jagoda; Morris, W. James; Palcic, Branko

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To explore whether DNA ploidy of prostate cancer cells determined from archived transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy specimens correlates with disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven failures and 47 controls were selected from 1006 consecutive low- and intermediate-risk patients treated with prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy (July 1998-October 2003). Median follow-up was 7.5 years. Ten-year actuarial disease-free survival was 94.1%. Controls were matched using age, initial prostate-specific antigen level, clinical stage, Gleason score, use of hormone therapy, and follow-up (all P nonsignificant). Seventy-eight specimens were successfully processed; 27 control and 20 failure specimens contained more than 100 tumor cells were used for the final analysis. The Feulgen-Thionin stained cytology samples from archived paraffin blocks were used to determine the DNA ploidy of each tumor by measuring integrated optical densities. Results: The samples were divided into diploid and aneuploid tumors. Aneuploid tumors were found in 16 of 20 of the failures (80%) and 8 of 27 controls (30%). Diploid DNA patients had a significantly lower rate of disease recurrence (P=.0086) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.256). On multivariable analysis, patients with aneuploid tumors had a higher prostate-specific antigen failure rate (HR 5.13). Additionally, those with “excellent” dosimetry (V100 >90%; D90 >144 Gy) had a significantly lower recurrence rate (HR 0.25). All patients with aneuploid tumors and dosimetry classified as “nonexcellent” (V100 <90%; D90 <144 Gy) (5 of 5) had disease recurrence, compared with 40% of patients with aneuploid tumors and “excellent” dosimetry (8 of 15). In contrast, dosimetry did not affect the outcome for diploid patients. Conclusions: Using core biopsy material from archived paraffin blocks, DNA ploidy correctly classified the majority of failures and nonfailures in this study. The results suggest that DNA ploidy can be used as a

  5. Detection of prostate-specific antigen with biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia-dong; Cheng, Jun-jie; Miao, Bin; Wei, Xiao-wei; Xie, Jie; Zhang, Jin-cheng; Zhang, Zhi-qiang; Wu, Dong-min

    2014-07-01

    In order to improve the sensitivity of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) biosensors, a simple biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure was designed and successfully fabricated for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. UV/ozone was used to oxidize the GaN surface and then a 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTES) self-assembled monolayer was bound to the sensing region. This monolayer serves as a binding layer for attachment of the prostate specific antibody (anti-PSA). The biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT sensor shows a rapid and sensitive response when the target prostate-specific antigen in buffer solution was added to the antibody-immobilized sensing area. The current change showed a logarithm relationship against the PSA concentration from 0.1 pg/ml to 0.993 ng/ml. The sensitivity of 0.215% is determined for 0.1 pg/ml PSA solution. The above experimental result of the biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensor suggested that this biosensor might be a useful tool for prostate cancer screening.

  6. Human prostate-specific antigen: structural and functional similarity with serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Watt, K W; Lee, P J; M'Timkulu, T; Chan, W P; Loor, R

    1986-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the prostate-specific antigen (PA) from human seminal plasma has been determined from analyses of the peptides generated by cyanogen bromide, hydroxylamine, endoproteinases Arg-C and Lys-C. The single polypeptide chain of PA contains 240-amino acid residues and has a calculated Mr of 26,496. An N-linked carbohydrate side chain is predicted at asparagine-45, and O-linked carbohydrate side chains are possibly attached to serine-69, threonine-70, and serine-71. The primary structure of PA shows a high degree of sequence homology with other serine proteases of the kallikrein family. The active site residues of histidine, aspartic acid, and serine comprising the charge-relay system of typical serine proteases were found in similar positions in PA (histidine-41, aspartic acid-96, and serine-192). At pH 7.8, PA hydrolyzed insulin A and B chains, recombinant interleukin 2, and--to a lesser extent--gelatin, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and fibrinogen. The cleavage sites of these proteins by PA were chemically analyzed as the alpha-carboxyl side of some hydrophobic residues, tyrosine, leucine, valine, and phenylalanine, and of basic residues histidine, lysine, and arginine. The chymotrypsin-like activity of PA exhibited with the chromogenic substrate N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide yielded a specific activity of 9.21 microM per min per mg of PA and Km and kcat values of 15.3 mM and 0.075s-1, respectively. "Trypsin-like" activity of PA was also detected with N alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide and gave a specific activity of 1.98 microM per min per mg of PA. Protease inhibitors such as phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, aprotinin, leupeptin, soybean trypsin inhibitor as well as Zn2+ and spermidine were effective inhibitors of PA enzymatic activity.

  7. Identification of Threshold Prostate Specific Antigen Levels to Optimize the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer by Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion Guided Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Nabeel A.; George, Arvin K.; Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Prostate

  8. Expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) correlates with poor response to tamoxifen therapy in recurrent breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foekens, J A; Diamandis, E P; Yu, H; Look, M P; Gelder, M E Meijer-van; Klijn, J G M

    1999-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a serine protease which may play a role in a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer. In the present study, we evaluated whether the level of PSA in breast tumour cytosol could be associated with prognosis in primary breast cancer, or with response to tamoxifen therapy in recurrent disease. PSA levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in breast tumour cytosols, and were correlated with prognosis in 1516 patients with primary breast cancer and with response to first-line tamoxifen therapy in 434 patients with recurrent disease. Relating the levels of PSA with classical prognostic factors, low levels were more often found in larger tumours, tumours of older and post-menopausal patients, and in steroid hormone receptor-negative tumours. There was no significant association between the levels of PSA with grade of differentiation or the number of involved lymph nodes. In patients with primary breast cancer, PSA was not significantly related to the rate of relapse, and a positive association of PSA with an improved survival could be attributed to its relationship to age. In patients with recurrent breast cancer, a high level of PSA was significantly related to a poor response to tamoxifen therapy, and a short progression-free and overall survival after start of treatment for recurrent disease. In Cox multivariate analyses for response to therapy and for (progression-free) survival, corrected for age/menopausal status, disease-free interval, site of relapse and steroid hormone receptor status, PSA was an independent variable of poor prognosis. It is concluded that the level of PSA in cytosols of primary breast tumours might be a marker to select breast cancer patients who may benefit from systemic tamoxifen therapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10070886

  9. Increasing level of prostate-specific antigen and prostate cancer risk factors among 193 men examined in screening procedure.

    PubMed

    Opalińska, Edyta; Michalak, Anna; Stoma, Filip; Latalski, Maciej; Goniewicz, Mariusz

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men, therefore has become recently an essential problem of public health. The factors influencing cancer include: androgens metabolism disorders, diabetes mellitus, overweight and obesity, smoking, alcohol and black coffee intake, diet rich in saturated fats and poor in unsaturated, lack of physical activity, geographical zone, race, such carcinogenic substances as: cadmium, materials used in rubber, painting, printing, ship industry etc., contagious factors and also older age and a positive family history of the disease. To diagnose prostate cancer in its early stage such screening procedures as physical examination--digital rectal exam (DRE) and determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in blood serum are used. The aim of the study was to assess prostate cancer risk factors occurrence in the examined 193 men, aged 50-70 years, who reported to urology outpatient department at Clinical Hospital in Lublin, measure the PSA level in blood serum and examine the correlation between them. Respondents filled in a questionnaire about the presence of prostate cancer risk factors and urogenital symptoms. The questionnaire was completed with DRE and PSA measurement. The results led us to the following conclusions: 1/ in the studied population elevated PSA level is determined in 3.1% of 193 examined men, 2/ increased PSA occurs mainly in men from rural areas, with elementary education, divorced, older (>60 years), using fat-rich diet, smokers, black coffee drinkers, with overweight or obesity and non diabetic, 3/ a combination of PSA test with DRE seems to be useful and rather cheap for the detection of prostate cancer in the early stage of its development.

  10. Circulating testosterone and prostate-specific antigen in nipple aspirate fluid and tissue are associated with breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Edward R; Tichansky, David S; Chervoneva, Inna; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary evidence has associated testosterone and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with breast cancer. Our objective was to determine whether a) testosterone levels in nipple aspirate fluid (NAF), serum, or breast tissue are associated with breast cancer; b) testosterone levels in serum are associated with levels in NAF; c) PSA in NAF, serum, or breast tissue is associated with breast cancer; and d) serum PSA is associated with NAF PSA levels. We obtained 342 NAF specimens from 171 women by means of a modified breast pump. Additionally, we collected 201 blood samples from 99 women and 51 tissue samples from 41 subjects who underwent surgical resection for suspected disease. Women currently using birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy were excluded from the study. Controlling for age and menopausal status, serum testosterone was significantly increased in women with breast cancer (p = 0.002). NAF and serum testosterone levels were not associated. Neither NAF nor tissue testosterone was associated with breast cancer. Controlling for menopausal status and age, NAF PSA was significantly decreased in women with breast cancer (p < 0.001). We did not find serum PSA to be associated with breast cancer, although we found an indication that, in postmenopausal women, its levels were lower in women with cancer. Serum PSA was associated with NAF PSA in postmenopausal women (p < 0.001). PSA levels in cancerous tissue were significantly lower than in benign breast specimens from subjects without cancer (p = 0.011), whereas levels of PSA in histologically benign specimens from subjects with cancer were intermediate. Our results suggest that serum testosterone is increased and NAF PSA is decreased in women with breast cancer, with PSA expression being higher in normal than in cancerous breast tissues. NAF and serum PSA levels in postmenopausal women are correlated, suggesting that as laboratory assessment of PSA becomes more sensitive, serum PSA may become useful in

  11. Metastatic superscan in prostate carcinoma on gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Rajeev; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a metastatic superscan on gallium-68 Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)], abbreviated as gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen (68Ga-PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. 68Ga-PSMA is novel radiotracer undergoing evaluation for PET/CT imaging of prostate carcinoma. This patient had a superscan of metastases on conventional bone scintigraphy and was referred for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to evaluate the feasibility of 177Lu-PSMA therapy. PMID:27095868

  12. What pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level warrants long-term androgen deprivation?

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenberg, Steven J. . E-mail: S_Feigenberg@fccc.edu; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Eisenberg, Debra F.; Pollack, Alan

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Several large randomized prospective studies have demonstrated a survival benefit with the addition of long-term androgen deprivation to definitive radiotherapy for patients with Gleason score 8-10 or T3-T4 prostate cancer. However, these studies were performed before the routine use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement. The purpose of this study was to determine what pretreatment (initial) PSA (iPSA) level, if any, warrants the addition of long-term androgen deprivation in the PSA era. Methods and materials: The data set evaluated consisted of 1003 prostate cancer patients treated definitively with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between May 1, 1989 and November 30, 1999 (median follow-up, 61 months). Specifically excluded were patients with T3-T4 disease or Gleason score greater than 7 or those who had undergone androgen deprivation as a part of their initial therapy. The median radiation dose was 76 Gy. Patients were randomly split into two data sets, with the first (n = 487) used to evaluate the optimal iPSA cutpoint for which a statistically significant difference in outcome was noted. The second data set (n = 516) served as a validation data set for the initial modeling. The analysis of the optimal iPSA cutpoint was based on a recursive partitioning approach for censored data using the log-rank test for nodal separation of freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) as defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition. Cox multivariate regression analysis was used to confirm independent predictors of outcome among the clinical and treatment-related factors: iPSA (grouped as defined by the recursive partitioning analysis), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7), T stage (T1c-T2a vs. T2b-T2c), and total radiation dose (continuous). Results: The recursive partitioning analysis data set resulted in an optimal iPSA cutpoint of 35 ng/mL, such that the 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of FFBF was 80%, 69%, and 19% for i

  13. Prostate-specific membrane antigen expression in tumor-associated vasculature of breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Wernicke, Alla Gabriella; Varma, Sonal; Greenwood, Eleni A; Christos, Paul J; Chao, K S Clifford; Liu, He; Bander, Neil H; Shin, Sandra J

    2014-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has been found to be expressed in the tumor-associated neovasculature of multiple solid tumor types including breast cancers. However, thus far, the number of cases studied from some tumor types has been limited. In this study, we set out to assess PSMA expression in the tumor-associated vasculature associated with invasive breast carcinomas in a sizable cohort of patients. One hundred and six patients with AJCC stage 0-IV breast cancer were identified. Ninety-two of these patients had primary breast cancer [invasive breast carcinoma with or without co-existing ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (74) or DCIS alone (18)]. In addition, 14 patients with breast cancer metastases to the brain were identified. Immunohistochemical staining for PSMA and CD31 was performed on parallel representative tumor sections in each case. Tumor-associated vascular endothelial cell PSMA immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively assessed based on two parameters: overall percent of endothelial positivity and staining intensity. PSMA expression for tumor-associated vascular endothelial cells was scored 0 if there was no detectable PSMA expression, 1 if PSMA staining was detectable in 5-50%, and 2 if PSMA expression was positive in >50% of microvessels. CD 31 staining was concurrently reviewed to confirm the presence of vasculature in each case. Tumor-associated vasculature was PSMA-positive in 68/92 (74%) of primary breast cancers and in 14/14 (100%) of breast cancers metastatic to brain. PSMA was not detected in normal breast tissue or carcinoma cells. All but 2 cases (98%) showed absence of PSMA expression in normal breast tissue-associated vasculature. The 10-year overall survival was 88.7% (95% CI = 80.0%, 93.8%) in patients without brain metastases. When overall survival (OS) was stratified based on PSMA score group, patients with PSMA scores of 0, 1, and 2 had 10-year OS of 95.8%, 96.0%, and 79.7%, respectively (p = 0.12). When PSMA scores

  14. Results of a study to correlate serum prostate specific antigen and reproductive hormone levels in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, S.; Quadri, S. F.; Dong, L.; Ignacio, L.; Kathuria, I. N.; Sutton, H.; Halpern, H.

    1995-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine whether serum hormones (free testosterone, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone, or prolactin) have any influence on serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels in patients with stage A-C prostate cancer. Blood samples were collected prior to any treatment in 36 patients; in 19 (group 1), three blood samples were collected 10 minutes apart between 9:00 AM and 9:30 AM for each patient and pooled together to avoid diurnal and episodic variation in serum testosterone values. In the remaining patients, only one sample could be collected (group 2). Free testosterone, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and PSA levels were determined with appropriate radioimmunoassay techniques. Statistical analyses were performed separately for groups 1 and 2, and then with pooled data. None of the hormones in any of the analyses showed any association to serum PSA values except for prolactin for the pooled data and for group 2. This statistical significance for prolactin disappeared on multivariate analysis. There were 21 African-American men and 15 whites in the study; no racial differences in hormonal levels were found except for lower luteinizing hormone levels in African Americans in group 2 and pooled data. No differences were found between group 1 and group 2 in the mean serum prolactin and luteinizing hormone values. Serum free testosterone, androstenedione, and luteinizing hormone appeared to have no influence on serum PSA values in nonmetastatic cancer patients. Serum prolactin values were inversely associated with PSA values in univariate analysis for the pooled data; this disappeared in multivariate analysis. Unlike other studies that found higher serum testosterone levels in African-American college students than whites, no such differences were seen in this age group. Luteinizing hormone was lower in African-American men than in whites in the pooled study population. Further studies are needed to clarify

  15. Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Density and Free to Total PSA Ratio in Diagnosing Prostate Cancer with Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels of 4.0 ng/ml or Less

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Xin; TANG, Jie; FEI, Xiang; LI, Qiu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to value the usefulness of free to total prostate-specific antigen and Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density for prostate cancer in the patients with PSA levels of 4.0 ng/ml or less. Methods: A total of 343 subjects with PSA levels of 4.0 ng/ml or less were biopsied. All patients were divided into four groups according to the PSA levels: 0 to 1.0 ng/ml, 1.1 to 2.0 ng/ml, 2.1 to 3.0 ng/ml, and 3.1 to 4.0 ng/ml. The reliability of cancer detection in relation to the f/t PSA ratio and PSAD were estimated. Results: Overall, 65 people were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The detection rate was 16.28%、17.17%, 21.82%, 25.00% in subjects with PSA levels of 0 to 1.0 ng/ml, 1.1 to 2.0 ng/ml, 2.1 to 3.0 ng/ml, and 3.1 to 4.0 ng/ml, respectively. The f/t PSA ratio was significantly lower in patients with prostate cancer and PSA levels of 2.1 to 4.0 ng/ml (P<0.05). The PSAD had no statistical significance between the two groups. Conclusions: Routine prostate biopsy should be undertaken if the f/t PSA ratio less than 15% with /without abnormal DRE/TRUS findings. PMID:26744703

  16. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  17. Opium consumption is negatively associated with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free PSA, and percentage of free PSA levels.

    PubMed

    Safarinejad, Mohammad Reza; Asgari, Seyyed Alaeddin; Farshi, Alireza; Iravani, Shahrokh; Khoshdel, Alireza; Shekarchi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Addiction to opium continues to be a major worldwide medical and social problem. The study addressing the association between opium consumption and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level is lacking. We determined the effects of opium consumption on serum PSA levels in opium-addict men. Our study subjects comprised 438 opium-addict men with a mean age of 52.2 ± 6.4 years (group 1). We compared these men with 446 men who did not indicate current or past opium use (group 2). Serum total PSA (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA), % fPSA, and sex hormones were compared between the 2 groups. The mean serum tPSA level was significantly lower in group 1 (1.05 ng/mL) than in controls (1.45 ng/mL) (P = 0.001). Opium consumption was also associated with lower fPSA (P = 0.001) and % fPSA (P = 0.001). Serum free testosterone level in opium-addict patients (132.5 ± 42 pg/mL) was significantly lower than that in controls (156.2 ± 43 pg/mL) (P = 0.03). However, no significant correlation existed between tPSA and free testosterone levels (r = 0.28, 95% CI, -0.036 to 0.51, P = 0.34). Among the patients with cancer in group 1, 35% were found to have high-grade tumor (Gleason score ≥ 7) compared with 26.7% in group 2 (P = 0.02). Total PSA and fPSA were strongly correlated with duration of opium use (r = -0.06, 95% CI, -0.04 to -0.08, P = 0.0001; and r = -0.05, 95% CI, -0.03 to -0.07, P = 0.0001, respectively). Opium consumption is independently and negatively associated with serum tPSA, fPSA, and % fPSA levels.

  18. The Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Levels in Men Being Treated for Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels. Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer. After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117–0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48–2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls. Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration

  19. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA)–Based Population Screening for Prostate Cancer: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pron, G

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed non-cutaneous cancer in men and their second or third leading cause of cancer death. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for PC has been in common practice for more than 20 years. Objectives A systematic review of the scientific literature was conducted to determine the effectiveness of PSA-based population screening programs for PC to inform policy decisions in a publicly funded health care system. Data Sources A systematic review of bibliographic databases was performed for systematic reviews or randomized controlled trials (RCT) of PSA-based population screening programs for PC. Review Methods A broad search strategy was employed to identify studies reporting on key outcomes of PC mortality and all-cause mortality. Results The search identified 5 systematic reviews and 6 RCTs. None of the systematic reviews found a statistically significant reduction in relative risk (RR) of PC mortality or overall mortality with PSA-based screening. PC mortality reductions were found to vary by country, by screening program, and by age of men at study entry. The European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer found a statistically significant reduction in RR in PC mortality at 11-year follow-up (0.79; 95% CI, 0.67–0.92), although the absolute risk reduction was small (1.0/10,000 person-years). However, the primary treatment for PCs differed significantly between countries and between trial arms. The American Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) found a statistically non-significant increase in RR for PC mortality with 13-year follow-up (1.09; 95% CI, 0.87–1.36). The degree of opportunistic screening in the control arm of the PLCO trial, however, was high. None of the RCTs found a reduction in all-cause mortality and all found a statistically significant increase in the detection of mainly low-risk, organ-confined PCs in the screening arm. Conclusions There was no

  20. A Phase 1 Study of a Vaccine Targeting Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma and Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey S.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Goodman, Oscar B.; Cranmer, Lee D.; Marshall, John L.; Miles, Sabrina; Rosario, Dar; Diamond, David C.; Qiu, Zhiyong; Obrocea, Mihail; Bot, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are tumor-associated antigens implicated in cellular differentiation, genetic stability, and angiogenesis. MKC1106-PP is an immunotherapeutic regimen cotargeting PRAME and PSMA, comprised of a recombinant plasmid (pPRA-PSM encoding fragments derived from both antigens) and 2 peptides (E-PRA and E-PSM derived from PRAME and PSMA, respectively). This multicenter study evaluated MKC1106-PP with a fixed plasmid dose and 2 different peptide doses, administered by intralymph node injection in a prime-boost sequence in human leukocyte antigen-A*0201 and tumor-antigen-positive patients with progressing metastatic solid tumors who had failed standard therapy. Immune monitoring was done by tetramer and enzymatic-linked immune spot analysis. The treatment was well tolerated, with no significant differences in safety, immune response, and clinical outcome relative to peptide doses. Fifteen of 24 evaluable patients showed an immune response, as defined by the expansion of PRAME-specific or PSMA-specific T cells in the blood. There were no partial or complete responses by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Seven patients showed stable disease (SD) for 6 months or longer, or prostate specific antigen decline: 4 of 10 with prostate carcinoma, 2 of 2 with renal clear cell carcinoma, and 1 of 10 with metastatic melanoma. In addition, there was an association between the induction and persistence of antigen-specific T cells in blood above baseline levels and disease control, defined as SD for 6 months or longer. These results support further development of MKC1106-PP in specific clinical indications. PMID:21760528

  1. Inverse relation between prostate-specific antigen and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 in bone metastases and serum of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, G L; Doherty, A P; Mitchell, H; Hanham, I W; Christmas, T J; Epstein, R J

    1999-12-11

    The usual osteoblastic phenotype of metastatic prostate cancer is unexplained. Here we show that tissue and serum concentrations of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-vary inversely with a substrate protein that binds a growth factor known to activate osteoblasts. These findings suggest that PSA may contribute to the osteoblastic phenotype, and could thus represent a new drug target devoid of antiandrogenic toxicity.

  2. Detection of prostate specific antigen based on electrocatalytic platinum nanoparticles conjugated to a recombinant scFv antibody.

    PubMed

    Spain, Elaine; Gilgunn, Sarah; Sharma, Shikha; Adamson, Kellie; Carthy, Eadaoin; O'Kennedy, Richard; Forster, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Highly sensitive and label free detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) still remains a challenge in prostate cancer diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a sensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on electrocatalytic platinum nanoparticles conjugated to a recombinant scFv antibody. Gold disc electrodes functionalised with a l-Cysteine (Cys) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) were used to covalently bind PSA specific monoclonal antibody (anti-PSA) using N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) chemistry. Immunosensing was completed using sandwich-type immunoreaction of the PSA-antigen (1-30 ng/mL) between anti-PSA immobilized on the l-Cys modified electrode using label free electrochemical impedance (EIS) technique. Furthermore, highly specific in-house generated scFv fragments as receptor proteins were utilised for one step site-directed immobilisation on the surface of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs). To improve the sensitivity of the immunoassay, these scFV labelled electrocatalytic PtNPs were then used for covalent hybridisation to the PSA modified electrode and then applied in a hybridisation assay to determine the concentration of the PSA by measuring the faradaic current associated with reduction of peroxide in solution. Semi-log plots of the PSA concentration vs. faradaic current are linear from 1 to 30 ng/mL and pM concentrations can be detected without the need for molecular, e.g., PCR or NASBA, amplification. PMID:26513282

  3. [Development of a biochip for quantitative determination of two forms of prostate specific antigen using internal calibration curve].

    PubMed

    Konovalova, E V; Savvateeva, E N; Dement'eva, E I; Filippova, M A; Turygin, A Iu; Osipova, T V; Riabykh, T P; Rubina, A Iu; Zasedatelev, A S

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional gel-based microchip allowing simultaneous quantitative detection of total (PSAtot) and free (PSAfree) forms of prostate specific antigen in human serum (in a format "one patient-one biochip") was developed. A method, which doesn't require preliminary construction of calibration curves when performing an assay, was applied for quantitative determination of PSAtot and PSAfree. Gel elements with immobilized antigen (PSA) in different concentration, forming an internal calibration curve, were included in a structure of the microchip, in addition to the elements with immobilized antibodies specific against PSAtot and PSAfree. The specialized software "ImaGelAssay" was used for data processing and interpretation. The sensitivity of the assay performed on biochips was 0.3 ng/ml for PSAtot and 0.2 ng/ml for PSAfree. Variation coefficient for the measurements inside one series of microchips didn't exceed 10%. Correlation coefficient between the results of measurements in human sera obtained on biochips and by the standard ELISA method was 0.988 for PSAtot and 0.987 for PSAfree.

  4. A nanoparticle label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-15

    We present a nanoparticle (NP) label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. This IEB integrates the immunochromatographic strip with the electrochemical detector for transducing quantitative signals. The NP label, made of CdSe@ZnS, serves as a signal-amplifier vehicle. A sandwich immunoreaction was performed on the immunochromatographic strip. The captured NP labels in the test zone were determined by highly sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium) with a disposable-screen-printed electrode, which is embedded underneath the membrane of the test zone. Experimental parameters (e.g., immunoreaction time, the amount of anti-PSA-NP conjugations applied) and electrochemical detection conditions (e.g., preconcentration potential and time) were optimized using this biosensor for PSA detection. The analytical performance of this biosensor was evaluated with serum PSA samples according to the “figure-of-merits” (e.g., dynamic range, reproducibility, and detection limit). The results were validated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and show high consistency. It is found that this biosensor is very sensitive with the detection limit of 0.02 ng/mL PSA and is quite reproducible. This method is rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive than other diagnosis tools for PSA; therefore, this IEB coupled with a portable electrochemical analyzer shows great promise for simple, sensitive, quantitative point-of-care testing of disease-related protein biomarkers.

  5. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-02-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves.

  6. Signal amplification strategy for sensitive immunoassay of prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on ferrocene incorporated polystyrene spheres.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lu; You, Jinmao; Kong, Rongmei; Qu, Fengli

    2013-09-01

    A new kind of signal amplification strategy based on ferrocene (Fc) incorporated polystyrene spheres (PS-Fc) was proposed. The synthesized PS-Fc displayed narrow size distribution and good stability. PS-Fc was applied as label to develop immunosensors for prostate specific antigen (PSA) after the typical sandwich immunoreaction by linking anti-PSA antibody (Ab2) onto PS-Fc. After the fabrication of the immunosensor, tetrahydrofuran (THF) was dropped to dissolve PS and release the contained Fc for the following stripping voltammetric detection. PS-Fc as a new electrochemical label prevented the leakage of Fc and greatly amplified the immunosensor signal. In addition, the good biocompatibility of PS could maintain the bioactivity of the antibodies. The response current was linear to the logarithm of PSA concentration in the range from 0.01 ng mL(-1) to 20 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 1 pg mL(-1). The immunosensor results were validated through the detection of PSA in serum samples with satisfactory results.

  7. ⁶⁴Cu-labeled inhibitors of prostate-specific membrane antigen for PET imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Foss, Catherine A; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Ferdani, Riccardo; Anderson, Carolyn J; Mease, Ronnie C; Pomper, Martin G

    2014-03-27

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-recognized target for identification and therapy of a variety of cancers. Here we report five (64)Cu-labeled inhibitors of PSMA, [(64)Cu]3-7, which are based on the lysine-glutamate urea scaffold and utilize a variety of macrocyclic chelators, namely NOTA(3), PCTA(4), Oxo-DO3A(5), CB-TE2A(6), and DOTA(7), in an effort to determine which provides the most suitable pharmacokinetics for in vivo PET imaging. [(64)Cu]3-7 were prepared in high radiochemical yield (60-90%) and purity (>95%). Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies of [(64)Cu]3-7 revealed specific accumulation in PSMA-expressing xenografts (PSMA+ PC3 PIP) relative to isogenic control tumor (PSMA- PC3 flu) and background tissue. The favorable kinetics and high image contrast provided by CB-TE2A chelated [(64)Cu]6 suggest it as the most promising among the candidates tested. That could be due to the higher stability of [(64)Cu]CB-TE2A as compared with [(64)Cu]NOTA, [(64)Cu]PCTA, [(64)Cu]Oxo-DO3A, and [(64)Cu]DOTA chelates in vivo.

  8. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry for a Probe Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Ken; Bluemel, Christina; Weineisen, Martina; Schottelius, Margret; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Czernin, Johannes; Eberlein, Uta; Beykan, Seval; Lapa, Constantin; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Krebs, Markus; Kropf, Saskia; Schirbel, Andreas; Buck, Andreas K.; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. EuK-Subkff-68Ga-DOTAGA (68Ga-PSMA Imaging & Therapy [PSMA I&T]) is a recently introduced PET tracer for imaging PSMA expression in vivo. Whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of this new probe were evaluated. Methods Five patients with a history of prostate cancer were injected intravenously with 91–148 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T (mean ± SD, 128 ± 23 MBq). After an initial series of rapid whole-body scans, 3 static whole-body scans were acquired at 1, 2, and 4 h after tracer injection. Time-dependent changes of the injected activity per organ were determined. Mean organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. Results Injection of 150 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T resulted in an effective dose of 3.0 mSv. The kidneys were the critical organ (33 mGy), followed by the urinary bladder wall and spleen (10 mGy each), salivary glands (9 mGy each), and liver (7 mGy). Conclusion 68Ga-PSMA I&T exhibits a favorable dosimetry, delivering organ doses that are comparable to (kidneys) or lower than those delivered by 18F-FDG. PMID:25883128

  9. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of prostate-specific antigen by using antibodies anchored on a DNA nanostructural scaffold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Guobao; Song, Ping; Wang, Jingjing; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2014-08-01

    The high occurrence of prostate cancer in men makes the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test really important. More importantly, the recurrence rate after radical prostatectomy is high, whereas the traditional PSA immunoassay does not possess the sufficient high sensitivity for post-treatment PSA detection. In these assays, uncontrolled and random orientation of capture antibodies on the surface largely reduces their activity. Here, by exploiting the rapidly emerging DNA nanotechnology, we developed a DNA nanostructure based scaffold to precisely control the assembly of antibody monolayer. We demonstrated that the detection sensitivity was critically dependent on the nanoscale-spacing (nanospacing) of immobilized antibodies. In addition to the controlled assembly, we further amplified the sensing signal by using the gold nanoparticles, resulting in extremely high sensitivity and a low detection limit of 1 pg/mL. To test the real-world applicability of our nanoengineered electrochemical sensor, we evaluated the performance with 11 patients' serum samples and obtained consistent results with the "gold-standard" assays.

  10. Arraying prostate specific antigen PSA and Fab anti-PSA using light-assisted molecular immobilization technology

    PubMed Central

    Parracino, Antonietta; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; di Gennaro, Ane Kold; Pettersson, Kim; Lövgren, Timo; Petersen, Steffen B

    2010-01-01

    We here report for the first time the creation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and Fab anti-PSA biosensor arrays using UV light-assisted molecular immobilization (LAMI), aiming at the detection and quantification of PSA, a cancer marker. The technology involves formation of free, reactive thiol groups upon UV excitation of protein aromatic residues located in spatial proximity of disulphide bridges, a conserved structural feature in both PSA and Fab molecules. The created thiol groups bind onto thiol reactive surfaces leading to oriented covalent protein immobilization. Protein activity was confirmed carrying out immunoassays: immobilized PSA was recognized by Fab anti-PSA in solution and immobilized Fab anti-PSA cross-reacted with PSA in solution. LAMI technology proved successful in immobilizing biomedically relevant molecules while preserving their activity, highlighting that insight into how light interacts with biomolecules may lead to new biophotonic technologies. Our work focused on the application of our new engineering principles to the design, analysis, construction, and manipulation of biological systems, and on the discovery and application of new engineering principles inspired by the properties of biological systems. PMID:20665692

  11. Microfluidic chip-based nanoelectrode array as miniaturized biochemical sensing platform for prostate-specific antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Triroj, Napat; Jaroenapibal, Papot; Shi, Haibin; Yeh, Joanne I; Beresford, Roderic

    2011-02-15

    A microfluidic biosensor chip with an embedded three-electrode configuration is developed for the study of the voltammetric response of a nanoelectrode array with controlled inter-electrode distance in a nanoliter-scale sample volume. The on-chip three-electrode cell consists of a 5 × 5 array of Au working nanoelectrodes with radii between 60 and 120 nm, a Cl(2)-plasma-treated Ag/AgCl reference electrode, and a Au counter electrode. The nanoelectrode array is fabricated by creating high-aspect-ratio pores through an alumina insulating layer using an I(2) gas-assisted focused-ion-beam (FIB) milling, ion beam sculpting, and electrodeposition of Au. The glass substrate with the electrode pattern is assembled with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel slab giving a volume of 180 nL for each channel. Cyclic voltammetry calibration with a standard redox species exhibits a significant increase of current density by two orders of magnitude compared to that obtained from a microelectrode. On-chip functionalization of the nanoelectrodes with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) biosensor complex and detection of PSA based on a competitive immunoassay method are performed. The detection limit is approximately 10 pg/mL (∼270 fM), which corresponds to roughly 30,000 copies of PSA in the microchannel test volume.

  12. Influence of dioxin exposure upon levels of prostate-specific antigen and steroid hormones in Vietnamese men.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian Liang; Kido, Teruhiko; Honma, Seijiro; Okamoto, Rie; Manh, Ho Dung; Maruzeni, Shoko; Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nakano, Takeshi; Koh, Eitetsu; Takasuga, Takumi; Nhu, Dang Duc; Hung, Nguyen Ngoc; Son, Le Ke

    2016-04-01

    Most studies on the relationship between Agent Orange and prostate cancer have focused on US veterans of the Vietnam War. There have been few studies focusing on the relationship between levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and dioxins or steroid hormones in Vietnamese men. In 2009-2011, we collected blood samples from 97 men who had resided in a "dioxin hotspot" and 85 men from a non-sprayed region in Vietnam. Then levels of PSA, dioxins, and steroid hormones were analyzed. Levels of most dioxins, furans, and non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls were higher in the hotspot than those in the non-sprayed region. Levels of testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and estradiol differed significantly between the hotspot and the non-sprayed region, but there were no correlations between levels of PSA and steroid hormones and dioxins in either of the two regions. Our findings suggest that PSA levels in Vietnamese men are not associated with levels of dioxin or steroid hormones in these two regions. PMID:26758301

  13. A Remote Arene-Binding Site on Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Revealed by Antibody-Recruiting Small Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Andrew X.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Barinka, Cyril; Michel, Julien; Cocleaza, Alexandra; Jorgensen, William L.; Lubkowski, Jacek; Spiegel, David A.

    2010-09-27

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a membrane-bound glutamate carboxypeptidase overexpressed in many forms of prostate cancer. Our laboratory has recently disclosed a class of small molecules, called ARM-Ps (antibody-recruiting molecule targeting prostate cancer) that are capable of enhancing antibody-mediated immune recognition of prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, during the course of these studies, we found ARM-Ps to exhibit extraordinarily high potencies toward PSMA, compared to previously reported inhibitors. Here, we report in-depth biochemical, crystallographic, and computational investigations which elucidate the origin of the observed affinity enhancement. These studies reveal a previously unreported arene-binding site on PSMA, which we believe participates in an aromatic stacking interaction with ARMs. Although this site is composed of only a few amino acid residues, it drastically enhances small molecule binding affinity. These results provide critical insights into the design of PSMA-targeted small molecules for prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment; more broadly, the presence of similar arene-binding sites throughout the proteome could prove widely enabling in the optimization of small molecule-protein interactions.

  14. Ethnic differences and predictors of colonoscopy, prostate-specific antigen, and mammography screening participation in the multiethnic cohort

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Brook E.; Little, Melissa A.; Woekel, Erica D.; Ettienne, Reynolette; Long, Camonia R.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Maskarinec, Gertraud

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Given the relation between screening and improved cancer outcomes and the persistence of ethnic disparities in cancer mortality, we explored ethnic differences in colonoscopy, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and mammography screening in the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Methods Logistic regression was applied to examine the influence of ethnicity as well as demographics, lifestyle factors, comorbidities, family history of cancer, and previous screening history on self-reported screening participation collected in 1999–2002. Results The analysis included 140,398 participants who identified as white, African American, Native Hawaiian, Japanese American, US born-Latino, or Mexican born-Latino. The screening prevalences overall were mammography: 88% of women, PSA: 45% of men, and colonoscopy: 35% of men and women. All minority groups reported 10–40% lower screening utilization than whites, but Mexican-born Latinos and Native Hawaiian were lowest. Men were nearly twice as likely to have a colonoscopy (OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.89–1.99) as women. A personal screening history, presence of comorbidities, and family history of cancer predicted higher screening utilization across modalities, but to different degrees across ethnic groups. Conclusions This study confirms previously reported sex differences in colorectal cancer screening and ethnic disparities in screening participation. The findings suggest it may be useful to include personal screening history and family history of cancer into counseling patients about screening participation. PMID:24667037

  15. Evaluation of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) membrane test assays for the forensic identification of seminal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Rudin, O; Gehrig, C; Borer, U; Thali, M; Dirnhofer, R

    1999-09-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA, also known as p30), a glycoprotein produced by the prostatic gland and secreted into seminal plasma, is a marker used for demonstrating the presence of seminal fluid. Methods for the detection of PSA include Ouchterlony double diffusion, crossover electrophoresis, rocket immuno-electrophoresis, radial immunodiffusion, and ELISA. The extremely sensitive ELISA technique can detect PSA in concentrations as low as approximately 4 ng/mL. However, all these techniques are cumbersome and time consuming to perform in forensic laboratories, especially when only a few samples per week are processed. Various membrane tests are currently used in clinical settings to screen a patient's serum for the presence of PSA at levels greater than 4 ng/mL. In this study we evaluated three immunochromatographic PSA membrane tests by analyzing semen stains stored at room temperature for up to 30 years, post-coital vaginal swabs taken at different time after intercourse, semen-free vaginal swabs, and various female and male body fluids, including urine. The data demonstrate that PSA membrane test assays offer the same sensitivity as ELISA-based tests and provide a rapid approach for the forensic identification of seminal fluid. Furthermore, when the supernatant from a DNA extraction is used for the assay, there is essentially no DNA consumption for determining the presence of PSA in a forensic sample.

  16. A microfluidic immunoassay platform for the detection of free prostate specific antigen: a systematic and quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Madaboosi, Narayanan; Soares, Ruben R G; Chu, Virginia; Conde, João Pedro

    2015-07-01

    As a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men globally, prostate cancer (PCa) demands immense attention for theranostic purposes. There is an increasing need for the development of rapid, sensitive, economical, miniaturized and multiplexable assays. Towards this goal, we present a systematic approach for the optimisation of a microfluidic sandwich immunoassay, which can be applied as a generic biosensor platform for PCa detection. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was used as the model biomarker, and its free form was captured using commercially available antibodies and detected using chemiluminescence, both in spiked buffer and matrix solutions. Along with the optimisation of surface chemistry and microfluidic parameters, we report a bio-affinity amplification strategy based on biotin-streptavidin chemistry to bring the limits of detection for free-PSA from 21.4 ng mL(-1) down to 2.7 ng mL(-1), within the clinically relevant range. An estimate of the surface coverage and simulations of the interactions taking place in the microfluidic biosensor during the assay are also presented. This novel platform using a simple passive adsorption-based bio-affinity strategy, when coupled with multiplexing and integrated detection, can serve as a promising point-of-care diagnostic tool for PCa. PMID:25988197

  17. Is Serum Prostate-specific Antigen a Diagnostic Marker for Benign and Malignant Breast Tumors in Women?

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Hasan Emami; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Abdollahi, Alireza; Shoar, Saeed; Omranipour, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a marker of prostate gland malignancy, which has been considered in cases with breast cancer in recent years. The goal of this study was to determine total and free PSA levels in cases with malignant and benign breast lesions. Methods: In this case–control study, ninety women with histological proved malignant breast masses and 90 with benign breast masses were enrolled. Total and free PSA levels along with Histological grade and conditions of vascular and perinural invasion, status of hormonal tumor receptors, immune-histo-chemistry markers recorded for all cases. Total and free PSA levels were assessed after treatment in cases with malignant masses. Results: Total and free PSA levels were significantly higher in cases with malignant masses. The best cut-off point for total PSA to differentiate benign and malignant masses was 0.31 with sensitivity and specificity of 100%, 100% (area under the curve [AUC] =1, P < 0.001) and the best cut-off point for free PSA to differentiate benign and malignant masses was 0.19 with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 100% (AUC = 1, P < 0.001). After treatment, mean free PSA level was significantly lower than free PSA before treatment (0.23 ± 0.1 vs. 0.3 ± 0.08, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Serum PSA level could be applied for differentiating benign and malignant breast masses. PMID:25789147

  18. Correlation of the osteoblastic phenotype with prostate-specific antigen expression in metastatic prostate cancer: implications for paracrine growth.

    PubMed

    Doherty, A; Smith, G; Banks, L; Christmas, T; Epstein, R J

    1999-07-01

    The characteristic sclerotic appearance of bone metastases from prostate cancer is unexplained but could involve excess peritumoural activity of osteoblast mitogens such as the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs). Since prostatic metastases are distinguished by androgen-dependent secretion of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a serine protease which cleaves extracellular IGF-binding proteins and thereby enhances the bioavailability of IGFs, the relationship was examined between tumour PSA expression and the osteoblastic phenotype. To this end, a cohort of 27 prostate cancer patients was evaluated to determine the relationship between serum PSA and radiographic bone lesion density at first presentation with metastatic disease. No linear correlation between absolute PSA levels and metastatic osteosclerosis was apparent. However, non-parametric statistical analysis revealed a highly significant link between low-PSA (<20 ng/ml) metastatic prostate cancer and osteolytic bone lesions (p<0.0001, chi(2)=21.5). This finding raises the possibility that the osteoblastic phenotype of prostate cancer derives in part from PSA-dependent proteolysis of IGF-binding proteins within bone matrix.

  19. Use of selenium-silymarin mix reduces lower urinary tract symptoms and prostate specific antigen in men.

    PubMed

    Vostalova, Jitka; Vidlar, Ales; Ulrichova, Jitka; Vrbkova, Jana; Simanek, Vilim; Student, Vladimir

    2013-12-15

    The aim of this double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial was to assess the effects of a combination of selenium and silymarin in men with lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia and a prostate specific antigen (PSA) ≤2.5ng/ml. The volunteers were randomized to two groups: the first one (n=26) received 240μg selenium (in the form of yeast l-selenomethionine) plus 570mg silymarin daily for 6 months and the second (n=29) received placebo. Outcome measures were changes in the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), bladder volume (V), urinary flow rate, ultrasound estimated postvoid residual urine volume (RV), serum PSA, testosterone and selenium levels, safety clinical biochemistry, hematology and oxidative stress parameters at baseline and on day 180. The results showed statistically significant differences (p<0.05) between treatment and control groups for the following parameters: IPSS score, urodynamic parameters: maximal rate of urine flow (Qmax), average flow (Qave), V and RV, total PSA value and serum selenium levels. There was a significant reduction in PSA in the selenium-silymarin group but no effect on blood testosterone level. Overall the treatment was well-tolerated with no adverse effects.

  20. Current Status of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Targeting in Nuclear Medicine: Clinical Translation of Chelator Containing Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligands Into Diagnostics and Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, Clemens; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Kopka, Klaus; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L

    2016-09-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by approximately 90% of prostate carcinomas. The expression correlates with unfavorable prognostic factors, such as a high Gleason score, infiltrative growth, metastasis, and hormone-independence. The high specificity, especially in the undifferentiated stage, makes it an excellent target for diagnosis and therapy. Therefore, antibodies and small molecule inhibitors have been developed for imaging and therapy. In 2011 PSMA-11, a ligand that consists of the Glu-urea-motif and the chelator HBED-CC, which can be exclusively radiolabeled with (68)Ga for PET imaging, presented the clinical breakthrough for prostate cancer diagnostics. In two large diagnostic studies (n = 319 and n = 248) PET/CT with PSMA-11 successfully localized the recurrent tumor in approximately 90% of patients with biochemical relapse. Integrating PSMA-PET/CT into the planning phase of radiotherapy, the treatment concept is changed in 30%-50% of the patients. The combination of the Glu-urea-motif with DOTA, which can be labeled with several diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides, opened new avenues for therapeutic usage of the small-molecule PSMA ligands. In the beginning of 2016, there are four confirmative reports (n = 19, n = 24, n = 30, and n = 56) from four different centers reporting a PSA response in approximately 70% of patients treated with (177)Lu-labeled PSMA ligands. In conclusion, the data available up to now indicate a widespread use of PSMA ligands for diagnostic applications with respect to staging, detection of recurrence, or metastases in patients with rising tumor markers and for therapy in case of failure of guideline-compliant treatment. PMID:27553466

  1. Quality-of-life effects of prostate-specific antigen screening

    PubMed Central

    Heijnsdijk, EAM; Wever, EM; Auvinen, A; Hugosson, J; Ciatto, S; Nelen, V; Kwiatkowski, M; Villers, A; Páez, A; Moss, SM; Zappa, M; Tammela, TLJ; Mäkinen, T; Carlsson, S; Korfage, IJ; Essink-Bot, ML; Otto, SJ; Draisma, G; Bangma, CH; Roobol, MJ; Schröder, FH; de Koning, HJ

    2016-01-01

    Background The European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) reported a 29% prostate cancer mortality reduction among screened men after 11 years. However, it is uncertain to what extent harms from overdiagnosis and treatment on quality of life counterbalance this benefit. Methods Based on ERSPC follow-up data, we used micro-simulation modeling (MISCAN) to predict the number of prostate cancers, treatments, deaths and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained following the introduction of screening. Various screening strategies, efficacies, and quality of life assumptions were modeled. Results Per 1,000 men of all ages followed for their entire lifespan we predicted for annual screening from age 55–69 years: 9 fewer deaths due to prostate cancer (28% reduction), 14 fewer men receiving palliative therapy (35% reduction), and 73 life-years gained (average 8.4 years per prostate cancer death avoided). QALYs gained were 56 (range: −21, 97), a reduction of 23% from unadjusted life-years gained. The number needed to screen (NNS) was 98 and number needed to detect (NND) 5. Also inviting men aged 70–74 resulted in more life-years (82) but similar QALYs (56). Conclusions Although NNS and NND are more favorable than previously calculated, the benefit of PSA screening is diminished by loss of QALYs, that is dependent primarily on post-diagnosis long-term effects. Longer follow-up data from both the ERSPC and quality of life are essential before making universal recommendations regarding screening. PMID:22894572

  2. Prostate cancer nodal oligometastasis accurately assessed using prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography and confirmed histologically following robotic-assisted lymph node dissection

    PubMed Central

    O’Kane, Dermot B.; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M.

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of a 76-year-old gentleman, where prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PSMA PET-CT) was used to accurately detect prostate cancer (PCa), pelvic lymph node (LN) metastasis in the setting of biochemical recurrence following definitive treatment for PCa. The positive PSMA PET-CT result was confirmed with histological examination of the involved pelvic LNs following pelvic LN dissection. PMID:27141207

  3. PET imaging of prostate-specific membrane antigen in prostate cancer: current state of the art and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, SP; Gorin, MA; Allaf, ME; Pienta, KJ; Tran, PT; Pomper, MG; Ross, AE; Cho, SY

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a cell surface enzyme that is highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) and is currently being extensively explored as a promising target for molecular imaging in a variety of clinical contexts. Novel antibody and small-molecule PSMA radiotracers labeled with a variety of radionuclides for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging applications have been developed and explored in recent studies. METHODS A great deal of progress has been made in defining the clinical utility of this class of PET agents through predominantly small and retrospective clinical studies. The most compelling data to date has been in the setting of biochemically recurrent PCa, where PSMA-targeted radiotracers have been found to be superior to conventional imaging and other molecular imaging agents for the detection of locally recurrent and metastatic PCa. RESULTS Early data, however, suggest that initial lymph node staging before definitive therapy in high-risk primary PCa patients may be limited, although intraoperative guidance may still hold promise. Other examples of potential promising applications for PSMA PET imaging include non-invasive characterization of primary PCa, staging and treatment planning for PSMA-targeted radiotherapeutics, and guidance of focal therapy for oligometastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS However, all of these indications and applications for PCa PSMA PET imaging are still lacking and require large, prospective, systematic clinical trials for validation. Such validation trials are needed and hopefully will be forthcoming as the fields of molecular imaging, urology, radiation oncology and medical oncology continue to define and refine the utility of PSMA-targeted PET imaging to improve the management of PCa patients. PMID:27136743

  4. Infectious mononucleosis, other infections and prostate-specific antigen concentration as a marker of prostate involvement during infection.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Nevin, Remington L; Pakpahan, Ratna; Elliott, Debra J; Langston, Marvin E; De Marzo, Angelo M; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Isaacs, William B; Nelson, William G; Sokoll, Lori J; Walsh, Patrick C; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Cersovsky, Steven B; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Although Epstein-Barr virus has been detected in prostate tissue, no associations have been observed with prostate cancer in the few studies conducted to date. One possible reason for these null findings may be use of cumulative exposure measures that do not inform the timing of infection, i.e., childhood versus adolescence/early adulthood when infection is more likely to manifest as infectious mononucleosis (IM). We sought to determine the influence of young adult-onset IM on the prostate by measuring prostate-specific antigen (PSA) as a marker of prostate inflammation/damage among U.S. military members. We defined IM cases as men diagnosed with IM from 1998 to 2003 (n = 55) and controls as men without an IM diagnosis (n = 255). We selected two archived serum specimens for each participant, the first collected after diagnosis for cases and one randomly selected from 1998 to 2003 for controls (index), as well as the preceding specimen (preindex). PSA was measured in each specimen. To explore the specificity of our findings for prostate as opposed to systemic inflammation, we performed a post hoc comparison of other infectious disease cases without genitourinary involvement (n = 90) and controls (n = 220). We found that IM cases were more likely to have a large PSA rise than controls (≥ 20 ng/mL: 19.7% versus 8.8%, p = 0.027; ≥ 40% rise: 25.7% versus 9.4%, p = 0.0021), as were other infectious disease cases (25.7% versus 14.0%, p = 0.020; 27.7% versus 18.0%, p = 0.092). These findings suggest that, in addition to rising because of prostate infection, PSA may also rise because of systemic inflammation, which could have implications for PSA interpretation in older men.

  5. Outcome After Conformal Salvage Radiotherapy in Patients With Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Riegel, Martina G.; Thamm, Reinhard; Astner, Sabrina T.; Lewerenz, Carolin; Zimmermann, Frank; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to improve our understanding of the role of salvage radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse after radical prostatectomy with regard to biochemical control, rate of distant metastasis, and survival. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 96 men treated with conformal prostate bed SRT (median, 64.8 Gy) at a single institution (median follow-up, 70 months). The majority had intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Fifty-four percent underwent a resection with positive margins (R1 resection). The median time interval between surgery and SRT was 22 months. Results: After SRT, 66% of patients reached a PSA nadir of less than 0.2 ng/mL. However, the 5-year biochemical no evidence of disease rate was 35%. Seminal vesicle involvement was predictive for a significantly lower biochemical no evidence of disease rate. All patients with a preoperative PSA level greater than 50 ng/mL relapsed biochemically within 2 years. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 18%, the 5-year prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 90%, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 88%. Significantly more distant metastases developed in patients with a PSA nadir greater than 0.05 ng/mL after SRT, and they had significantly inferior prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates. Resection status (R1 vs. R0) was not predictive for any of the endpoints. Conclusions: Men with postoperative PSA relapse can undergo salvage treatment by prostate bed radiotherapy, but durable PSA control is maintained only in about one-third of the patients. Despite a high biochemical failure rate after SRT, prostate cancer-specific survival does not decrease rapidly.

  6. Salvage Radiotherapy for Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: Dose-Response Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Johnny Ray; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Ko, Stephen J.; Macdonald, Orlan K.; Schild, Steven E.; Pisansky, Thomas M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose and biochemical failure (BcF) of prostate cancer in patients who received salvage prostate bed EBRT for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with a rising PSA level after prostatectomy who received salvage EBRT between July 1987 and October 2007. Patients receiving pre-EBRT androgen suppression were excluded. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the association between EBRT dose and BcF. Dose was considered as a numeric variable and as a categoric variable (low, <64.8 Gy; moderate, 64.8-66.6 Gy; high, >66.6 Gy). Results: A total of 364 men met study selection criteria and were followed up for a median of 6.0 years (range, 0.1-19.3 years). Median pre-EBRT PSA level was 0.6 ng/mL. The estimated cumulative rate of BcF at 5 years after EBRT was 50% overall and 57%, 46%, and 39% for the low-, moderate-, and high-dose groups, respectively. In multivariable analysis adjusting for potentially confounding variables, there was evidence of a linear trend between dose and BcF, with risk of BcF decreasing as dose increased (relative risk [RR], 0.77 [5.0-Gy increase]; p = 0.05). Compared with the low-dose group, there was evidence of a decreased risk of BcF for the high-dose group (RR, 0.60; p = 0.04), but no difference for the moderate-dose group (RR, 0.85; p = 0.41). Conclusions: Our results suggest a dose response for salvage EBRT. Doses higher than 66.6 Gy result in decreased risk of BcF.

  7. Prostate-specific Antigen Density Variation Rate as a Potential Guideline Parameter for Second Prostate Cancer Detection Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gan-Sheng; Lyv, Jin-Xing; Li, Gang; Yan, Chun-Yin; Hou, Jian-Quan; Pu, Jin-Xian; Ding, Xiang; Huang, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic value of current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests is challenged by the poor detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) in repeat prostate biopsy. In this study, we proposed a novel PSA-related parameter named PSA density variation rate (PSADVR) and designed a clinical trial to evaluate its potential diagnostic value for detecting PCa on a second prostate biopsy. Methods: Data from 184 males who underwent second ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy 6 months after the first biopsy were included in the study. The subjects were divided into PCa and non-PCa groups according to the second biopsy pathological results. Prostate volume, PSA density (PSAD), free-total PSA ratio, and PSADVR were calculated according to corresponding formulas at the second biopsy. These parameters were compared using t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test between PCa and non-PCa groups, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate their predictability on PCa detection. Results: PCa was detected in 24 patients on the second biopsy. Mean values of PSA, PSAD, and PSADVR were greater in the PCa group than in the non-PCa group (8.39 μg/L vs. 7.16 μg/L, 0.20 vs. 0.16, 14.15% vs. −1.36%, respectively). PSADVR had the largest area under the curve, with 0.667 sensitivity and 0.824 specificity when the cutoff was 10%. The PCa detection rate was significantly greater in subjects with PSADVR >10% than PSADVR ≤10% (28.6% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.001). In addition, PSADVR was the only parameter in this study that showed a significant correlation with mid-to-high-risk PCa (r = 0.63, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that PSADVR improved the PCa detection rate on second biopsies, especially for mid-to-high-risk cancers requiring prompt treatment. PMID:27453228

  8. Twitter Response to the United States Preventive Services Task Force Recommendations against Screening with Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Vinay; Lee, Ted; Loeb, Stacy; Holmes, John H.; Gold, Heather T.; Lepor, Herbert; Penson, David F.; Makarov, Danil V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine public and media response to the United States Preventive Services Task Force’s (USPSTF) draft (October 2011) and finalized (May 2012) recommendations against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing using Twitter, a popular social network with over 200 million active users. Materials and Methods We used a mixed methods design to analyze posts on Twitter, called “tweets.” Using the search term “prostate cancer,” we archived tweets in the 24 hour periods following the release of the USPSTF draft and finalized recommendations. We recorded tweet rate per hour and developed a coding system to assess type of user and sentiment expressed in tweets and linked articles. Results After the draft and finalized recommendations, 2042 and 5357 tweets focused on the USPSTF report, respectively. Tweet rate nearly doubled within two hours of both announcements. Fewer than 10% of tweets expressed an opinion about screening, and the majority of these were pro-screening during both periods. In contrast, anti-screening articles were tweeted more frequently in both draft and finalized study periods. From the draft to the finalized recommendations, the proportion of anti-screening tweets and anti-screening article links increased (p = 0.03 and p<0.01, respectively). Conclusions There was increased Twitter activity surrounding the USPSTF draft and finalized recommendations. The percentage of anti-screening tweets and articles appeared to increase, perhaps due to the interval public comment period. Despite this, most tweets did not express an opinion, suggesting a missed opportunity in this important arena for advocacy. PMID:24661474

  9. A prostate-specific antigen-dependent fusion polypeptide inhibits growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Ma, Yueyun; Wei, Hua; Li, Bin; Xiao, Fengjing; Yang, Jing; Yue, Qiaohong; Yang, Angang; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide APP8 is a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-activated prodrug that was designed to synergize the effects of the Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3) peptide, K237 and the DG2 peptide. The aim of this study is to evaluate its biodistribution and anticancer effect in vitro and in vivo. In this study, APP8 and each component peptide were synthesized. The biodistribution was identified using con-focal microscopyin both PSA+ cell line and PSA- cell line in vitro. Then cell cycle, MTT and in-cell western blot were accessed to analyze the effect mechanisms. Finally, xenografts were used to confirm the anticancer effect in vivo. Here, it was shown that APP8 was hydrolyzed and BH3 was released into the nucleus, while K237 and DG2 were located predominantly in the cytoplasm, only in LNCaP cells (PSA+), but not PC3 cells (PSA-). K237 and DG2 could induce cell apoptosis through decreasing the phosphorylation of ERK-2 and Flk-1. APP8 also caused the death of LNCaP cells, and was predominantly dependent on BH3 in vitro. In addition, It was noted that as the tumor grew in vivo, APP8 could inhibit the tumor volume to 77.3%, mainly depending on K237 and DG2 via inhibition of the growth of vascular endothelial cells. Our results suggested that APP8 could promote prostate cancer cell death and stop prostate cancer growth via synergizing apoptosis induction of tumor cell and inhibition of the growth of vascular endothelial cells. It provides a novel candidate prodrug for specific therapy of prostate cancer. PMID:27293998

  10. Impact of capillary conditioning and background electrolyte composition on capillary electrophoresis analysis of prostate specific antigen isoforms.

    PubMed

    Farina-Gomez, Noemi; Puerta, Angel; Gonzalez, Monica; Diez-Masa, Jose Carlos; de Frutos, Mercedes

    2016-04-22

    Glycoproteins expressed in the human body can experience modifications as result of pathological situations. Detection of those changes can be useful as disease biomarkers. As a result of these modifications, size and/or electrical charge of the glycoprotein can be altered. Migration in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) is governed by the size to charge ratio of the analyte and therefore this separation technique can be used to monitor those modifications. At its turn, the alteration of the electrophoretical pattern of a given glycoprotein could be used as disease biomarker. To this aim, high repeatability for separation of a large number of peaks for a given glycoprotein is desirable. For prostate cancer, new markers are needed to decrease the high number of false positive results provided by the biomarkers currently used in clinics. In this sense, CZE methods for analysis of the several prostate specific antigen (PSA) peaks which this glycoprotein exhibit, called isoforms and containing one or more glycoforms, could be useful to study the PSA pattern as prostate cancer marker. In this study two complementary strategies to achieve both lot-to-lot capillary repeatability and high resolution of a large number of PSA isoforms are developed. Better performance and precision have been obtained for capillaries conditioned with HCl than for those conditioned with NaOH. Optimization of the background electrolyte (BGE) pH value to 8.0 and inclusion of 3M urea on its composition were the two factors of highest impact for enhancing resolution of the highest number of PSA peaks. Under the optimized conditions for capillary conditioning and BGE pH and composition, long-term resolution of 10 isoforms of PSA was achieved. Inter-day (n=3) %RSD was 0.55 for the ratio tm/tEOF, 1.15 for μeff, and 5.02 for % Acorr of the PSA peaks. PMID:27018191

  11. The high prevalence of undiagnosed prostate cancer at autopsy: implications for epidemiology and treatment of prostate cancer in the Prostate-specific Antigen-era.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Jaquelyn L; Giovannucci, Edward L; Stampfer, Meir J

    2015-12-15

    Widespread prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening detects many cancers that would have otherwise gone undiagnosed. To estimate the prevalence of unsuspected prostate cancer, we reviewed 19 studies of prostate cancer discovered at autopsy among 6,024 men. Among men aged 70-79, tumor was found in 36% of Caucasians and 51% of African-Americans. This enormous prevalence, coupled with the high sensitivity of PSA screening, has led to the marked increase in the apparent incidence of prostate cancer. The impact of PSA screening on clinical practice is well-recognized, but its effect on epidemiologic research is less appreciated. Before screening, a larger proportion of incident prostate cancers had lethal potential and were diagnosed at advanced stage. However, in the PSA era, overall incident prostate cancer mainly is indolent disease, and often reflects the propensity to be screened and biopsied. Studies must therefore focus on cancers with lethal potential, and include long follow-up to accommodate the lead time induced by screening. Moreover, risk factor patterns differ markedly for potentially lethal and indolent disease, suggesting separate etiologies and distinct disease entities. Studies of total incident or indolent prostate cancer are of limited clinical utility, and the main focus of research should be on prostate cancers of lethal potential.

  12. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Ma, M; Nan, X; Sheng, B

    2016-07-11

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC)] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on self-report including demographics, weight, height, and WC (>90 cm=obese). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and prostate volume (PV) were assessed clinically. Patients were grouped by BMI (normal=22.9, overweight=23-27.4, obese≥27.5 kg/m2). PSA parameters of density (PSAD), PSA serum level, and PSA increasing rate per year (PSAR) were calculated per BMI and age groups (30-40, 41-59, 60-85 years). Obesity indicators (BMI and WC) and PSA parameter relationships were modeled by age-stratified linear regression. Of 35,632 Chinese men surveyed, 13,084 were analyzed, including 13.44% obese, 57.44% overweight, and 29.12% normal weight, according to BMI; 25.84% were centrally (abdominally) obese according to WC. BMI and WC were negatively associated with all PSA parameters, except PSAD and PSAR [P<0.05, BMI: β=-0.081 (95%CI=-0.055 to -0.036), WC: β=-0.101 (-0.021 to -0.015)], and independent of FBG and PV (P<0.05) in an age-adjusted model. In conclusion, obesity was associated with lower PSA in Chinese men. Therefore, an individual's BMI and WC should be considered when PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer. PMID:27409334

  13. Obesity inversely correlates with prostate-specific antigen levels in a population with normal screening results of prostate cancer in northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Ma, M.; Nan, X.; Sheng, B.

    2016-01-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a diagnostic biomarker of prostate cancer and is possibly associated with obesity. This study aimed to explore the relationships between obesity indicators [body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC)] with PSA in Chinese men. A cross-sectional study of men aged 30-85 years undergoing prostate cancer screening was conducted from August 2008 to July 2013 in Xi'an, China. Data were obtained from clinical reports, condition was recorded based on self-report including demographics, weight, height, and WC (>90 cm=obese). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and prostate volume (PV) were assessed clinically. Patients were grouped by BMI (normal=22.9, overweight=23-27.4, obese≥27.5 kg/m2). PSA parameters of density (PSAD), PSA serum level, and PSA increasing rate per year (PSAR) were calculated per BMI and age groups (30-40, 41-59, 60-85 years). Obesity indicators (BMI and WC) and PSA parameter relationships were modeled by age-stratified linear regression. Of 35,632 Chinese men surveyed, 13,084 were analyzed, including 13.44% obese, 57.44% overweight, and 29.12% normal weight, according to BMI; 25.84% were centrally (abdominally) obese according to WC. BMI and WC were negatively associated with all PSA parameters, except PSAD and PSAR [P<0.05, BMI: β=-0.081 (95%CI=-0.055 to -0.036), WC: β=-0.101 (-0.021 to -0.015)], and independent of FBG and PV (P<0.05) in an age-adjusted model. In conclusion, obesity was associated with lower PSA in Chinese men. Therefore, an individual's BMI and WC should be considered when PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer. PMID:27409334

  14. Biochemical failure and the temporal kinetics of prostate-specific antigen after radiation therapy with androgen deprivation

    SciTech Connect

    Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Pollack, Alan . E-mail: alan.pollack@fccc.edu

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: The accuracy of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology consensus definition of biochemical failure (BF) after radiation therapy (RT) and androgen deprivation (AD) has been questioned, because posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels typically rise after release from AD, and misclassification of BF may be made. The temporal kinetics of posttreatment PSA levels was examined to define the error in the classification of BF. Methods and Materials: Between December 1, 1991 and April 30, 1998, 688 men with T1c-T3 NX/0 M0 prostate cancer received three-dimensional conformal RT alone (n = 586) or in combination with either short-term (STAD: 3 to 12 months, n = 82) or long-term (LTAD: 12 to 36 months, n = 20) AD. Follow-up, calculated from the end of all treatment, was {>=}48 months. The mean posttreatment PSA was calculated in 3-month intervals. Results: The median posttreatment clinical follow-up period was 76 months (range, 48-152 months). The posttreatment PSA values from the end of all treatment for the RT+STAD-BF group showed an initial period of rise followed by a period of decline at 30 months and then a continued rise again. The decline in the mean posttreatment PSA is explained in part by stabilization in PSA level after 3 consecutive rises. Nonbiochemical failures (NBF) after RT+STAD had a relatively constant mean PSA over time of approximately 0.5 ng/mL. Unlike the RT+STAD-NBF profile, the RT+LTAD-NBF profile rose continuously and steadily to a level approaching 1 ng/mL. The RT+LTAD-BF profile rose continuously but at a slower rate over time. Nine RT+STAD-NBF patients (22%) and 2 RT+LTAD-BF (29%) patients experienced 3 consecutive rises followed by a subsequent decline and stabilization of PSA compared to 10 RT-BF patients (5%). Redistributing these misclassified patients to their respective NBF groups changed the mean posttreatment PSA profiles as follows: The RT+LTAD-BF profile rose constantly and steadily with a doubling

  15. Preclinical Evaluation of 86Y-Labeled Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Dosimetry Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Foss, Catherine A.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Wang, Yuchuan; Srinivasan, Senthamizhchelvan; Hobbs, Robert F.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C.; Sgouros, George; Pomper, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    86Y (half-life = 14.74 h, 33% β+) is within an emerging class of positron-emitting isotopes with relatively long physical half-lives that enables extended imaging of biologic processes. We report the synthesis and evaluation of 3 low-molecular-weight compounds labeled with 86Y for imaging the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) using PET. Impetus for the study derives from the need to perform dosimetry estimates for the corresponding 90Y-labeled radiotherapeutics. Methods Multistep syntheses were used in preparing 86Y-4–6. PSMA inhibition constants were evaluated by competitive binding assay. In vivo characterization using tumor-bearing male mice was performed by PET/CT for 86Y-4–6 and by biodistribution studies of 86Y-4 and 86Y-6 out to 24 h after injection. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the kinetics for 14 organs in a male baboon using 86Y-6. Results Compounds 86Y-4–6 were obtained in high radiochemical yield and purity, with specific radioactivities of more than 83.92 GBq/µmol. PET imaging and biodistribution studies using PSMA-positive PC-3 PIP and PSMA-negative PC-3 flu tumor-bearing mice revealed that 86Y-4–6 had high site-specific uptake in PSMA-positive PC-3 PIP tumor starting at 20 min after injection and remained high at 24 h. Compound 86Y-6 demonstrated the highest tumor uptake and retention, with 32.17 ± 7.99 and 15.79 ± 6.44 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 5 and 24 h, respectively. Low activity concentrations were associated with blood and normal organs, except for the kidneys, a PSMA-expressing tissue. PET imaging in baboons reveals that all organs have a 2-phase (rapid and slow) clearance, with the highest uptake (8 %ID/g) in the kidneys at 25 min. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate radiation doses using the OLINDA/EXM software. The highest mean absorbed dose was received by the renal cortex, with 1.9 mGy per MBq of 86Y-6. Conclusion Compound 86Y-6 is a promising

  16. Aberrant sialylation of a prostate-specific antigen: Electrochemical label-free glycoprofiling in prostate cancer serum samples.

    PubMed

    Pihikova, Dominika; Kasak, Peter; Kubanikova, Petra; Sokol, Roman; Tkac, Jan

    2016-08-31

    Electrochemical detection method allowing to detect prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker of prostate cancer (PCa), with PSA glycoprofiling was applied in an analysis of PCa serum samples for the first time. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a label-free method with immobilized anti-PSA was applied for PSA detection and lectins to glycoprofile captured PSA on the same surface. A proper choice of blocking agent providing high selectivity of biosensor detection with the immobilized anti-PSA antibody was done. The biosensor could detect PSA down to 100 ag/mL with a linear concentration working range from 100 ag/mL up to 1 μg/mL, i.e. 10 orders of concentration magnitude and the sensitivity of (5.5 ± 0.2)%/decade. The results showed that a commercial carbo-free blocking solution was the best one, reducing non-specific binding 55-fold when compared to the immunosensor surface without any blocking agent applied, while allowing to detect PSA. The biosensor response obtained after addition of lectin (i.e. proportional to the amount of a particular glycan on PSA) divided by the biosensor response obtained after incubation with a sample (i.e. proportional to the PSA level in the sample) was applied to distinguish serum samples of PCa patients from those of healthy individuals. The results showed that Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA) recognizing α-2,3-terminal sialic acid can be applied to distinguish between these two sets of samples since the MAA/PSA response obtained from the analysis of the PCa samples was significantly higher (5.3-fold) compared to the MAA/PSA response obtained by the analysis of samples from healthy individuals. Thus, combined analysis of serological PSA levels together with PSA glycoprofiling of aberrant glycosylation of PSA (i.e. increase in the level of α-2,3-terminal sialic acid) has a potential to improve detection of PCa. PMID:27506346

  17. Comparison of the Effects of Testosterone Gels, Injections, and Pellets on Serum Hormones, Erythrocytosis, Lipids, and Prostate-Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W; Gomez, Lissette P; Scovell, Jason M; Khera, Mohit; Lamb, Dolores J; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Numerous testosterone (T) formulations are available, each with differing effects on serum parameters. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the long-term effects of topical, injectable, and implantable pellet T formulations in hypogonadal men. Methods Retrospective review of hypogonadal men treated with a single T formulation was performed: 47 men on T gels, 57 on injectable T, and 74 on T pellets were identified. Total T (TT), calculated free T (FT), estradiol (E), hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrit (Hct), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), total cholesterol (Tchol), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were evaluated at baseline and every 3–6 months for 3 years. Serum parameters were compared using a mixed model linear regression for repeated measures. Main Outcome Measures Effects of topical, injectable, and pellet T formulations on serum hormone levels, Hgb, Hct, lipid parameters and PSA. Results Men in the injectable T group were younger (42.5 ± 12.3 years) than in the gel (54.1 ± 9.8 years) or pellet groups (53.8 ± 13.0 years), and baseline FT, Hgb, and Hct were higher in the injectable T group than in gel or pellet groups. Increases in TT and FT were observed throughout follow-up in all groups. Increases in E were observed at in all T groups and throughout follow-up in injectable and gel groups. No PSA increases were observed. Erythrocytosis (Hct > 50%) was more common with injectable T (66.7%) than with T gels (12.8%) or pellets (35.1%, P < 0.0001). Transient changes in cholesterol, TG, and LDL were observed, and no significant changes were seen in HDL for any group. Conclusions All T formulations increase serum T and FT. More significant increases in E occur with injectable T and T gels. Changes in Hgb and Hct are most significant with injectable T, and effects on lipids are variable and inconsistent. Selection of T formulations must account for individual

  18. Social ecological predictors of prostate-specific antigen blood test and digital rectal examination in black American men.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, V. Diane; Montgomery, Susanne B.; Herring, R. Patti; Gardner, Robert W.; Stokols, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Black American men continue to suffer disproportionately from epidemically higher rates of prostate cancer. We hypothesize that complex reasons for persistently higher death rates of prostate cancer in this group are steeped in social factors associated with health access. METHODS: We utilized data from the It's All About U prostate cancer prevention study among black men to investigate: 1) what social ecological factors were predictive of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and digital rectal examinations (DRE); 2) if black men were aware of prostate cancer screening and, if screening was available, would they take the PSA and DRE? Quantitative cross-sectional data from a cohort of 276 black men with no diagnosis of prostate cancer were analyzed to identify characteristics, beliefs, practices and attitudes of this group toward prostate cancer screening. We created a social ecological model to examine which social factors (i.e., environmental, personal, person/environment interplay, black culture and institutional policy) were predictive of PSA and DRE, PSA only and DRE only. To reduce data and identify data patterns, factor analyses (tested for reliability by calculating Cronbach alpha scores) were performed. Variables were standardized with Z scores and analyzed with predictive analytic software technology (SPSS, version 12). A multivariate binary logistic regression was conducted to identify predictors of PSA and DRE. RESULTS: A significant predictor of both PSA and DRE was the physician's direct prostate cancer communication message (P<0.010). Significant correlations exist in PSA and DRE outcomes with a physician's engaging communication style (P<0.012), encouragement to screen (P<0.001) and sharing prostate cancer information (P<0.001); as was men understanding the serious risk of prostate cancer (P<0.001), culture (P<0.004), positive interaction with healthcare staff, significant other(s) and providers (P<0.001), and environmental dimensions

  19. Treatment Outcomes in Non-Metastatic Prostate Cancer Patients With Ultra-High Prostate-Specific Antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Patricia; Tonita, Jon; Woitas, Carla; Zhu Tong; Joseph, Kurian; Skarsgard, David

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: It is commonly believed that prostate cancer patients with very high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels are unlikely to benefit from definitive local treatment, and patients with very high PSA are often underrepresented in, or excluded from, randomized clinical trials. Consequently, little is known about their optimal treatment or prognosis. We performed a registry-based analysis of management and outcome in this population of patients. Methods and Materials: Our provincial Cancer Registry was used to identify all men who were diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1990 to 2001. A retrospective chart review provided information on stage, Gleason score, PSA at diagnosis, and treatment. In this study, ultra-high PSA was defined as PSA of {>=}50 ng/ml. For a more complete perspective, treatment outcomes of patients with PSA of 20 to 49.9 ng/ml were also studied. Results: Of the 8378 men diagnosed with prostate cancer during this period, 6,449 had no known nodal or distant metastatic disease. The median follow-up of this group was 67.2 months (range, 0-192 months). A total of 1534 patients had PSA of {>=}20 ng/ml. Among the 995 patients with PSA 20 to 49.9 ng/ml, 85 had radical prostatectomy (RP), and their 5- and 10-year cause-specific survivals (CSS) were 95% and 84%, respectively. The 497 patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) had 5- and 10-year CSS of 92% and 71%. For the 332 patients with PSA 50-99.9 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 81% and 55%. For the 207 patients with PSA of {>=}100 ng/ml, RT was associated with 5- and 10-year CSS of 80% and 54%. Conclusions: This is the largest series in the world on non metastatic cancer patients with ultra-high PSA at diagnosis. Even in the setting of a very high presenting PSA level, prostatectomy and radiotherapy are often associated with prolonged survival.

  20. In vitro characterization of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies specific for the extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen.

    PubMed

    Smith-Jones, P M; Vallabahajosula, S; Goldsmith, S J; Navarro, V; Hunter, C J; Bastidas, D; Bander, N H

    2000-09-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-characterized cell surface antigen expressed by virtually all prostate cancers (PCas). PSMA has been successfully targeted in vivo with (111)In-labeled 7E11 monoclonal antibody (mAb; ProstaScint; Cytogen, Princeton, NJ), which binds to an intracellular epitope of PSMA. This work reports the in vitro characterization of three recently developed mAbs that bind the extracellular domain of PSMA (PSMAext). Murine mAbs J415, J533, J591, and 7E11 were radiolabeled with 131I and evaluated in competitive and saturation binding studies with substrates derived from LNCaP cells. J415 and J591 were conjugated to 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid labeled with (111)In. The uptake and cellular processing of these antibodies were evaluated in viable LNCaP cells. All four mAbs could be labeled with 131I up to a specific activity of 350 MBq/mg with no or little apparent loss of immunoreactivity. Competition assays revealed that J415 and J591 compete for binding to PSMAext antigen. J533 bound to a region close to the J591 binding epitope, but J533 did not interfere with J415 binding to PSMA. mAb 7E11 did not inhibit the binding of J415, J533, or J591 (or vice versa), consistent with earlier work that these latter mAbs bind PSMAext whereas 7E11 binds the intracellular domain of PSMA. Saturation binding studies demonstrated that J415 and J591 bound with a similar affinity (Kds 1.76 and 1.83 nM), whereas J533 had a lower affinity (Kd, 18 nM). In parallel studies, all four mAbs bound to a similar number of PSMA sites expressed by permeabilized cells (1,000,000-1,300,000 sites/cell). In parallel studies performed with viable LNCaP cells, J415, J533, and J591 bound to a similar number of PSMA sites (i.e., 600,000-800,000 sites/cell), whereas 7E11 bound only to a subpopulation of the available PSMA sites (95,000 sites/cell). This apparent binding of 7E11 to viable cells can be accounted for by a 5

  1. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  2. Predicting Gleason score using the initial serum total prostate-specific antigen in Black men with symptomatic prostate adenocarcinoma in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nnabugwu, Ikenna I; Udeh, Emeka I; Ugwumba, Fredrick O; Ozoemena, Francis O

    2016-01-01

    Background Men of Black African descent are known to have the highest incidence of prostate cancer. The disease is also more aggressive in this group possibly due to biologically more aggressive tumor or late presentation. Currently, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay plays a significant role in making the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, the obtained value of serum PSA may not directly relate with the Gleason score (GS), a measure of tumor aggression in prostate cancer. This study explores the relationship between serum total PSA at presentation (iPSA) and GS. Patients and methods The iPSA of patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer was compared with the obtained GS of the prostate biopsy specimens. The age of the patients at presentation and the prostate volumes were also analyzed with respect to the iPSA and GS. The data were analyzed retrospectively using IBM SPSS Version 20. Pearson correlation was used for numeric variables, whereas Fisher’s exact test was used for categorical variables. Significance was set at P≤0.05. Results There were 205 patients from January 2010 to November 2013 who satisfied the inclusion criteria. iPSA as well as age at presentation and prostate volume were not found to significantly correlate with the primary Gleason grade, the secondary Gleason grade, or the GS. However, the presence of distant metastasis was identified to significantly correlate positively with GS. Conclusion GS may not be confidently predicted by the iPSA. Higher iPSA does not correlate with higher GS and vice versa. PMID:27486316

  3. Race, genetic West African ancestry, and prostate cancer prediction by prostate-specific antigen in prospectively screened high-risk men.

    PubMed

    Giri, Veda N; Egleston, Brian; Ruth, Karen; Uzzo, Robert G; Chen, David Y T; Buyyounouski, Mark; Raysor, Susan; Hooker, Stanley; Torres, Jada Benn; Ramike, Teniel; Mastalski, Kathleen; Kim, Taylor Y; Kittles, Rick

    2009-03-01

    "Race-specific" prostate-specific antigen (PSA) needs evaluation in men at high risk for prostate cancer for optimizing early detection. Baseline PSA and longitudinal prediction for prostate cancer were examined by self-reported race and genetic West African (WA) ancestry in the Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program, a prospective high-risk cohort. Eligibility criteria were age 35 to 69 years, family history of prostate cancer, African American race, or BRCA1/2 mutations. Biopsies were done at low PSA values (<4.0 ng/mL). WA ancestry was discerned by genotyping 100 ancestry informative markers. Cox proportional hazards models evaluated baseline PSA, self-reported race, and genetic WA ancestry. Cox models were used for 3-year predictions for prostate cancer. Six hundred forty-six men (63% African American) were analyzed. Individual WA ancestry estimates varied widely among self-reported African American men. Race-specific differences in baseline PSA were not found by self-reported race or genetic WA ancestry. Among men with > or =1 follow-up visit (405 total, 54% African American), 3-year prediction for prostate cancer with a PSA of 1.5 to 4.0 ng/mL was higher in African American men with age in the model (P = 0.025) compared with European American men. Hazard ratios of PSA for prostate cancer were also higher by self-reported race (1.59 for African American versus 1.32 for European American, P = 0.04). There was a trend for increasing prediction for prostate cancer with increasing genetic WA ancestry. "Race-specific" PSA may need to be redefined as higher prediction for prostate cancer at any given PSA in African American men. Large-scale studies are needed to confirm if genetic WA ancestry explains these findings to make progress in personalizing prostate cancer early detection.

  4. Presentation of a functional pituitary adenoma as a significant decrease in prostate-specific antigen level in a patient followed for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Grotas, Aaron B; Nagler, Harris M

    2006-12-01

    The stimulatory role of testosterone in the production and release of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been well characterized. Testosterone production by the testes is dependent on a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. High prolactin levels have been shown to disrupt this axis, resulting in decreases in gonadotropins and testosterone levels. We report a patient with prostate cancer and elevated PSA levels followed with "watchful waiting" for several years who experienced a precipitous decrease in PSA level over a 3 month period. The patient was found to have an asymptomatic prolactin-secreting pituitary macroadenoma.

  5. Development of Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Inhibitors Coupled to 99mTc(CO)3+ with Enhanced Specific Activity for SPECT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Paul; D.; Benny,; Clifford; Berkman,; Jeffery; Bryan

    2011-12-20

    The overall objectives of the project were two fold: 1) the development of new facile reactions for coupling radioactive complexes with biomolecules and 2) the development of a novel molecular imaging targeting vector for Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for prostate cancer. The didactic approach allowed the synergistic exploration of new technologies for coupling reactions of radioactive complexes that can be applied to a novel targeting moiety. As part of the project, a number of students (undergraduate, graduate and post-doctoral) were trained in radiochemical techniques for preparing and characterizing radiometal complexes. Results from the experiments within the project have generated several presentations and publications.

  6. Ultrasensitive Prostate Specific Antigen Assay Following Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy – An Outcome Measure for Defining the Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Viney, R; Gommersall, L; Zeif, J; Hayne, D; Shah, ZH; Doherty, A

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) performed laparoscopically is a popular treatment with curative intent for organ-confined prostate cancer. After surgery, prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels drop to low levels which can be measured with ultrasensitive assays. This has been described in the literature for open RRP but not for laparoscopic RRP. This paper describes PSA changes in the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. OBJECTIVES To use ultrasensitive PSA (uPSA) assays to measure a PSA nadir in patients having laparoscopic radical prostatectomy below levels recorded by standard assays. The aim was to use uPSA nadir at 3 months' post-prostatectomy as an early surrogate end-point of oncological outcome. In so doing, laparoscopic oncological outcomes could then be compared with published results from other open radical prostatectomy series with similar end-points. Furthermore, this end-point could be used in the assessment of the surgeon's learning curve. PATIENTS AND METHODS Prospective, comprehensive, demographic, clinical, biochemical and operative data were collected from all patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP. We present data from the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. uPSA was measured every 3 months post surgery. RESULTS Median follow-up was 29 months (minimum 3 months). The likelihood of reaching a uPSA of ≤ 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months is 73% for the first 100 patients. This is statistically lower when compared with 83% (P < 0.05) for the second 100 patients and 80% for the third 100 patients (P < 0.05). Overall, 84% of patients with pT2 disease and 66% patients with pT3 disease had a uPSA of ≤ 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months. Pre-operative PSA, PSA density and Gleason score were not correlated with outcome as determined by a uPSA of ≤ 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months. Positive margins correlate with outcome as determined by a uPSA of ≤ 0

  7. Determinants of Change in Prostate-Specific Antigen Over Time and Its Association With Recurrence After External Beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer in Five Large Cohorts

    SciTech Connect

    Proust-Lima, Cecile; Taylor, Jeremy M.G. Williams, Scott G.; Ankerst, Donna P.; Liu Ning; Kestin, Larry L.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Sandler, Howard M.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between prognostic factors, postradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) dynamics, and clinical failure after prostate cancer radiation therapy using contemporary statistical models. Methods and Materials: Data from 4,247 patients with 40,324 PSA measurements treated with external beam radiation monotherapy in five cohorts were analyzed. Temporal change of PSA after treatment completion was described by a specially developed linear mixed model that included standard prognostic factors. These factors, along with predicted PSA evolution, were incorporated into a Cox model to establish their predictive value for the risk of clinical recurrence over time. Results: Consistent relationships were found across cohorts. The initial PSA decline after radiation therapy was associated with baseline PSA and T-stage (p < 0.001). The long-term PSA rise was associated with baseline PSA, T-stage, and Gleason score (p < 0.001). The risk of clinical recurrence increased with current level (p < 0.001) and current slope of PSA (p < 0.001). In a pooled analysis, higher doses of radiation were associated with a lower long-term PSA rise (p < 0.001) but not with the risk of recurrence after adjusting for PSA trajectory (p = 0.63). Conversely, after adjusting for other factors, increased age at diagnosis was not associated with long-term PSA rise (p = 0.85) but was directly associated with decreased risk of recurrence (p < 0.001). Conclusions: We conclude that a linear mixed model can be reliably used to construct typical patient PSA profiles after prostate cancer radiation therapy. Pretreatment factors along with PSA evolution and the associated risk of recurrence provide an efficient and quantitative way to assess the impact of risk factors on disease progression.

  8. Polymorphisms at the Microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB) Locus Associated With Physiological Variation in Beta-Microseminoprotein (β-MSP) and Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) Levels

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xing; Valtonen-André, Camilla; Sävblom, Charlotta; Halldén, Christer; Lilja, Hans; Klein, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Background rs10993994, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the genetic locus encoding ß-microseminoprotein (β-MSP), is associated with both prostate cancer risk and levels of blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker used in prostate cancer screening. Therefore, we wished to determine the association between SNPs at MSMB, the gene encoding β-MSP, and levels of the prostate-produced biomarkers β-MSP, PSA, and human kallikrein 2 (hK2) in blood and semen. Methods Blood and semen from 304 healthy young Swedish men (aged 18-21) were assayed for β-MSP, PSA and hK2. SNPs around MSMB were genotyped from matched DNA and analyzed for quantitative association with biomarker levels. Empirical p-values were multiple test corrected and independence of each SNP’s effect was determined. Results rs10993994 is significantly associated with blood and semen levels of β-MSP (both p<1.0×10−7) and PSA (p=0.00014 and p=0.0019), and semen levels of hK2 (p=0.00027). Additional copies of the prostate cancer risk allele resulted in lower β-MSP but higher PSA levels, and singly explained 23% and 5% of the variation seen in semen β-MSP and PSA. Additional SNPs at MSMB are associated with β-MSP and PSA independently of rs10993994. Conclusions SNPs at MSMB correlate with physiological variation in β-MSP and PSA levels in the blood and semen of healthy young Swedish men. In particular, rs10993994 has a strong effect on β-MSP levels. Impact Our results suggest a mechanism by which rs10993994 may predispose to prostate cancer and raise the possibility that genetic variation may need to be considered in interpreting levels of these biomarkers. PMID:20696662

  9. Is there any association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Ceylan, Cavit; Kilinc, Fatih; Gazel, Eymen; Resorlu, Berkan; Odabas, Oner

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose We investigated the association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods The data of 440 patients who had undergone prostate biopsies due to high PSA levels and suspicious digital rectal examination findings were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of accompanying NIH IV prostatitis. The exclusion criteria were as follows: Gleason score>6, PSA level>20ng/mL, >2 positive cores, >50% cancerous tissue per biopsy, urinary tract infection, urological interventions at least 1 week previously (cystoscopy, urethral catheterization, or similar procedure), history of prostate biopsy, and history of androgen or 5-alpha reductase use. All patient's age, total PSA and free PSA levels, ratio of free to total PSA, PSA density and prostate volume were recorded. Results In total, 101 patients were included in the study. Histopathological examination revealed only PCa in 78 (77.2%) patients and PCa+NIH IV prostatitis in 23 (22.7%) patients. The median total PSA level was 7.4 (3.5–20.0) ng/mL in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group and 6.5 (0.6–20.0) ng/mL in the PCa group (p=0.67). The PSA level was≤10ng/mL in 60 (76.9%) patients in the PCa group and in 16 (69.6%) patients in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group (p=0.32). Conclusions Our study showed no statistically significant difference in PSA levels between patients with and without NIH IV prostatitis accompanying PCa. PMID:27256190

  10. The PXR rs7643645 Polymorphism Is Associated with the Risk of Higher Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Hernández, Octavio D.; Vega, Libia; Jiménez-Ríos, Miguel A.; Martínez-Cervera, Pedro F.; Lugo-García, Juan A.; Hernández-Cadena, Leticia; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Orozco, Lorena; Elizondo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Levels of enzymes that determine testosterone catabolism such as CYP3A4 have been associated with prostate cancer (PCa) risk. Although some studies have related CYP3A4*1B allele, a gene polymorphism that modifies CYP3A4 expression level, with PCa risk, others have failed, suggesting that additional genetic variants may be involved. Expression of CYP3A4 is largely due to the activation of Pregnane X Receptor (PXR). Particularly, rs2472677 and rs7643645 PXR polymorphisms modify CYP3A4 expression levels. To evaluate whether PXR-HNF3β/T (rs2472677), PXR-HNF4/G (rs7643645), and CYP3A4*1B (rs2740574) polymorphisms are associated with PCa a case control-study was performed. The multiple testing analysis showed that the PXR-HNF4/G polymorphism was associated with higher levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patients with PCa (OR = 3.99, p = 0.03). This association was stronger in patients diagnosed at the age of 65 years or older (OR = 10.8, p = 0.006). Although the CYP3A4*1B/*1B genotype was overrepresented in PCa patients, no differences were observed in the frequency of this and PXR-HNF3β/T alleles between controls and cases. Moreover, no significant association was found between these polymorphisms and PSA, Gleason grade, or tumor lymph node metastasis. PMID:24924803

  11. The PXR rs7643645 polymorphism is associated with the risk of higher prostate-specific antigen levels in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Hernández, Octavio D; Vega, Libia; Jiménez-Ríos, Miguel A; Martínez-Cervera, Pedro F; Lugo-García, Juan A; Hernández-Cadena, Leticia; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Orozco, Lorena; Elizondo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Levels of enzymes that determine testosterone catabolism such as CYP3A4 have been associated with prostate cancer (PCa) risk. Although some studies have related CYP3A4*1B allele, a gene polymorphism that modifies CYP3A4 expression level, with PCa risk, others have failed, suggesting that additional genetic variants may be involved. Expression of CYP3A4 is largely due to the activation of Pregnane X Receptor (PXR). Particularly, rs2472677 and rs7643645 PXR polymorphisms modify CYP3A4 expression levels. To evaluate whether PXR-HNF3β/T (rs2472677), PXR-HNF4/G (rs7643645), and CYP3A4*1B (rs2740574) polymorphisms are associated with PCa a case control-study was performed. The multiple testing analysis showed that the PXR-HNF4/G polymorphism was associated with higher levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patients with PCa (OR = 3.99, p = 0.03). This association was stronger in patients diagnosed at the age of 65 years or older (OR = 10.8, p = 0.006). Although the CYP3A4*1B/*1B genotype was overrepresented in PCa patients, no differences were observed in the frequency of this and PXR-HNF3β/T alleles between controls and cases. Moreover, no significant association was found between these polymorphisms and PSA, Gleason grade, or tumor lymph node metastasis. PMID:24924803

  12. Prospective Assessment of Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Toxicity of Salvage Radiotherapy for Patients With Prostate-Specific Antigen Relapse or Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Pearse, Maria; Choo, Richard Danjoux, Cyril; Gardner, Sandra; Morton, Gerard; Szumacher, Ewa; Loblaw, Andrew; Cheung, Patrick

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity of salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 75 patients with prostate-specific antigen relapse or clinically isolated local recurrence after radical prostatectomy were accrued between 1998 and 2002 for a Phase II study to evaluate the efficacy of salvage RT plus 2-year androgen suppression. Acute and late GI and GU toxicity was prospectively assessed using the National Cancer Institute Expanded Common Toxicity Criteria Version 2. For acute toxicity, prevalence was examined. For late toxicity, cumulative incidences of Grade 2 or higher and Grade 3 toxicity were calculated. Results: Median age was 67 years at the time of salvage RT. Median time from radical prostatectomy to RT was 36.2 months. Median follow-up was 45.1 months. Seventy-five patients were available for acute toxicity analysis, and 72 for late toxicity. Twelve percent and 40% had preexisting GI and GU dysfunction before RT, respectively. Sixty-eight percent, 21%, and 5% experienced Grade 1, 2, and 3 acute GI or GU toxicity, respectively. Cumulative incidences of Grade 2 or higher late GI and GU toxicity at 36 months were 8.7% and 22.6%, and Grade 3 late GI and GU toxicity, 1.6% and 2.8%, respectively. None had Grade 4 late toxicity. The severity of acute GU toxicity (Grade < 2 vs. {>=} 2) was a significant predictor factor for Grade 2 or higher late GU toxicity after adjusting for preexisting GU dysfunction. Conclusion: Salvage RT generally was well tolerated. Grade 3 or higher late GI or GU toxicity was uncommon.

  13. Prostate specific antigen testing in family practice: a cross sectional survey of self-reported rates of and reasons for testing participation and risk disclosure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite controversy about the benefits of routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, rates of participation continue to rise. It is important to ensure that men are fully informed about the potential risks associated with this test. Little is known about the processes of shared decision making for PSA testing in the family practice setting. This study aimed to explore men’s experiences of PSA testing participation and risk disclosure for PSA testing. Methods A cross-sectional survey of male family practice attendees aged 40 years or older, with no previous history of prostate cancer, between June 2010 and November 2011. Questions related to whether participants had undertaken PSA testing or discussed this with their doctor over the past 5 years, whether the patient or doctor had initiated the discussion, reasons for undergoing testing, and whether their doctor had discussed particular risks associated with PSA testing. Results Sixty-seven percent (215/320) of men recalled having a PSA test in the past five years. Of the respondents who reported not having a test, 14% had discussed it with their doctor. The main reasons for having a PSA test were doctor recommendation and wanting to keep up to date with health tests. Thirty-eight percent or fewer respondents reported being advised of each potential risk. Conclusions Despite debate over the benefits of routine PSA testing, a high proportion of male family practice attendees report undertaking this test. Risks associated with testing appear to be poorly disclosed by general practitioners. These results suggest the need to improve the quality of informed consent for PSA testing in the family practice setting. PMID:24321004

  14. Determinants of change of prostate-specific antigen over time and its association with recurrence following external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer in 5 large cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Proust-Lima, Cécile; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Williams, Scott G.; Ankerst, Donna P.; Liu, Ning; Kestin, Larry L.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Sandler, Howard M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To assess the relationship between prognostic factors, post-radiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) dynamics, and clinical failure following prostate cancer radiation therapy using contemporary statistical models. Methods and materials Data from 4,247 patients with 40,324 PSA measurements treated with external beam radiation monotherapy in five cohorts were analyzed. Temporal change of PSA following treatment completion was described by a specially developed linear mixed model (LMM), including standard prognostic factors. These factors, along with predicted PSA evolution, were incorporated into a Cox model to establish their predictive value for the risk of clinical recurrence over time. Results Consistent relationships were found across cohorts. The initial PSA decline after radiation therapy was associated with baseline PSA and T-stage (p<0.001). The long-term PSA rise was associated with baseline PSA, T-stage and Gleason score (p<0.001). The risk of clinical recurrence increased with current level (p<0.001) and current slope of PSA (p<0.001). In a pooled analysis, higher doses of radiation were associated with a lower long-term PSA rise (p<0.001) but not with the risk of recurrence after adjusting for PSA trajectory (p=0.63). Conversely, after adjusting for other factors, increased age at diagnosis was not associated with long-term PSA rise (p=0.85) but directly associated with increased risk of recurrence (p<0.001). Conclusions LMM can be reliably used to construct typical patient PSA profiles following prostate cancer radiation therapy. Pre-treatment factors along with PSA evolution and the associated risk of recurrence provide an efficient and quantitative way to assess impact of risk factors on disease progression. PMID:19014779

  15. Metastasis in urothelial carcinoma mimicking prostate cancer metastasis in Ga-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a case of synchronous malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manoj; Choudhury, Partha Sarathi; Gupta, Gurudutt; Gandhi, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in man. It commonly presents with urinary symptoms, bone pain, or diagnosed with elevated prostate-specific antigen.(PSA) levels. Correct staging and early diagnosis of recurrence by a precise imaging tool are the keys for optimum management. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with Ga-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen.(PSMA), positron emission tomography-computed tomography.(PET-CT) has recently received significant attention and frequently used with a signature to prostate cancer-specific remark. However, this case will highlight the more cautious use of it. A-72-year-old male treated earlier for synchronous double malignancy.(invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma right ureter and carcinoma prostate) presented with rising PSA.(0.51.ng/ml) and referred for Ga-68 PSMA PET-CT, which showed a positive enlarged left supraclavicular lymph node. Lymph node biopsy microscopic and immunohistochemistry examination revealed metastatic carcinoma favoring urothelial origin. Specificity of PSMA scan to prostate cancer has been seen to be compromised in a certain situation mostly due to neoangiogenesis, and false positives emerged in renal cell cancer, differentiated thyroid cancer, glioblastoma, breast cancer brain metastasis, and paravertebral schwannomas. Understanding the causes of false positive will further enhance the confidence of interpretating PSMA scans. PMID:27385897

  16. Metastasis in urothelial carcinoma mimicking prostate cancer metastasis in Ga-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a case of synchronous malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Manoj; Choudhury, Partha Sarathi; Gupta, Gurudutt; Gandhi, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in man. It commonly presents with urinary symptoms, bone pain, or diagnosed with elevated prostate-specific antigen.(PSA) levels. Correct staging and early diagnosis of recurrence by a precise imaging tool are the keys for optimum management. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with Ga-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen.(PSMA), positron emission tomography-computed tomography.(PET-CT) has recently received significant attention and frequently used with a signature to prostate cancer-specific remark. However, this case will highlight the more cautious use of it. A-72-year-old male treated earlier for synchronous double malignancy.(invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma right ureter and carcinoma prostate) presented with rising PSA.(0.51.ng/ml) and referred for Ga-68 PSMA PET-CT, which showed a positive enlarged left supraclavicular lymph node. Lymph node biopsy microscopic and immunohistochemistry examination revealed metastatic carcinoma favoring urothelial origin. Specificity of PSMA scan to prostate cancer has been seen to be compromised in a certain situation mostly due to neoangiogenesis, and false positives emerged in renal cell cancer, differentiated thyroid cancer, glioblastoma, breast cancer brain metastasis, and paravertebral schwannomas. Understanding the causes of false positive will further enhance the confidence of interpretating PSMA scans. PMID:27385897

  17. Specific probe selection from landscape phage display library and its application in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of free prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Lang, Qiaolin; Wang, Fei; Yin, Long; Liu, Mingjun; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2014-03-01

    Probes against targets can be selected from the landscape phage library f8/8, displaying random octapeptides on the pVIII coat protein of the phage fd-tet and demonstrating many excellent features including multivalency, stability, and high structural homogeneity. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is usually determined by immunoassay, by which antibodies are frequently used as the specific probes. Herein we found that more advanced probes against free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) can be screened from the landscape phage library. Four phage monoclones were selected and identified by the specificity array. One phage clone displaying the fusion peptide ERNSVSPS showed good specificity and affinity to f-PSA and was used as a PSA capture probe in a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) array. An anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (anti-PSA mAb) was used to recognize the captured antigen, followed by horseradish peroxidase-conjugated antibody (HRP-IgG) and o-phenylenediamine, which were successively added to develop plate color. The ELISA conditions such as effect of blocking agent, coating buffer pH, phage concentration, antigen incubation time, and anti-PSA mAb dilution for phage ELISA were optimized. On the basis of the optimal phage ELISA conditions, the absorbance taken at 492 nm on a microplate reader was linear with f-PSA concentration within 0.825-165 ng/mL with a low limit of detection of 0.16 ng/mL. Thus, the landscape phage is an attractive biomolecular probe in bioanalysis.

  18. Urinary microRNA-based signature improves accuracy of detection of clinically relevant prostate cancer within the prostate-specific antigen grey zone.

    PubMed

    Salido-Guadarrama, Alberto Ivan; Morales-Montor, Jorge Gustavo; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Langley, Elizabeth; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Cruz Colin, Jose Luis; Rodriguez-Dorantes, Mauricio

    2016-06-01

    At present, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is used as a clinical biomarker for prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis; however, a large number of patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with PSA levels in the 'gray area' (4-10 ng/ml) are currently subjected to unnecessary biopsy due to overdiagnosis. Certain microRNAs (miRs) have been proven to be useful biomarkers, several of which are detectable in bodily fluids. The present study identified and validated a urinary miR‑based signature to enhance the specificity of PCa diagnosis and to reduce the number of patients with benign conditions undergoing biopsy. Seventy‑three urine samples from Mexican patients with diagnosis of PCa with a Gleason score ≥7 and 70 patients diagnosed with BPH were collected after digital rectal examination (DRE) of the prostate. miR expression profiles were determined using TaqMan Low Density Array experiments, and normalized Ct values for the miRs were compared between PCa and BPH groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether miR detection in urine is suitable for distinguishing patients with PCa from those with BPH. The identified miR‑100/200b signature was significantly correlated with PCa. Using a multivariable logistic regression approach, a base model including the clinical variables age, prostate‑specific antigen (PSA), the percentage of free PSA and DRE was generated, and a second base model additionally contained the miR‑100/200b signature. ROC analysis demonstrated that the combined model significantly outperformed the capacity of PSA (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.01) to discriminate between PCa and BPH patients. In terms of evaluation of the sub‑group of patients in the gray zone of PSA levels, the performance of the combined model for predicting PCa cases was significantly superior to PSA level determination (P<0.001) and the base model (P=0.009). In addition, decision curve analysis demonstrated that the

  19. Systems Pharmacology Modeling of Prostate-Specific Antigen in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated With an Androgen Receptor Antagonist and Down-Regulator.

    PubMed

    Mistry, H B; Fabre, M-A; Young, J; Clack, G; Dickinson, P A

    2016-05-01

    First-in-human (FIH) studies with AZD3514, a selective androgen receptor (AR) down-regulator, showed decreases of >30% in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in some patients. A modeling approach was adopted to understand these observations and define the optimum clinical use hypothesis for AZD3514 for clinical testing. Initial empirical modeling showed that only baseline PSA correlated significantly with this biological response, whereas drug concentration did not. To identify the mechanistic cause of this observation, a mechanism-based model was first developed, which described the effects of AZD3514 on AR protein and PSA mRNA levels in LNCaP cells with and without dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Second, the mechanism-based model was linked to a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model; PSA effects of clinical doses were subsequently simulated under different clinical conditions. This model was used to adjust the design of the ongoing clinical FIH study and direct the backup program. PMID:27299938

  20. Fear, knowledge, and efficacy beliefs differentially predict the frequency of digital rectal examination versus prostate specific antigen screening in ethnically diverse samples of older men.

    PubMed

    Consedine, Nathan S; Horton, David; Ungar, Tracey; Joe, Andrew K; Ramirez, Paul; Borrell, Luisa

    2007-03-01

    Emotional and cognitive characteristics have been studied in the context of women's cancer screening but have received scant attention in the study of men's screening behavior. Researchers know little about how such factors interact to predict screening or whether digital rectal examination (DRE) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) screens are predicted by the same characteristics. This study examines the relevance of emotional and cognitive characteristics to DRE and PSA screening among 180 U.S.-born African American, U.S.- born European American, and immigrant Jamaican men. The study identifies the expected effects in which fear is negatively related and efficacy beliefs positively related to DRE and PSA screening. Greater efficacy and (marginally) knowledge appear to "offset" the negative impact of fear on screening, and fear appears particularly relevant to DRE frequency. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for the development of health belief and self-regulatory models in the context of prostate cancer screening among minority men.

  1. The effect of testosterone replacement therapy on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in men being treated for hypogonadism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels.Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer.After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117-0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48-2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls.Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration is minimal

  2. Posttreatment prostatic-specific antigen doubling time as a surrogate endpoint for prostate cancer-specific survival: An analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 92-02

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K. . E-mail: Richard.Valicenti@mail.tju.edu; DeSilvio, Michelle; Hanks, Gerald E.; Porter, Arthur; Brereton, Harmar; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Shipley, William U.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: We evaluated whether posttreatment prostatic-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) was predictive of prostate cancer mortality by testing the Prentice requirements for a surrogate endpoint. Methods and Materials: We analyzed posttreatment PSA measurements in a cohort of 1,514 men with localized prostate cancer (T2c-4 and PSA level <150 ng/mL), treated and monitored prospectively on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 92-02. From June 1992 to April 1995, men were randomized to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and 65-70 Gy of radiation therapy (n = 761), or in combination with 24 months of adjuvant androgen deprivation (n = 753). Using an adjusted Cox proportional hazards model, we tested if PSADT was prognostic and independent of randomized treatment in this cohort. The endpoints were time to PSADT (assuming first-order kinetics for a minimum of 3 rising PSA measurements) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results: After a median follow-up time of 5.9 years, randomized treatment was a significant predictor for CSS (p{sub Cox} = 0.002), PSADT <6 months (p{sub Cox} < 0.001), PSADT <9 months (p{sub Cox} < 0.001), and PSADT <12 months (p{sub Cox} < 0.001) but not for PSADT <3 (p{sub Cox} = 0.4). The significant posttreatment PSADTs were also significant predictors of CSS (p{sub Cox}< 0.001). After adjusting for T stage, Gleason score and PSA, all of Prentice's requirements were not met, indicating that the effect of PSADT on CSS was not independent of the randomized treatment. Conclusions: Prostatic specific antigen doubling time is significantly associated with CSS, but did not meet all of Prentice's requirements for a surrogate endpoint of CSS. Thus, the risk of dying of prostate cancer is not fully explained by PSADT.

  3. Bone Marrow Recovery and Subsequent Chemotherapy Following Radiolabeled Anti-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Scott T.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Kaur, Gurveen; Robinson, Brian; Kahn, Renee; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Nanus, David M.; Bander, Neil H.

    2013-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated efficacy with acceptable toxicity leading to approval in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but has been slower to develop for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. Prostate cancer (PC) represents a good candidate for RIT based upon high exposure to circulating antibodies at common disease sites with a specific, highly expressed cell-surface antigen of prostate-specific membrane antigen. Four phase I and II trials utilizing 177Lu- or 90Y-J591 have been reported. Long-term toxicity and chemotherapy administration was analyzed. As expected, the only serious toxicity observed was myelosuppression. Grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurred in 33.3% without significant hemorrhage and grade 4 neutropenia occurred in 17.3% with 0.07% febrile neutropenia. Nearly all subjects (97.3%) recovered to grade 0 or 1 platelets and all had complete neutrophil recovery. The majority (81.3%) received chemotherapy at any time, with 61.3% receiving chemotherapy following RIT. Ten subjects underwent bone marrow biopsies at some point in their disease course following RIT for low counts; all had diffuse PC infiltration without evidence of myelodysplasia or leukemia. As expected, myelosuppression occurs following therapeutic doses of RIT for men with metastatic castration-resistant PC. However, toxicity is predictable and self-limited, with the majority of patients who do not refuse able to receive cytotoxic chemotherapy following RIT. PMID:23986881

  4. Bone marrow recovery and subsequent chemotherapy following radiolabeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody j591 in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Scott T; Akhtar, Naveed H; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Kaur, Gurveen; Robinson, Brian; Kahn, Renee; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Nanus, David M; Bander, Neil H

    2013-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated efficacy with acceptable toxicity leading to approval in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but has been slower to develop for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. Prostate cancer (PC) represents a good candidate for RIT based upon high exposure to circulating antibodies at common disease sites with a specific, highly expressed cell-surface antigen of prostate-specific membrane antigen. Four phase I and II trials utilizing (177)Lu- or (90)Y-J591 have been reported. Long-term toxicity and chemotherapy administration was analyzed. As expected, the only serious toxicity observed was myelosuppression. Grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurred in 33.3% without significant hemorrhage and grade 4 neutropenia occurred in 17.3% with 0.07% febrile neutropenia. Nearly all subjects (97.3%) recovered to grade 0 or 1 platelets and all had complete neutrophil recovery. The majority (81.3%) received chemotherapy at any time, with 61.3% receiving chemotherapy following RIT. Ten subjects underwent bone marrow biopsies at some point in their disease course following RIT for low counts; all had diffuse PC infiltration without evidence of myelodysplasia or leukemia. As expected, myelosuppression occurs following therapeutic doses of RIT for men with metastatic castration-resistant PC. However, toxicity is predictable and self-limited, with the majority of patients who do not refuse able to receive cytotoxic chemotherapy following RIT.

  5. Prostate-specific antigen nadir after high-dose-rate brachytherapy predicts long-term survival outcomes in high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Komori, Shouko; Sekiguchi, Akane; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kurosaka, Shinji; Fujita, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masashi; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen nadir (nPSA) after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in clinically non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer patients. Material and methods Data from 216 patients with high-risk or locally advanced prostate cancer who underwent HDR brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy with long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) between 2003 and 2008 were analyzed. The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at diagnosis was 24 ng/ml (range: 3-338 ng/ml). The clinical stage was T1c-2a in 55 cases (26%), T2b-2c in 48 (22%), T3a in 75 (35%), and T3b-4 in 38 (17%). The mean dose to 90% of the planning target volume was 6.3 Gy/fraction of HDR brachytherapy. After 5 fractions, external beam radiation therapy with 10 fractions of 3 Gy was administered. All patients initially underwent neoadjuvant ADT for at least 6 months, and adjuvant ADT was continued for 36 months. The median follow-up was 7 years from the start of radiotherapy. Results The 7-year PSA relapse-free rate among patients with a post-radiotherapy nPSA level of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was 94%, compared with 23% for patients with higher nPSA values (HR = 28.57; 95% CI: 12.04-66.66; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the nPSA value after radiotherapy was a significant independent predictor of biochemical failure, whereas pretreatment predictive values for worse biochemical control including higher level of initial PSA, Gleason score ≥ 8, positive biopsy core rate ≥ 67%, and T3b-T4, failed to reach independent predictor status. The 7-year cancer-specific survival rate among patients with a post-radiotherapy nPSA level of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was 99%, compared with 82% for patients with higher nPSA values (HR = 32.25; 95% CI: 3.401-333.3; p = 0.002). Conclusions A post-radiotherapy nPSA value of ≤ 0.02 ng/ml was associated with better long-term biochemical tumor control even if patients had pretreatment predictive values for worse

  6. Improved porous silicon (P-Si) microarray based PSA (prostate specific antigen) immunoassay by optimized surface density of the capture antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SangWook; Kim, Soyoun; Malm, Johan; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Enriching the surface density of immobilized capture antibodies enhances the detection signal of antibody sandwich microarrays. In this study, we improved the detection sensitivity of our previously developed P-Si (porous silicon) antibody microarray by optimizing concentrations of the capturing antibody. We investigated immunoassays using a P-Si microarray at three different capture antibody (PSA - prostate specific antigen) concentrations, analyzing the influence of the antibody density on the assay detection sensitivity. The LOD (limit of detection) for PSA was 2.5ngmL−1, 80pgmL−1, and 800fgmL−1 when arraying the PSA antibody, H117 at the concentration 15µgmL−1, 35µgmL−1 and 154µgmL−1, respectively. We further investigated PSA spiked into human female serum in the range of 800fgmL−1 to 500ngmL−1. The microarray showed a LOD of 800fgmL−1 and a dynamic range of 800 fgmL−1 to 80ngmL−1 in serum spiked samples. PMID:24016590

  7. Walnut polyphenol metabolites, urolithins A and B, inhibit the expression of the prostate-specific antigen and the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Claudia; Ciudad, Carlos J; Noé, Véronique; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Walnuts have been gathering attention for their health-promoting properties. They are rich in polyphenols, mainly ellagitannins (ETs) that after consumption are hydrolyzed to release ellagic acid (EA). EA is further metabolized by microbiota to form urolithins, such as A and B, which are absorbed. ETs, EA and urolithins have shown to slow the proliferation and growth of different types of cancer cells but the mechanisms remain unclear. We investigate the role of urolithins in the regulatory mechanisms in prostate cancer, specifically those related to the androgen receptor (AR), which have been linked to the development of this type of cancer. In our study, urolithins down-regulated the mRNA and protein levels of both prostate specific antigen (PSA) and AR in LNCaP cells. The luciferase assay performed with a construct containing three androgen response elements (AREs) showed that urolithins inhibit AR-mediated PSA expression at the transcriptional level. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that urolithins decreased AR binding to its consensus response element. Additionally, urolithins induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells, and this effect correlated with a decrease in Bcl-2 protein levels. In summary, urolithins attenuate the function of the AR by repressing its expression, causing a down-regulation of PSA levels and inducing apoptosis. Our results suggest that a diet rich in ET-containing foods, such as walnuts, could contribute to the prevention of prostate cancer.

  8. Structure-Activity Relationship of (18)F-Labeled Phosphoramidate Peptidomimetic Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)-Targeted Inhibitor Analogues for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dannoon, Shorouk; Ganguly, Tanushree; Cahaya, Hendry; Geruntho, Jonathan J; Galliher, Matthew S; Beyer, Sophia K; Choy, Cindy J; Hopkins, Mark R; Regan, Melanie; Blecha, Joseph E; Skultetyova, Lubica; Drake, Christopher R; Jivan, Salma; Barinka, Cyril; Jones, Ella F; Berkman, Clifford E; VanBrocklin, Henry F

    2016-06-23

    A series of phosphoramidate-based prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitors of increasing lipophilicity were synthesized (4, 5, and 6), and their fluorine-18 analogs were evaluated for use as positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents for prostate cancer. To gain insight into their modes of binding, they were also cocrystallized with the extracellular domain of PSMA. All analogs exhibited irreversible binding to PSMA with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 to 1.3 nM. In vitro assays showed binding and rapid internalization (80-95%, 2 h) of the radiolabeled ligands in PSMA(+) cells. In vivo distribution demonstrated significant uptake in CWR22Rv1 (PSMA(+)) tumor, with tumor to blood ratios of 25.6:1, 63.6:1, and 69.6:1 for [(18)F]4, [(18)F]5, and [(18)F]6, respectively, at 2 h postinjection. Installation of aminohexanoic acid (AH) linkers in the phosphoramidate scaffold improved their PSMA binding and inhibition and was critical for achieving suitable in vivo imaging properties, positioning [(18)F]5 and [(18)F]6 as favorable candidates for future prostate cancer imaging clinical trials. PMID:27228467

  9. Label-free Electrochemiluminescent Immunosensor for Detection of Prostate Specific Antigen based on Aminated Graphene Quantum Dots and Carboxyl Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Liu, Yixin; Wang, Yaoguang; Hu, Lihua; Ma, Hongmin; Wang, Guoqin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was used as the model, an ultrasensitive label-free electrochemiluminescent immunosensor was developed based on graphene quantum dots. Au/Ag-rGO was sythsized and used as electrode material to load a great deal of graphene quantum dots due to the large surface area and excellent electron conductivity. After aminated graphene quantum dots and acarboxyl graphene quantum dots were modified onto the electrode, the ECL intensity was much high using K2S2O8 as coreactant. Then, antibody of PSA was immobilized on the surface of modified electrode surface through the adsorption of Au/Ag toward proteins, leading to the decrease of the ECL intensity. As proven by ECL spectra test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, the fabrication process of the immunosensor is successful. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL intensity decreased linearly with the logarithm of PSA concentration in the range of 1 pg/mL ~ 10 ng/mL. The detection limit achieved is 0.29 pg/mL. The immunosensor results were validated through the detection of PSA in serum samples with satisfactory results. Due to excellent stability, high sensitivity, acceptable repeatability and selectivity, the immunosensor has promising applications in disease and drug analysis. PMID:26842737

  10. Electrochemical immunosensor for prostate-specific antigens using a label-free second antibody based on silica nanoparticles and polymer brush.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Saima; Bin, Wang; Bhatti, Arshad S

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a sensitive electrochemical immunosensor synthesized using a surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization process for the detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Electrochemical immunosensors based on polymer brush [oligo(ethylene glycol)methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate] (OEGMA-co-GMA) were grown on plane Au and nanostructured (NS) Au electrodes, characterized and compared for their sensitivity to detect PSA. Due to a large capacity for antibody loading and high resistance to nonspecific antibody adsorption of POEGMA-co-GMA brush, the Au-NS immunosensor exhibited detection in a wide dynamic range of five orders of magnitude with an improved lower limit of detection of 2pgml(-1), which was better than the synthesized immunosensor with the polymer brush grown on plane Au electrode. The Au-NS electrode showed improved detection sensitivity of 4.9μAng(-1)ml for PSA detection, which was almost 2 times better than the plane Au electrode. Finally, the use of silica nanoparticles (Si-NPs) conjugated with polyclonal antibody enhanced the response of the immunosensor. The proposed electrochemical immunosensor would be an exciting addition in medical diagnostics for the early detection of cancer biomarkers, e.g., PSA due to improved limit of detection (LOD); eventually helpful in circumventing cancer metastasis.

  11. Nanogold-functionalized g-C3N4 nanohybrids for sensitive impedimetric immunoassay of prostate-specific antigen using enzymatic biocatalytic precipitation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li-Li; Ge, Jing-Ping; Zhou, Wen-Quan; Gao, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Xiong, Ya

    2016-11-15

    This work reports on a new impedimetric immunosensing strategy for sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in biological fluids. The assay was carried out on monoclonal anti-PSA capture antibody-modified glassy carbon electrode with a sandwich-type detection format. Gold nanoparticles-decorated g-C3N4 nanosheets (AuNP/g-C3N4), synthesized by the wet-chemistry method, were utilized for the labeling of polyclonal anti-PSA detection antibody and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Upon target PSA introduction, the sandwiched immunocomplex could be formed between capture antibody and detection antibody. Followed by the AuNP/g-C3N4, the labeled HRP could catalyze 4-choloro-1-naphthol into benzo-4-chlorohexadienone. The as-generated insoluble product was coated on the electrode surface, thus increasing the Faradaic impedance of Fe(CN)6(4-/3)(-) indicator between the solution and the base electrode. Under the optimal conditions, the impedance increased with the increasing target PSA in the sample, and exhibited a wide linear range from 10pgmL(-1) and 30ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 5.2pgmL(-1). A repeatability and intermediate precision of <14% was accomplished. The specificity and method accuracy in comparison with commercial PSA ELISA kit for analysis of human serum specimens were relatively satisfactory.

  12. Cadmium may impair prostate function as measured by prostate specific antigen in semen: A cross-sectional study among European and Inuit men.

    PubMed

    Andreucci, Alessandro; Mocevic, Emina; Jönsson, Bo A G; Giwercman, Aleksander; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg; Toft, Gunnar; Lundh, Thomas; Bizzaro, Davide; Specht, Ina Olmer; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the association between cadmium in blood and the concentration of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) in semen, including the modifying effects of zinc or the CAG polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR). Blood and semen samples were collected from 504 partners of pregnant women in Greenland, Poland and Ukraine. We found an inverse trend between cadmium and PSA (log(β) = -0.121, 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.213; -0.029, P = 0.0103) in Greenlandic men. Similar results were observed in men with a high number of CAG repeats (CAG 24) (log(β) = -0.231, 95% CI: -0.363; -0.098, P = 0.0009). Inverse trends between cadmium and PSA were found when semen zinc concentrations were below the median value for men from Ukraine and Greenland. These outcomes suggest that cadmium may impair prostate function, as measured by PSA in semen, while high zinc levels and a low number of CAG repeats protects against this action.

  13. Nanogold-functionalized g-C3N4 nanohybrids for sensitive impedimetric immunoassay of prostate-specific antigen using enzymatic biocatalytic precipitation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li-Li; Ge, Jing-Ping; Zhou, Wen-Quan; Gao, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Xiong, Ya

    2016-11-15

    This work reports on a new impedimetric immunosensing strategy for sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in biological fluids. The assay was carried out on monoclonal anti-PSA capture antibody-modified glassy carbon electrode with a sandwich-type detection format. Gold nanoparticles-decorated g-C3N4 nanosheets (AuNP/g-C3N4), synthesized by the wet-chemistry method, were utilized for the labeling of polyclonal anti-PSA detection antibody and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Upon target PSA introduction, the sandwiched immunocomplex could be formed between capture antibody and detection antibody. Followed by the AuNP/g-C3N4, the labeled HRP could catalyze 4-choloro-1-naphthol into benzo-4-chlorohexadienone. The as-generated insoluble product was coated on the electrode surface, thus increasing the Faradaic impedance of Fe(CN)6(4-/3)(-) indicator between the solution and the base electrode. Under the optimal conditions, the impedance increased with the increasing target PSA in the sample, and exhibited a wide linear range from 10pgmL(-1) and 30ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 5.2pgmL(-1). A repeatability and intermediate precision of <14% was accomplished. The specificity and method accuracy in comparison with commercial PSA ELISA kit for analysis of human serum specimens were relatively satisfactory. PMID:27179136

  14. Graphene oxide quantum dots@silver core-shell nanocrystals as turn-on fluorescent nanoprobe for ultrasensitive detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Pei, Haimeng; Zhu, Shuyun; Yang, Minghui; Kong, Rongmei; Zheng, Yiqun; Qu, Fengli

    2015-12-15

    We report a fluorescent turn-on nanoprobe for ultrasensitive detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on graphene oxide quantum dots@silver (GQDs@Ag) core-shell nanocrystals. The success of this work relies on the assembly of quantities of GQDs in one GQDs@Ag probe, which makes the ratio of probe to target significantly increased and thus enables the fluorescent signal enhancement. When the silver shell was removed via oxidative etching using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the incorporated GQDs could be readily released and the whole process caused little change to their fluorescence performance. We tested the probe for the ultrasensitive detection of PSA based on the sandwich protocol of immunosensors. In particular, magnetic beads (MBs) were employed to immobilize anti-PSA antibody (Ab1) and acted as a separable capture probe, while GQDs@Ag was used as detection probe by linking antibody (Ab2). The developed immunosensor showed a good linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of PSA in the range from 1 pg/mL to 20 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.3 pg/mL. The immunosensor used for the analysis of clinical serum samples exhibited satisfactory results, which demonstrated its potential for practical diagnostic applications. This method provides a possible solution to the application of GQDs in immunosensing and could be potentially extended to other similar systems. PMID:26257182

  15. [(18)F]Fluorobenzoyllysinepentanedioic Acid Carbamates: New Scaffolds for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Mease, Ronnie C; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala; Chen, Ying; Foss, Catherine A; Wang, Yuchuan; Shallal, Hassan; Edelman, Hannah; Hoye, Adam T; Attardo, Giorgio; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pomper, Martin G

    2016-01-14

    Radiolabeled urea-based low-molecular weight inhibitors of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are under intense investigation as imaging and therapeutic agents for prostate and other cancers. In an effort to provide agents with less nontarget organ uptake than the ureas, we synthesized four (18)F-labeled inhibitors of PSMA based on carbamate scaffolds. 4-Bromo-2-[(18)F]fluorobenzoyllysineoxypentanedioic acid (OPA) carbamate [(18)F]23 and 4-iodo-2-[(18)F]fluorobenzoyllysine OPA carbamate [(18)F]24 in particular exhibited high target-selective uptake in PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumor xenografts, with tumor-to-kidney ratios of >1 by 4 h postinjection, an important benchmark. Because of its high tumor uptake (90% injected dose per gram of tissue at 2 h postinjection) and high tumor-to-organ ratios, [(18)F]23 is promising for clinical translation. Prolonged tumor-specific uptake demonstrated by [(18)F]24, which did not reach equilibrium during the 4 h study period, suggests carbamates as alternative scaffolds for mitigating dose to nontarget tissues. PMID:26629713

  16. High-throughput chemiluminometric determination of prostate-specific membrane antigen mRNA in peripheral blood by RT-PCR using a synthetic RNA internal standard.

    PubMed

    Emmanouilidou, Evaggelia; Ioannou, Penelope C; Christopoulos, Theodore K

    2004-09-01

    A quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method, employing internal standard (IS) RNA and a simplified chemiluminometric hybridization assay, is described for the determination of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) mRNA. The recombinant RNA IS has the same binding sites and size as the amplified PSMA mRNA. Biotinylated PCR products (263 bp) from PSMA mRNA and RNA IS are captured in microtiter wells coated with streptavidin, and hybridized with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated probes. The bound alkaline phosphatase (AP) is measured by using a chemiluminogenic substrate. The ratio of the luminescence values obtained for PSMA mRNA and the RNA IS is a linear function of the initial amount of PSMA mRNA present in the sample before RT-PCR. The linear range extends from 500 to 5,000,000 PSMA mRNA copies and the overall reproducibility of the assay, including RT-PCR and hybridization, ranges from 7.4 to 16.6%. Samples containing total RNA from PSMA-expressing LNCaP cells give luminescence ratios linearly related to the number of cells in the range 0.5-5,000 cells.

  17. Radioimmunotherapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer with ¹⁷⁷Lu-DOTAhuJ591 Anti Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Specific Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Jhanwar, Yuliya S; Kaur, Gurveen; Tagawa, Scott T; Nanus, David M; Bander, Neil H; Goldsmith, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is the single most well-validated prostate cancer (PCa)-specific cell membrane antigen known. It is present in high levels in 95% of PCa, and is an ideal target to develop radiopharmaceuticals for imaging studies and radionuclide therapy. Humanized J591 monoclonal antibody (mAb) binds specifically with nanomolar affinity to the extracellular domain of PSMA. After binding, the PSMA-antibody complex is rapidly internalized, increasing the potential utility of PSMA as a target for the delivery of mAb-conjugated radionuclides or cytotoxins. J591 mAb was labeled with 177Lu at a high specific activity (10-30 mCi/mg) using DOTA as the bifunctional chelate. The preclinical data in PSMA positive xenografts, strongly suggested that 177;Lu-J591 mAb is an ideal radiopharmaceutical for RIT of metastatic PCa. Since October 2000, five clinical studies (phase I and II) were performed in subjects with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) using 177Lu-J591. The methodology and the results of these clinical studies are briefly reviewed in this article. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) as a single dose was 70 mCi2. Based on dose fractionation (DF), MTD was 90 mCi/m2(2 doses of 45 mCi/m2, 2 wks apart). Phase II study in patients with progressive metastatic CRPC, at a dose of 65- 70 mCi/m2 resulted in significant PSA declines in 60% of the patients. While myelosuppression was the dose limiting toxicity, DF alone or in combination with docetaxel also resulted in significant PSA declines with much less toxicity. 177Lu imaging studies demonstrated accurate targeting of known metastatic sites in >90% of patients and those with stronger PSMA expression by semi-quantitative imaging had more PSA declines. These clinical studies clearly documented the potential therapeutic value of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in metastatic PCa.

  18. A dimerized urea-based inhibitor of the prostate-specific membrane antigen for 68Ga-PET imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alternative positron-emission tomography (PET) probes like labeled inhibitors of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are of emerging clinical impact as they show the ability to image small lesions of recurrent prostate cancer. Here, the dimerization of the pharmacophore Glu‐ureido‐Lys via the 68Ga chelator N,N′-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N′-diacetic acid (HBED-CC) was investigated to further improve the binding characteristics and pharmacokinetics. Methods The peptidomimetic structures were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry, and the resulting products were coupled with the respective 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenol esters of HBED-CC to form the monomeric reference and the dimeric Glu‐ureido‐Lys derivative. The binding properties were analyzed in competitive binding, internalization, and cell surface retention experiments. PET images and biodistribution data were obtained 1 h after injection in BALB/c nu/nu mice bearing LNCaP tumor xenografts. Results Cell binding data revealed significant better binding properties of the dimer (IC50 = 3.9 ± 1.8 nM; IC50 (monomer) = 12.1 ± 2.1 nM). The inhibition potency investigated by the enzyme-based NAALADase assay confirmed these results. Specific internalization in LNCaP cells was demonstrated for both, the monomer and dimer. As shown by efflux measurements, the dimeric compound was more effectively retained on the cell surface, resulting in advanced in vivo properties (T/BMonomer = 9.2; T/BDimer = 26.5). Conclusions The dimeric [68Ga]7 is a promising imaging agent for PSMA-expressing tumors as it shows higher tumor uptake while observing more favorable background clearance. As compared to the respective monomer, the higher affinity and prolonged tumor retention additionally represent promising features and warrant further evaluation regarding 68Ga-PET imaging of PSMA expression. PMID:22673157

  19. Evaluation of prostatic cancer prevalence in patients with prostatic-specific antigen between 4 and 10 and normal digital rectal examination

    PubMed Central

    Tadayon, Farhad; Arezegar, Hamid Reza; Khorrami, Mohammad Hatef; Hashemi Juzdani, Rasoul; Shahdoost, Amir Abbas; Mellat, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers. The prevalence of prostate cancer is different due to genetic and environmental factors. Diagnosis of prostate cancer is by biopsy due to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and Digital Rectal Examination (DRE). Controversy about decision making for prostate biopsy in PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, is one of the problems in this time. In this study we evaluated the prevalence of prostate cancer in males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE. We also evaluated the PSA density and percent of free PSA in patients with prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: A total of 121 males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, were evaluated. Then, transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) andprostate biopsy from 12 points of peripheral zone, was done. These data were analyzed by Chi-square, t-test and ANOVA and Roc curve. Results: In this study, the prevalence of prostate cancer in PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, was evaluated, 29.8%. With use of Roc curve, PSA density cutoff point was calculated 0.12 and percent of free PSA cutoff point, was calculated, 18%. Conclusion: In males with PSA between 4 and 10 and normal DRE, PSA density smaller than 0.12-0.15, and percent of free PSA greater than 18%, the prevalence of prostate cancer is very few and we can safely ignore the TRUS and prostate biopsy in these males and eliminate its costs and side effects. PMID:27403407

  20. The Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen Regulates the Expression of IL-6 and CCL5 in Prostate Tumour Cells by Activating the MAPK Pathways1

    PubMed Central

    Colombatti, Marco; Fracasso, Giulio; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Cingarlini, Sara; Poffe, Ornella; Naim, Hassan Y.; Heine, Martin; Tridente, Giuseppe; Mainiero, Fabrizio; Ramarli, Dunia

    2009-01-01

    The interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the chemokine CCL5 are implicated in the development and progression of several forms of tumours including that of the prostate. The expression of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is augmented in high-grade and metastatic tumors. Observations of the clinical behaviour of prostate tumors suggest that the increased secretion of IL-6 and CCL5 and the higher expression of PSMA may be correlated. We hypothesized that PSMA could be endowed with signalling properties and that its stimulation might impact on the regulation of the gene expression of IL-6 and CCL5. We herein demonstrate that the cross-linking of cell surface PSMA with specific antibodies activates the small GTPases RAS and RAC1 and the MAPKs p38 and ERK1/2 in prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. As downstream effects of the PSMA-fostered RAS-RAC1-MAPK pathway activation we observed a strong induction of NF-κB activation associated with an increased expression of IL-6 and CCL5 genes. Pharmacological blockade with specific inhibitors revealed that both p38 and ERK1/2 participate in the phenomenon, although a major role exerted by p38 was evident. Finally we demonstrate that IL-6 and CCL5 enhanced the proliferative potential of LNCaP cells synergistically and in a dose-dependent manner and that CCL5 functioned by receptor-mediated activation of the STAT5-Cyclin D1 pro-proliferative pathway. The novel functions attributable to PSMA which are described in the present report may have profound influence on the survival and proliferation of prostate tumor cells, accounting for the observation that PSMA overexpression in prostate cancer patients is related to a worse prognosis. PMID:19242540

  1. Prostatic cancer surveillance following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound: comparison of MRI and prostate-specific antigen for detection of residual or recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    Punwani, S; Emberton, M; Walkden, M; Sohaib, A; Freeman, A; Ahmed, H; Allen, C; Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study compares dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI with the serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement for detection of residual disease following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Methods Patients in whom post-HIFU DCE-MRI was followed within 3 months by ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsy were selected from a local database. 26 patients met the study inclusion criteria. Serial PSA levels following HIFU and post-HIFU follow-up MRI were retrieved for each patient. Three radiologists unaware of other investigative results independently assessed post-HIFU MRI studies for the presence of cancer, scoring on a four-point scale (1, no disease; 2, probably no disease; 3, probably residual disease; and 4, residual disease). Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were performed for each reader, post-HIFU PSA nadir and pre-biopsy PSA level thresholds of >0.2 and >0.5 ng ml−1. Results The sensitivity of DCE-MRI for detection of residual disease for the three readers ranged between 73% and 87%, and the specificity between 73% and 82%. There was good agreement between readers (κ=0.69–0.77). The sensitivity and specificity of PSA thresholds was 60–87% and 73–100%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was greatest for pre-biopsy PSA (0.95). Conclusion DCE-MRI performed following whole-gland HIFU has similar sensitivity and specificity and ROC performance to serial PSA measurements for detection of residual or recurrent disease. PMID:22253342

  2. Phase II study of lutetium-177 labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) monoclonal antibody J591 for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Scott T.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Morris, Michael; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Christos, Paul; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Osborne, Joseph; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Larson, Steve; Taskar, Neeta Pandit; Scher, Howard I.; Bander, Neil H.; Nanus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy of a single infusion of radiolabeled anti-prostate specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 (177Lu-J591) by PSA decline, measurable disease response, and survival. Experimental Design In this dual-center phase II study, 2 cohorts with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received one dose of 177Lu-J591 (15 patients at 65 mCi/m2, 17 at 70 mCi/m2) with radionuclide imaging. Expansion cohort (n=15) received 70 mCi/m2 to verify response rate and examine biomarkers. Results 47 patients who progressed after hormonal therapies (55.3% also received prior chemotherapy) received 177Lu-J591. 10.6% experienced ≥ 50% decline in PSA, 36.2% experienced ≥ 30% decline, and 59.6% experienced any PSA decline following their single treatment. One of 12 with measurable disease experienced a partial radiographic response (8 with stable disease). Sites of prostate cancer metastases were targeted in 44 of 47 (93.6%) as determined by planar imaging. All experienced reversible hematologic toxicity with grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurring in 46.8% (29.8% received platelet transfusions) without significant hemorrhage. 25.5% experienced grade 4 neutropenia with 1 episode of febrile neutropenia. The phase I maximum tolerated dose (70 mCi/m2) resulted in more 30% PSA declines (46.9% vs 13.3%, p=0.048) and longer survival (21.8 vs 11.9 months, p=0.03), but also more grade 4 hematologic toxicity and platelet transfusions. No serious non-hematologic toxicity occurred. Those with poor PSMA imaging were less likely to respond. Conclusion A single dose of 177Lu-J591 was well-tolerated with reversible myelosuppression. Accurate tumor targeting and PSA responses were seen with evidence of dose-response. Imaging biomarkers appear promising. PMID:23714732

  3. A Novel Prostate-Specific Membrane-Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Micelle-Encapsulating Wogonin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation via Inducing Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hailong; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Fengbo; Qin, Feifei; Feng, Ping; Xu, Ting; Li, Xiang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a malignant tumor for which there are no effective treatment strategies. In this study, we developed a targeted strategy for prostate-specific membrane-antigen (PSMA)-positive PCa in vitro based on 2-(3-((S)-5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)ureido) pentanedioic acid (ACUPA) modified polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Cholesterol micelles containing wogonin (WOG), which was named ACUPA-M-WOG. ACUPA-M-WOG was conventionally prepared using a self-assembling method, which produced stable particle size and ζ potential. Moreover, ACUPA-M-WOG showed good drug encapsulating capacity and drug release profiles. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) results suggested that ACUPA modified PEG-Cholesterol micelles could effectively enhance the drug uptake on PSMA(+) PCa cells, and the cytotoxicity of ACUPA-M-WOG was stronger than other controls according to in vitro cellular proliferation and apoptosis assays, separately through methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) staining. Finally, the molecular mechanisms of ACUPA-M-WOG’s effects on human PSMA(+) PCa were investigated, and were mainly the intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis signaling pathways. The Western blot results suggested that ACUPA-M-WOG could enhance the WOG-induced apoptosis, which was mainly via the intrinsic signaling pathway rather than the extrinsic signaling pathway. In conclusion, ACUPA-M-WOG was successfully developed for WOG-selective delivery to PSMA(+) PCa cells and had stronger inhibition than free drugs, which might make it an effective strategy for PSMA(+) PCa. PMID:27196894

  4. Synthesis and positron emission tomography evaluation of 18F-Glu-Urea-Lys, a prostate-specific membrane antigen-based imaging agent for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    FAN, WEIWEI; ZHANG, ZHIWEI; ZHU, ZHENG; YANG, DEYONG; CHEN, XIAOCHI; WANG, JIANBO; CHEN, FENG; SONG, XISHUANG

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography (PET) have also been used, in addition to computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, in targeting the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to synthesize the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-based imaging agent 2-{3-[1-Carboxy-5-(4-[18F] fluoro-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido}-pentanedioic acid (18F-Glu-Urea-Lys, [18F]3) and to detect its PET imaging efficiency for high PSMA expression in prostate cancer. In this study, 18F-Glu-Urea-Lys was synthesized in two steps from the p-methoxybenzyl-protected Glu-Urea-Lys precursor using N-Hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-[18F] fluorobenzoate ([18F]SFB). PET imaging evaluation was conducted in nude mice using LNCaP (PSMA+), and PC-3, 231 and A549 (all PSMA−) xenograft models. The results indicated that 18F-Glu-Urea-Lys was produced in radiochemical yields of 28.7%. The radiochemical purity was 99.1% and the mean total synthesis time was 168 min. In nude mice models 18F-Glu-Urea-Lys clearly delineated PSMA+ LNCaP prostate tumor xenografts on PET imaging. At 4 h post-injection, the contrast agents were only observed in renal, liver, bladder and PSMA+ LNCaP tumors. The PSMA− tumor (PC-3, 231 and A549) was clear. In conclusion, 18F-Glu-Urea-Lys was found to be easily synthesized. This radiotracer demonstrated high tumor and low-to-normal tissue uptake, fast clearance from non-target tissues and retention in PSMA+ prostate tumor xenografts. PMID:26622838

  5. Exposure to Agent Orange is a significant predictor of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based recurrence and a rapid PSA doubling time after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sagar R.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Aronson, William J.; Kane, Christopher J.; Presti, Joseph C.; Amling, Christopher L.; Terris, Martha K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate and report the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer and previous exposure to Agent Orange (AO), particularly in relationship to race. PATIENTS AND METHODS In 1495 veterans who had undergone RP the clinicopathological characteristics, biochemical progression rates, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time (DT) after recurrence between AO-exposed and unexposed men were compared using logistic and linear regression and Cox proportional hazards analyses, and stratified by race. RESULTS The 206 (14%) men with AO exposure were more likely to be black (P = 0.001), younger (P < 0.001), treated more recently (P < 0.001), have a higher body mass index (P = 0.001), have clinical stage T1 disease (P < 0.001), and have lower preoperative PSA levels (P = 0.001). After adjusting for several clinical characteristics, AO exposure was not significantly related to adverse pathological features but was significantly associated with biochemical progression risk (relative risk 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.15–2.09, P = 0.004) and shorter PSADT (P < 0.001) after recurrence (8.2 vs 18.6 months). When stratified by race, these associations were present and similar in both races, with no significant interaction between race and AO exposure for predicting biochemical recurrence or mean adjusted PSADT (P interaction >0.20). CONCLUSIONS Patients with AO exposure and treated with RP were more likely to be black, present with lower risk features, have an increased risk of biochemical progression, and shorter PSADT after recurrence. When stratified by race, the association between AO exposure and poor outcomes was present in both races. These findings suggest that among selected men who choose RP, AO exposure might be associated with more aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:19298411

  6. Plasma Carotenoids and Tocopherols in Relation to Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Levels Among Men with Biochemical Recurrence of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Samuel; Steck, Susan E.; Zhang, Hongmei; Stumm, Lareissa; Zhang, Jiajia; Hurley, Thomas G.; Hebert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although men presenting with clinically localized prostate cancer (PrCA) often are treated with radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy with curative intent, about 25–40% develop biochemically recurrent PrCA within 5 years of treatment, which has no known cure. Studies suggest that carotenoid and tocopherol intake may be associated with PrCA risk and progression. We examined plasma carotenoid and tocopherol levels in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels among men with PSA-defined biochemical recurrence of PrCA. Methods Data analyzed were from a 6-month diet, physical activity and stress-reduction intervention trial conducted in South Carolina among biochemically recurrent PrCA patients (n=39). Plasma carotenoids and tocopherol levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Linear regression was used to estimate least-square means comparing PSA levels of men with high versus low carotenoid/tocopherol levels, adjusting for covariates. Results After adjusting for baseline PSA level, plasma cis-lutein/zeaxanthin level at 3 months was related inversely to PSA level at 3 months (P=0.0008), while α-tocopherol (P=0.01), β-cryptoxanthin (P=0.01), and all-trans-lycopene (P=0.004) levels at 3 months were related inversely to PSA levels at 6-months. Percent increase in α-tocopherol and trans-β-carotene levels from baseline to month 3 were associated with lower PSA levels at 3 and 6 months. Percent increase in β−cryptoxanthin, cislutein/zeaxanthin and all-trans-lycopene were associated with lower PSA levels at 6 months only. Conclusions Certain plasma carotenoids and tocopherols were related inversely to PSA levels at various timepoints, suggesting that greater intake of foods containing these micronutrients might be beneficial to men with PSA-defined PrCA recurrence. PMID:26165176

  7. A Novel Prostate-Specific Membrane-Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Micelle-Encapsulating Wogonin Inhibits Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation via Inducing Intrinsic Apoptotic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hailong; Liu, Xiaogang; Wu, Fengbo; Qin, Feifei; Feng, Ping; Xu, Ting; Li, Xiang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a malignant tumor for which there are no effective treatment strategies. In this study, we developed a targeted strategy for prostate-specific membrane-antigen (PSMA)-positive PCa in vitro based on 2-(3-((S)-5-amino-1-carboxypentyl)ureido) pentanedioic acid (ACUPA) modified polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Cholesterol micelles containing wogonin (WOG), which was named ACUPA-M-WOG. ACUPA-M-WOG was conventionally prepared using a self-assembling method, which produced stable particle size and ζ potential. Moreover, ACUPA-M-WOG showed good drug encapsulating capacity and drug release profiles. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) results suggested that ACUPA modified PEG-Cholesterol micelles could effectively enhance the drug uptake on PSMA(+) PCa cells, and the cytotoxicity of ACUPA-M-WOG was stronger than other controls according to in vitro cellular proliferation and apoptosis assays, separately through methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) and Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) staining. Finally, the molecular mechanisms of ACUPA-M-WOG's effects on human PSMA(+) PCa were investigated, and were mainly the intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis signaling pathways. The Western blot results suggested that ACUPA-M-WOG could enhance the WOG-induced apoptosis, which was mainly via the intrinsic signaling pathway rather than the extrinsic signaling pathway. In conclusion, ACUPA-M-WOG was successfully developed for WOG-selective delivery to PSMA(+) PCa cells and had stronger inhibition than free drugs, which might make it an effective strategy for PSMA(+) PCa. PMID:27196894

  8. Towards Personalized Treatment of Prostate Cancer: PSMA I&T, a Promising Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen-Targeted Theranostic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Chatalic, Kristell L.S.; Heskamp, Sandra; Konijnenberg, Mark; Molkenboer-Kuenen, Janneke D.M.; Franssen, Gerben M.; Clahsen-van Groningen, Marian C.; Schottelius, Margret; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; van Weerden, Wytske M.; Boerman, Otto C.; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-established target for nuclear imaging and therapy of prostate cancer (PCa). Radiolabeled small-molecule PSMA inhibitors are excellent candidates for PCa theranostics—they rapidly and efficiently localize in tumor lesions. However, high tracer uptake in kidneys and salivary glands are major concerns for therapeutic applications. Here, we present the preclinical application of PSMA I&T, a DOTAGA-chelated urea-based PSMA inhibitor, for SPECT/CT imaging and radionuclide therapy of PCa. 111In-PSMA I&T showed dose-dependent uptake in PSMA-expressing tumors, kidneys, spleen, adrenals, lungs and salivary glands. Coadministration of 2-(phosphonomethyl)pentane-1,5-dioic acid (2-PMPA) efficiently reduced PSMA-mediated renal uptake of 111In-PSMA I&T, with the highest tumor/kidney radioactivity ratios being obtained using a dose of 50 nmol 2-PMPA. SPECT/CT clearly visualized subcutaneous tumors and sub-millimeter intraperitoneal metastases; however, high renal and spleen uptake in control mice (no 2-PMPA) interfered with visualization of metastases in the vicinity of those organs. Coadministration of 2-PMPA increased the tumor-to-kidney absorbed dose ratio during 177Lu-PSMA I&T radionuclide therapy. Hence, at equivalent absorbed dose to the tumor (36 Gy), coinjection of 2-PMPA decreased absorbed dose to the kidneys from 30 Gy to 12 Gy. Mice injected with 177Lu-PSMA I&T only, showed signs of nephrotoxicity at 3 months after therapy, whereas mice injected with 177Lu-PSMA I&T + 2-PMPA did not. These data indicate that PSMA I&T is a promising theranostic tool for PCa. PSMA-specific uptake in kidneys can be successfully tackled using blocking agents such as 2-PMPA. PMID:27162555

  9. p,p'-Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) repress prostate specific antigen levels in human prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lilian I L; Labrecque, Mark P; Ibuki, Naokazu; Cox, Michael E; Elliott, John E; Beischlag, Timothy V

    2015-03-25

    Despite stringent restrictions on their use by many countries since the 1970s, the endocrine disrupting chemicals, DDT and DDE are still ubiquitous in the environment. However, little attention has been directed to p,p'-DDT and the anti-androgen, p,p'-DDE on androgen receptor (AR) target gene transcription in human cells. Inhibitors of androgenic activity may have a deleterious clinical outcome in prostate cancer screens and progression, therefore we determined whether environmentally relevant concentrations of p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE negatively impact AR-regulated expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and other AR target genes in human LNCaP and VCaP prostate cancer cells. Quantitative real-time PCR and immuno-blotting techniques were used to measure intracellular PSA, PSMA and AR mRNA and protein levels. We have shown for the first time that p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE repressed R1881-inducible PSA mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we used the fully automated COBAS PSA detection system to determine that extracellular PSA levels were also significantly repressed. These chemicals achieve this by blocking the recruitment of AR to the PSA promoter region at 10 μM, as demonstrated by the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in LNCaP cells. Both p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE repressed R1881-inducible AR protein accumulation at 10 μM. Thus, we conclude that men who have been exposed to either DDT or DDE may produce a false-negative PSA test when screening for prostate cancer, resulting in an inaccurate clinical diagnosis. More importantly, prolonged exposure to these anti-androgens may mimic androgen ablation therapy in individuals with prostate cancer, thus exacerbating the condition by inadvertently forcing adaptation to this stress early in the disease.

  10. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  11. On the use of prostate-specific antigen for screening of prostate cancer in European Randomised Study for Screening of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bangma, Chris H; van Schaik, Ron H; Blijenberg, Bert G; Roobol, Monique J; Lilja, Hans; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2010-11-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been the main drive for early detection of prostate cancer (PCa), including in population-based screening as in the European Randomised Study for Screening of Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). The specificity of PSA to indicate men with biopsy detectable prostate cancer can be improved by adding information obtained by new biomarkers, such as PSA isoforms. This improvement is needed to increase the efficacy of the screening procedure for the population-based as well as the individual screening. Various PSA isoforms, kallikreins and molecular markers have been validated in various cohorts from ERSPC of men with and without PCa in order to design the optimal diagnostic procedure for screening asymptomatic men. So far, most promising results have been obtained from the analysis of free PSA, proPSA, nicked PSA and hK2. The use of free PSA in addition to total PSA reduces the number of negative sextant biopsies at a PSA cut-off level of 3 ng/ml at initial screening with 30%, at the cost of losing 10% of detectable cancers that are predominantly well differentiated on histology. Further addition of PSA isoforms and hK2 only improve ROC curves in selected samples by a maximum of 5%. Molecular markers like PCA3 and TMPRSS2 in urine do not appear to be useful but they have been assessed insufficiently so far. The level of PSA at initial screening is highly predictive for the chance of being diagnosed with PCa later on in life. The changes in PSA over time after initial screening (like PSA-velocity and PSA-doubling time) are statistically different between men with detectable cancers versus those without (PSA-doubling time 5.1 versus 6.1 years), but this does not contribute significantly to population-based screening overall. Changes in specificity need to be related to a cost efficacy evaluation in the final analysis of ERSPC. PMID:21047594

  12. Biopsy Quantitative Patohistology and Seral Values of Prostate Specific Antigen-Alpha (1) Antichymotrypsine Complex in Prediction of Adverse Pathology Findings after Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Tomasković, Igor; Milicić, Valerija; Tomić, Miroslav; Ruzić, Boris; Ulamec, Monika

    2015-09-01

    In this prospective study we examined the utility of parameters obtained on prostate needle biopsy and prostate specific antigen-alpha(1)-antichymotripsine complex (PSA-ACT) to predict adverse pathologic findings after radical prostatectomy. 45 consecutive patients assigned for radical prostatectomy due to clinically localized prostate cancer were included in the study. Prostate biopsy parameters such as number of positive cores, the greatest percentage of tumor in the positive cores, Gleason score, perineural invasion, unilaterality or bilaterality of the tumor were recorded. PSA-ACT was determined using sandwich immunoassay chemiluminiscent method (Bayer, Tarrytown, New York). We analyzed relationship of preoperative PSA, PSA-ACTand quantitative biopsy parameters with final pathology after prostatectomy. Adverse findings were considered when extracapsular extension of cancer (pT3) was noted. Postoperatively, 29 (64.4%) patients were diagnosed with pT2 disease and 16 (35.6%) with pT3 disease. There was a significant difference in localized vs. locally advanced disease in number of positive biopsy cores (p<0.001), greatest percentage of tumor in the core (p=0.008), localization of the tumor (p=0.003) and perineural invasion (p=0.004). Logistic regression was used to develop a model on the multivariate level. It included number of positive cores and PSA-ACT and was significant on our cohort with the reliability of 82.22%. The combination of PSA-ACT and a large scale of biopsy parameters could be used in prediction of adverse pathologic findings after radical prostatectomy. Clinical decisions and patients counselling could be influenced by these predictors but further confirmation on a larger population is necessary. PMID:26898067

  13. Synthesis and SAR of ⁹⁹mTc/Re-labeled small molecule prostate specific membrane antigen inhibitors with novel polar chelates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Genliang; Maresca, Kevin P; Hillier, Shawn M; Zimmerman, Craig N; Eckelman, William C; Joyal, John L; Babich, John W

    2013-03-01

    Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is recognized as an attractive molecular target for the development of radiopharmaceuticals to image and potentially treat metastatic prostate cancer. A series of novel (99m)Tc/Re-tricarbonyl radiolabeled PSMA inhibitors were therefore synthesized by the attachment of glutamate-urea-lysine (Glu-urea-Lys) and glutamate-urea-glutamate (Glu-urea-Glu) pharmacophore to single amino acid chelate (SAAC) where the SAAC ligand was either bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino (DPA), bis((1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl)amino (NMI), bis((1-(carboxymethyl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl)amino (CIM) or bis((1-(2-(bis(carboxymethyl)amino)-2-oxoethyl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl)amino (TIM). The in vitro binding affinity of the rhenium complexes was evaluated using PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. IC(50) values ranged from 3.8 ± 2 to >2000 nM. A linker between the SAAC chelate and pharmacophore was required for high affinity binding. However, extending the length of the linker did not substantially improve binding. PSMA binding was also influenced by the nature of the SAAC chelate. One of the most potent compounds, 23b (IC(50)=4.8 ± 2.7 nM), was radiolabeled with technetium tricarbonyl ({(99m)Tc(CO)(3)}(+)) to afford the {(99m)Tc(CO)(3)}(+) complex in excellent yield and high purity. This effort has led to the identification of a diverse series of promising high affinity {(99m)Tc(CO)(3)}(+) radiolabeled PSMA inhibitors. PMID:23333070

  14. Evaluation of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer in Patients with Prostate-specific Antigen <20 ng/ml

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Wang, Jian-Ye; Li, Chun-Mei; Zhang, Ya-Qun; Wang, Jian-Long; Wan, Ben; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Min; Li, Sa-Ying; Wan, Gang; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The European Society of Urogenital Radiology has built the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) for standardizing the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). This study evaluated the PI-RADS diagnosis method in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <20 ng/ml. Methods: A total of 133 patients with PSA <20 ng/ml were prospectively recruited. T2-weighted (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance images of the prostate were acquired before a 12-core transrectal prostate biopsy. Each patient's peripheral zone was divided into six regions on the images; each region corresponded to two of the 12 biopsy cores. T2WI, DWI, and T2WI + DWI scores were computed according to PI-RADS. The diagnostic accuracy of the PI-RADS score was evaluated using histopathology of prostate biopsies as the reference standard. Results: PCa was histologically diagnosed in 169 (21.2%) regions. Increased PI-RADS score correlated positively with increased cancer detection rate. The cancer detection rate for scores 1 to 5 was 2.8%, 15.0%, 34.6%, 52.6%, and 88.9%, respectively, using T2WI and 12.0%, 20.2%, 48.0%, 85.7%, and 93.3%, respectively, using DWI. For T2WI + DWI, the cancer detection rate was 1.5% (score 2), 13.5% (scores 3–4), 41.3% (scores 5–6), 75.9% (scores 7–8), and 92.3% (scores 9–10). The area under the curve for cancer detection was 0.700 (T2WI), 0.735 (DWI) and 0.749 (T2WI + DWI). The sensitivity and specificity were 53.8% and 89.2%, respectively, when using scores 5–6 as the cutoff value for T2WI + DWI. Conclusions: The PI-RADS score correlates with the PCa detection rate in patients with PSA <20 ng/ml. The summed score of T2WI + DWI has the highest accuracy in detection of PCa. However, the sensitivity should be further improved. PMID:27270538

  15. Prostate-Specific Antigen at 4 to 5 Years After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Is a Strong Predictor of Disease-Free Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Andrea C.; Morris, W. James; Lapointe, Vincent; Hamm, Jeremy; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom; McKenzie, Michael; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prognostic utility of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration at 45 to 60 months (48mPSA) after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-PB); (2) the predictors of 48mPSA; and (3) the prognostic utility of directional trends between PSA levels at 24, 36, and 48 months after LDR-PB. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2008, 2223 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer received LDR-PB monotherapy. A cohort of 1434 of these patients was identified with a documented 48mPSA and no evidence of disease relapse prior to the 48mPSA. In addition, a subset of this cohort (n=585) was identified with ≥72 months of follow-up and documented PSA values at both 24 and 36 months after implantation. Results: Median follow-up time was 76 months. Eight-year Kaplan-Meier disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 100% vs 73.4% for patients with 48mPSA ≤0.2 vs those with >0.2 ng/mL; 99.1% versus 53.8% for a 48mPSA threshold of ≤0.4 versus >0.4 ng/mL, respectively; and 97.3% versus 0% for a threshold of ≤1.0 versus >1.0 ng/mL, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the only factor predictive of DFS was 48mPSA (P<.0001). On subset analysis (n=585), 29 patients had a PSA rise (defined as >0.2 ng/mL) between 24 and 36 months, 24 patients had a rise between 36 and 48 months, and 11 patients had rises over both intervals. Failure rates in these patients were 52%, 79%, and 100%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, initial PSA, androgen deprivation therapy, and dose to 90% of the prostate significantly correlated with 48mPSA but together accounted for only ∼5% of its total variance. Conclusions: The 48mPSA after LDR-PB is highly predictive of long-term DFS. Patients with 48mPSA ≤0.4 ng/mL had a <1% risk of disease relapse at 8 years, whereas all patients with 48mPSA >1.0 ng/mL relapsed. Consecutive PSA rises of >0.2 ng/mL from 24 to 36 months and from 36 to 48 months were also highly predictive of subsequent failure.

  16. Design and preclinical evaluation of a 99mTc-labelled diabody of mAb J591 for SPECT imaging of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sensitive and specific detection of nodal status, sites of metastases and low-volume recurrent disease could greatly improve management of patients with advanced prostate cancer. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-established marker for prostate carcinoma with increased levels of expression in high-grade, hormone-refractory and metastatic disease. The monoclonal antibody (mAb) J591 is directed against an extracellular epitope of PSMA and has been shown to efficiently target disseminated disease including metastases in lymph nodes and bone. Its use as a diagnostic imaging agent however is limited due to its slow pharmacokinetics. In this study a diabody derived from mAb J591 was developed as a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer with improved pharmacokinetics for the detection of PSMA expression in prostate cancer. Methods A diabody in VH-VL orientation and with a C-terminal cysteine was expressed in HEK293T cells and purified by a combination of metal ion affinity and size exclusion chromatography. Specificity and affinity were determined in cell binding studies. For SPECT imaging, the diabody was site-specifically labelled with [99mTc(CO)3]+ via the C-terminal His tag and evaluated in a subcutaneous DU145/DU145-PSMA prostate carcinoma xenograft model. Results J591C diabody binds to PSMA-expressing cells with low nanomolar affinity (3.3 ± 0.2 nM). SPECT studies allowed imaging of tumour xenografts with high contrast from 4 h post injection (p.i.). Ex vivo biodistribution studies showed peak tumour uptake of the tracer of 12.1% ± 1.7% injected dose (ID)/g at 8 h p.i. with a tumour to blood ratio of 8.0. Uptake in PSMA-negative tumours was significantly lower with 6.3% ± 0.5% at 8 h p.i. (p < 0.001). Conclusion The presented diabody has favourable properties required to warrant its further development for antibody-based imaging of PSMA expression in prostate cancer, including PSMA-specific uptake

  17. Long-Term Follow-Up and Risk of Cancer Death After Radiation for Post-Prostatectomy Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Gregory P.; Du, Fei; Michalek, Joel E.; Hermans, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The results of salvage radiation therapy for rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy appear favorable, but the ultimate outcome is uncertain, given the relatively short follow-up in most studies. We report on a group of patients at a median follow-up of 13.9 years after salvage radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1995, 92 patients were referred postoperatively for radiation for a rising PSA level. PSA level at the time of referral ranged from 0.1 to 30.5 ng/ml (median, 1.5 ng/ml). The median time from surgery to radiation was 2.1 years (range,, 0.3-7.4 years). Radiation was directed to the prostatic fossa only with a median dose of 6,500 cGy (range, 6,000-7,000 cGy). Results: Eighty-five patients experienced a PSA drop after radiation, as predicted by Gleason score and PSA level at the start of radiation. Five- and 10-year biochemical failure free survival (BFFS) was 35% and 26%, respectively, and overall survival was 86% and 67%, respectively. Median survival was 12.0 years, and median BFF was 2.3 years. The presurgery PSA level was not predictive, but the PSA level at the start of radiation predicted a response. Patients with Gleason 8 to 9 cancers had a significantly higher progression rate than those with lower Gleason scores. There were no significant differences in outcomes based on pathology findings (none vs. positive margins vs. positive seminal vesicles). Overall, 22 (24%) patients died directly from prostate cancer, resulting in a 10-year cancer-specific survival rate of 82%. Multivariate analysis risk factors for dying of cancer were Gleason's score (8 to 9) and PSA at the start of radiation therapy (>1.0 ng/ml). Conclusions: Patients have a good response to salvage radiation therapy. A small but durable subgroup appears to have permanent control. In those for whom therapy fails, radiation delays the need for other salvage therapy, indicating at least a transient benefit to most patients.

  18. Relationship of spermatoscopy, prostatic acid phosphatase activity and prostate-specific antigen (p30) assays with further DNA typing in forensic samples from rape cases.

    PubMed

    Romero-Montoya, Lydia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Hugo; Pérez, Miguel Antonio; Argüello-García, Raúl

    2011-03-20

    In the forensic laboratory the biological analyses for rape investigation commonly include vaginal swabs as sample material combined to biochemical tests including sperm cytology (SC) and detection of acid phosphatase activity (AP) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA, p30) for the conclusive identification of semen components. Most reports comparing these tests relied on analysis of semen samples or donor swabs taken under controlled conditions; however their individual or combined efficacy under real live sampling conditions in different laboratories is largely unknown. We carried out SC, APA and PSA analyses in vaginal swabs collected from casework rapes submitted to Mexican Forensic Laboratories at Texcoco and Toluca. On the basis of positive and negative results from each assay and sample, data were classified into eight categories (I-VIII) and compared with those obtained in the two only similar studies reported in Toronto, Canada and Hong Kong, China. SC and APA assays had the higher overall positivity in Toluca and Texcoco samples respectively and otherwise PSA had a lower but very similar positivity between these two laboratories. When compared to the previous studies some similarities were found, namely similar frequencies (at a ratio of approximately 1 out of 3) of samples being positive or negative by all techniques (Categories I and VI respectively) and a comparable overall positivity of APA and SC but higher than that of PSA. Indeed the combined results of using SC, APA and PSA tests was considered as conclusive for semen detection from approximately 1 out of 3 cases (Category I) to approximately 1 out of 2 cases in a scenario where at least SC is positive, strongly presumptive in 2 out of 3 cases (with at least one test positive) and the remainder 1 out of 3 cases (Category VI) suggested absence of semen. By determining Y-STR polymorphisms (12-loci) in additional samples obtained at Toluca laboratory, complete DNA profiles were determined from all

  19. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time predicts clinical outcome and survival in prostate cancer patients treated with combined radiation and hormone therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Andrew K. . E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org; Levy, Larry B.; Cheung, Rex; Kuban, Deborah

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time predicts clinical outcomes in patients with prostate cancer that has been treated with combined radiation and hormone therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 621 men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy and hormone therapy between 1989 and 2003. 'Any' clinical failure was defined as any distant, nodal, or local failure, or the use of salvage therapy. 'True' clinical failure was defined as any distant, nodal, or local failure. PSA doubling time was calculated by using the log PSA values from patients with a PSA failure as defined by the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology Oncology consensus statement. One hundred thirty-seven men were at intermediate risk for PSA failure (as determined by T2b, Gleason score of 7, or PSA 10.1-0 ng/mL) and 484 men were at high risk for failure (T2c-4; Gleason 8-10; or PSA >20 ng/mL). Pretreatment PSA value, Gleason score, tumor stage, timing and duration of hormone therapy, radiation therapy dose, and PSA doubling time were analyzed for any associations with time to clinical failure by using Cox regression analysis. Estimates of survival were calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Pairwise comparisons were made by using the log-rank test. Results: Sixty-two men experienced any clinical failure, and 22 men experienced true clinical failure. Multivariate analysis revealed that pretreatment PSA (p = 0.013), Gleason score (p = 0.0019), and a PSA doubling time (PSADT) {<=}8 months (p < 0.001) were independently associated with time to any clinical failure. Tumor stage, hormone therapy timing, hormone therapy duration, and radiation therapy dose were not statistically significant on multivariate or univariate analysis. Only hormone therapy duration (p 0.008) and PSADT {<=}8 months (<0.001) were significantly associated with time to true clinical failure. The estimated 5-year rate of any clinical

  20. 89Zr-DFO-J591 for immunoPET imaging of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Jason P.; Divilov, Vadim; Bander, Neil H.; Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Larson, Steven M.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium-89 (t1/2 = 3.27 days) is a positron emitting radionuclide which displays excellent potential for use in the design and synthesis of radioimmunoconjugates for immunoPET. In these studies we report the preparation of 89Zr-DFO-J591, a novel 89Zr -labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) construct for targeted immunoPET imaging and quantification of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression in vivo. Methods The in vivo behavior of [89Zr]Zr-chloride, [89Zr]Zr-oxalate and [89Zr]Zr-DFO was investigated by using PET imaging. High level computational studies using density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to investigate the electronic structure of [89Zr]Zr-DFO and probe the nature of the complex in aqueous conditions. J591 was functionalized with the hexadentate, tris-hydroxamate ligand desferrioxamine B (DFO) and radiolabeled with [89Zr]Zr-oxalate at room temperature. ImmunoPET imaging experiments in male, athymic nu/nu mice bearing sub-cutaneous LNCaP (PSMA positive) or PC-3 (PSMA negative) tumors were conducted. The change in 89Zr-DFO-J591 tissue uptake in response to high- and low-specific-activity formulations in the two tumor models was measured by using acute biodistribution studies and immunoPET. Results Basic characterization of three important reagents, [89Zr]Zr-chloride and [89Zr]Zr-oxalate, as well as the complex, [89Zr]Zr-DFO, demonstrated that the nature of the 89Zr species has a dramatic effect on the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics. DFT calculations provide a rationale for the observed high in vivo stability of 89Zr-DFO-labeled mAbs and suggest that in aqueous conditions, [89Zr]Zr-DFO forms a thermodynamically stable, 8-coordinate complex by coordination of two water molecules. 89Zr-DFO-J591 was produced in high radiochemical yield (>77%) with radiochemical purity >99% and a specific-activity of 181.7±1.1 MBq/mg (4.91±0.03 mCi/mg). In vitro assays demonstrated that 89Zr-DFO-J591 had an initial immunoreactive fraction of

  1. The Practicality of Targeted Prostate Biopsy Procedures on the Dominant Side of the Tumor Determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Elderly Patients with High Serum Levels of Prostate-Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung Sik; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Sung Dae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the possibility of reducing the number of cores per prostate biopsy in elderly patients with high levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) without significantly lowering the detection rate of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Two hundreds sixteen men with PSA levels >20 ng/mL who underwent prostate biopsies from May 2009 to April 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. With the help of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the laterality of the dominant tumor burden in patients was determined. The results of targeted biopsies were compared with those of conventional biopsy procedures. Results The mean age and PSA level were 79.5 years and 81.3 ng/mL, respectively, and the overall diagnostic rate of sextant biopsies was 81.9% (177/216). MRI was able to show the tumor burden in 189 of the 216 patients. The detection rate of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided targeted biopsies was 87.3% (165/189). Detection rates were comparable with conventional biopsies (81.9% [177/216]) (p=0.23). Of the 177 men in whom the results of the sextant biopsy were positive, 12 men (6.8%) with PSA levels <29 ng/mL did not have any cancer cells according to targeted biopsies. However, all other patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer using the abovementioned techniques. Conclusions We believe that TRUS-guided targeted biopsies of the prostate in elderly men with high PSA levels could reduce the number of unnecessary cores per biopsy. However, a risk of detection loss remains. Therefore, we recommend that at least a sextant biopsy should be performed, even in elderly patients, in order to detect prostate cancer. PMID:26770939

  2. Socioeconomic determinants of prostate-specific antigen testing and estimation of the prevalence of undiagnosed prostate cancer in an elderly Polish population based on the PolSenior study

    PubMed Central

    Prajsner, Andrzej; Szybalska, Aleksandra; Piotrowicz, Karolina; Zejda, Jan; Więcek, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Socioeconomic determinants of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prevalence of undiagnosed prostate cancer (PCa) in the Polish population are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with PSA testing in elderly Polish men, and estimate the size of the population at risk of PCa related to PSA non-testing. Material and methods We analyzed questionnaire-derived data concerning PSA testing, obtained in 2567 elderly and 332 younger (age: 55–59) participants of the population-based PolSenior study. Additionally, PSA was measured in 2414 subjects. Results The PSA had previously been tested in 41.2% of elderly and in 24.8% of younger participants. Non-smoking status (OR = 2.06, p < 0.001), higher personal income (OR = 1.56, p < 0.001), better education (OR = 1.49, p = 0.001), previous white-collar work (OR = 1.37, p = 0.005), alcohol abstinence (OR = 1.28, p = 0.02), married status (OR = 1.24, p = 0.04), dependence in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) but not in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) (OR = 0.65, p < 0.001), and dependence in ADL (OR = 0.55, p < 0.001) were independent predictors of previous PSA testing in elderly participants. There were 31 elderly previously treated for PCa (calculated standardized prevalence: 935 per 100,000 elderly population). The PSA levels > 4 ng/ml were found in 12.8% of 65–74-year-old and 4.5% of 55–59-year-old previously non-tested participants. We calculated the standardized prevalence rate of undiagnosed PCa as approximately 1370 and 2352 cases per 100,000 population aged 55–59 and 65–74 years, respectively. Conclusions In Poland, 58.8% of elderly men have never had PSA tested. These were less likely to be functionally independent, married, better educated, non-smokers or to have previous office employment or higher than average personal income. Our data suggest substantial underdiagnosis of prostate cancer among Polish men. PMID:27695494

  3. The Role of Positron Emission Tomography With (68)Gallium (Ga)-Labeled Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) in the Management of Patients With Organ-confined and Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Treatment and After Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Baum, Richard Paul; Patel, Amit; Hughes, Robert; Alonzi, Roberto; Lane, Tim; Adshead, Jim; Vasdev, Nikhil

    2016-09-01

    The role of positron emission tomography (PET) with (68)Gallium (Ga)-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) imaging for prostate cancer is gaining prominence. Current imaging strategies, despite having progressed significantly, have limitations, in particular their ability to diagnose metastatic lymph node involvement. Preliminary results of PET with (68)Ga-labeled PSMA have shown encouraging results, particularly in the recurrent prostate cancer setting. Furthermore, the ability of PET with (68)Ga-labeled PSMA of playing a dual diagnostic and therapeutic setting (theranostics) is currently being investigated as well. PET with (68)Ga-labeled PSMA certainly has a role to play in bridging some of the voids in contemporary prostate cancer imaging tools. PMID:26790588

  4. Impact of the US Preventive Services Task Force Grade D Recommendation: Assessment of Evaluations for Elevated Prostate-specific Antigen and Prostate Biopsies in a Large Urology Group Practice Following Statement Revision

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Kathleen F; McMahon, Gregory C; Brown, Gordon A

    2015-01-01

    On October 7, 2011, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released their evidence statement and grade D recommendation against prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based prostate cancer screening. Using a time series design, we assessed the effect of this recommendation upon evaluations for elevated PSA levels and prostate biopsies in our large urology group practice. We found that, despite a 24.1% increase in total visits, the 32 urologists in our practice completed 16.4% fewer evaluations for elevated PSA levels (317 fewer evaluations per month; P = .017) and 21.4% fewer prostate biopsies (42 fewer biopsies per month; P = .001) in the 2 years following the USPSTF grade D recommendation. PMID:26543432

  5. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy compared with permanent prostate implantation in low-risk prostate cancer based on endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging and prostate-specific antigen level

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, Barby . E-mail: pickett@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Kurhanewicz, John; Pouliot, Jean; Weinberg, Vivian; Shinohara, Katsuto; Coakley, Fergus; Roach, Mack

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic response by comparing the time to resolution of spectroscopic abnormalities (TRSA) and the time to prostate-specific antigen level in low-risk prostate cancer patients after treatment with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) compared with permanent prostate implantation (PPI). Recent studies have suggested that the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer yields similar results for patients treated with 3D-CRT or PPI. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients, 25 in each group, who had been treated with 3D-CRT or PPI, had undergone endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging before and/or at varying times after therapy. The 3D-CRT patients had received radiation doses of {>=}72 Gy compared with 144 Gy for the PPI patients. The spectra from all usable voxels were examined for detectable levels of metabolic signal, and the percentages of atrophic and cancerous voxels were tabulated. Results: The median time to resolution of the spectroscopic abnormalities was 32.2 and 24.8 months and the time to the nadir prostate-specific antigen level was 52.4 and 38.0 months for the 3D-CRT and PPI patients, respectively. Of the 3D-CRT patients, 92% achieved negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 40% having complete metabolic atrophy. All 25 PPI patients had negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 60% achieving complete metabolic atrophy. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that metabolic and biochemical responses of the prostate are more pronounced after PPI. Our results have not proved PPI is more effective at curing prostate cancer, but they have demonstrated that it may be more effective at destroying prostate metabolism.

  6. Prostate-specific antigen as a biomarker of condom failure: comparison of three laboratory assays and self-reported condom use problems in a randomized trial of female condom performance☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Terri; Warner, Lee; Macaluso, Maurizio; Frezieres, Ron; Snead, Margaret; Wraxall, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for semen exposure, may provide a more objective measure of condom failure than subject self-reports. Methods for measuring PSA vary and their comparability with respect to assessing condom performance has not been adequately evaluated. This study compared results from three different PSA assays of vaginal samples collected by subjects in a randomized clinical trial which compared the performance of female condoms. Study Design We selected 30 pairs of pre- and post-coital vaginal samples from subjects who reported condom functionality problems or whose original PSA assay was positive. Samples were retested using three different PSA assays [quantitative enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA), rocket immune-electrophoresis (RIE) and chromatographic immunoassay (CIA)]. We compared the proportion of condom uses where the post-coital PSA result indicated semen exposure for each of the three assays. Results Despite varying levels of sensitivity, the results from all three assays were remarkably consistent. Self-reported condom failures did not correlate well with positive PSA results, suggesting that exclusive reliance on either PSA or user self-report may be inadequate for assessing condom functionality. Conclusion In combination with user self-report of condom failure, PSA testing provides a reliable, objective marker of condom functionality. Studies based on PSA testing may improve on conventional contraceptive clinical trials by offering a more direct assessment of a condom product's ability to prevent semen exposure. PMID:22386229

  7. Sensitivity improvement of a sandwich-type ELISA immunosensor for the detection of different prostate-specific antigen isoforms in human serum using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Zúñiga, Gabriela Guadalupe; Hernández-López, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    A gold millielectrode (GME) functionalized with a mixed (16-MHA + EG3SH) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was used to fabricate an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunosensor for the sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a prostate cancer (PCa) biomarker, in human serum samples. To address and minimize the issue of non-specific protein adsorption, an organic matrix (amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin) was assembled on the previously functionalized electrode surface to build up an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture: Au/16-MHA/EG3SH/amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin. The electrode was then exposed to serum samples at different concentrations of a sandwich-type immunocomplex molecule ((Btn)Ab-AgPSA-(HRP)Ab), and its interfacial properties were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Calibration curves for polarization resistance (RP) and capacitance (1/C) vs. total and free PSA concentrations were obtained and their analytical quality parameters were determined. This approach was compared with results obtained from a commercially available ELISA immunosensor. The results obtained in this work showed that the proposed immunosensor can be successfully applied to analyze serum samples of patients representative of the Mexican population.

  8. Sensitivity improvement of a sandwich-type ELISA immunosensor for the detection of different prostate-specific antigen isoforms in human serum using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Zúñiga, Gabriela Guadalupe; Hernández-López, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    A gold millielectrode (GME) functionalized with a mixed (16-MHA + EG3SH) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was used to fabricate an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunosensor for the sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a prostate cancer (PCa) biomarker, in human serum samples. To address and minimize the issue of non-specific protein adsorption, an organic matrix (amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin) was assembled on the previously functionalized electrode surface to build up an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture: Au/16-MHA/EG3SH/amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin. The electrode was then exposed to serum samples at different concentrations of a sandwich-type immunocomplex molecule ((Btn)Ab-AgPSA-(HRP)Ab), and its interfacial properties were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Calibration curves for polarization resistance (RP) and capacitance (1/C) vs. total and free PSA concentrations were obtained and their analytical quality parameters were determined. This approach was compared with results obtained from a commercially available ELISA immunosensor. The results obtained in this work showed that the proposed immunosensor can be successfully applied to analyze serum samples of patients representative of the Mexican population. PMID:26703258

  9. Long-term follow-up of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as pretreatment assessment in patients who undergo salvage radiotherapy for rising prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagda, Suneel N. . E-mail: snagda@gmail.com; Mohideen, Najeeb; Lo, Simon S.; Khan, Usman B.S.; Dillehay, Gary; Wagner, Robert; Campbell, Steven; Flanigan, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term failure patterns in patients who underwent an {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as part of their pretreatment assessment for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after prostatectomy and subsequently received local radiotherapy (RT) to the prostate bed. Methods: Fifty-eight patients were referred for evaluation of a rising PSA level after radical prostatectomy. All patients had negative findings for metastatic disease after abdominal/pelvis imaging with CT and isotope bone scans. All patients underwent a capromab pendetide scan, and the sites of uptake were noted. All patients were treated with local prostate bed RT (median dose 66.6 Gy). Results: Of the 58 patients, 20 had biochemical failure (post-RT PSA level >0.2 ng/mL or a rise to greater than the nadir PSA), including 6 patients with positive uptake outside the bed (positive elsewhere). The 4-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rates for patients with negative (53%), positive in the prostate bed alone (45%), or positive elsewhere (74%) scan findings did not differ significantly (p = 0.51). The positive predictive value of the capromab pendetide scan in detecting disease outside the bed was 27%. The capromab pendetide scan status had no effect on bRFS. Those with a pre-RT PSA level of <1 ng/mL had improved bRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: The capromab pendetide scan has a low positive predictive value in patients with positive elsewhere uptake and the 4-year bRFS was similar to that for those who did not exhibit positive elsewhere uptake. Therefore, patients with a postprostatectomy rising PSA level should considered for local RT on the basis of clinicopathologic factors.

  10. Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) did not affect cell viability despite increased androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Cardenas, H; Orihuela, P A

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether aqueous extract of Lepidium meyenii (red Maca) could inhibit growth, potentiate apoptotic activity of two anticancer drugs Taxol and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) or change mRNA expression for the androgen target genes, androgen receptor (Ar) and prostate-specific antigen (Psa) in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Red Maca aqueous extract at 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml was added to LNCaP cells, and viability was evaluated by the MTS assay at 24 or 48 hr after treatment. Furthermore, LNCaP cells were treated with 80 μg/ml of red Maca plus Taxol or 2ME 5 μM and viability was assessed 48 hr later. Finally, LNCaP cells were treated with red Maca 0, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml, and 12 hr later, mRNA level for Ar or Psa was assessed by real-time PCR. Treatment with red Maca did not affect viability of LNCaP cells. Apoptotic activity induced by Taxol and 2ME in LNCaP cells was not altered with red Maca treatment. Relative expression of the mRNA for Ar and Psa increased with red Maca 20 and 40 μg/ml, but not at 80 μg/ml. We conclude that red Maca aqueous extract does not have toxic effects, but stimulates androgen signalling in LNCaP cells. PMID:27681649

  11. Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) did not affect cell viability despite increased androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Cardenas, H; Orihuela, P A

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether aqueous extract of Lepidium meyenii (red Maca) could inhibit growth, potentiate apoptotic activity of two anticancer drugs Taxol and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) or change mRNA expression for the androgen target genes, androgen receptor (Ar) and prostate-specific antigen (Psa) in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Red Maca aqueous extract at 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml was added to LNCaP cells, and viability was evaluated by the MTS assay at 24 or 48 hr after treatment. Furthermore, LNCaP cells were treated with 80 μg/ml of red Maca plus Taxol or 2ME 5 μM and viability was assessed 48 hr later. Finally, LNCaP cells were treated with red Maca 0, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml, and 12 hr later, mRNA level for Ar or Psa was assessed by real-time PCR. Treatment with red Maca did not affect viability of LNCaP cells. Apoptotic activity induced by Taxol and 2ME in LNCaP cells was not altered with red Maca treatment. Relative expression of the mRNA for Ar and Psa increased with red Maca 20 and 40 μg/ml, but not at 80 μg/ml. We conclude that red Maca aqueous extract does not have toxic effects, but stimulates androgen signalling in LNCaP cells.

  12. Anti-Tumor Effect of the Alphavirus-based Virus-like Particle Vector Expressing Prostate-Specific Antigen in a HLA-DR Transgenic Mouse Model of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, V.; Tretyakova, I.; Alexander, R. B.; Pushko, P.; Klyushnenkova, E. N.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if an alphavirus-based vaccine encoding human Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) could generate an effective anti-tumor immune response in a stringent mouse model of prostate cancer. DR2bxPSA F1 male mice expressing human PSA and HLA-DRB1*1501 transgenes were vaccinated with virus-like particle vector encoding PSA (VLPV-PSA) followed by the challenge with Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate cells engineered to express PSA (TRAMP-PSA). PSA-specific cellular and humoral immune responses were measured before and after tumor challenge. PSA and CD8 reactivity in the tumors was detected by immunohistochemistry. Tumor growth was compared in vaccinated and control groups. We found that VLPV-PSA could infect mouse dendritic cells in vitro and induce a robust PSA-specific immune response in vivo. A substantial proportion of splenic CD8+ T cells (19.6±7.4%) produced IFNγ in response to the immunodominant peptide PSA65–73. In the blood of vaccinated mice, 18.4±4.1% of CD8+ T cells were PSA-specific as determined by the staining with H-2Db/PSA65–73 dextramers. VLPV-PSA vaccination also strongly stimulated production of IgG2a/b anti-PSA antibodies. Tumors in vaccinated mice showed low levels of PSA expression and significant CD8 T cell infiltration. Tumor growth in VLPV-PSA vaccinated mice was significantly delayed at early time points (p=0.002, Gehan-Breslow test). Our data suggest that TC-83-based VLPV-PSA vaccine can efficiently overcome immune tolerance to PSA, mediate rapid clearance of PSA-expressing tumor cells and delay tumor growth. The VLPV-PSA vaccine will undergo further testing for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. PMID:26319744

  13. Prostate specific antigen through the years.

    PubMed

    Kouriefs, Chryssanthos; Sahoyl, Mukhtar; Grange, Philippe; Muir, Gordon

    2009-12-01

    PSA was first identified in the 1960s. Some controversy exist as to who should be credited with its discovery as different groups, simultaneously, isolated the same protein but gave it a different name. PSA was firstly approved by FDA in 1986 as a test to aid the management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. In 1994, it was approved by the FDA as a diagnostic tool and up to date its beneficial role as a screening test is largely unknown. The results of the PLCO and ERSPC trials are awaited. Increasing interest is also emerging on the use of PSA as a tool in the management of BPH. Recently some embryonic data on the use of other novel markers such as EPCA and prostasomes is emerging and the data on PCA3 as a diagnostic tool for prostate cancer is maturing.

  14. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... What are some of the limitations and potential harms of the PSA test for prostate cancer screening? ... has been learned about both the benefits and harms of prostate cancer screening, a number of organizations ...

  15. Comparative analysis of prostate-specific antigen free survival outcomes for patients with low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer treatment by radical therapy. Results from the Prostate Cancer Results Study Group.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Peter; Billiet, Ignace; Bostwick, David; Dicker, Adam P; Frank, Steven; Immerzeel, Jos; Keyes, Mira; Kupelian, Patrick; Lee, W Robert; Machtens, Stefan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Moran, Brian J; Merrick, Gregory; Millar, Jeremy; Roach, Mack; Stock, Richard; Shinohara, Katsuto; Scholz, Mark; Weber, Ed; Zietman, Anthony; Zelefsky, Michael; Wong, Jason; Wentworth, Stacy; Vera, Robyn; Langley, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Very few comparative studies to date evaluate the results of treatment options for prostate cancer using the most sensitive measurement tools. PSA has been identified as the most sensitive tool for measuring treatment effectiveness. To date, comprehensive unbiased reviews of all the current literature are limited for prostate cancer. This is the first large scale comprehensive review of the literature comparing risk stratified patients by treatment option and with long-term follow-up. The results of the studies are weighted, respecting the impact of larger studies on overall results. The study identified a lack of uniformity in reporting results amongst institutions and centres. A large number of studies have been conducted on the primary therapy of prostate cancer but very few randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The comparison of outcomes from individual studies involving surgery (radical prostatectomy or robotic radical prostatectomy), external beam radiation (EBRT) (conformal, intensity modulated radiotherapy, protons), brachytherapy, cryotherapy or high intensity focused ultrasound remains problematic due to the non-uniformity of reporting results and the use of varied disease outcome endpoints. Technical advances in these treatments have also made long-term comparisons difficult. The Prostate Cancer Results Study Group was formed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of prostate cancer treatments. This international group conducted a comprehensive literature review to identify all studies involving treatment of localized prostate cancer published during 2000-2010. Over 18,000 papers were identified and a further selection was made based on the following key criteria: minimum/median follow-up of 5 years; stratification into low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups; clinical and pathological staging; accepted standard definitions for prostate-specific antigen failure; minimum patient

  16. Prostate-Specific Antigen Persistence After Radical Prostatectomy as a Predictive Factor of Clinical Relapse-Free Survival and Overall Survival: 10-Year Data of the ARO 96-02 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegel, Thomas; Bartkowiak, Detlef; Bottke, Dirk; Thamm, Reinhard; Hinke, Axel; Stöckle, Michael; Wirth, Manfred; Störkel, Stephan; Golz, Reinhard; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Hofmann, Rainer; Feldmann, Horst-Jürgen; Kälble, Tilman; Siegmann, Alessandra; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang; Steiner, Ursula; Miller, Kurt

    2015-02-01

    Objective: The ARO 96-02 trial primarily compared wait-and-see (WS, arm A) with adjuvant radiation therapy (ART, arm B) in prostate cancer patients who achieved an undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after radical prostatectomy (RP). Here, we report the outcome with up to 12 years of follow-up of patients who retained a post-RP detectable PSA and received salvage radiation therapy (SRT, arm C). Methods and Materials: For the study, 388 patients with pT3-4pN0 prostate cancer with positive or negative surgical margins were recruited. After RP, 307 men achieved an undetectable PSA (arms A + B). In 78 patients the PSA remained above thresholds (median 0.6, range 0.05-5.6 ng/mL). Of the latter, 74 consented to receive 66 Gy to the prostate bed, and SRT was applied at a median of 86 days after RP. Clinical relapse-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Patients with persisting PSA after RP had higher preoperative PSA values, higher tumor stages, higher Gleason scores, and more positive surgical margins than did patients in arms A + B. For the 74 patients, the 10-year clinical relapse-free survival rate was 63%. Forty-three men had hormone therapy; 12 experienced distant metastases; 23 patients died. Compared with men who did achieve an undetectable PSA, the arm-C patients fared significantly worse, with a 10-year metastasis-free survival of 67% versus 83% and overall survival of 68% versus 84%, respectively. In Cox regression analysis, Gleason score ≥8 (hazard ratio [HR] 2.8), pT ≥ 3c (HR 2.4), and extraprostatic extension ≥2 mm (HR 3.6) were unfavorable risk factors of progression. Conclusions: A persisting PSA after prostatectomy seems to be an important prognosticator of clinical progression for pT3 tumors. It correlates with a higher rate of distant metastases and with worse overall survival. A larger prospective study is required to determine which patient subgroups

  17. Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Hyun; Shin, Hyun Woo; Jung, Ae Ryang; Kwon, Oh Sung; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Park, Jaesung; Lee, Ji Youl

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We aimed to investigate the prognostic potential of prostate-specific EVs in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Plasma and prostate tissue were collected from patients who underwent surgery for PCa (n = 82) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, n = 28). To analyze the quantity of EVs in prostate, we performed transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immuno-TEM with CD63 and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and immunofluorescence staining. After EV isolation from plasma, CD63 and PSMA concentration was measured using ELISA kits. PSMA-positive areas in prostate differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (2.4, 8.2, 17.5, 26.5%, p < 0.001). Plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (21.9, 43.4, 49.2, 59.9 ng/mL, p < 0.001), and ROC curve analysis indicated that plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration differentiated PCa from BPH (AUC 0.943). Patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration had greater prostate volume (50.2 vs. 33.4 cc, p < 0.001) and lower pathologic Gleason score (p = 0.025). During the median follow-up of 18 months, patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration tended to have a lower risk of biochemical failure than those with higher levels of prostate-specific EVs (p = 0.085). PMID:27503267

  18. Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Hyun; Shin, Hyun Woo; Jung, Ae Ryang; Kwon, Oh Sung; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Park, Jaesung; Lee, Ji Youl

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) may play an important role in cancer development and progression. We aimed to investigate the prognostic potential of prostate-specific EVs in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Plasma and prostate tissue were collected from patients who underwent surgery for PCa (n = 82) or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, n = 28). To analyze the quantity of EVs in prostate, we performed transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immuno-TEM with CD63 and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and immunofluorescence staining. After EV isolation from plasma, CD63 and PSMA concentration was measured using ELISA kits. PSMA-positive areas in prostate differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (2.4, 8.2, 17.5, 26.5%, p < 0.001). Plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration differed in patients with BPH, and low-, intermediate-, and high-risk PCa (21.9, 43.4, 49.2, 59.9 ng/mL, p < 0.001), and ROC curve analysis indicated that plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration differentiated PCa from BPH (AUC 0.943). Patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration had greater prostate volume (50.2 vs. 33.4 cc, p < 0.001) and lower pathologic Gleason score (p = 0.025). During the median follow-up of 18 months, patients with lower plasma PSMA-positive EV concentration tended to have a lower risk of biochemical failure than those with higher levels of prostate-specific EVs (p = 0.085). PMID:27503267

  19. Cellular prostatic acid phosphatase, a PTEN-functional homologue in prostate epithelia, functions as a prostate-specific tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; Ingersoll, Matthew A.; Batra, Surinder K.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2014-01-01

    The inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) plays a vital role in the progression of human cancers. Nevertheless, those ubiquitous TSGs have been shown with limited roles in various stages of diverse carcinogenesis. Investigation on identifying unique TSG, especially for early stage of carcinogenesis, is imperative. As such, the search for organ-specific TSGs has emerged as a major strategy in cancer research. Prostate cancer (PCa) has the highest incidence in solid tumors in US males. Cellular prostatic acid phosphatase (cPAcP) is a prostate-specific differentiation antigen. Despite intensive studies over the past several decades on PAcP as a PCa biomarker, the role of cPAcP as a PCa-specific tumor suppressor has only recently been emerged and validated. The mechanism underlying the pivotal role of cPAcP as a prostate-specific TSG is, in part, due to its function as a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) as well as a phosphoinositide phosphatase (PIP), an apparent functional homologue to Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in PCa cells. This review is focused on discussing the function of this authentic prostate-specific tumor suppressor and the mechanism behind the loss of cPAcP expression leading to prostate carcinogenesis. We review other phosphatases’ roles as TSGs which regulate oncogenic PI3K signaling in PCa and discuss the functional similarity between cPAcP and PTEN in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:24747769

  20. Prostate-specific targeting of the aqueous root extract of Croton membranaceus in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Afriyie, D K; Asare, G A; Bugyei, K; Asiedu-Gyekye, I J; Tackie, R; Adjei, S

    2014-09-01

    Croton membranaceus Müll.Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) is used for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) treatment. The study aimed at investigating organs that the aqueous root extracts of C. membranaceus (CMARE) target, which is absent in literature. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats (100-140 g) were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group 1, the control group received distilled water. Groups 2, 3 and 4 received 30, 150 and 300 mg kg(-1) b.wt CMARE respectively (oral gavage). Rats fed 90 days the standard chow diet ad libitum. Upon sacrifice, major organs were histologically examined and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) biochemically determined. Only the prostate was abnormal. Histologically, H&E staining revealed thickness and infoldings of the epithelial cells shrinking with increasing dose. The 30 mg kg(-1) group showed low columnar or flattened epithelium cells, whereas the columnar epithelium infoldings of the 150 mg kg(-1) b.wt and 300 mg kg(-1) b.wt groups were virtually nonexistent. The acini of the control, 30 mg kg(-1) b.wt group and the 150 mg kg(-1) b.wt groups showed clear pinkish secretion. However, secretion of the high-dose group appeared light pink in colour and the stroma cells appeared much darker than all the treated and control group. C. membranaceus targets the prostate with significant PSA reduction (P < 0.01).

  1. Comparative Analysis of Gingival Tissue Antigen Presentation Pathways in Aging and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, O.A.; Novak, M.J.; Kirakodu, S.; Orraca, L.; Chen, K.C.; Strom-berg, A.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Gingival tissues of periodontitis lesions contribute to local elevations in mediators, including both specific T cell and antibody immune responses to oral bacterial antigens. Thus, antigen processing and presentation activities must exist in these tissues to link antigen-presenting cells with adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that alterations in the transcriptome of antigen processing and presentation genes occur in aging gingival tissues and that periodontitis enhances these differences reflecting tissues less capable of immune resistance to oral pathogens. Materials and Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=34) from 3–23 years of age were examined. A buccal gingival sample from healthy or periodontitis sites were obtained, total RNA isolated, and microarray analysis was used to describe the transcriptome. Results The results demonstrated increased transcription of genes related to the MHC class II and negative regulation of NK cells with aging in healthy gingival tissues. In contrast, both adult and aging periodontitis tissues showed decreased transcription of genes for MHC class II antigens, coincident with up-regulation of MHC class I-associated genes. Conclusion These transcriptional changes suggest a response of healthy aging tissues through the class II pathway (i.e., endocytosed antigens) and altered responses in periodontitis that could reflect host-associated self-antigens or targeting cytosolic intra-cellular microbial pathogens. PMID:24304139

  2. Electrochemical assay of active prostate-specific antigen (PSA) using ferrocene-functionalized peptide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ning; He, Yuqing; Mao, Xun; Sun, Yuhan; Zhang, Xibao; Li, Chen-Zhong; Lin, Yuehe; Liu, Guodong

    2010-03-24

    This paper presents a novel approach to electrochemically determine enzymatically active PSA using ferrocene-functionalized helix peptide (CHSSLKQK). The principle of electrochemical measurement is based on the specific proteolytic cleavage events of the FC-peptide on the gold electrode surface in the presence of PSA, resulting the change of the current signal of the electrode. The percentage of the decreased current is linear with the concentration of active PSA at the range of 0.5-40 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.2 ng/mL. The direct transduction of peptide cleavage events into an electrical signal provides a simple, sensitive method for detecting the enzymatic activity of PSA and determining the active PSA concentration.

  3. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Screening and New Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer (PCa)

    PubMed Central

    Rittenhouse, Harry; Hu, Xinhai; Cammann, Henning; Jung, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Abstract PSA screening reduces PCa-mortality but the disadvantages overdiagnosis and overtreatment require multivariable risk-prediction tools to select appropriate treatment or active surveillance. This review explains the differences between the two largest screening trials and discusses the drawbacks of screening and its meta-analysisxs. The current American and European screening strategies are described. Nonetheless, PSA is one of the most widely used tumor markers and strongly correlates with the risk of harboring PCa. However, while PSA has limitations for PCa detection with its low specificity there are several potential biomarkers presented in this review with utility for PCa currently being studied. There is an urgent need for new biomarkers especially to detect clinically significant and aggressive PCa. From all PSA-based markers, the FDA-approved prostate health index (phi) shows improved specificity over percent free and total PSA. Another kallikrein panel, 4K, which includes KLK2 has recently shown promise in clinical research studies but has not yet undergone formal validation studies. In urine, prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) has also been validated and approved by the FDA for its utility to detect PCa. The potential correlation of PCA3 with cancer aggressiveness requires more clinical studies. The detection of the fusion of androgen-regulated genes with genes of the regulatory transcription factors in tissue of ~50% of all PCa-patients is a milestone in PCa research. A combination of the urinary assays for TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion and PCA3 shows an improved accuracy for PCa detection. Overall, the field of PCa biomarker discovery is very exciting and prospective.

  4. Age-dependent B cell Autoimmunity to a Myelin Surface Antigen in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katherine A.; Chitnis, Tanuja; Newcombe, Jia; Franz, Bettina; Kennedy, Julia; McArdel, Shannon; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin; Pohl, Daniela; Gagne, Donald; Ness, Jayne M.; Tenembaum, Silvia; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Viglietta, Vissia; Wong, Susan J.; Tavakoli, Norma P.; de Seze, Jerome; Khoury, Samia J.; Bar-Or, Amit; Hafler, David A.; Banwell, Brenda; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) typically manifests in early to mid adulthood, but there is increasing recognition of pediatric-onset MS, aided by improvements in imaging techniques. The immunological mechanisms of disease are largely unexplored in pediatric-onset MS, in part because studies have historically focused on adult-onset disease. We investigated autoantibodies to myelin surface antigens in a large cohort of pediatric MS cases by flow cytometric labeling of transfectants that expressed different myelin proteins. While antibodies to native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) were uncommon among adult-onset patients, a subset of pediatric patients had serum antibodies that brightly labeled the MOG transfectant. Antibodies to two other myelin surface antigens were largely absent. Affinity purification of MOG antibodies as well as competition of binding with soluble MOG documented their binding specificity. The prevalence of such autoantibodies was highest among patients with a very early onset of MS: 38.7% of patients less than 10 years of age at disease onset had MOG antibodies, compared to 14.7% of patients in the 10–18 year age group. B cell autoimmunity to this myelin surface antigen is therefore most common in patients with a very early onset of MS. PMID:19687098

  5. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing gammaH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2mug/mL], Trinovin [10mug/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 mug/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10mug/mL) and Prostate Rx (6mug/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  6. Definition of a physiologic aging autoantigen by using synthetic peptides of membrane protein band 3: localization of the active antigenic sites.

    PubMed

    Kay, M M; Marchalonis, J J; Hughes, J; Watanabe, K; Schluter, S F

    1990-08-01

    Senescent cell antigen (SCA), an aging antigen, is a protein that appears on old cells and marks them for removal by the immune system in mammals. It is derived from band 3, a ubiquitous membrane transport protein found in diverse cell types and tissues. We have used synthetic peptides to identify aging antigenic sites on band 3, using a competitive inhibition assay and immunoblotting with IgG directed against the aging antigen on old cells. Results indicate that: (i) the active antigenic sites of the aging antigen reside on membrane protein band 3 residues that are extracellular regions implicated in anion transport (residues 538-554 and 788-827); (ii) a putative ankyrin-binding-region peptide is not involved in SCA activity; and (iii) carbohydrate moieties are not required for the antigenicity or recognition of SCA because synthetic peptides alone abolish binding of senescent cell IgG to erythrocytes. One of the putative transport sites that contributes to the aging antigen is located toward the carboxyl terminus. A model of band 3 is presented. Localization of the active antigenic site on the band 3 molecule facilitates definition of the molecular changes occurring during aging that initiate molecular as well as cellular degeneration. PMID:1696010

  7. Influenza A infection enhances antigen-induced airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness in young but not aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Birmingham, Janette M.; Gillespie, Virginia L.; Srivastava, Kamal; Li, Xiu-Min; Busse, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although morbidity and mortality rates from asthma are highest in patients > 65 years of age, the effect of older age on airway inflammation in asthma is not well established. Objective To investigate age-related differences in the promotion of allergic inflammation after influenza A viral respiratory infection on antigen specific IgE production, antigen-induced airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness in mice. Methods To accomplish this objective, the following model system was used. Young (six-week) and aged (18-month) BALB/c mice were first infected with a non-lethal dose of influenza virus A (H/HK×31). Mice were then ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized during the acute-infection (3-days post inoculation) and then chronically underwent challenge to the airways with OVA. Forty-eight hours after the final OVA-challenge, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) cellular and cytokine profile, antigen-specific IgE and IgG1, and lung tissue inflammation were measured. Results Age-specific differences were noted on the effect of a viral infection, allergic sensitization, airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Serum OVA-specific IgE was significantly increased in only the aged mice infected with influenza virus. Despite greater morbidity (e.g. weight loss and sickness scores) during the acute infection in the 18-month old mice that were OVA-sensitized there was little effect on the AHR and BALF cellular differential. In contrast, BALF neutrophils and AHR increased, but eosinophils decreased in 6-week mice that were OVA-sensitized during an acute influenza infection. Conclusion With increased age in a mouse model, viral infection prior to antigen sensitization affects the airway and systemic allergic response differently. These differences may reflect distinct phenotypic features of allergic inflammation in older patients with asthma PMID:25039815

  8. Age-specific genetic and antigenic variations of influenza A viruses in Hong Kong, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peihua; Wong, Chit-Ming; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Wang, Xiling; Chan, King-Pan; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Poon, Leo Lit-Man; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Age-specific genetic and antigenic variations of influenza viruses have not been documented in tropical and subtropical regions. We implemented a systematic surveillance program in two tertiary hospitals in Hong Kong Island, to collect 112 A(H1N1)pdm09 and 254 A(H3N2) positive specimens from 2013 to 2014. Of these, 56 and 72 were identified as genetic variants of the WHO recommended vaccine composition strains, respectively. A subset of these genetic variants was selected for hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests, but none appeared to be antigenic variants of the vaccine composition strains. We also found that genetic and antigenicity variations were similar across sex and age groups of ≤18 yrs, 18 to 65 yrs, and ≥65 yrs. Our findings suggest that none of the age groups led other age groups in genetic evolution of influenza virus A strains. Future studies from different regions and longer study periods are needed to further investigate the age and sex heterogeneity of influenza viruses. PMID:27453320

  9. Age-specific genetic and antigenic variations of influenza A viruses in Hong Kong, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peihua; Wong, Chit-Ming; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Wang, Xiling; Chan, King-Pan; Peiris, Joseph Sriyal Malik; Poon, Leo Lit-Man; Yang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Age-specific genetic and antigenic variations of influenza viruses have not been documented in tropical and subtropical regions. We implemented a systematic surveillance program in two tertiary hospitals in Hong Kong Island, to collect 112 A(H1N1)pdm09 and 254 A(H3N2) positive specimens from 2013 to 2014. Of these, 56 and 72 were identified as genetic variants of the WHO recommended vaccine composition strains, respectively. A subset of these genetic variants was selected for hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests, but none appeared to be antigenic variants of the vaccine composition strains. We also found that genetic and antigenicity variations were similar across sex and age groups of ≤18 yrs, 18 to 65 yrs, and ≥65 yrs. Our findings suggest that none of the age groups led other age groups in genetic evolution of influenza virus A strains. Future studies from different regions and longer study periods are needed to further investigate the age and sex heterogeneity of influenza viruses. PMID:27453320

  10. Androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene polymorphisms and breast cancer in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2005-12-01

    Several previous studies have found the CAG repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene to be associated with breast cancer risk among some groups of Caucasian and Asian women. In a population-based case-control study of 488 African-American women (239 cases and 249 controls), we examined this polymorphism along with a polymorphism (-158 G/A) in an androgen-regulated gene (PSA) whose expression has been correlated with breast cancer prognosis. Overall, we did not observe any significant association between the CAG repeat polymorphism and breast cancer risk. However, among women with a first-degree family history of breast cancer, longer CAG repeats were associated with a significantly increased risk. Women carrying at least one longer allele [(CAG)n > or = 22] had a 3-fold increased risk compared to those with two shorter alleles (odds ratio, 3.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-9.36). There was no significant association between the PSA gene polymorphism and breast cancer risk, nor was there significant gene-gene interaction. In summary, our results further support that shorter CAG repeats (stronger AR transactivation activity) may reduce the risk of breast cancer, at least among some groups of women. Our data, however, are unable to provide evidence that PSA is the pathway through which the protective effect of androgens operates.

  11. The prognostic value of prostate specific antigen in the follow-up of patients after radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Würz, U; Bach, D

    1995-01-01

    The authors compared the PSA levels in 19 patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy between 1986 and 1991. Measurements were done preoperatively, 3-4 weeks postoperatively and at the end of 1993. The increase of the average preoperative level corresponds to the stage of the disease (local, local advanced, metastatic lymph nodes). Patients with high preoperative PSA levels have a higher risk for progression, even if their postoperative PSA values are normal. While the predictive value of low PSA levels measured immediately after prostatectomy is small, high postoperative PSA levels are unfavourable prognostic signs.

  12. Body Composition and Serum Prostate Specific Antigen: A Review and Findings from the Flint Men’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L.; Faerber, Gary J.; Morgenstern, Hal; Werny, David; Wojno, Kirk; Halstead-Nussloch, Bronwen; Cooney, Kathleen A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies suggest obesity is associated with lower serum PSA, perhaps influencing recommendation for prostate biopsy, potentially explaining part of the observed poorer prognosis among obese men. African American men have the highest rates of prostate cancer and are more likely to die of the disease making early detection a priority in this group. We present findings from the Flint Men’s Health Study, a study in African American men, which are consistent with most studies suggesting that overweight men have PSA levels 0.15–0.30 ng/mL lower than those who are not overweight. We have coupled our results with a systematic review of publications in this area. PMID:18308373

  13. Improving the Specificity of the Prostate-Specific Antigen Substrate Glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln as a Promoiety.

    PubMed

    Aloysius, Herve; Hu, Longqin

    2015-10-01

    To develop PSA peptide substrates with improved specificity and plasma stability from the known substrate sequence glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln, systematic replacements of the N-terminal segment with D-retro-inverso-peptides were performed with the incorporation of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (7-AMC) after Gln for convenient fluorometric determination and ranking of the PSA substrate activity. The D-retro-inverso-peptide conjugates with P2-P5 D-amino acid substitutions were moderate but poorer PSA substrates as compared to the original peptide, suggesting that inversion of the amide bonds and/or incorporation of the additional atom as in the urea linker adversely affected PSA binding. However, P5 substitution of Hyp with Ser showed significant improvements in PSA cleavage rate; the resulting AMC conjugate, glutaryl-Ser-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (11), exhibited the fastest PSA cleavage rate of 351 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA. In addition, GABA←mGly-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (conjugate 6) was the second best PSA substrate and released 7-AMC at a rate of 225 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA as compared to 171 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA for the control conjugate glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC. Incubations of selected AMC conjugates with mouse and human plasma revealed that GABA←D-Ser-ψ[NH-CO-NH]-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (5) and GABA←mGly-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (6) were most stable to non-PSA-mediated proteolysis. Our results suggest that the PSA specificity of glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln is improved with Ser and mGly substitutions of Hyp at the P5.

  14. Prostate-specific acid phosphatase versus acid phosphatase in monitoring patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Killian, C S; Vargas, F P; Slack, N H; Murphy, G P; Chu, T M

    1982-01-01

    Serial levels of PAP and AcP activity were compared for their relative values in monitoring 57 early and 33 advanced prostate cancer patients. Several findings regarding the patients' disease status and the enzyme levels have been observed that may be beneficial to therapeutic management of these patients. They are: [1] an elevated PAP activity in disease recurrence and disease progression generally precedes an elevated AcP activity, and thus represents a more sensitive index for patients with early and advanced disease; [2] serial mean levels of PAP activity greater than the mean + 3 SD are more predictive for disease recurrence and progression than are those of AcP activity in both groups of patients; [3] PAP activity is a more sensitive monitor for changes in objective treatment response than is AcP activity; and [4] PAP is more specific than AcP for prostate, thus offering a more reliable marker to identify metastasis of unknown origin, or to confirm metastasis derived from a primary prostate tumor that may have been suggested by other non-prostate-specific marker[s]. In addition, data suggest a favorable prognosis for patients receiving therapy as inferred by a serial mean of PAP activity that is less than mean + 3 SD. PMID:6953924

  15. A resolution expressing the sense of the Senate that the United States Preventive Services Task Force should reevaluate its recommendations against prostate-specific antigen-based screening for prostate cancer for men in all age groups in consultation with appropriate specialists.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Sessions, Jeff [R-AL

    2013-09-23

    09/23/2013 Referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (text of measure as introduced: CR S6684-6685) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Highly specific transgene expression mediated by a complex adenovirus vector incorporating a prostate-specific amplification feedback loop

    PubMed Central

    Woraratanadharm, Jan; Rubinchik, Semyon; Yu, Hong; Fan, Fan; Morrow, Scotty M.; Dong., John Y.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Development of novel therapeutic agents is needed to address the problems of locally recurrent, metastatic, and advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer. We have constructed a novel complex adenovirus (Ad) vector regulation system that incorporates both the prostate-specific ARR2PB promoter and a positive feedback loop using the TRE promoter to enhance gene expression. This regulation strategy involves the incorporation of the TRE upstream of the prostate-specific ARR2PB promoter to enhance its activity with Tet-regulation. The expressions of both GFP and tTA were placed under the control of these TRE-ARR2PB promoters, so that in the cells of prostate origin, a positive feedback loop would be generated. This design greatly enhanced GFP reporter expression in prostate cancer cells, while retaining tight control of expression in non-prostate cancer cells, even at MOI as high as 1000. This novel positive feedback loop with prostate specificity (PFLPS) regulation system we have developed may have broad applications for expressing not only high levels of toxic proteins in cancer cells but alternatively could be manipulated to regulate essential genes in a highly efficient conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vector specifically directed to prostate cancer cells. The PFLPS regulation system, therefore, serves as a promising new approach in the development of both a specific and effective vector for cancer gene therapy. PMID:15229631

  17. Age-related impairment of humoral response to influenza is associated with changes in antigen specific T follicular helper cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Julie S; Masters, April R; Hopkins, Jacob W; Haynes, Laura

    2016-01-01

    T follicular helper (TFH) cell responses are essential for generation of protective humoral immunity during influenza infection. Aging has a profound impact on CD4+ T cell function and humoral immunity, yet the impact of aging on antigen specific TFH responses remains unclear. Influenza specific TFH cells are generated in similar numbers in young and aged animals during infection, but TFH cells from aged mice exhibit significant differences, including reduced expression of ICOS and elevated production of IL-10 and IFNγ, which potentially impairs interaction with cognate B cells. Also, more influenza specific T cells in aged mice have a regulatory phenotype, which could contribute to the impaired TFH function. Adoptive transfer studies with young T cells demonstrated that TGF-β1 in the aged environment can drive increased regulatory T cell accumulation. Aging and the aged environment thus impact antigen specific TFH cell function and formation, which contribute to reduced protective humoral responses. PMID:27109638

  18. Effect of Lactobacillus paracasei NCC2461 on antigen-specific T-cell mediated immune responses in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Karine; Benyacoub, Jalil; Moser, Mireille; Sanchez-Garcia, J; Serrant, Patrick; Segura-Roggero, Iris; Reuteler, Gloria; Blum, Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Aging is associated with a reduced capacity to mount proper immune responses, in particular to vaccines. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria may improve the immune status of the elderly; however, there is little evidence showing an effect of these bacteria on humoral and cellular immune responses. In the present study, the immunomodulatory capacity of the probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei NCC2461 combined or not with a prebiotic composition, FOS/inulin, was examined in aged mice. Male C57BL/6J mice (21-months-old) were allocated to one of three groups fed ad libitum for 44 days with different diets: a normal diet (control), a normal diet plus NCC2461 given in the drinking water, or a diet containing FOS/inulin plus NCC2461 in the drinking water. All mice were immunized on day 15 and challenged on day 22 with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). T helper (Th)1 cell-dependent immune responses (anti-KLH immunoglobulin G(2a) [IgG(2a)] levels and delayed type hypersensitivity response) were increased significantly in NCC2461-supplemented mice when compared to controls. Supplementation with FOS/inulin did not further improve the immune-enhancing effect mediated by the probiotic. Splenocyte proliferation, T cell subsets, systemic total IgG levels, and mucosal total IgA responses were not affected. Interestingly, supplementation with NCC2461 modulated the intestinal microbiota composition by increasing the numbers of bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. In conclusion, oral intake of L. paracasei NCC2461 by aged mice enhanced the specific adaptive immune response to in vivo antigenic challenge without altering other cellular and humoral immune responses. The poor responsiveness to antigenic challenge, frequently observed in elderly people, may be improved by supplementation with L. paracasei NCC2461. PMID:18922048

  19. Aging affects B-cell antigen receptor repertoire diversity in primary and secondary lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Tabibian-Keissar, Hilla; Hazanov, Lena; Schiby, Ginette; Rosenthal, Noemie; Rakovsky, Aviya; Michaeli, Miri; Shahaf, Gitit Lavy; Pickman, Yishai; Rosenblatt, Kinneret; Melamed, Doron; Dunn-Walters, Deborah; Mehr, Ramit; Barshack, Iris

    2016-02-01

    The elderly immune system is characterized by reduced responses to infections and vaccines, and an increase in the incidence of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Age-related deficits in the immune system may be caused by peripheral homeostatic pressures that limit bone marrow B-cell production or migration to the peripheral lymphoid tissues. Studies of peripheral blood B-cell receptor spectratypes have shown that those of the elderly are characterized by reduced diversity, which is correlated with poor health status. In the present study, we performed for the first time high-throughput sequencing of immunoglobulin genes from archived biopsy samples of primary and secondary lymphoid tissues in old (74 ± 7 years old, range 61-89) versus young (24 ± 5 years old, range 18-45) individuals, analyzed repertoire diversities and compared these to results in peripheral blood. We found reduced repertoire diversity in peripheral blood and lymph node repertoires from old people, while in the old spleen samples the diversity was larger than in the young. There were no differences in somatic hypermutation characteristics between age groups. These results support the hypothesis that age-related immune frailty stems from altered B-cell homeostasis leading to narrower memory B-cell repertoires, rather than changes in somatic hypermutation mechanisms.

  20. Dose of house dust mite antigen (P1) inhaled by infants aged one month

    SciTech Connect

    Carswell, F.; Clark, J.; Robinson, P.; Platts-Mills, T.A.

    1983-11-01

    A survey of the habitats occupied by 12 infants of one month of age revealed that approximately 10% of their day was spent in conditions of potential exposure to the major (P1) allergen of the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. A respiratory pump which reproduced the minute ventilation of an infant was placed in representative infant habitats. The P1 allergen trapped by the filter in this pump was measured as an estimate of infants' allergen intake. Detectable P1 intake was only present when there was active air disturbance (bed making and vacuuming). The average P1 intake was approximately 3 ng P1/24 hours. Comparison of this P1 intake with that which sensitizes in other situations suggests that it is usually inadequate to sensitize infants.

  1. Prospective Evaluation of Operating Characteristics of Prostate Cancer Detection Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuanyuan; Ankerst, Donna P.; Ketchum, Norma S.; Ercole, Barbara; Shah, Girish; Shaughnessy, John D.; Leach, Robin J.; Thompson, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the independent predictive values of the serum markers free prostate specific antigen, proenzyme prostate specific antigen, neuroendocrine marker and Dickkopf-1 compared to serum prostate specific antigen and other standard risk factors for early prostate cancer detection. Materials and Methods From the prospectively collected SABOR cohort 250 prostate cancer cases, and 250 mean age matched and proportion of African-American race/ethnicity matched controls were selected who had a prior available prostate specific antigen and digital rectal examination. Serum samples were obtained, and free prostate specific antigen, [−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen, Dickkopf-1 and neuroendocrine marker were measured. AUC, sensitivities and specificities were calculated, and multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the independent predictive value compared to prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination, family history, prior biopsy history, race/ethnicity and age. Results The AUCs (95% CI) were 0.76 (0.71, 0.8) for free prostate specific antigen, 0.72 (0.67, 0.76) for [−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen, 0.76 (0.72, 0.8) for %free prostate specific antigen, 0.61 (0.56, 0.66) for %[−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen, 0.73 (0.68, 0.77) for prostate health index, 0.53 (0.48, 0.58) for Dickkopf-1 and 0.53 (0.48, 0.59) for neuroendocrine marker. In the 2 to 10 ng/ml prostate specific antigen range the AUCs (95% CI) were 0.58 (0.49, 0.67) for free prostate specific antigen, 0.53 (0.44, 0.62) for [−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen, 0.67 (0.59, 0.75) for %free prostate specific antigen, 0.57 (0.49, 0.65) for %[−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen and 0.59 (0.51, 0.67) for phi. Only %free prostate specific antigen retained independent predictive value compared to the traditional risk factors. Conclusions Free prostate specific antigen retained independent diagnostic usefulness for prostate cancers detected through

  2. Transcription variants of the prostate-specific PrLZ gene and their interaction with 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruoxiang; He, Hui; Sun, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jianchun; Marshall, Fray F.; Zhau, Haiyen; Chung, Leland W.K.; Fu, Haian; He, Dalin

    2009-11-20

    We have reported isolation and characterization of the prostate-specific and androgen-regulated PrLZ gene abnormally expressed in prostate cancer. PrLZ is a potential biomarker for prostate cancer and a candidate oncogene promoting cell proliferation and survival in prostate cancer cells. A full delineation of the PrLZ gene and its gene products may provide clues to the mechanisms regulating its expression and function. In this report, we identified three additional exons in the PrLZ gene and recognized five transcript variants from alternative splicing that could be detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Structural comparison demonstrated that the PrLZ proteins are highly conserved among species. PrLZ contains multiple potential sites for interaction with other proteins. We used mammalian two-hybrid assays to demonstrate that PrLZ isoforms interact with 14-3-3 proteins, and multiple sites in the PrLZ may be involved in the interaction. Alternative splicing may contribute to abnormally enhanced PrLZ levels in prostate cancer, and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins may be a mechanism by which PrLZ promotes cell proliferation and survival during prostate cancer development and progression. This information is a valuable addition to the investigation of the oncogenic properties of the PrLZ gene.

  3. B cells from aged mice exhibit reduced apoptosis upon B-cell antigen receptor stimulation and differential ability to up-regulate survival signals.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Maletto, B A; Acosta Rodriguez, E V; Gruppi, A; Pistoresi-Palencia, M C

    2006-01-01

    During ageing, autoimmune disorders and the higher susceptibility to infectious have been associated with alterations in the humoral immune response. We report that splenic B lymphocytes from aged mice exhibit lower level of apoptosis induced by B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) ligation in vitro. Respect to B cells from young mice the anti-mu stimulated aged B cells show similar Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression but differential kinetic of A1 degradation and a higher level of cFLIP and FAIM. Even though B cells from aged mice show minor Fas expression they exhibit the same susceptibility to anti-Fas induced apoptosis. Aged B cells also present upon BCR stimulation, a higher proliferative response and similar level of activation markers expression than B cells from young mice. These data agree with the observation that aged mice exhibit an increment of T2 and mature B cell subset which rapidly enters cell cycle upon BCR engagement. The diminished apoptosis after activation in aged mice could compromise homeostatic mechanism allowing the persistence of self and non-self antigen specific B cells.

  4. Serology in the Digital Age: Using Long Synthetic Peptides Created from Nucleic Acid Sequences as Antigens in Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Rönnberg, Bengt; Cistjakovs, Maksims; Lundkvist, Åke; Pipkorn, Rudiger; Blomberg, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibodies to microbes, or to autoantigens, are important markers of disease. Antibody detection (serology) can reveal both past and recent infections. There is a great need for development of rational ways of detecting and quantifying antibodies, both for humans and animals. Traditionally, serology using synthetic antigens covers linear epitopes using up to 30 amino acid peptides. Methods: We here report that peptides of 100 amino acids or longer (“megapeptides”), designed and synthesized for optimal serological performance, can successfully be used as detection antigens in a suspension multiplex immunoassay (SMIA). Megapeptides can quickly be created just from pathogen sequences. A combination of rational sequencing and bioinformatic routines for definition of diagnostically-relevant antigens can, thus, rapidly yield efficient serological diagnostic tools for an emerging infectious pathogen. Results: We designed megapeptides using bioinformatics and viral genome sequences. These long peptides were tested as antigens for the presence of antibodies in human serum to the filo-, herpes-, and polyoma virus families in a multiplex microarray system. All of these virus families contain recently discovered or emerging infectious viruses. Conclusion: Long synthetic peptides can be useful as serological diagnostic antigens, serving as biomarkers, in suspension microarrays. PMID:27600087

  5. Human leukocyte antigen-G polymorphism influences the age of onset and autoantibody status in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mariaselvam, C M; Chaaben, A B; Salah, S; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Negi, V S

    2015-03-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the frequency of three gene polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) gene in south Indian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and analyze their influence on disease susceptibility, phenotype and treatment response. HLA-G 14 bp insertion (Ins)/deletion (del) (rs66554220), HLA-G +3142G>C (rs1063320) and +3187A>G (rs9380142) polymorphism was analyzed in 221 RA patients and 200 healthy controls. Frequency of HLA-G genotypes or alleles did not differ between patients and controls. Analysis based on rheumatoid factor (RF) status revealed that the frequency of allele 'A' (rs9380142) was significantly higher in RF-positive than in RF-negative patients [84% vs 74%, Yates-corrected P value (Pc) = 0.04, odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-3.2]. A similar difference was maintained in RF-positive female patients than their RF-negative counterparts (83% vs 71%, Pc = 0.02, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0 to 3.4) and between RF-positive and RF-negative young onset RA (YORA) patients (84% vs 73%, Pc = 0.03, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.2), suggesting that rs9380142 polymorphism influenced RF status. The 14 bp Ins allele of rs66554220 was significantly more prevalent in RF-positive YORA than in RF-positive late onset RA (LORA) patients (51% vs 25%, P = 0.03, OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.1-9.8). Frequency of the four major haplotypes [InsGA (48%), DelGA (22%), DelCG (18%), DelCA (9.7%)] observed did not differ between cases and controls. HLA-G does not appear to be a risk factor for development of RA in south Indian Tamils but may act as a genetic modifier of clinical phenotype in terms of autoantibody production, gender preference and age at disease onset.

  6. Potential antigenic explanation for atypical H1N1 infections among middle-aged adults during the 2013–2014 influenza season

    PubMed Central

    Linderman, Susanne L.; Chambers, Benjamin S.; Zost, Seth J.; Parkhouse, Kaela; Li, Yang; Herrmann, Christin; Ellebedy, Ali H.; Carter, Donald M.; Andrews, Sarah F.; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Huang, Min; Huang, Yunping; Strauss, Donna; Shaz, Beth H.; Hodinka, Richard L.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Ross, Ted M.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Bloom, Jesse D.; Hensley, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses typically cause the most severe disease in children and elderly individuals. However, H1N1 viruses disproportionately affected middle-aged adults during the 2013–2014 influenza season. Although H1N1 viruses recently acquired several mutations in the hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein, classic serological tests used by surveillance laboratories indicate that these mutations do not change antigenic properties of the virus. Here, we show that one of these mutations is located in a region of HA targeted by antibodies elicited in many middle-aged adults. We find that over 42% of individuals born between 1965 and 1979 possess antibodies that recognize this region of HA. Our findings offer a possible antigenic explanation of why middle-aged adults were highly susceptible to H1N1 viruses during the 2013–2014 influenza season. Our data further suggest that a drifted H1N1 strain should be included in future influenza vaccines to potentially reduce morbidity and mortality in this age group. PMID:25331901

  7. Pyridoxamine-5-phosphate enzyme-linked immune mass spectrometric assay substrate for linear absolute quantification of alkaline phosphatase to the yoctomole range applied to prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Florentinus-Mefailoski, Angelique; Marshall, John G

    2014-11-01

    There is a need to measure proteins that are present in concentrations below the detection limits of existing colorimetric approaches with enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assays (ELISA). The powerful enzyme alkaline phosphatase conjugated to the highly specific bacterial protein streptavidin binds to biotinylated macromolecules like proteins, antibodies, or other ligands and receptors with a high affinity. The binding of the biotinylated detection antibody, with resulting amplification of the signal by the catalytic production of reporter molecules, is key to the sensitivity of ELISA. The specificity and amplification of the signal by the enzyme alkaline phosphatase in ELISA together with the sensitivity of liquid chromatography electrospray ionization and mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) to detect femtomole to picomole amounts of reporter molecules results in an ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immune mass spectrometric assay (ELIMSA). The novel ELIMSA substrate pyridoxamine-5-phosphate (PA5P) is cleaved by the enzyme alkaline phosphatase to yield the basic and hydrophilic product pyridoxamine (PA) that elutes rapidly with symmetrical peaks and a flat baseline. Pyridoxamine (PA) and (13)C PA were both observed to show a linear relationship between log ion intensity and quantity from picomole to femtomole amounts by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization and mass spectrometry. Four independent methods, (i) internal (13)C isotope PA dilution curves, (ii) internal (13)C isotope one-point calibration, (iii) external PA standard curve, and (iv) external (13)C PA standard curve, all agreed within 1 digit in the same order of magnitude on the linear quantification of PA. Hence, a mass spectrometer can be used to robustly detect 526 ymol of the alkaline phosphatase streptavidin probe and accurately quantify zeptomole amounts of PSA against log linear absolute standard by micro electrospray on a simple ion trap.

  8. Prostate Specific Antigen/Solvent Interaction Analysis (PSA/SIA): A Preliminary Evaluation of a New Assay Concept for Detecting Prostate Cancer Using Urinary Samples

    PubMed Central

    Stovsky, Mark; Ponsky, Lee; Vourganti, Srinivas; Stuhldreher, Peter; Siroky, Mike B.; Kipnis, Victor; Fedotoff, Olga; Mikheeva, Larissa; Zaslavsky, Boris; Chait, Arnon; Jones, J. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To provide preliminary clinical performance evaluation of a novel CaP assay, PSA/SIA (Solvent Interaction Analysis) that focused on changes to the structure of PSA. Methods 222 men undergoing prostate biopsy for accepted clinical criteria at three sites (University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Cleveland Clinic, and Veterans Administration Boston Healthcare System) were enrolled in IRB approved study. Prior to TRUS guided biopsy, patients received DRE with systematic prostate massage followed by collection of urine. The PSA/SIA assay determined the relative partitioning of heterogeneous PSA isoform populations in urine between two aqueous phases. A structural index, K, whose numerical value is defined as the ratio of the concentration of all PSA isoforms, was determined by total PSA ELISA and used to set a diagnostic threshold for CaP. Performance was assessed using ROC analysis with biopsy as the gold standard. Results Biopsies were pathologically classified as case (malignant, n=100) or control (benign, n=122). ROC performance demonstrated AUC=0.90 for PSA/SIA and 0.58 for serum tPSA. At a cutoff value of K=1.73, PSA/SIA displayed sensitivity=100%, specificity=80.3%, PPV=80.6%, and NPV=100%. No attempt was made in this preliminary study to further control patient population or selection criteria for biopsy, nor did we analytically investigate the type of structural differences in PSA that led to changes in K value. Conclusions PSA/SIA provides ratiometric information independently of PSA concentration. In this preliminary study, analysis of the overall structurally heterogeneous PSA isoform population using the SIA assay showed promising results to be further evaluated in future studies. PMID:21783231

  9. Determination of Carbohydrate Structure Recognized by Prostate-specific F77 Monoclonal Antibody through Expression Analysis of Glycosyltransferase Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Motohiro; Fukuda, Michiko N.; Gao, Chao; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I.; Peehl, Donna M.; Feizi, Ten; Fukuda, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the determination of the carbohydrate epitope of monoclonal antibody F77 previously raised against human prostate cancer PC-3 cells (Zhang, G., Zhang, H., Wang, Q., Lal, P., Carroll, A. M., de la Llera-Moya, M., Xu, X., and Greene, M. I. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 107, 732–737). We performed a series of co-transfections using mammalian expression vectors encoding specific glycosyltransferases. We thereby identified branching enzymes and FUT1 (required for Fucα1→2Gal linkage) as being essential for F77 antigen formation. When immortalized normal prostate 267B1 cells were transfected with FUT1 alone, cells showed weak expression of F77 antigen. By contrast, cells co-transfected with FUT1 plus either GCNT1, GCNT2, or GCNT3 (an enzyme required to form GlcNAcβ1→6Gal/GalNAc) showed robust F77 antigen expression, suggesting that F77 specifically binds to Fucα1→2Galβ1→4GlcNAcβ1→6Gal/GalNAc. RT-PCR for FUT1, GCNT1, GCNT2, and GCNT3 showed that F77-positive cell lines indeed express transcripts encoding FUT1 plus one GCNT. F77-positive prostate cancer cells transfected with siRNAs targeting FUT1, GCNT2, and GCNT3 showed significantly reduced F77 antigen, confirming the requirement of these enzymes for epitope synthesis. We also found that hypoxia induces F77 epitope expression in immortalized prostate RWPE1 cells, which express F77 antigen moderately under normoxia but at an elevated level under hypoxia. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated up-regulation of FUT1, GCNT2, and GCNT3 transcripts in RWPE1 cells under hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia up-regulates glycosyltransferase expression required for F77 antigen synthesis. These results define the F77 epitope and provide a potential mechanism for F77 antigen synthesis in malignant prostate cancer. PMID:24753248

  10. Hepatitis B e Antigen Status and Hepatitis B DNA Levels in Women of Childbearing Age with Chronic Hepatitis B Infection Screening for Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tram T.; Gordon, Stuart C.; Fung, Scott; Dinh, Phillip; Yee, Leland; Martins, Eduardo Bruno; Buti, Maria; Marcellin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background Perinatal or mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) results in a high frequency of chronic infection. Risk of mother-to-child transmission is associated with maternal viral factors including hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) positivity and viral load. Aim To investigate associations between age, HBeAg status, HBV DNA levels and genotype in female patients screened for inclusion into two contemporary, randomized HBV trials. Methods Retrospective analyses focused on differences between women of childbearing age (≤44 years) and older women. Female patients (N = 355; 18–69 years) were included in the analysis: 41.7% of patients were Asian. In total, 44.4% were HBeAg-positive. Results Significantly more women aged ≤44 years were HBeAg-positive compared to women ≥45 years (57.2% versus 27.5%, respectively, p<0.0001), this proportion declined with increasing age. Younger women were significantly more likely to have high HBV viral load (HBV DNA>108 copies mL: ≤44 years 46.0% vs ≥45 years 25.5%, respectively; p<0.0001), and this declined with increasing age. HBeAg positivity was slightly higher in Asian women, associated with a higher proportion of HBV genotypes B and C in this population. There was no obvious relationship between genotype and viral load. Conclusions Women of childbearing age with CHB are more likely to have high HBV viral load and HBeAg positivity than older women; this likelihood decreases with age. Maternal serological and virological status should therefore be established early in pregnancy, taking into account age and genotype, and a risk-reducing strategy implemented in any patient who is HBeAg positive and has a high viral load. PMID:25789483

  11. Immunoanatomic distribution of cytostructural and tissue-associated antigens in the human urinary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; Finstad, C. L.; Bander, N. H.; Melamed, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to define the expression and/or modulation of antigenic phenotypes in cells of the normal human kidney and urothelium according to cell type. Fourteen antibodies detecting differentiation and structural antigens expressed in the human urinary tract have been used to define the immunoanatomic distribution of these antigenic systems. They include urinary tract antigens (Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein and prostate-specific antigen), tissue-associated antigens (epithelial membrane antigen, Factor VIII antigen, and Protein S-100), and cytoskeletal antigens of the intermediate filament classes (cytokeratins, vimentin, desmin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and neurofilaments. Immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase analyses performed on normal human fetal and adult tissue sections have demonstrated that these antigens are expressed by different cell types and domains of the nephron. Studies correlating normal fetal and adult tissues reveal that some of the antigens appear at distinct stages of maturation, representing early and late antigenic expression events. These antibodies offer a wide range of potential applications that include studies of embryogenesis of the human urinary tract and immunopathologic analyses of neoplastic and nonneoplastic diseases of the human kidney and urothelium. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3548401

  12. Hepatitis B surface antigen prevalence among 12 393 rural women of childbearing age in Hainan Province, China: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is highly endemic in China and it threats human health seriously. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) prevalence among women of childbearing age plays an important role in mother to child transmission of HBV, as 30% ~50% of chronic carriers can be attributed to maternal-infantile transmission. However, there are few studies which have reported on the prevalence of HBsAg among women of childbearing age in China. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of HBsAg and its associated risk factors among rural women of childbearing age in Hainan, which is the highest hepatitis B virus endemic province in China. Methods A cross-sectional, population-based study, which included 12393 rural women aged 15 ~ 49 years, enrolled by a multistage stratified cluster sampling, was carried out in Hainan province, China, from November 2007 to December 2008. Blood samples were obtained from each study participant, and screened for HBsAg. Results The overall HBsAg prevalence of childbearing age women was 9.51%. Risk factors for HBsAg positivity among rural women were: lower education level (OR=1.206), lower family monthly income (OR=1.233), having an HBsAg-positive family member (OR=1.300), without an immunization history (OR=1.243), tattooing (OR=1.190), body piercing (OR=1.293), vaginoscopy history (OR=1.103) and history of induced abortion (OR=1.142). Conclusions There is a high HBsAg seroprevalence rate among rural women of childbearing age in Hainan province. Hence, it is necessary to take preventive measures to reduce the seroprevalence of HBsAg and to control its associated risk factors. PMID:23332007

  13. Changes in sex and non-sex hormones and distribution of erythrocyte antigens in reproductive age women with tumors of body of uterus in Adjara.

    PubMed

    Nakashidze, I; Kotrikadze, N; Diasamidze, A; Nagervadze, M; Ramishvili, L

    2013-04-01

    The aim the research was to study the hormonal state of reproductive age women with tumors of body of uterus. The quantitative changes of sex steroid hormones: progesterone (P), estradiol (E), testosterone (T), gonadotropine -Luteinizing hormone (LH) and Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were investigated. Distribution of ABO blood group antigens and Rh-Hr systems genetic variants in the blood of women living in Adjara Region was also studied. For study was used reproductive age women's blood with benign (fibromioma) and malignant (endometrial cancer) tumors of body of uterus (the middle age was 20-45 years). The determination of hormones was made by the enzymatic analysis method (ELAIZA). For the research of blood groups, were used the immunoserologic methods. The study have revealed that in blood of reproductive age women with benign and malignant tumors of body of uterus, level of estradiol was increased while levels of progesterone and testosterone were sharply reduced. Amount of Follicle-stimulating hormone and Luteinizing hormone were also increased. It's significant that, both hormones were sharply increased in case of cancer of body of uterus, in comparison with control group and benign tumor. According to distribution of ABO blood group phenotypes - O (I) phenotypic group of ABO system has its highest frequency in blood of women with cancer of body of uterus. Cancer of body of uterus is associated with O (I) phenotypic groups; benign tumor of body of uterus - with A(II) and AB(IV) phenotypic groups. Women with cc and EE genetic variants of Rh-Hr system have sensitivity to the development of benign and malignant tumors of body of uterus; women with ee genetic variant have lower sensitivity towards body of uterus cancer and sharply expressed sensitivity to uterus benign tumors. In women with malignant tumors of body of uterus the frequency of distribution of Rh-Hr system CC genetic variant was sharply reduced. PMID:23676481

  14. Comparison of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen–Based 18F-DCFBC PET/CT to Conventional Imaging Modalities for Detection of Hormone-Naïve and Castration-Resistant Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Ciarallo, Anthony; Mena, Esther; Blackford, Amanda; Nadal, Rosa; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Carducci, Michael A.; Ross, Ashley E.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Holt, Daniel P.; Dannals, Robert F.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.; Cho, Steve Y.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities (CIMs) have limited sensitivity and specificity for detection of metastatic prostate cancer. We examined the potential of a first-in-class radiofluorinated small-molecule inhibitor of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-18F-fluorobenzyl-l-cysteine (18F-DCFBC), to detect metastatic hormone-naïve (HNPC) and castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods Seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled (9 HNPC and 8 CRPC); 16 had CIM evidence of new or progressive metastatic prostate cancer and 1 had high clinical suspicion of metastatic disease. 18F-DCFBC PET/CT imaging was obtained with 2 successive PET scans starting at 2 h after injection. Patients were imaged with CIM at approximately the time of PET. A lesion-by-lesion analysis of PET to CIM was performed in the context of either HNPC or CRPC. The patients were followed with available clinical imaging as a reference standard to determine the true nature of identified lesions on PET and CIM. Results On the lesion-by-lesion analysis, 18F-DCFBC PET was able to detect a larger number of lesions (592 positive with 63 equivocal) than CIM (520 positive with 61 equivocal) overall, in both HNPC and CRPC patients. 18F-DCFBC PET detection of lymph nodes, bone lesions, and visceral lesions was superior to CIM. When intrapatient clustering effects were considered, 18F-DCFBC PET was estimated to be positive in a large proportion of lesions that would be negative or equivocal on CIM (0.45). On follow-up, the sensitivity of 18F-DCFBC PET (0.92) was superior to CIM (0.71). 18F-DCFBC tumor uptake was increased at the later PET time point (∼2.5 h after injection), with background uptake showing a decreasing trend on later PET. Conclusion PET imaging with 18F-DCFBC, a small-molecule PSMA-targeted radiotracer, detected more lesions than CIM and promises to diagnose and stage patients with metastatic prostate cancer more accurately than current

  15. Serum Concentrations of Antibodies against Outer Membrane Protein P6, Protein D, and T- and B-Cell Combined Antigenic Epitopes of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Children and Adults of Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Chun-Zhen; Hu, Wei-Lin; Li, Jian-Ping; Hong, Li-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is one of the most common etiologies of acute otitis media, rhinosinusitis, and pneumonia. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are the main focus in new vaccine development against NTHi, as the H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine does not cover noncapsulated NTHi. The OMPs P6 and protein D are the most promising candidate antigens for an NTHi vaccine, and low antibody levels against them in serum may be correlated with infection caused by NTHi. In the current study, we measured the antibody titers against P6, protein D, and their T- and B-cell combined peptide epitopes in healthy individuals of different ages. We found that children <1 month old had the lowest antibody levels against NTHi P6, protein D, and their T- and B-cell combined antigenic epitopes. Antibody titers increased at ages 1 to 6 months, peaked at 7 months to 3 years, and remained high at 4 to 6 years. The antibody titers started to decrease after 6 years and were the lowest in the 21- to 30-year group. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) of T- and B-cell combined antigenic epitopes in P6 and protein D were positively correlated with those of the protein antigens. Among 12 peptides tested, P6-61, P6-123, and protein D-167 epitopes were better recognized than others in human serum. These findings might contribute to the development of an effective serotype-independent vaccine for H. influenzae. PMID:26677200

  16. Circulating Autoantibodies in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Recognize Human Macular Tissue Antigens Implicated in Autophagy, Immunomodulation, and Protection from Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Alessandro; Giorgianni, Francesco; New, David D.; Hollingsworth, T. J.; Umfress, Allison; Alhatem, Albert H.; Neeli, Indira; Lenchik, Nataliya I.; Jennings, Barbara J.; Calzada, Jorge I.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Mathews, Dennis; Diaz, Rocio I.; Harris, Tamara; Johnson, Karen C.; Charles, Steve; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gerling, Ivan C.; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka; Radic, Marko Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated sera from elderly subjects with and without age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for presence of autoantibodies (AAbs) against human macular antigens and characterized their identity. Methods Sera were collected from participants in the Age-Related Maculopathy Ancillary (ARMA) Study, a cross-sectional investigation ancillary to the Health ABC Study, enriched with participants from the general population. The resulting sample (mean age: 79.2±3.9 years old) included subjects with early to advanced AMD (n = 131) and controls (n = 231). Sera were tested by Western blots for immunoreactive bands against human donor macular tissue homogenates. Immunoreactive bands were identified and graded, and odds ratios (OR) calculated. Based on these findings, sera were immunoprecipitated, and subjected to 2D gel electrophoresis (GE). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify the targets recognized by circulating AAbs seen on 2D-GE, followed by ELISAs with recombinant proteins to confirm LC-MS/MS results, and quantify autoreactivities. Results In AMD, 11 immunoreactive bands were significantly more frequent and 13 were significantly stronger than in controls. Nine of the more frequent bands also showed stronger reactivity. OR estimates ranged between 4.06 and 1.93, and all clearly excluded the null value. Following immunoprecipitation, 2D-GE and LC-MS/MS, five of the possible autoreactivity targets were conclusively identified: two members of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family, HSPA8 and HSPA9; another member of the HSP family, HSPB4, also known as alpha-crystallin A chain (CRYAA); Annexin A5 (ANXA5); and Protein S100-A9, also known as calgranulin B that, when complexed with S100A8, forms calprotectin. ELISA testing with recombinant proteins confirmed, on average, significantly higher reactivities against all targets in AMD samples compared to controls. Conclusions Consistent with other evidence supporting the

  17. Personalizing Age of Cancer Screening Cessation Based on Comorbidity: Model estimates of harms and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Lansdorp-Vogelaar, Iris; Gulati, Roman; Mariotto, Angela B; Schechter, Clyde B; de Carvalho, Tiago M; Knudsen, Amy B; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Heijnsdijk, Eveline AM; Pabiniak, Chester; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Rutter, Carolyn M; Kuntz, Karen M; Feuer, Eric J; Etzioni, Ruth; de Koning, Harry J; Zauber, Ann G; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2014-01-01

    Background Harms and benefits of cancer screening depend on age and comorbidity, yet reliable estimates are lacking. Objective To estimate the harms and benefits of cancer screening by age and comorbidity to inform decisions about screening cessation. Design Collaborative modeling with seven well-established cancer simulation models and common data on average and comorbidity level-specific life expectancy from SEER-Medicare. Setting US population. Patients US cohorts aged 66–90 years in 2010 with average health or one of four comorbidity levels (linked to specific conditions): none, mild, moderate, or severe. Intervention Mammography, prostate-specific antigen testing, or fecal immunochemical testing. Measurements Lifetime cancer deaths prevented and life-years gained (benefits); false-positive tests and overdiagnosed cancers (harms). For each comorbidity level: the age at which harms and benefits of screening were similar to that for individuals with average health undergoing screening at age 74. Results Screening 1000 women with average life expectancy at age 74 for breast cancer resulted in 79–96 (range across models) false-positives, 0.5–0.8 overdiagnosed cancers, and 0.7–0.9 breast cancer deaths prevented. While absolute numbers of harms and benefits differed across cancer sites, the ages at which to cease screening were highly consistent across models and cancer sites when based on harm-benefit ratios comparable to screening average-health individuals at age 74. For individuals with no, mild, moderate, and severe comorbidities, screening until ages of 76, 74, 72, and 66, respectively, resulted in similar harms and benefits as for average-health individuals. Limitations Comorbidity only influenced life expectancy. Conclusion Comorbidity is an important determinant of harms and benefits of screening. Estimates of screening benefits and harms by comorbidity can inform discussions between providers and their older patients about personalizing decisions

  18. Persistence at one year of age of antigen-induced cellular immune responses in preterm infants vaccinated against whooping cough: comparison of three different vaccines and effect of a booster dose.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Françoise; Dirix, Violette; Verscheure, Virginie; Damis, Eliane; Vermeylen, Danièle; Locht, Camille; Mascart, Françoise

    2013-04-01

    Due to their high risk of developing severe Bordetella pertussis (Bp) infections, it is recommended to immunize preterm infants at their chronological age. However, little is known about the persistence of their specific immune responses, especially of the cellular responses recognized to play a role in protection. We compared here the cellular immune responses to two major antigens of Bp between three groups of one year-old children born prematurely, who received for their primary vaccination respectively the whole cell vaccine Tetracoq(®) (TC), the acellular vaccine Tetravac(®) (TV), or the acellular vaccine Infanrix-hexa(®) (IR). Whereas most children had still detectable IFN-γ responses at one year of age, they were lower in the IR-vaccinated children compared to the two other groups. In contrast, both the TV- and the IR-vaccinated children displayed higher Th2-type immune responses, resulting in higher antigen-specific IFN-γ/IL-5 ratios in TC- than in TV- or IR-vaccinated children. The IFN-γ/IL-5 ratio of mitogen-induced cytokines was also lower in IR- compared to TC- or TV-vaccinated children. No major differences in the immune responses were noted after the booster compared to the pre-booster responses for each vaccine. The IR-vaccinated children had a persistently low specific Th1-type immune response associated with high specific Th2-type immune responses, resulting in lower antigen-specific IFN-γ/IL-5 ratios compared to the two other groups. We conclude that antigen-specific cellular immune responses persisted in one year-old children born prematurely and vaccinated during infancy at their chronological age, that a booster dose did not significantly boost the cellular immune responses, and that the Th1/Th2 balance of the immune responses is modulated by the different vaccines.

  19. A dedicated clinic for HIV-positive individuals over 50 years of age: a multidisciplinary experience.

    PubMed

    Waters, L; Patterson, B; Scourfield, A; Hughes, A; de Silva, S; Gazzard, B; Barton, S; Asboe, D; Pozniak, A; Boffito, M

    2012-08-01

    The HIV-infected population is ageing. Issues including polypharmacy and co-morbidities led us to develop a dedicated clinic for HIV-infected individuals over 50. We describe our service evaluation after two years. The over 50 clinic commenced in January 2009. The team comprises a registrar, consultant, nurse practitioner and is supported by a pharmacist and mental health services. Patients undergo a full medication and drug interactions review, neurocognitive assessment, adherence self-assessment and investigations including therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) and bone mineral density. Over two years of activity, 150 patients attended the service. Median (range) age was 58 (50-88), all were on combined antiretroviral therapy and 38% (57/150) were on ≥3 non-HIV drugs. CACS was high (>90th centile) in 14%. Thirty-eight percent had osteopaenia and 18% had osteoporosis requiring treatment. Thirteen out of 125 men had an increased prostate specific antigen, four were diagnosed with prostate cancer. Drug interaction, TDM and neurocognitive assessments were useful for several patients. Asymptomatic patients over 50 in long-term follow-up had new pathologies detected through targeted screening. The clinic has improved general practitioner (GP) liaison and facilitated closer working relationships with other specialties. Patients have reacted positively to the clinic, particularly as many do not routinely access their GP. PMID:22930290

  20. Psychological Predictors of Prostate Cancer Screening Behaviors Among Men Over 50 Years of Age in Hamadan: Perceived Threat and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Majid; Amirzargar, Mohammad Ali; Bashirian, Saeed; Kafami, Vahid; Mousali, Amir Abbas; Moeini, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the fourth most common cancer worldwide and is the second most lethal cancer. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate psychological predictors of prostate cancer screening behaviors among men over 50 years of age in Hamadan. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out on 200 men over 50 years of age in Hamadan, west of Iran. Participants were recruited with a cluster sampling method. The subjects completed a self-administered questionnaire including demographic characteristics, prostate cancer screening behaviors and psychological factors related to prostate cancer. Data was analyzed by SPSS-18 using chi-square, fisher exact test, and logestic regression. Results According to the results, 8.5 and 7.5 percent of participants reported history of digital rectal exam and prostate-specific antigen test, respectively. Also, the subjects reported 18.5%, 49.3% and 50.3% of receivable scores of knowledge, perceived threat, and perceived efficacy of prostate cancer screening behaviors, respectively. There was a significant association between prostate cancer screening behaviors and age groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions The results showed that providing analytical studies in this field helps to surface the hidden aspects of this context and the health care providers and administrators will hopefully consider them in planning for identification of psychological factors, such as barriers and facilitators factors.

  1. Prostate Brachytherapy in Men {>=}75 Years of Age

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S. Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Brammer, Sarah G.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Adamovich, Edward

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in prostate cancer patients aged {>=}75 years undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and August 2004, 145 consecutive patients aged {>=}75 years underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 5.8 years. Biochemical progression-free survival was defined by a prostate-specific antigen level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or hormone-refractory disease without obvious metastases who died of any cause were classified as dead of prostate cancer. All other deaths were attributed to the immediate cause of death. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Nine-year CSS, bPFS, and OS rates for the entire cohort were 99.3%, 97.1%, and 64.5%, respectively. None of the evaluated parameters predicted for CSS, whereas bPFS was most closely predicted by percentage positive biopsies. Overall survival and non-cancer deaths were best predicted by tobacco status. Thirty-seven patients have died, with 83.8% of the deaths due to cardiovascular disease (22 patients) or second malignancies (9 patients). To date, only 1 patient (0.7%) has died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: After brachytherapy, high rates of CSS and bPFS are noted in elderly prostate cancer patients. Overall, approximately 65% of patients are alive at 9 years, with survival most closely related to tobacco status. We believe our results support an aggressive locoregional approach in appropriately selected elderly patients.

  2. Cardiovascular Risk in Men Aged Over 40 in Boa Vista, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Lima Junior, Mário Maciel; Bezerra, Emanuel Araújo; Ticianeli, José Geraldo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of disease in the developed world. Early detection and risk prediction are a key component in reducing cardiovascular mortality. The Framingham Risk Score uses age, sex, cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking to calculate the 10-year risk probability of developing cardiovascular disease for a given patient. The aim of this study was to examine cardiovascular disease risk in men aged over 40 years in Boa Vista, Brazil and identify socioeconomic factors contributing to the risk. Methods: This was an epidemiological, cross-sectional, descriptive study. Physical examination and questionnaire survey were conducted on the participants. Results: Of the 598 participants (average age = 55.38 ± 10.77 years), 346 completed all the examinations and answered the survey, while 252 completed the survey and the physical examinations but did not undertake the laboratory tests. A large proportion of participants were overweight (42.6%) or obese (23.6%), 14.5% were hypertensive, and 71.9% were prehypertensive. Consumption of red meat and junk food was high, while participation in the exercise was low. Framingham scores ranged from −3 to 13 (mean score: 3.86 ± 3.16). A total of 204 participants (34.1%) had a low risk of cardiovascular disease, 98 (16.4%) had a medium risk, and 44 (7.4%) possessed high risk. Increased abdominal circumference (P = 0.013), resting pulse (P = 0.002), and prostate-specific antigen levels (P < 0.001) were associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Conclusions: Our study highlights a worrying trend in increasing obesity and hypertension, most likely associated with increasingly poor diet and reduced participation in exercises. As the Brazilian population ages, this will drive increasing rates of cardiovascular mortality unless these trends are reversed. This study suggests that such campaigns should focus on men over the age of 40, who are married or divorced and of

  3. Detection of prostate cancer with a blood-based assay for early prostate cancer antigen.

    PubMed

    Paul, Barbara; Dhir, Rajiv; Landsittel, Douglas; Hitchens, Moira R; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2005-05-15

    Prostate-specific antigen lacks specificity for prostate cancer, so the identification and characterization of a unique blood-based marker for the disease would provide for a more accurate diagnosis, reducing both unnecessary biopsies and patient uncertainty. We previously identified a novel biomarker for prostate cancer, early prostate cancer antigen (EPCA). EPCA antibodies positively stained the negative biopsies of men who, as much as 5 years later, were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether EPCA antibodies could be used in a clinically applicable plasma-based immunoassay to specifically detect prostate cancer. Using an EPCA-based ELISA, the protein was measured in the plasma of 46 individuals, including prostate cancer patients, healthy individuals, other cancer patients, spinal cord injury victims, and patients with prostatitis. With a predetermined cutoff value of 1.7 absorbance at 450 nm, only the prostate cancer population, as a whole, expressed plasma-EPCA levels above the cutoff. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in EPCA levels between the prostate cancer population and each of the other groups, specifically the healthy donors (P < 0.0001), bladder cancer patients (P = 0.03), and spinal cord injury patients (P = 0.001). Sensitivity of the EPCA assay for prostate cancer patients was 92% whereas the overall specificity was 94%. Specificity for the healthy donors was 100%. Although larger trials are required, this initial study shows the potential of EPCA to serve as a highly specific blood-based marker for prostate cancer. EPCA, when coupled with prostate-specific antigen, may help reduce the number of both unnecessary biopsies and undetected prostate tumors.

  4. Can a Gleason 6 or Less Microfocus of Prostate Cancer in One Biopsy and Prostate-Specific Antigen Level <10 ng/mL Be Defined as the Archetype of Low-Risk Prostate Disease?

    PubMed

    Taverna, Gianluigi; Benecchi, Luigi; Grizzi, Fabio; Seveso, Mauro; Giusti, Guido; Piccinelli, Alessandro; Benetti, Alessio; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Minuti, Francesco; Graziotti, Pierpaolo

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) remains a cause of death worldwide. Here we investigate whether a single microfocus of PC at the biopsy (graded as Gleason 6 or less, ≤5% occupancy) and the PSA <10 ng/mL can define the archetype of low-risk prostate disease. 4500 consecutive patients were enrolled. Among them, 134 patients with a single micro-focus of PC were followed up, and the parameters influencing the biochemical relapse (BR) were analysed. Out of 134 patients, 94 had clinically significant disease, specifically in 74.26% of the patients with PSA <10 ng/mL. Positive surgical margins and the extracapsular invasion were found in 29.1% and 51.4% patients, respectively. BR was observed in 29.6% of the patients. Cox regression evidenced a correlation between the BR and Gleason grade at the retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP), capsular invasion, and the presence of positive surgical margins. Multivariate regression analysis showed a statistically significant correlation between the presence of surgical margins at the RRP and BR. Considering a single micro-focus of PC at the biopsy and PSA serum level <10 ng/mL, clinically significant disease was found in 74.26% patients and only positive surgical margins are useful for predicting the BR.

  5. Syphilis among middle-aged female sex workers in China: a three-site cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjie; Dumenci, Levent; Morisky, Donald E; Xu, Yongfang; Li, Xiaojing; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study addresses the lack of empirical studies about the epidemic of syphilis among middle-aged female sex workers (FSWs). The objectives of this study were to investigate prevalence of syphilis, and its potential risk factors among middle-aged FSWs in China. Design A cross-sectional study with respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Setting A multisite study conducted at three Chinese cites (Nanning, Hefei, and Qingdao) with different levels of sexually transmitted diseases in 2014. Participants 1245 middle-aged female sex workers who were over 35 years old (about 400 per study site). Main outcome measures Unprotected commercial sex, and syphilis and HIV infection were biologically tested and measured. Results The RDS-adjusted prevalence of active syphilis was 17.3% in Hefei, 9.9% in Qingdao, and 5.4% in Nanning. The RDS-adjusted prevalence of prevalent syphilis was between 6.8% and 33.6% in the three cities. The proportion of unprotected sex in the past 48 h verified by the prostate-specific antigen test (PSA) was between 27.8% and 42.4%. Multiple log-binomial regression analyses indicate that middle-aged FSWs who had 5 or more clients in the past week prior to interviews and engaged in unprotected sex were more likely to be active syphilitic cases. Middle-aged FSWs who had rural residency were less likely to be active syphilitic cases. Conclusions In contrast with previous studies that reported low prevalence of syphilis and high prevalence of protected sex among FSWs in China, both the prevalence of syphilis and unprotected sex were high among middle-aged FSWs. Evidence-based intervention programmes should be developed and evaluated among this vulnerable population in China and other countries with similar settings. PMID:27165644

  6. Age and Obesity Promote Methylation and Suppression of 5-Alpha Reductase 2–Implications for Personalized Therapy in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bechis, Seth K.; Otsetov, Alexander G.; Ge, Rongbin; Wang, Zongwei; Vangel, Mark G.; Wu, Chin-Lee; Tabatabaei, Shahin; Olumi, Aria F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 5α reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) are a main modality of treatment for men suffering from symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Over 30% of men do not respond to the therapeutic effects of 5ARIs. We have found that 1/3 of adult prostate samples do not express 5AR2 secondary to epigenetic modifications. We sought to evaluate whether 5AR2 expression in BPH specimens of symptomatic men was linked to methylation of the 5AR2 gene promoter and identify associations with age, obesity, cardiac risk factors, and prostate specific antigen (PSA). Materials and Methods Prostate samples from men undergoing transurethral prostate resection were used. 5AR2 protein expression and gene promoter methylation status were determined by common assays. Clinical variables included age, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, PSA, and prostate volume. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed, followed by stepwise logistic regression modeling. Results BMI and age were significantly correlated with methylation of the 5AR2 gene promoter (p<0.05), whereas prostate volume, PSA, or use of BPH medication were not. Methylation was highly correlated with 5AR protein expression (p<0.0001). In a predictive model, both increasing age and BMI significantly predicted methylation status and protein expression (p<0.01). Conclusions Increasing age and BMI correlate with increased 5AR2 gene promoter methylation and decreased protein expression in men with symptomatic BPH. These results highlight the interplay between age, obesity and gene regulation. Our findings suggest the presence of an individualized epigenetic signature for symptomatic BPH, which may be important for choosing appropriate personalized treatment options. PMID:25916673

  7. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  8. Undetectable ultrasensitive PSA after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer predicts relapse-free survival.

    PubMed

    Doherty, A P; Bower, M; Smith, G L; Miano, R; Mannion, E M; Mitchell, H; Christmas, T J

    2000-12-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy is considered by many centres to be the treatment of choice for men aged less than 70 years with localized prostate cancer. A rise in serum prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy occurs in 10-40% of cases. This study evaluates the usefulness of novel ultrasensitive PSA assays in the early detection of biochemical relapse. 200 patients of mean age 61. 2 years underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy. Levels < or = 0.01 ng ml-1 were considered undetectable. Mean pre-operative prostate-specific antigen was 13.3 ng ml-1. Biochemical relapse was defined as 3 consecutive rises. The 2-year biochemical disease-free survival for the 134 patients with evaluable prostate-specific antigen nadir data was 61.1% (95% CI: 51.6-70.6%). Only 2 patients with an undetectable prostate-specific antigen after radical retropubic prostatectomy biochemically relapsed (3%), compared to 47 relapses out of 61 patients (75%) who did not reach this level. Cox multivariate analysis confirms prostate-specific antigen nadir < or = 0.01 ng ml-1 to be a superb independent variable predicting a favourable biochemical disease-free survival (P < 0.0001). Early diagnosis of biochemical relapse is feasible with sensitive prostate-specific antigen assays. These assays more accurately measure the prostate-specific antigen nadir, which is an excellent predictor of biochemical disease-free survival. Thus, sensitive prostate-specific antigen assays offer accurate prognostic information and expedite decision-making regarding the use of salvage prostate-bed radiotherapy or hormone therapy.

  9. Haploidentical T Cell-Replete Transplantation with Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide for Patients in or above the Sixth Decade of Age Compared with Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation from an Human Leukocyte Antigen-Matched Related or Unrelated Donor.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Didier; Fürst, Sabine; Crocchiolo, Roberto; El-Cheikh, Jean; Granata, Angela; Harbi, Samia; Bouabdallah, Reda; Devillier, Raynier; Bramanti, Stephania; Lemarie, Claude; Picard, Christophe; Chabannon, Christian; Weiller, Pierre-Jean; Faucher, Catherine; Mohty, Bilal; Vey, Norbert; Castagna, Luca

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been shown that a T cell-replete allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from a haploidentical donor (haplo-ID) could be a valid treatment for hematological malignancies. However, little data exist concerning older populations. We provided transplantation to 31 patients over the age of 55 years from a haplo-ID and compared their outcomes with patients of the same ages who underwent transplantation from a matched related (MRD) or an unrelated donor (UD). All 3 groups were comparable, except for their conditioning. Patients in haplo-ID group received 2 days of post-transplantation high-dose cyclophosphamide followed by cyclosporine A and mycophenolate mofetil, whereas patients in other groups received pretransplantation antithymocyte globulin, cyclosporine A, and additional mycophenolate mofetil in case of 1-antigen mismatch. All patients but 1 in the haplo-ID group engrafted. The incidence of grades 2 to 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was not statistically different between recipients from haplo-ID (cumulative incidence, 23%) and MRD (cumulative incidence, 21%) transplantations but it was lower than after UD HSCT (cumulative incidence, 44%). No patient in the haplo-ID group developed severe chronic GVHD, compared with cumulative incidences of 16% and 14% after MRD (P = .02) and UD (P = .03) grafts, respectively. The cumulative incidences of relapse were similar in the 3 groups, whereas nonrelapse mortality after UD HSCT was 3-fold higher than after haplo-ID or MRD HSCT. Overall, 2-year overall survival (70%), progression-free survival (67%), and progression and severe chronic GVHD-free survival (67%) probabilities after haplo-ID did not statistically differ from MRD transplantation (78%, 64%, and 51%, respectively), although they were higher than after UD transplantation (51% [P = .08], 38% [P = .02], and 31% [P = .007]). We conclude that T cell-replete haplo-ID HSCT followed by post-transplantation high

  10. Detection of antibody-antigen reaction by silicon nitride slot-ring biosensors using protein G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomoya; Hirowatari, Anna; Ikeda, Takeshi; Fukuyama, Masataka; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Kuroda, Akio; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors using ring resonators with silicon nitride (SiN) slot waveguides have been fabricated. The temperature coefficient of the resonance wavelength of the SiN resonator is 0.006 nm/°C, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that of Si. The sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by using slot waveguide together with Si-binding protein (designated as Si-tag), which bonds to SiN or SiO2 surface, as an anchoring molecule to immobilize bioreceptors on the SiN rings in an oriented manner. Furthermore, the protein G, which strongly bonds to many kinds of mammalian antibodies only by mixing the antibody solution, is used to efficiently immobilize the antigen on the sensor surface. By means of these devises the sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by factor of 10-100 compared with that of normal Si ring resonator sensors without slot. Then the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) with the sensitivity of ~1×10-8 g/ml, which is the concentration of strongly suspicious for the prostate cancer, has been achieved.

  11. Discriminating antigen and non-antigen using proteome dissimilarity: bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Flower, Darren R

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that immunogenicity results from the overall dissimilarity of pathogenic proteins versus the host proteome. We have sought to use this concept to discriminate between antigens and non-antigens of bacterial origin. Sets of 100 known antigenic and nonantigenic peptide sequences from bacteria were compared to human and mouse proteomes. Both antigenic and non-antigenic sequences lacked human or mouse homologues. Observed distributions were compared using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. The statistical null hypothesis was accepted, indicating that antigen and non-antigens did not differ significantly. Likewise, we were unable to determine a threshold able to separate meaningfully antigen from non-antigen. Thus, antigens cannot be predicted from pathogen genomes based solely on their dissimilarity to the human genome. PMID:20975907

  12. Presentation of hepatocellular antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grakoui, Arash; Crispe, Ian Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The liver is an organ in which antigen-specific T-cell responses manifest a bias toward immune tolerance. This is clearly seen in the rejection of allogeneic liver transplants, and multiple other phenomena suggest that this effect is more general. These include tolerance toward antigens introduced via the portal vein, immune failure to several hepatotropic viruses, the lack of natural liver-stage immunity to malaria parasites, and the frequent metastasis of cancers to the liver. Here we review the mechanisms by which T cells engage with hepatocellular antigens, the context in which such encounters occur, and the mechanisms that act to suppress a full T-cell response. While many mechanisms play a role, we will argue that two important processes are the constraints on the cross-presentation of hepatocellular antigens, and the induction of negative feedback inhibition driven by interferons. The constant exposure of the liver to microbial products from the intestine may drive innate immunity, rendering the local environment unfavorable for specific T-cell responses through this mechanism. Nevertheless, tolerance toward hepatocellular antigens is not monolithic and under specific circumstances allows both effective immunity and immunopathology. PMID:26924525

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for prostate cancer patients with old age or medical comorbidity: a 5-year follow-up of an investigational study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sea-Won; Jang, Hong Seok; Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Yoon, Sei Chul

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated 5-year follow-up of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with Cyberknife for prostate cancer patients. Forty-five men with prostate adenocarcinoma who received SBRT using Cyberknife from May 2006 to November 2012 were enrolled in this study. They were prostate cancer patients with old age and medical comorbidities who received a total of 36 Gy to the prostate in 5 fractions with either everyday or every other day schedule. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels at initial diagnosis and after radiation were traced. Primary endpoints were biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). The definition of biochemical relapse was a PSA level of nadir+2 ng/mL. Progression was defined as biochemically or clinically detected disease and the start of salvage therapy. After median follow-up of 63 months, the 5-year bRFS for all patients was estimated at 89.7%. The 5-year PFS was estimated at 71%. Four cases of biochemical relapse were observed, including two patients who experienced locoregional failure and one patient who had distant metastasis with biochemical relapse. The 5-year OS was estimated at 94.3%. There were five deaths, all of which were unrelated to prostate cancer. There was no grade 3 or higher acute complication. Grade 3 or higher late urinary toxicity was reported in 2 (4.4%) of 45 patients. The 5-year survival and toxicity outcome of SBRT using Cyberknife on prostate cancer patients with old age or comorbidities were favorable and safe in an investigational study.

  14. Pathways of Antigen Processing

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Janice S.; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Cresswell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    T cell recognition of antigen presenting cells depends on their expression of a spectrum of peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and class II (MHC-II) molecules. Conversion of antigens from pathogens or transformed cells into MHC-I and MHC-II-bound peptides is critical for mounting protective T cell responses, and similar processing of self proteins is necessary to establish and maintain tolerance. Cells use a variety of mechanisms to acquire protein antigens, from translation in the cytosol to variations on the theme of endocytosis, and to degrade them once acquired. In this review we highlight the aspects of MHC-I and MHC-II biosynthesis and assembly that have evolved to intersect these pathways and sample the peptides that are produced. PMID:23298205

  15. Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) significantly improve prostate cancer detection at initial biopsy in a total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Bruzzese, Dario; Perdonà, Sisto; Marino, Ada; Mazzarella, Claudia; Perruolo, Giuseppe; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Chun, Felix K; Terracciano, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Many efforts to reduce prostate specific antigen (PSA) overdiagnosis and overtreatment have been made. To this aim, Prostate Health Index (Phi) and Prostate Cancer Antigen 3 (PCA3) have been proposed as new more specific biomarkers. We evaluated the ability of phi and PCA3 to identify prostate cancer (PCa) at initial prostate biopsy in men with total PSA range of 2-10 ng/ml. The performance of phi and PCA3 were evaluated in 300 patients undergoing first prostate biopsy. ROC curve analyses tested the accuracy (AUC) of phi and PCA3 in predicting PCa. Decision curve analyses (DCA) were used to compare the clinical benefit of the two biomarkers. We found that the AUC value of phi (0.77) was comparable to those of %p2PSA (0.76) and PCA3 (0.73) with no significant differences in pairwise comparison (%p2PSA vs phi p = 0.673, %p2PSA vs. PCA3 p = 0.417 and phi vs. PCA3 p = 0.247). These three biomarkers significantly outperformed fPSA (AUC = 0.60), % fPSA (AUC = 0.62) and p2PSA (AUC = 0.63). At DCA, phi and PCA3 exhibited a very close net benefit profile until the threshold probability of 25%, then phi index showed higher net benefit than PCA3. Multivariable analysis showed that the addition of phi and PCA3 to the base multivariable model (age, PSA, %fPSA, DRE, prostate volume) increased predictive accuracy, whereas no model improved single biomarker performance. Finally we showed that subjects with active surveillance (AS) compatible cancer had significantly lower phi and PCA3 values (p<0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, both phi and PCA3 comparably increase the accuracy in predicting the presence of PCa in total PSA range 2-10 ng/ml at initial biopsy, outperforming currently used %fPSA.

  16. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  17. Cancer vaccine--Antigenics.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Antigenics is developing a therapeutic cancer vaccine based on heat-shock proteins (HSPs). The vaccine [HSPPC-96, Oncophage] is in a pivotal phase III clinical trial for renal cancer at 80 clinical sites worldwide. The trial is enrolling at least 500 patients who are randomised to receive surgical removal of the primary tumour followed by out-patient treatment with Oncophage((R)) or surgery only. This study was initiated on the basis of results from a pilot phase I/II study and preliminary results from a phase II study in patients with renal cell cancer. In October 2001, Oncophage was designated as a fast-track product by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Oncophage is in phase I/II trials in Italy for colorectal cancer (30 patients) and melanoma. The trials in Italy are being conducted at the Istituto dei Tumouri, Milan (in association with Sigma-Tau). Preliminary data from the phase II trial for melanoma was presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference in Florida, USA, in October 2001. Oncophage is also in a phase I/II (42 patients) and a phase II trial (84 patients) in the US for renal cell cancer, a phase II trial in the US for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (35 patients), a phase II trial in the US for sarcoma (20-35 patients), a phase I/II trial in the US for melanoma (36 patients), and phase I/II trials in Germany for gastric (30 patients) and pancreatic cancers. A pilot phase I trial in patients with pancreatic cancer began in the US in 1997 with 5 patients enrolled. In November 2000, Antigenics announced that this trial had been expanded to a phase I/II study which would now include survival as an endpoint and would enroll 5 additional patients. The US trials are being performed at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The trials in Germany are being carried out at Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz. Oncophage is an autologous vaccine consisting of

  18. Antigens and allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.E.; Swanson, M.C.

    1987-06-01

    There are few reliable epidemiologic data on the overall frequency and importance of allergy. We describe a practical method for quantifying the concentration of both amorphous and morphologically defined antigens in the air. A high volume air sampler is used to collect airborne particles and has a facility to separate samples into different particle sizes. Samples are tested for allergenic activity by radioallergosorbent test inhibition assay. Preliminary findings from studies of community wide, amorphous and common household allergens are reported.

  19. Isotope and Patient Age Predict for PSA Spikes After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bostancic, Chelsea; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah; Galbreath, Robert; Lief, Jonathan; Gutman, Sarah E.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate-specific antigen (PSA) spikes after permanent prostate brachytherapy in low-risk patients. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 164 prostate cancer patients who were part of a prospective randomized trial comparing {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I for low-risk disease. Of the 164 patients, 61 (37.2%) received short-course androgen deprivation therapy. The median follow-up was 5.4 years. On average, 11.1 post-treatment PSA measurements were obtained per patient. Biochemical disease-free survival was defined as a PSA level of {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. A PSA spike was defined as an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL, followed by a durable decline to prespike levels. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors for a PSA spike. Results: Of the 164 patients, 44 (26.9%) developed a PSA spike. Of the 46 hormone-naive {sup 125}I patients and 57 hormone-naive {sup 103}Pd patients, 21 (45.7%) and 8 (14.0%) developed a PSA spike. In the hormone-naive patients, the mean time between implantation and the spike was 22.6 months and 18.7 months for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. In patients receiving neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, the incidence of spikes was comparable between isotopes ({sup 125}I 28.1% and {sup 103}Pd 20.7%). The incidence of spikes was substantially different in patients <65 years vs. {>=}65 years old (38.5% vs. 16.3%). On multivariate Cox regression analysis, patient age (p < 0.001) and isotope (p = 0.002) were significant predictors for spike. Conclusion: In low-risk prostate cancer, PSA spikes are most common in patients implanted with {sup 125}I and/or <65 years of age. Differences in isotope-related spikes are most pronounced in hormone-naive patients.

  20. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  1. Collaborative study on antigens for immunodiagnosis of Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    PubMed

    Mott, K E; Dixon, H; Carter, C E; Garcia, E; Ishii, A; Matsuda, H; Mitchell, G; Owhashi, M; Tanaka, H; Tsang, V C

    1987-01-01

    Six research laboratories in Australia, Japan, the Philippines and the USA participated in a collaborative evaluation of immunodiagnostic tests for Schistosoma japonicum infections. The serum bank consisted of 385 well-documented sera from Brazil, Kenya, Philippines, Republic of Korea and Europe. Twelve S. japonicum antigen/test system combinations were evaluated.Crude S. japonicum egg antigens showed the highest sensitivity and specificity. The defined or characterized antigens showed no advantage over the crude antigens. Quantitative seroreactivity of all S. japonicum antigens showed a positive correlation with faecal egg counts (log x + 1) in all age groups. The performance of the circumoval precipitin test was satisfactory within the same laboratory but with differences in the results between laboratories. A monoclonal antibody used in a competitive radioimmunoassay test system performed as well as the crude egg antigens.The high sensitivity of crude S. japonicum antigens now permits further evaluation for wide-scale use in public health laboratories of endemic areas to support control efforts. PMID:3111737

  2. Antigenic variation in ciliates: antigen structure, function, expression.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2007-01-01

    In the past decades, the major focus of antigen variation research has been on parasitic protists. However, antigenic variation occurs also in free-living protists. The antigenic systems of the ciliates Paramecium and Tetrahymena have been studied for more than 100 yr. In spite of different life strategies and distant phylogenetic relationships of free-living ciliates and parasitic protists, their antigenic systems have features in common, such as the presence of repeated protein motifs and multigene families. The function of variable surface antigens in free-living ciliates is still unknown. Up to now no detailed monitoring of antigen expression in free-living ciliates in natural habitats has been performed. Unlike stochastic switching in parasites, antigen expression in ciliates can be directed, e.g. by temperature, which holds great advantages for research on the expression mechanism. Regulated expression of surface antigens occurs in an exclusive way and the responsible mechanism is complex, involving both transcriptional and post-transcriptional features. The involvement of homology-dependent effects has been proposed several times but has not been proved yet.

  3. Kinetic analysis of a high-affinity antibody/antigen interaction performed by multiple Biacore users.

    PubMed

    Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Navratilova, Iva; Calderon-Cacia, Maria; Fan, Linsey; Thornton, Kevin; Zhu, Mingde; Bos, Tim Vanden; Forte, Carla; Friend, Della; Laird-Offringa, Ite; Tavares, Gisele; Whatley, John; Shi, Ergang; Widom, Angela; Lindquist, Kevin C; Klakamp, Scott; Drake, Andrew; Bohmann, David; Roell, Marina; Rose, Larry; Dorocke, Jill; Roth, Bruce; Luginbühl, Béatrice; Myszka, David G

    2006-05-15

    To explore the reliability of Biacore-based assays, 22 study participants measured the binding of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to a monoclonal antibody (mAb). Each participant was provided with the same reagents and a detailed experimental protocol. The mAb was immobilized on the sensor chip at three different densities and a two-step assay was used to determine the kinetic and affinity parameters of the PSA/mAb complex. First, PSA was tested over a concentration range of 2.5-600 nM to obtain k(a) information. Second, to define the k(d) of this stable antigen/antibody complex accurately, the highest PSA concentration was retested with the dissociation phase of each binding cycle monitored for 1h. All participants collected data that could be analyzed to obtain kinetic parameters for the interaction. The association and the extended-dissociation data derived from the three antibody surfaces were globally fit using a simple 1:1 interaction model. The average k(a) and k(d) for the PSA/mAb interaction as calculated from the 22 analyses were (4.1+/-0.6) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and (4.5+/-0.6) x 10(-5) s(-1), respectively. Overall, the experimental standard errors in the rate constants were only approximately 14%. Based on the kinetic rate constants, the affinity (K(D)) of the PSA/mAb interaction was 1.1+/-0.2 nM.

  4. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  5. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) ...

  6. Differentiation antigens in lymphohemopoietic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Trnka, Z.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 15 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: In Situ Characterization of Human Lymphoid Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies; Structural and Functional Aspects of HLA Clas II Genes; Cell-Surface Differentiation Antigens Expressed on Thymocytes and T Cells of the Mouse; and Differentiation Antigens on Lymphoid Cells of the Guinea Pig.

  7. Effects of long-term androgen replacement therapy on the physical and mental statuses of aging males with late-onset hypogonadism: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial in Japan (EARTH Study)

    PubMed Central

    Konaka, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Orikasa, Hideki; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Takamura, Toshinari; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Iijima, Masashi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Androgen replacement therapy (ART) efficacy on late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) has been widely investigated in Western countries; however, it remains controversial whether ART can improve health and prolong active lifestyles. We prospectively assessed long-term ART effects on the physical and mental statuses of aging men with LOH in Japan. The primary endpoint was health-related quality of life assessed by questionnaires. Secondary endpoints included glycemic control, lipid parameters, blood pressure, waist circumference, body composition, muscular strength, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) scores, and serum prostate-specific antigen levels. Of the 1637 eligible volunteers, 334 patients > 40 years with LOH were randomly assigned to either the ART (n = 169) or control groups (n = 165). Fifty-two weeks after the initial treatment, ART significantly affected the role physical subdomain of the short form-36 health survey (SF-36) scale (P = 0.0318). ART was also associated with significant decreases in waist circumstance (P = 0.002) and serum triglyceride (TG) (P = 0.013) and with significant increases in whole-body and leg muscle mass volumes (P = 0.071 and 0.0108, respectively), serum hemoglobin (P < 0.001), IPSS voiding subscore (P = 0.0418), and the second question on IIEF-5 (P = 0.0049). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of severe adverse events. In conclusion, in patients with LOH, long-term ART exerted beneficial effects on Role Physical subdomain of the SF-36 scale, serum TG, waist circumstance, muscle mass volume, voiding subscore of IPSS, and the second question of IIEF-5. We hope our study will contribute to the future development of this area. PMID:25761833

  8. Effects of long-term androgen replacement therapy on the physical and mental statuses of aging males with late-onset hypogonadism: a multicenter randomized controlled trial in Japan (EARTH Study).

    PubMed

    Konaka, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Orikasa, Hideki; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Takamura, Toshinari; Takeda, Yoshiyu; Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Iijima, Masashi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Androgen replacement therapy (ART) efficacy on late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) has been widely investigated in Western countries; however, it remains controversial whether ART can improve health and prolong active lifestyles. We prospectively assessed long-term ART effects on the physical and mental statuses of aging men with LOH in Japan. The primary endpoint was health-related quality of life assessed by questionnaires. Secondary endpoints included glycemic control, lipid parameters, blood pressure, waist circumference, body composition, muscular strength, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS), International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) scores, and serum prostate-specific antigen levels. Of the 1637 eligible volunteers, 334 patients > 40 years with LOH were randomly assigned to either the ART (n = 169) or control groups (n = 165). Fifty-two weeks after the initial treatment, ART significantly affected the role physical subdomain of the short form-36 health survey (SF-36) scale (P = 0.0318). ART was also associated with significant decreases in waist circumstance (P = 0.002) and serum triglyceride (TG) (P = 0.013) and with significant increases in whole-body and leg muscle mass volumes (P = 0.071 and 0.0108, respectively), serum hemoglobin (P < 0.001), IPSS voiding subscore (P = 0.0418), and the second question on IIEF-5 (P = 0.0049). There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of severe adverse events. In conclusion, in patients with LOH, long-term ART exerted beneficial effects on Role Physical subdomain of the SF-36 scale, serum TG, waist circumstance, muscle mass volume, voiding subscore of IPSS, and the second question of IIEF-5. We hope our study will contribute to the future development of this area. PMID:25761833

  9. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  10. A surface antigen influenza vaccine. 2. Pyrogenicity and antigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, M. I.; Furminger, I. G.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional influenza vaccine containing whole virus particles purified on a zonal centrifuge is pyrogenic and can cause systemic and local adverse side effects. An improved vaccine was therefore prepared which contained only the surface antigens of the virus adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide. The antigenicity of this vaccine was compared with conventional vaccine in chickens. Both vaccines induced similar titres of serum haemagglutination-inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition antibody. The dose response curves, however, were different. The surface antigens at vaccine strength without aluminium hydroxide were of negligible pyrogenicity in rabbits. PMID:1068196

  11. [Antigenic response against PPD and antigen 60 in tubercular patients: single antigen versus the combined test].

    PubMed

    Máttar, S; Broquetas, J M; Gea, J; Aran, X; el-Banna, N; Sauleda, J; Torres, J M

    1992-05-01

    We analyze serum samples from 70 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 50 healthy individuals. The antigenic activity (IgG) against protein purified antigen (PPD) and antigen 60 (A60) from M. tuberculosis. Thirteen patients were also HIV infected, and three patients had AIDS defined by the presence of disseminated tuberculosis. The test using antigen alone showed a 77% sensitivity and 74% specificity when PPD is used. When A60 was used, both values improved (81% sensitivity, 94% specificity). The use of a combined test (PPD and A60) improves the sensitivity (89%) but reduces the specificity (82%). The HIV infected patients showed similar responses to those of other patients. The combined use of different antigens might be useful for diagnosing tuberculosis. PMID:1390996

  12. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  13. Age-related deregulation of Aire and peripheral tissue antigen genes in the thymic stroma of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice is associated with autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1).

    PubMed

    Fornari, Thaís A; Donate, Paula B; Macedo, Claudia; Marques, Márcia M C; Magalhães, Danielle A; Passos, Geraldo A S

    2010-09-01

    Gene expression of peripheral tissue antigens (PTAs) in stromal medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is a key process to the negative selection of autoreactive thymocytes. This phenomenon was termed "promiscuous gene expression" (PGE), which is partially controlled by the Aire gene. Nevertheless, reasons for the correlation of Aire and PTAs with the emergence of autoimmune diseases are largely unknown, though it may be a result of a chronological effect. Although the effect of Aire mutations in pathogenic autoimmunity is well know, it could not be a unique cause for autoimmunity. Independently of mutations, temporal deregulation of Aire expression may imbalance Aire-dependent PTAs and/or wide PGE. This deregulation may be an early warning sign for autoimmune diseases as it guarantees autoantigen representation in the thymus. To assess this hypothesis, we studied the expression levels of Aire, Aire-dependent (Ins2) and Aire-independent (Gad67 and Col2a1) PTAs using real-time-PCR of the thymic stromal cells of NOD mice during the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM-1). Wide PGE was studied by microarrays in which the PTA genes were identified through parallel CD80(+) mTEC 3.10 cell line expression profiling. The results show that Aire gene was down-regulated in young pre-autoimmune (pre-diabetic) NOD mice. PGE and specific PTA genes were down-regulated in adult autoimmune diabetic animals. These findings represent evidence indicating that chronological deregulation of genes important to negative selection may be associated with the development of an autoimmune disease (DM-1) in mice.

  14. Antigen Retrieval Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shan-Rong; Shi, Yan; Taylor, Clive R.

    2011-01-01

    As a review for the 20th anniversary of publishing the antigen retrieval (AR) technique in this journal, the authors intend briefly to summarize developments in AR-immunohistochemistry (IHC)–based research and diagnostics, with particular emphasis on current challenges and future research directions. Over the past 20 years, the efforts of many different investigators have coalesced in extending the AR approach to all areas of anatomic pathology diagnosis and research and further have led to AR-based protein extraction techniques and tissue-based proteomics. As a result, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tissue collections are now seen as a literal treasure of materials for clinical and translational research to an extent unimaginable just two decades ago. Further research in AR-IHC is likely to focus on tissue proteomics, developing a more efficient protocol for protein extraction from FFPE tissue based on the AR principle, and combining the proteomics approach with AR-IHC to establish a practical, sophisticated platform for identifying and using biomarkers in personalized medicine. PMID:21339172

  15. Recognition of oxidized albumin and thyroid antigens by psoriasis autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Rasheed, Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the role of reactive-oxygen-species (ROS) induced epitopes on human-serum-albumin (HSA) and thyroid antigens in psoriasis autoimmunity. Methods: This study was performed in the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia between May 2014 and February 2015. The study was designed to explore the role of ROS-induced epitopes in psoriasis autoimmunity. Singlet-oxygen (or ROS)-induced epitopes on protein (ROS-epitopes-albumin) was characterized by in-vitro and in-vivo. Thyroid antigens were prepared from rabbit thyroid, and thyroglobulin was isolated from thyroid extract. Immunocross-reactions of protein-A purified anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-immunoglobulin G (IgGs) with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin, and their oxidized forms were determined. Binding characteristics of autoantibodies in chronic plaque psoriasis patients (n=26) against ROS-epitopes-HSA and also with native and oxidized thyroid antigens were screened, and the results were compared with age-matched controls (n=22). Results: The anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-IgGs showed cross-reactions with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin and with their oxidized forms. High degree of specific binding by psoriasis IgGs to ROS-epitopes-HSA, ROS-thyroid antigen and ROS-thyroglobulin was observed. Immunoglobulin G from normal-human-controls showed negligible binding with all tested antigens. Moreover, sera from psoriasis patients had higher levels of carbonyl contents compared with control sera. Conclusion: Structural alterations in albumin, thyroid antigens by ROS, generate unique neo-epitopes that might be one of the factors for the induction of autoantibodies in psoriasis. PMID:26620982

  16. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  17. Vaccines and viral antigenic diversity.

    PubMed

    Mumford, J A

    2007-04-01

    Antigenic diversity among ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses occurs as a result of rapid mutation during replication and recombination/reassortment between genetic material of related strains during co-infections. Variants which have a selective advantage in terms of ability to spread or to avoid host immunity become established within populations. Examples of antigenically diverse viruses include influenza, foot and mouth disease (FMD) and bluetongue (BT). Effective vaccination against such viruses requires surveillance programmes to monitor circulating serotypes and their evolution to ensure that vaccine strains match field viruses. A formal vaccine strain selection scheme for equine influenza has been established under the auspices of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) based on an international surveillance programme. A regulatory framework has been put in place to allow rapid updating of vaccine strains withoutthe need to provide full registration data for licensing the updated vaccine. While there is extensive surveillance of FMD worldwide and antigenic and genetic characterisation of isolates, there is no formal vaccine strain selection system. A coordinated international effort has been initiated to agree harmonised approaches to virus characterisation which is aimed at providing the basis for an internationally agreed vaccine matching system for FMD supported by the OIE. The emergence and spread of BT in Europe have resulted in an intensification of vaccine evaluation in terms of safety and efficacy, particularly cross-protection within and between serotypes. The most important requirement for producing vaccines against viruses displaying antigenic diversity is a method of measuring antigenic distances between strains and developing an understanding of how these distances relate to cross-protection. Antigenic cartography, a new computational method of quantifying antigenic distances between strains has been applied to human and equine influenza to

  18. Clinically insignificant improvement of prostate cancer prediction by addition of sex steroid hormones and SHBG serum levels to serum PSA, fPSA%, and age in a screening setting.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Popovscaia, Marina; Ramoner, Reinhold; Schäfer, Georg; Stenzel, Birgit; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Klocker, Helmut

    2012-10-01

    Abstract Various findings implicate sex hormones in prostate growth and development and also in prostate carcinogenesis. We investigated if addition of sex steroid hormone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) serum levels to standard risk assessment parameters [prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free PSA percentage (fPSA%), and age] improves prostate cancer prediction in a PSA screening setting. Steroid hormones testosterone (T), free testosterone (fT), and estradiol (E2), and binding protein SHBG levels were measured in 762 men undergoing prostate biopsy due to suspect PSA serum levels. Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 286 (37.5%) of these men. Our data confirmed that PSA (mean BE=5.09; mean CA=6.05; p=1.24×10-5), fPSA% (mean BE=22.08; mean CA=18.67; p=1.97×10-7), and age (mean BE=60.64; mean CA=64.5; p=7.05×10-10) differentiate men with cancer (CA) and men with benign disease (BE), such as benign prostate hyperplasia. In addition, SHBG (mean BE=50.3; mean CA=54.9; p=0.008) also differed statistically significantly between these two groups. All hormones except E2 and tumor markers correlated significantly with age (T: ρ=-0.09; fT: ρ=-0.27; SHBG: ρ=0.21; PSA: ρ=0.32; and fPSA%: ρ=0.22). Furthermore, we found that PSA correlates with E2 (ρ=0.08), and fPSA% with SHBG (ρ=0.1) and fT (ρ=-0.09). Addition of hormones and SHBG to a baseline marker model including PSA, fPSA%, and age improved cancer prediction in three multivariate classification methods; however, the improvement was minimal. The best improvement by 0.8% was obtained in the logistic regression model with the addition of T and SHBG or of E2 and SHBG, or in the support vector machine model with the addition of SHBG and all steroid hormones to the combination of standard markers PSA, fPSA%, and age; however, this additional gain of accuracy is too small to justify the additional efforts and costs.

  19. Common antigenic structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Kreiter, V. P.; Pressman, D.

    1974-01-01

    Spent culture media of all the human cell lines tested have been found to contain the antigenic activity present on the 11,000-Dalton HL-A common portion fragment of the HL-A antigen molecule that appears to be a characteristic, invariant portion of HL-A antigen molecules. From the culture medium of one of these lines, RPMI 1788, a lymphoid cell line, the substance carrying HL-A common activity was isolated, which was shown to be identical to the HL-A common portion fragment with respect to molecular size, electrophoretic mobility, isoelectric focusing patterns, and certain antigenic characteristics. By an isolation procedure involving differential ultrafiltration, gel filtration, and column electrophoresis, 8 litres of the culture medium yielded 1.5–2.0 A280 units of the substance representing 15–20 per cent of the HL-A common antigenic activity originally present. A single protein band with a Rf of 0.47 was obtained by disc electrophoresis. The molecular size was shown to be about 11,000 Daltons by gel filtration and by sodium dodecyl sulphate—acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Upon isoelectric focusing two bands were obtained which corresponded exactly to those obtained with HL-A common portion fragment prepared from papain-solubilized HL-A antigen preparations by acid dissociation. The isoelectric point of the major band was 5.0. The reactions of this substance with rabbit antisera against human lymphoid cell membrane and against the substance were essentially identical to the reactions of HL-A common portion fragment with these same antisera. ImagesFIG. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4476726

  20. Organ-Specific Membrane Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Sell, K. W.; Mori, W.; Rack, J. H.; Gurner, B. W.; Coombs, R. R. A.

    1969-01-01

    A satisfactory system for testing the reaction of rabbit antisera with membrane antigens of human tissue cells is described. This method allows the differentiation between IgG and IgM antibodies and provides an extremely sensitive method for the detection of antigens on all cells including non-viable fixed cells. Anti-organ serum before selective absorption showed very little organ specificity in their reactions, but may be made specific by extensive absorption although often the resulting specific titre was very low. Organ-specific membrane antigens were also identified and shown to be represented on tumour cells, although in some cases such as the colon the reactions were weaker with tumour cells than with normal parenchymal cells of an organ. On the other hand, in one case of carcinoma of the kidney the organ-specific antigens were detectably stronger on tumour cells than on normal kidney cells. Preliminary studies on human ascitic tumour cells from 4 different cancer patients show that species-specific membrane antigens can be demonstrated. Unfortunately none of the cases were derived from organs whose origin could be identified with the antisera which had been prepared for this series of experiments. ImagesFigs. 2-3 PMID:5806432

  1. [Specific prostatic antigen in prostatic carcinoma: its relationship with tumor differentiation and clinical course].

    PubMed

    Sáenz de Chirife, A M; Bassi, A M; Celeste, F; Bergdolt, D

    1991-05-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate is a tumor with a variable clinical course and a high incidence of local progression and/or metastasis. This study was undertaken to evaluate tissue prostate specific antigen (PSA) in patients with carcinoma of the prostate, its correlation with Gleason's grading and its value in predicting the clinical course of these patients. We studied 28 transurethral biopsies of patients with prostatic carcinoma utilizing HE and peroxidase-antiperoxidase staining techniques. These were given a score of 2 to 10 using Gleason's grading. PSA was determined according to percent positivity. The clinical course was considered favourable (F) when the lesion remained stable and unfavourable (U) when peri-prostatic spread was evidenced, metastasis and/or death from the disease. Statistical analysis was performed with the linear discriminatory test. PSA percentages ranged from 0 to 95 and the Gleason score from 3 to 11. There was an indirect correlation between these methods (r = 0.74): high Gleason scores corresponded to low PSA values and viceversa. PSA was highly positive in patients with F and U clinical courses whereas low positive values (less than 40%) were observed only in patients with U clinical course. High Gleason (8 to 10) and low (less than 5) scores were observed only in patients with a clinical course of U or F, respectively, while intermediate values (5 to 8) were not predictive of the clinical course. Discriminatory analysis gave Z values of -2.446 (P = 0.014) for PSA, -2.90 (P = 0.004) for the Gleason score in predicting prognosis, conferring a greater value overall to the latter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Surface antigens of smooth brucellae.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R; Jones, L M; Leong, D; Wilson, J B

    1968-10-01

    Surface antigens of smooth brucellae were extracted by ether-water, phenol-water, trichloroacetic acid, and saline and examined by immunoelectrophoresis and gel diffusion with antisera from infected and immunized rabbits. Ether-water extracts of Brucella melitensis contained a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was specific for the surface of smooth brucellae and was correlated with the M agglutinogen of Wilson and Miles, a polysaccharide protein component devoid of lipid which was not restricted to the surface of smooth brucellae and was not correlated with the smooth agglutinogen (component 1), and several protein components which were associated with internal antigens of rough and smooth brucellae. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis of ether-water extracts of B. abortus revealed only two components, a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was correlated with the A agglutinogen, and component 1. Component 1 from B. melitensis and B. abortus showed identity in gel diffusion tests, whereas component M from B. melitensis and component A from B. abortus showed partial identity with unabsorbed antisera and no cross-reactions with monospecific sera. Attempts to prepare monospecific sera directly by immunization of rabbits with cell walls or ether-water extracts were unsuccessful. Absorption of antisera with heavy fraction of ether-water extracts did not always result in monospecific sera. It was concluded (as has been described before) that the A and M antigens are present on a single antigenic complex, in different proportions depending upon the species and biotype, and that this component is a lipopolysaccharide protein complex of high molecular weight that diffuses poorly through agar gel. Components 1, A, and M were also demonstrated in trichloroacetic acid and phenol-water extracts. With all extracts, B. melitensis antigen showed greater diffusibility in agar than B. abortus antigens. After mild acid hydrolysis, B. abortus ether-water extract was able

  3. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  4. Concepts and applications for influenza antigenic cartography

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza antigenic cartography projects influenza antigens into a two or three dimensional map based on immunological datasets, such as hemagglutination inhibition and microneutralization assays. A robust antigenic cartography can facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection since the antigenic map can simplify data interpretation through intuitive antigenic map. However, antigenic cartography construction is not trivial due to the challenging features embedded in the immunological data, such as data incompleteness, high noises, and low reactors. To overcome these challenges, we developed a computational method, temporal Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS), by adapting the low rank MC concept from the movie recommendation system in Netflix and the MDS method from geographic cartography construction. The application on H3N2 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A viruses demonstrates that temporal MC-MDS is effective and efficient in constructing influenza antigenic cartography. The web sever is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap. PMID:21761589

  5. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus

    SciTech Connect

    Salfeld, J.; Pfaff, E.; Noah, M.; Schaller, H.

    1989-02-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen (HBcAg)) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen (HBeAg)). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis virus nucleocapsid.

  6. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  7. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  8. Antigenic Variation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Petter, Michaela; Duffy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite that causes most malaria-associated morbidity and mortality in humans with over 500,000 deaths annually. The disease symptoms are associated with repeated cycles of invasion and asexual multiplication inside red blood cells of the parasite. Partial, non-sterile immunity to P. falciparum malaria develops only after repeated infections and continuous exposure. The successful evasion of the human immune system relies on the large repertoire of antigenically diverse parasite proteins displayed on the red blood cell surface and on the merozoite membrane where they are exposed to the human immune system. Expression switching of these polymorphic proteins between asexual parasite generations provides an efficient mechanism to adapt to the changing environment in the host and to maintain chronic infection. This chapter discusses antigenic diversity and variation in the malaria parasite and our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that direct the expression of these proteins. PMID:26537377

  9. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  10. Meningococcal protein antigens and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Feavers, Ian M; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2009-06-24

    The development of a comprehensive vaccine against meningococcal disease has been challenging. Recent developments in molecular genetics have provided both explanations for these challenges and possible solutions. Since genome sequence data became available there has been a marked increase in number of protein antigens that have been suggested as prospective vaccine components. This review catalogues the proposed vaccine candidates and examines the evidence for their inclusion in potential protein vaccine formulations.

  11. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  12. Stable solid-phase Rh antigen.

    PubMed

    Yared, M A; Moise, K J; Rodkey, L S

    1997-12-01

    Numerous investigators have attempted to isolate the Rh antigens in a stable, immunologically reactive form since the discovery of the Rh system over 56 years ago. We report here a successful and reproducible approach to solubilizing and adsorbing the human Rh antigen(s) to a solid-phase matrix in an antigenically active form. Similar results were obtained with rabbit A/D/F red blood cell antigens. The antigen preparation was made by dissolution of the red blood cell membrane lipid followed by fragmentation of the residual cytoskeleton in an EDTA solution at low ionic strength. The antigenic activity of the soluble preparations was labile in standard buffers but was stable in zwitterionic buffers for extended periods of time. Further studies showed that the antigenic activity of these preparations was enhanced, as was their affinity for plastic surfaces, in the presence of acidic zwitterionic buffers. Adherence to plastic surfaces at low pH maintained antigenic reactivity and specificity for antibody was retained. The data show that this approach yields a stable form of antigenically active human Rh D antigen that could be used in a red blood cell-free assay for quantitative analysis of Rh D antibody and for Rh D antibody immunoadsorption and purification.

  13. Reaction of antibodies to rheumatoid arthritis nuclear antigen with a synthetic peptide corresponding to part of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1.

    PubMed Central

    Venables, P J; Pawlowski, T; Mumford, P A; Brown, C; Crawford, D H; Maini, R N

    1988-01-01

    Antibodies to rheumatoid arthritis nuclear antigen (RANA) are detected by immunodiffusion (ID) and immunofluorescence (IF), though reports of the identity of the antigen(s) have been conflicting. In this study it is shown conclusively that ID and IF anti-RANA react with epitopes on Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) and that the major epitope detected by immunofluorescence is represented by a synthetic peptide, P62, corresponding to part of EBNA-1. In an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) anti-P62 antibodies in 35 rheumatoid arthritis sera were threefold higher than those of 35 age and sex matched controls, with the highest levels occurring in young patients with active joint disease. Images PMID:2452607

  14. HLA antigens and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. A family study.

    PubMed

    Savi, M; Neri, T M; Zavaroni, I; Coscelli, I

    1977-12-01

    Sixteen insulin dependent diabetic patients (age at onset less than 35 years) and their families were tissue typed for HLA antigens. Glucose tolerance of relatives was also tested. Among diabetic patients two HLA antigens were found with increased frequency: B8 (31 percent, control 15 percent) and Bw35 (38 percent, control 23 percent). Among normal relatives B8 and Bw35 had the same frequency as the control group. Bw15 frequency was not increased in either group. In relatives, no correlation between HLA antigens (B8 or Bw35) and abnormal glucose tolerance, obesity and over-weight at birth was found. Present data confirm previous reports of high B8 frequency in early onset diabetic patients, but fail to demonstrate a raised frequency of abnormal glucose tolerance among relatives bearing B8 (or, in our cases, Bw35). B8 may be considered a genetic indicator for susceptibility to juvenile diabetes. On the basis of present results in families, however non genetic factors clearly also play a determinant role. Furthermore, that diabetogenesis arises from a link between Ir-genes and HLA-B8 antigen should only be considered a suggestive hypothesis. PMID:413751

  15. Antigen-Induced Immunomodulation in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Milioti, Natalia; Bermudez-Fajardo, Alexandra; Penichet, Manuel L.; Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterised by the accumulation of monocytes/macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and lymphocytes within the arterial wall in response to the release of proinflammatory molecules. Such accumulation results in the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque, which would eventually evolve to complications such as total artery occlusion, rupture, calcification, or aneurysm. Although the molecular mechanism responsible for the development of atherosclerosis is not completely understood, it is clear that the immune system plays a key role in the development of the atherosclerotic plaque and in its complications. There are multiple antigenic stimuli that have been associated with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Most of these stimuli come from modified self-molecules such as oxidised low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs), beta2glycoprotein1 (β2GP1), lipoprotein a (LP(a)), heat shock proteins (HSPs), and protein components of the extracellular matrix such as collagen and fibrinogen in the form of advanced glycation-end (AGE) products. In addition, several foreign antigens including bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Chlamydia pneumoniae and viruses such as enterovirus and cytomegalovirus have been associated with atherosclerosis as potentially causative or bystander participants, adding another level of complexity to the analysis of the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. The present review summarises the most important scientific findings published within the last two decades on the importance of antigens, antigen stimulation, and adaptive immune responses in the development of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:18551190

  16. Prostate-associated gene 4 (PAGE4), an intrinsically disordered cancer/testis antigen, is a novel therapeutic target for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prakash; Dunker, A Keith; Weninger, Keith; Orban, John

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-associated gene 4 (PAGE4) is a remarkably prostate-specific Cancer/Testis Antigen that is highly upregulated in the human fetal prostate and its diseased states but not in the adult normal gland. PAGE4 is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that functions as a stress-response protein to suppress reactive oxygen species as well as prevent DNA damage. In addition, PAGE4 is also a transcriptional regulator that potentiates transactivation by the oncogene c-Jun. c-Jun forms the AP-1 complex by heterodimerizing with members of the Fos family and plays an important role in the development and pathology of the prostate gland, underscoring the importance of the PAGE4/c-Jun interaction. HIPK1, also a component of the stress-response pathway, phosphorylates PAGE4 at T51 which is critical for its transcriptional activity. Phosphorylation induces conformational and dynamic switching in the PAGE4 ensemble leading to a new cellular function. Finally, bioinformatics evidence suggests that the PAGE4 mRNA could be alternatively spliced resulting in four potential isoforms of the polypeptide alluding to the possibility of a range of conformational ensembles with latent functions. Considered together, the data suggest that PAGE4 may represent the first molecular link between stress and prostate cancer (PCa). Thus, pharmacologically targeting PAGE4 may be a novel opportunity for treating and managing patients with PCa, especially patients with low-risk disease. PMID:27270343

  17. Septa design for a prostate specific PET camera

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Jinyi; Huber, Jennifer S.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Moses, William W.; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-11-15

    The recent development of new prostate tracers has motivated us to build a low cost PET camera optimized to image the prostate. Coincidence imaging of positron emitters is achieved using a pair of external curved detector banks. The bottom bank is fixed below the patient bed, and the top bank moves upward for patient access and downward for maximum sensitivity. In this paper, we study the design of septa for the prostate camera using Monte Carlo simulations. The system performance is measured by the detectability of a prostate lesion. We have studied 17 septa configurations. The results show that the design of septa has a large impact on the lesion detection at a given activity concentration. Significant differences are also observed between the lesion detectability and the conventional noise equivalent count (NEC) performance, indicating that the NEC is not appropriate for the detection task.

  18. Image Reconstruction for Prostate Specific Nuclear Medicine imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Smith

    2007-01-11

    There is increasing interest in the design and construction of nuclear medicine detectors for dedicated prostate imaging. These include detectors designed for imaging the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with single gamma as well as positron-emitting radionuclides. New detectors and acquisition geometries present challenges and opportunities for image reconstruction. In this contribution various strategies for image reconstruction for these special purpose imagers are reviewed. Iterative statistical algorithms provide a framework for reconstructing prostate images from a wide variety of detectors and acquisition geometries for PET and SPECT. The key to their success is modeling the physics of photon transport and data acquisition and the Poisson statistics of nuclear decay. Analytic image reconstruction methods can be fast and are useful for favorable acquisition geometries. Future perspectives on algorithm development and data analysis for prostate imaging are presented.

  19. Killed poliovirus antigen titration in humans.

    PubMed

    Salk, J; Cohen, H; Fillastre, C; Stoeckel, P; Rey, J L; Schlumberger, M; Nicolas, A; van Steenis, G; van Wezel, A L; Triau, R; Saliou, P; Barry, L F; Moreau, J P; Mérieux, C

    1978-01-01

    To establish the antigen content of a killed poliovirus vaccine sufficiently potent to induce immunity with one or two doses and to establish a reference standard vaccine which has been tested under field conditions, a titration was carried out in infants to determine the amount of each of the three antigenic types of poliovirus vaccine required to induce seroconversion with a single dose. It has been observed that over a critical range of antigen concentration there is an essentially linear relationship between antibody response and quantity of antigen administered. More than 90 percent of the groups studied had detectable antibody after receiving single injections of 80, 8 and 64 D-antigen units of Types I, II and III, respectively. Four-fold less antigen for each of the three types was less effective. The implications of these findings for an efficient immunization procedure are discussed.

  20. Acquired loss of red cell Kell antigens.

    PubMed

    Vengelen-Tyler, V; Gonzalez, B; Garratty, G; Kruppe, C; Johnson, C L; Mueller, K A; Marsh, W L

    1987-02-01

    A 19-year-old patient with a long history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura developed a potent antibody against a high-incidence antigen in the Kell blood group system. The direct antiglobulin test on his red cells was negative. His cells exhibited profound depression of Kell blood group antigens, but antigens of other blood groups were normal. Transfusion of incompatible blood was well tolerated and differential agglutination tests, using selected Rh antisera, showed in vivo survival of the transfused red cells for more than 8 weeks. However, the transfused red cells also showed acquired loss of Kell antigens. Five months after the initial findings, Kell-related antibody disappeared and Kell antigens reappeared on his red cells. The patient's serum stored from the initial investigation now reacted with his freshly collected red cells. These data suggest that an environmental agent in the patient's plasma was responsible for the temporary loss of Kell antigens from red cells in his circulation.

  1. Identification of the antigen content of electroimmunoprecipitates.

    PubMed

    Beyer, N Helena; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2013-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies including purified antibody fractions and animal or human antisera may react with unknown antigens or antigens other than their main specificity in reactions that are best visualized by gel electroimmunoprecipitation methods, e.g., when analyzing complex antigen mixtures. The great advantage of gel immunoprecipitation approaches is that each immunoprecipitate contains antigen in a pure form and that the precipitate is separated by position, shape, and size from other precipitates in the complex patterns of crossed immunoelectrophoresis. The identification of the antigen content of such immunoprecipitates is important but challenging because of the very stable, high affinity complex formation leading to precipitation in the gels. Here, we present detailed step-by-step recipes for identifying the antigen content of electroimmunoprecipitates.

  2. The ABCs of artificial antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyun V; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2004-04-01

    Artificial antigen presentation aims to accelerate the establishment of therapeutic cellular immunity. Artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) and their cell-free substitutes are designed to stimulate the expansion and acquisition of optimal therapeutic features of T cells before therapeutic infusion, without the need for autologous antigen-presenting cells. Compelling recent advances include fibroblast AAPCs that process antigens, magnetic beads that are antigen specific, novel T-cell costimulatory combinations, the augmentation of therapeutic potency of adoptively transferred T lymphocytes by interleukin-15, and the safe use of dendritic cell-derived exosomes pulsed with tumor antigen. Whereas the safety and potency of the various systems warrant further preclinical and clinical studies, these emerging technologies are poised to have a major impact on adoptive T-cell therapy and the investigation of T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:15060556

  3. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  4. Minor histocompatibility antigens: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Spierings, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Minor histocompatibility (H) antigens are key molecules driving allo-immune responses in both graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD) and in graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reactivity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Dissection of the dual function of minor H antigens became evident through their different modes of tissue and cell expression, i.e. hematopoietic system-restricted or broad. Broadly expressed minor H antigens can cause both GvHD and GvL effects, while hematopoietic system-restricted minor H antigens are more prone to induce GvL responses. This phenomenon renders the latter group of minor H antigens as curative tools for HSCT-based immunotherapy of hematological malignancies and disorders, in which minor H antigen-specific responses are enhanced in order to eradicate the malignant cells. This article describes the immunogenetics of minor H antigens and methods that have been developed to identify them. Moreover, it summarizes the clinical relevance of minor H antigens in transplantation, with special regards to allogeneic HSCT and solid-organ transplantation.

  5. Tumor-associated antigens in gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    DiSaia, P J

    1975-12-01

    If the study of tumor immunology is to have a profound impact on clinical medicine, certain hypotheses must be proven to be valid. First and foremost, it must be demonstrated that malignant tissue possesses antigenic substances (probably protein moieties) that are unique to that particular malignant process. In addition, these antigenic substances must be very similar in histologically similar tumors. Second, the host defense mechanisms must be capable of reacting to these tumor-associated antigens. The reaction is, of course, necessary in order to develop both diagnostic and therapeutic routes of application. The reaction of the immunologic system to these tumor-associated antigens could be monitored as an early serodiagnostic tool for subclinical cancer, and the cytotoxic reaction holds great promise as an immunotherapeutic tool. The essence of tumor immunologic research can thus be stated in the form of the following questions: 1. Do histologically similar cancers from identical primary sites share common tumor-associated antigens? 2. Does the immunologic system react to these antigens? 3. Can this reaction be assayed on one hand for serodiagnosis and augmented on the other for immunotherapy? Specific antigens have been found in animal tumors and have been divided into two classes: the viral induced tumors, which share common antigens when caused by the same viral agent, and carcinogen-induced tumors, which appear to have unique antigenic determinants for each tumor. In recent years a great many human tumors have been found to have tumor-associated antigens; these include colonic carcinoma, neuroblastoma, melanoma, soft tissue and osteogenic sarcoma, bladder carcinoma and Burkitt's lymphoma. This report includes evidence for the existence of such antigens in adenocarcinoma of the ovary and squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. The laboratory evidence that has been presented would suggest that there are both a cell-mediated response and humoral response to the

  6. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  7. Effect of antigenic exposure on airway smooth muscle remodeling in an equine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Leclere, Mathilde; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Gélinas-Lymburner, Emilie; David, Florent; Martin, James G; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that airway smooth muscle remodeling is an early event in asthma, but whether it remains a dynamic process late in the course of the disease is unknown. Moreover, little is known about the effects of an antigenic exposure on chronically established smooth muscle remodeling. We measured the effects of antigenic exposure on airway smooth muscle in the central and peripheral airways of horses with heaves, a naturally occurring airway disease that shares similarities with chronic asthma. Heaves-affected horses (n = 6) and age-matched control horses (n = 5) were kept on pasture before being exposed to indoor antigens for 30 days to induce airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. Peripheral lung and endobronchial biopsies were collected before and after antigenic exposure by thoracoscopy and bronchoscopy, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and enzymatic labeling were used for morphometric analyses of airway smooth muscle mass and proliferative and apoptotic myocytes. In the peripheral airways, heaves-affected horses had twice as much smooth muscle as control horses. Remodeling was associated with smooth muscle hyperplasia and in situ proliferation, without reduced apoptosis. Further antigenic exposure had no effect on the morphometric data. In central airways, proliferating myocytes were increased compared with control horses only after antigenic exposure. Peripheral airway smooth muscle mass is stable in chronically affected animals subjected to antigenic exposure. This increased mass is maintained in a dynamic equilibrium by an elevated cellular turnover, suggesting that targeting smooth muscle proliferation could be effective at decreasing chronic remodeling.

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Influence Levels of Antibodies to the Plasmodium falciparum Asexual-Stage Apical Membrane Antigen 1 but Not to Merozoite Surface Antigen 2 and Merozoite Surface Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Armead H.; Leke, Rose G. F.; Mendell, Nancy R.; Shon, Dewon; Suh, Young Ju; Bomba-Nkolo, Dennis; Tchinda, Viviane; Kouontchou, Samuel; Thuita, Lucy W.; van der Wel, Anne Marie; Thomas, Alan; Stowers, Anthony; Saul, Allan; Zhou, Ainong; Taylor, Diane W.; Quakyi, Isabella A.

    2004-01-01

    The apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA2), and merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) are asexual-stage proteins currently being evaluated for inclusion in a vaccine for Plasmodium falciparum. Accordingly, it is important to understand factors that control antibody responses to these antigens. Antibody levels in plasma from residents of Etoa, Cameroon, between the ages of 5 and 70 years, were determined using recombinant AMA1, MSA2, and the N-terminal region of MSP1 (MSP1-190L). In addition, antibody responses to four variants of the C-terminal region of MSP1 (MSP119) were assessed. Results showed that all individuals produced antibodies to AMA1, MSA2, and MSP1-190L; however, a proportion of individuals never produced antibodies to the MSP119 variants, although the percentage of nonresponders decreased with age. The influence of age and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1/DQB1 alleles on antibody levels was evaluated using two-way analysis of variance. Age was correlated with levels of antibodies to AMA1 and MSP119 but not with levels of antibodies to MSA2 and MSP1-190L. No association was found between a single HLA allele and levels of antibodies to MSA2, MSP1-190L, or any of the MSP119 variants. However, individuals positive for DRB1*1201 had higher levels of antibodies to the variant of recombinant AMA1 tested than did individuals of all other HLA types. Since the effect was seen across all age groups, HLA influenced the level but not the rate of antibody acquisition. This association for AMA1, combined with the previously reported association between HLA class II alleles and levels of antibodies to rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP1) and RAP2, indicates that HLA influences the levels of antibodies to three of the five vaccine candidate antigens that we have evaluated. PMID:15102786

  9. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  10. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  11. Large-Scale Production of Protective Antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Anaerobic Cultures1

    PubMed Central

    Puziss, Milton; Manning, Lee C.; Lynch, Joe W.; Barclay, Eugene; Abelow, Ira; Wright, George G.

    1963-01-01

    A production-proving test was described for the preparation, by the anaerobic culture method, of large volumes of culture filtrate containing immunologically potent protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis. The process consisted of the anaerobic culture of a selected production strain in a chemically defined medium. The culture was then clarified and sterilized by filtration through sintered-glass filters. The sterile culture filtrate was adsorbed onto a preformed aluminum hydroxide gel, and the stabilized gel-antigen complex was concentrated. The final product had high immunizing potency, as shown by both in vivo and in vitro assays, and was well tolerated in man. Stability of the product to accelerated aging was good, and storage at 4 C for 1 year caused only a minor loss in protective activity. Large volumes of the highly antigenic gel-adsorbed protective antigen were readily produced by the method described. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:13972634

  12. Increased serum level of early prostate cancer antigen is associated with subsequent cancer risk in men with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhigang; Zeng, Guohua

    2010-06-01

    Early prostate cancer antigen (EPCA) has been recently suggested as a novel biomarker in malignant and premalignant lesions of the prostate. This study was to examine serum expression of EPCA and to further clarify the relationship between initial serum EPCA levels and the presence of subsequent cancer in the individuals with isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). An indirect ELISA was used for initial serum EPCA measurement in 112 men with isolated HGPIN, who were enrolled and completed a follow-up of >or=5 years. All patients had a detectable concentration of EPCA in the initial serum, with a mean of 0.64+/-0.13 absorbance at 450 nm. Thirty-three patients had an initial serum EPCA level of >or=1.10, in which 31 cases were subsequently identified as having prostate cancer on follow-up. However, in the remaining 79 cases, serum EPCA levels were all <1.10, and none was diagnosed with cancer later. Statistical analysis showed a significantly higher serum ECPA level in isolated HGPIN patients with subsequent cancer than those without cancer (P<0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves showed that serum EPCA level had better predictive accuracy of cancer onset on follow-up than prostate specific antigen velocity and abnormal digital rectal examination findings. Furthermore, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses demonstrated the predictive performance independently by initial serum EPCA>or=1.10 absorbance (relative risk, 3.32; 95% confidence intervals, 2.62-5.03, P<0.001). These preliminary findings first show the potential of serum EPCA to serve as a significant predictor for subsequent cancer in isolated HGPIN.

  13. Vaccination of prostate cancer patients with modified vaccinia ankara delivering the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax): a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Amato, Robert J; Drury, Noel; Naylor, Stuart; Jac, Jaroslaw; Saxena, Somya; Cao, Amy; Hernandez-McClain, Joan; Harrop, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The attenuated vaccinia virus, modified vaccinia Ankara, has been engineered to deliver the tumor antigen 5T4 (TroVax). TroVax has been evaluated in an open-label phase 2 trial in hormone refractory prostate cancer patients in which the vaccine was administered either alone or in combination with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The comparative safety and immunologic and clinical efficacy of TroVax alone or in combination with GM-CSF was determined. Twenty-seven patients with metastatic hormone refractory prostate cancer were treated with TroVax alone (n=14) or TroVax+GM-CSF (n=13). 5T4-specific cellular and humoral responses were monitored throughout the study. Clinical responses were assessed by quantifying prostate-specific antigen concentrations and measuring changes in tumor burden by computer-assisted tomography scan. TroVax was well tolerated in all patients with no serious adverse events attributed to vaccination. Of 24 immunologically evaluable patients, all mounted 5T4-specific antibody responses. Periods of disease stabilization from 2 to >10 months were observed. Time to progression was significantly greater in patients who mounted 5T4-specific cellular responses compared with those who did not (5.6 vs. 2.3 mo, respectively). There were no objective clinical responses seen in this study. In this study, the combination of GM-CSF with TroVax showed similar clinical and immunologic responses to TroVax alone. The high frequency of 5T4-specific immune responses and relationship with enhanced time to progression is encouraging and warrants further investigation.

  14. Detection of IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against raw and processed food antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Aristo

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the first documented case of food allergy to cooked food in 1921 by Prausnitz and Kustner, all commercial food antigens are prepared from raw food. Furthermore, all IgE and IgG antibodies against dietary proteins offered by many clinical laboratories are measured against raw food antigens. Methods We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against raw and processed food antigens. Sera with low or high reactivity to modified food antigens were subjected to myelin basic protein, oxidized low density lipoprotein, and advanced glycation end products (AGE) such as AGE-human serum albumin and AGE-hemoglobin. Results Compared to raw food antigens, IgE antibodies showed a 3–8-fold increase against processed food antigens in 31% of the patients. Similarly, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against modified food antigens overall were found at much higher levels than antibody reactions against raw food antigens. Almost every tested serum with high levels of antibodies against modified food antigens showed very high levels of antibodies against myelin basic protein, oxidized low density lipoprotein, AGE-human serum albumin and AGE-hemoglobin. Conclusion We conclude that the determination of food allergy, intolerance and sensitivity would be improved by testing IgE, IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies against both raw and processed food antigens. Antibodies against modified food antigens, by reacting with AGEs and tissue proteins, may cause perturbation in degenerative and autoimmune diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammation, autoimmunity, neurodegeneration and neuroautoimmunity. PMID:19435515

  15. BINDING OF ANTIGEN BY IMMUNOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Bystryn, Jean-Claude; Siskind, Gregory W.; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1973-01-01

    The binding of antigen to cells with antibody on their surface has been studied in a model system consisting of murine myeloma cells (MOPC 315) and DNP conjugates. Specific binding occurred between the DNP groups of DNP conjugates and cell surface immunoglobulin. Using this model, the binding affinities of multivalent and univalent DNP conjugates were measured directly by equilibrium-binding techniques and indirectly by displacement of bound conjugate with univalent hapten. With both approaches the multivalent conjugate was shown to bind to cells with an avidity 100–300 fold greater than the univalent hapten. Nonspecific binding of unrelated protein and repeated washing of cells was found to markedly dedecrease the specific binding of univalent conjugates, presumably because the relatively weak bonds dissociate readily. PMID:4734402

  16. Recent improvements in antigene technology.

    PubMed

    Buchini, Sabrina; Leumann, Christian J

    2003-12-01

    DNA triple-helix-based approaches to control and modulate cellular functions on the level of genomic DNA (antigene technology) suffered in the past from a stepmother-like treatment in comparison to the flourishing field of oligonucleotide-based control of translation (antisense technology). This was mostly due to lack of affinity of triplex-forming oligonucleotides to their DNA target, to sequence restriction constraints imposed by the triple helical recognition motifs and by open questions to the accessibility of the target DNA. Recent developments in the area have brought about new bases that specifically recognize pyrimidine-purine inversion sites as well as sugar modifications, for example, the 2'-aminoethoxy-oligonucleotides or oligonucleotides based on the locked nucleic acid sugar unit, which greatly enhance triplex stability and alleviate in part the sequence restriction constraints. With this, sequence-specific genomic DNA manipulation is starting to become a useful tool in biotechnology.

  17. Pecking order among tumor-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Urban, J L; Van Waes, C; Schreiber, H

    1984-02-01

    The ultraviolet light-induced fibrosarcoma 1591 is regularly rejected upon transplantation into young syngeneic mice; in rare instances, however, this tumor grows progressively and the tumors that develop are then heritably stable variant progressor tumors (1591-PRO tumors). In this study, we have induced transplantation resistance to 1591-PRO tumors and determined which antigens were recognized by mice that rejected these progressor tumors. We found that cytolytic T cells of such mice recognized a 1591-specific antigen that was present not only on all the independently derived 1591-PRO tumors but also on the parental regressor tumor (1591-RE). However, the cytolytic immune response of mice that rejected 1591-RE lysed 1591-RE tumor cells but not 1591-PRO tumor cells. Thus, the 1591-RE tumor seemed to express two antigens that were specific for tumors of the 1591 lineage, one that was lost and a second that was retained by 1591-PRO tumor cells. Mice challenged with 1591-R# tumor cells mounted a response to only one of the tumor-specific antigens which was therefore "immunodominant" over the other "immunorecessive" antigen. This immunorecessive antigen became the target of the immune response once the immunodominant antigen was lost. This "pecking order" interfered with the simultaneous recognition of two tumor-specific antigens and this mechanism may favor immune escape.

  18. Lipase Processing of Complex Lipid Antigens.

    PubMed

    Sander, Peter; Becker, Katja; Molin, Michael Dal

    2016-09-22

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis synthesizes a wide variety of complex lipids that can serve as antigens in immune recognition of the bacterium. In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Gilleron et al. (2016) identify key enzymes essential for lipid antigen processing, which is required for CD1b-restricted T cell activation. PMID:27662250

  19. Protein antigen delivery by gene gun-mediated epidermal antigen incorporation (EAI).

    PubMed

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Ritter, Uwe; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The gene gun technology can not only be employed for efficient transfer of gene vaccines into upper layers of the skin, but also for application of protein antigens. As a tissue rich in professional antigen presenting cells, the skin represents an attractive target for immunizations. In this chapter we present a method for delivery of the model antigen ovalbumin into the skin of mice termed epidermal antigen incorporation and describe in detail how antigen-specific proliferation in draining lymph nodes can be followed by flow cytometry.

  20. Lymphoid-specific antigen: distribution and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Potworowski, E. F.; Nairn, R. C.

    1968-01-01

    The distribution of a lymphoid-specific antigen has been studied by immunofluorescence in the thymus and other lymphoid organs of the rat and in the thymuses of other vertebrate species. It was demonstrable in all rat lymphocytes except those of the bone marrow. The thymic lymphocytes of all warm-blooded vertebrates also reacted with the lymphoid-specific serum. Plasma cells in antigenically stimulated lymph nodes did not seem to possess the antigen but similar cells appearing in lymph nodes of rats which had been irradiated and injected with marrow cells of the same strain showed a strong reaction with the antiserum. The antigen is depleted in human and murine leukaemic lymphocytes. X-irradiation did not appear to affect the antigen significantly in cells surviving the treatment. ImagesFIG. 1-6 PMID:4871349

  1. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  2. Tiny T antigen: an autonomous polyomavirus T antigen amino-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M I; Yoo, W; Mda, N Y; Folk, W R

    1997-01-01

    Three mRNAs from the murine polyomavirus early region encode the three well-characterized tumor antigens. We report the existence of a fourth alternatively spliced mRNA which encodes a fourth tumor antigen, tiny T antigen, which comprises the amino-terminal domain common to all of the T antigens but is extended by six unique amino acid residues. The amount of tiny T antigen in infected cells is small because of its short half-life. Tiny T antigen stimulates the ATPase activity of Hsc70, most likely because of its DnaJ-like motif. The common amino-terminal domain may interface with chaperone complexes to assist the T antigens in carrying out their diverse functions of replication, transcription, and transformation in the appropriate cellular compartments. PMID:9223500

  3. Serological versus antigen detection methods for Giardia duodenalis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, M; Farid, A; Rabia, I; Mostafa, B; El Amir, A

    2014-12-01

    Giardiasis constitutes an important public health problem in the world. Contamination of the water with fecal materials including viruses and pathogenic protozoa still represents an environmental health hazard, especially in rural areas. The survey study evaluated the relation between seropositivity and some risk factors. Moreover, the study compared between the serological IgG and IgM level and antigen detection methods for the diagnosis of giardiasis. The results indicate that sex distribution and age were the mean risk factors for seroprevelence. In this study, sera samples were employed in sandwich ELISA assay, to detect circulating Giardia antigens. None of the negative control serum samples gave a positive reaction, but cross reaction was encountered with 3 case of Cryptosporidium. The specificity of the assay was 94.830/a. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the Giardia patient's sera was 94.12% which was higher than that of IgG (86.25%) and IgM (87.50%) secretion measurements. In conclusion, antigen detection methods give better and earlier diagnosis for giardiasis can be performed quickly and do not require an experienced and skilled morphologist. PMID:25643512

  4. Characterization of excretory/secretory antigen from Toxocara vitulorum larvae.

    PubMed

    Starke-Buzetti, Wilma A; Ferreira, Fabiano P

    2004-10-01

    Toxocara vitulorum is a nematode parasite of the small intestine of cattle and water buffalo, particularly buffalo calves between one and three months of age, causing high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this research was to characterize the excretory/secretory (ES) antigens of T. vitulorum larvae by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and Western blot (WB), using immune sera and colostrum of buffalo naturally infected by T. vitulorum. The parasitological status of the buffalo calves was also evaluated using sequential fecal examinations. The results showed that the ES antigen revealed eight (190, 150, 110, 90, 64, 56, 48, and 19 kDa) protein bands by SDS-PAGE. The majority of these bands were recognized in the sera and colostrum of infected buffalo with T. vitulorum when analyzed by WB. However, particularly fractions of high molecular weight (190, 150, 110, and 90 kDa) were represented in more prominent bands and persisted in the groups of buffalo calves at the peak of egg output, as well as during the period of rejection of T. vitulorum by the feces of the calves. During the period of post-rejection of the worms (between the day 118 and 210 of age) the serum antibodies did not react with any protein bands. On the other hand, sera from buffalo calves at one day of age (after suckling the colostrum and at the beginning of infection) reacted with the same bands detected in the serum and colostrum of the buffalo cows.

  5. Gestational age

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal age - gestational age; Gestation; Neonatal gestational age; Newborn gestational age ... Gestational age can be determined before or after birth. Before birth, your health care provider will use ultrasound to ...

  6. Evaluation of the Antigen-Experienced B-Cell Receptor Repertoire in Healthy Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    IJspeert, Hanna; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A.; van Zessen, David; Pico-Knijnenburg, Ingrid; Driessen, Gertjan J.; Stubbs, Andrew P.; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen recognition via their B cell receptor (BR), B cells migrate to the germinal center where they undergo somatic hypermutation (SHM) to increase their affinity for the antigen, and class switch recombination (CSR) to change the effector function of the secreted antibodies. These steps are essential to create an antigen-experienced BR repertoire that efficiently protects the body against pathogens. At the same time, the BR repertoire should be selected to protect against responses to self-antigen or harmless antigens. Insights into the processes of SHM, selection, and CSR can be obtained by studying the antigen-experienced BR repertoire. Currently, a large reference data set of healthy children and adults, which ranges from neonates to the elderly, is not available. In this study, we analyzed the antigen-experienced repertoire of 38 healthy donors (HD), ranging from cord blood to 74 years old, by sequencing IGA and IGG transcripts using next generation sequencing. This resulted in a large, freely available reference data set containing 412,890 IGA and IGG transcripts. We used this data set to study mutation levels, SHM patterns, antigenic selection, and CSR from birth to elderly HD. Only small differences were observed in SHM patterns, while the mutation levels increase in early childhood and stabilize at 6 years of age at around 7%. Furthermore, comparison of the antigen-experienced repertoire with sequences from the naive immune repertoire showed that features associated with autoimmunity such as long CDR3 length and IGHV4-34 usage are reduced in the antigen-experienced repertoire. Moreover, IGA2 and IGG2 usage was increased in HD in higher age categories, while IGG1 usage was decreased. In addition, we studied clonal relationship in the different samples. Clonally related sequences were found with different subclasses. Interestingly, we found transcripts with the same CDR1–CDR3 sequence, but different subclasses. Together, these data suggest that

  7. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  8. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  9. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases.

    PubMed

    Brehony, Carina; Hill, Dorothea M; Lucidarme, Jay; Borrow, Ray; Maiden, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens.

  10. Meningococcal vaccine antigen diversity in global databases.

    PubMed

    Brehony, Carina; Hill, Dorothea M; Lucidarme, Jay; Borrow, Ray; Maiden, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    The lack of an anti-capsular vaccine against serogroup B meningococcal disease has necessitated the exploration of alternative vaccine candidates, mostly proteins exhibiting varying degrees of antigenic variation. Analysis of variants of antigen-encoding genes is facilitated by publicly accessible online sequence repositories, such as the Neisseria PubMLST database and the associated Meningitis Research Foundation Meningococcus Genome Library (MRF-MGL). We investigated six proposed meningococcal vaccine formulations by deducing the prevalence of their components in the isolates represented in these repositories. Despite high diversity, a limited number of antigenic variants of each of the vaccine antigens were prevalent, with strong associations of particular variant combinations with given serogroups and genotypes. In the MRF-MGL and globally, the highest levels of identical sequences were observed with multicomponent/multivariant vaccines. Our analyses further demonstrated that certain combinations of antigen variants were prevalent over periods of decades in widely differing locations, indicating that vaccine formulations containing a judicious choice of antigen variants have potential for long-term protection across geographic regions. The data further indicated that formulations with multiple variants would be especially relevant at times of low disease incidence, as relative diversity was higher. Continued surveillance is required to monitor the changing prevalence of these vaccine antigens. PMID:26676305

  11. The significance of erythrocyte antigen site density

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Leon W.; Trabold, Norma C.

    1971-01-01

    The importance of antigen site density has been studied by means of a model passive hemolysis system using red cells coupled with sulfanilic acid groups. Relative site numbers were estimated from the covalent linkage of sulfanilic acid-35S to red cell membrane protein, and the effective antigen site number was determined with 125I-labeled rabbit IgG anti-sulfanilic acid (anti-S). Immune hemolysis was demonstrated for red cells which had greater than a threshold number of antigen sites, the value of which was different for normal human cells (80,000 sites/cell), cells from a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) (40,000 sites/cell), and sheep red blood cells (RBC) (15,000 sites/cell). Cells with antigen site densities below these values did not hemolyze when tested with 1 mg/ml purified rabbit IgM anti-S. 2-8 times greater antigen site densities were required to obtain hemolysis with IgG anti-S. Above the threshold value, hemolysis titers were proportional to the antigen site number until maximal values were obtained. The greater hemolytic efficiency of IgM antibody was demonstrated in this system, and it was established that the magnitude of the difference was related to the test cell antigen site density. These data, taken with previously reported hemagglutination studies, have been used to develop a general classification of immune hemolysis and hemagglutination based on antigen site density and antibody class. It is suggested that the heterogeneity of blood group systems is caused by differences in the site separation of erythrocyte membrane antigens. PMID:5105661

  12. Evidence for Horizontal Gene Transfer of Two Antigenically Distinct O Antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Buboltz, Anne M.; Nicholson, Tracy L.; Karanikas, Alexia T.; Preston, Andrew; Harvill, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    Host immunity is a major driving force of antigenic diversity, resulting in pathogens that can evade immunity induced by closely related strains. Here we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2, respectively). When 18 additional B. bronchiseptica strains were serotyped, all were found to express either the O1 or O2 serotype. Comparative genomic hybridization and PCR screening showed that the expression of either the O1 or O2 serotype correlated with the strain containing either the classical or alternative O-antigen locus, respectively. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of 49 B. bronchiseptica strains was used to build a phylogenetic tree, which revealed that the two O-antigen loci did not associate with a particular lineage, evidence that these loci are horizontally transferred between B. bronchiseptica strains. From experiments using mice vaccinated with purified lipopolysaccharide from strain RB50 (O1), 1289 (O2), or RB50Δwbm (O antigen deficient), our data indicate that these O antigens do not confer cross-protection in vivo. The lack of cross-immunity between O-antigen serotypes appears to contribute to inefficient antibody-mediated clearance between strains. Together, these data are consistent with the idea that the O-antigen loci of B. bronchiseptica are horizontally transferred between strains and encode antigenically distinct serotypes, resulting in inefficient cross-immunity. PMID:19528223

  13. Age and immunity.

    PubMed

    Vasto, Sonya; Malavolta, Marco; Pawelec, Graham

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal studies are defining progressive alterations to the immune system associated with increased mortality in the very elderly. Many of these changes are exacerbated by or even caused by chronic T cell stimulation by persistent antigen, particularly from Cytomegalovirus. The composition of T cell subsets, their functional integrity and representation in the repertoire are all markedly influenced by age and by CMV. How these findings relate to epidemiological, functional, genetic, genomic and proteomic studies of human T cell immunosenescence was the subject of intense debate at an international conference held just before Christmas 2005 in the Black Forest.

  14. Antigen retrieval techniques: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shi, S R; Cote, R J; Taylor, C R

    2001-08-01

    Development of the antigen retrieval (AR) technique, a simple method of boiling archival paraffin-embedded tissue sections in water to enhance the signal of immunohistochemistry (IHC), was the fruit of pioneering efforts guided by the philosophy of rendering IHC applicable to routine formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues for wide application of IHC in research and clinical pathology. On the basis of thousands of articles and many reviews, a book has recently been published that summarizes basic principles for practice and further development of the AR technique. Major topics with respect to several critical issues, such as the definition, application, technical principles, and further studies of the AR technique, are highlighted in this article. In particular, a further application of the heat-induced retrieval approach for sufficient extraction of nucleic acids in addition to proteins, and standardization of routine IHC based on the AR technique in terms of a test battery approach, are also addressed. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism of the AR technique may shed light on facilitating the development of molecular morphology.

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Antigenic Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Campo, David S.; Dimitrova, Zoya; Yokosawa, Jonny; Hoang, Duc; Perez, Nestor O.; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine development against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hindered by poor understanding of factors defining cross-immunoreactivity among heterogeneous epitopes. Using synthetic peptides and mouse immunization as a model, we conducted a quantitative analysis of cross-immunoreactivity among variants of the HCV hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Analysis of 26,883 immunological reactions among pairs of peptides showed that the distribution of cross-immunoreactivity among HVR1 variants was skewed, with antibodies against a few variants reacting with all tested peptides. The HVR1 cross-immunoreactivity was accurately modeled based on amino acid sequence alone. The tested peptides were mapped in the HVR1 sequence space, which was visualized as a network of 11,319 sequences. The HVR1 variants with a greater network centrality showed a broader cross-immunoreactivity. The entire sequence space is explored by each HCV genotype and subtype. These findings indicate that HVR1 antigenic diversity is extensively convergent and effectively limited, suggesting significant implications for vaccine development. PMID:22355779

  16. Flaviviruses and their antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Heinz, F X; Stiasny, Karin

    2012-12-01

    Flaviviruses comprise important arthropod-transmitted human pathogens, including yellow fever (YF), dengue (Den), Japanese encephalitis (JE), West Nile (WN) and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) viruses that have the potential of expanding their endemic areas due to global climatic, ecological and socio-economic changes. While effective vaccines against YF, JE and TBE are in widespread use, the development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered for a long time because of concerns of immunopathological consequences of vaccination. Phase III clinical trials with a recombinant chimeric live vaccine are now ongoing and will show whether the enormous problem of dengue can be resolved or at least reduced by vaccination in the future. Unprecedented details of the flavivirus particle structure have become available through the combined use of X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy that led to novel and surprising insights into the antigenic structure of these viruses. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of virus maturation as well as particle dynamics in virus neutralization by antibodies and thus added previously unknown layers of complexity to our understanding of flavivirus immune protection. This information is invaluable for interpreting current investigations on the functional activities of polyclonal antibody responses to flavivirus infections and vaccinations and may open new avenues for studies on flavivirus cell biology and vaccine design.

  17. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  18. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S.; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18–65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  19. Specific Antibodies Reacting with SV40 Large T Antigen Mimotopes in Serum Samples of Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tognon, Mauro; Corallini, Alfredo; Manfrini, Marco; Taronna, Angelo; Butel, Janet S; Pietrobon, Silvia; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Bononi, Ilaria; Vaccher, Emanuela; Barbanti-Brodano, Giuseppe; Martini, Fernanda; Mazzoni, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Simian Virus 40, experimentally assayed in vitro in different animal and human cells and in vivo in rodents, was classified as a small DNA tumor virus. In previous studies, many groups identified Simian Virus 40 sequences in healthy individuals and cancer patients using PCR techniques, whereas others failed to detect the viral sequences in human specimens. These conflicting results prompted us to develop a novel indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides, mimicking Simian Virus 40 capsid viral protein antigens, named mimotopes. This immunologic assay allowed us to investigate the presence of serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 and to verify whether Simian Virus 40 is circulating in humans. In this investigation two mimotopes from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen, the viral replication protein and oncoprotein, were employed to analyze for specific reactions to human sera antibodies. This indirect ELISA with synthetic peptides from Simian Virus 40 large T antigen was used to assay a new collection of serum samples from healthy subjects. This novel assay revealed that serum antibodies against Simian Virus 40 large T antigen mimotopes are detectable, at low titer, in healthy subjects aged from 18-65 years old. The overall prevalence of reactivity with the two Simian Virus 40 large T antigen peptides was 20%. This new ELISA with two mimotopes of the early viral regions is able to detect in a specific manner Simian Virus 40 large T antigen-antibody responses. PMID:26731525

  20. IMMUNOLOGICAL UNRESPONSIVENESS IN RABBITS PRODUCED BY NEONATAL INJECTION OF DEFINED ANTIGENS

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard T.; Bridges, Robert A.

    1958-01-01

    The phenomenon of immunological unresponsiveness induced in the neonatal rabbit by a single injection of a defined protein antigen, has been characterized semiquantitatively, and studies bearing upon the mechanism of such unresponsiveness have been presented. A single intraperitoneal injection at birth of 10 to 100 mg. BSA, HGG, ovalbumin, or a human macroglobulin, or an oral feeding of 100 mg. BSA, induced a state of unresponsiveness lasting at least 90 to 120 days. 100 mg. BSA given from birth to 17 days of age, but not later, produced unresponsiveness of 90 to 120 days' duration. Data are presented which show that the duration of unresponsiveness is finite and related to the amount of antigen given at birth, and that it may be indefinitely prolonged by repeated injections of antigen. Disappearance of injected antigen in the unresponsive animal was exponential with time, with no accelerated or immune phase. Administration of the antigen in adjuvants resulted in significant shortening of the duration of unresponsiveness. The transfer of immune cells to the unresponsive host while resulting in vicarious antibody formation, did not affect the underlying unresponsive state. Negative results of attempts to produce unresponsiveness to a variety of bacterial antigens are presented. The implications of the data are discussed, particularly in reference to the other experimental models of immunological tolerance, and to the various theories of acquired immunity. It is clear that any satisfactory theoretical explanation of acquired immunity will have to account simultaneously for the phenomena of immune tolerance. PMID:13563758

  1. Prevalence of Alloimmunization to Human Platelet Antigen Glycoproteins and Human Leucocyte Antigen Class I in β Thalassemia Major Patients in Western India.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Kumar, Sudeep; Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S

    2014-12-01

    Present management of β thalassemia major by regular packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions poses risk of alloimmunization not only to red blood cell antigens, but also to human platelet antigens (HPA) and Human leucocyte antigens class I (HLA I). However data in this context is very limited in Indian population. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA I in β thalassemia major patients who have received multiple PRBC transfusions over the years. A cross sectional study was performed at our tertiary care blood bank. β thalassemia major patients of more than 6 years of age were included who were receiving fresh, leucoreduced and irradiated PRBC units regularly with annual requirement of more than ten PRBC transfusions. A total of 9 out of 80 (11.25 %) patients were found to be alloimmunized for HPA antigens of various specificity and 24 out of 80 (30 %) developed antibodies to HLA I. The awareness of development of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA antigens in multi PRBC transfused thalassemics, despite use of leucofilters will prompt us, to look for improvement in our current PRBC preparations to minimise platelet alloimmunisation. Further studies are required to validate the findings and build the base line data in this regard. This is of importance, especially in view of providing suitable cross-matched platelets when required in future especially when considering future haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  2. Antibody production in vitamin A-depleted rats is impaired after immunization with bacterial polysaccharide or protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Pasatiempo, A M; Kinoshita, M; Taylor, C E; Ross, A C

    1990-05-01

    Vitamin A nutritional status has been implicated as important in maintaining the integrity of immune functions. We have determined the effect of vitamin A (retinol) depletion on the ability of young animals to produce antibodies after challenge with various bacterial antigens. Male Lewis rats raised on vitamin A-free or adequate diets were immunized either near 40 days of age, before signs of vitamin A deficiency were apparent, or near 47 days of age when symptoms of deficiency were beginning to be manifest. For rats immunized with polysaccharide antigens from Streptococcus pneumoniae or Neisseria meningitidis, antibody production did not exceed 0-19% of the response of control rats. Vitamin A depletion also severely compromised the response to two T cell-dependent antigens, tetanus toxoid and sheep red blood cells. In striking contrast, retinol-depleted rats immunized with lipopolysaccharides from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcesens produced an antibody response indistinguishable from retinol-sufficient animals. These lipopolysaccharides could elicit antibodies in rat pups, whereas the capsular polysaccharide antigens could not. This is consistent with the characteristics of type 1 and type 2 antigens, respectively. These studies indicate that retinol status is an important determinant of the humoral immune response to certain types of antigen and suggest that antibody production to capsular polysaccharides and T cell-dependent antigens is particularly dependent on adequate retinol status.

  3. Relationship between major histocompatibility antigens and disease

    PubMed Central

    Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Histocompatibility antigens, virus infections, and disease are discussed relative to avenues of research in humans with arenavirus infections. The data implicating a relationship between histocompatibility complexes in man and animals and diseases of the central nervous system are reviewed. Histocompatibility antigens may share common antigenic determinants with viruses, act as receptor sites for attachment of viruses, and be altered by viruses. In addition, genes regulating immune responses to a variety of natural and synthetic antigens are linked, in many species, to the major histocompatibility complex. Since injury associated with virus infections may be largely due to the activity of the immune system, study of immune response genes may provide insight into understanding resistance to disease. Further, histoincompatibility reactions can activate latent viruses with resultant disease. PMID:60183

  4. Lymphocyte activation by streptococcal antigens in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Gross, W L; Packhäuser, U; Hahn, G; Westphal, E; Christophers, E; Schlaak, M

    1977-11-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses in 28 hospitalized patients with psoriasis and in 36 healthy controls were studied using the two-step leukocyte migration agarose test. Specific cell-mediated immunity to A-streptococcal cell wall and cell membrane antigens occurred significantly more often in patients with psoriasis than in the control group. A statistically significant correlation between psoriasis-associated antigens of the HLA-B locus and cellular immune reactivity to A-streptococcal antigens or clinical course was not found. When patients with guttate psoriasis were compared separately with the control group, leukocyte migration inhibition induced by cell-free supernatants of A-streptococcal antigen-exposed mononuclear cell cultures was found to be more frequent than in other forms of psoriasis.

  5. THE SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIGEN IN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Kölsch, E.; Mitchison, N. A.

    1968-01-01

    The intracellular fate of phagocytosed antigens in cells from peritoneal exudate in CBA mice has been studied by using 126I and 131I labeled antigens. After uptake of labeled antigen, cells were homogenized and the subcellular fractions were analyzed by isopycnic centrifugation in a sucrose gradient. The uptake of heat-denatured BSA (c BSA) by these cells in vivo is 3.5 µg/mg c BSA injected/108 cells. The uptake by cells in animals which were exposed 2 days earlier to 900 r whole body irradiation is slightly lower but does not differ significantly. 90% of the phagocytosed material is degraded within 2–3 hr, the residual 10% is retained at least over an 8 hr periods. Using a pulse and chase technique, with 125I and 131I c BSA in vitro and in vivo it was shown that newly phagocytosed antigen is found mainly in a lysosomal turnover compartment of a density 1.19 g cm–3. Antigen which has been in the cells for longer was found in a denser fraction (1.26 g cm–3). In a comparison of nhrmal and X-irradiated cells it can be shown that after irradiation with 900 r less c BSA is found in this storage compartment. Binding of the antigen to the subcellular fractions, and its behavior towards several detergents has been studied. Subcellular fractions do not have the increased immunogenic capacity of antigen enclosed in living macrophages. Two synthetic polypeptide antigens, poly(D-Tyr, D-Glu, D-Ala) and poly-(L-Tyr, L-Glu) have a different subcellular distribution from c BSA, BSA, or bovine gamma globulin. Apart from also being found in the 1.26 storage compartment the polypeptide antigens are mainly located in a 1.15 compartment and only to a small extent in the 1.19 compartment. The half-life of these antigens in the cells is much longer than the half-life of the protein antigens studied. The finding of several subcellular compartments is discussed in connection with the functions possibly performed by macrophages. PMID:5682940

  6. Detection of rotavirus antigen in diarrhoeic and non-diarrhoeic piglets in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atii, D J; Ojeh, C K; Durojaiye, O A

    1990-01-01

    Faecal samples from 96 piglets with acute gastroenteritis and 41 samples from non-diarrhoeic piglets were investigated for porcine rotavirus (PRV) antigens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PRV was detected in 43 of 96 (44.8%) in the diarrhoeic group whilst none of the samples in the non-diarrhoeic group was positive for PRV (P less than 0.01). Age distribution of infection showed a higher infection rate of 30.2% in piglets aged 1-3 weeks, which was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) than in piglets aged 4-6 weeks, where the infection rate was 14.6 per cent. No PRV antigen was detected in diarrhoeic piglets above 6 weeks of age. Titration of 10 randomly selected ELISA-positive samples showed titres ranging from 512 to greater than or equal to 4.096.

  7. Mapping Epitopes on a Protein Antigen by the Proteolysis of Antigen-Antibody Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmerson, Ronald; Paterson, Yvonne

    1986-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody bound to a protein antigen decreases the rate of proteolytic cleavage of the antigen, having the greatest effect on those regions involved in antibody contact. Thus, an epitope can be identified by the ability of the antibody to protect one region of the antigen more than others from proteolysis. By means of this approach, two distinct epitopes, both conformationally well-ordered, were characterized on horse cytochrome c.

  8. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  9. Tales of Antigen Evasion from CAR Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sadelain, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Both T cells bearing chimeric antigen receptors and tumor-specific antibodies can successfully target some malignancies, but antigen escape can lead to relapse. Two articles in this issue of Cancer Immunology Research explore what effective countermeasures may prevent it. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 473-473. ©2016 AACRSee articles by Zah et al., p. 498, and Rufener et al., p. 509. PMID:27252092

  10. Antigens of Streptococcus sanguis: purification and characterization of the b antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, B; Rosan, B

    1978-01-01

    The antigen defining Streptococcus sanguis serotype 2 has been designated the b antigen. This antigen can be detected in extracts, obtained from whole cells by autoclaving (Rantz and Randall extraction), as a single precipitin band using a reference antiserum (M-5). However, the extract can also be shown to contain a teichoic acid using anti-polyglycerol phosphate serum. This teichoic acid does not contain the antigenic determinant for group H specificity. Studies of the b antigen have been hampered because of the difficulty in separating the b antigen from the teichoic acid using ion-exchange and molecular sieve chromatography. However, a relatively pure preparation has been obtained by affinity chromatography using anti-polyglycerol phosphate serum coupled to Sepharose. The isolated b antigen is a typical streptococcal cell wall polysaccharide composed of glucose, rhamnose, and N-acetylglucosamine in a molar ratio of 2.5:1.0:0.1. The antigen appears to have a single antigenic determinant closely related to isomaltose (glucose alpha-1,6-glucoside) based upon hapten inhibition studies. Images PMID:711341

  11. Heat shock protein derivatives for delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Takemoto, Seiji; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2008-04-16

    Delivery of antigens to antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a key issue for developing effective cancer vaccines. Controlling the tissue distribution of antigens can increase antigen-specific immune responses, including the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) forms complexes with a variety of tumor-related antigens via its polypeptide-binding domain. Because Hsp70 is taken up by APCs through recognition by Hsp receptors, such as CD91 and LOX-1, its application to antigen delivery systems has been examined both in experimental and clinical settings. A tissue distribution study revealed that Hsp70 is mainly taken up by the liver, especially by hepatocytes, after intravenous injection in mice. A significant amount of Hsp70 was also delivered to regional lymph nodes when it was injected subcutaneously, supporting the hypothesis that Hsp70 is a natural targeting system for APCs. Model antigens were complexed with or conjugated to Hsp70, resulting in greater antigen-specific immune responses. Cytoplasmic delivery of Hsp70-antigen further increased the efficacy of the Hsp70-based vaccines. These findings indicate that effective cancer therapy can be achieved by developing Hsp70-based anticancer vaccines when their tissue and intracellular distribution is properly controlled. PMID:17980980

  12. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  13. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  14. HLA antigen expression and malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T I; Manning, L S; Davis, M R; Robinson, B W; Garlepp, M J

    1991-09-01

    The expression of HLA antigens by a tumor may determine its progression and metastatic potential by influencing the immune response to that tumor. The upregulation of HLA antigen expression on some cell types by interferons (IFNs) may contribute to their antitumor activity. Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a tumor that has a poor prognosis and is unaffected by conventional therapy, although immunotherapy has not been adequately assessed. In this study, we have examined the constitutive and IFN-inducible expression of class I and class II HLA antigens on MM cell lines using indirect immunofluorescence and Northern blotting. All MM cell lines constitutively expressed class I, but not class II, surface antigen, and all three class I loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C) were expressed. The MM cell lines were heterogeneous in their response to the IFNs. Treatment with IFN-alpha marginally increased class I surface expression, but not class II. Class I mRNA was, however, clearly increased in all cell lines after IFN-alpha treatment, suggesting that class I surface antigen was already maximally expressed. IFN-gamma increased class I mRNA expression in all but one cell line and induced DR expression on three of the cell lines. DQ-beta, but not DQ-alpha, mRNA was inducible in the same three cell lines, but DQ surface antigen was never demonstrable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. HLA antigens in Japanese patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, K; Juji, T; Tokunaga, K; Takamizawa, M; Maeda, H; Soda, M; Nomura, Y; Segawa, M

    1990-01-01

    HLA antigens in 104 Japanese patients and 41 families with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated. The frequencies of DR9 and DRw13 were significantly increased in the patients who developed MG before 3 yr of age. The DQw3 antigen was positive for all the patients that developed MG before 15 yr with only one exception. All the examined cases that developed MG before 3 yr (including this DQw3 negative patient) had the same DQA and DQB DNA restriction fragments. These HLA frequencies decreased as the age of onset increased, and no significant association was observed in adult-onset MG. No patients had B8, DR3, and DQw2. The relative risk was higher for the DR9/DRw13 heterozygotes (37.4) than for DR9 (16.4) or DRw13 (7.1) in the childhood-onset MG. Statistical analysis suggested that DR9 and DRw13 (or DQw1 and DQw3) act synergistically in the disease development. Family study revealed diverse DR9 haplotypes. The most frequent DRw13 haplotype was Bw44-BFF-C4A3B1-DRw13-DQw1, which may be evolutionarily related to the caucasian B8-DR3-DQw2 haplotype. These results showed that MG in early childhood in Japanese individuals is genetically different from that in adulthood and that in caucasians. Images PMID:1974553

  16. Detection of circulating toxocaral antigens in dogs by sandwich enzyme-immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, K; Kazuta, Y; Endo, R; Tanaka, K

    1984-01-01

    This study describes the presence of circulating toxocaral antigens (CTA) in the sera of dogs infected with Toxocara canis (T. canis) by using a sandwich enzyme-immunoassay (SEIA). A specificity of this assay with different antigens was observed, i.e. the EIA values, which express the antigen concentration, of excretory-secretory antigen from T. canis larvae were higher than those of other antigens (Ascaris lumbricoides, Dirofilaria immitis and Fasciola hepatica). The variability in intra-assay was below 10%. In age distribution of CTA levels, the highest level was observed at 1 month of age. Thereafter, the levels decreased gradually until 6 months of age and then the same levels were maintained until adult age. Also, slightly elevated levels were found in the sera of foetuses. A significant correlation was obtained between age and CTA levels. The positive correlation between the number of worms and CTA levels was significant. As for the IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies, a significant correlation was observed between the IgM antibody activities and CTA levels, but this was not observed with IgG and IgA antibodies. From these results, it was indicated that the immunological response to T. canis infection in dogs may not be reached until 1 or 2 months after birth, although detectable CTA levels were observed in foetal and early life. It was also suggested that the immunological stimulation for canine toxocariasis may be maintained by the excretory-secretory materials from the larvae through life and as a result, IgM antibody production may be observed even in chronically infected adult dogs. The SEIA technique reported in this study may be useful as a diagnostic tool of human toxocariasis, since the CTA can be directly demonstrated by the technique. PMID:6365746

  17. Antigen Processing and Presentation Mechanisms in Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Roche, Paul A; Cresswell, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Unlike B cells, CD8-positive and CD4-positive T cells of the adaptive immune system do not recognize intact foreign proteins but instead recognize polypeptide fragments of potential antigens. These antigenic peptides are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells bound to MHC class I and MHC class II proteins. Here, we review the basics of antigen acquisition by antigen presenting cells, antigen proteolysis into polypeptide fragments, antigenic peptide binding to MHC proteins, and surface display of both MHC class I-peptide and MHC class II-peptide complexes.

  18. Expression and Antigenic Evaluation of VacA Antigenic Fragment of Helicobacter Pylori

    PubMed Central

    Hasanzadeh, Leila; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Soufian, Safieh; Farjadi, Vahideh; Abtahi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Helicobacter pylori, a human specific gastric pathogen is a causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an effective virulence factor involved in gastric injury. The aim of this study was to construct a recombinant protein containing antigenic region of VacA gene and determine its antigenicity. Materials and Methods: The antigenic region of VacA gene was detected by bioinformatics methods. The polymerase chain reaction method was used to amplify a highly antigenic region of VacA gene from chromosomal DNA of H. pylori. The eluted product was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a. The target protein was expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS. The bacteria including pET32a-VacA plasmids were induced by IPTG. The antigenicity was finally studied by western blotting using sera of 15 H. pylori infected patients after purification. Results: Enzyme digestion analysis, PCR and DNA sequencing results showed that the target gene was inserted correctly into the recombinant vector. The expressed protein was purified successfully via affinity chromatography. Data indicated that antigenic region of VacA protein from Helicobacter pylori was recognized by all 15 patient’s sera. Conclusion : Our data showed that antigenic region of VacA protein can be expressed by in E. co.li. This protein was recognized by sera patients suffering from H. pylori infection. the recombinant protein has similar epitopes and close antigenic properties to the natural form of this antigen. Recombinant antigenic region of VacA protein also seems to be a promising antigen for protective and serologic diagnosis . PMID:23997913

  19. Bullous pemphigoid antigens: extraction and degradation of antigens during epidermal preparation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, L J; Taylor, T B; Kadunce, D P; Thuong-Nguyen, V; Zone, J J

    1991-06-01

    Although two groups of bullous pemphigoid antigens have been well characterized, different research groups have shown strikingly different prevalence rates of antibodies to these antigens in their patients. Potential explanations for this phenomena include a patient population that has different prevalence of antibodies, or that the antigen preparations used by the different groups contain different relative amounts of these antigens. We have compared the relative concentration of the different bullous pemphigoid antigens in epidermal extract preparations made by three different procedures commonly used to separate dermis from epidermis: NaCl, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and heat. We have found that the amount of the 180-kD antigen present in extracts is dependent on the techniques involved in separation of the epidermis from dermis. NaCl- and EDTA-separation procedures result in partial proteolysis of the 180-kD antigen to smaller forms, including major brands at 160 kD and 97 kD in the EDTA preparation. Fragments of the 180-kD antigen are present in both the separation and wash fluids, associated with a significant reduction of the 180-kD form in the extract of the NaCl-separated skin. We conclude that the native molecular weight of the previously described minor bullous pemphigoid antigen is 180 kD, and that the apparent difference in patient reaction to the 180-kD antigen may be due to different preparations of the antigen rather than underlying differences in seropositivity in the patient population. PMID:1904470

  20. Development of an Antigen-driven Colitis Model to Study Presentation of Antigens by Antigen Presenting Cells to T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Valerio; Radulovic, Katarina; Riedel, Christian U; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation which affects the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). One of the best ways to study the immunological mechanisms involved during the disease is the T cell transfer model of colitis. In this model, immunodeficient mice (RAG(-/-) recipients) are reconstituted with naive CD4(+) T cells from healthy wild type hosts. This model allows examination of the earliest immunological events leading to disease and chronic inflammation, when the gut inflammation perpetuates but does not depend on a defined antigen. To study the potential role of antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the disease process, it is helpful to have an antigen-driven disease model, in which a defined commensal-derived antigen leads to colitis. An antigen driven-colitis model has hence been developed. In this model OT-II CD4(+) T cells, that can recognize only specific epitopes in the OVA protein, are transferred into RAG(-/-) hosts challenged with CFP-OVA-expressing E. coli. This model allows the examination of interactions between APCs and T cells in the lamina propria. PMID:27684040

  1. Tresyl-based conjugation of protein antigen to lipid nanoparticles increases antigen immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-11-30

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  2. Tresyl-Based Conjugation of Protein Antigen to Lipid Nanoparticles Increases Antigen Immunogencity

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anekant; Yan, Weili; Miller, Keith R.; O'Carra, Ronan; Woodward, Jerold G.; Mumper, Russell J.

    2010-01-01

    The present studies were aimed at investigating the engineering of NPs with protein-conjugated-surfactant at their surface. In order to increase the immunogenicity of a protein antigen, Brij 78 was functionalized by tresyl chloride and then further reacted with the primary amine of the model proteins ovalbumin (OVA) or horseradish peroxide (HRP). The reaction yielded Brij 78-OVA and Brij 78-HRP conjugates which were then used directly to form NP-OVA or NP-HRP using a one-step warm oil-in-water microemulsion precursor method with emulsifying wax as the oil phase, and Brij 78 and the Brij 78-OVA or Brij 78-HRP conjugate as surfactants. Similarly, Brij 700 was conjugated to HIV p24 antigen to yield Brij 700-p24 conjugate. The utility of these NPs for enhancing the immune responses to protein-based vaccines was evaluated in vivo using ovalbumin (OVA) as model protein and p24 as a relevant HIV antigen. In separate in vivo studies, female BALB/c mice were immunized by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection with NP-OVA and NP-p24 formulations along with several control formulations. These results suggested that with multiple antigens, covalent attachment of the antigen to the NP significantly enhanced antigen-specific immune responses. This facile covalent conjugation and incorporation method may be utilized to further incorporate other protein antigens, even multiple antigens, into an enhanced vaccine delivery system. PMID:20837122

  3. Antigenic determinant of the Lancefield group H antigen of Streptococcus sanguis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosan, B; Argenbright, L

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the teichoic acid isolated from strains of Streptococcus sanguis was group specific and defined the Lancefield group H streptococci. To determine the specific antigenic determinants, the antigen was extracted from a group H streptococcus (ATCC 903) by the phenol-water method and purified by column chromatography. The isolated antigen had a glycerol/phosphate/glucose molar ratio of 1:0.9:0.3; the lipid concentration was 7.6% of its dry weight. No nucleic acids were detected, and amino acids constituted approximately 2% of the dry weight. The minimum concentration of antigen required to sensitize erythrocytes for hemagglutination with a 1:1,000 dilution of either group H antiserum or antiteichoic acid serum was 0.02 microgram/ml. Hemagglutination inhibition studies suggested that the major antigenic determinant consisted of an alpha-glucose linked to the glycerol phosphate backbone. Images PMID:6185428

  4. Immunity, ageing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Solana, Rafael; Larbi, Anis; Pawelec, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Compromised immunity contributes to the decreased ability of the elderly to control infectious disease and to their generally poor response to vaccination. It is controversial as to how far this phenomenon contributes to the well-known age-associated increase in the occurrence of many cancers in the elderly. However, should the immune system be important in controlling cancer, for which there is a great deal of evidence, it is logical to propose that dysfunctional immunity in the elderly would contribute to compromised immunosurveillance and increased cancer occurrence. The chronological age at which immunosenescence becomes clinically important is known to be influenced by many factors, including the pathogen load to which individuals are exposed throughout life. It is proposed here that the cancer antigen load may have a similar effect on "immune exhaustion" and that pathogen load and tumor load may act additively to accelerate immunosenescence. Understanding how and why immune responsiveness changes in humans as they age is essential for developing strategies to prevent or restore dysregulated immunity and assure healthy longevity, clearly possible only if cancer is avoided. Here, we provide an overview of the impact of age on human immune competence, emphasizing T-cell-dependent adaptive immunity, which is the most sensitive to ageing. This knowledge will pave the way for rational interventions to maintain or restore appropriate immune function not only in the elderly but also in the cancer patient. PMID:18816370

  5. The significance of erythrocyte antigen site density

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Leon W.; Trabold, Norma C.

    1970-01-01

    The importance of antigen site density has been studied by means of a model passive hemagglutination system using human red cells coupled with sulfanilic acid groups. Relative site numbers were estimated from the covalent linkage of sulfanilic acid-35S to red cell membrane protein and the effective antigen site number was determined with 125I-labeled rabbit IgG antisulfanilic acid. Cells which had fewer than 20,000 antigen sites per cell were not agglutinated. As greater numbers of sulfanilic groups were coupled to the red cells, the agglutination titers increased to maximum values with red fanilic groups were coupled to the red cells, the agglutination titers of purified IgM antibody were 10-20 times greater than IgG antibody when preparations with the same protein concentration were compared, but this difference was not noted when IgG antibody was measured by antiglobulin reactions. These findings emphasize the need to consider differences in antigen site density when comparing blood group systems. They are consistent with the hypothesis that those blood group antigens which have a very low site number will not be detected by IgG antibodies in saline hemagglutination determinations. PMID:5409811

  6. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  7. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  8. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  9. Whole Tumor Antigen Vaccines: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Coukos, George; Kandalaft, Lana E.

    2015-01-01

    With its vast amount of uncharacterized and characterized T cell epitopes available for activating CD4+ T helper and CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes simultaneously, whole tumor antigen represents an attractive alternative source of antigens as compared to tumor-derived peptides and full-length recombinant tumor proteins for dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy. Unlike defined tumor-derived peptides and proteins, whole tumor lysate therapy is applicable to all patients regardless of their HLA type. DCs are essentially the master regulators of immune response, and are the most potent antigen-presenting cell population for priming and activating naïve T cells to target tumors. Because of these unique properties, numerous DC-based immunotherapies have been initiated in the clinics. In this review, we describe the different types of whole tumor antigens that we could use to pulse DCs ex vivo and in vivo. We also discuss the different routes of delivering whole tumor antigens to DCs in vivo and activating them with toll-like receptor agonists. PMID:26343191

  10. ANTIGEN RECOGNITION AND THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Maurice E.; Alkan, Sefik S.; Nitecki, Danute E.; Goodman, Joel W.

    1972-01-01

    L-Tyrosine-p-azobenzenearsonate (RAT) induces cellular immunity without humoral antibody in guinea pigs. Asymmetric bifunctional antigens composed of one RAT moiety and one dinitrophenyl (DNP) group separated by flexible spacers induce anti-RAT cellular immunity and an anti-DNP humoral response. Symmetrical bifunctional antigens of similar design but comprised of two RAT determinants induce cellular immunity without demonstrable anti-RAT antibody. However, when the flexible spacer is replaced by a rigid decaproline chain, humoral anti-RAT responses are provoked. Since RAT contains both electropositive (azo) and electronegative (arsonate) centers, the failure of bifunctional RAT compounds with flexible spacers to induce humoral immunity might be ascribed either to intramolecular stacking, which compromises their bifunctional character, or to interaction of both determinants with receptors on the same cell surface, which would fail to satisfy the requirement for cooperation. In order to distinguish between these alternatives, symmetrical bifunctional antigens composed of two L-tyrosine-p-azophenyltrimethylammonium (TAT) determinants separated by flexible or rigid spacers were synthesized. TAT is immunogenic and does not cross-react with RAT. Furthermore, it contains only electropositive centers and consequently bifunctional molecules do not undergo intramolecular stacking. Immunization with either flexibly or rigidly spaced bifunctional TAT antigens raised anti-TAT antibody. These results conclusively demonstrate that "self-help," cooperation between bone marrow-derived and thymus-derived lymphocytes of identical or similar specificity, can occur, provided the determinants on the antigen are prevented from associating with each other. PMID:4118413

  11. Persistence of Antigen in Rabbit Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Webb, F. W. S.; Ford, P. M.; Glynn, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    It is already known that rabbits which show delayed-type hypersensitivity to an antigen will, after a single injection of the same antigen into a knee joint develop a chronic proliferative synovitis. It is also known that almost all of a foreign protein injected into a normal knee joint is rapidly cleared in a few days. It has now been shown that if an animal is given foreign protein into a knee joint, and delayed-type hypersensitivity is produced later, that a chronic proliferative synovitis can also develop. This suggests that minute amounts of foreign protein can persist in an antigenic form in normal rabbit synovial membrane. It is possible that the persistence of this small amount of antigen may account in part for the chronicity of this form of experimental synovitis, and the fact that unlike human rheumatoid arthritis this type of experimental synovitis is confined to the joint injected with antigen. ImagesFigs. 3-4Figs. 1-2 PMID:5547654

  12. Antigenic Properties of N Protein of Hantavirus

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Hantavirus causes two important rodent-borne viral zoonoses, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Eurasia and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in North and South America. Twenty-four species that represent sero- and genotypes have been registered within the genus Hantavirus by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Among the viral proteins, nucleocapsid (N) protein possesses an immunodominant antigen. The antigenicitiy of N protein is conserved compared with that of envelope glycoproteins. Therefore, N protein has been used for serological diagnoses and seroepidemiological studies. An understanding of the antigenic properties of N protein is important for the interpretation of results from serological tests using N antigen. N protein consists of about 430 amino acids and possesses various epitopes. The N-terminal quarter of N protein bears linear and immunodominant epitopes. However, a serotype-specific and multimerization-dependent antigenic site was found in the C-terminal half of N protein. In this paper, the structure, function, and antigenicity of N protein are reviewed. PMID:25123683

  13. Fungal Antigens Expressed during Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Denikus, Nicole; Orfaniotou, Foteini; Wulf, Gerald; Lehmann, Paul F.; Monod, Michel; Reichard, Utz

    2005-01-01

    Rabbits that had been infected intravenously with conidiospores of Aspergillus fumigatus were used as sources of antibody for screening a λ phage cDNA expression library. The cDNA was derived from A. fumigatus mRNA that had been extracted from newly formed, germling hyphae. Thirty-six antigens were identified using antisera from six rabbits. Though many of these antigens were expected to be intracellular proteins because their genes did not encode a signal sequence, the antisera showed consistently a stronger immunoblot reaction with a cell fraction enriched for the fungal cell wall than with a fraction of predominantly intracellular components. Antibodies to eight antigens, including the glycosylhydrolase Asp f 16, were produced by more than one rabbit. In current vaccine studies, Asp f 16 is the only single antigen which has been reported to be capable of inducing protection against invasive aspergillosis in mice (S. Bozza et al., Microb. Infect. 4:1281-1290, 2002). Enolase and Aspergillus HSP90 were detected also; their homologues in Candida albicans have been tested as vaccines and have been reported to provide a partially protective response against invasive candidiasis in mice. The Aspergillus antigens reported here may have value both in diagnostic tests for different forms of aspergillosis and as vaccine candidates for protection against invasive disease. PMID:16040983

  14. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines.

  15. [A new method for detection and erradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by stool antigens test].

    PubMed

    Amèndola, R; Doweck, J; Katz, J; Racca, J; Menendez, G; Schenone, L; Farìas, R; Barrantes, C; Quintanta, C; Zerbo, O; Kogan, Z; Valero, J; Bartellini, M A; Questa, U; Luna, P; Corti, R E

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays technics for Helicobacter pylori detection in stools like culture, and PCR, are expensive and difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to evaluate ELISA test efficacy for detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools comparing this results with standarized technics like histology (Giemsa), ureasa test and UBT C 14. 26 patients were evaluated in this study, ages between 15-75 with upper gastrointestinal symptoms; all of them required gastroduodenal endoscopy, status H. Pylori was determined with methods upon mentioned. 24 hours after endoscopy H. Pylori antigens in stools with the technique Premier Platinum Htsa, Elisa were determined. The detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools accurately identified active H. Pylori infection. The performance characteristics of this non-invasive method was similar in sensibility and specificity to conventional tests.

  16. Evaluation of urine pneumococcal antigen test performance among adults in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Lee M; Bigogo, Godfrey; Jagero, Geofrey; da Gloria Carvalho, Maria; Pimenta, Fabiana; Junghae, Muthoni; Breiman, Robert F; Whitney, Cynthia G; Feikin, Daniel R; Conklin, Laura M

    2016-08-01

    When used in an area of rural western Kenya, the BinaxNOW® urine antigen test had a sensitivity of 67% (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 43-85%) among 21 adults ≥15 years old with acute respiratory illnesses and pneumococcal bacteremia and a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 96-99%) among 660 adults ≥15 years old without fever or cough. The specificity of the test was not significantly affected by pneumococcal colonization, regardless of patients' HIV status, age, or sex. Use of the pneumococcal urine antigen test in clinical assessments of adults in Africa with acute respiratory illness is a viable option regardless of whether a patient is colonized by pneumococci, even among HIV-infected adults, although the moderate sensitivity of the urine antigen test indicates that the test is probably best used clinically as part of a panel with other tests that can detect pneumococci. PMID:27220607

  17. Seroprevalence of antibodies against fHbp and NadA, two potential vaccine antigens for Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Jacobsson, Susanne; Mölling, Paula; Olcén, Per

    2009-09-25

    The IgG antibody levels directed against fHbp and NadA, two potential vaccine antigens for Neisseria meningitidis, were examined in order to investigate the extent of natural immunisation against these antigens in different age groups. As a comparison, the IgG antibody levels against Haemophilus influenzae type b were examined. In the two youngest age groups, below 10 years of age, relatively low levels of both anti-fHbp and anti-NadA were measured. A 15-fold higher geometric mean concentration of anti-fHbp was noted in the age group 20-29 years as compared to the age group 15-19 years. The peak concentration was found at 30-39 years, followed by decreased levels with age. Anti-NadA showed a certain increase up to 9 years followed by an even increase up to 40-49 years.

  18. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens.

    PubMed

    Gerbase-DeLima, M; Pereira-Santos, A; Sesso, R; Temin, J; Aragão, E S; Ajzen, H

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin) with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P < 0.05). In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease. PMID:9698788

  19. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) A healthy ... Aging email updates. Enter email address Submit Healthy Aging news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to ...

  20. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Change Contrast print sign up Share Healthy Aging This category offers tips on how to stay ... with Smell Problems with Taste Skin Care and Aging Sleep and Aging Taking Medicines Talking with Your ...

  1. Immune Responses to Pertussis Antigens in Infants and Toddlers after Immunization with Multicomponent Acellular Pertussis Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Chen, Qingxia

    2014-01-01

    Given the resurgence of pertussis despite high rates of vaccination with the diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, a better understanding of vaccine-induced immune responses to Bordetella pertussis is needed. We investigated the antibody, cell-mediated, and cytokine responses to B. pertussis antigens in children who received the primary vaccination series (at 2, 4, and 6 months) and first booster vaccination (at 15 to 18 months) with 5-component acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine. The majority of subjects demonstrated a 4-fold increase in antibody titer to all four pertussis antigens (pertussis toxin [PT], pertactin [PRN], filamentous hemagglutinin [FHA], and fimbriae [FIM]) following the primary series and booster vaccination. Following the primary vaccine series, the majority of subjects (52 to 67%) mounted a positive T cell proliferative response (stimulation index of ≥3) to the PT and PRN antigens, while few subjects (7 to 12%) mounted positive proliferative responses to FHA and FIM. One month after booster vaccination (age 16 to 19 months), our study revealed significant increase in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in response to the PT and FIM antigens, a significant increase in IL-2 production with the PT, FHA, and PRN antigens, and a lack of significant interleukin-4 (IL-4) secretion with any of the antigens. While previous reports documented a mixed Th1/Th2 or Th2-skewed response to DTaP vaccine in children, our data suggest that following the first DTaP booster, children aged 16 to 19 months have a cytokine profile consistent with a Th1 response, which is known to be essential for clearance of pertussis infection. To better define aP-induced immune responses following the booster vaccine, further studies are needed to assess cytokine responses pre- and postbooster in DTaP recipients. PMID:25253666

  2. Separation of soluble Brucella antigens by gel-filtration chromatography.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Freeman, B A

    1970-07-01

    Soluble precipitating antigens of Brucella suis have been, in various degrees, purified by filtration on Sephadex gels. The most useful gels employed were Sephadex G-150, Sephadex G-200, and Sepharose 4B. Although not all fractions proved to be immunologically pure, some crude molecular-size estimates of most of the 13 soluble antigens of the Brucella cell could be given. In addition, monospecific antisera to three purified Brucella antigens have been prepared. By using purified preparations, physical and chemical data were obtained on two major antigens, E and 1, and a minor antigen, f. Antigen E is not an agglutinogen and may be toxic. Antigen 1 is of low molecular weight and is neither toxic nor agglutinogenic. The minor antigen f is an agglutinogen as well as a precipitinogen and is found on the cell surface. Both major antigens, when purified, were immunogenic in rabbits. PMID:16557798

  3. Properties of glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, William; Smith, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Presentation of antigen to T cells represents one of the central events in the engagement of the immune system toward the defense of the host against pathogens. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms by which antigen presentation occurs is critical toward our understanding the properties of host defense against foreign antigen, as well as insight into other features of the immune system, such as autoimmune disease. The entire antigen-presentation event is complex, and many features of it remain poorly understood. However, recent studies have provided evidence showing that glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts are important for efficient antigen presentation; the studies suggest that one such function of rafts is trafficking of antigen-MHC II complexes to the presentation site on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. Here, we present a critical discussion of rafts and their proposed functions in antigen presentation. Emerging topics of rafts and antigen presentation that warrant further investigation are also highlighted.

  4. Antigenic and phenotypic variations in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neena; Fries, Bettina C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mechanisms to vary the phenotypic characteristics of fungi are diverse and can be important for their life cycle. This review summarizes phenotypic variability in fungi and divides this phenomenon into three topics: (i) morphological transitions, which are environmentally induced and involve the entire fungal population, (ii) reversible phenotypic switching between different colony morphologies, which is restricted to a small fraction of the population, and (iii) antigenic variation of surface antigens, which can be immuno-dominant epitopes happens in individual fungal cells. PMID:19769677

  5. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  6. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  7. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  8. Antigen Processing and Remodeling of the Endosomal Pathway: Requirements for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation. PMID:22566920

  9. Antibodies against papillomavirus antigens in cervical secretions from condyloma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dillner, L; Fredriksson, A; Persson, E; Forslund, O; Hansson, B G; Dillner, J

    1993-01-01

    Samples of cervical secretions and serum from 30 women with genital condylomas and 30 age-matched controls were tested for the presence of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies against a panel of papillomavirus-derived antigens. The same cervical samples were also analyzed for presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction. By Southern blotting HPV DNA was detected in 8 of 30 patients with condylomas and 2 of 30 controls, and by the polymerase chain reaction HPV DNA was detected in 14 of 30 patients with condylomas and 5 of 30 controls. A total of 18 of 29 patients with condylomas and 8 of 28 controls had IgA antibodies in cervical secretions to an E2 synthetic peptide, and 17 of 29 patients with condylomas and 5 of 28 controls had local IgA antibodies to an E7 peptide (P < 0.025 and P < 0.005, respectively). The results suggest that measurement of local antibody production against selected HPV antigens may be useful in the study of HPV immunology and, possibly, for the diagnosis of HPV infection. PMID:8381807

  10. Human humoral responses to antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: immunodominance of high-molecular-mass antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Laal, S; Samanich, K M; Sonnenberg, M G; Zolla-Pazner, S; Phadtare, J M; Belisle, J T

    1997-01-01

    The selection of antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis for most studies of humoral responses in tuberculosis patients has been restricted to molecules that were either immunodominant in immunized animals or amenable to biochemical purification rather than those that were reactive with the human immune system. Delineation of antigens that elicit humoral responses during the natural course of disease progression in humans has been hindered by the presence of cross-reactive antibodies to conserved regions on ubiquitous prokaryotic antigens in sera from healthy individuals and tuberculosis patients. The levels of cross-reactive antibodies in the sera were reduced by preadsorption with Escherichia coli lysates, prior to studying their reactivity against a large panel of M. tuberculosis antigens to which the human immune system may be exposed during natural infection and disease. Thus, reactivity against pools of secreted, cellular, and cell wall-associated antigens of M. tuberculosis was assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results suggested that the secreted protein preparation contained antigens most frequently recognized by the humoral responses of pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The culture filtrate proteins were subsequently size fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, characterized by reaction with murine monoclonal antibodies to known antigens of M. tuberculosis by an ELISA, and assessed for reactivity with tuberculous and nontuberculous sera. Results show that a secreted antigen of 88 kDa elicits a strong antibody response in a high percentage of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This and other antigens identified on the basis of their reactivity with patient sera may prove useful for developing serodiagnosis for tuberculosis. PMID:9008280

  11. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  12. Determinants of prostate cancer screening in a sample of African American military servicemen.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Hyacinth J

    2006-05-01

    This descriptive/cross-sectional study assessed determinants of prostate cancer screening in a sample of African American military servicemen who were age 45 years and older. Data were collected using the Edwards Prostate Perception Survey, a 52-item questionnaire that assessed knowledge, beliefs, self-efficacy, health-related practices, and demographic variables. Despite reporting high knowledge and positive belief about prostate cancer and screening, 43% of the respondents indicated they had never been screened with the prostate-specific antigen blood test, and 27% reported that health care providers had not recommended screening. Respondents were more likely to be screened if they had more knowledge of the prostate-specific antigen test, were retired, older, and when health care providers recommended it. The younger active duty servicemen in the 45 to 50 age group reported the lowest rates of screening.

  13. HLA antigens and asthma in Greeks.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, J; Toumbis, M; Konstantopoulos, K; Kamaroulias, D; Anagnostakis, J; Georgoulias, V; Fessas, P; Zervas, J

    1996-04-01

    HLA-A and -B antigens were determined in a group of 76 Greek asthmatic patients: 35 children (1.5-15 years) and 41 adults (18-73 years). The results were compared to those of 400 healthy unrelated controls from the same population. The standard NIH lymphocytotoxicity test was applied. When all 76 patients were compared to the controls, a statistically significant lower frequency of HLA-B5 and -B35 antigens was noted. When adults were analysed alone, an increased frequency of HLA-B8 was found. On the other hand, in the asthmatic children sub-group, the HLA-A10 antigen was significantly higher and the HLA-B5 was significantly lower than in the controls. These data imply that different HLA antigens may be involved in the pathogenesis of several clinical forms of asthma and that, in order to study the role of immunogenetic factor(s) in the pathogenesis of this disease, more adequate grouping criteria are needed.

  14. Radioimmunoassay for hepatitis B core antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnelli, E.; Pereira, C.; Triolo, G.; Vernace, S.; Paronetto, F.

    1982-02-01

    Serum hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is an important marker of hepatitis B virus replication. We describe an easy, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of HBcAg in detergent-treated serum pellets containing Dane particles. Components of a commercial kit for anticore determination are used, and HBcAG is measured by competitive inhibition of binding of /sub 125/I-labeled antibodies to HBcAg with HBcAg-coated beads. We assayed for HBcAG in the sera of 49 patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic hepatitis, 50 patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis, and 30 healthy volunteers. HBcAg was detected in 41% of patients with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis but not in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis Be antigen (an antigen closely associated with the core of Dane particles) determined in the same sera by radioimmunoassay, was not detected in 50% of HBcAg-positive sera.

  15. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  16. Circulating filarial antigen detection in brugian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Praveen Kumar; Mahajan, Ramesh Chander; Malla, Nancy; Mewara, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Shailja Misra; Shenoy, Ranganatha Krishna; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a major cause of disability globally. The success of global elimination programmes for LF depends upon effectiveness of tools for diagnosis and treatment. In this study on stage-specific antigen detection in brugian filariasis, L3, adult worm (AW) and microfilarial antigenaemia were detected in around 90-95% of microfilariae carriers (MF group), 50-70% of adenolymphangitis (ADL) patients, 10-25% of chronic pathology (CP) patients and 10-15% of endemic normal (EN) controls. The sensitivity of the circulating filarial antigen (CFA) detection in serum samples from MF group was up to 95%. In sera from ADL patients, unexpectedly, less antigen reactivity was observed. In CP group all the CFA positive individuals were from CP grade I and II only and none from grade III or IV, suggesting that with chronicity the AWs lose fecundity and start to disintegrate and die. Amongst EN subject, 10-15% had CFA indicating that few of them harbour filarial AWs, thus they might not be truly immune as has been conventionally believed. The specificity for antigen detection was 100% when tested with sera from various other protozoan and non-filarial helminthic infections.

  17. Antigenic characterisation of lyssaviruses in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ngoepe, Ernest; Fehlner-Gardiner, Christine; Wandeler, Alex; Sabeta, Claude

    2014-01-01

    There are at least six Lyssavirus species that have been isolated in Africa, which include classical rabies virus, Lagos bat virus, Mokola virus, Duvenhage virus, Shimoni bat virus and Ikoma lyssavirus. In this retrospective study, an analysis of the antigenic reactivity patterns of lyssaviruses in South Africa against a panel of 15 anti-nucleoprotein monoclonal antibodies was undertaken. A total of 624 brain specimens, collected between 2005 and 2009, confirmed as containing lyssavirus antigen by direct fluorescent antibody test, were subjected to antigenic differentiation. The lyssaviruses were differentiated into two species, namely rabies virus (99.5%) and Mokola virus (0.5%). Furthermore, rabies virus was further delineated into two common rabies biotypes in South Africa: canid and mongoose. Initially, it was found that the canid rabies biotype had two reactivity patterns; differential staining was observed with just one monoclonal antibody. This difference was likely to have been an artefact related to sample quality, as passage in cell culture restored staining. Mongoose rabies viruses were more heterogeneous, with seven antigenic reactivity patterns detected. Although Mokola viruses were identified in this study, prevalence and reservoir host species are yet to be established. These data demonstrate the usefulness of monoclonal antibody typing panels in lyssavirus surveillance with reference to emergence of new species or spread of rabies biotypes to new geographic zones. PMID:25685866

  18. Identification and manipulation of antigen specific T-cells with artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Koffeman, Eva; Keogh, Elissa; Klein, Mark; Prakken, Berent; Albani, Salvatore

    2007-01-01

    T-cells specific for a particular antigen represent a small percentage of the overall T-cell population. Detecting the presence of antigen specific T-cells in patients, animal models or populations of cultured cells has presented a challenge to researchers. The T-cell capture method described here utilizes a truly artificial method of antigen presentation and requires only 50,000 cells for the detection of the major histomcompatibility complex (MHC) class II and antigen restricted T-cells. With this method, liposomes, prepared with readily available materials, are loaded with neutravidin "rafts" comprised of MHC/peptide complexes, anti-CD28, a costimulatory molecule, and anti-LFA-1, an adhesion molecule. These artificial APCs are easily manipulated to include any MHC, antibodies to cell surface markers and/or costimulatory signals of interest thereby enabling not only T-cell identification but also the manipulation of mechanisms of T-cell activation. PMID:17983141

  19. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo Alonso; Gabilondo-Navarro, Fernando Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent tumor found in men worldwide and in Mexico in particular. Age and family history are the main risk factors. The diagnosis is made by prostate biopsy in patients with abnormalities detected in their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels or digital rectal exam (DRE). This article reviews screening and diagnostic methods as well as treatment options for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. PMID:27557386

  20. FDA Approves Test to Aid Post-PSA Biopsy Decisions | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a test to help men with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test scores decide whether to have a biopsy to test for prostate cancer. The Access Hybritech p2PSA test is approved for use in men aged 50 or older who have a PSA test score between 4 and 10 ng/ml but who show no signs of cancer during a digital rectal exam. |

  1. Using Sequence Data To Infer the Antigenicity of Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hailiang; Yang, Jialiang; Zhang, Tong; Long, Li-Ping; Jia, Kun; Yang, Guohua; Webby, Richard J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The efficacy of current influenza vaccines requires a close antigenic match between circulating and vaccine strains. As such, timely identification of emerging influenza virus antigenic variants is central to the success of influenza vaccination programs. Empirical methods to determine influenza virus antigenic properties are time-consuming and mid-throughput and require live viruses. Here, we present a novel, experimentally validated, computational method for determining influenza virus antigenicity on the basis of hemagglutinin (HA) sequence. This method integrates a bootstrapped ridge regression with antigenic mapping to quantify antigenic distances by using influenza HA1 sequences. Our method was applied to H3N2 seasonal influenza viruses and identified the 13 previously recognized H3N2 antigenic clusters and the antigenic drift event of 2009 that led to a change of the H3N2 vaccine strain. PMID:23820391

  2. Biodegradable nanoellipsoidal artificial antigen presenting cells for antigen specific T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Kosmides, Alyssa K; Aje, Kent; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2015-04-01

    Non-spherical nanodimensional artificial antigen presenting cells (naAPCs) offer the potential to systemically induce an effective antigen-specific immune response. In this report it is shown biodegradable ellipsoidal naAPCs mimic the T-Cell/APC interaction better than equivalent spherical naAPCs. In addition, it is demonstrated ellipsoidal naAPCs offer reduced non-specific cellular uptake and a superior pharmacokinetic profile compared to spherical naAPCs. PMID:25641795

  3. Two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell clones display heterogeneity in antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, M T; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1989-01-01

    Evidence from various antigen systems suggests that antigen processing can be one factor that determines the repertoire of immunogenic peptides. Thus, processing events may account for some of the disparity between the available and expressed helper T-cell repertoires. In this report, we demonstrate that the immunodominant T-cell determinant in ovalbumin [p323-339; ovalbumin-(323-339) heptadecapeptide] is processed differently by two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell lines, M12 and A20. The ovalbumin-specific T-cell-T-cell hybridomas, DO-11.10 and 3DO-54.8, were used to detect processed antigen. These T-T hybridomas have different fine specificities for the p323-339 determinant. A20 cells presented native ovalbumin well to both T-T hybridomas, whereas M12 cells presented native ovalbumin well to 3DO-54.8 but very inefficiently to DO-11.10. M12 and A20 cells effectively stimulated both T-T hybridomas with the same concentrations of the immunogenic synthetic peptide p323-339. Therefore, M12 cells and DO-11.10 can interact with each other, and both T-T hybridomas have similar sensitivities for the same immunogenic peptide. We conclude that genetically identical antigen-presenting cells can display heterogeneity in the fine processing of an immunodominant T-cell determinant, and synthetic model peptides that represent the minimal stimulatory sequence of a T-cell determinant are not necessarily identical to the structure of in vivo processed antigen. Heterogeneity in antigen processing by individual antigen-presenting cells would serve to increase the repertoire of immunogenic peptides that are presented to T cells. PMID:2470101

  4. Antigen suppression of the in vitro development of plaque-forming cells to autologous erythrocyte antigens.

    PubMed

    Lord, E M; Dutton, R W

    1975-12-01

    Peritoneal cell cultures from NZB and C57BL/6 mice develop large numbers of PFC directed against antigens present on bromelain-treated isologous erythrocytes. The development of these autoimmune PFC can be suppressed by the addition of small numbers of BrMRBC at the start of the culture period. The possibility that the development of the plaque is prevented by the presence of antigen in vivo is discussed.

  5. Contrasting Patterns of Serologic and Functional Antibody Dynamics to Plasmodium falciparum Antigens in a Kenyan Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Indu; Wang, Xuelie; Babineau, Denise; Yeo, Kee Thai; Anderson, Timothy; Kimmel, Rhonda J.; Angov, Evelina; Lanar, David E.; Narum, David; Dutta, Sheetij; Richards, Jack; Beeson, James G.; Crabb, Brendan S.; Cowman, Alan F.; Horii, Toshihiro; Muchiri, Eric; Mungai, Peter L.; King, Christopher L.; Kazura, James W.

    2015-01-01

    IgG antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum are transferred from the maternal to fetal circulation during pregnancy, wane after birth, and are subsequently acquired in response to natural infection. We examined the dynamics of malaria antibody responses of 84 Kenyan infants from birth to 36 months of age by (i) serology, (ii) variant surface antigen (VSA) assay, (iii) growth inhibitory activity (GIA), and (iv) invasion inhibition assays (IIA) specific for merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) and sialic acid-dependent invasion pathway. Maternal antibodies in each of these four categories were detected in cord blood and decreased to their lowest level by approximately 6 months of age. Serologic antibodies to 3 preerythrocytic and 10 blood-stage antigens subsequently increased, reaching peak prevalence by 36 months. In contrast, antibodies measured by VSA, GIA, and IIA remained low even up to 36 months. Infants sensitized to P. falciparum in utero, defined by cord blood lymphocyte recall responses to malaria antigens, acquired antimalarial antibodies at the same rate as those who were not sensitized in utero, indicating that fetal exposure to malaria antigens did not affect subsequent infant antimalarial responses. Infants with detectable serologic antibodies at 12 months of age had an increased risk of P. falciparum infection during the subsequent 24 months. We conclude that serologic measures of antimalarial antibodies in children 36 months of age or younger represent biomarkers of malaria exposure rather than protection and that functional antibodies develop after 36 months of age in this population. PMID:26656119

  6. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents.

    PubMed

    Vollert, Craig T; Moree, Wilna J; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J; Eriksen, Jason L

    2015-11-27

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents.

  7. Formaldehyde scavengers function as novel antigen retrieval agents

    PubMed Central

    Vollert, Craig T.; Moree, Wilna J.; Gregory, Steven; Bark, Steven J.; Eriksen, Jason L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen retrieval agents improve the detection of formaldehyde-fixed proteins, but how they work is not well understood. We demonstrate that formaldehyde scavenging represents a key characteristic associated with effective antigen retrieval; under controlled temperature and pH conditions, scavenging improves the typical antigen retrieval process through reversal of formaldehyde-protein adduct formation. This approach provides a rational framework for the identification and development of more effective antigen retrieval agents. PMID:26612041

  8. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  9. Mapping Antigenic Motifs in the Trypomastigote Small Surface Antigen from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Balouz, Virginia; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Cánepa, Gaspar E.; Carmona, Santiago J.; Volcovich, Romina; Gonzalez, Nicolás; Altcheh, Jaime; Agüero, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The trypomastigote small surface antigen (TSSA) is a mucin-like molecule from Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which displays amino acid polymorphisms in parasite isolates. TSSA expression is restricted to the surface of infective cell-derived trypomastigotes, where it functions as an adhesin and engages surface receptors on the host cell as a prerequisite for parasite internalization. Previous results have established TSSA-CL, the isoform encoded by the CL Brener clone, as an appealing candidate for use in serology-based diagnostics for Chagas disease. Here, we used a combination of peptide- and recombinant protein-based tools to map the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL at maximal resolution. Our results indicate the presence of different partially overlapping B-cell epitopes clustering in the central portion of TSSA-CL, which contains most of the polymorphisms found in parasite isolates. Based on these results, we assessed the serodiagnostic performance of a 21-amino-acid-long peptide that spans TSSA-CL major antigenic determinants, which was similar to the performance of the previously validated glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TSSA-CL fusion molecule. Furthermore, the tools developed for the antigenic characterization of the TSSA antigen were also used to explore other potential diagnostic applications of the anti-TSSA humoral response in Chagasic patients. Overall, our present results provide additional insights into the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL and support this molecule as an excellent target for molecular intervention in Chagas disease. PMID:25589551

  10. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  11. Development of a novel universal immune receptor for antigen targeting

    PubMed Central

    Urbanska, Katarzyna; Powell, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) possess fixed specificity for a single antigen and require empirical testing in T cells. To address this, we have developed a novel, adaptable immune receptor strategy that allows for the rapid generation and testing of T cells of nearly infinite antigen specificity. PMID:22934280

  12. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  13. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  14. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  15. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  16. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  17. Multivalent Antigens for Promoting B and T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Nitasha R.; Zwick, Daniel B.; Courtney, Adam H.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Efficacious vaccines require antigens that elicit productive immune system activation. Antigens that afford robust antibody production activate both B and T cells. Elucidating the antigen properties that enhance B–T cell communication is difficult with traditional antigens. We therefore used ring-opening metathesis polymerization to access chemically defined, multivalent antigens containing both B and T cell epitopes to explore how antigen structure impacts B cell and T cell activation and communication. The bifunctional antigens were designed so that the backbone substitution level of each antigenic epitope could be quantified using 19F NMR. The T cell peptide epitope was appended so that it could be liberated in B cells via the action of the endosomal protease cathepsin D, and this design feature was critical for T cell activation. Antigens with high BCR epitope valency induce greater BCR-mediated internalization and T cell activation than did low valency antigens, and these high-valency polymeric antigens were superior to protein antigens. We anticipate that these findings can guide the design of more effective vaccines. PMID:25970017

  18. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-06-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to -lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with -lactamase in Freund's adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund's adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. backbone flexibility | Freund's adjuvant | conformational epitope | antisera

  19. The intracellular pathway for the presentation of vitamin B-related antigens by the antigen-presenting molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Eckle, Sidonia B G; Theodossis, Alex; Liu, Ligong; Chen, Zhenjun; Wubben, Jacinta M; Fairlie, David P; Strugnell, Richard A; Mintern, Justine D; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Villadangos, Jose A

    2016-05-01

    The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 presents vitamin B-related antigens (VitB antigens) to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells through an uncharacterized pathway. We show that MR1, unlike other antigen-presenting molecules, does not constitutively present self-ligands. In the steady state it accumulates in a ligand-receptive conformation within the endoplasmic reticulum. VitB antigens reach this location and form a Schiff base with MR1, triggering a 'molecular switch' that allows MR1-VitB antigen complexes to traffic to the plasma membrane. These complexes are endocytosed with kinetics independent of the affinity of the MR1-ligand interaction and are degraded intracellularly, although some MR1 molecules acquire new ligands during passage through endosomes and recycle back to the surface. MR1 antigen presentation is characterized by a rapid 'off-on-off' mechanism that is strictly dependent on antigen availability. PMID:27043408

  20. Influence of the host system on the pathogenicity, immunogenicity, and antigenicity of infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M K; Saif, Y M

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the host system on the pathogenicity, immunogenicity, and antigenicity of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) was investigated. One classic (SAL) and one variant strain (IN) of IBDV were passaged separately six times in three host systems, namely BGM-70 continuous cell line, primary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells, or embryonating chicken eggs (embryos) or one time in the bursa of Fabricius (BF) of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. Passage in BGM-70 cells or CEF cells resulted in loss of pathogenicity, but viruses passaged in embryos or BF maintained their pathogenicity. For the immunogenicity study, the viruses described above were used to prepare live and inactivated vaccines, containing 10(3) mean embryo infectious doses (EID50s) and 10(5) EID50s respectively. These vaccines induced different levels of protection. It was concluded that the antigen titration methodology employing embryonating chicken eggs was not suitable for titration of viruses propagated in other host systems because of varying degrees of adaptation and/or pathogenicity of the viruses resulting in variability in antigen mass of the tested vaccines. To test this assumption, an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used as a titration system to compare the antigenicity of viruses propagated in BGM-70 cells or BF. Preparations containing similar antigen masses were inactivated then inoculated into two age groups of SPF chickens and antibody titers were monitored. During the experimental period, the geometric mean virus-neutralizing (VN) antibody titers of the vaccinated groups did not differ significantly (P > 0.05).

  1. Characterisation of antibody responses in pigs induced by recombinant oncosphere antigens from Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Jayashi, César M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Kyngdon, Craig T; Gauci, Charles G; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2012-12-14

    Recombinant antigens cloned from the oncosphere life cycle stage of the cestode parasite Taenia solium (T. solium) have been proven to be effective as vaccines for protecting pigs against infections with T. solium. Previous studies have defined three different host protective oncosphere antigens, TSOL18, TSOL16 and TSOL45. In this study, we evaluated the potential for combining the antigens TSOL16 and TSOL18 as a practical vaccine. Firstly, in a laboratory trial, we compared the immunogenicity of the combined antigens (TSOL16/18) versus the immunogenicity of the antigens separately. Secondly, in a field trial, we tested the ability of the TSOL16/18 vaccine to induce detectable antibody responses in animals living under environmental stress and traditionally reared in areas where T. solium cysticercosis is endemic; and finally, we characterised the immune response of the study population. Pigs of 8-16 weeks of age were vaccinated with 200 μg each of TSOL16 and TSOL18, plus 5mg of Quil-A. Specific total IgG, IgG(1) and IgG(2) antibody responses induced by TSOL16 and TSOL18 were determined with ELISA. The immunogenicity of both antigens was retained in the combined TSOL16/18 vaccine. The combined vaccine TSOL16/18 induced detectable specific anti-TSOL18 antibody responses in 100% (113/113) and specific anti-TSOL16 in 99% (112/113) of the vaccinated animals measured at 2 weeks following the booster vaccination. From the two IgG antibody subtypes analysed we found there was stronger response to IgG(2).

  2. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out of ... person has smoked. Many products claim to revitalize aging skin or reduce wrinkles, but the Food and ...

  3. Relationship between gingival hyperplasia and class II histocompatibility antigens in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, A; Ak, G; Furuncuoglu, Y; Akar, U; Seyhun, Y; Türk, S; Carin, M; Sever, M S

    2000-01-01

    Gingival hyperplasia, a well-known side effect of ciclosporin A (CS-A), is much more prominent when CS-A is used in combination with calcium channel blockers, especially dihydropyridines. On the other hand, it is interesting to note that this complication is not observed in all patients using this drug combination. This study was conducted in order to investigate the relationship (if any) between major histocompatibility complex antigens and gingival hyperplasia. Seventy-six renal transplantation patients were evaluated by an experienced dentist for gingival hyperplasia. The patients were then divided into two groups according to the presence (group 1, n = 18) or absence (group 2, n = 58) of gingival hyperplasia. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding age, sex, transplant age, donor type, antihypertensive and immunosuppressive therapy protocols, and CS-A levels. HLA-DR2 antigen was present in 63% of the patients with gingival hyperplasia and in 34% of the patients without gingival hyperplasia. However, the HLA-DR1 antigen frequencies were found to be 11 and 22% in group 1 and group 2, respectively. In patients receiving nifedipine as an antihypertensive therapy, gingival hyperplasia developed more often than in patients receiving verapamil or diltiazem. As a result, in renal allograft recipients with HLA-DR1 antigen, gingival hyperplasia was seen less frequently than in HLA-DR2-positive patients. It is believed that the presence of these antigens regulates the response of the patients to either CS-A and/or calcium channel blockers.

  4. [Platelet antigens: immunology and immuno-allergology].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, J C; Palma-Carlos, A G

    1996-02-01

    Platelet immunology allows the understanding of clinical findings in a genetic and serologic basis. Blood platelets bear common antigens and same specific antigens, classified in five groups (HPA 1 to 5), that are localized on membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib alpha, IIb and IIIa. Antiplatelet autoimmunization is generally due to IgG antibodies against membrane complexes IIb/IIIa or Ib/lX. Antiplatelet alloimmunization, clinically resulting in Posttransfusion Purpura and Neonatal Thrombocytopenia is more frequently associated with anti-IIb/IIIa antibodies, either anti-HPA-1a or HPA-1b. Finally, platelet participation in immunoallergic reactions is discussed, focusing both platelet activation by allergen itself and platelet recruitment by other inflammatory cells.

  5. The Lymph Self-Antigen Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Cristina C.; Santambrogio, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The lymphatic fluid originates from the interstitial fluid which bathes every parenchymal organ and reflects the “omic” composition of the tissue from which it originates in its physiological or pathological signature. Several recent proteomic analyses have mapped the proteome-degradome and peptidome of this immunologically relevant fluid pointing to the lymph as an important source of tissue-derived self-antigens. A vast array of lymph-circulating peptides have been mapped deriving from a variety of processing pathways including caspases, cathepsins, MMPs, ADAMs, kallikreins, calpains, and granzymes, among others. These self peptides can be directly loaded on circulatory dendritic cells and expand the self-antigenic repertoire available for central and peripheral tolerance. PMID:24379811

  6. A Review of Pneumococcal Vaccines: Current Polysaccharide Vaccine Recommendations and Future Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Calvin C.; Rogers, P. David

    2016-01-01

    This review describes development of currently available pneumococcal vaccines, provides summary tables of current pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in children and adults, and describes new potential vaccine antigens in the pipeline. Streptococcus pneumoniae, the bacteria responsible for pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis and bacteremia, remains a cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults. Introductions of unconjugated and conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have each reduced the rate of pneumococcal infections caused by the organism S. pneumoniae. The first vaccine developed, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23), protected adults and children older than 2 years of age against invasive disease caused by the 23 capsular serotypes contained in the vaccine. Because PPSV23 did not elicit a protective immune response in children younger than 2 years of age, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) containing seven of the most common serotypes from PPSV23 in pediatric invasive disease was developed for use in children younger than 2 years of age. The last vaccine to be developed, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), contains the seven serotypes in PCV7, five additional serotypes from PPSV23, and a new serotype not contained in PPSV23 or PCV7. Serotype replacement with virulent strains that are not contained in the polysaccharide vaccines has been observed after vaccine implementation and stresses the need for continued research into novel vaccine antigens. We describe eight potential protein antigens that are in the pipeline for new pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:26997927

  7. Antigen presenting cells - diversity, differentiation, and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schook, L.B. ); Tew, J.G. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 35 papers. Some of the titles are: DNA-mediated gene transfer as a tool for analyzing Ia structure-function relationships and antigen presentation; Regulation of immune-associated genes during macrophage differentiation; Presentation of arsonate-tyrosine to cloned T-cells by L-Cells transfected with class II genes; and The duration of class II MHC glycoprotein expression by mononuclear phagocytes is regulated by the Bcg gene.

  8. Murine lung immunity to a soluble antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, D.N.; Bice, D.E.; Siegel, D.W.; Schuyler, M.R. Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM )

    1990-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that soluble antigen triggers antigen-specific immunity in the respiratory tract in a fashion similar to that reported for particulate antigen, the authors examined the development of local and systemic immunity in C57BL/6 mice after intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of a soluble, large molecular weight protein neoantigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Specific anti-KLH IgG and IgM first appeared in the sera of mice on day 7 after primary immunization by i.t. instillation of KLH, with specific serum antibody concentrations remaining elevated at day 11. Cultured spleen cells obtained from mice after primary immunization released only low levels of specific IgM, and no specific IgG. No specific antibody was released by cell populations derived from the lungs of animals undergoing primary immunization. When presensitized mice were given an i.t. challenge with KLH, responses differed markedly from those following primary immunization. Lung-associated lymph node cell populations from challenged mice released greater amounts of specific antibody earlier than did cell populations, which after primary immunization had not released detectable amounts of specific antibody in vitro, released easily detectable amounts of specific antibody after challenge. Thus, i.t. instillation of soluble KLH generates specific immunity in mice in a fashion similar to that reported for particulate antigen. Specific responses following primary immunization occur largely within draining lung-associated lymph nodes. In contrast, presensitized animals challenged i.t. with soluble KLH mount secondary antibody responses in both lung and lung-associated lymph nodes.

  9. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  10. Examining connections between screening for breast, cervical and prostate cancer and colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Michael D; Brandt, Heather M; Dolinger, Heather; Hardin, James W; Sharpe, Patricia A; Eberth, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim To compare participation in breast, cervical and prostate cancer screening with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Materials & methods This random digit-dialed survey includes participants (aged 50–75 years) from South Carolina (USA). Past participation information in fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, mammography, clinical breast examination, Pap test, prostate-specific antigen and digital rectal examination was obtained.Adjusted odds ratios are reported. Results Among European–American women, any cervical or breast cancer screening was associated with adherence to any CRC screening. Among African–American women, mammography was associated with adherence to any CRC screening. Digital rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen tests were associated with adherence to any CRC screening test among all men. Conclusion Future research should explore approaches inclusive of cancer screening recommendations for multiple cancer types for reduction of cancer screening disparities. PMID:25143785

  11. Cancer/testis antigens and urological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Prakash; Shiraishi, Takumi; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Kim, Robert; Mooney, Steven M.; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer/testis antigens (CTAs) are a group of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) that display normal expression in the adult testis—an immune-privileged organ—but aberrant expression in several types of cancers, particularly in advanced cancers with stem cell-like characteristics. There has been an explosion in CTA-based research since CTAs were first identified in 1991 and MAGE-1 was shown to elicit an autologous cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response in a patient with melanoma. The resulting data have not only highlighted a role for CTAs in tumorigenesis, but have also underscored the translational potential of these antigens for detecting and treating many types of cancers. Studies that have investigated the use of CTAs for the clinical management of urological malignancies indicate that these TAAs have potential roles as novel biomarkers, with increased specificity and sensitivity compared to those currently used in the clinic, and therapeutic targets for cancer immunotherapy. Increasing evidence supports the utilization of these promising tools for urological indications. PMID:22710665

  12. Ku antigen binds to Alu family DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, T; Saëgusa, Y; Taira, T; Mimori, T; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1998-01-01

    The GC-rich segment containing GGAGGC (Alu core) is conserved within the RNA polymerase III (pol III) promoters of Alu family sequences. We have shown that the GGAGGC motif functions as a modulator of DNA replication as well as of transcription, and identified the proteins binding to the motif in human HeLa cells. In this study, the Alu core binding proteins were partially purified from human Raji cells by using an Alu core DNA affinity column. Both the proteins thus purified were implied to be subunits of Ku antigen based on the following criteria: The molecular weights of the proteins estimated on gel electrophoreses were 70 and 85 kDa, respectively, under denaturing conditions, while under non-denaturing conditions only one band was observed for the same sample at 150 kDa, probably representing hetero-dimer formed between the 70 and 85 kDa proteins. The sizes and the hetero-dimer formation are reminiscent of the 70 and 80 kDa subunits of Ku antigen (Ku-p70 and Ku-p80). Moreover, the purified proteins were immunoreactive with anti-Ku antibodies, and the specific DNA-protein complex on the Alu core element was cancelled by the anti-Ku antibodies. The nucleoprotein complex showed the same clipping patterns as those of the complex between the Alu core element and an authentically purified Ku antigen after proteolytic cleavage with trypsin and chymotrypsin.

  13. Structure and function of the Ca antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, M. E.; Bhavanandan, V. P.; Wiseman, G.; Harris, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Ca antigen, which can be detected in a wide range of malignant human tumours by means of the Cal antibody, is a glycoprotein of the mucin type. At least 95% of the carbohydrate is 0-glycosidically linked to the polypeptide which contains high proportions of glycine, serine and glutamic acid. The carbohydrate has a very simple structure: it is composed almost entirely of tetra- tri- and disaccharides having the general formula (NeuNac)n leads to [Gal leads to GalNac] alpha leads to, where n = 0, 1 or 2. In many malignant cell lines, the antigen is produced constitutively in vitro; but in one that has been examined, its synthesis can be induced by high concentrations of lactate. Evidence is presented for the view that a primary function of this glycoprotein is to shield the cells that produce it from hydrogen ion concentrations outside of the physiological range. The presence of the Ca antigen in malignant tumours may thus be a reflection of metabolic conditions that are known to be characteristics of such tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6349673

  14. Therapeutic cancer vaccines: Using unique antigens

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jonathan J.

    2004-01-01

    A decade ago, it seemed rational that our rapidly increasing knowledge of the molecular identities of tumor antigens and a deeper understanding of basic immunology would point the way to an effective therapeutic cancer vaccine. Significant progress has been made, but we do not yet have a cancer vaccine that can reliably and consistently induce tumor destruction or improve patient survival. Random mutations in cancer cells generate unique antigens in each individual, and this may be important in terms of generating a therapeutic immune response. Autologous heat shock protein–peptide complexes produced from each patient's tumor is a logical personalized approach that may obviate the need to identify the unique antigens contained in the individual vaccine. Heat shock proteins elicit adaptive and innate immune responses and have been tested in a variety of animal models and different human cancers. Activity has been seen in several animal studies. Early-phase human studies have also suggested some activity in certain cancers. Large, randomized phase 3 studies are ongoing, and these will effectively answer the question of efficacy regarding this approach to therapeutic vaccination. There are sufficient data to support the notion that cancer vaccines can induce anti-tumor immune responses in humans with cancer. How best to translate this increase in immune responsiveness to consistently and reproducibly induce objective cancer regression or increased survival remains unclear at this time. PMID:15297620

  15. The antigenicity of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Van Regenmortel, M H

    1999-01-01

    The antigenic properties of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been studied extensively for more than 50 years. Distinct antigenic determinants called neotopes and cryptotopes have been identified at the surface of intact virions and dissociated coat protein subunits, respectively, indicating that the quaternary structure of the virus influences the antigenic properties. A correlation has been found to exist between the location of seven to ten residue-long continuous epitopes in the TMV coat protein and the degree of segmental mobility along the polypeptide chain. Immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies specific for the bottom surface of the protein subunit, showed that these antibodies reacted with both ends of the stacked-disk aggregates of viral protein. This finding indicates that the stacked disks are bipolar and cannot be converted directly into helical viral rods as has been previously assumed. TMV epitopes have been mapped at the surface of coat protein subunits using biosensor technology. The ability of certain monoclonal antibodies to block the cotranslational disassembly of virions during the infection process was found to be linked to the precise location of their complementary epitopes and not to their binding affinity. Such blocking antibodies, which act by sterically preventing the interaction between virions and ribosomes may, when expressed in plants, be useful for controlling virus infection. PMID:10212935

  16. The antigenicity of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Van Regenmortel, M H

    1999-03-29

    The antigenic properties of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been studied extensively for more than 50 years. Distinct antigenic determinants called neotopes and cryptotopes have been identified at the surface of intact virions and dissociated coat protein subunits, respectively, indicating that the quaternary structure of the virus influences the antigenic properties. A correlation has been found to exist between the location of seven to ten residue-long continuous epitopes in the TMV coat protein and the degree of segmental mobility along the polypeptide chain. Immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies specific for the bottom surface of the protein subunit, showed that these antibodies reacted with both ends of the stacked-disk aggregates of viral protein. This finding indicates that the stacked disks are bipolar and cannot be converted directly into helical viral rods as has been previously assumed. TMV epitopes have been mapped at the surface of coat protein subunits using biosensor technology. The ability of certain monoclonal antibodies to block the cotranslational disassembly of virions during the infection process was found to be linked to the precise location of their complementary epitopes and not to their binding affinity. Such blocking antibodies, which act by sterically preventing the interaction between virions and ribosomes may, when expressed in plants, be useful for controlling virus infection.

  17. Introduction to Antigen and Antibody Assays.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Serological tests are used widely in veterinary practice; most often in the diagnosis of infectious disease. Such tests may be used to detect antigen from an infectious agent within a biological sample or to detect the presence of serum antibody specific for the pathogen as evidence of immunological exposure. These tests are all based on the fundamental principles of interaction between antigenic epitopes and antibodies of either the immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM, IgA, or IgE classes. The relative concentration of specific antibody within a sample is traditionally determined by calculation of the titer of antibody. With few exceptions, the primary interaction between an antigen and antibody in vitro cannot be visualized and so serological tests generally employ a secondary indicator system based on the use of a polyclonal antiserum or monoclonal antibody. A range of such tests has been developed, but many in veterinary medicine are based on the principle of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, which is described in detail in this article. The interpretation of serological tests must be made carefully, taking into consideration the sensitivity and specificity of the test and the possible reasons for false-positive and false-negative outcomes. PMID:27154595

  18. The Prevalence of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen and Antibody in Home-Reared Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study found no significant difference in the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigens or antibodies between 180 noninstitutionalized subjects (ages 1-29) with Down's syndrome and 155 subjects without Down's syndrome. This finding contrasts with previous findings with institutionalized Down's syndrome subjects. (Author/DB)

  19. Poor memory B cell generation contributes to non-protective responses to DTaP vaccine antigens in otitis-prone children.

    PubMed

    Basha, S; Pichichero, M E

    2015-12-01

    We recently identified a cohort of children with recurrent episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) who fail to generate protective antibody titres to otopathogens and several vaccine antigens. In this study we determined the antibody levels against DTaP vaccine antigens, diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and acellular pertussis toxoid (PT) in sera from 15 stringently defined otitis-prone (sOP) children and 20 non-otitis-prone (NOP) children. We found significantly lower concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies against vaccine antigens in the serum of sOP children compared to age-matched NOP children. To elucidate immunological cellular responses to the vaccines in these children, we investigated memory B cell responses to DTaP vaccination. We used fluorescently conjugated vaccine antigens to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells and examined the frequency of antigen-specific CD19(+) CD27(+) memory B cells in the peripheral blood. sOP children showed a significantly lower percentage of antigen-specific CD19(+) CD27(+) memory B cells than NOP children. We also found a linear correlation between the frequencies of memory B cells and circulating IgG titres for DT, TT and PT proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show significant differences in memory B cell responses to DTaP vaccine antigens and their correlation with the circulating antibodies in young children with recurrent AOM.

  20. IFNγ Responses to Pre-erythrocytic and Blood-stage Malaria Antigens Exhibit Differential Associations With Past Exposure and Subsequent Protection

    PubMed Central

    Jagannathan, Prasanna; Nankya, Felistas; Stoyanov, Cristina; Eccles-James, Ijeoma; Sikyomu, Esther; Naluwu, Kate; Wamala, Samuel; Nalubega, Mayimuna; Briggs, Jessica; Bowen, Katherine; Bigira, Victor; Kapisi, James; Kamya, Moses R.; Dorsey, Grant; Feeney, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The malaria-specific T-cell response is believed to be important for protective immunity. Antimalarial chemoprevention may affect this response by altering exposure to malaria antigens. Methods. We performed interferon γ (IFNγ) ELISpot assays to assess the cellular immune response to blood-stage and pre-erythrocytic antigens longitudinally from 1 to 3 years of age in 196 children enrolled in a randomized trial of antimalarial chemoprevention in Tororo, Uganda, an area of high transmission intensity. Results. IFNγ responses to blood-stage antigens, particularly MSP1, were frequently detected, strongly associated with recent malaria exposure, and lower in those adherent to chemoprevention compared to nonadherent children and those randomized to no chemoprevention. IFNγ responses to pre-erythrocytic antigens were infrequent and similar between children randomized to chemoprevention or no chemoprevention. Responses to blood-stage antigens were not associated with subsequent protection from malaria (aHR 0.96, P = .83), but responses to pre-erythrocytic antigens were associated with protection after adjusting for prior malaria exposure (aHR 0.52, P = .009). Conclusions. In this high transmission setting, IFNγ responses to blood-stage antigens were common and associated with recent exposure to malaria but not protection from subsequent malaria. Responses to pre-erythrocytic antigens were uncommon, not associated with exposure but were associated with protection from subsequent malaria. PMID:25520427

  1. Mosaic aging

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lary C.; Herndon, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although all multicellular organisms undergo structural and functional deterioration with age, senescence is not a uniform process. Rather, each organism experiences a constellation of changes that reflect the heterogeneous effects of age on molecules, cells, organs and systems, an idiosyncratic pattern that we refer to as mosaic aging. Varying genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors (local and extrinsic) contribute to the aging phenotype in a given individual, and these agents influence the type and rate of functional decline, as well as the likelihood of developing age-associated afflictions such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Identifying key factors that drive aging, clarifying their activities in different systems, and in particular understanding how they interact will enhance our comprehension of the aging process, and could yield insights into the permissive role that senescence plays in the emergence of acute and chronic diseases of the elderly. PMID:20110150

  2. Immunochemical detection of a common antigen among Streptococcus uberis isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K F; Norcross, N L

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-three isolates of Streptococcus uberis from various sources were examined for the presence of a common antigen. Initially, a serum was produced in rabbits which, by using rocket line immunoelectrophoresis, proved to react with identity to all of the S. uberis crude extracts as well as group B and E streptococcal extracts. The antigen(s) responsible for this cross-reactivity was partially purified by Sephacryl S-200 gel chromatography and analyzed by fused rocket immunoelectrophoresis. Further analysis by immunodiffusion showed that probably two antigens in the gel chromatography-consolidated fractions were common to the S. uberis and group B and E isolates, but that one of the antigens present was unique to S. uberis. Trypsin destroyed the immunoreactivity of this antigen. Isolation of this common antigen could possibly alleviate some of the tedium associated with the identification of this organism. Images PMID:6408120

  3. Humoral immune response of water buffalo monitored with three different antigens of Toxocara vitulorum.

    PubMed

    de Souza, E M; Starke-Buzetti, W A; Ferreira, F P; Neves, M F; Machado, R Z

    2004-06-10

    Humoral immune response of water buffalo naturally infected with Toxocara vitulorum was monitored using three different antigens of this parasite in serum and colostrum of buffalo cows and calves. Soluble extract (Ex) and excretory/secretory (ES) larval antigens and perienteric fluid antigen (Pe) of adult T. vitulorum were used to measure the antibody levels by an indirect ELISA. Serum of 7-12 buffalo cows for the first 365 days and colostrum of the same number of buffalo cows for the first 60 days of parturition, and serum of 8-10 buffalo calves for the first 365 days after birth were assayed. The ELISA detected antibodies against all three T. vitulorum antigens in the colostrum and serum of 100% of buffalo cows and calves examined. The highest antibody levels against Ex, ES and Pe antigens were detected in the buffalo cow sera during the perinatal period and were maintained at high levels through 300 days after parturition. On the other hand, colostrum antibody concentrations of all three antigens were highest on the first day post-parturition, but decreased sharply during the first 15 days. Concomitantly to the monitoring of immune response, the parasitic status of the calves was also evaluated. In calves, antibodies passively acquired were at the highest concentrations 24 h after birth and remained at high levels until 45 days coincidentally with the peak of T. vitulorum infection. The rejection of the worms by the calves occurred simultaneously with the decline of antibody levels, which reached their lowest levels between 76 and 150 days. Thereafter, probably because of the presence of adults/larvae stimulation, the calves acquired active immunity and the antibodies started to increase slightly in the serum and plateaued between the days 211 and 365. All three antigens were detected by the serum antibodies of buffalo calves; however, the concentration of anti-Pe antibody was higher than anti-EX and anti-ES, particularly after 90 days of age. By conclusion, the

  4. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response.

  5. Conformational Dynamics and Antigenicity in the Disordered Malaria Antigen Merozoite Surface Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Dean; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Nováček, Jiří; Žídek, Lukáš; Sklenář, Vladimír; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) of Plasmodium falciparum is an abundant, intrinsically disordered protein that is GPI-anchored to the surface of the invasive blood stage of the malaria parasite. Recombinant MSP2 has been trialled as a component of a malaria vaccine, and is one of several disordered proteins that are candidates for inclusion in vaccines for malaria and other diseases. Nonetheless, little is known about the implications of protein disorder for the development of an effective antibody response. We have therefore undertaken a detailed analysis of the conformational dynamics of the two allelic forms of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) using NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts and NMR relaxation data indicate that conformational and dynamic properties of the N- and C-terminal conserved regions in the two forms of MSP2 are essentially identical, but significant variation exists between and within the central variable regions. We observe a strong relationship between the conformational dynamics and the antigenicity of MSP2, as assessed with antisera to recombinant MSP2. Regions of increased conformational order in MSP2, including those in the conserved regions, are more strongly antigenic, while the most flexible regions are minimally antigenic. This suggests that modifications that increase conformational order may offer a means to tune the antigenicity of MSP2 and other disordered antigens, with implications for vaccine design. PMID:25742002

  6. Is cancer vaccination feasible at older age?

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Jahangir, Arthee

    2014-01-01

    Age-related defects of the immune system are responsible for T cell unresponsiveness to cancer vaccination at older age. Major immune defects at older age are lack of naïve T cells, impaired activation pathways of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), and age-related changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME). This raises the question whether cancer vaccination is feasible at older age. We compared various cancer vaccine studies at young and old age, thereby focusing on the importance of both innate and adaptive immune responses for cancer immunotherapy. These analyses suggest that creating an immune-stimulating environment with help of the innate immune system may improve T cell responses in cancer vaccination at older age. PMID:24509231

  7. Aging: overview.

    PubMed

    Harman, D

    2001-04-01

    Aging is a universal process that began with the origination of life about 3.5 billion years ago. Accumulation of the diverse deleterious changes produced by aging throughout the cells and tissues progressively impairs function and can eventually cause death. Aging changes can be attributed to development, genetic defects, the environment, disease, and an inborn process--the aging process. The chance of death at a given age serves as a measure of the average number of aging changes accumulated by persons of that age, that is, of physiologic age, and the rate of change of this measure as the rate of aging. Chances for death are decreased by improvements in general living conditions. As a result, during the past two millennia average life expectancy at birth (ALE-B), determined by the chances for death, of humans has risen from 30 years, in ancient Rome, to almost 80 years today in the developed countries. Chances for death in the developed countries are now near limiting values and ALE-Bs are approaching plateau values that are 6-9 years less than the potential maximum of about 85 years. Chances for death are now largely determined by the inherent aging process after age 28. Only 1.1% of female cohorts in Sweden die before this age; the remainder die off at an exponentially increasing rate with advancing age. The inherent aging process limits ALE-B to around 85 years, and the maximum life span (MLS) to about 122 years. Past efforts to increase ALE-B did not require an understanding of aging. Such knowledge will be necessary in the future to significantly increase ALE-B and MLS, and to satisfactorily ameliorate the medical, economic, and social problems associated with advancing age. The many theories advanced to account for aging should be used, to the extent it is feasible, to help with these important practical problems, including applications of the free radical theory of aging. Past measures evolved by societies to ensure adequate care for older individuals are

  8. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M.; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Olshen, Richard A.; Boyd, Scott D.; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood is able to escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. While all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells, but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important read-out to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  9. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E; Dekker, Cornelia L; Olshen, Richard A; Boyd, Scott D; Weyand, Cornelia M; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2016-03-30

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood can escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. Although all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs, including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection that occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single-booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important readout to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection.

  10. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell recepto