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Sample records for age seer cancer

  1. SEER Cancer Stat Facts

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  2. More Fact Sheets - SEER Cancer Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  3. Surgical Treatment of Colon Cancer in Patients Eighty Years of Age and Older: Analysis of 31,574 Patients in the SEER-Medicare Database

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Heather B.; O’Connor, Erin S.; Weiss, Jennifer; LoConte, Noelle K.; Greenblatt, David Y.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Age-related disparities in colon cancer treatment exist, with older patients less likely to receive recommended therapy. However, few studies have focused on receipt of surgery. The objective was to describe patterns of surgery in colon cancer patients ≥80 years and examine outcomes with and without colectomy. Methods Medicare beneficiaries ≥80 years with colon cancer diagnosed from 1992–2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results- Medicare database. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was utilized to assess factors associated with non-operative management. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis determined one-year overall and colon cancer-specific survival. Results Of 31,574 patients, 80% underwent colectomy. 46% occurred during an urgent/emergent admission, with decreased 1-year overall survival (70% vs. 86% during an elective admission). Factors most predictive of non-operative management include older age, black race, more hospital admissions, use of home oxygen, use of a wheel chair, being frail and dementia. For both operative and non-operative patients, one-year overall survival was lower than colon cancer-specific survival (colectomy 78% vs. 89%; no colectomy 58% vs. 78%). Conclusions Most older colon cancer patients are receiving surgery, with improved outcomes compared to non-operative management. However, many patients not selected for surgery die of unrelated causes, reflecting good surgical selection. Patients undergoing surgery during an urgent/emergent admission have an increased short-term mortality. As earlier detection of colon cancer may increase the proportion of older patients undergoing elective surgery, these findings have policy implications for colon cancer screening and suggest that age should not be the only factor driving cancer screening recommendations. PMID:22893570

  4. Changing incidence of esophageal cancer among white women: analysis of SEER data (1992–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rachna; Deorah, Sundeep; McDowell, Bradley D.; Hejleh, Taher Abu; Lynch, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse trends in the incidence rates of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus (ACE and SCC, respectively) in white women between 1992 and 2010. Material and methods We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER program to identify cases of esophageal cancer). Age adjusted incidence rates (IR) were calculated for ACE and SCC for two different time periods (1992–1996 and 2006–2010) and stratified by age, stage, and histologic type. We used joinpoint analysis to detect changes in rates between 1992 and 2010. Results Between the time periods 1992–1996 and 2006–2010, the age-adjusted incidence rates for SCC in white women decreased from 1.2/100,000 to 0.8/100,000 personyears, and for ACE it increased from 0.5/100,000 to 0.7/100,000 personyears. Similar to white men, the increase in the incidence of ACE was consistent for all stages and all age groups in white women. However, it was most pronounced in women aged 45–59 years, where the incidence of ACE (0.9/100,000 person-years) in 2006–2010 exceeded the incidence of SCC (0.6/100,000 person-years). On joinpoint regression analysis, an inflection point was seen in 1999 for ACE, indicating a slower rate of increase for ACE after 1999 (annual percentage change of 8.00 before 1999 vs. 0.88 starting in 1999). Conclusions The incidence of ACE is increasing in white women, irrespective of age or stage. Indeed, ACE is now more common than SCC in white women between 45 and 59 years of age. PMID:26557784

  5. Differences in esophageal cancer characteristics and survival between Chinese and Caucasian patients in the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min-Qiang; Li, Yue-Ping; Wu, San-Gang; Sun, Jia-Yuan; Lin, Huan-Xin; Zhang, Shi-Yang; He, Zhen-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare the clinicopathologic characteristics and survival of Chinese and Caucasian esophageal cancer (EC) patients residing in the US, using a population-based national registry (Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results [SEER]) database. Methods Patients with EC were identified from the SEER program from 1988 to 2012. Kaplan–Meier survival methods and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed. Results A total of 479 Chinese and 35,748 Caucasian EC patients were identified. Compared with Caucasian patients, the Chinese patients had a later year of diagnosis, remained married after EC was diagnosed, had esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs) more frequently, had tumors located in the upper-third and middle-third of the esophagus more frequently, and fewer patients presented with poorly/undifferentiated EC and underwent cancer-directed surgery. In Chinese patients, the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs) increased from 1988 to 2012 (P=0.054), and the majority of EAC patients had tumors located in the lower thoracic esophagus. The overall survival (OS) was not significantly different between Chinese and Caucasian patients (P=0.767). However, Chinese patients with ESCC had a significantly better OS when compared to their Caucasian counterparts, whereas there was no significant difference in the OS between Chinese and Caucasian patients with EAC. Conclusion The presenting demographic features, tumor characteristics, and outcomes of EC patients differed between Chinese and Caucasian patients residing in the US. Chinese patients diagnosed with EAC tended to share similar clinical features with their Caucasian counterparts, and the Chinese patients with ESCC had better OS than their Caucasian counterparts. PMID:27799791

  6. Lung Cancer Survival Prediction using Ensemble Data Mining on Seer Data

    DOE PAGES

    Agrawal, Ankit; Misra, Sanchit; Narayanan, Ramanathan; ...

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the lung cancer data available from the SEER program with the aim of developing accurate survival prediction models for lung cancer. Carefully designed preprocessing steps resulted in removal/modification/splitting of several attributes, and 2 of the 11 derived attributes were found to have significant predictive power. Several supervised classification methods were used on the preprocessed data along with various data mining optimizations and validations. In our experiments, ensemble voting of five decision tree based classifiers and meta-classifiers was found to result in the best prediction performance in terms of accuracy and area under the ROC curve. We have developedmore » an on-line lung cancer outcome calculator for estimating the risk of mortality after 6 months, 9 months, 1 year, 2 year and 5 years of diagnosis, for which a smaller non-redundant subset of 13 attributes was carefully selected using attribute selection techniques, while trying to retain the predictive power of the original set of attributes. Further, ensemble voting models were also created for predicting conditional survival outcome for lung cancer (estimating risk of mortality after 5 years of diagnosis, given that the patient has already survived for a period of time), and included in the calculator. The on-line lung cancer outcome calculator developed as a result of this study is available at http://info.eecs.northwestern.edu:8080/LungCancerOutcomeCalculator/.« less

  7. Impact of molecular subtypes on metastatic breast cancer patients: a SEER population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yue; Liu, Yi-Rong; Ji, Peng; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the significance and impact of molecular subtyping stratification on metastatic breast cancer patients, we identified 159,344 female breast cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database with known hormone receptor (HoR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. 4.8% of patients were identified as having stage IV disease, and were more likely to be HER2+/HoR−, HER2+/HoR+, or HER2−/HoR−. Stage IV breast cancer patients with a HER2+/HoR+ status exhibited the highest median overall survival (OS) (44.0 months) and those with a HER2−/HoR− status exhibited the lowest median OS (13.0 months). Patients with a HER2−/HoR+ status had more bone metastasis, whereas patients with a HER2+/HoR− status had an increased incidence of liver metastasis. Brain and lung metastasis were more likely to occur in women with a HER2−/HoR− status. The multivariable analysis revealed a significant interaction between single metastasis and molecular subtype. No matter which molecular subtype, women who did not undergo primary tumour surgery had worse survival than those who experienced primary tumour surgery. Collectively, our findings advanced the understanding that molecular subtype might lead to more tailored and effective therapies in metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:28345619

  8. Revisiting the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Cancer Registry and Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (SEER-MHOS) Linked Data Resource for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research in Older Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erin E; Malinoff, Rochelle; Rozjabek, Heather M; Ambs, Anita; Clauser, Steven B; Topor, Marie A; Yuan, Gigi; Burroughs, James; Rodgers, Anne B; DeMichele, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the value of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to better characterize people's health and experiences with illness and care. Considering the rising prevalence of cancer in adults aged 65 and older, PRO data are particularly relevant for older adults with cancer, who often require complex cancer care and have additional comorbid conditions. A data linkage between the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was created through a partnership between the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that created the opportunity to examine PROs in Medicare Advantage enrollees with and without cancer. The December 2013 linkage of SEER-MHOS data included the linked data for 12 cohorts, bringing the number of individuals in the linked data set to 95,723 with cancer and 1,510,127 without. This article reviews the features of the resource and provides information on some descriptive characteristics of the individuals in the data set (health-related quality of life, body mass index, fall risk management, number of unhealthy days in the past month). Individuals without (n=258,108) and with (n=3,440) cancer (1,311 men with prostate cancer, 982 women with breast cancer, 689 with colorectal cancer, 458 with lung cancer) were included in the current descriptive analysis. Given increasing longevity, advances in effective therapies and earlier detection, and population growth, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with cancer is expected to reach more than 12 million by 2020. SEER-MHOS provides population-level, self-reported, cancer registry-linked data for person-centered surveillance research on this growing population.

  9. Patterns of Care and Locoregional Treatment Outcomes in Older Esophageal Cancer Patients: The SEER-Medicare Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Liao Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda; Swisher, Stephen G. M.D.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; McAleer, Mary F.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Optimal management of elderly patients with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer is unclear. Outcomes data after locoregional treatment are lacking for this group. Methods: We assessed outcomes associated with standard locoregional treatments in 2,626 patients (age > 65 years) from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort diagnosed with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer from 1992 to 2002. In patients treated with radiotherapy alone (RT), surgery alone (S), chemoradiotherapy (CRT), or preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery (CRT + S), overall and disease-free survival were compared using proportional hazards regression. Postoperative complications were compared using logistic regression. Results: Mean age was 76 {+-} 6 years. Seven percent underwent CRT + S, 39% CRT, 30% S, and 24% RT. One-year survival was 68% (CRT + S), 52% (CRT), 53% (S), and 16% (RT), respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent CRT + S demonstrated improved overall survival compared with S alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.98; p = 0.03) and RT (HR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.35-0.55; p < 0.0001); and comparable survival to CRT (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-1.01; p = 0.06). Patients who underwent CRT + S also had comparable postoperative mortality (HR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.87-1.07; p = 0.45) and complications (OR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.70-1.14; p = 0.36) compared with S alone. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy may be an acceptable treatment option in appropriately selected older esophageal cancer patients. This treatment modality did not appear to increase surgical complications and offered potential therapeutic benefit, particularly compared with surgery alone.

  10. Metadata - Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and mortality in the United States. SEER collects and publishes cancer data from a set of 17 population.

  11. Radiation-induced mesothelioma among long-term solid cancer survivors: a longitudinal analysis of SEER database.

    PubMed

    Farioli, Andrea; Ottone, Marta; Morganti, Alessio G; Compagnone, Gaetano; Romani, Fabrizio; Cammelli, Silvia; Mattioli, Stefano; Violante, Francesco S

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma among long-term (>5 years) solid cancer survivors. We analyzed data from the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program (1973-2012). We fitted survival models adjusted by age, gender, race, year, surgery, and relative risk of primary mesothelioma in the county of residence (proxy for individual asbestos exposure). We estimated hazard ratios [HR] with reference to nonirradiated patients. We distinguished between scattered and direct irradiation to study the dose-response. We observed 301 mesotheliomas (265 pleural; 32 peritoneal; 4 others) among 935,637 patients. EBRT increased the risk of mesothelioma (any site; HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.04-1.77). We observed an increased risk of pleural mesothelioma (HR for EBRT 1.34, 95% CI 1.01-1.77), but we did not find signs of a dose-response relationship (HR for scattered irradiation 1.38; HR for direct irradiation 1.23). On the opposite, only direct peritoneal irradiation was associated with peritoneal mesothelioma (HR 2.20, 95% CI 0.99-4.88), particularly for latencies ≥10 years (HR 3.28, 95% CI 1.14-9.43). A competing risks analysis revealed that the clinical impact of radiation-induced mesothelioma was limited by the high frequency of competing events. The cumulative incidence function of mesothelioma after 40 years of observation was very low (nonirradiated patients 0.00032, irradiated patients 0.00055).EBRT might be a determinant of mesothelioma. Longer latency periods are associated with higher risks, while the dose-response seems nonlinear. The clinical impact of mesothelioma after EBRT for primary solid cancers is limited.

  12. Neoadjuvant Radiation Is Associated With Improved Survival in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: An Analysis of Data From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Stessin, Alexander M.; Meyer, Joshua E.; Sherr, David L.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation has been investigated in several trials as a strategy for downstaging locally advanced disease to resectability. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of neoadjuvant radiation therapy (RT) vs. other treatments on long-term survival for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer in a large population-based sample group. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database (1994-2003) was queried for cases of surgically resected pancreatic cancer. Retrospective analysis was performed. The endpoint of the study was overall survival. Results: Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we found that the median overall survival of patients receiving neoadjuvant RT was 23 months vs. 12 months with no RT and 17 months with adjuvant RT. Using Cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, stage, grade, and year of diagnosis), we found that neoadjuvant RT results in significantly higher rates of survival than other treatments (hazard ratio [HR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.79; p = 0.001). Specifically comparing adjuvant with neoadjuvant RT, we found a significantly lower HR for death in patients receiving neoadjuvant RT rather than adjuvant RT (HR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.90; p = 0.03). Conclusions: This analysis of SEER data showed a survival benefit for the use of neoadjuvant RT over surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant RT in treating pancreatic cancer. Therapeutic strategies that use neoadjuvant RT should be further explored for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

  13. The Demographic Features, Clinicopathological Characteristics and Cancer-specific Outcomes for Patients with Microinvasive Breast Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenna; Zhu, Wenjie; Du, Feng; Luo, Yang; Xu, Binghe

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of microinvasive breast cancer, we conducted an observational study of female diagnosed with DCIS or DCIS with microinvasion (DCISM) from 1990 to 2012 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. There were 87695 DCIS and 8863 DCISM identified. In DCISM group, patients appeared to be younger and more black patients were identified in comparison with DCIS group. Furthermore, DCISM was associated with more aggressive tumor characteristics like higher rates of oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) negativity, HER2 positivity, and lymph node metastasis. With a median follow-up of 91 months, patients with DCISM had worse cancer-specific survival (CSS) (hazard ratio [HR], 2.475; P < 0.001) and overall survival (OS) (HR, 1.263; P < 0.001). In the multivariable analysis, microinvasion was an independent prognostic factor for worse CSS (HR, 1.919; P < 0.001) and OS (HR, 1.184; P < 0.001). The 10-year cancer-specific mortality rate was 1.49% in DCIS and 4.08% in DCISM (HR, 2.771; P < 0.001). The 20-year cancer-specific mortality rate was 4.00% in DCIS and 9.65% in DCISM (HR, 2.482; P < 0.001). Deepening understanding of the nature of microinvasive breast cancer will be valuable for clinical treatment recommendations. PMID:28165014

  14. Survival improvement in patients with pancreatic cancer by decade: A period analysis of the SEER database, 1981–2010

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Huanhuan; Ma, Haiqing; Hong, Guobin; Sun, Hongliu; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is an aggressive malignancy with a high mortality rate and a poor prognosis. To evaluate treatment outcomes of patients with pancreatic cancer over the past three decades, data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries were used to assess the survival of patients with PaCa. A total of 63,530 patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer between 1981 and 2010 were identified from nine original SEER registries. The 1-year relative survival rates (RSRs) improved each decade, from 17.0% to 19.9% to 28.2% (p < 0.0001), with a larger increase during the third decade than during the second decade. However, the long-term survival rates have remained very low. The 5-year RSRs increased from 3.1% to 4.4% to 6.9% over these three decades—i.e., still only few patients with PaCa survive more than 5 years. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated that the survival rates for all the patients with pancreatic cancer were lower in patients of lower socioeconomic status and black race. These results will help predict future trends in PaCa incidence and survival, contribute to better-designed clinical trials by eliminating disparities that may affect the results, and thereby improve the clinical management and outcomes of PaCa. PMID:25339498

  15. SEER Statistics | DCCPS/NCI/NIH

    Cancer.gov

    The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute works to provide information on cancer statistics in an effort to reduce the burden of cancer among the U.S. population.

  16. Breast cancer histology and receptor status characterization in Asian Indian and Pakistani women in the U.S. - a SEER analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent reports suggest increase in estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) negative breast cancer yet little is known about histology or receptor status of breast cancer in Indian/Pakistani women.in the U.S. Methods We examined the United States National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Cancer program to assess: a) frequency of breast cancer by age, b) histologic subtypes, c) receptor status of breast cancer and, d) survival in Indians/Pakistanis compared to Caucasians. There were 360,933 breast cancer cases diagnosed 1988-2006. Chi-Square analyses and Cox proportional hazards models, to estimate relative risks for breast cancer mortality after adjusting for confounders, were performed using Statistical Analysis Software 9.2. Results Among Asian Indian/Pakistani breast cancer patients, 16.2% were < 40 yrs. old compared to 6.23% in Caucasians (p < 0.0001). Asian Indian women had more invasive ductal carcinoma (69.1 vs. 65.7%, p < 0.0001), inflammatory cancer (1.4% vs. 0.8, p < 0.0001) and less invasive lobular carcinoma (4.2% vs. 8.1%, p < 0.0001) than Caucasians. Asian Indian/Pakistani women had more ER/PR negative breast cancer (30.6% vs. 21.8%, p = 0.0095) than Caucasians. Adjusting for stage at diagnosis, age, tumor grade, nodal status, and histology, Asian Indian/Pakistani women's survival was similar to Caucasians, while African Americans' was worse. Conclusions Asian Indian/Pakistani women have higher frequency of breast cancer (particularly in age < 40), ER/PR negative invasive ductal and inflammatory cancer than Caucasians. PMID:20459777

  17. Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Stage II Right- and Left-Sided Colon Cancer: Analysis of SEER-Medicare Data

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jennifer M.; Schumacher, Jessica; Allen, Glenn O.; Neuman, Heather; Lange, Erin O’Connor; LoConte, Noelle K.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Survival benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy is established for stage III colon cancer; however, uncertainty exists for stage II patients. Tumor heterogeneity, specifically microsatellite instability (MSI) which is more common in right-sided cancers, may be the reason for this observation. We examined the relationship between adjuvant chemotherapy and overall 5-year mortality for stage II colon cancer by location (right- versus left-side) as a surrogate for MSI. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data, we identified Medicare beneficiaries from 1992 to 2005 with AJCC stage II (n=23,578) and III (n=17,148) primary adenocarcinoma of the colon who underwent surgery for curative intent. Overall 5-year mortality was examined with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression with propensity score weighting. Results Eighteen percent (n=2,941) of stage II patients with right-sided cancer and 22% (n=1,693) with left-sided cancer received adjuvant chemotherapy. After adjustment, overall 5-year survival benefit from chemotherapy was observed only for stage III patients (right-sided: HR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.59–0.68, p<0.001 and left-sided: HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.56–0.68, p<0.001). No survival benefit was observed for stage II patients with either right-sided (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.87–1.09, p=0.64) or left-sided cancer (HR 0.97; 95% CI, 0.84–1.12, p=0.68). Conclusions Among Medicare patients with stage II colon cancer, a substantial number receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy did not improve overall 5-year survival for either right- or left-sided colon cancers. Our results reinforce existing guidelines and should be considered in treatment algorithms for older adults with stage II colon cancer. PMID:24643898

  18. Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Clinicopathologic Features and Survival Outcomes in Asian Pacific Islanders Residing in the United States: A SEER Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Muhammad Saad; Mina, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    Background. The objective of our study was to ascertain racial/ethnic disparities in Asian/Pacific Islanders (API) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinicopathologic features and survival outcomes based on various tumor characteristics and treatment modalities. Method. SEER database identified invasive NSCLC cases from 2004 to 2010. Variables included American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage 7, tumor grade, tumor size, histology, age, marital status, radiation, surgery, and reason for no surgery. The Kruskall-Wallis test and the Z test were used to examine differences between races/ethnicities and the referent, non-Hispanic white (NHW). Multivariate Cox proportional analyses were used to establish the weight of the prognostic significance contributing to disease-specific survival (DSS) in each AJCC stage. Result. Improved DSS was seen in API across stage I (HR: 0.78), stage II (HR: 0.79), and stage IV (HR: 0.86), respectively, compared to the referent NHW (P < 0.01). Prognosis was improved by being married, being female gender, AIS histology, and birth outside the US (P < 0.01). Conclusion. We have demonstrated improved survival among API in early stage and stage IV NSCLC. Further research is necessary to clarify the role of lifestyle and tumor biology for these differences. PMID:25685148

  19. What Is SEER?

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic describing the functions of NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program: collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and disseminating reliable population-based statistics.

  20. Marital status is an independent prognostic factor for tracheal cancer patients: an analysis of the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu; Dai, Chen-Yang; Wang, Yu-Ning; Chen, Tao; Wang, Long; Yang, Ping; Xie, Dong; Mao, Rui; Chen, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background Although marital status is an independent prognostic factor in many cancers, its prognostic impact on tracheal cancer has not yet been determined. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between marital status and survival in patients with tracheal cancer. Results Compared with unmarried patients (42.67%), married patients (57.33%) had better 5-year OS (25.64% vs. 35.89%, p = 0.009) and 5-year TCSS (44.58% vs. 58.75%, p = 0.004). Results of multivariate analysis indicated that marital status is an independent prognostic factor, with married patients showing better OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64–0.95, p = 0.015) and TCSS (HR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.54–0.91, p = 0.008). In addition, subgroup analysis suggested that marital status plays a more important role in the TCSS of patients with non-low-grade malignant tumors (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.53–0.93, p = 0.015). Methods We extracted 600 cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Variables were compared by Pearson chi-squared test, t-test, log-rank test, and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Overall survival (OS) and tracheal cancer-specific survival (TCSS) were compared between subgroups with different pathologic features and tumor stages. Conclusions Marital status is an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with tracheal cancer. For that reason, additional social support may be needed for unmarried patients, especially those with non-low-grade malignant tumors. PMID:27780931

  1. Cancer Incidence in the U.S. Military Population: Comparison with Rates from the SEER Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-08

    analysis, 34% of active-duty women and 29% of women in the general population used oral contraceptive pills in the preceding 12 months. Oral... contraceptive pill use has been shown to increase the risk for breast cancer, particu- larly in younger women (33, 34). Military women are also more likely to...screening with mam- mography in Sweden. Int J Cancer 2005;117:842–7. 33. Pymar HC, Creinin MD. The risks of oral contraceptive pills . Semin Reprod Med

  2. Cancer and African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 Pancreas 12.2 9.5 1.3 Stomach 4.2 1.8 2.3 Source: NCI 2016. Seer Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2013. Tables 1.21 http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2013/sections.html Screening Breast Cancer Percent of women age 40 and ...

  3. Estimation of the tumor size at cure threshold among aggressive non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs): evidence from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) program and the national lung screening trial (NLST).

    PubMed

    Goldwasser, Deborah L

    2017-03-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mortality can be reduced by a program of annual CT screening in high-risk individuals. However, CT screening regimens and adherence vary, potentially impacting the lung cancer mortality benefit. We defined the NSCLC cure threshold as the maximum tumor size at which a given NSCLC would be curable due to early detection. We obtained data from 518,234 NSCLCs documented in the U.S. SEER cancer registry between 1988 and 2012 and 1769 NSCLCs detected in the NLST. We demonstrated mathematically that the distribution function governing the cure threshold for the most aggressive NSCLCs, G(x|Φ = 1), was embedded in the probability function governing detection of SEER-documented NSCLCs. We determined the resulting probability functions governing detection over a range of G(x|Φ = 1) scenarios and compared them with their expected functional forms. We constructed a simulation framework to determine the cure threshold models most consistent with tumor sizes and outcomes documented in SEER and the NLST. Whereas the median tumor size for lethal NSCLCs documented in SEER is 43 mm (males) and 40 mm (females), a simulation model in which the median cure threshold for the most aggressive NSCLCs is 10 mm (males) and 15 mm (females) best fit the SEER and NLST data. The majority of NSCLCs in the NLST were treated at sizes greater than our median cure threshold estimates. New technology is needed to better distinguish and treat the most aggressive NSCLCs when they are small (i.e., 5-15 mm).

  4. Impact of age on the survival of pediatric leukemia: an analysis of 15083 children in the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Kang, Meiyun; Zhang, Xuejie; Lu, Qin; Fang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Age at diagnosis is a key factor for predicting the prognosis of pediatric leukemia especially regarding the survivorship assessment. In this study, we aimed to assess the impact of this prognostic factor such as age in children with pediatric leukemia. METHODS In this study, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program-registered children with leukemia during 1988-2013 were analyzed. All patients were divided into five groups according to the age at the time of diagnosis (<1, 1-4, 5-9, 10-15, >15 years old). Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression models were used to evaluate leukemia survival outcomes and risk factors. RESULTS There was significant variability in pediatric leukemia survival by age at diagnosis including ALL, AML and CML subtypes. According to the survival curves in each group, survival rate were peaked among children diagnosed at 1–4 years and steadily declined among those diagnosed at older ages in children with ALL. Infants (<1 year) had the lowest survivorship in children with either ALL or AML. However, children (1-4 years) harbored the worst prognosis suffering from CML. A stratified analysis of the effect of age at diagnosis was validated as independent predictors for the prognosis of pediatric leukemia. CONCLUSIONS Age at diagnosis remained to be a crucial determinant of the survival variability of pediatric leukemia patients. PMID:27590519

  5. [Aging and gynecologic cancer].

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Arturo A

    2005-01-01

    The interrelation between cancer and ageing in women is emphasized, on its increased incidence, in their molecular background, into the particular biological characteristics of the different tumors and the effects of ageing in the affected women.

  6. Age distribution, polyps and rectal cancer in the Egyptian population-based cancer registry

    PubMed Central

    Veruttipong, Darlene; Soliman, Amr S; Gilbert, Samuel F; Blachley, Taylor S; Hablas, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mohamed; Rozek, Laura S; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To describe the clinical and epidemiologic profiles of the disease and to compare the findings with those generated from the previous hospital-based studies. METHODS: The Gharbiah cancer registry is the only population-based cancer registry in Egypt since 1998. We analyzed the data of all colorectal cancer patients included in the registry for the period of 1999-2007. All medical records of the 1364 patients diagnosed in Gharbiah during the study period were retrieved and the following information abstracted: age, residence, diagnosis date, grade, stage, topology, clinical characteristics, and histology variables. Egyptian census data for 1996 and 2006 were used to provide the general population’s statistics on age, sex, residence and other related demographic factors. In addition to age- and sex-specific incidence rate analyses, we analyze the data to explore the incidence distribution by rural-urban differences among the 8 districts of the province. We also compared the incidence rates of Gharbiah to the rates of the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data of the United States. RESULTS: Over the 9 year-period, 1364 colorectal cancer cases were included. The disease incidence under age 40 years was relatively high (1.3/105) while the incidence in the age groups 40 and over was very low (12.0/105, 19.4/105 and 21.2/105 in the age groups 40-59 years, 60-69 years and > 70 years, respectively). The vast majority of tumors (97.2%) had no polyps and 37.2% of the patients presented with primary lesions in the rectum. Colorectal cancer was more common in patients from urban (55%) than rural (45%) areas. Regional differences in colon and rectal cancer incidence in the 8 districts of the study province may reflect different etiologic patterns in this population. The registry data of Egypt shows a slightly higher incidence of colorectal cancer than the United States in subjects under age 40 years. The results also shows significantly lower incidence of

  7. Aging, immunity, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Fulop, Tamas; Larbi, Anis; Kotb, Rami; de Angelis, Flavia; Pawelec, Graham

    2011-06-01

    Age is the most important risk factor for tumorigenesis. More than 60% of new cancers and more than 70% of cancer deaths occur in elderly subjects >65 years. The immune system plays an important role in the battle of the host against cancer development. Deleterious alterations occur to the immune response with aging, termed immunosenescence. It is tempting to speculate that this waning immune response contributes to the higher incidence of cancer, but robust data on this important topic are few and far between. This review is devoted to discussing state of the art knowledge on the relationship between immunosenescence and cancer. Emerging understanding of the aging process at the molecular level is viewed from the perspective of this increased tumorigenesis. We also consider some of the most recent means to intervene in the modulation of immunosenescence to increase the ability of the immune system to fight against tumors. Future research will unravel new aspects of the immune response against tumors which will be modulable to decrease the burden of cancer in elderly individuals.

  8. Breast cancer racial differences before age 40--implications for screening.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Edwin T.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most authorities advocate mammogram screening for breast cancer beginning at age 40 based on the age-specific distribution and incidence of breast cancer in the general population. This policy has been bolstered by studies that demonstrate that, for the general population, mammography in the 40-49 age bracket reduces mortality. However, it also has been reported that African-American breast cancer patients are diagnosed more often than white patients below the age of 40. Young African-American women are also more likely to have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis with predictably higher mortality. The purpose of this investigation is to explore the question, whether a subset of African-American women, age 30-39, by virtue of increased vulnerability, would benefit from early mammogram screening. STUDY DESIGN: The age-specific distribution (age 30-84) of African-American and white breast cancer patients in five State cancer registries were compared. Prognostic indicators (tumor size and nodal status) in two of the five registries in African-American and white breast cancer cases below the age of 40 were compared. Age-specific incidence in the 30-39 age group and the relative populations of black and white women in the United States were noted in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Report (SEER) (1994-1998) and The U.S. Census 2000. RESULTS: The differences of age-specific distribution and age-specific incidence of African-American and white breast cancer patients were found to be significant. More than 10% of African-American women with breast cancer were diagnosed before age 40 compared to 5% of white patients. The incidence of breast cancer (SEER Report 1994-1998) in the 30-39-age bracket for African-American and white women was 48.9 and 40.2 at the 95% confidence level, while the proportion of African-American and white women reported by the Census Bureau was not too dissimilar, 15.8% and 14.6% respectively. Prognostic indicators (tumor size

  9. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  10. SEER Informational Guidebook Training Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Paula

    This book includes topics on the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results reporting of human cancer. An anatomy section describes various systems of the human body, emphasizing those sites with high incidence of cancer. A general reference section describes weights and measures, pathology and histology, diagnostic techniques, and medical…

  11. Survival after Abdominoperineal and Sphincter-Preserving Resection in Nonmetastatic Rectal Cancer: A Population-Based Time-Trend and Propensity Score-Matched SEER Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Warschkow, Rene; Ebinger, Sabrina M.; Brunner, Walter; Schmied, Bruno M.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Abdominoperineal resection (APR) has been associated with impaired survival in nonmetastatic rectal cancer patients. It is unclear whether this adverse outcome is due to the surgical procedure itself or is a consequence of tumor-related characteristics. Study Design. Patients were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The impact of APR compared to coloanal anastomosis (CAA) on survival was assessed by Cox regression and propensity-score matching. Results. In 36,488 patients with rectal cancer resection, the APR rate declined from 31.8% in 1998 to 19.2% in 2011, with a significant trend change in 2004 at 21.6% (P < 0.001). To minimize a potential time-trend bias, survival analysis was limited to patients diagnosed after 2004. APR was associated with an increased risk of cancer-specific mortality after unadjusted analysis (HR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.28–2.03, P < 0.01) and multivariable adjustment (HR = 1.39, 95% CI: 1.10–1.76, P < 0.01). After optimal adjustment of highly biased patient characteristics by propensity-score matching, APR was not identified as a risk factor for cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.56–1.29, P = 0.456). Conclusions. The current propensity score-adjusted analysis provides evidence that worse oncological outcomes in patients undergoing APR compared to CAA are caused by different patient characteristics and not by the surgical procedure itself. PMID:28197206

  12. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema

    Campisi, Judith

    2016-07-12

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  13. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle; Chen Changhu Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

  14. Effect of nodal status on clinical outcomes of triple-negative breast cancer: a population-based study using the SEER 18 database

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chuan-Gui; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database (2010–2012) were used to identify 10,771 patients with TNBC, and we assessed the effects of lymph node (LN) status on breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS). In our study, a Kaplan-Meier plot showed that LN-negative patients (N0) had better survival outcomes than LN-positive patients and that patients with ≥10 positive LNs (N3) exhibited the worst survival outcomes regardless of tumor size. A pairwise comparison showed no difference in survival outcomes among each group stratified by tumor size. Further, for LN-positive patients with a tumor size ≤2 cm (T1) or >5 cm (T3), there were similar outcomes between patients with one to three LNs (N1) and those with four to nine LNs (N2), whereas N1 patients experienced significantly better survival outcomes than N3 patients (P<0.001). Therefore, ten metastatic lymph nodes was the cut-off value for poor prognosis. Nevertheless, for patients with a tumor size of 2-5 cm (T2), the extent of LN involvement contributed prognostic value to OS but not BCSS. In summary, we found that nodal status and tumor size exhibited distinct interaction patterns for predicting the outcomes of TNBC. These results provide deeper insight into the prognostic value of nodal status in TNBC. PMID:27203673

  15. p53 mutations associated with aging-related rise in cancer incidence rates.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    TP53's role as guardian of the genome diminishes with age, as the probability of mutation increases. Previous studies have shown an association between p53 gene mutations and cancer. However, the role of somatic TP53 mutations in the steep rise in cancer rates with aging has not been investigated at a population level. This relationship was quantified using the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) TP53 and GLOBOCAN cancer databases. The power function exponent of the cancer rate was calculated for 5-y age-standardized incidence or mortality rates for up to 25 cancer sites occurring in adults of median age 42 to 72 y. Linear regression analysis of the mean percentage of a cancer's TP53 mutations and the corresponding cancer exponent was conducted for four populations: worldwide, Japan, Western Europe, and the United States. Significant associations (P ≤ 0.05) were found for incidence rates but not mortality rates. Regardless of the population studied, positive associations were found for all cancer sites, with more significant associations for solid tumors, excluding the outlier prostate cancer or sex-related tumors. Worldwide and Japanese populations yielded P values as low as 0.002 and 0.005, respectively. For the United States, a significant association was apparent only when analysis utilized the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. This study found that TP53 mutations accounts for approximately one-quarter and one-third of the aging-related rise in the worldwide and Japanese incidence of all cancers, respectively. These significant associations between TP53 mutations and the rapid rise in cancer incidence with aging, considered with previously published literature, support a causal role for TP53 according to the Bradford-Hill criteria. However, questions remain concerning the contribution of TP53 mutations to neoplastic development and the role of factors such as genetic instability, obesity, and gene deficiencies other

  16. The Trend of Age-Group Effect on Prognosis in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong-Liang; Qu, Ning; Liao, Tian; Wei, Wen-Jun; Wang, Yu-Long; Ji, Qing-Hai

    2016-06-08

    Age has been included in various prognostic scoring systems for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The aim of this study is to re-examine the relationship between age and prognosis by using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based database. We identified 51,061 DTC patients between 2004 and 2012. Patients were separated into 10-year age groups. Cancer cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) data were obtained. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox models were built to analyze the outcomes and risk factors. Increasing age gradient with a 10-year interval was associated with the trend of higher proportions for male gender, grade III/IV and summary stage of distant metastases. Both CSS and OS continued to worsen with increasing age, being poorest in in the oldest age group (≥71); multivariate analysis confirmed that CSS continued to fall with each age decade, significantly starting at 60 years (HR = 7.5, 95% 1.0-54.1, p = 0.047) compared to the young group (≤20). Similarly, multivariate analysis suggested that OS continued worsening with increasing age, but starting at 40 years (HR = 3.7, 95% 1.4-10.1, p = 0.009) compared to the young group. The current study suggests that an age exceeding 60 years itself represents an unfavorable prognostic factor and high risk for cancer-specific death in DTC.

  17. Sex disparities in colorectal cancer incidence by anatomic subsite, race and age.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gwen; Devesa, Susan S; Cross, Amanda J; Inskip, Peter D; McGlynn, Katherine A; Cook, Michael B

    2011-04-01

    Although incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the United States has declined in recent years, rates remain higher in men than in women and the male-to-female incidence rate ratio (MF IRR) increases progressively across the colon from the cecum to the rectum. Rates among races/ethnicities other than Whites or Blacks have not been frequently reported. To examine CRC rates by sex across anatomic subsite, age and racial/ethnic groups, we used the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program for cases diagnosed among residents of 13 registries during 1992-2006. Incidence rates were expressed per 100,000 person-years and age-adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Population; MF IRR and 95% confidence intervals were also calculated. Among each racial/ethnic group, the MF IRR increased fairly monotonically from close to unity for cecal cancers to 1.81 (Hispanics) for rectal cancers. MF IRRs increased with age most rapidly for distal colon cancers from <1.0 at ages <50 years to 1.4-1.9 at older ages. The MF IRR for rectal cancers also rose with age from about 1.0 to 2.0. For proximal cancer, the MF IRR was consistently <1.5; among American Indian/Alaska Natives, it was <1.0 across all ages. The MF IRRs for CRC vary markedly according to subsite and age but less by racial/ethnic group. These findings may partially reflect differences in screening experiences and access to medical care but also suggest that etiologic factors may be playing a role.

  18. Cancer, aging and immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Zanussi, Stefania; Serraino, Diego; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Berretta, Massimiliano; De Paoli, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Aging is a complex phenomenon involving multiple physiological functions. Among these, very important are the modifications induced in the immune system; these modifications may be related to cancer development, a disease of older people. We herein describe the age-dependent alterations observed in the various arms of the immune system. Both innate and adaptive immunity are compromised during aging, a condition where an inflammatory status contributes to promote immune suppression and tumour growth. Collectively, aging of the immune system may produce detrimental consequences on the response against tumours in old patients. In fact, preclinical studies and clinical observations in humans have demonstrated age-associated alterations in antitumor immunity. Immunological recovery of old patients after conventional chemotherapy (CT) has not been fully investigated, while several studies conducted in patients undergoing blood stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that a delayed immune reconstitution associated with older age results in increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and risk of tumour relapse. Cellular immunotherapy and vaccination are becoming viable options for improving survival and quality of life of cancer patients targeting both the host defences and the tumour. The clinical experience in elderly patients is still in its infancy, but available data indicate that these approaches are feasible and promising. A key problem in the studies on aging, immunity and cancer is that it is difficult to distinguish changes related to age from those related to cancer-dependent immunosuppression, but independent from the age of the subject. Longitudinal studies on aged healthy and cancer persons and the use of new immunological techniques may be required to clarify these issues.

  19. Implications for determining the optimal treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jue-feng; Zhu, Ji; Li, Gui-chao; Sun, Wen-jie; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-10-06

    Patients were excluded if they were older than 75 years of age in most clinical trials. Thus, the optimal treatment strategies in elderly patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are still controversial. We designed our study to specifically evaluate the cancer specific survival of four subgroups of patients according to four different treatment modalities: surgery only, radiation (RT) only, neoadjuvant RT and adjuvant RT by analyzing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-registered database. The results showed that the 5-year cancer specific survival (CSS) was 52.1% in surgery only, 27.7% in RT only, 70.4% in neoadjuvant RT and 60.4% in adjuvant RT, which had significant difference in univariate log-rank test (P < 0.001) and multivariate Cox regression (P < 0.001). Thus, the neoadjuvant RT and surgery may be the optimal treatment pattern in elderly patients, especially for patients who are medically fit for the operation.

  20. Strategies for Energy Efficient Remodeling: SEER 2003 Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    The goal of the Strategies for Energy Efficiency in Remodeling (SEER) project is to provide information, based on research and case studies, to remodelers and consumers about opportunities to increase home energy performance.

  1. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jonathan; Xu, Beibei; Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Le, Quynh-Thu; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  2. Case-based visualization of a patient cohort using SEER epidemiologic data.

    PubMed

    Maier, Christian; Bürkle, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Data from cancer registries can be used to track the epidemiology of cancer and can potentially serve to guide individual diagnostic and treatment decisions. Even though some cancer registry datasets have been made publicly available for scientific and clinical use, few applications have so far provided direct access to these data from within the patient context of an electronic patient record. The goal of this project was to implement a proof-of-concept integration of the public SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) cancer registry dataset with a digital breast cancer tumor board at a German university hospital and to determine its utility in the clinical settings. The integration was successfully established, using data from routine documentation to provide dynamic visualizations of cohort composition and Kaplan-Meier survival plots. Evaluation feedback was favorable regarding the concept and implementation, but highlighted that important data elements, e.g. receptor status data, were missing in the SEER dataset, limiting clinical value of the system.

  3. Genome instability, cancer and aging

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Alexander Y.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage-driven genome instability underlies the diversity of life forms generated by the evolutionary process but is detrimental to the somatic cells of individual organisms. The cellular response to DNA damage can be roughly divided in two parts. First, when damage is severe, programmed cell death may occur or, alternatively, temporary or permanent cell cycle arrest. This protects against cancer but can have negative effects on the long term, e.g., by depleting stem cell reservoirs. Second, damage can be repaired through one or more of the many sophisticated genome maintenance pathways. However, erroneous DNA repair and incomplete restoration of chromatin after damage is resolved, produce mutations and epimutations, respectively, both of which have been shown to accumulate with age. An increased burden of mutations and/or epimutations in aged tissues increases cancer risk and adversely affects gene transcriptional regulation, leading to progressive decline in organ function. Cellular degeneration and uncontrolled cell proliferation are both major hallmarks of aging. Despite the fact that one seems to exclude the other, they both may be driven by a common mechanism. Here, we review age related changes in the mammalian genome and their possible functional consequences, with special emphasis on genome instability in stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19344750

  4. Cancer of the colon and rectum: Potential effects of sex-age interactions on incidence and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Purim, Ofer; Gordon, Noa; Brenner, Baruch

    2013-01-01

    Background Sex differences in epidemiological, clinical and pathological characteristics of colorectal cancer have been under intensive investigation for the last three decades. Given that most of the sex-related differences reported were also age-related, this study sought to determine the potential effect of a sex-age interaction on colorectal cancer development and progression. Material/Methods Statistical data on sex- and age-specific colon or rectal cancer incidence, disease stage and survival for white persons were derived from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program. Age-specific incidence rates in 2002–2006 were analyzed by 5-year age groups (45–49, 50–54, 55–59, 60–64, 65–69, 70–74, 75–79, 80–84 years) in men and women. Sex differences were measured by calculating rate differences (RD) and rate ratios (RR). Equivalent analyses for a similar time period were performed for stage distribution and 5-year relative survival. Results Age-specific incidence rates were higher for men, for all life-time periods. However, the magnitude of the male predominance was age-dependent. The RR and RD did not remain constant over time: they increased gradually with age, peaked at 70–74 years, and declined thereafter. The distribution of stage at diagnosis was similar between men and women, but women seemed to have better survival, until the age of 64 years for colon cancer and 74 years for rectal cancer. Conclusions There seem to be significant age-related sex differences in the incidence of colorectal cancer, and maybe also in its prognosis. PMID:23511310

  5. Socioeconomic status (SES) and childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mortality risk: Analysis of SEER data.

    PubMed

    Knoble, Naomi B; Alderfer, Melissa A; Hossain, Md Jobayer

    2016-10-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is a complex construct of multiple indicators, known to impact cancer outcomes, but has not been adequately examined among pediatric AML patients. This study aimed to identify the patterns of co-occurrence of multiple community-level SES indicators and to explore associations between various patterns of these indicators and pediatric AML mortality risk. A nationally representative US sample of 3651 pediatric AML patients, aged 0-19 years at diagnosis was drawn from 17 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database registries created between 1973 and 2012. Factor analysis, cluster analysis, stratified univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used. Four SES factors accounting for 87% of the variance in SES indicators were identified: F1) economic/educational disadvantage, less immigration; F2) immigration-related features (foreign-born, language-isolation, crowding), less mobility; F3) housing instability; and, F4) absence of moving. F1 and F3 showed elevated risk of mortality, adjusted hazards ratios (aHR) (95% CI): 1.07(1.02-1.12) and 1.05(1.00-1.10), respectively. Seven SES-defined cluster groups were identified. Cluster 1 (low economic/educational disadvantage, few immigration-related features, and residential-stability) showed the minimum risk of mortality. Compared to Cluster 1, Cluster 3 (high economic/educational disadvantage, high-mobility) and Cluster 6 (moderately-high economic/educational disadvantages, housing-instability and immigration-related features) exhibited substantially greater risk of mortality, aHR(95% CI)=1.19(1.0-1.4) and 1.23 (1.1-1.5), respectively. Factors of correlated SES-indicators and their pattern-based groups demonstrated differential risks in the pediatric AML mortality indicating the need of special public-health attention in areas with economic-educational disadvantages, housing-instability and immigration-related features.

  6. Difference in characteristics and outcomes between medullary breast carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma: a population based study from SEER 18 database

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Jing; Song, Chuan-Gui; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Medullary breast carcinoma (MBC) is a unique histological subtype of breast cancer. Our study was designed to identify difference in characteristics and outcomes between MBC and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and further confirm the prognostic factors of MBC. Utilizing Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER), we identified 84,764 eligible patients, including 309 MBC and 84,455 IDC. Compared with the IDC group, the MBC group was associated with younger age at diagnosis, higher grade, more advanced stage, larger tumor size, and higher proportion of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Kaplan-Meier analysis and univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model showed that patients with IDC had significantly better breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) compared to MBC, but they had similar overall survival (OS). However, MBC histology was no longer a surrogate for worse BCSS or OS after 1:1 matching by age, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, grade and breast subtype. In addition, it was exposed that not married status, high grade, large tumor size, positive nodal status, the subtype of TNBC and no receipt of radiation therapy were significantly associated with poor BCSS and OS. In conclusion, MBC demonstrated more aggressive behavior but similar outcomes compared to IDC, which may be determined by prognostic factors such as breast subtype. These results not only confer deeper insight into MBC but contribute to individualized and tailored therapy, and thereby may improve clinical management and outcomes. PMID:27009810

  7. Age, Race and Regional Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Incidence Rates in Georgia between 2000 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wonsuk; De, Subhendu; Wilkins, Thad; Smith, Selina A.; Blumenthal, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates and mortality have been decreasing in the United States. Currently, states in the South have the smallest reduction in CRC mortality. The trends of CRC incidence rates in Georgia in comparison to the United States have not been investigated. We analyzed age-adjusted incidence rates of CRC in Georgia and the United States from 2000 to 2012 using data from SEER 18 registries. Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) were calculated as cases per 100,000 to the 2000 US Standard population. CRC incidence rates were calculated for groupings based on age at time of diagnosis, race, sex, and geographic location within Georgia. Incidence rates were higher in males compared to females in Georgia. In Georgians age 50–64, incidence rates were higher compared to the US, while those ages 65+ displayed lower incidence rates. Black Georgians age 50–64 generally exhibited higher incidence rates of CRC and lower rates of decrease in incidence compared to other races in Georgia. Asian/Pacific Islander females age 50–64 in Georgia exhibited an increasing trend in incidence rate. Whites and blacks Georgians age 50–64 displayed higher incidence rates compared to the US, while Asian/Pacific Islanders displayed lower incidence rates. Greater incidence rates of CRC in rural and Greater Georgia were seen across all races when compared to overall rates in Georgia. Efforts should be made to address disparities in Georgia based on race and geographic location. Increased screening by colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing, reduction of risk factors and promotion of healthy lifestyles can reduce CRC incidence rates. PMID:27042701

  8. A gerontologic perspective on cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Blank, Thomas O; Bellizzi, Keith M

    2008-06-01

    Most people diagnosed with cancer are aged >65 years, and many diagnosed younger live to become older survivors. Geriatric oncology is becoming recognized as a specialty area within oncology. It focuses specifically on the functional impacts of the interplay of aging and cancer, including the role of comorbidities. Nevertheless, to the authors' knowledge, little attention has been given to cancer from a gerontologic and lifespan perspective, especially quality of life and psychologic impact. Research has shown that the amount and type of psychologic impact of cancer is highly variable and that part of that variation is related to age, in that older persons are often less affected in both negative and positive ways. Gerontologic concepts and empiric findings related to physical, psychologic, and social aging processes may serve as partial explanations for that age-related pattern. Important potential contributors include psychologic factors, such as changes in future time perspective and goals, as well as social ones, such as roles and previous experience. The result is a complex interplay of factors that vary across persons but are covaried with age. Empiric findings regarding 1-year to 8-year prostate cancer survivors illustrate the age differences and the differential impacts of age itself and comorbidity. The use of gerontologic concepts to explain the age-related impact of cancer will benefit both research and clinical practice by providing a means to target interventions more effectively by taking into account the psychologic and social changes that often accompany aging. .

  9. Paradoxes in thyroid carcinoma treatment: analysis of the SEER database 2010—2013

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Tian, Shuangming; Li, Jiale; Zhao, Yongfeng; Liu, Wengang; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Zheyu

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common malignant disease with high survival rate (98.1%, 2006-2012, Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program). In this study, we investigated the treatment paradoxes in thyroid T0 and micro-carcinoma patients. 48,234 thyroid carcinoma patients were identified from 2010 to 2013 in SEER*Stat database (version 8.2.1) released in 2016. Survival analysis showed a significantly lower thyroid carcinoma-specific survival in T0 patients compared with T1–T3 patients. In propensity score analysis, T0 patients had a similar survival curve with T1-T3 patients when lymph node and distant metastasis stages were matched. When all variables, including radiation and surgery treatment, were matched, T0 patients had significantly higher survival compared to T3 patients. These findings suggested that more metastasis and less treatment led to poorer prognosis in T0 patients. Another paradox is about thyroid micro-carcinoma. The survival rate of micro-carcinoma patients was high (4 years survival rate was 99.92%), and more than 99% micro-carcinoma patients received surgery. Interestingly, all the patients who died because of thyroid carcinoma received surgery. Survival analysis showed no difference in survival when patients stratified by surgery or radiation. In conclusion, we suggested paradoxes in thyroid carcinoma treatment: over-treated in micro-carcinoma patients and less-treated in T0 patients. PMID:27861148

  10. Post-mastectomy Radiation Therapy for T3N0: A SEER Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew E.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Martin, Jeffrey M.; Hayes, Shelly B.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is conflicting evidence regarding the benefit of post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) for pathologic stage T3N0M0 breast cancers. We analyzed data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database to investigate the benefit of PMRT in these patients. Methods We queried the SEER database for T3N0M0 breast cancer patients diagnosed from 2000–2010 who underwent modified radical mastectomy. We excluded males, patients with unknown radiation timing/type, other primary tumors, or survival <6 months. 2525 patients were included in this analysis. We performed univariate and multivariate statistical analysis using Chi-squared tests, log rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and breast cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results Of the 2525 patients identified, 1063 received PMRT. The median follow-up was 56 months (range: 6–131). On univariate analysis, PMRT improved OS (76.5% vs. 61.8%, p<0.01) and CSS (85.0% vs. 82.4%, p<0.01) at 8 years. The use of PMRT remained significant on multivariate analysis: PMRT improved OS (HR 0.63, p<0.001) and CSS (HR 0.77, p=0.045). Low tumor grade (p<0.01) and marital status "married" (p=0.01) also predicted for improved CSS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion(s) PMRT was associated with significant improvements in both CSS and OS in patients with T3N0M0 breast cancers treated with modified radical mastectomy from 2000 to 2010. PMRT should be strongly considered in T3N0M0 patients. PMID:24985911

  11. OpinionSeer: interactive visualization of hotel customer feedback.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingcai; Wei, Furu; Liu, Shixia; Au, Norman; Cui, Weiwei; Zhou, Hong; Qu, Huamin

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of Web technology has resulted in an increasing number of hotel customers sharing their opinions on the hotel services. Effective visual analysis of online customer opinions is needed, as it has a significant impact on building a successful business. In this paper, we present OpinionSeer, an interactive visualization system that could visually analyze a large collection of online hotel customer reviews. The system is built on a new visualization-centric opinion mining technique that considers uncertainty for faithfully modeling and analyzing customer opinions. A new visual representation is developed to convey customer opinions by augmenting well-established scatterplots and radial visualization. To provide multiple-level exploration, we introduce subjective logic to handle and organize subjective opinions with degrees of uncertainty. Several case studies illustrate the effectiveness and usefulness of OpinionSeer on analyzing relationships among multiple data dimensions and comparing opinions of different groups. Aside from data on hotel customer feedback, OpinionSeer could also be applied to visually analyze customer opinions on other products or services.

  12. Size, longevity and cancer: age structure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There is significant recent interest in Peto's paradox and the related problem of the evolution of large, long-lived organisms in terms of cancer robustness. Peto's paradox refers to the expectation that large, long-lived organisms have a higher lifetime cancer risk, which is not the case: a paradox. This paradox, however, is circular: large, long-lived organisms are large and long-lived because they are cancer robust. Lifetime risk, meanwhile, depends on the age distributions of both cancer and competing risks: if cancer strikes before competing risks, then lifetime risk is high; if not, not. Because no set of competing risks is generally prevalent, it is instructive to temporarily dispose of competing risks and investigate the pure age dynamics of cancer under the multistage model of carcinogenesis. In addition to augmenting earlier results, I show that in terms of cancer-free lifespan large organisms reap greater benefits from an increase in cellular cancer robustness than smaller organisms. Conversely, a higher cellular cancer robustness renders cancer-free lifespan more resilient to an increase in size. This interaction may be an important driver of the evolution of large, cancer-robust organisms. PMID:27629030

  13. Understanding the causes of aging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ames, B N

    1995-09-01

    Cancer, a disease typical of old age, is in large part of degenerative origin. Several factors leading to the development of cancer and other degenerative diseases are discussed. The results of cancer tests in animals have been misinterpreted; they are mainly carried out by using synthetic chemicals, whereas most carcinogenic substances are natural chemicals. Animals have defense systems which prevent them from the carcinogenic effects of both natural and synthetic chemicals.

  14. Aging: Balancing regeneration and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beausejour, Christian M.; Campisi, Judith

    2006-08-24

    The proliferation of cells must balance the longevity assured by tissue renewal against the risk of developing cancer. The tumor-suppressor protein p16{sup INK4a} seems to act at the pivot of this delicate equilibrium.

  15. Cancer and Aging: Epidemiology and Methodological Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jacob K; Engholm, Gerda; Skytthe, Axel; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological cancer data shed light on key questions within basic science, clinical medicine and public health. For decades, Denmark has had linkable health registers that contain individual level data on the entire population with virtually complete follow-up. This has enabled high quality studies of cancer epidemiology and minimized the challenges often faced in many countries, such as uncertain identification of the study base, age misreporting, and low validity of the cancer diagnoses. However, methodological challenges still remain to be addressed, especially in cancer epidemiology studies among the elderly and the oldest-old. E.g., a characteristic pattern for many cancer types is that the incidence increases up to a maximum at about ages 75 to 90 years and is then followed by a decline or a leveling off at the oldest ages. It has been suggested that the oldest individuals may be asymptomatic, or even insusceptible to cancer. An alternative interpretation is that this pattern is an artifact due to lower diagnostic intensity among the elderly and oldest-old caused by higher levels of co-morbidities in this age group. Currently, the available cancer epidemiology data are not able to provide clear evidence for any of these hypotheses. PMID:26825001

  16. Comparison of survival and clinicopathologic features in colorectal cancer among African American, Caucasian, and Chinese patients treated in the United States: Results from the surveillance epidemiology and end results (SEER) database.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junzhong; Qiu, Miaozhen; Xu, Ruihua; Dobs, Adrian Sandra

    2015-10-20

    African American patients of colorectal cancer (CRC) were found to have a worse prognosis than Caucasians, but it has not been fully understood about the survival difference among Chinese and these two races above. In this study, we used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database to analyze the survival difference among these three race/ethnicities in the United States. Adenocarcinoma patients of colorectal cancer with a race/ethnicity of Caucasian, Chinese and African American were enrolled for study. Patients were excluded if they had more than one primary cancer but the CRC was not the first one, had unknown cause of death or unknown survival months. The 5-year cause specific survival (CSS) was our primary endpoint. Totally, there were 585,670 eligible patients for analysis. Chinese patients had the best and African American patients had the worst 5-year CSS (66.7% vs 55.9%), P < 0.001. The 5-year CSS for Caucasian patients was 62.9%. Race/ethnicity was an independent prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis, P < 0.001. The comparison of clinicopathologic factors among these three race/ethnicities showed that the insurance coverage rate, income, percentage that completing high school and percentage of urban residence was lowest in the African American patients. Chinese patients had the highest percentage of married, while African American patients ranked lowest. More African American patients were diagnosed as stage IV and had high percentage of signet ring cell and mucinous adenocarcinoma. It is likely that biological differences as well as socioeconomic status both contribute to the survival disparity among the different race/ethnicities.

  17. Breast Cancer Before Age 40 Years

    PubMed Central

    Anders, Carey K.; Johnson, Rebecca; Litton, Jennifer; Phillips, Marianne; Bleyer, Archie

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 7% of women with breast cancer are diagnosed before the age of 40 years, and this disease accounts for more than 40% of all cancer in women in this age group. Survival rates are worse when compared to those in older women, and multivariate analysis has shown younger age to be an independent predictor of adverse outcome. Inherited syndromes, specifically BRCA1 and BRCA2, must be considered when developing treatment algorithms for younger women. Chemotherapy, endocrine, and local therapies have the potential to significantly impact both the physiologic health—including future fertility, premature menopause, and bone health—and the psychological health of young women as they face a diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:19460581

  18. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.

    2014-03-01

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  19. ANOVA like analysis of cancer death age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areia, Aníbal; Mexia, João T.

    2016-06-01

    We use ANOVA to study the influence of year, sex, country and location on the average cancer death age. The data used was from the World Health Organization (WHO) files for 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011. The locations considered were: kidney, leukaemia, melanoma of skin and oesophagus and the countries: Portugal, Norway, Greece and Romania.

  20. Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Neville, Bridget A.; Chen, Aileen B.; Schrag, Deborah

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

  1. Telomere biology: cancer firewall or aging clock?

    PubMed

    Mitteldorf, J J

    2013-09-01

    It has been a decade since the first surprising discovery that longer telomeres in humans are statistically associated with longer life expectancies. Since then, it has been firmly established that telomere shortening imposes an individual fitness cost in a number of mammalian species, including humans. But telomere shortening is easily avoided by application of telomerase, an enzyme which is coded into nearly every eukaryotic genome, but whose expression is suppressed most of the time. This raises the question how the sequestration of telomerase might have evolved. The predominant assumption is that in higher organisms, shortening telomeres provide a firewall against tumor growth. A more straightforward interpretation is that telomere attrition provides an aging clock, reliably programming lifespans. The latter hypothesis is routinely rejected by most biologists because the benefit of programmed lifespan applies only to the community, and in fact the individual pays a substantial fitness cost. There is a long-standing skepticism that the concept of fitness can be applied on a communal level, and of group selection in general. But the cancer hypothesis is problematic as well. Animal studies indicate that there is a net fitness cost in sequestration of telomerase, even when cancer risk is lowered. The hypothesis of protection against cancer has never been tested in animals that actually limit telomerase expression, but only in mice, whose lifespans are not telomerase-limited. And human medical evidence suggests a net aggravation of cancer risk from the sequestration of telomerase, because cells with short telomeres are at high risk of neoplastic transformation, and they also secrete cytokines that exacerbate inflammation globally. The aging clock hypothesis fits well with what is known about ancestral origins of telomerase sequestration, and the prejudices concerning group selection are without merit. If telomeres are an aging clock, then telomerase makes an

  2. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes of Invasive Cribriform Carcinoma of Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Liu, Yi-Rong; Zuo, Wen-Jia; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Invasive cribriform carcinoma (ICC) is a rare histologic subtype of breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of ICC.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 233,337 female patients diagnosed with ICC (n = 618) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,719). Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were utilized to calculate and compare disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS). A 1:1 paired match was carried out on age, tumor stage, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, and progesterone receptor (PR) status. Baseline characteristics and survival outcomes were also analyzed in ER-positive tumors. Subgroup analyses summarized the hazard ratio (HR) of IDC versus ICC using a forest plot.ICCs presented smaller size, lower grade, higher ER and PR positive rate, less nodal metastasis, and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy compared to IDCs. Five-year DSS rates were significantly better for patients with ICC than for patients with IDC (98.8% vs. 93%, P < 0.001). Five-year OS rates were 95.3% versus 90.1% (P < 0.001). After adjustment for common clinicopathological factors in the multivariate analysis, patients with ICC showed limited DSS advantage over the IDC group (HR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.38-1.51, P = 0.421). No significant difference in DSS nor OS was observed in matched groups between ICC and IDC. Analysis among ER-positive patients revealed similar prognostic factors as among all patients. Survival analysis in different tumor grade subgroups showed no significant difference between ICC and IDC.ICCs have unique clinicopathological characteristics, higher rates of breast-conserving surgery, and more favorable prognosis compared to the overall IDC population. Difference in tumor grade between the 2 groups may partially explain the different outcome. Improved clinical and biological understanding of ICC

  3. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Williams, Melanie; Jiang, Jing; Niu, Jiangong; MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad; Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ≥66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, κ, and χ{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  4. Blood Epigenetic Age may Predict Cancer Incidence and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yinan; Joyce, Brian T; Colicino, Elena; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Dai, Qi; Shrubsole, Martha J; Kibbe, Warren A; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Zhou; Jafari, Nadereh; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Hou, Lifang

    2016-03-01

    Biological measures of aging are important for understanding the health of an aging population, with epigenetics particularly promising. Previous studies found that tumor tissue is epigenetically older than its donors are chronologically. We examined whether blood Δage (the discrepancy between epigenetic and chronological ages) can predict cancer incidence or mortality, thus assessing its potential as a cancer biomarker. In a prospective cohort, Δage and its rate of change over time were calculated in 834 blood leukocyte samples collected from 442 participants free of cancer at blood draw. About 3-5 years before cancer onset or death, Δage was associated with cancer risks in a dose-responsive manner (P = 0.02) and a one-year increase in Δage was associated with cancer incidence (HR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10) and mortality (HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07-1.28). Participants with smaller Δage and decelerated epigenetic aging over time had the lowest risks of cancer incidence (P = 0.003) and mortality (P = 0.02). Δage was associated with cancer incidence in a 'J-shaped' manner for subjects examined pre-2003, and with cancer mortality in a time-varying manner. We conclude that blood epigenetic age may mirror epigenetic abnormalities related to cancer development, potentially serving as a minimally invasive biomarker for cancer early detection.

  5. Metformin for aging and cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir N

    2010-11-01

    Studies in mammals have led to the suggestion that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are important factors in aging. Insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling molecules that have been linked to longevity include daf-2 and InR and their homologues in mammals, and inactivation of the corresponding genes increases life span in nematodes, fruit flies and mice. It is possible that the life-prolonging effect of caloric restriction is due to decreasing IGF-1 levels. Evidence has emerged that antidiabetic drugs are promising candidates for both life span extension and prevention of cancer. Thus, antidiabetic drugs postpone spontaneous carcinogenesis in mice and rats, as well as chemical and radiation carcinogenesis in mice, rats and hamsters. Furthermore metformin seems to decrease cancer risk in diabetic patients.

  6. Completeness of required site-specific factors for brain and CNS tumors in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 18 database (2004-2012, varying).

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn T; Gittleman, Haley; Kruchko, Carol; Louis, David N; Brat, Daniel J; Gilbert, Mark R; Petkov, Valentina I; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2016-10-01

    Cancer registries are an important source of population-level information on brain tumor incidence and survival. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries currently collect data on specific required factors related to brain tumors as defined by the American Joint Commission on Cancer, including World Health Organization (WHO) grade, MGMT methylation and 1p/19q codeletion status. We assessed 'completeness', defined as having valid values over the time periods that they have been collected, overall, by year, histology, and registry. Data were obtained through a SEER custom data request for four factors related to brain tumors for the years 2004-2012 (3/4 factors were collected only from 2010 to 2012). SEER*Stat was used to generate frequencies of 'completeness' for each factor overall, and by year, histology and registry. The four factors varied in completeness, but increased over time. WHO grade has been collected the longest, and showed significant increases in completeness. Completeness of MGMT and 1p/19q codeletion was highest for glioma subtypes for which testing is recommended by clinical practice guidelines. Completeness of all factors varied by histology and cancer registry. Overall, several of the factors had high completeness, and all increased in completeness over time. With increasing focus on 'precision medicine' and the incorporation of molecular parameters into the 2016 WHO CNS tumor classification, it is critical that the data are complete, and factors collected at the population level are fully integrated into cancer reporting. It is critical that cancer registries continue to collect established and emerging prognostic and predictive factors.

  7. Breast cancer, genetics, and age at first pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, H T; Albano, W A; Layton, M A; Kimberling, W J; Lynch, J F

    1984-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer shows a distinctive natural history characterised by an earlier age of onset, excess bilaterality, vertical transmission, heterogeneous tumour associations, and improved survival when compared to its sporadic counterpart. To date, very little attention has been given to interrelationships between breast cancer risk factors and genetics. In the general population, early age of first term pregnancy has been generally accepted as protective against breast cancer. In addition, recent findings suggest that an early age of first pregnancy may be associated with an earlier age of breast cancer diagnosis. We studied the age at first pregnancy and age at onset of breast cancer among 162 females at 50% genetic risk, 72 of whom had already developed the disease. We then compared them to 154 consecutively ascertained breast cancer patients from the Creighton Cancer Center. In the hereditary subset (1) early first term pregnancy did not alter the frequency of breast cancer; (2) early age at first term pregnancy was not associated with an earlier age at cancer diagnosis; and (3) age of breast cancer onset in nulliparous females was not significantly lower than that in females having at least one term pregnancy. We speculate, therefore, that in our hereditary population, pregnancy does not influence the natural history of breast cancer in the same way that it does in the population at large. PMID:6716424

  8. Age and Axillary Lymph Node Ratio in Postmenopausal Women with T1-T2 Node Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sue A.; Coutty, Nadege; Ly, Bevan Hong; Vlastos, Georges; Nguyen, Nam Phong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this article was to examine the relationship between age and lymph node ratio (LNR, number of positive nodes divided by number of examined nodes), and to determine their effects on breast cancer (BC) and overall mortality. Methods. Women aged ≥50 years, diagnosed in 1988–1997 with a unilateral histologically confirmed T1-T2 node positive surgically treated primary nonmetastatic BC, were selected from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER). Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) were used to evaluate the age-LNR relationship. Cumulative incidence functions and multivariate competing risks analysis based on model selection by the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) were used to examine the effect of age and LNR on mortality. Low LNR was defined as ≤0.20, mid-LNR 0.21–0.65, and high LNR >0.65. Results. GAMLSS showed a nonlinear LNR-age relationship, increasing from mean LNR 0.26–0.28 at age 50–70 years to 0.30 at 80 years and 0.40 at 90 years. Compared with a 9.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.8%–10.8%] risk of BC death at 5 years in women aged 50–59 years with low LNR, the risk in women ≥80 years with low LNR was 12.6% [95% CI 10.1%–15.0%], mid-LNR 18.1% [13.9%–22.1%], high LNR 29.8% [22.7%–36.1%]. Five-years overall risk of death increased from 40.8% [37.5%–43.9%] by low LNR to 67.4% [61.4%–72.4%] by high LNR. The overall mortality hazard ratio for age ≥80 years with high LNR was 7.49 [6.54–8.59], as compared with women aged 50–59 years with low LNR. Conclusion. High LNR combined with older age was associated with a threefold increased risk of BC death and a sevenfold increased hazard ratio of overall mortality. PMID:20930094

  9. Similar outcomes between adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast and invasive ductal carcinoma: a population-based study from the SEER 18 database

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Jie; Song, Chuan-Gui; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast (breast-ACC) is a rare and indolent tumor with a good prognosis despite its triple-negative status. However, we observed different outcomes in the present study. Utilizing the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we enrolled a total of 89,937 eligible patients with an estimated 86 breast-ACC cases and 89,851 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) patients. In our study, breast-ACC among women presented with a higher proportion of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which was more likely to feature well-differentiated tumors, rare regional lymph node involvement and greater application of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with breast-ACC and breast-IDC patients had similar breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS). Moreover, using the propensity score matching method, no significant difference in survival was observed in matched pairs of breast-ACC and breast-IDC patients. Additionally, BCSS and OS did not differ significantly between TNBC-ACC and TNBC-IDC after matching patients for age, tumor size, and nodal status. Further subgroup analysis of molecular subtype indicated improved survival in breast-ACC patients with hormone receptor-positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HR+/Her2-) tumors compared to IDC patients with HR+/Her2- tumors. However, the survival of ACC-TNBC and IDC-TNBC patients was similar. In conclusion, ACCs have an indolent clinical course and result in similar outcomes compared to IDC. Understanding these clinical characteristics and outcomes will endow doctors with evidence to provide the same intensive treatment for ACC-TNBC as for IDC-TNBC and lead to more individualized and tailored therapies for breast-ACC patients. PMID:28008158

  10. The role of poverty rate and racial distribution in the geographic clustering of breast cancer survival among older women: a geographic and multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Schootman, Mario; Jeffe, Donna B; Lian, Min; Gillanders, William E; Aft, Rebecca

    2009-03-01

    The authors examined disparities in survival among women aged 66 years or older in association with census-tract-level poverty rate, racial distribution, and individual-level factors, including patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related factors, utilization of medical care, and mammography use. They used linked data from the 1992-1999 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) programs, 1991-1999 Medicare claims, and the 1990 US Census. A geographic information system and advanced statistics identified areas of increased or reduced breast cancer survival and possible reasons for geographic variation in survival in 2 of the 5 SEER areas studied. In the Detroit, Michigan, area, one geographic cluster of shorter-than-expected breast cancer survival was identified (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.60). An additional area where survival was longer than expected approached statistical significance (HR = 0.4; P = 0.056). In the Atlanta, Georgia, area, one cluster of shorter- (HR = 1.81) and one cluster of longer-than-expected (HR = 0.72) breast cancer survival were identified. Stage at diagnosis and census-tract poverty (and patient's race in Atlanta) explained the geographic variation in breast cancer survival. No geographic clusters were identified in the 3 other SEER programs. Interventions to reduce late-stage breast cancer, focusing on areas of high poverty and targeting African Americans, may reduce disparities in breast cancer survival in the Detroit and Atlanta areas.

  11. Impact of age and comorbidity on survival in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Eeghen, Elmer E.; Bakker, Sandra D.; van Bochove, Aart

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer are often excluded from clinical trials based on age or a poor performance score. However, 70% of colorectal cancer is diagnosed in patients over 65. Evaluation on the influence of age and comorbidity on survival and cause of death in a non-selected population. Methods Included were 621 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An extensive chart review was performed for 392 patients with colon cancer and 143 patients with rectal cancer. Analyses were performed separately for both groups. Results Median survival of colon cancer patients was 5.13 years, 131 patients (34.3%) died from tumour progression. Age and comorbidity were significant predictors for overall survival (P<0.001). Age was also a significant predictor of cause of death (P=0.001). In rectal cancer patients median survival was 4.67 years, 51 (35.7%) of patients died from tumour progression. Neither age nor comorbidity was significant predictors of survival. Age was a significant predictor of cause of death (P<0.001). Conclusions In colon cancer patient age and comorbidity predict survival. This represents possible bias or a reduced survival benefit of treatment, and is an indication that colon cancer is not the prognosis defining illness in the majority of patients. In rectal cancer patients neither age or comorbidity significantly impacted survival. PMID:26697191

  12. Online CME Series Can Nutrition Simultaneously Affect Cancer and Aging? | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Aging is considered by some scientists to be a normal physiological process, while others believe it is a disease. Increased cancer risk in the elderly raises the question regarding the common pathways for cancer and aging. Undeniably, nutrition plays an important role in both cases and this webinar will explore whether nutrition can simultaneously affect cancer and aging. |

  13. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Krasnov, George S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Alekseev, Boris Y.; Kardymon, Olga L.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Fedorova, Maria S.; Pokrovsky, Anatoly V.; Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kaprin, Andrey D.; Moskalev, Alexey A.; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.

    2016-01-01

    Aging and cancer are the most important issues to research. The population in the world is growing older, and the incidence of cancer increases with age. There is no doubt about the linkage between aging and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this association are still unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest that the oxidative stress as a cause and/or consequence of the mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the main drivers of these processes. Increasing ROS levels and products of the oxidative stress, which occur in aging and age-related disorders, were also found in cancer. This review focuses on the similarities between ageing-associated and cancer-associated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction as their common phenotype. PMID:27270647

  14. Impact of sex, age, and ethnicity/race on the survival of patients with rectal cancer in the United States from 1988 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Martin D.; Yang, Dongyun; Sunakawa, Yu; Zhang, Wu; Ning, Yan; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Okazaki, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Yuji; Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Schirripa, Marta; Lenz, Annika Medea; Bohanes, Pierre; Barzi, Afsaneh; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Hanna, Diana L.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Most studies report on colon and rectal cancers collectively, even though biologic and prognostic differences exist between these disease entities. Here, we investigated the effects of sex, age, and ethnicity/race on rectal cancer (RC) mortality by stage focusing on differences before and after 2004. Using the SEER database, we identified 105,511 patients diagnosed with RC from 1988-2012. Main outcomes were disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS). In patients with stage I-III RC, women achieved a longer DSS (HR 0.87, P < 0.001) than men, independent of age, from 1988-2012. In stage IV disease, the sex disparity favoring women was limited to the age 18-44 yr cohort (DSS HR 0.79, P < 0.001). The sex difference in DSS (Pinteraction = 0.009) was significantly reduced from 2004 to 2012 across all ages. Hispanics and Native Americans with locoregional RC had inferior DSS relative to Whites from 1988-2003, but these differences were not evident from 2004-2012 (Pinteraction = 0.001). Additionally, Asians with stage I-III RC had superior DSS from 2004 on compared to Whites. Mortality in African American patients improved modestly overall and remained significantly higher than other ethnicities/races across all stages. Sex disparities have narrowed in patients with metastatic RC, but persist in patients with stage I-III disease. These differences are most evident among young patients (18-44 years), where sex disparities have even widened in stage I-III disease. While outcomes have improved for Asians, Hispanics, and Native Americans with stage I-III rectal cancer, black-white disparities remain in all disease stages. PMID:27449091

  15. Breast cancer and other neoplasms in women with neurofibromatosis type 1: a retrospective review of cases in the Detroit metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Levin, A M; Smolinski, S E; Vigneau, F D; Levin, N K; Tainsky, M A

    2012-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common cancer predisposing syndromes with an incidence of 1 in 3,500 worldwide. Certain neoplasms or malignancies are over-represented in individuals with NF1; however, an increased risk of breast cancer has not been widely recognized or accepted. We identified 76 women with NF1 seen in the Henry Ford Health System (HFHS) from 1990 to 2009, and linked them to the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry covering the metropolitan Detroit area. Fifty-one women (67%) were under age 50 years at the time of data analysis. Six women developed invasive breast cancer before age 50, and three developed invasive breast cancer after age 50. Using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) calculated based on the SEER age-adjusted invasive breast cancer incidence rates, our findings demonstrated a statistically significant increase of breast cancer incidence occurring in NF1 women (SIR = 5.2; 95% CI 2.4-9.8), and this relative increase was especially evident among those with breast cancer onset under age 50 (SIR = 8.8; 95% CI 3.2-19.2). These data are consistent with other reports suggesting an increase in breast cancer risk among females with NF1, which indicate that breast cancer screening guidelines should be evaluated for this potentially high-risk group.

  16. Invasive neuroendocrine carcinoma of the breast: a population-based study from the surveillance, epidemiology and end results (SEER) database

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of the breast is a rare type of carcinoma that has not been well studied or characterized. Of the limited number of studies reported in the literature, most are case reports. A few small retrospective series studies have been reported. Methods We reviewed data on 142 cases of mammary NEC recorded in the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) database during 2003–2009 and evaluated disease incidence and patient age, sex, and race/ethnicity; clinicopathologic characteristics; and survival in comparison to invasive mammary carcinoma, not otherwise specified. We also performed univariate and multivariate analyses to identify prognostic factors in this disease. Results Review of the 142 SEER cases revealed that NEC is an aggressive variant of invasive mammary carcinoma. It generally occurred in older women (>60 years); present with larger tumor size (>20 mm), higher histologic grade, and higher clinical stage; and result in shorter overall survival and disease-specific survival than invasive mammary carcinoma, not otherwise specified (IMC-NOS). Overall survival and disease-specific survival were shorter in NEC at each stage than in IMC-NOS of the same stage. Furthermore, when all NEC and IMC-NOS cases were pooled together, neuroendocrine differentiation itself was an adverse prognostic factor independent of other known prognostic factors, including age, tumor size, nodal status, histologic grade, estrogen/progesterone receptor status, and therapy. Conclusions NEC is a rare but aggressive type of mammary carcinoma. Novel therapeutic approaches should be explored for this uniquely clinical entity. PMID:24589259

  17. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  18. Family history of gynaecological cancers: relationships to the incidence of breast cancer prior to age 55.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W D; Schildkraut, J M

    1991-09-01

    As part of a multi-centre epidemiological study of cancer in women between the ages of 20 and 54, data were collected concerning family history of gynaecological cancers in the female relatives of 4730 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer and the relatives of 4688 women from the general population. Women who were diagnosed with breast cancer prior to age 45 were more likely than controls to have a mother or sister with ovarian cancer (odds ratio (OR): 1.50), endometrial cancer (1.29), and cervical cancer (1.53), although none of these elevations achieved statistical significance. The corresponding odds ratios for women diagnosed with breast cancer between the ages of 45 and 54 were 1.88, 0.84 and 0.93. The association with ovarian cancer was statistically significant in this group (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-3.19). In this latter group, having a first degree relative with ovarian cancer was associated approximately as strongly with breast cancer as was having a first degree relative with breast cancer. The results suggest that there may be a shared genetic basis for some cancers of the breast and ovary. From a clinical perspective, the results indicate that in setting appropriate levels of screening for breast cancer and in establishing an appropriate age at which to begin such screening for a particular woman, her family history of ovarian cancer should be considered in addition to her family history of breast cancer.

  19. State Education & Environment Roundtable (SEER) Seminar (11th, Des Moines, Iowa, May 20-24, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Gerald A.; Hoody, Linda L.

    This document reports on the 11th seminar of the State Education and Environment Roundtable (SEER). It consists of brief overviews of the daily discussions and presentations that were made at the seminar. Topics discussed include potential partnerships with national language arts organizations and associations, how environmental justice issues…

  20. Accelerated aging in the tumor microenvironment: connecting aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Michael P; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pavlides, Stephanos; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-07-01

    Cancer is thought to be a disease associated with aging. Interestingly, normal aging is driven by the production of ROS and mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting in the cumulative accumulation of DNA damage. Here, we discuss how ROS signaling, NFκB- and HIF1-activation in the tumor microenvironment induces a form of "accelerated aging," which leads to stromal inflammation and changes in cancer cell metabolism. Thus, we present a unified model where aging (ROS), inflammation (NFκB) and cancer metabolism (HIF1), act as co-conspirators to drive autophagy ("self-eating") in the tumor stroma. Then, autophagy in the tumor stroma provides high-energy "fuel" and the necessary chemical building blocks, for accelerated tumor growth and metastasis. Stromal ROS production acts as a "mutagenic motor" and allows cancer cells to buffer-at a distance-exactly how much of a mutagenic stimulus they receive, further driving tumor cell selection and evolution. Surviving cancer cells would be selected for the ability to induce ROS more effectively in stromal fibroblasts, so they could extract more nutrients from the stroma via autophagy. If lethal cancer is a disease of "accelerated host aging" in the tumor stroma, then cancer patients may benefit from therapy with powerful antioxidants. Antioxidant therapy should block the resulting DNA damage, and halt autophagy in the tumor stroma, effectively "cutting off the fuel supply" for cancer cells. These findings have important new implications for personalized cancer medicine, as they link aging, inflammation and cancer metabolism with novel strategies for more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

  1. Introduction to Aging, Cancer, and Age-related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Perry, Daniel P

    2010-06-01

    A rising tide of chronic age-dependent diseases, co-morbidities, and geriatric syndromes--a veritable Silver Tsunami--will soon present serious challenges for North America, Europe, Japan, and other industrialized nations. Meanwhile, a growing number of scientists, led by biogerontologists, maintain that the key to blunting the societal impact of large-scale decline and disability among older populations lies with better understanding and potential manipulation of biological mechanisms of aging itself. Well-characterized interventions that slow aging and extend health and vigor in animal models may be forerunners of technologies that preserve additional years of healthy productive life in humans. What will it take to validate these momentous insights from biogerontology and their potential applications for human populations? What are the points of resistance for key opinion leaders and policy makers? And how can biogerontologists make common cause with those outside the discipline to inform larger and more politically powerful audiences?

  2. Cancer Screening Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.; Schrag, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Context Cancer screening has been integrated into routine primary care but does not benefit patients with limited life expectancy. Objective To evaluate the extent to which patients with advanced cancer continue to be screened for new cancers. Design, Setting, and Participants Utilization of cancer screening procedures (mammography, Papanicolaou test, prostate-specific antigen [PSA], and lower gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) was assessed in 87 736 fee-for-service Medicare enrollees aged 65 years or older diagnosed with advanced lung, colorectal, pancreatic, gastroesophageal, or breast cancer between 1998 and 2005, and reported to one of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registries. Participants were followed up until death or December 31, 2007, whichever came first. A group of 87 307 Medicare enrollees without cancer were individually matched by age, sex, race, and SEER registry to patients with cancer and observed over the same period to evaluate screening rates in context. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with screening were also investigated. Main Outcome Measure For each cancer screening test, utilization rates were defined as the percentage of patients who were screened following the diagnosis of an incurable cancer. Results Among women following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, at least 1 screening mammogram was received by 8.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.6%-9.1%) vs 22.0% (95% CI, 21.7%-22.5%); Papanicolaou test screening was received by 5.8% (95% CI, 5.6%-6.1%) vs 12.5% (95% CI, 12.2%-12.8%). Among men following advanced cancer diagnosis compared with controls, PSA test was received by 15.0% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.3%) vs 27.2% (95% CI, 26.8%-27.6%). For all patients following advanced diagnosis compared with controls, lower GI endoscopy was received by 1.7% (95% CI, 1.6%-1.8%) vs 4.7% (95% CI, 4.6%-4.9%). Screening was more frequent among patients with a recent history of screening (16.2% [95

  3. Cancer Survivorship and Aging: Moving the Science Forward

    PubMed Central

    Bellizzi, Keith M.; Mustian, Karen M.; Palesh, Oxana G.; Diefenbach, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Given the high incidence and prevalence of cancer in older adults and the anticipated growth of this population over the next few decades, oncologists, geriatricians and primary care providers will be challenged to provide timely and appropriate post-treatment care to a diverse population of older cancer survivors. Few post-treatment epidemiologic or clinical trial studies have investigated the mental, social and physical health issues among older cancer survivors. The behavioral oncology, gerontology, geriatric and psychology literature on cancer survivorship and aging is reviewed. This article highlights several methodological challenges investigators face when conducting epidemiological and cancer clinical trial research with older cancer survivors following treatment. These challenges must be considered and overcome to develop an informative body of scientific knowledge to address the post-treatment health care needs of this growing population. Future research directions, new models of care, and the need for trans-disciplinary approaches are discussed. PMID:19058147

  4. Opportunities for Cancer Prevention Among Adults Aged 45 to 64

    PubMed Central

    Zonderman, Alan B.; Ejiogu, Ngozi; Norbeck, Jennifer; Evans, Michele K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in cancer medicine and the resultant 20% decline in cancer death rates for Americans since 1991, there remain distinct cancer health disparities among African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and the those living in poverty. Minorities and the poor continue to bear the disproportionate burden of cancer especially in terms of stage at diagnosis, incidence and mortality. Cancer health disparities are persistent reminders that state-of-the art cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are not equally effective for and accessible to all Americans. The cancer prevention model must take into account the phenotype of accelerated aging associated with health disparities as well as the important interplay of biological and sociocultural factors that lead to disparate health outcomes. The building blocks of this prevention model will include: interdisciplinary prevention modalities that encourage partnerships across medical and nonmedical entities, community-based participatory research, development of ethnically and racially diverse research cohorts, and full actualization of the prevention benefits outlined in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, the most essential facet should be a thoughtful integration of cancer prevention and screening into prevention, screening, and disease management activities for hypertension and diabetes mellitus since these chronic medical illnesses have a substantial prevalence in populations at risk for cancer disparities and cause considerable comorbidity and likely complicate effective treatment and contribute to disproportionate cancer death rates. PMID:24512936

  5. Is cancer a metabolic rebellion against host aging?

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Birbe, Ruth C; Pavlides, Stephanos; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Aging drives large systemic reductions in oxidative mitochondrial function, shifting the entire body metabolically toward aerobic glycolysis, a.k.a, the Warburg effect. Aging is also one of the most significant risk factors for the development of human cancers, including breast tumors. How are these two findings connected? One simplistic idea is that cancer cells rebel against the aging process by increasing their capacity for oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). Then, local and systemic aerobic glycolysis in the aging host would provide energy-rich mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketones) to directly “fuel” tumor cell growth and metastasis. This would establish a type of parasite-host relationship or “two-compartment tumor metabolism,” with glycolytic/oxidative metabolic coupling. The cancer cells (“the seeds”) would flourish in this nutrient-rich microenvironment (“the soil”), which has been fertilized by host aging. In this scenario, cancer cells are only trying to save themselves from the consequences of aging by engineering a metabolic mutiny, through the amplification of mitochondrial metabolism. We discuss the recent findings of Drs. Ron DePinho (MD Anderson) and Craig Thomspson (Sloan-Kettering) that are also consistent with this new hypothesis, linking cancer progression with metabolic aging. Using data mining and bioinformatics approaches, we also provide key evidence of a role for PGC1a/NRF1 signaling in the pathogenesis of (1) two-compartment tumor metabolism and (2) mitochondrial biogenesis in human breast cancer cells. PMID:22234241

  6. Leukoplakia, Oral Cavity Cancer Risk, and Cancer Survival in the U.S. Elderly.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Katki, Hormuzd A; Silverberg, Michael J; Manos, M Michele; Engels, Eric A; Chaturvedi, Anil K

    2015-09-01

    Screening for oral leukoplakia, an oral cavity cancer (OCC) precursor, could lead to earlier detection of OCC. However, the progression rate from leukoplakia to OCC and the benefits of leukoplakia screening for improving OCC outcomes are currently unclear. We conducted a case-cohort study of U.S. adults ages ≥65 years in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linkage. We identified leukoplakia diagnoses through Medicare claims, and OCC diagnoses through SEER cancer registries. Weighted Cox regression was used to estimate leukoplakia associations with OCC incidence, and the absolute OCC risk following leukoplakia diagnosis was calculated. Among OCC cases, we compared OCC stage and OCC survival between cases with a prior leukoplakia diagnosis versus those without prior leukoplakia. Among 470,266 individuals in the SEER-Medicare subcohort, 1,526 (0.3%) had a leukoplakia diagnosis. Among people with leukoplakia, the cumulative OCC incidence was 0.7% at 3 months and 2.5% at 5 years. OCC risk was most increased <3 months after leukoplakia diagnosis (HR, 115), likely representing the diagnosis of prevalent cancers. Nonetheless, risk remained substantially increased in subsequent follow-up [HR ≥ 3 months, 24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 22-27; HR ≥ 12 months, 22, 95% CI, 20-25]. Among OCC cases (N = 8,927), those with prior leukoplakia were less likely to be diagnosed at regional/distant stage (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.30-0.43), and had lower mortality (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.65-0.84) when compared with OCC cases without a prior leukoplakia. Individuals with leukoplakia have substantially elevated risk of OCC. Lower stage and better survival after OCC diagnosis suggest that leukoplakia identification can lead to earlier OCC detection and reduced mortality.

  7. Long-term all-sites cancer mortality time trends in Ohio, USA, 1970–2001: differences by race, gender and age

    PubMed Central

    Tyczynski, Jerzy E; Berkel, Hans J

    2005-01-01

    Background There were significant changes in cancer mortality in the USA over the last several decades, in the whole country and in particular states. However, no in depth analysis has been published so far, dealing with changes in mortality time trends in the state of Ohio. Since the state of Ohio belongs to the states of relatively high level of all-sites mortality in both males and females, it is of interest to analyze recent changes in mortality rates, as well as to compare them with the situation in the rest of the USA. The main aim of this study was to analyze, describe and interpret all-sites cancer mortality time trends in the population of the State of Ohio. Methods Cancer mortality data by age, sex, race and year for the period 1970–2001 were obtained from the Surveillance Research Program of the National Cancer Institute SEER*Stat software. A joinpoint regression methodology was used to provide estimated annual percentage changes (EAPCs) and to detect points in time where significant changes in the trends occurred. Results In both, males and females mortality rates were higher in blacks compared with whites. The difference was bigger in males (39.9%) than in women (23.3%). Mortality rates in Ohio are generally higher than average USA rates – an overall difference was 7.5% in men in 1997–2001, and 6.1% in women. All-sites mortality trends in Ohio and in the whole USA are similar. However, in general, mortality rates in Ohio remained elevated compared with the USA rates throughout the entire analyzed period. The exceptions are the rates in young and middle-aged African Americans. Conclusion Although direction of time trends in Ohio are similar in Ohio and the whole US, Ohio still have cancer mortality rates higher than the US average. In addition, there is a significant discrepancy between white and black population of Ohio in all-sites mortality level, with disadvantage for Blacks. To diminish disparities in cancer mortality between African

  8. Infective endocarditis and cancer in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    García-Albéniz, Xabier; Hsu, John; Lipsitch, Marc; Logan, Roger W.; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Hernán, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about the magnitude of the association between infective endocarditis and cancer, and about the natural history of cancer patients with concomitant diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Methods We used the SEER-Medicare linked database to identify individuals aged 65 years or more diagnosed with colorectal, lung, breast, or prostate cancer, and without any cancer diagnosis (5% random Medicare sample from SEER areas) between 1992–2009. We identified infective endocarditis from the ICD-9 diagnosis of each admission recorded in the Medpar file and its incidence rate 90 days around cancer diagnosis. We also estimated the overall survival and CRC-specific survival after a concomitant diagnosis of infective endocarditis. Results The peri-diagnostic incidence of infective endocarditis was 19.8 cases per 100,000 person-months for CRC, 5.7 cases per 100,000 person-months for lung cancer, 1.9 cases per 100,000 person-months for breast cancer, 4.1 cases per 100,000 person-months for prostate cancer and 2.4 cases per 100,000 person-months for individuals without cancer. Two-year overall survival was 46.4% (95% CI 39.5, 54.5%) for stage I–III CRC patients with concomitant endocarditis and 73.1% (95% CI 72.9, 73.3%) for those without it. Conclusion In this elderly population, the incidence of infective endocarditis around CRC diagnosis was substantially higher than around the diagnosis of lung, breast and prostate cancers. A concomitant diagnosis of infective endocarditis in patients with CRC diagnosis is associated with shorter survival. PMID:26683995

  9. The Use of Radiation Therapy Appears to Improve Outcome in Patients With Malignant Primary Tracheal Tumors: A SEER-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Liyi; Fan Min; Sheets, Nathan C.; Chen, Ronald C.; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To conduct a matched pair analysis assessing the impact of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with resectable and unresectable primary malignant tracheal tumors using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Patients and Methods: The SEER registry was used to identify every patient (or 'case') who received RT between 1988 and 2007 for primary malignant tracheal tumors, and to search for corresponding 'controls' (not treated with RT), with the same prognostic and treatment factors (surgery on the trachea, disease extension, histology, and gender). Overall survival (OS) was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier methods. Results of OS and cumulative incidence of death from tracheal cancer in the cases and controls, and in various subsets, were compared using log-rank and Gray's tests. Results: Two hundred fifty-eight patients who received RT were identified, and 78 of these had appropriate matched controls identified, forming the basis of this analysis. In the 78 (+RT) cases, the median follow-up was 60 months (range, 10-192) in the survivors vs. 55 months (range, 2-187) in the controls (no-RT group). Patients in RT group had significantly better OS, and a lower cumulative incidence of death from tracheal cancer than no-RT patients (p < 0.05). Treatment with radiation was associated with improved survival in patients with squamous cell histology [p < 0.0001], regional disease extension [p = 0.030], or those that did not undergo resection [p = 0.038]. There were four deaths in RT group and three in no-RT group attributed to cardiac and respiratory causes. Conclusion: Our data suggest a survival benefit for the use of RT broadly for all patients with tracheal cancer. Nevertheless, the retrospective nature of this observational study limits its interpretation.

  10. Prostate cancer: experience with definitive irradiation in the aged

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.; Bodner, H.; Broth, E.

    1985-03-01

    When considering therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer, stage and grade of disease have been the most important determinants. In the elderly, the nominal age has assumed increasing importance in the final decision. A balanced judgment must be reached between the patient's normal life expectancy and the rapidity with which the cancer may be expected to express its malignant potential. By careful attention to patient selection and the details of treatment, definitive irradiation can improve quality of life and survival. Of 63 patients aged seventy-three to ninety years referred for irradiation, 56 were found medically suitable for definitive treatment. A review of the authors experience is presented.

  11. Rethinking: Ideal Screening Age for Breast Cancer in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Maha Abdel; Al Ratrout, Hefzi; Al Wadaani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim is to identify the ideal screening age for women in developing countries and to determine the suitable method for early detection of breast cancer based on age and readiness of the community. Materials and Methods A 30-year retrospective review (from 1984 to 2014) was undertaken at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia. Medical records of those diagnosed with breast cancer from the outpatient department and hospital admission records were reviewed, focusing mainly on demographic data, age, and time at presentation. Radiological and histopathological records were also reviewed for confirmation of diagnosis. Age-based statistical review was undertaken of the female population within the hospital catchment area. Results The total number of patients was 1.832, accounting for 0.8 % affected patients when plotted against the 235,339 females within the catchment area. Considering the standard screening age of 40 years, patients were divided into two groups: group I included those below the age of 40 years at the time of diagnosis, accounting for 641patients (35%), and group II included those above the age of 40 years, accounting for 1191 patients (65%). Group I patients were mostly reassured in primary healthcare centers, diagnostic modalities were used with reservation, relying solely on ultrasonography 276 (43%); whereas in group II patients, mammography was used liberally, which aided in the diagnosis in all 1191 (100%). Conclusion Despite the undisputable notion that breast cancer has higher predilection for women above the age of 40 years, there is a substantial subset of affected younger women in developing countries, which contradicts this concept. However, the scarcity of structured sessions in developing countries dictates Western-based early detection strategies, but the validity of such programs is culture-governed. Rigorously tailored screening programs directed towards individual communities are mandatory. Reducing

  12. Biological ageing and frailty markers in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hatse, Sigrid; Laenen, Annouschka; Kenis, Cindy; Swerts, Evalien; Neven, Patrick; Smeets, Ann; Schöffski, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Older cancer patients are a highly heterogeneous population in terms of global health and physiological reserves, and it is often difficult to determine the best treatment. Moreover, clinical tools currently used to assess global health require dedicated time and lack a standardized end score. Circulating markers of biological age and/or fitness could complement or partially substitute the existing screening tools. In this study we explored the relationship of potential ageing/frailty biomarkers with age and clinical frailty. On a population of 82 young and 162 older non-metastatic breast cancer patients, we measured mean leukocyte telomere length and plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). We also developed a new tool to summarize clinical frailty, designated Leuven Oncogeriatric Frailty Score (LOFS), by integrating GA results in a single, semi-continuous score. LOFS' median score was 8, on a scale from 0=frail to 10=fit. IL-6 levels were associated with chronological age in both groups and with clinical frailty in older breast cancer patients, whereas telomere length, IGF-1 and MCP-1 only correlated with age. Plasma IL-6 should be further explored as frailty biomarker in cancer patients. PMID:25989735

  13. Aging, Breast Cancer and the Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Presenescent or senescent hBF (1.2 or 18x×10 4/well, respectively) [M, Stampfer , P. Yaswen, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory wdre suspended in 60 l cold...2.8 1 2.8 Inducing a human-like senescent phenotype in mouse fibroblasts Jean-Philihoo Copp , Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher K. Patil...MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELL PROLIFERATION AND TUMORIGENESIS: A MOUSE MODEL FOR HUMAN AGING. Jean-Philippe Coppe, Simona Parrinello, Ana Krtolica, Christopher

  14. Pesticide exposure and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a case-control study using a geographic information system (GIS) to link SEER-Medicare and California pesticide data

    PubMed Central

    VoPham, Trang; Brooks, Maria M.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Talbott, Evelyn O.; Ruddell, Darren; Hart, Jaime E.; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Weissfeld, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of primary liver cancer, is associated with low survival. U.S. studies examining self-reported pesticide exposure in relation to HCC have demonstrated inconclusive results. We aimed to clarify the association between pesticide exposure and HCC by implementing a novel data linkage between Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare and California Pesticide Use Report (PUR) data using a geographic information system (GIS). Methods Controls were frequency-matched to HCC cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 in California by year, age, race, sex, and duration of residence in California. Potential confounders were extracted from Medicare claims. From 1974 to 2008, pounds (1 pound represents 0.45 kg) of applied organophosphate, organochlorine, and carbamate pesticides provided in PURs were aggregated to the ZIP Code level using area weighting in a GIS. ZIP Code exposure estimates were linked to subjects using Medicare-provided ZIP Codes to calculate pesticide exposure. Agricultural residents were defined as living in ZIP Codes with a majority area intersecting agricultural land cover according to the 1992, 2001, and 2006 National Land Cover Database (NLCD) rasters. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the association between pesticide exposure and HCC. Results Among California residents of agriculturally intensive areas, previous annual ZIP Code-level exposure to over 14.53 kg/km2 of organochlorine pesticides (75th percentile among controls) was associated with an increased risk of HCC after adjusting for liver disease and diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17, 2.99; p=0.0085). ZIP Code-level organochlorines were significantly associated with an increased risk of HCC among males (adjusted OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.58, 4.82; p=0.0004), but not associated with HCC among females (adjusted OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.35, 1.93; p=0

  15. Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependentBreast Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Christina; Fedele, Vita; Roydasgupta, Ritu; Fridlyand, Jane; Hubbard, Alan; Gray, Joe W.; Chew, Karen; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Moore, DanH.; Schittulli, Francesco; Tommasi, Stefania; Paradiso, Angelo; Albertson, Donna G.; Benz, Christopher C.

    2007-10-09

    Age is one of the most important risk factors for human malignancies, including breast cancer; in addition, age-at-diagnosis has been shown to be an independent indicator of breast cancer prognosis. However, except for inherited forms of breast cancer, there is little genetic or epigenetic understanding of the biological basis linking aging with sporadic breast cancer incidence and its clinical behavior.

  16. Analysis of cancer genomes reveals basic features of human aging and its role in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Podolskiy, Dmitriy I.; Lobanov, Alexei V.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations have long been implicated in aging and disease, but their impact on fitness and function is difficult to assess. Here by analysing human cancer genomes we identify mutational patterns associated with aging. Our analyses suggest that age-associated mutation load and burden double approximately every 8 years, similar to the all-cause mortality doubling time. This analysis further reveals variance in the rate of aging among different human tissues, for example, slightly accelerated aging of the reproductive system. Age-adjusted mutation load and burden correlate with the corresponding cancer incidence and precede it on average by 15 years, pointing to pre-clinical cancer development times. Behaviour of mutation load also exhibits gender differences and late-life reversals, explaining some gender-specific and late-life patterns in cancer incidence rates. Overall, this study characterizes some features of human aging and offers a mechanism for age being a risk factor for the onset of cancer. PMID:27515585

  17. Aging, tumor suppression and cancer: High-wire act!

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Judith

    2004-08-15

    Evolutionary theory holds that aging is a consequence of the declining force of natural selection with age. We discuss here the evidence that among the causes of aging in complex multicellular organisms, such as mammals, is the antagonistically pleiotropic effects of the cellular responses that protect the organism from cancer. Cancer is relatively rare in young mammals, owing in large measure to the activity of tumor suppressor mechanisms. These mechanisms either protect the genome from damage and/or mutations, or they elicit cellular responses--apoptosis or senescence--that eliminate or prevent the proliferation of somatic cells at risk for neoplastic transformation.We focus here on the senescence response, reviewing its causes, regulation and effects. In addition, we describe recent data that support the idea that both senescence and apoptosis may indeed be the double-edged swords predicted by the evolutionary hypothesis of antagonistic pleiotropy--protecting organisms from cancer early in life, but promoting aging phenotypes, including late life cancer, in older organisms.

  18. Obesity, age, ethnicity, and clinical features of prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Victor J; Pang, Darren; Tang, Wendell W; Zhang, Xin; Li, Li; You, Zongbing

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 36.5% of the U.S. adults (≥ 20 years old) are obese. Obesity has been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and several types of cancer. The present study included 1788 prostate cancer patients who were treated with radical prostatectomy at the Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, Louisiana, from January, 2001 to March, 2016. The patient’s medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Body mass index (BMI), age, ethnicity (Caucasians versus African Americans), clinical stage, Gleason score, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were retrieved. The relative risk of the patients was stratified into low risk and high risk groups. Associative analyses found that BMI was associated with age, clinical stage, Gleason score, but not ethnicity, PSA levels, or the relative risk in this cohort. Age was associated with ethnicity, clinical stage, Gleason score, and PSA levels, as well as the relative risk. Ethnicity was associated with Gleason score and PSA levels as well as the relative risk, but not clinical stage. These findings suggest that obesity is associated with advanced prostate cancer with stage T3 or Gleason score ≥ 7 diseases, and age and ethnicity are important factors that are associated with the clinical features of prostate cancer patients. PMID:28337464

  19. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  20. Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer Enters Its Golden Age

    PubMed Central

    Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, prostate cancer is the most frequent malignancy in men and ranks second in terms of mortality. Although recurrent or metastatic disease can be managed initially with androgen ablation, most patients eventually develop castration-resistant disease within a number of years, for which conventional treatments (eg, chemotherapy) provide only modest benefits. In the last few years, immunotherapy has emerged as an exciting therapeutic modality for advanced prostate cancer, and this field is evolving rapidly. Encouragingly, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has recently approved two novel immunotherapy agents for patients with advanced cancer: the antigen presenting cell-based product sipuleucel-T and the anti-CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) antibody ipilimumab, based on improvements in overall survival in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic melanoma, respectively. Currently, a number of trials are investigating the role of various immunological approaches for the treatment of prostate cancer, many of them with early indications of success. As immunotherapy for prostate cancer enters its golden age, the challenge of the future will be to design rational combinations of immunotherapy agents with each other or with other standard prostate cancer treatments in an effort to improve patient outcomes further. PMID:22844202

  1. Spatial-temporal analysis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the NCI-SEER NHL case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Exploring spatial-temporal patterns of disease incidence through cluster analysis identifies areas of significantly elevated or decreased risk, providing potential clues about disease risk factors. Little is known about the etiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), or the latency period that might be relevant for environmental exposures, and there are no published spatial-temporal cluster studies of NHL. Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study of NHL in four National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) centers: Detroit, Iowa, Los Angeles, and Seattle during 1998-2000. Using 20-year residential histories, we used generalized additive models adjusted for known risk factors to model spatially the probability that an individual had NHL and to identify clusters of elevated or decreased NHL risk. We evaluated models at five different time periods to explore the presence of clusters in a time frame of etiologic relevance. Results The best model fit was for residential locations 20 years prior to diagnosis in Detroit, Iowa, and Los Angeles. We found statistically significant areas of elevated risk of NHL in three of the four study areas (Detroit, Iowa, and Los Angeles) at a lag time of 20 years. The two areas of significantly elevated risk in the Los Angeles study area were detected only at a time lag of 20 years. Clusters in Detroit and Iowa were detected at several time points. Conclusions We found significant spatial clusters of NHL after allowing for disease latency and residential mobility. Our results show the importance of evaluating residential histories when studying spatial patterns of cancer. PMID:21718483

  2. Role of cancer stem cells in age-related rise in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip PN

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that comprises about 50% of estimated gastrointestinal cancers remains a high mortality malignancy. It is estimated that CRC will result in 9% of all cancer related deaths. CRC is the third leading malignancy affecting both males and females equally; with 9% of the estimated new cancer cases and 9% cancer related deaths. Sporadic CRC, whose incidence increases markedly with advancing age, occurs in 80%-85% patients diagnosed with CRC. Little is known about the precise biochemical mechanisms responsible for the rise in CRC with aging. However, many probable reasons for this increase have been suggested; among others they include altered carcinogen metabolism and the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to cancer-causing agents. Herein, we propose a role for self-renewing, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in regulating these cellular events. In this editorial, we have briefly described the recent work on the evolution of CSCs in gastro-intestinal track especially in the colon, and how they are involved in the age-related rise in CRC. Focus of this editorial is to provide a description of (1) CSC; (2) epigenetic and genetic mechanisms giving rise to CSCs; (3) markers of CSC; (4) characteristics; and (5) age-related increase in CSC in the colonic crypt. PMID:26600965

  3. Contraceptive Practices Among Female Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Dominick, Sally A.; McLean, Mamie R.; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Gorman, Jessica R.; Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Bouknight, Janet M.; Su, H. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of contraception between reproductive-aged cancer survivors and women in the general U.S. population. Among survivors, the study examined factors associated with use of contraception and emergency contraception. Methods This study analyzed enrollment data from an ongoing national prospective cohort study on reproductive health after cancer entitled the Fertility Information Research Study. We compared current contraceptive use in survivors with that of the general population ascertained by the 2006–2010 National Survey for Family Growth. Log-binomial regression models estimated relative risks for characteristics associated with use of contraception, World Health Organization tiers I–II (sterilization and hormonal) contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception in survivors. Results Data from 295 survivors (mean age 31.6 ± 5.7 years, range 20–44 years) enrolled in this prospective study (85% response rate) were examined. Age-adjusted rates of using tiers I–II contraceptive methods were lower in survivors than the general population (34% [28.8–40.0] compared with 53% [51.5–54.5], P<.01). Only 56% of survivors reported receiving family planning services (counseling, prescription or procedure related to birth control) since cancer diagnosis. In adjusted analysis, receipt of family planning services was associated with both increased use of tiers I–II contraceptive methods (relative risk 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–1.5) and accessing emergency contraception (relative risk 5.0, 95% CI 1.6–16.3) in survivors. Conclusion Lower rates of using Tiers I–II contraceptive methods were found in reproductive-aged cancer survivors compared to the general population of U.S. women. Exposure to family planning services across the cancer care continuum may improve contraception utilization among these women. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01843140. PMID:26181090

  4. Metformin in obesity, cancer and aging: addressing controversies

    PubMed Central

    Berstein, Lev M.

    2012-01-01

    Metformin, an oral anti-diabetic drug, is being considered increasingly for treatment and prevention of cancer, obesity as well as for the extension of healthy lifespan. Gradually accumulating discrepancies about its effect on cancer and obesity can be explained by the shortage of randomized clinical trials, differences between control groups (reference points), gender- and age-associated effects and pharmacogenetic factors. Studies of the potential antiaging effects of antidiabetic biguanides, such as metformin, are still experimental for obvious reasons and their results are currently ambiguous. Here we discuss whether the discrepancies in different studies are merely methodological or inherently related to individual differences in responsiveness to the drug. PMID:22589237

  5. African Americans and Prostate Cancer: A Spatial and Multilevel Analysis of Post-treatment Care and Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    5 2.2.2. Geocoded prostate cancer data set development 5 2.3. Task 2: Integrate data to build GIS and conduct exploratory spatial...of the SEER-Medicare data set, the development and construction of the prostate cancer geocoded data set, and the GIS database development. Under...From this data file, 2 geocoded prostate cancer data sets were developed: one with all cases in the SEER-Medicare data set, and a second that

  6. Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kevin B; Yeager, Meredith; Zhou, Weiyin; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin; Hutchinson, Amy; Deng, Xiang; Liu, Chenwei; Horner, Marie-Josephe; Cullen, Michael; Epstein, Caroline G; Burdett, Laurie; Dean, Michael C; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Sampson, Joshua; Chung, Charles C; Kovaks, Joseph; Gapstur, Susan M; Stevens, Victoria L; Teras, Lauren T; Gaudet, Mia M; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Philip R; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M; Hu, Nan; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Liao, Linda; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Koh, Woon-Puay; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Fan, Jin-Hu; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret R; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Zanetti, Krista A; Ziegler, Regina G; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Malats, Nuria; Marenne, Gaelle; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Landi, Maria Teresa; Goldin, Lynn; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Rotunno, Melissa; Rajaraman, Preetha; Andersson, Ulrika; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreon, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henriksson, Roger; Inskip, Peter D; Johansen, Christoffer; Landgren, Annelie; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique S; Melin, Beatrice S; Peters, Ulrike; Ruder, Avima M; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Silverman, Debra T; Kogevinas, Manolis; Gonzalez, Juan R; Villa, Olaya; Li, Donghui; Duell, Eric J; Risch, Harvey A; Olson, Sara H; Kooperberg, Charles; Wolpin, Brian M; Jiao, Li; Hassan, Manal; Wheeler, William; Arslan, Alan A; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron D; Holly, Elizabeth A; Klein, Alison P; LaCroix, Andrea; Mandelson, Margaret T; Petersen, Gloria; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Canzian, Federico; Chang, Kenneth; Cotterchio, Michelle; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Jenab, Mazda; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; McWilliams, Robert R; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Rabe, Kari G; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Elena, Joanne W; Yu, Herbert; Amundadottir, Laufey; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stram, Daniel; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Wunder, Jay S; García, Ana Patiño; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Barkauskas, Donald A; Gorlick, Richard G; Purdue, Mark; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E; Schwartz, Kendra L; Davis, Faith G; Hsing, Ann W; Berndt, Sonja I; Black, Amanda; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; McGlynn, Katherine A; Cook, Michael B; Graubard, Barry I; Kratz, Christian P; Greene, Mark H; Erickson, Ralph L; Hunter, David J; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Real, Francisco X; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Caporaso, Neil E; Tucker, Margaret; Rothman, Nathaniel; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Chanock, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls drawn from 13 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones from DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of size >2 Mb were observed in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%) with abnormal cell proportions between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, the frequency increased with age; 0.23% under 50 and 1.91% between 75 and 79 (p=4.8×10−8). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid-tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals, OR=1.25, p=0.016), with a stronger association for cases who had DNA collected prior to diagnosis or treatment (OR=1.45, p=0.0005). Detectable clonal mosaicism was common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least one year prior to diagnosis of leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR=35.4, p=3.8×10−11). These findings underscore the importance of the role and time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and other late-onset diseases. PMID:22561519

  7. Trend analysis and survival of primary gallbladder cancer in the United States: a 1973-2009 population-based study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rubayat; Simoes, Eduardo J; Schmaltz, Chester; Jackson, Christian S; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2017-03-20

    Primary gallbladder cancer is an aggressive and uncommon cancer with poor outcomes. Our study examines epidemiology, trend, and survival of gallbladder cancer in the United States from 1973 to 2009. We utilized the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database (SEER). Frequency and rate analyses on demographics, stage, and survival were compared among non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, African American, and Asian/Pacific Islanders. A total of 18,124 cases were reported in SEER from 1973 to 2009 comprising 1.4% of all reported gastrointestinal cancers. Gallbladder cancer was more common in females than males (71 vs. 29%, respectively). The age-adjusted incidence rate was 1.4 per 100,000, significantly higher in females than males (1.7 vs. 1.0). Trend analysis showed that the incidence rate has been decreasing over the last three decades for males. However, among females, the incidence rate had decreased from 1973 to mid-90s but has remained stable since then. Trend analysis for stage at diagnosis showed that the proportion of late-stage cases has been increasing significantly since 2001 after a decreasing pattern since 1973. Survival has improved considerably over time, and survival is better in females than males and in Asian/Pacific Islanders than other racial groups. The highest survival was in patients who received both surgery and radiation. Trend analysis revealed a recent increase of the incidence of late-stage gallbladder cancer. Highest survival was associated with receiving both surgery and radiation.

  8. Male breast cancer, age and sex chromosome aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, P A; Maloney, V; Cooke, R; Crolla, J A; Ashworth, A; Swerdlow, A J

    2013-01-01

    Background: In cultured, dividing transformed T lymphocytes and in dividing bone marrow cells from normal men and those with a haematological malignancy, sex chromosome aneuploidy has been found to increase in prevalence and degree with age. This has rarely been investigated in non-dividing uncultured blood samples. The loss and gain of the X chromosome in dividing transformed lymphocytes in women with age is much more frequent than that of the Y chromosome in males. However, paradoxically X chromosome aneuploidy is rarely seen in the dividing cells of bone marrow of females. Methods: In blood samples from 565 men with breast cancer and 54 control men from the England and Wales general population, 80 cell nuclei per sample were scored for presence of X and Y chromosomes using fluorescent centromeric probes. Results: Sex chromosome aneuploidy, largely Y chromosome loss, was present in 63% of cases and 57% of controls, with the prevalence and degree of aneuploidy increasingly sharply and highly significantly with age. At ages 65–80 years, 71% of cases and 85% of controls showed aneuploidy and 15% and 25%, respectively, had ⩾10% of cells aneuploid. Allowing for age, aneuploidy was less prevalent (P=0.03) in cases than controls. Conclusion: Sex chromosome aneuploidy in non-dividing nuclei of peripheral blood cells is frequent in adult men, the prevalence and degree increasing sharply with age. The possible relation of sex chromosome aneuploidy to breast cancer risk in men, and to cancer risk generally, needs further investigation, ideally in cohort studies. PMID:23299533

  9. Molecular damage in cancer: an argument for mTOR-driven aging.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2011-12-01

    Despite common belief, accumulation of molecular damage does not play a key role in aging. Still, cancer (an age-related disease) is initiated by molecular damage. Cancer and aging share a lot in common including the activation of the TOR pathway. But the role of molecular damage distinguishes cancer and aging. Furthermore, an analysis of the role of both damage and aging in cancer argues against "a decline, caused by accumulation of molecular damage" as a cause of aging. I also discuss how random molecular damage, via rounds of multiplication and selection, brings about non-random hallmarks of cancer.

  10. The crossroads between cancer stem cells and aging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis suggests that only a subpopulation of cells within a tumour is responsible for the initiation and progression of neoplasia. The original and best evidence for the existence of CSCs came from advances in the field of haematological malignancies. Thus far, putative CSCs have been isolated from various solid and non-solid tumours and shown to possess self-renewal, differentiation, and cancer regeneration properties. Although research in the field is progressing extremely fast, proof of concept for the CSC hypothesis is still lacking and key questions remain unanswered, e.g. the cell of origin for these cells. Nevertheless, it is undisputed that neoplastic transformation is associated with genetic and epigenetic alterations of normal cells, and a better understanding of these complex processes is of utmost importance for developing new anti-cancer therapies. In the present review, we discuss the CSC hypothesis with special emphasis on age-associated alterations that govern carcinogenesis, at least in some types of tumours. We present evidence from the scientific literature for age-related genetic and epigenetic alterations leading to cancer and discuss the main challenges in the field. PMID:25708542

  11. Breast cancer characteristics at diagnosis and survival among Arab-American women compared to European- and African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Sharon Hensley; Schwartz, Kendra; Soliman, Amr; Johnson, Christine Cole; Gruber, Stephen B.; Merajver, Sofia D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Data from Arab world studies suggest that Arab women may experience a more aggressive breast cancer phenotype. To investigate this finding, we focused on one of the largest settlements of Arabs and Iraqi Christians (Chaldeans) in the US, metropolitan Detroit- a SEER reporting site since 1973. Materials and Methods We identified a cohort of primary breast cancer cases diagnosed 1973–2003. Using a validated name algorithm, women were identified as being of Arab/Chaldean descent if they had an Arab last or maiden name. We compared characteristics at diagnosis (age, grade, histology, SEER stage, and marker status) and overall survival between Arab-, European-, and African-Americans. Results The cohort included 1,652 (2%) women of Arab descent, 13,855 (18%) African-American women, and 63,615 (80%) European-American. There were statistically significant differences between the racial groups for all characteristics at diagnosis. Survival analyses overall and for each SEER stage showed that Arab-American women had the best survival, followed by European-American women. African-American women had the poorest overall survival and were 1.37 (95% confidence interval: 1.23–1.52) times more likely to be diagnosed with an aggressive tumor (adjusting for age, grade, marker status, and year of diagnosis). Conclusion Overall, Arab-American women have a distribution of breast cancer histology similar to European-American women. In contrast, the stage, age, and hormone receptor status at diagnosis among Arab-Americans was more similar to African-American women. However, Arab-American women have a better overall survival than even European-American women. PMID:18415013

  12. Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; McDonald, Mark W.; Chang, Andrew L.; Esiashvili, Natia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation

  13. Infertility in reproductive-age female cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jennifer M; Kelvin, Joanne Frankel; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2015-05-15

    Improved survival rates among reproductive-age females diagnosed with cancer have increased the focus on long-term quality of life, including maintenance of the ability to conceive biological children. Cancer-directed therapies such as high-dose alkylating agents and radiation to the pelvis, which deplete ovarian reserve, radiation to the brain, which affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and surgical resection of reproductive structures can decrease the likelihood of having biological children. Standard fertility preservation strategies such as embryo and oocyte cryopreservation before the onset of therapy offer the opportunity to conserve fertility, but they may not be feasible because of the urgency to start cancer therapy, financial limitations, and a lack of access to reproductive endocrinologists. Ovarian tissue freezing is considered experimental, with limited data related to pregnancies, but it minimizes treatment delay. Studies evaluating gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues have had mixed results, although a recent randomized, prospective study in women with breast cancer demonstrated a protective effect. Fertility preservation programs are increasingly being developed within cancer programs. In this article, we describe risks to infertility and options for preservation, raise psychosocial and ethical issues, and propose elements for establishing an effective fertility preservation program.

  14. An actuarial approach to comparing early stage and late stage lung cancer mortality and survival.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sara W; Mulshine, James L; Hagstrom, Dale; Pyenson, Bruce S

    2010-02-01

    Comparing the mortality characteristics of different cohorts is an essential process in the life insurance industry. Pseudodisease, lead-time bias, and length bias, which are critical to determining the value of cancer screening, have close analogues in life insurance company management, including the temporal impact of underwriting. Ratios of all-cause mortality rates for cancer cohorts relative to standard population mortality rates can provide insights into early stage and late stage mortality differences, differences by age, sex, race, and histology, and allow modeling of biases associated with early stage detection or screening protocols. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data set has characteristics that allow efficient application of actuarial techniques. We show the mortality burden associated with treated early stage lung cancer and that identifying all lung cancers at early stage could reduce US lung cancer deaths by over 70,000 per year.

  15. Aging and the Dendritic Cell System: Implications for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.; Chatta, Gurkamal S.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system shows a decline in responsiveness to antigens both with aging, as well as in the presence of tumors. The malfunction of the immune system with age can be attributed to developmental and functional alterations in several cell populations. Previous studies have shown defects in humoral responses and abnormalities in T cell function in aged individuals, but have not distinguished between abnormalities in antigen presentation and intrinsic T cell or B cell defects in aged individuals. Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in regulating immune responses by presenting antigens to naïve T lymphocytes, modulating Th1/Th2/Treg balance, producing numerous regulatory cytokines and chemokines, and modifying survival of immune effectors. DC are receiving increased attention due to their involvement in the immunobiology of tolerance and autoimmunity, as well as their potential role as biological adjuvants in tumor vaccines. Recent advances in the molecular and cell biology of different DC populations allow for addressing the issue of DC and aging both in rodents and humans. Since DC play a crucial role in initiating and regulating immune responses, it is reasonable to hypothesize that they are directly involved in altered antitumor immunity in aging. However, the results of studies focusing on DC in the elderly are conflicting. The present review summarizes the available human and experimental animal data on quantitative and qualitative alterations of DC in aging and discusses the potential role of the DC system in the increased incidence of cancer in the elderly. PMID:17446082

  16. Complete prevalence of malignant primary brain tumors registry data in the United States compared with other common cancers, 2010

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Adah S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Kruchko, Carol; ...

    2016-12-29

    Complete prevalence proportions illustrate the burden of disease in a population. Here, this study estimates the 2010 complete prevalence of malignant primary brain tumors overall and by Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) histology groups, and compares the brain tumor prevalence estimates to the complete prevalence of other common cancers as determined by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (SEER) by age at prevalence (2010): children (0–14 y), adolescent and young adult (AYA) (15–39 y), and adult (40+ y).

  17. A midpoint assessment of the American Cancer Society challenge goal to decrease cancer incidence by 25% between 1992 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Sedjo, Rebecca L; Byers, Tim; Barrera, Ermilo; Cohen, Carmel; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Newman, Lisa A; Runowicz, Carolyn D; Thorson, Alan G; Thun, Michael J; Ward, Elizabeth; Wender, Richard C; Eyre, Harmon J

    2007-01-01

    In 1998, the American Cancer Society (ACS) set a challenge goal for the nation to reduce cancer incidence by 25% over the period between 1992 and 2015. This report examines the trends in cancer incidence between 1992 and 2004. Trends were calculated using data on incident malignant cancer cases from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry. Delay-adjusted incidence trends for all cancer sites; all cancer sites without prostate cancer included; all cancer sites stratified by gender, age, and race; and for 20 selected cancer sites are presented. Over the first half of the ACS challenge period, overall cancer incidence rates have declined by about 0.6% per year. The greatest overall declines were observed among men and among those aged 65 years and older. The pace of incidence reduction over the first half of the ACS challenge period was only half that necessary to put us on target to achieve the 25% cancer incidence reduction goal in 2015. New understandings of preventable factors are needed, and new efforts are also needed to better act on our current knowledge about how we can prevent cancer, especially by continuing to reduce tobacco use and beginning to reverse the epidemic of obesity.

  18. DNA Helicases Associated with Genetic Instability, Cancer, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Avvaru N.

    2015-01-01

    DNA helicases have essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability. They have achieved even greater prominence with the discovery that mutations in human helicase genes are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders and are associated with tumorigenesis. A number of missense mutations in human helicase genes are linked to chromosomal instability diseases characterized by age-related disease or associated with cancer, providing incentive for the characterization of molecular defects underlying aberrant cellular phenotypes. In this chapter, we discuss some examples of clinically relevant missense mutations in various human DNA helicases, particularly those of the Iron-Sulfur cluster and RecQ families. Clinically relevant mutations in the XPD helicase can lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne’s syndrome, Trichothiodystrophy, or COFS syndrome. FANCJ mutations are associated with Fanconi anemia or breast cancer. Mutations of the Fe-S helicase ChlR1 (DDX11) are linked to Warsaw Breakage syndrome. Mutations in the RecQ helicases BLM and WRN are linked to the cancer-prone disorder Bloom’s syndrome and premature aging condition Werner syndrome, respectively. RECQL4 mutations can lead to Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, or RAPADILINO. Mutations in the Twinkle mitochondrial helicase are responsible for several neuromuscular degenerative disorders. We will discuss some insights gained from biochemical and genetic studies of helicase variants, and highlight some hot areas of helicase research based on recent developments. PMID:23161009

  19. Cancer and aging: The importance of telomeres in genome maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Rodier, Francis; Kim, Sahn-ho; Nijjar, Tarlochan; Yaswen, Paul; Campisi, Judith

    2004-10-01

    Telomeres are the specialized DNA-protein structures that cap the ends of linear chromosomes, thereby protecting them from degradation and fusion by cellular DNA repair processes. In vertebrate cells, telomeres consist of several kilobase pairs of DNA having the sequence TTAGGG, a few hundred base pairs of single-stranded DNA at the 3' end of the telomeric DNA tract, and a host of proteins that organize the telomeric double and single stranded DNA into a protective structure. Functional telomeres are essential for maintaining the integrity and stability of genomes. When combined with loss of cell cycle checkpoint controls, telomere dysfunction can lead to genomic instability, a common cause and hallmark of cancer. Consequently, normal mammalian cells respond to dysfunctional telomeres by undergoing apoptosis (programmed cell death) or cellular senescence (permanent cell cycle arrest), two cellular tumor suppressor mechanisms. These tumor suppressor mechanisms are potent suppressors of cancer, but recent evidence suggests that they can antagonistically also contribute to aging phenotypes. Here, we review what is known about the structure and function of telomeres in mammalian cells, particularly human cells, and how telomere dysfunction may arise and contribute to cancer and aging phenotypes.

  20. DNA helicases associated with genetic instability, cancer, and aging.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Brosh, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    DNA helicases have essential roles in the maintenance of genomic -stability. They have achieved even greater prominence with the discovery that mutations in human helicase genes are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders and are associated with tumorigenesis. A number of missense mutations in human helicase genes are linked to chromosomal instability diseases characterized by age-related disease or associated with cancer, providing incentive for the characterization of molecular defects underlying aberrant cellular phenotypes. In this chapter, we discuss some examples of clinically relevant missense mutations in various human DNA helicases, particularly those of the Iron-Sulfur cluster and RecQ families. Clinically relevant mutations in the XPD helicase can lead to Xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne's syndrome, Trichothiodystrophy, or COFS syndrome. FANCJ mutations are associated with Fanconi anemia or breast cancer. Mutations of the Fe-S helicase ChlR1 (DDX11) are linked to Warsaw Breakage syndrome. Mutations in the RecQ helicases BLM and WRN are linked to the cancer-prone disorder Bloom's syndrome and premature aging condition Werner syndrome, respectively. RECQL4 mutations can lead to Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, or RAPADILINO. Mutations in the Twinkle mitochondrial helicase are responsible for several neuromuscular degenerative disorders. We will discuss some insights gained from biochemical and genetic studies of helicase variants, and highlight some hot areas of helicase research based on recent developments.

  1. Cancers of the Thyroid: Overview and Statistics in the United States and Oklahoma

    PubMed Central

    Deen, Munim H; Burke, Kaitlin M; Janitz, Amanda; Campbell, Janis

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an apparent increase in thyroid cancer in the United States. Whether is due to an actual increase or increased screening is disputed. We analyzed thyroid cancer incidence and mortality across age and racial groups in Oklahoma (using data from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry) against Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program national data – using SEER*Stat software for mortality. In the US and Oklahoma, females had a higher AAIR compared to males, but it was lower in Oklahoma than in the US (Females: US 15.5 per 100,000, OK 10.9 per 100,000; Males: US 5.4 per 100,000, OK 3.8 per 100,000). Overall, five-year relative survival was lower, yet still high, for Oklahoma than in the US (92.1% v. 97.1%). Survival by stage was lower in Oklahoma compared to the United States for localized (97.8% v. 99.8%), regional (92.0% v. 97.0%), and distant (36.6% v. 55.3%) stage cancers. PMID:27885302

  2. Effect of marital status on the survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma treated with surgical resection: an analysis of 13,408 patients in the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Chen, Ping; Qian, Jian-Jun; Jin, Sheng-Jie; Yao, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Bai, Dou-Sheng; Jiang, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Marital status has been reported as an independent prognostic factor for survival in various cancers, but it has been rarely studied in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated by surgical resection. We retrospectively investigated Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data and identified 13,408 cases of HCC with surgical treatment between 1998 and 2013. The patients were categorized according to marital status, as “married,” “never married,” “widowed,” or “divorced/separated.” The 5-year HCC cause-specific survival (HCSS) data were obtained, and Kaplan–Meier methods and multivariate Cox regression models were used to ascertain whether marital status is also an independent prognostic factor for survival in HCC. Patients in the widowed group had the higher proportion of women, a greater proportion of older (>60 years) patients, more frequency in latest year of diagnosis (2008-2013), a greater number of tumors at TNM stage I/II, and more prevalence at localized SEER Stage, all of which were statistically significant within-group comparisons (P < 0.001). Marital status was demonstrated to be an independent prognostic factor by multivariate survival analysis (P < 0.001). Married patients had better 5-year HCSS than did unmarried patients (46.7% vs 37.8%) (P < 0.001); conversely, widowed patients had lowest HCSS compared with all other patients, overall, at each SEER stage, and for different tumor sizes. Marital status is an important prognostic factor for survival in patients with HCC treated with surgical resection. Widowed patients have the highest risk of death compared with other groups. PMID:27769053

  3. Between-ward disparities in colorectal cancer incidence and screening in Washington DC.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sharmila; Chattopadhyay, Amit; Levine, Paul H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the incidence and determinants of colorectal cancer (CRC) and its screening in District of Columbia (DC), and identify modifiable risk factors. Data (2000-2009) from the DC Cancer Registry, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS-DC) and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) were used to estimate CRC incidence in eight DC Wards. Risk factors and CRC screening were analyzed using uni-, bi-, and multivariable statistical methods with survey procedures in SAS (version 9.2) including binary, unconditional multivariable logistic regression analysis. Factors measured included stage of diagnosis, age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking, alcohol, exercise, body weight, health insurance, education, employment, and income. Over the study time, CRC screening increased from 48.4% to 68.6%. Mean age at diagnosis was 67 years. CRC incidence is high in DC. Furthermore, CRC incidence rates in DC below 50 years' age were higher than the SEER18 average. Disparities exist between CRC incidence and screening among DC Wards. Identified risk factors for CRC are smoking, obesity, and low physical activity; screening was less prevalent among the uninsured and low socio-economic group. Local variations in CRC occurrence exist and may vary from average national experiences. Identification of local regions which vary from national trends in disease occurrence is important for comprehensive understanding of the disease in the community.

  4. Historical Trends in the Use of Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Cancers: 1973-2008

    SciTech Connect

    Jairam, Vikram; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Yu, James B.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess historical trends in the use of radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric cancers over the past 4 decades. Methods: The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the 9 original tumor registries (SEER-9) was queried to identify patients aged 0 to 19 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, bone and joint cancer, cancer of the brain and nervous system, Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, Wilms tumor, or retinoblastoma from 1973 to 2008. Patients were grouped into 4-year time epochs. The number and percentage of patients who received RT as part of their initial treatment were calculated per epoch by each diagnosis group from 1973 to 2008. Results: RT use for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and retinoblastoma declined sharply from 57%, 57%, and 30% in 1973 to 1976 to 11%, 15%, and 2%, respectively, in 2005 to 2008. Similarly, smaller declines in RT use were also seen in brain cancer (70%-39%), bone cancer (41%-21%), Wilms tumor (75%-53%), and neuroblastoma (60%-25%). RT use curves for Wilms tumor and neuroblastoma were nonlinear with nadirs in 1993 to 1996 at 39% and 19%, respectively. There were minimal changes in RT use for Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia, roughly stable at 72%, 40%, and 11%, respectively. Almost all patients treated with RT were given external beam RT exclusively. However, from 1985 to 2008, treatments involving brachytherapy, radioisotopes, or combination therapy increased in frequency, comprising 1.8%, 4.6%, and 11.9% of RT treatments in brain cancer, soft tissue cancer, and retinoblastoma, respectively. Conclusions: The use of RT is declining over time in 7 of 10 pediatric cancer categories. A limitation of this study is a potential under-ascertainment of RT use in the SEER-9 database including the delayed use of RT.

  5. Analysis of Environmental Chemical Mixtures and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study

    PubMed Central

    Czarnota, Jenna; Gennings, Chris; Colt, Joanne S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Hartge, Patricia; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are several suspected environmental risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The associations between NHL and environmental chemical exposures have typically been evaluated for individual chemicals (i.e., one-by-one). Objectives We determined the association between a mixture of 27 correlated chemicals measured in house dust and NHL risk. Methods We conducted a population-based case–control study of NHL in four National Cancer Institute–Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results centers—Detroit, Michigan; Iowa; Los Angeles County, California; and Seattle, Washington—from 1998 to 2000. We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression to model the association of a mixture of chemicals and risk of NHL. The WQS index was a sum of weighted quartiles for 5 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 7 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 15 pesticides. We estimated chemical mixture weights and effects for study sites combined and for each site individually, and also for histologic subtypes of NHL. Results The WQS index was statistically significantly associated with NHL overall [odds ratio (OR) = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.56; p = 0.006; for one quartile increase] and in the study sites of Detroit (OR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.92; p = 0.045), Los Angeles (OR = 1.44; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.08; p = 0.049), and Iowa (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.23, 2.53; p = 0.002). The index was marginally statistically significant in Seattle (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.99; p = 0.071). The most highly weighted chemicals for predicting risk overall were PCB congener 180 and propoxur. Highly weighted chemicals varied by study site; PCBs were more highly weighted in Detroit, and pesticides were more highly weighted in Iowa. Conclusions An index of chemical mixtures was significantly associated with NHL. Our results show the importance of evaluating chemical mixtures when studying cancer risk. Citation Czarnota J, Gennings C, Colt JS, De Roos AJ, Cerhan JR, Severson RK, Hartge P, Ward MH

  6. Breast cancer under age 40: a different approach.

    PubMed

    Ribnikar, D; Ribeiro, J M; Pinto, D; Sousa, B; Pinto, A C; Gomes, E; Moser, E C; Cardoso, M J; Cardoso, F

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer (BC) under age 40 is a complex disease to manage due to the additionally fertility-related factors to be taken in consideration. More than 90% of young patients with BC are symptomatic. Women<40 years are more likely to develop BC with worse clinicopathological features and more aggressive subtype. This has been frequently associated with inferior outcomes. Recently, the prognostic significance of age<40 has been shown to differ according to the BC subtype, being associated with worst recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) for luminal BC. The biology of BC<40 has also been explored through analysis of large genomic data set, and specific pathways overexpressed in these tumors have been identified which can lead to the development of targeted therapy in the future. A multidisciplinary tumor board should determine the optimal locoregional and systemic management strategies for every individual patient with BC before the start of any therapy including surgery. This applies to both early (early breast cancer (EBC)) and advanced (advanced breast cancer (ABC)) disease, before the start of any therapy. Mastectomy even in young patients confers no overall survival advantage when compared to breast-conserving treatment (BCT), followed by radiotherapy. Regarding axillary approach, indications are identical to other age groups. Young age is one of the most important risk factors for local recurrence after both breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and mastectomy, associated with a higher risk of distant metastasis and death. Radiation after BCS reduces local recurrence from 19.5 to 10.2% in BC patients 40 years and younger. The indications for and the choice of systemic treatment for invasive BC (both early and advanced disease) should not be based on age alone but driven by the biological characteristics of the individual tumor (including hormone receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) status, grade, and proliferative

  7. Use of Palliative Radiotherapy Among Patients With Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, James A. Abrahamse, Paul H.; Lakhani, Indu; Earle, Craig C.; Katz, Steven J.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is known to effectively palliate many symptoms of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anecdotally, RT is believed to be commonly used in this setting, but limited population-based data are available. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization patterns of palliative RT among elderly patients with Stage IV NSCLC and, in particular, to identify factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify 11,084 Medicare beneficiaries aged {>=}65 years who presented with Stage IV NSCLC in the 11 SEER regions between 1991 and 1996. The primary outcome was receipt of RT. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with receipt of RT. Results: A total of 58% of these patients received RT, with its use decreasing over time (p = 0.01). Increasing age was negatively associated with receipt of treatment (p <0.001), as was increasing comorbidities (p <0.001). Factors positively associated with the receipt of RT included income (p = 0.001), hospitalization (p <0.001), and treatment with chemotherapy (p <0.001). Although the use varied across the SEER regions (p = 0.001), gender, race/ethnicity, and distance to the nearest RT facility were not associated with treatment. Conclusions: Elderly patients with metastatic NSCLC frequently receive palliative RT, but its use varies, especially with age and receipt of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to determine whether this variability reflects good quality care.

  8. Light-at-night-induced circadian disruption, cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Vinogradova, Irina A; Panchenko, Andrei V; Popovich, Irina G; Zabezhinski, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Light-at-night has become an increasing and essential part of the modern lifestyle and leads to a number of health problems, including excessive body mass index, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Working Group concluded that "shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2A) [1]. According to the circadian disruption hypothesis, light-at-night might disrupt the endogenous circadian rhythm and specifically suppress nocturnal production of the pineal hormone melatonin and its secretion into the blood. We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span, and spontaneous and chemical carcinogenesis in rodents. Exposure to constant illumination was followed by accelerated aging and enhanced spontaneous tumorigenesis in female CBA and transgenic HER-2/neu mice. In male and female rats maintained at various light/dark regimens (standard 12:12 light/dark [LD], the natural light [NL] of northwestern Russia, constant light [LL], and constant darkness [DD]) from the age of 25 days until natural death, it was found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated age-related switch-off of the estrous function (in females), induced development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, and shortened life span both in male and females rats compared to the standard LD regimen. Melatonin given in nocturnal drinking water prevented the adverse effect of the constant illumination (LL) and natural light (NL) regimens on the homeostasis, life span, and tumor development both in mice and rats. The exposure to the LL regimen accelerated colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats, whereas the treatment with melatonin alleviated the effects of LL. The maintenance of rats at the DD regimen inhibited DMH-induced carcinogenesis. The LL regimen accelerated, whereas the DD regimen inhibited both mammary carcinogenesis

  9. Age- and time-dependent changes in cancer incidence among immigrants to Sweden: colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Fallah, Mahdi; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari

    2012-07-15

    To examine the role of gender, age at immigration and length of stay on incidence trends of common cancers, we studied risk of colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancers in immigrants to Sweden from 1958 to 2008. The nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database was used to calculate standardized incidence ratios for common cancers among immigrants compared to Swedes. Immigrants were classified into "high-risk" countries when their risk was increased, into "low-risk" when their risk was decreased and into "other" when their risk was nonsignificant. Among those who immigrated at younger age (<30 years), we found an increasing trend for colorectal cancer risk in low-risk men and high-risk women. Among those who immigrated at older age (≥ 30 years), a decreasing lung cancer risk in high-risk men and an increasing breast cancer risk in low-risk women were observed. The increasing trend of prostate cancer risk was independent of age at immigration. The risk trends for "other" immigrants were between the risks of low- and high-risk countries. The gender-specific shifts in cancer risks in immigrants toward the risk in natives indicate a major role of sex, age at immigration and environmental exposures in colorectal and lung cancers risks. In contrast, the unchanged trend of breast cancer among those who immigrated at younger ages and an increasing trend for those who migrated at older ages may suggest a limited effect for environmental exposures, especially at younger age. Our study points out a role of age at immigration on the risk trend of cancer.

  10. Age at exposure and attained age variations of cancer risk in the Japanese A-bomb and radiotherapy cohorts

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Uwe; Walsh, Linda

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Phenomenological risk models for radiation-induced cancer are frequently applied to estimate the risk of radiation-induced cancers at radiotherapy doses. Such models often include the effect modification, of the main risk to radiation dose response, by age at exposure and attained age. The aim of this paper is to compare the patterns in risk effect modification by age, between models obtained from the Japanese atomic-bomb (A-bomb) survivor data and models for cancer risks previously reported for radiotherapy patients. Patterns in risk effect modification by age from the epidemiological studies of radiotherapy patients were also used to refine and extend the risk effect modification by age obtained from the A-bomb survivor data, so that more universal models can be presented here. Methods: Simple log-linear and power functions of age for the risk effect modification applied in models of the A-bomb survivor data are compared to risks from epidemiological studies of second cancers after radiotherapy. These functions of age were also refined and fitted to radiotherapy risks. The resulting age models provide a refined and extended functional dependence of risk with age at exposure and attained age especially beyond 40 and 65 yr, respectively, and provide a better representation than the currently available simple age functions. Results: It was found that the A-bomb models predict risk similarly to the outcomes of testicular cancer survivors. The survivors of Hodgkin’s disease show steeper variations of risk with both age at exposure and attained age. The extended models predict solid cancer risk increase as a function of age at exposure beyond 40 yr and the risk decrease as a function of attained age beyond 65 yr better than the simple models. Conclusions: The standard functions for risk effect modification by age, based on the A-bomb survivor data, predict second cancer risk in radiotherapy patients for ages at exposure prior to 40 yr and attained ages

  11. Improved survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and disparities by age, race, and socioeconomic status by decade, 1983–2012

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Hong, Guobin; Li, Dan; Mallampati, Saradhi; Zhou, Xiuling; Zhou, Cuiling; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheng, Zhibin; Shan, Hong; Ma, Haiqing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), accounting for the majority of liver cancer, is a highly aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis and therefore adds up the financial burden. Incidence data of HCC in three decades during 1983-2012 were extracted from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database with incidence rates of 1.9, 3.1 and 4.9 per 100,000 respectively. In addition, to evaluate the survival changes in the same period, a total of 63,640 HCC cancer cases were accessed from SEER database. The six-month relative survival rates improved each decade from 31.0% to 42.9% to 57.2% and the higher increase can be seen in the last two decades. More importantly, the disparities of survival among different racial groups and socioeconomic status (SES) were confirmed by the inferiority of survival in Black race and high-poverty group respectively. This research analyzed the incidence and survival data of HCC in the past three decades and may help predict the future trends of incidence and survival. Furthermore, this study may help better design healthcare policies and clinical management programs to balance the disparities of survival between SES groups, races, ages and sexes confirmed in this study and thereby improve the clinical management of HCC. PMID:27486977

  12. Age-related cancer mutations associated with clonal hematopoietic expansion

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingchao; Lu, Charles; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Yellapantula, Venkata; Miller, Christopher A.; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Welch, John S.; Link, Daniel C.; Walter, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Several genetic alterations characteristic of leukemia and lymphoma have been detected in the blood of individuals without apparent hematological malignancies. We analyzed blood-derived sequence data from 2,728 individuals within The Cancer Genome Atlas, and discovered 77 blood-specific mutations in cancer-associated genes, the majority being associated with advanced age. Remarkably, 83% of these mutations were from 19 leukemia/lymphoma-associated genes, and nine were recurrently mutated (DNMT3A, TET2, JAK2, ASXL1, TP53, GNAS, PPM1D, BCORL1 and SF3B1). We identified 14 additional mutations in a very small fraction of blood cells, possibly representing the earliest stages of clonal expansion in hematopoietic stem cells. Comparison of these findings to mutations in hematological malignancies identified several recurrently mutated genes that may be disease initiators. Our analyses show that the blood cells of more than 2% of individuals (5–6% of people older than 70 years) contain mutations that may represent premalignant, initiating events that cause clonal hematopoietic expansion. PMID:25326804

  13. Specker’s parable of the overprotective seer: A road to contextuality, nonlocality and complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yeong-Cherng; Spekkens, Robert W.; Wiseman, Howard M.

    2011-09-01

    In 1960, the mathematician Ernst Specker described a simple example of nonclassical correlations, the counter-intuitive features of which he dramatized using a parable about a seer, who sets an impossible prediction task to his daughter’s suitors. We revisit this example here, using it as an entrée to three central concepts in quantum foundations: contextuality, Bell-nonlocality, and complementarity. Specifically, we show that Specker’s parable offers a narrative thread that weaves together a large number of results, including the following: the impossibility of measurement-noncontextual and outcome-deterministic ontological models of quantum theory (the 1967 Kochen-Specker theorem), in particular, the recent state-specific pentagram proof of Klyachko; the impossibility of Bell-local models of quantum theory (Bell’s theorem), especially the proofs by Mermin and Hardy and extensions thereof; the impossibility of a preparation-noncontextual ontological model of quantum theory; the existence of triples of positive operator valued measures (POVMs) that can be measured jointly pairwise but not triplewise. Along the way, several novel results are presented: a generalization of a theorem by Fine connecting the existence of a joint distribution over outcomes of counterfactual measurements to the existence of a measurement-noncontextual and outcome-deterministic ontological model; a generalization of Klyachko’s proof of the Kochen-Specker theorem from pentagrams to a family of star polygons; a proof of the Kochen-Specker theorem in the style of Hardy’s proof of Bell’s theorem (i.e., one that makes use of the failure of the transitivity of implication for counterfactual statements); a categorization of contextual and Bell-nonlocal correlations in terms of frustrated networks; a derivation of a new inequality testing preparation noncontextuality; some novel results on the joint measurability of POVMs and the question of whether these can be modeled

  14. Common risk variants for colorectal cancer: an evaluation of associations with age at cancer onset

    PubMed Central

    Song, Nan; Shin, Aesun; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Jeongseon; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Common genetic risk variants for colorectal cancer (CRC) have been identified at approximately 40 loci by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We investigated the association of these risk variants by age at onset of CRC using case-only and case-control analysis. A total of 1,962 CRC cases and 2,668 controls from two independent case-control studies conducted by Korea’s National Cancer Center were included in this study. We genotyped 33 GWAS-identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CRC risk. The risk allele in SNP rs704017, located at 10q22.3 in the ZMIZ1-AS1 gene, was consistently less frequent among CRC patients aged <50 years than among CRC patients aged ≥50 years in the case-only analysis (odds ratio (OR) = 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.66–0.92, P = 2.7 × 10−3, in an additive model), although this did not surpass the threshold for multiple testing. The direction of associations between rs704017 and CRC risk differed by age group in the combined case-control analysis (<50 years: OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60–0.98, P = 0.03 and ≥50 years: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.98–1.29, P = 0.09, in a dominant model); the p-values for heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity = 7.5 × 10−3) and for interaction were statistically significant (Pinteraction = 7.8 × 10−3, in the dominant model). Our results suggest that the CRC susceptibility SNP rs704017 has a hereditary effect on onset age of CRC. PMID:28084440

  15. Colorectal Cancer in Alaska Native People, 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Steven R.; Sacco, Frank; Lanier, Anne P.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among Alaska Native (AN) people, and the second leading cause of cancer death. The incidence rate for the combined years 1999 through 2003 was 30% higher than the rate among U.S. whites (USWs) for the same period. Current incidence rates may serve to monitor the impact of screening programs in reducing CRC in the AN population. METHODS: Incidence data are from the Alaska Native Tumor Registry and the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. We compared AN CRC incidence, survival rates, and stage at diagnosis with rates in USWs for cases diagnosed from 2005 through 2009. Relative survival calculations were produced in SEER*Stat by the actuarial method. RESULTS: The CRC age-adjusted incidence rate among AN men and women combined was higher than those in USW men and women (84 vs. 43/100,000; P < .05; AN:USW rate ratio [RR] = 2.0). The greatest differences between rates in AN people and USWs were for tumors in the hepatic flexure (RR = 3.1) and in the transverse (RR = 2.9) and sigmoid (RR = 2.5) regions of the colon. Rectal cancer rates among AN people were significantly higher than rates in USWs (21 vs.12/100,000). Five-year relative survival proportions by stage at diagnosis indicate that the CRC 5-year relative survival was similar in AN people and USWs for the period 2004 through 2009. CONCLUSIONS: The high rate of CRC in AN people emphasizes the need for screening programs and interventions to reduce known modifiable risks. Research in methods to promote healthy behaviors among AN people is greatly needed. PMID:23112882

  16. Esophageal cancer epidemiology in blacks and whites: racial and gender disparities in incidence, mortality, survival rates and histology.

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Commiskey, Patricia; Mack, Kelly; Meltzer, Stephen; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Esophageal cancer rate disparities are pronounced for blacks and whites. This study presents black-white esophageal cancer incidence, mortality, relative survival rates, histology and trends for two five-year time periods--1991-1995 and 1996-2000--and for the time period 1991-2000. METHODS: The study used data from the National Cancer Institute's population-based Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) program with submission dates 1991-2000. Age-adjusted incidence, mortality, relative survival rates and histology for esophageal carcinoma were calculated for nine SEER cancer registries for 1991-2000. Rates were analyzed by race and gender for changes over specified time periods. RESULTS: Esophageal cancer age-adjusted incidence of blacks was about twice that of whites (8.63 vs. 4.39/100,000, p < 0.05). Age-adjusted mortality for blacks, although showing a declining trend, was nearly twice that of whites (7.79 vs. 3.96, p < 0.05). Although survival was poor for all groups, it was significantly poorer in blacks than in whites. Squamous cell carcinoma was more commonly diagnosed in blacks and white females, whereas adenocarcinoma was more common among white males (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Racial disparities in esophageal cancer incidence, mortality, survival and histology exist. Survival rates from this disease have not significantly improved over the decade. These data support the need for advances in prevention, early detection biomarker research and research on new, more effective treatment modalities for this disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:16334494

  17. The 2008 American Federation For Aging Annual Research Conference: aging and cancer: two sides of the same coin?

    PubMed

    Martin, George M

    2009-06-01

    The 2008 Research Conference of the American Federation for Aging Research took place in New York City on October 6-7 and had, as its theme, the interface between the biology of cancer and the biology of aging. The first day was devoted to a series of 5-year progress reports by grantees of an innovative program jointly sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging aimed at fostering both basic and clinical interactions and integrations among investigators with primary research interests in either the biology of aging or the biology of cancer. This was followed by a series of presentations on cell biology (Judith Campisi), evolutionary biology (Steven N. Austad), mitochondrial damage (Lawrence A. Loeb), stem cell functionality (Thomas A. Rando), oxidative stress and cancer resistance (Rochelle Buffenstein), signal transduction and replicative senescence in cancer and aging (Norman E. Sharpless), and telomere biology (Jack D. Griffith). Overview presentations were given by John W. Rowe and Harvey Jay Cohen. The conference closed with a roundtable discussion with representatives of industry in an effort to enhance communications with academicians.

  18. Function of Klotho and is MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer and Aging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    completely absent in prostate cancer samples whereas all of non- cancer tissues investigated showed strong staining for this miRNA , suggesting that...CONTRACT NUMBER Function of Klotho and is MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer and Aging 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0264 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...ABSTRACT We have observed the expression of CD164, IGFR, and Klotho proteins in human prostate cancer tissue microarrays as determined by

  19. Management of Cancer in the Older Age Person: An Approach to Complex Medical Decisions.

    PubMed

    Vallet-Regí, María; Manzano, Miguel; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Checa López, Marta; Aapro, Matti; Balducci, Lodovico

    2017-03-01

    The management of cancer in older aged people is becoming a common problem due to the aging of the population. There are many variables determining the complex situation that are interconnected. Some of them can be assessed, such as risk of mortality and risk of treatment complications, but many others are still unknown, such as the course of disease, the host-related factors that influence cancer aggressiveness, and the phenotype heralding risk of permanent treatment-related damage.This article presents a dynamic and personalized approach to older people with cancer based on our experience on aging, cancer, and their biological interactions. Also, novel treatments and management approaches to older individuals, based on their functional age and their social and emotional needs, are thoughtfully explored here. The Oncologist 2017;22:335-342 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The goal of this article is to suggest a practical approach to complexity, a clinical situation becoming increasingly common with the aging of the population. Beginning with the analysis of two clinical cases, the authors offer an algorithm for approaching cancer in the older person that involves the assessment of life expectancy without cancer, the risk that cancer might compromise a patient's survival, function, or quality of life, and the potential benefits and risks of the treatments based on a clinical evaluation. The authors then review possible laboratory assessment of functional age and the importance of rapid-learning databases in the study of cancer and age.

  20. Factors associated with guideline-recommended KRAS testing in colorectal cancer patients: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Mary E.; Karlitz, Jordan J.; Schlichting, Jennifer A.; Chen, Vivien W.; Lynch, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Response to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors is poorer among Stage IV colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with KRAS mutations, thus KRAS testing is recommended prior to treatment. KRAS testing was collected by Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries for 2010 CRC cases, and our goal was to provide the first population-based estimates of testing in the U.S. Methods SEER CRC cases diagnosed in 2010 were evaluated (n=30,351). Chi-square tests and logistic regression were conducted to determine patient characteristics associated with KRAS testing, stratified by Stages I-III vs. Stage IV. Log-rank tests were used to examine survival by testing status. Results KRAS testing among Stage IV cases ranged from 39% in New Mexico to 15% in Louisiana. In the model, younger age, being married, living in a metropolitan area, and having primary site surgery were associated with greater odds of receiving KRAS testing. Those who received testing had significantly better survival then those who did not (p<0.0001). Among those who received testing, there was no significant difference in survival by mutated vs. wild type KRAS. Five percent of Stage I-III cases received testing. Conclusions Wide variation in documented KRAS testing for Stage IV CRC patients exists among SEER registries. Age remained highly significant in multivariate models, suggesting it plays an independent role in the patient and/or provider decision to be tested. Further research is needed to determine drivers of variation in testing, as well as reasons for testing in Stage I-III cases where it is not recommended. PMID:25844824

  1. Occurrence of pancreatic, biliary tract, and gallbladder cancers in Alaska Native people, 1973–2007

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Steven R.; Kelly, Janet J.; Ashokkumar, Ramkumar; Lanier, Anne P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the occurrence of pancreatic, biliary tract, and gallbladder cancers within the Alaska Native (AN) population. Study design Population-based analysis utilizing a tumor registry and comparative population data. Methods Pancreaticobiliary cancers rates for AN people during 1973–2007 were determined from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) AN Tumor Registry. Cancer incidence rates were age-adjusted to the World Standard Million and compared over 2 time periods with US white and black rates. Results During 1973–2007, 213 AN people developed pancreatic cancer, 73 gallbladder cancer and 61 biliary tract cancer. Pancreatic cancer occurs at similar rates in AN men and women, but data for 1993–2007 indicate that the rates among AN men may be increasing. The incidence rate in AN women (9.5/100,000) was statistically higher than in US white women (5.8/100,000). The incidence for biliary tract cancer in AN men and gallbladder cancer in AN men and women is statistically higher than that for US whites and blacks. Conclusions Pancreaticobiliary cancers, particularly biliary tract and gallbladder cancers, in both AN men and women and pancreatic cancer in women occur at an increased rate in AN people. Risk factors relating to the elevated rate are discussed. Certain factors are potentially modifiable, such as the use of tobacco and obesity. PMID:22456038

  2. A novel web informatics approach for automated surveillance of cancer mortality trends.

    PubMed

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua

    2016-06-01

    Cancer surveillance data are collected every year in the United States via the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). General trends are closely monitored to measure the nation's progress against cancer. The objective of this study was to apply a novel web informatics approach for enabling fully automated monitoring of cancer mortality trends. The approach involves automated collection and text mining of online obituaries to derive the age distribution, geospatial, and temporal trends of cancer deaths in the US. Using breast and lung cancer as examples, we mined 23,850 cancer-related and 413,024 general online obituaries spanning the timeframe 2008-2012. There was high correlation between the web-derived mortality trends and the official surveillance statistics reported by NCI with respect to the age distribution (ρ=0.981 for breast; ρ=0.994 for lung), the geospatial distribution (ρ=0.939 for breast; ρ=0.881 for lung), and the annual rates of cancer deaths (ρ=0.661 for breast; ρ=0.839 for lung). Additional experiments investigated the effect of sample size on the consistency of the web-based findings. Overall, our study findings support web informatics as a promising, cost-effective way to dynamically monitor spatiotemporal cancer mortality trends.

  3. A novel web informatics approach for automated surveillance of cancer mortality trends✩

    PubMed Central

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer surveillance data are collected every year in the United States via the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). General trends are closely monitored to measure the nation's progress against cancer. The objective of this study was to apply a novel web informatics approach for enabling fully automated monitoring of cancer mortality trends. The approach involves automated collection and text mining of online obituaries to derive the age distribution, geospatial, and temporal trends of cancer deaths in the US. Using breast and lung cancer as examples, we mined 23,850 cancer-related and 413,024 general online obituaries spanning the timeframe 2008–2012. There was high correlation between the web-derived mortality trends and the official surveillance statistics reported by NCI with respect to the age distribution (ρ = 0.981 for breast; ρ = 0.994 for lung), the geospatial distribution (ρ = 0.939 for breast; ρ = 0.881 for lung), and the annual rates of cancer deaths (ρ = 0.661 for breast; ρ = 0.839 for lung). Additional experiments investigated the effect of sample size on the consistency of the web-based findings. Overall, our study findings support web informatics as a promising, cost-effective way to dynamically monitor spatiotemporal cancer mortality trends. PMID:27044930

  4. A novel web informatics approach for automated surveillance of cancer mortality trends

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong -Jun; Xu, Songhua

    2016-04-01

    Cancer surveillance data are collected every year in the United States via the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). General trends are closely monitored to measure the nation’s progress against cancer. The objective of this study was to apply a novel web informatics approach for enabling fully automated monitoring of cancer mortality trends. The approach involves automated collection and text mining of online obituaries to derive the age distribution, geospatial, and temporal trends of cancer deaths in the US. Using breast and lung cancer as examples, we mined 23,850 cancer-related and 413,024 general online obituaries spanning the timeframe 2008–2012. There was high correlation between the web-derived mortality trends and the official surveillance statistics reported by NCI with respect to the age distribution (ρ = 0.981 for breast; ρ = 0.994 for lung), the geospatial distribution (ρ = 0.939 for breast; ρ = 0.881 for lung), and the annual rates of cancer deaths (ρ = 0.661 for breast; ρ = 0.839 for lung). Additional experiments investigated the effect of sample size on the consistency of the web-based findings. Altogether, our study findings support web informatics as a promising, cost-effective way to dynamically monitor spatiotemporal cancer mortality trends.

  5. A novel web informatics approach for automated surveillance of cancer mortality trends

    DOE PAGES

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong -Jun; Xu, Songhua

    2016-04-01

    Cancer surveillance data are collected every year in the United States via the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). General trends are closely monitored to measure the nation’s progress against cancer. The objective of this study was to apply a novel web informatics approach for enabling fully automated monitoring of cancer mortality trends. The approach involves automated collection and text mining of online obituaries to derive the age distribution, geospatial, and temporal trends of cancer deaths in the US. Using breast and lung cancer asmore » examples, we mined 23,850 cancer-related and 413,024 general online obituaries spanning the timeframe 2008–2012. There was high correlation between the web-derived mortality trends and the official surveillance statistics reported by NCI with respect to the age distribution (ρ = 0.981 for breast; ρ = 0.994 for lung), the geospatial distribution (ρ = 0.939 for breast; ρ = 0.881 for lung), and the annual rates of cancer deaths (ρ = 0.661 for breast; ρ = 0.839 for lung). Additional experiments investigated the effect of sample size on the consistency of the web-based findings. Altogether, our study findings support web informatics as a promising, cost-effective way to dynamically monitor spatiotemporal cancer mortality trends.« less

  6. The Effect of Care Setting in the Delivery of High-Value Colon Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Veenstra, Christine M.; Epstein, Andrew J.; Liao, Kaijun; Morris, Arden M.; Pollack, Craig E.; Armstrong, Katrina A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effect of care setting on value of colon cancer care is unknown. METHODS A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort study of 6544 patients aged ≥66 years with stage IV colon cancer (based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system) who were diagnosed between 1996 and 2005 was performed. All patients were followed through December 31, 2007. Using outpatient and carrier claims, patients were assigned to a treating hospital based on the hospital affiliation of the primary oncologist. Hospitals were classified academic or nonacademic using the SEER-Medicare National Cancer Institute Hospital File. RESULTS Of the 6544 patients, 1605 (25%) received care from providers affiliated with academic medical centers. The unadjusted median cancer-specific survival was 16.0 months at academic medical centers versus 13.9 months at nonacademic medical centers (P<.001). After adjustment, treatment at academic hospitals remained significantly associated with a reduced risk of death from cancer (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.82–0.93 [P<.001]). Adjusted mean 12-month Medicare spending was $8571 higher at academic medical centers (95% CI, $2340–$14,802; P =.007). The adjusted median cost was $1559 higher at academic medical centers; this difference was not found to be statistically significant (95% CI, −$5239 to $2122; P =.41). A small percentage of patients who received very expensive care skewed the difference in mean cost; the only statistically significant difference in adjusted costs in quantile regressions was at the 99.9th percentile of costs (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS Among Medicare beneficiaries with stage IV colon cancer, treatment by a provider affiliated with an academic medical center was associated with a 2 month improvement in overall survival. Except for patients in the 99.9th percentile of the cost distribution, costs at academic medical centers were not found to be significantly

  7. Cell migration is regulated by AGE-RAGE interaction in human oral cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ko, Shun-Yao; Ko, Hshin-An; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Chang, Weng-Cheng; Chen, Hong-I; Chang, Shu-Shing; Lin, I-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are produced in an irreversible non-enzymatic reaction of carbohydrates and proteins. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are known to have elevated AGE levels, which is viewed as a risk factor of diabetes-related complications. In a clinical setting, it has been shown that patients with oral cancer in conjunction with DM have a higher likelihood of cancer metastasis and lower cancer survival rates. AGE-RAGE (a receptor of AGEs) is also correlated with metastasis and angiogenesis. Recent studies have suggested that the malignancy of cancer may be enhanced by glyceraldehyde-derived AGEs; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study examined the apparently close correlation between AGE-RAGE and the malignancy of SAS oral cancer cell line. In this study, AGEs increased ERK phosphorylation, enhanced cell migration, and promoted the expression of RAGE, MMP2, and MMP9. Using PD98059, RAGE antibody, and RAGE RNAi to block RAGE pathway resulted in the inhibition of ERK phosphorylation. Cell migration, MMP2 and MMP9 expression were also reduced by this treatment. Our findings demonstrate the importance of AGE-RAGE with regard to the malignancy of oral cancer, and help to explain the poor prognosis of DM subjects with oral cancer.

  8. Age as a factor in breast cancer knowledge, attitudes and screening behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Z; Bryant, H

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there are age-related differences in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour with respect to breast cancer and whether the differences reflect the age-specific Canadian recommendations on breast cancer screening. DESIGN: Telephone survey. SETTING: Two cities and five towns and their surrounding areas in Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: The age-specific, randomly selected sample comprised 1284 women aged 40 to 75 years who did not have breast cancer. Of the 1741 eligible women who were contacted, 1350 (78%) agreed to participate; 66 were excluded because of age ineligibility or a history of breast cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Frequency of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour with respect to breast cancer, by age group. RESULTS: Knowledge of breast cancer risk factors was generally low and decreased with age. Few women were aware of the Canadian recommendations on breast self-examination, physical examination of the breasts by a health care practitioner and mammographic screening. Older women believed they were less susceptible to breast cancer than younger women and were less likely to have positive attitudes toward screening. Self-examination was performed 9 to 15 times per year by 424 women (33%), and 810 (63%) had been examined by a health care professional in the past year. Although 664 (52%) had undergone mammography, the proportion decreased with age after age 59. The main barriers to mammography were lack of physician referral and the woman's belief that the procedure is unnecessary if she is healthy. CONCLUSIONS: Education is needed to increase breast cancer knowledge, promote the Canadian recommendations for early detection of breast cancer and decrease negative beliefs about the disease. Changes in the behaviour of women and physicians are needed to increase the use of breast self-examination, clinical breast examination by a health care professional and mammographic screening. Reaching women in the upper range (60 to 69 years) of the

  9. Hepatitis B virus infection is associated with younger median age at diagnosis and death in cancers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao-Li; Luo, Hui-Yan; Li, Chao-Feng; Jin, Ying; Zeng, Zhao-Lei; Ju, Huai-Qiang; Wu, Qi-Nian; Wang, Yun; Mao, Min-Jie; Liu, Wan-Li; Jia, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Hui-Zhong; Li, Yu-Hong; Wang, Feng; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Several non-hepatocellular cancers were linked with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study was aimed to quantify the potential associations between HBV infection and multiple non-hepatocellular cancers. Continuous cases, including 5,715 non-cancer and 40,963 cancer cases diagnosed from 2008 to 2014 in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center were analyzed. HBV DNA and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) were examed in gastric cancer tissues by polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining. After adjusting for age, sex, year of diagnosis, smoking, drinking and family history of cancer, significant associations were found between serum HBsAg and frequently reported HBV-related non-hepatocellular cancers, including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, cholangiocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] and 95% confidence ratio [CI]: 1.89 [1.65 - 2.16]), as well as total other non-hepatocellular cancers (AOR and 95% CI: 1.12 [1.03 - 1.22]). The median ages at diagnosis, all-cause death and cancer-specific death of serum HBsAg positive cancer patients were all significantly younger than those with serum HBsAg negative. HBV DNA was detected in 12.4% (34/275) gastric cancer tissues and HBcAg was most commonly detected in lymphocytes. This was the first report that HBV infection had a modest but significant nonspecific association with total non-hepatocellular cancers. Median age at diagnosis and death was significantly younger in serum HBsAg positive cancer patients. The underlying mechanism need further investigation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Discovery of molecular associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer based on gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosheng

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of a huge volume of "omics" data enables a computational approach to the investigation of the biology of cancer. The cancer informatics approach is a useful supplement to the traditional experimental approach. I reviewed several reports that used a bioinformatics approach to analyze the associations among aging, stem cells, and cancer by microarray gene expression profiling. The high expression of aging- or human embryonic stem cell-related molecules in cancer suggests that certain important mechanisms are commonly underlying aging, stem cells, and cancer. These mechanisms are involved in cell cycle regulation, metabolic process, DNA damage response, apoptosis, p53 signaling pathway, immune/inflammatory response, and other processes, suggesting that cancer is a developmental and evolutional disease that is strongly related to aging. Moreover, these mechanisms demonstrate that the initiation, proliferation, and metastasis of cancer are associated with the deregulation of stem cells. These findings provide insights into the biology of cancer. Certainly, the findings that are obtained by the informatics approach should be justified by experimental validation. This review also noted that next-generation sequencing data provide enriched sources for cancer informatics study.

  11. The prognostic impact of age in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, Cornelia; Rody, Achim; Gluz, Oleg; Baumann, Kristin; Beyer, Daniel; Kohls, Eva-Beatrice; Lausen, Kerstin; Hanker, Lars; Holtrich, Uwe; Becker, Sven; Karn, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous entity composed of distinct molecular subgroups with different molecular and clinical features. We analyzed the association between molecular breast cancer subgroups, age at diagnosis, and prognosis in a compilation of publicly available gene expression datasets. Affymetrix gene expression data (U133A or U133Plus2.0 arrays) of 4467 breast cancers from 40 datasets were compiled and homogenized. Breast cancer subgroups were defined based on expression of ESR1, PR, HER2, and Ki67. Event-free survival was calculated as recurrence-free survival or distant metastasis-free survival if recurrence-free survival was not available. Young age at diagnosis is associated with higher frequency of triple negative and HER2 subtypes and lower frequency of luminal A breast cancers. The 5-year event-free survival rates of patients aged less than 40, between 40 and 50, and >50 years were 54.3 ± 3.5, 68.5 ± 1.9, and 70.4 ± 1.3 %, respectively. When controlling for breast cancer subtype, we found that age <40 years remained significantly associated with poor prognosis in triple negative breast cancer. The effect was modest in luminal tumors and not found in HER2 subtype. Both subtypes and age retained their significances in multivariate analysis. Association of age at diagnosis with molecular breast cancer subtype contributes to its important role as prognostic factor among patients with breast cancer. Still, within the group of triple negative breast cancer, young age <40 years has a significant prognostic value which was retained in multivariate analysis.

  12. Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Treatment in Elderly Prostate Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Carpenter, William R.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Bainbridge, John; Wang, Andrew Z.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the proportion of elderly prostate cancer patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: A total of 29,001 men diagnosed in 2004-2007 with localized prostate cancer, aged 66 to 79 years, were included. We characterized the proportion of men who received treatment concordant with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, stratified by risk group and age. Logistic regression was used to examine covariates associated with receipt of guideline-concordant management. Results: Guideline concordance was 79%-89% for patients with low- or intermediate-risk disease. Among high-risk patients, 66.6% of those aged 66-69 years received guideline-concordant management, compared with 51.9% of those aged 75-79 years. Discordance was mainly due to conservative management—no treatment or hormone therapy alone. Among the subgroup of patients aged ≤76 years with no measured comorbidity, findings were similar. On multivariable analysis, older age (75-79 vs 66-69 years, odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.57) was associated with a lower likelihood of guideline concordance for high-risk prostate cancer, but comorbidity was not. Conclusions: There is undertreatment of elderly but healthy patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the most aggressive form of this disease.

  13. Combination of glazing, nisin treatment and radiation processing for shelf-life extension of seer fish (Scomberomorous guttatus) steaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakatkar, Aarti S.; Gautam, Raj Kamal; Shashidhar, Ravindranath

    2017-01-01

    Fish and fishery products are most perishable. Combination of chilling with gamma irradiation, edible coatings, addition of antimicrobials etc has been applied to extend the shelf life. In the present study, a process to enhance the shelf life of seer fish (Scomberomorus guttatus) steaks using combination of coating prepared from gel dispersion of same fish; incorporated with nisin and gamma irradiation is described. A combination of glazing incorporated with nisin and irradiation at 2 kGy and 5 kGy increased the shelf life of the steaks from 7 days up to 34 and 42 days respectively on chilled storage.

  14. Chromosomal abnormalities are associated with aging and cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Two new studies have found that large structural abnormalities in chromosomes, some of which have been associated with increased risk of cancer, can be detected in a small fraction of people without a prior history of cancer. The studies found that these

  15. Does cancer reduce labor market entry? Evidence for prime-age females.

    PubMed

    Moran, John R; Short, Pamela Farley

    2014-06-01

    Existing studies of the labor market status of cancer survivors have focused on the extent to which cancer disrupts the employment of individuals who were working when diagnosed with cancer. We examine how surviving cancer affects labor market entry and usual hours of work among females aged 28 to 54 years who were not working when first diagnosed. We find that prime-age females have employment rates 2 to 6 years after diagnosis that are 12 percentage points lower than otherwise similar women who were initially out of the labor force, full-time employment rates that are 10 percentage points lower, and usual hours of work that are 5 hours per week lower. These estimates are somewhat larger than estimates for prime-age women employed at the time of diagnosis and highlight the importance of considering nonworking females when assessing the economic and psychosocial burden of cancer.

  16. Age at breast cancer diagnosis in populations of african and European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Kadhel, Philippe; Multigner, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Based on US national cancer registry data, age differences at breast cancer diagnosis have been reported between African-American women and European-American women. Such differences between populations of African and European ancestry have not been studied in other countries at a nationwide level. Here, we report and compare descriptive nationwide epidemiological indicators of invasive breast cancer for the populations of European ancestry living in the US and in mainland France and for women of African ancestry living in the US and in the French West Indies (Martinique and Guadeloupe). Based on the available data, we determined age frequency distributions, world age-standardized incidence, and the distribution of expected cases of breast cancer in a standard population of women by age. The age frequency distributions revealed that women of African ancestry were younger at diagnosis than women of European ancestry. By contrast, compared with the US regardless of ancestry and mainland France, the standardized incidences appeared lower, and the largest numbers of expected cases younger, in the French West Indies. The populations with African ancestry were not homogeneous in terms of epidemiologic indicators of age-related breast cancer. These descriptive findings suggest that populations of African ancestry cannot be considered uniform when determining whether it would be appropriate to decrease the age of entry into screening programs for breast cancer.

  17. The Age Specific Incidence Anomaly Suggests that Cancers Originate During Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, James P.

    The accumulation of genetic alterations causes cancers. Since this accumulation takes time, the incidence of most cancers is thought to increase exponentially with age. However, careful measurements of the age-specific incidence show that the specific incidence for many forms of cancer rises with age to a maximum, and then decreases. This decrease in the age-specific incidence with age is an anomaly. Understanding this anomaly should lead to a better understanding of how tumors develop and grow. Here we derive the shape of the age-specific incidence, showing that it should follow the shape of a Weibull distribution. Measurements indicate that the age-specific incidence for colon cancer does indeed follow a Weibull distribution. This analysis leads to the interpretation that for colon cancer two subpopulations exist in the general population: a susceptible population and an immune population. Colon tumors will only occur in the susceptible population. This analysis is consistent with the developmental origins of disease hypothesis and generalizable to many other common forms of cancer.

  18. The cancer burden in the United Kingdom in 2007 due to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Maddams, Jacob; Parkin, D Maxwell; Darby, Sarah C

    2011-12-15

    The number of long-term cancer survivors in the general population of the UK is substantial and increasing rapidly. Many cancer survivors have been treated with radiotherapy but the likely number of radiotherapy-related second cancers has not previously been estimated. We used estimates of the numbers of cancer survivors in the UK at the beginning of 2007, in conjunction with estimates of the relative risk of a second primary cancer associated with previous radiotherapy from the United States Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) programme, to estimate the numbers of incident cancers in the UK in 2007 that were associated with radiotherapy for a previous cancer and that may have been caused by it. We estimated that 1,346 cases of cancer, or about 0.45% of the 298,000 new cancers registered in the UK in 2007, were associated with radiotherapy for a previous cancer. The largest numbers of radiotherapy-related second cancers were lung cancer (23.7% of the total), oesophageal cancer (13.3%), and female breast cancer (10.6%); 54% of radiotherapy-related second cancers were in individuals aged 75 or over. The highest percentages of second cancers related to radiotherapy were among survivors of Hodgkin's disease and cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx and cervix uteri; over 15% of second cancers among these survivors were associated with radiotherapy for the first cancer. These calculations, which involve a number of assumptions and approximations, provide a reasonable, if conservative, estimate of the fraction of incident cancers in the UK that are attributable to past radiation therapy.

  19. Age-specific occurrence of HPV16- and HPV18-related cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Quint, Wim G. V.; Hunt, William C.; Joste, Nancy E.; Alemany, Laia; Bosch, F. Xavier; Myers, Evan R.; Castle, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    The age-specific of occurrence of cervical cancer related to human papillomavirus genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, the two targeted by current HPV vaccines, is not well described. We therefore used data from two large, tissue-based HPV genotyping studies of cervical cancer, one conducted in New Mexico (USA) (n = 744) and an international study restricted to cancers (n = 1,729) from Europe, North America, and Australia to represent those regions with widely available cervical cancer screening facilities. HPV results were categorized as HPV16 or HPV18 positive (HPV16/18) versus other HPV genotype. We observed a decreasing proportion of HPV16/18-positive cancers with increasing age in the international study (ptrend < 0.001) and New Mexico study (ptrend < 0.001). There was no heterogeneity in the relationship between age of diagnosis and the proportion of HPV16/18-positive cancers between studies (p = 0.8). Combining results from the two studies (n = 2,473), the percentages of HPV16/18-positive cases were 77.0% (95%CI: 75.1%-78.9%) for women less than 65 years old and 62.7% (95%CI: 58.4%-66.9%) for women aged 65 and older (p < 0.001). In women who are under the age of 25 and have been vaccinated before becoming sexually active, the cervical cancer incidence is expected to be approximately 3.5 per million by 2020. HPV vaccination against HPV16/18 may have a greater impact on cervical cancers in women under 65 than in women aged 65 and older. These data will inform the age-specific impact of HPV vaccination and its integration with cervical cancer screening activities. PMID:23632816

  20. Reassessing the NTCTCS Staging Systems for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer, Including Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Donald S.A.; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Brierley, James D.; Ain, Kenneth B.; Cooper, David S.; Fein, Henry G.; Haugen, Bryan R.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Magner, James; Ross, Douglas S.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Steward, David L.; Xing, Mingzhao; Litofsky, Danielle R.; Maxon, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid cancer is unique for having age as a staging variable. Recently, the commonly used age cut-point of 45 years has been questioned. Objective: This study assessed alternate staging systems on the outcome of overall survival, and compared these with current National Thyroid Cancer Treatment Cooperative Study (NTCTCS) staging systems for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. Methods: A total of 4721 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were assessed. Five potential alternate staging systems were generated at age cut-points in five-year increments from 35 to 70 years, and tested for model discrimination (Harrell's C-statistic) and calibration (R2). The best five models for papillary and follicular cancer were further tested with bootstrap resampling and significance testing for discrimination. Results: The best five alternate papillary cancer systems had age cut-points of 45–50 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. No significant difference in C-statistic was found between the best alternate and current NTCTCS systems (p = 0.200). The best five alternate follicular cancer systems had age cut-points of 50–55 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. All five best alternate staging systems performed better compared with the current system (p = 0.003–0.035). There was no significant difference in discrimination between the best alternate system (cut-point age 50 years) and the best system of cut-point age 45 years (p = 0.197). Conclusions: No alternate papillary cancer systems assessed were significantly better than the current system. New alternate staging systems for follicular cancer appear to be better than the current NTCTCS system, although they require external validation. PMID:26203804

  1. Performance of the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool Among Women Aged 75 Years and Older

    PubMed Central

    Li, Vicky W.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Davis, Roger B.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; McCarthy, Ellen P.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Rohan, Thomas E.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Ngo, Long H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT, “Gail model”) is commonly used for breast cancer prediction; however, it has not been validated for women age 75 years and older. Methods: We used Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) data beginning in 2004 and Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) data beginning in 2005 to compare BCRAT’s performance among women age 75 years and older with that in women age 55 to 74 years in predicting five-year breast cancer incidence. BCRAT risk factors include: age, race/ethnicity, age at menarche, age at first birth, family history, history of benign breast biopsy, and atypia. We examined BCRAT’s calibration by age by comparing expected/observed (E/O) ratios of breast cancer incidence. We examined discrimination by computing c-statistics for the model by age. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Seventy-three thousand seventy-two NHS and 97 081 WHI women participated. NHS participants were more likely to be non-Hispanic white (96.2% vs 84.7% in WHI, P < .001) and were less likely to develop breast cancer (1.8% vs 2.0%, P = .02). E/O ratios by age in NHS were 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09 to 1.23, age 57–74 years) and 1.31 (95% CI = 1.18 to 1.45, age ≥ 75 years, P = .02), and in WHI 1.03 (95% CI = 0.97 to 1.09, age 55–74 years) and 1.10 (95% CI = 1.00 to 1.21, age ≥ 75 years, P = .21). E/O ratio 95% confidence intervals crossed one among women age 75 years and older when samples were limited to women who underwent mammography and were without significant illness. C-statistics ranged between 0.56 and 0.58 in both cohorts regardless of age. Conclusions: BCRAT accurately predicted breast cancer for women age 75 years and older who underwent mammography and were without significant illness but had modest discrimination. Models that consider individual competing risks of non–breast cancer death may improve breast cancer risk prediction for older women. PMID:26625899

  2. Risk adjusting survival outcomes of hospitals that treat cancer patients without information on cancer stage

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, David G.; Rubin, David M.; Elkin, Elena B.; Neill, Ushma S.; Duck, Elaine; Radzyner, Mark; Bach, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Instituting widespread measurement of outcomes for cancer hospitals using administrative data is difficult due to the lack of cancer specific information such as disease stage. Objective To evaluate the performance of hospitals that treat cancer patients using Medicare data for outcome ascertainment and risk adjustment, and to assess whether hospital rankings based on these measures are influenced by the addition of cancer-specific information. Design Risk adjusted cumulative mortality of patients with cancer captured in Medicare claims from 2005–2009 nationally were assessed at the hospital level. Similar analyses were conducted in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Result (SEER)-Medicare data for the subset of the US covered by the SEER program to determine whether the exclusion of cancer specific information (only available in cancer registries) from risk adjustment altered measured hospital performance. Setting Administrative claims data and SEER cancer registry data Participants Sample of 729,279 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries treated for cancer in 2006 at hospitals treating 10+ patients with each of the following cancers, according to Medicare claims: lung, prostate, breast, colon. An additional sample of 18,677 similar patients in SEER-Medicare administrative data. Main Outcomes and Measures Risk-adjusted mortality overall and by cancer type, stratified by type of hospital; measures of correlation and agreement between hospital-level outcomes risk adjusted using Medicare data alone and Medicare data with SEER data. Results There were large outcome differences between different types of hospitals that treat Medicare patients with cancer. At one year, cumulative mortality for Medicare-prospective-payment-system exempt hospitals was 10% lower than at community hospitals (18% versus 28%) across all cancers, the pattern persisted through five years of follow-up and within specific cancer types. Performance ranking of hospitals was

  3. Advanced paternal age and childhood cancer in offspring: A nationwide register-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Urhoj, Stine Kjaer; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Per Kragh; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie

    2017-03-03

    Cancer initiation is presumed to occur in utero for many childhood cancers and it has been hypothesized that advanced paternal age may have an impact due to the increasing number of mutations in the sperm DNA with increasing paternal age. We examined the association between paternal age and specific types of childhood cancer in offspring in a large nationwide cohort of 1,904,363 children born in Denmark from 1978 through 2010. The children were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry and were linked to information from other national registers, including the Danish Cancer Registry. In total, 3,492 children were diagnosed with cancer before the age of 15 years. The adjusted hazard ratio of childhood cancer according to paternal age was estimated using Cox proportional hazards regressions. We found a 13% (95% confidence interval: 4-23%) higher hazard rate for every 5 years advantage in paternal age for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, while no clear association was found for acute myeloid leukemia (hazard ratio pr. 5 years = 1.02, 95% confidence interval: 0.80-1.30). The estimates for neoplasms in the central nervous system suggested a lower hazard rate with higher paternal age (hazard ratio pr. 5 years = 0.92, 95% confidence interval: 0.84-1.01). No clear associations were found for the remaining childhood cancer types. The findings suggest that paternal age is moderately associated with a higher rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but not acute myeloid leukemia, in offspring, while no firm conclusions could be made for other specific cancer types.

  4. Recent lung cancer patterns in younger age-cohorts in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Kabir, Zubair; Connolly, Gregory N; Clancy, Luke

    2007-01-01

    Background Smoking causes 85% of all lung cancers in males and 70% in females. Therefore, birth cohort analysis and annual-percent-changes (APC) in age-specific lung cancer mortality rates, particularly in the youngest age cohorts, can explain the beneficial impacts of both past and recent anti-smoking interventions. Methods A long-term time-trend analysis (1958-2002) in lung cancer mortality rates focusing on the youngest age-cohorts (30-49 years of age) in particular was investigated in Ireland. The rates were standardised to the World Standard Population. Lung cancer mortality data were downloaded from the WHO Cancer Mortality Database to estimate APCs in death rates, using the Joinpoint regression (version 3.0) program. A simple age-cohort modelling (log-linear Poisson model) was also done, using SAS software. Results The youngest birth cohorts (born after 1965) have almost one-fourth lower lung cancer risk relative to those born around the First World War. A more than 50% relative decline in death rates among those between 35 and 39 years of age was observed in both sexes in recent years. The youngest age-cohorts (30-39 years of age) in males also showed a significant decrease in death rates in 1998-2002 by more than 3% every five years from 1958-1962 onwards. However, death rate declines in females are slower. Conclusions The youngest birth cohorts had the lowest lung cancer risk and also showed a significant decreasing lung cancer death rate in the most recent years. Such temporal patterns indicate the beneficial impacts of both recent and past tobacco control efforts in Ireland. However, the decline in younger female cohorts is slower. A comprehensive national tobacco control program enforced on evidence-based policies elsewhere can further accelerate a decline in death rates, especially among the younger generations. PMID:17476821

  5. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant

  6. Coming-of-Age of Antibodies in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ayyar, B Vijayalakshmi; Arora, Sushrut; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Antibody-based therapies have garnered considerable success in recent years. This is due to the availability of strategies to successfully engineer antibodies into humanized forms, better understanding of the biological processes involved in cancer development, the availability of novel recombinant antibody formats, better antibody selection platforms, and improved antibody conjugation methodologies. Such achievements have led to an explosion in the generation of antibodies and antibody-associated constructs for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. In this review, we critically assess recent trends in the development and applications of bispecific antibodies (bsAbs), antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), and immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) as cancer therapeutics. We also highlight recent US FDA approvals and clinical trials of antibody-based cancer therapies.

  7. A brief history of cancer: age-old milestones underlying our current knowledge database.

    PubMed

    Faguet, Guy B

    2015-05-01

    This mini-review chronicles the history of cancer ranging from cancerous growths discovered in dinosaur fossils, suggestions of cancer in Ancient Egyptian papyri written in 1500-1600 BC, and the first documented case of human cancer 2,700 years ago, to contributions by pioneers beginning with Hippocrates and ending with the originators of radiation and medical oncology. Fanciful notions that soon fell into oblivion are mentioned such as Paracelsus and van Helmont substituting Galen's black bile by mysterious ens or archeus systems. Likewise, unfortunate episodes such as Virchow claiming Remak's hypotheses as his own remind us that human shortcomings can affect otherwise excellent scientists. However, age-old benchmark observations, hypotheses, and practices of historic and scientific interest are underscored, excerpts included, as precursors of recent discoveries that shaped modern medicine. Examples include: Petit's total mastectomy with excision of axillary glands for breast cancer; a now routine practice, Peyrilhe's ichorous matter a cancer-causing factor he tested for transmissibility one century before Rous confirmed the virus-cancer link, Hill's warning of the dangers of tobacco snuff; heralding today's cancer pandemic caused by smoking, Pott reporting scrotum cancer in chimney sweepers; the first proven occupational cancer, Velpeau's remarkable foresight that a yet unknown subcellular element would have to be discovered in order to define the nature of cancer; a view confirmed by cancer genetics two centuries later, ending with Röntgen and the Curies, and Gilman et al. ushering radiation (1896, 1919) and medical oncology (1942), respectively.

  8. Economic independence in survivors of cancer diagnosed at a young age: A Norwegian national cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Rolv Terje; Bjørge, Tone; Syse, Astri; Ruud, Ellen; Wesenberg, Finn; Moster, Dag

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The impact of cancer on socioeconomic outcomes is attracting attention as the number of survivors of cancer in young age continues to rise. This study examines economic independence in a national cohort of survivors of cancer at a young age in Norway. METHODS Through the linkage of several national registries, the study cohort comprised 1,212,013 individuals born in Norway during 1965 through 1985, of which 5440 had received a cancer diagnosis before age 25 years. Follow‐up was through 2007, and the main outcomes were receipt of governmental financial assistance, employment, income, and occupation. Analytic methods included Cox proportional hazard regression, log‐binomial regression, and quantile regression models. RESULTS Individuals in the cancer survivor group had an increased probability of receiving governmental financial assistance (men: hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3‐1.5; women: HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3‐1.6) and of not being employed (men: HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2‐1.7; women: HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2‐1.6) compared with those in the noncancer group. Income discrepancies were particularly pronounced for survivors of central nervous system tumors. There was no difference in representation in higher skilled occupations. CONCLUSIONS Survivors of cancer at a young age in Norway had an increased risk of being economically dependent and unemployed. This was evident in several tumor groups and was most pronounced in female survivors. There were only small differences in income or representation in higher skilled occupations for most employed survivors compared with the noncancer group. The current results are important for understanding the impact of a cancer diagnosis at a young age on subsequent job market outcomes. Cancer 2016;122:3873–3882. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. PMID:27518040

  9. When Anti-Aging Studies Meet Cancer Chemoprevention: Can Anti-Aging Agent Kill Two Birds with One Blow?

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Noriko N; Denmon, Andria; Uchio, Edward M; Jordan, Mark; Mercola, Dan; Zi, Xiaolin

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence has strongly supported that the rate of aging is controlled, at least to some extent, by evolutionarily conserved nutrient sensing pathways (e.g. the insulin/IGF-1-signaling, mTOR, AMPK, and sirtuins) from worms to humans. These pathways are also commonly involved in carcinogenesis and cancer metabolism. Agents (e.g. metformin, resveratrol, and Rhodiola) that target these nutrient sensing pathways often have both anti-aging and anti-cancer efficacy. These agents not only reprogram energy metabolism of malignant cells, but also target normal postmitotic cells by suppressing their conversion into senescent cells, which confers systematic metabolism benefits. These agents are fundamentally different from chemotherapy (e.g. paclitaxel and doxorubicin) or radiation therapy that causes molecular damage (e.g. DNA and protein damages) and thereby no selection resistance may be expected. By reviewing molecular mechanisms of action, epidemiological evidence, experimental data in tumor models, and early clinical study results, this review provides information supporting the promising use of agents with both anti-aging and anti-cancer efficacy for cancer chemoprevention.

  10. Does the age of breast cancer diagnosis in first-degree relatives impact on the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers?

    PubMed

    Semple, John; Metcalfe, Kelly A; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Armel, Susan; Lynch, Henry T; Karlan, Beth; Foulkes, William; Singer, Christian F; Neuhausen, Susan L; Eng, Charis; Iqbal, Javaid; Narod, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate the age-specific annual risks of breast cancer in a woman with a germline BRCA mutation and an affected first-degree relative according to the age of breast cancer diagnosis in the relative. Women with BRCA mutations with no previous diagnosis of breast cancer and with one first-degree relative with breast cancer were followed for breast cancers for a mean of 5.9 years (minimum 2 years). Age-specific annual breast cancer risks were calculated, according to the age of breast cancer diagnosis in the proband and the first-degree relative. 1114 cancer-free women with a BRCA mutation with a single first-degree relative with breast cancer were eligible for the study. 122 women (11.0 %) were diagnosed with incident breast cancer. The annual risk of breast cancer was 2.0 % for women with BRCA1 mutations and was 1.6 % for women with BRCA2 mutations. The age of breast cancer diagnosis in the first-degree relative did not affect the annual breast cancer risks for BRCA1 mutation carriers. For BRCA2 mutation carriers, the annual breast cancer risk was 4.5 % for women with a first-degree relative diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 30 years and was 0.7 % for women with a relative diagnosed over the age of 60. Among women with BRCA2 mutations, a family history of early-onset breast cancer is a risk factor for developing breast cancer. Risk assessment for healthy BRCA2 mutation carriers should consider the ages of breast cancers diagnosed in first-degree relatives.

  11. Racial Differences in Cervical Cancer Survival in the Detroit Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Movva, Sujana; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Banerjee, Mousumi; Patel, Divya A.; Schwartz, Kendra; Yee, Cecilia L.; Simon, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND African-American (AA) women have lower survival rates from cervical cancer compared with white women. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of socioeconomic status (SES) and other variables on racial disparities in overall survival among women with invasive cervical cancer. METHODS One thousand thirty-six women (705 white women and 331 AA women) who were diagnosed with primary invasive cancer of the cervix between 1988 and 1992 were identified through the Metropolitan Detroit Cancer Surveillance System (MDCSS), a registry in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Pathology, treatment, and survival data were obtained through SEER. SES was categorized by using occupation, poverty, and educational status at the census tract level. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare overall survival between AA women and white women adjusting for sociodemographics, clinical presentation, and treatment. RESULTS AA women were more likely to present at an older age (P < .001), with later stage disease (P < .001), and with squamous histology (P = .01), and they were more likely to reside in a census tract categorized as Working Poor (WP) (P < .001). After multivariate adjustment, race no longer had a significant impact on survival. Women who resided in a WP census tract had a higher risk of death than women from a Professional census tract (P = .05). There was a significant interaction between disease stage and time with the effect of stage on survival attenuated after 6 years. CONCLUSIONS In this study, factors that affected access to medical care appeared to have a more important influence than race on the long-term survival of women with invasive cervical cancer. PMID:18257090

  12. Prediction of Breast Cancer Survival Through Knowledge Discovery in Databases

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hadi Lotfnezhad; Ahmadi, Maryam; Roudbari, Masoud; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    The collection of large volumes of medical data has offered an opportunity to develop prediction models for survival by the medical research community. Medical researchers who seek to discover and extract hidden patterns and relationships among large number of variables use knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) to predict the outcome of a disease. The study was conducted to develop predictive models and discover relationships between certain predictor variables and survival in the context of breast cancer. This study is Cross sectional. After data preparation, data of 22,763 female patients, mean age 59.4 years, stored in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) breast cancer dataset were analyzed anonymously. IBM SPSS Statistics 16, Access 2003 and Excel 2003 were used in the data preparation and IBM SPSS Modeler 14.2 was used in the model design. Support Vector Machine (SVM) model outperformed other models in the prediction of breast cancer survival. Analysis showed SVM model detected ten important predictor variables contributing mostly to prediction of breast cancer survival. Among important variables, behavior of tumor as the most important variable and stage of malignancy as the least important variable were identified. In current study, applying of the knowledge discovery method in the breast cancer dataset predicted the survival condition of breast cancer patients with high confidence and identified the most important variables participating in breast cancer survival. PMID:25946945

  13. Modeling age-specific cancer incidences using logistic growth equations: implications for data collection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xing-Rong; Feng, Rui; Chai, Jing; Cheng, Jing; Wang, De-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Large scale secular registry or surveillance systems have been accumulating vast data that allow mathematical modeling of cancer incidence and mortality rates. Most contemporary models in this regard use time series and APC (age-period-cohort) methods and focus primarily on predicting or analyzing cancer epidemiology with little attention being paid to implications for designing cancer registry, surveillance or evaluation initiatives. This research models age-specific cancer incidence rates using logistic growth equations and explores their performance under different scenarios of data completeness in the hope of deriving clues for reshaping relevant data collection. The study used China Cancer Registry Report 2012 as the data source. It employed 3-parameter logistic growth equations and modeled the age-specific incidence rates of all and the top 10 cancers presented in the registry report. The study performed 3 types of modeling, namely full age-span by fitting, multiple 5-year- segment fitting and single-segment fitting. Measurement of model performance adopted adjusted goodness of fit that combines sum of squred residuals and relative errors. Both model simulation and performance evalation utilized self-developed algorithms programed using C# languade and MS Visual Studio 2008. For models built upon full age-span data, predicted age-specific cancer incidence rates fitted very well with observed values for most (except cervical and breast) cancers with estimated goodness of fit (Rs) being over 0.96. When a given cancer is concerned, the R valuae of the logistic growth model derived using observed data from urban residents was greater than or at least equal to that of the same model built on data from rural people. For models based on multiple-5-year-segment data, the Rs remained fairly high (over 0.89) until 3-fourths of the data segments were excluded. For models using a fixed length single-segment of observed data, the older the age covered by the corresponding

  14. Premature aging/senescence in cancer cells facing therapy: good or bad?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Llilians Calvo; Ghadaouia, Sabrina; Martinez, Aurélie; Rodier, Francis

    2016-02-01

    Normal and cancer cells facing their demise following exposure to radio-chemotherapy can actively participate in choosing their subsequent fate. These programmed cell fate decisions include true cell death (apoptosis-necroptosis) and therapy-induced cellular senescence (TIS), a permanent "proliferative arrest" commonly portrayed as premature cellular aging. Despite a permanent loss of proliferative potential, senescent cells remain viable and are highly bioactive at the microenvironment level, resulting in a prolonged impact on tissue architecture and functions. Cellular senescence is primarily documented as a tumor suppression mechanism that prevents cellular transformation. In the context of normal tissues, cellular senescence also plays important roles in tissue repair, but contributes to age-associated tissue dysfunction when senescent cells accumulate. Theoretically, in multi-step cancer progression models, cancer cells have already bypassed cellular senescence during their immortalization step (see hallmarks of cancer). It is then perhaps surprising to find that cancer cells often retain the ability to undergo TIS, or premature aging. This occurs because cellular senescence results from multiple signalling pathways, some retained in cancer cells, aiming to prevent cell cycle progression in damaged cells. Since senescent cancer cells persist after therapy and secrete an array of cytokines and growth factors that can modulate the tumor microenvironment, these cells may have beneficial and detrimental effects regarding immune modulation and survival of remaining proliferation-competent cancer cells. Similarly, while normal cells undergoing senescence are believed to remain indefinitely growth arrested, whether this is true for senescent cancer cells remains unclear, raising the possibility that these cells may represent a reservoir for cancer recurrence after treatment. This review discusses our current knowledge on cancer cell senescence and highlight questions

  15. Factors Associated With Cancer Worry Among People Aged 50 or Older, Spain, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Sotos, Joseba Rabanales; Herráez, María José Simarro; Rosa, Monchi Campos; López, Jaime López-Torres; Ortiz, María Pilar Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cancer worry varies among patients and may influence their participation in preventive activities. We tested whether sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, locus of control, comorbidity, and perceived health status were associated with the level of cancer worry among adults aged 50 or older. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 666 adults in Spain aged 50 or older. Participants were selected by simple random sampling and asked to visit their designated health center for a personal interview. The study variables were level of cancer worry (measured by Cancer Worry Scale [CWS]), sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, personal history or family history of cancer, comorbidity, self-perceived health, locus of control, and social support. Results More than half of participants, 58.1%, were women; mean age was 60.5 years (standard deviation [SD], 6.8 y). Measurement of the frequency and severity of cancer worry (possible scale of 6–24 points) yielded a mean CWS score of 9.3 (95% confidence interval, 9.0–9.5); 31.9% of participants reported being concerned about cancer. Scores were higher among women (9.7 [SD, 3.3]) than men (8.7 [SD, 2.7]) (P < .001) and among participants in rural settings (10.0 [SD, 3.4]) than in urban settings (9.0 [SD, 3.0]) (P < .001). Multiple linear regression showed a greater degree of cancer worry among people with personal or family history of cancer, more health problems, worse self-perceived health, and lower social support. Conclusion Cancer worry is frequent among older adults, and the level of such concern is related not only to personal characteristics but also to lifestyle and health status. Further research is required to understand how contextual factors can influence cancer worry and how such concern changes behavior patterns related to cancer prevention activities. PMID:26704444

  16. Earlier Age of Breast Cancer Onset in Israeli BRCA Carriers-Is it a Real Phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Agranat, Sivan; Baris, Hagit; Kedar, Inbal; Shochat, Mordechai; Rizel, Shulamith; Perry, Shlomit; Margel, David; Sulkes, Aaron; Yerushalmi, Rinat

    2016-11-01

    Data on genetic anticipation in breast cancer are sparse. We sought to evaluate age at diagnosis of breast cancer in daughters with a BRCA mutation and their mothers. A review of all carriers of the BRCA mutation diagnosed with breast cancer at the Genetics Institute of a tertiary medical center in 2000-2013 yielded 80 women who could be paired with a mother with breast cancer who was either a carrier of the BRCA mutation or an obligate carrier according to pedigree analysis. Age at diagnosis, type of mutation (BRCA1, BRCA2), year of birth, and ethnicity were recorded. Paired t-test was used to analyze differences in age at cancer diagnosis between groups and subgroups. Mean age at diagnosis of breast cancer was 50.74 years (range 22-88) in the mothers and 43.85 years (range 24-75) in the daughters. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). These findings were consistent regardless of type of BRCA mutation, ethnicity, or mother's year of birth. However, on separate analysis of pairs in which the mother was diagnosed before the age of 50 years, there was no significant difference in mean age at diagnosis between mothers and daughters (~42 years for both). Daughters who carry a BRCA mutation are diagnosed with breast cancer at an earlier age than their carrier mothers, with the exception of pairs in which the mother was diagnosed before the age of 50 years. Future breast-screening guidelines may need to target specific subpopulations of BRCA mutation carriers.

  17. Changing pattern of age-specific breast cancer incidence in the Swiss canton of Geneva.

    PubMed

    Bouchardy, Christine; Usel, Massimo; Verkooijen, Helena M; Fioretta, Gérald; Benhamou, Simone; Neyroud-Caspar, Isabelle; Schaffar, Robin; Vlastos, Georges; Wespi, Yves; Schäfer, Peter; Rapiti, Elisabetta

    2010-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use declined sharply after mid-2002, when the Women's Health Initiative trial reported an association between breast cancer occurrence and HRT. Hypothesized mechanism behind this association is that HRT promotes growth of pre-existing small tumors, leading to earlier tumor detection. We evaluated the impact of the sudden decline in HRT use on age distribution of breast cancer in Geneva. We included all incident breast cancer cases recorded from 1975 to 2006 at the Geneva cancer registry. We calculated mean annual incidence rates per 100,000 for 2 year periods for three age groups and assessed temporal changes by joinpoint regression. We compared age-specific incidence curves for different periods, reflecting different prevalence rates of HRT use. After increasing constantly between 1986 and 2002 among women aged 50-69 years [annual percent change (APC): +4.4, P < 0.0001], rates declined sharply after 2003 (APC: -6.0; P = 0.0264). Age-specific breast cancer rates changed dramatically with changes in prevalence of HRT use. During low HRT prevalence, breast cancer incidence increased progressively with age, when HRT prevalence was reaching its maximum (1995-2002), higher rates were seen in 60- to 64-year-old women, with a concomitant decrease in risk among elderly. After the sudden decline in HRT use, the incidence peak diminished significantly and incidence increased again with age. Following the abrupt decline in HRT use in Geneva, breast cancer incidence rates among post-menopausal women decreased considerably with striking changes in age-specific incidence rates before, during and after the peak in HRT prevalence.

  18. Effects of Abies sibirica terpenes on cancer- and aging-associated pathways in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lipatova, Anastasiya; Alekseev, Boris; Maganova, Faniya; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Fedorova, Maria; Snezhkina, Anastasiya; Moskalev, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    A large number of terpenoids exhibit potential geroprotector and anti-cancer properties. Here, we studied whole transcriptomic effects of Abisil, the extract of fir (Abies sibirica) terpenes, on normal and cancer cell lines. We used early passaged and senescent none-immortalized fibroblasts as cellular aging models. It was revealed that in normal fibroblasts, terpenes induced genes of stress response, apoptosis regulation and tissue regeneration. The restoration of the expression level of some prolongevity genes after fir extract treatment was shown in old cells. In Caco-2 and AsPC-1 cancer cell lines, Abisil induced expression of both onco-suppressors (members of GADD45, DUSP, and DDIT gene families), and proto-oncogenes (c-Myc, c-Jun, EGR and others). Thus, the study demonstrates the potential anti-aging and anti-cancer effects of Abisil on senescent and cancer cell lines. PMID:27888805

  19. Inclusive fitness effects can select for cancer suppression into old age

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joel S.; Aktipis, C. Athena

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection can favour health at youth or middle age (high reproductive value) over health at old age (low reproductive value). This means, all else being equal, selection for cancer suppression should dramatically drop after reproductive age. However, in species with significant parental investment, the capacity to enhance inclusive fitness may increase the reproductive value of older individuals or even those past reproductive age. Variation in parental investment levels could therefore contribute to variation in cancer susceptibility across species. In this article, we describe a simple model and framework for the evolution of cancer suppression with varying levels of parental investment and use this model to make testable predictions about variation in cancer suppression across species. This model can be extended to show that selection for cancer suppression is stronger in species with cooperative breeding systems and intergenerational transfers. We consider three cases that can select for cancer suppression into old age: (i) extended parental care that increases the survivorship of their offspring, (ii) grandparents contributing to higher fecundity of their children and (iii) cooperative breeding where helpers forgo reproduction or even survivorship to assist parents in having higher fecundity. PMID:26056358

  20. Relationship of oral cancer with age, sex, site distribution and habits.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mandakini Mansukh; Pandya, Amrish N

    2004-04-01

    Many studies are carried out regarding age incidence, tobacco smoking and sites of oral cancer, but in Gujarat tobacco chewing in form of Gutkha is more common than smoking and start during preteen years. Tobacco chewing causing chronic inflammation, submucous fibrosis and oral cancer. This study was conducted on 504 patients to find out if there is increasing incidence of oral cancer in lower age group and its relation with sex as well which site was commonly affected. There was statistically significant increase in oral cancer in lower age group, and anatomically anterior part of oral cavity showed involvement in 61.32% of cases. Though males were affected more but female cases were 25%. So tobacco chewing has got detrimental effect on oral cavity.

  1. Analysis of the effect of age on the prognosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cluze, C; Colonna, M; Remontet, L; Poncet, F; Sellier, E; Seigneurin, A; Delafosse, P; Bossard, N

    2009-09-01

    To explore the effect of age at diagnosis on relative survival from breast cancer at different cancer stages and grades, using appropriate statistical modeling of time-varying and non-linear effects of that prognostic covariate. Data on 4,791 female invasive breast cancers diagnosed between 1990 and 1997 were obtained from a French cancer registry. The effect of age on relative survival was studied using an approach based on excess rate modeling. Different models testing non-linear and non-proportional effects of age were explored for each grade and each stage. In the whole population, the effect of age was not linear and varied with the time elapsed since diagnosis. When analyzing the different sub-groups according to grade and stage, age did not have a significant effect on relative survival in grade 1 or stage 3 tumors. In grade 2 and stage 4 tumors, the excess mortality rate increased with age, in a linear way. In grade 3 tumors, age was a time-dependent factor: older women had higher excess rates than younger ones during the first year after diagnosis whereas the inverse phenomenon was observed 5 years after diagnosis. Our findings suggest that when taking into account grade and stage, the time-varying impact of young age at diagnosis is limited to grade 3 tumors, without evidence of worst prognosis at 5 years for the youngest women.

  2. Elderly cancer patients' psychopathology: a systematic review: aging and mental health.

    PubMed

    Parpa, Efi; Tsilika, Eleni; Gennimata, Vassiliki; Mystakidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    This review of the literature on elderly cancer patients and their psychiatric disorders was undertaken to determine the extent of the problem. It consists of articles with elderly cancer patients. Keyword terms included "cancer", "elderly", "aging", "geriatric", "psychiatric disorders", "psychiatric symptoms", "psychological problems", "aged >60 years", "sucidal ideation, geriatric, cancer", "suicide geriatric cancer". We conducted searches on the following databases: PubMed; PsychINFO (1980-2013); finally, 102 publications were suitable for the current review. Depression in elderly cancer patients is the most common disorder in elderly cancer patients associated with disability, morbidity and mortality. Anxiety disorders may be less frequent in geriatric patients; however, it seemed to be a major problem in late life. Psychiatric disorders are common in geriatric patients with cancer especially at advanced stages of the disease. In addition, health care professionals can help provide treatment and emotional support. Future research should aim to provide data about the real prevalence and severity of psychiatric disorders in elderly patients with cancer, for the improvement of patients' quality of life and their caregivers.

  3. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US

  4. Inflamma-miRs in Aging and Breast Cancer: Are They Reliable Players?

    PubMed Central

    Cătană, Cristina Sorina; Calin, George A.; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    Human aging is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation known as “inflammaging.” Persistent low-level inflammation also plays a key role in all stages of breast cancer since “inflammaging” is the potential link between cancer and aging through NF-kB pathways highly influenced by specific miRs. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at a posttranscriptional level. Inflamma-miRs have been implicated in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. Their abnormal expression contributes to the chronic pro-inflammatory status documented in normal aging and major age-related diseases (ARDs), inflammaging being a significant mortality risk factor in both cases. Nevertheless, the correct diagnosis of inflammaging is difficult to make and its hidden contribution to negative health outcomes remains unknown. This methodological work flow was aimed at defining crucial unanswered questions about inflammaging that can be used to clarify aging-related miRNAs in serum and cell lines as well as their targets, thus confirming their role in aging and breast cancer tumorigenesis. Moreover, we aim to highlight the links between the pro-inflammatory mechanism underlying the cancer and aging processes and the precise function of certain miRNAs in cellular senescence (CS). In addition, miRNAs and cancer genes represent the basis for new therapeutic findings indicating that both cancer and ARDs genes are possible candidates involved in CS and vice versa. Our goal is to obtain a focused review that could facilitate future approaches in the investigation of the mechanisms by which miRNAs control the aging process by acting as efficient ARDs inflammatory biomarkers. An understanding of the sources and modulation of inflamma-miRs along with the identification of their specific target genes could enhance their therapeutic potential. PMID:26697428

  5. Maternal age at birth and risk of breast cancer in daughters.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W D; Janerich, D T

    1990-03-01

    Data from a large case-control study of breast cancer were examined to test the hypothesis that maternal age at the birth of female offspring is related to the incidence of breast cancer in daughters. Participants were between the ages of 20 and 54 at the time of the study. Based on results for 2,492 parous women who were newly diagnosed with breast cancer and 2,687 parous controls from the general population, a 15-year increase in maternal age was found to be associated with a 29% increase in the risk of breast cancer in daughters. Adjustment for the daughter's age, her own reproductive history, and other potential confounding factors yielded an estimate of 25% for this increase in risk (95% CI, 8% to 46%). The corresponding increase among 499 nulliparous cases and 457 nulliparous controls was 7%, which was not statistically significantly different in magnitude from the increase among parous women. These findings provide evidence for perinatal influences on the subsequent incidence of breast cancer during adulthood. Although specific mechanisms cannot be inferred directly, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that mutations in the genes of the human egg or sperm play a role in the etiology of breast cancer in female offspring.

  6. Recent trends in racial and regional disparities in cervical cancer incidence and mortality in United States

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangmi

    2017-01-01

    Background Although black women experienced greater cervical cancer incidence and mortality rate reduction in recent years, they continue to have higher incidence rates than whites. Great variations also exist among geographic regions of the US, with the South having both the highest incidence and mortality rates compared to other regions. The present study explores the question of whether living in the South is associated with greater racial disparity in cervical cancer incidence and mortality by examining race- and region-specific rates and the trend between 2000 and 2012. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 Program data was used. Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates, annual percent changes, and disparity ratios were calculated using SEER*Stat software and Joinpoint regression for four groups: US14-Non-Hispanic White (NHW), US14-Non-Hispanic Black (NHB), South-NHW, and South-NHB, where South included 4 registries from Georgia and Louisiana and US14 were 14 US registries except the four South registries. Results The average age-adjusted cervical cancer incidence rate was the highest among South-NHBs (11.1) and mortality rate was the highest among US14-NHBs (5.4). In 2012, the degree of racial disparities between South-NHBs and South-NHWs was greater in terms of mortality rates (NHB:NHW = 1.80:1.35) than incidence rates (NHB:NHW = 1.45:1.15). While mortality disparity ratios decreased from 2000–2012 for US14-NHB (APC: -1.9(-2.3,-1.4), mortality disparity ratios for South-NHWs (although lower than NHBs) increased compared to US14-NHW. Incidence rates for NHBs continued to increase with increasing age, whereas rates for NHWs decreased after age 40. Mortality rates for NHBs dramatically increased at age 65 compared to a relatively stable trend for NHWs. The increasing racial disparity with increasing age in terms of cervical cancer incidence rates became more pronounced when corrected for hysterectomy prevalence. Conclusions

  7. Natural history of age-related lobular involution and impact on breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Radisky, Derek C; Visscher, Daniel W; Frank, Ryan D; Vierkant, Robert A; Winham, Stacey; Stallings-Mann, Melody; Hoskin, Tanya L; Nassar, Aziza; Vachon, Celine M; Denison, Lori A; Hartmann, Lynn C; Frost, Marlene H; Degnim, Amy C

    2016-02-01

    Age-related lobular involution (LI) is a physiological process in which the terminal duct lobular units of the breast regress as a woman ages. Analyses of breast biopsies from women with benign breast disease (BBD) have found that extent of LI is negatively associated with subsequent breast cancer development. Here we assess the natural course of LI within individual women, and the impact of progressive LI on breast cancer risk. The Mayo Clinic BBD cohort consists of 13,455 women with BBD from 1967 to 2001. The BBD cohort includes 1115 women who had multiple benign biopsies, 106 of whom had developed breast cancer. Within this multiple biopsy cohort, the progression of the LI process was examined by age at initial biopsy and time between biopsies. The relationship between LI progression and breast cancer risk was assessed using standardized incidence ratios and by Cox proportional hazards analysis. Women who had multiple biopsies were younger age and had a slightly higher family history of breast cancer as compared with the overall BBD cohort. Extent of LI at subsequent biopsy was greater with increasing time between biopsies and for women age 55 + at initial biopsy. Among women with multiple biopsies, there was a significant association of higher breast cancer risk among those with involution stasis (lack of progression, HR 1.63) as compared with those with involution progression, p = 0.036. The multiple biopsy BBD cohort allows for a longitudinal study of the natural progression of LI. The majority of women in the multiple biopsy cohort showed progression of LI status between benign biopsies, and extent of progression was highest for women who were in the perimenopausal age range at initial biopsy. Progression of LI status between initial and subsequent biopsy was associated with decreased breast cancer risk.

  8. Patients with Old Age or Proximal Tumors Benefit from Metabolic Syndrome in Early Stage Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Jian-xin; Yu, Hong-mei; Liang, Wei-ping; Jin, Ying; Ren, Chao; He, Ming-ming; Chen, Wei-wei; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Feng-hua; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome and/or its components have been demonstrated to be risk factors for several cancers. They are also found to influence survival in breast, colon and prostate cancer, but the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in gastric cancer has not been investigated. Methods Clinical data and pre-treatment information of metabolic syndrome of 587 patients diagnosed with early stage gastric cancer were retrospectively collected. The associations of metabolic syndrome and/or its components with clinical characteristics and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer were analyzed. Results Metabolic syndrome was identified to be associated with a higher tumor cell differentiation (P = 0.036). Metabolic syndrome was also demonstrated to be a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients aged >50 years old (P = 0.009 in multivariate analysis) or patients with proximal gastric cancer (P = 0.047 in multivariate analysis). No association was found between single metabolic syndrome component and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer. In addition, patients with hypertension might have a trend of better survival through a good control of blood pressure (P = 0.052 in univariate analysis). Conclusions Metabolic syndrome was associated with a better tumor cell differentiation in patients with early stage gastric cancer. Moreover, metabolic syndrome was a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients with old age or proximal tumors. PMID:24599168

  9. Old age at diagnosis increases risk of tumor progression in nasopharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao-Xuan; Chen, Xiao-Di; Zhang, Guo-Ye; Li, Zhi-Kun; Hong, Jing; Xie, Dan; Cai, Mu-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Age at diagnosis has been found to be a prognostic factor of outcomes in various cancers. However, the effect of age at diagnosis on nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) progression has not been explored. We retrospectively evaluated the relationship between age and disease progression in 3,153 NPC patients who underwent radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy between 2007 and 2009. Patients were randomly assigned to either a testing cohort or a validation cohort by computer-generated random assignment. X-tile plots determined the optimal cut-point of age based on survival status to be ≤61 vs. >61 years. Further correlation analysis showed that age >61 years was significantly correlated with the tumor progression and therapeutic regimen in both testing and validation cohorts (P <0.05). In the present study, we observed that older age (>61 years) was a strong and independent predictor of poor disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Age was also found to be a significant prognostic predictor as well (P <0.05) when evaluating patients with the same disease stage. ROC analysis confirmed the predictive value of age on NPC-specific survival in both cohorts (P <0.001) and suggested that age may improve the ability to discriminate outcomes in NPCs, especially regarding tumor progression. In conclusion, our study suggests that older age at NPC diagnosis is associated with a higher incidence of tumor progression and cancer-specific mortality. Age is a strong and independent predictor of poor outcomes and may allow for more tailored therapeutic decision-making and individualized patient counseling. PMID:27463012

  10. Gallstones, cholecystectomy, and risk of digestive system cancers.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Leticia; Freedman, Neal D; Engels, Eric A; Warren, Joan L; Castro, Felipe; Koshiol, Jill

    2014-03-15

    Gallstones and cholecystectomy may be related to digestive system cancer through inflammation, altered bile flux, and changes in metabolic hormone levels. Although gallstones are recognized causes of gallbladder cancer, associations with other cancers of the digestive system are poorly established. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database (1992-2005), which includes 17 cancer registries that cover approximately 26% of the US population, to identify first primary cancers (n = 236,850) occurring in persons aged ≥66 years and 100,000 cancer-free population-based controls frequency-matched by calendar year, age, and gender. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression analysis, adjusting for the matching factors. Gallstones and cholecystectomy were associated with increased risk of noncardia gastric cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 1.21 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11, 1.32) and OR = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.13, 1.40), respectively), small-intestine carcinoid (OR = 1.27 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.60) and OR = 1.78 (95% CI: 1.41, 2.25)), liver cancer (OR = 2.35 (95% CI: 2.18, 2.54) and OR = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.41)), and pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.24 (95% CI: 1.16, 1.31) and OR = 1.23 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.33)). Colorectal cancer risk associated with gallstones and cholecystectomy decreased with increasing distance from the common bile duct (P-trend < 0.001). Hence, gallstones and cholecystectomy are associated with the risk of cancers occurring throughout the digestive tract.

  11. Greater absolute risk for all subtypes of breast cancer in the US than Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Beena Devi, C R; Sung, Hyuna; Tang, Tieng Swee; Rosenberg, Philip S; Hewitt, Stephen M; Sherman, Mark E; Anderson, William F; Yang, Xiaohong R

    2015-01-01

    Hormone receptor (HR) negative breast cancers are relatively more common in low-risk than high-risk countries and/or populations. However, the absolute variations between these different populations are not well established given the limited number of cancer registries with incidence rate data by breast cancer subtype. We, therefore, used two unique population-based resources with molecular data to compare incidence rates for the 'intrinsic' breast cancer subtypes between a low-risk Asian population in Malaysia and high-risk non-Hispanic white population in the National Cancer Institute's surveillance, epidemiology, and end results 18 registries database (SEER 18). The intrinsic breast cancer subtypes were recapitulated with the joint expression of the HRs (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). Invasive breast cancer incidence rates overall were fivefold greater in SEER 18 than in Malaysia. The majority of breast cancers were HR-positive in SEER 18 and HR-negative in Malaysia. Notwithstanding the greater relative distribution for HR-negative cancers in Malaysia, there was a greater absolute risk for all subtypes in SEER 18; incidence rates were nearly 7-fold higher for HR-positive and 2-fold higher for HR-negative cancers in SEER 18. Despite the well-established relative breast cancer differences between low-risk and high-risk countries and/or populations, there was a greater absolute risk for HR-positive and HR-negative subtypes in the US than Malaysia. Additional analytical studies are sorely needed to determine the factors responsible for the elevated risk of all subtypes of breast cancer in high-risk countries like the United States.

  12. Qualitative analysis of couples' experience with prostate cancer by age cohort.

    PubMed

    Harden, Janet K; Northouse, Laurel L; Mood, Darlene W

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in men in all adult life stages. Normative developmental tasks of aging combined with disease-related stressors may negatively affect adjustment to prostate cancer and, consequently, affect the quality of life of both the man and his spouse. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of men with prostate cancer and their partners according to their life cycle cohort: 50-64 (late middle age), 65-74 (young-old), and 75-84 (old-old). Qualitative interviews with 15 couples were used to provide information about the dyad's experiences with prostate cancer. Interview data were analyzed to identify preliminary coding schemas, which were subsequently refined and modified into themes. Three major themes were identified from the data. Across all age groups, prostate cancer had a significant effect on: (1) couples' daily lives, (2) their dyadic and family relationships, and (3) their developmental stage. There were also differences in age groups. Couples in the late middle age group reported greater disappointment and anger at their inability to reach life goals and establish financial security. Couples in the young-old group made more spontaneous comments about being satisfied with their life than the couples in the other 2 groups. Couples in the old-old group reported slower recovery from the illness than the younger couples. Results indicate that although prostate cancer may have some universal effects on couples, it also may have differential effects by age cohort. Hence, targeted interventions by age cohort may be warranted.

  13. Enabling High Data Throughput in Desktop Grids through Decentralized Data and Metadata Management: The BlobSeer Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolae, Bogdan; Antoniu, Gabriel; Bougé, Luc

    Whereas traditional Desktop Grids rely on centralized servers for data management, some recent progress has been made to enable distributed, large input data, using to peer-to-peer (P2P) protocols and Content Distribution Networks (CDN). We make a step further and propose a generic, yet efficient data storage which enables the use of Desktop Grids for applications with high output data requirements, where the access grain and the access patterns may be random. Our solution builds on a blob management service enabling a large number of concurrent clients to efficiently read/write and append huge data that are fragmented and distributed at a large scale. Scalability under heavy concurrency is achieved thanks to an original metadata scheme using a distributed segment tree built on top of a Distributed Hash Table (DHT). The proposed approach has been implemented and its benefits have successfully been demonstrated within our BlobSeer prototype on the Grid’5000 testbed.

  14. Frailty in Older Breast Cancer Survivors: Age, Prevalence, and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jill A.; Winters-Stone, Kerri M.; Dobek, Jessica; Nail, Lillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Describe frailty and associated factors in breast cancer survivors Design Cross-sectional descriptive Setting School of nursing Sample 216 breast cancer survivors (BCS) aged 53–87 not currently participating in exercise Methods Performance tests, clinical measures, and self-reported questionnaires provided baseline data analyzed for this study Main Research Variables Frailty was defined as meeting 3 of the 5 criteria of the Frailty Phenotype: shrinking, exhaustion, low activity, slowness, and weakness. Data were compared to published data from women in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) and Women’s Health and Aging Study (WHAS). Findings 18% of BCS aged 70–79 were frail, compared to 11% of CHS and WHAS women aged 70–79. Frailty was more common at a younger age in BCS and more BCS were frail in all age groups compared to CHS women until approximately age 80 when prevalence of frailty was similar in the two groups. 50% of BCS were classified as prefrail because they met 1–2 of the 5 frailty criteria. Higher body mass index increased the odds of frailty and higher physical activity decreased the odds of frailty (OR= 1.12, p=.003 and OR=.99, p=.000 respectively). Conclusions Frailty and prefrailty may be common in BCS and may occur at an earlier age than in adults without a history of cancer. PMID:23615146

  15. A theory of the cancer age-specific incidence data based on extreme value distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Ortiz, Luis; Brody, James P.

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of cancers varies with age, if normalized this is called the age-specific incidence. A mathematical model that describes this variation should provide a better understanding of how cancers develop. We suggest that the age-specific incidence should follow an extreme value distribution, based on three widely accepted assumptions: (1) a tumor develops from a single cell, (2) many potential tumor progenitor cells exist in a tissue, and (3) cancer is diagnosed when the first of these many potential tumor cells develops into a tumor. We tested this by comparing the predicted distribution to the age-specific incidence data for colon and prostate carcinomas collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results network of 17 cancer registries. We found that colon carcinoma age-specific incidence data is consistent with an extreme value distribution, while prostate carcinomas age-specific incidence data generally follows the distribution. This model indicates that both colon and prostate carcinomas only occur in a subset of the population (22% for prostate and 13.5% for colon.) Because of their very general nature, extreme value distributions might be applicable to understanding other chronic human diseases.

  16. Spatial gender-age-period-cohort analysis of pancreatic cancer mortality in Spain (1990–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Etxeberria, Jaione; Goicoa, Tomás; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Riebler, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the interest in studying pancreatic cancer mortality has increased due to its high lethality. In this work a detailed analysis of pancreatic cancer mortality in Spanish provinces was performed using recent data. A set of multivariate spatial gender-age-period-cohort models was considered to look for potential candidates to analyze pancreatic cancer mortality rates. The selected model combines features of APC (age-period-cohort) models with disease mapping approaches. To ensure model identifiability sum-to-zero constraints were applied. A fully Bayesian approach based on integrated nested Laplace approximations (INLA) was considered for model fitting and inference. Sensitivity analyses were also conducted. In general, estimated average rates by age, cohort, and period are higher in males than in females. The higher differences according to age between males and females correspond to the age groups [65, 70), [70, 75), and [75, 80). Regarding the cohort, the greatest difference between men and women is observed for those born between the forties and the sixties. From there on, the younger the birth cohort is, the smaller the difference becomes. Some cohort differences are also identified by regions and age-groups. The spatial pattern indicates a North-South gradient of pancreatic cancer mortality in Spain, the provinces in the North being the ones with the highest effects on mortality during the studied period. Finally, the space-time evolution shows that the space pattern has changed little over time. PMID:28199327

  17. Impact of Age and Comorbidity on Cervical and Breast Cancer Literacy of African Americans, Latina, and Arab Women.

    PubMed

    Talley, Costellia H; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2015-09-01

    This study examines the relationship between age, comorbidity, and breast and cervical cancer literacy in a sample of African American, Latina, and Arab women (N = 371) from Detroit, Michigan. The Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (ACC) was used characterize the impact of age and comorbidity on breast and cervical cancer literacy. The relationship between ACC and breast and cervical cancer screening, and group differences, were assessed. There was a statistically significant difference between breast cancer literacy scores. ACC had a greater impact on breast cancer literacy for African Americans.

  18. Increasing incidence of thyroid cancer in Great Britain, 1976-2005: age-period-cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J Q; Blakey, Karen; James, Peter W; Gomez Pozo, Basilio; Basta, Nermine O; Hale, Juliet

    2012-08-01

    Increases in the incidence of thyroid cancer have been previously reported. The purpose of the present study was to examine temporal trends in the incidence of primary thyroid cancer diagnosed in 0-49 year olds in parts of Great Britain during 1976-2005. Data on 4,337 cases of thyroid cancer were obtained from regional cancer registries. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) were calculated. Negative binomial regression was used to examine effects of age, sex, drift (linear trend), non-linear period and non-linear cohort. The best fitting negative binomial regression model included age (P < 0.001), sex (P < 0.001) and drift (P < 0.001). Non-linear period (P = 0.648) and non-linear cohort (P = 0.788) were not statistically significant. For males aged 0-14, the ASR increased from 0.2 per million persons per year in 1976-1986 to 0.6 in 1997-2005. For males aged 15-29 and 30-49 the ASRs increased from 1.9 to 3.3 and from 7.4 to 12.7, respectively. For females aged 0-14, the corresponding ASR increased from 0.3 to 0.5. For females aged 15-29 and 30-49 the ASRs increased from 6.9 to 12.4 and from 21.2 to 42.3, respectively. For all age groups, there has been a linear increase in incidence of thyroid cancer, which has led to a doubling of the number of cases diagnosed over a twenty year span. The reasons for this increase are not well understood, but it is consistent with findings from other countries.

  19. Validation of a Pre-Clinical Model for the Investigation of Menarcheal Age on Breast Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    relationship between age at vaginal opening (VO), a marker for ovarian function, and susceptibility to MNU-induced mammary cancer and 2) investigate...the Investigation of Menarcheal Age on Breast Cancer Risk PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Pepper J. Schedin, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...of Menarcheal Age on Breast Cancer Risk 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0499 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  20. Incidence of cancer in children aged 0-14 years in Taiwan, 1996-2010.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Lin; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Chiang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Ya-Wen; Lu, Meng-Yao; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Ho, Wan-Ling; Li, Meng-Ju; Miser, James S; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2015-02-01

    Studies have found lower risk of childhood cancer among Asian children. We aim to characterize the recent incidence and incidence-trend of childhood cancer in Taiwan after the National Health Insurance program was launched in March 1995. Data were extracted from the Taiwan Cancer Registry, a population-based database established in 1979. Cases diagnosed at age 0-14 from 1996 to 2010 were analyzed and categorized according to the International Classification of Childhood Cancer, Third Edition (ICCC-3). In total, 8032 childhood cancer cases were included, with a microscopic verification rate of 93.9%. The overall age-standardized rate (ASR) of incidence adjusted to the 2000 World Standard Population is 125.0 cases/million, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.3. The top five cancer types (ICCC-3 subgroup[s]; ASR per million) are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ia, 30.3), acute myeloid leukemia (Ib; 9.4), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (IIb,c,e, 9.0), extracranial germ cell tumor (Xb,c; 8.3), and neuroblastoma (IVa; 7.8). The median age of diagnosis was 6 years for both genders. During the study period, the ASR of childhood cancer has been increasing at a rate of 1.2% per year (95% confidence interval, 0.6-1.7%). In contrast to Western countries, China, Japan, and Taiwan have lower incidence of childhood cancer; however, Taiwan's incidence rates of childhood germ cell tumors and hepatic tumors are higher. In conclusion, this population-based study reveals that the incidence rate of childhood cancer in Taiwan is rising consistently. The high incidence of germ cell tumors warrants further investigation.

  1. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  2. For Working-Age Cancer Survivors, Medical Debt And Bankruptcy Create Financial Hardships.

    PubMed

    Banegas, Matthew P; Guy, Gery P; de Moor, Janet S; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Virgo, Katherine S; Kent, Erin E; Nutt, Stephanie; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Rechis, Ruth; Yabroff, K Robin

    2016-01-01

    The rising medical costs associated with cancer have led to considerable financial hardship for patients and their families in the United States. Using data from the LIVESTRONG 2012 survey of 4,719 cancer survivors ages 18-64, we examined the proportions of survivors who reported going into debt or filing for bankruptcy as a result of cancer, as well as the amount of debt incurred. Approximately one-third of the survivors had gone into debt, and 3 percent had filed for bankruptcy. Of those who had gone into debt, 55 percent incurred obligations of $10,000 or more. Cancer survivors who were younger, had lower incomes, and had public health insurance were more likely to go into debt or file for bankruptcy, compared to those who were older, had higher incomes, and had private insurance, respectively. Future longitudinal population-based studies are needed to improve understanding of financial hardship among US working-age cancer survivors throughout the cancer care trajectory and, ultimately, to help stakeholders develop evidence-based interventions and policies to reduce the financial hardship of cancer.

  3. Impact of cervical screening on cervical cancer mortality: estimation using stage-specific results from a nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Rebecca; Pesola, Francesca; Castañón, Alejandra; Sasieni, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that screening can prevent cervical cancer, but the magnitude of the impact of regular screening on cervical cancer mortality is unknown. Methods: Population-based case–control study using prospectively recorded cervical screening data, England 1988–2013. Case women had cervical cancer diagnosed during April 2007–March 2013 aged 25–79 years (N=11 619). Two cancer-free controls were individually age matched to each case. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate the odds ratio (OR) of developing stage-specific cancer for women regularly screened or irregularly screened compared with women not screened in the preceding 15 years. Mortality was estimated from excess deaths within 5 years of diagnosis using stage-specific 5-year relative survival from England with adjustment for age within stage based on SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, USA) data. Results: In women aged 35–64 years, regular screening is associated with a 67% (95% confidence interval (CI): 62–73%) reduction in stage 1A cancer and a 95% (95% CI: 94–97%) reduction in stage 3 or worse cervical cancer: the estimated OR comparing regular (⩽5.5yearly) screening to no (or minimal) screening are 0.18 (95% CI: 0.16–0.19) for cancer incidence and 0.08 (95% CI: 0.07–0.09) for mortality. It is estimated that in England screening currently prevents 70% (95% CI: 66–73%) of cervical cancer deaths (all ages); however, if everyone attended screening regularly, 83% (95% CI: 82–84%) could be prevented. Conclusions: The association between cervical cancer screening and incidence is stronger in more advanced stage cancers, and screening is more effective at preventing death from cancer than preventing cancer itself. PMID:27632376

  4. Socioeconomic factors, immigration status, and cancer screening among Mexican American women aged 75 and older.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2010-12-01

    To explore the association between socioeconomic factors and acculturation with cancer screening methods, we analyzed data from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, on 1,272 women aged 75 and older residing in the United States in 2004-2005. We found that lower Pap smear or mammography uses were associated with older age, lower education, and having public health insurance compared with private. Other factors associated with mammography use were depressive symptoms, cognition, and functional limitations. In sum, socioeconomic factors and health insurance coverage, but not acculturation, determine cancer screening utilization in very old Mexican American women.

  5. CAM Provider Use and Expenditures by Cancer Treatment Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, William E.; Tyree, Patrick T.; Devlin, Sean M.; Andersen, M. Robyn; Diehr, Paula K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess cancer patients’ utilization of complementary and alternative medical providers and the associated expenditures by specific treatment phases. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis of medical services utilization and expenditures during three therapeutic intervals: an initial treatment phase, continuing care, and end-of-life. Methods Analysis of an insurance claims database that had been matched to the Washington State SEER cancer registry. Results Of 2,900 registry-matched cancer patients 63.2% were female, the median age was 54 years, and 92.7% were white. Breast cancer was the most frequent diagnosis (52.7%), followed by prostate cancer (24.7%), lung cancer (10.1%), colon cancer (7.0%), and hematologic malignancies (5.6%). CAM provider using patients were 26.5% of the overall cohort (18.5% used chiropractors, 7.7% naturopathic physicians, 5.3% massage therapists, and 4.2% saw acupuncturists). The proportion of CAM using patients was similar during each treatment phase. All patients used some conventional care. Female gender, a breast cancer diagnosis, age, and white race were significant predictors of CAM use. Diagnosis of a musculoskeletal problem occurred at sometime during the study for 72.1% of cancer patients. CAM provider visits were 7.2% of total outpatient medical visits and 85.1% of CAM visits resulted in a musculoskeletal diagnosis. Expenditures for CAM providers were 0.3%, 1.0%, and 0.1% of all expenditures during the initial, continuing, and end-of-life phases respectively. Conclusion For cancer patients, musculoskeletal issues were the most commonly listed diagnosis made by a CAM provider. Although expenditures associated with CAM are a small proportion of the total, additional studies are necessary to determine the importance patients place on access to these services. PMID:18471036

  6. Pancreas cancer in Mississippi: present challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Helling, Thomas S

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a deadly disease. Currently, the only hope for cure is surgical resection at an early stage of the disease. However, there is evidence that many individuals do not receive this treatment, perhaps because of health care disparities. Mississippi, because of its socioeconomic composition, has been the focus of concern for health care disparities. In order to determine whether such disparities exist in Mississippi for pancreatic cancer, a retrospective analysis was done from 2000 2006 of case diagnosis, treatment, and mortality from this disease. The Mississippi Cancer Registry, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program were surveyed. Outcomes at all 12 ACS Commission on Cancer (CoC) accredited hospitals within the state were compared to the NCDB nationwide (n=1331 hospitals). In 2006 Mississippi had the highest death rate from pancreas cancer in the nation (12.7/100,000). Age-adjusted incidence by county ranged to a high of 26.91/100,000. Fifty-one percent of patients who died from pancreatic cancer in the state were treated at ACS CoC hospitals. The fate of the other 49% is not known. Of the patients tracked at CoC hospitals, there was essentially no significant difference with respect to age distribution, stage at diagnosis, or first treatment modalities when compared to NCDB nationwide CoC data. There were fewer patients surviving two years with locally advanced disease compared to national figures. Of concern was the large number of patients whose treatment for pancreatic cancer is unknown. It is incumbent on health care providers in the state to develop a system of care for pancreatic cancer that is accessible, inclusive, and comprehensive.

  7. Treating medullary thyroid cancer in the age of targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Maria E; Hu, Mimi I; Jimenez, Camilo; Grubbs, Elizabeth G; Cote, Gilbert J

    2015-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumor deriving from the thyroid parafollicular cell. Thyroidectomy continues to serve as the primary initial treatment for this cancer. Because standard cytotoxic chemotherapy has proven ineffective, reoperation and external beam radiation therapy had been the only tools to treat recurrences or distant disease. The discovery that aberrant activation of RET, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is a primary driver of MTC tumorigenesis led to clinical trials using RET-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The successes of those trials led to the approval of vandetanib and cabozantinib for treating patients with progressive or symptomatic MTC. The availability of these drugs, along with additional targeted therapies in development, requires a thoughtful reconsideration of the approach to treating patients with unresectable locally advanced and/or metastatic progressive MTC. PMID:25908961

  8. Differences in the progesterone receptor contents between familial breast cancers and sporadic breast cancers stratified by patient age.

    PubMed

    Fukutomi, T; Akashi-Tanaka, S

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) contents of familial breast cancers (FBCs) and compared the findings with those of sporadic breast cancers., stratified by the patients' age. To evaluate the hormone receptor contents of Japanese FBCs, we collected a consecutive series of 250 FBCs and 2,533 sporadic breast cancers (SBCs). These patients were divided into the three groups stratified by the patients' age at initial surgery (group I, under 40 years old; group II, 40-60 years old; group III, over 60 years old). The clinicopathological features of FBCs and SBCs, including ERs and PRs, were analyzed for each group. In all age groups, the PR contents of FBCs were significantly lower than those of SBCs, particularly for group III. In FBCs, the PR content was significantly lower in group III than in groups I or II. In addition, there was a nonsignificant trend towards a high frequency of ER-positive, PR-negative tumors in FBC patients aged 60 years and over. These data indicate that the loss of ER function and/or loss of binding capacity of PR to progesterone was associated with some late-onset FBCS.

  9. Cigarette smoke metabolically promotes cancer, via autophagy and premature aging in the host stromal microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Ahmed F.; Al-Zoubi, Mazhar Salim; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Gandara, Ricardo; Sartini, Marina; Galbiati, Ferruccio; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been directly implicated in the disease pathogenesis of a plethora of different human cancer subtypes, including breast cancers. The prevailing view is that cigarette smoke acts as a mutagen and DNA damaging agent in normal epithelial cells, driving tumor initiation. However, its potential negative metabolic effects on the normal stromal microenvironment have been largely ignored. Here, we propose a new mechanism by which carcinogen-rich cigarette smoke may promote cancer growth, by metabolically “fertilizing” the host microenvironment. More specifically, we show that cigarette smoke exposure is indeed sufficient to drive the onset of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype via the induction of DNA damage, autophagy and mitophagy in the tumor stroma. In turn, cigarette smoke exposure induces premature aging and mitochondrial dysfunction in stromal fibroblasts, leading to the secretion of high-energy mitochondrial fuels, such as L-lactate and ketone bodies. Hence, cigarette smoke induces catabolism in the local microenvironment, directly fueling oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) in neighboring epithelial cancer cells, actively promoting anabolic tumor growth. Remarkably, these autophagic-senescent fibroblasts increased breast cancer tumor growth in vivo by up to 4-fold. Importantly, we show that cigarette smoke-induced metabolic reprogramming of the fibroblastic stroma occurs independently of tumor neo-angiogenesis. We discuss the possible implications of our current findings for the prevention of aging-associated human diseases and, especially, common epithelial cancers, as we show that cigarette smoke can systemically accelerate aging in the host microenvironment. Finally, our current findings are consistent with the idea that cigarette smoke induces the “reverse Warburg effect,” thereby fueling “two-compartment tumor metabolism” and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in epithelial cancer cells. PMID:23388463

  10. One-carbon metabolism: an aging-cancer crossroad for the gerosuppressant metformin.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    The gerosuppressant metformin operates as an efficient inhibitor of the mTOR/S6K1 gerogenic pathway due to its ability to ultimately activate the energy-sensor AMPK. If an aging-related decline in the AMPK sensitivity to cellular stress is a crucial event for mTOR-driven aging and aging-related diseases, including cancer, unraveling new proximal causes through which AMPK activation endows its gerosuppressive effects may offer not only a better understanding of metformin function but also the likely possibility of repositioning our existing gerosuppressant drugs. Here we provide our perspective on recent findings suggesting that de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides, which is based on the metabolism of one-carbon compounds, is a new target for metformin's actions at the crossroads of aging and cancer.

  11. Regenerative medicine: shedding light into the link between aging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Fabio; Serra, Maria Paola; Fanti, Maura; Cadoni, Erika; Serra, Monica; Laconi, Ezio

    2017-03-02

    The evidence linking aging and cancer is overwhelming. Findings emerging from the field of regenerative medicine reinforce the notion that aging and cancer are profoundly interrelated in their pathogenetic pathways. We discuss evidence to indicate that age-associated alterations in the tissue microenvironment contribute to the emergence of a neoplastic-prone tissue landscape, which is able to support the selective growth of pre-neoplastic cell populations. Interestingly, tissue contexts that are able to select for the growth of pre-neoplastic cells, including the aged liver microenvironment, are also supportive for the clonal expansion of normal, homotypic, transplanted cells. This suggests that the growth of normal and pre-neoplastic cells is possibly driven by similar mechanisms, implying that strategies based on principles of regenerative medicine might be applicable to modulate neoplastic disease.

  12. Variation in Positron Emission Tomography Use After Colon Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christina E.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y. Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D.; Chang, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. Patients and Methods: We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. Conclusion: PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. PMID:25852143

  13. Prospective Predictors of Mental Health after the Development of Breast Cancer in Middle-Aged Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Tracey D.; Lee, Christina

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigated the prospective predictors of mental health after breast cancer diagnosis among mid-aged Australian women (initially aged 45-50 years). Two waves of data collected 2 years apart from a longitudinal population-based survey of 12,177 women identified a group of 63 women who reported onset of BC between T1 (T1) and Time 2…

  14. Aging, obesity, and post-therapy cognitive recovery in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhezhou; Zheng, Ying; Bao, Pingping; Cai, Hui; Hong, Zhen; Ding, Ding; Jackson, James; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Dai, Qi

    2016-10-11

    Therapy-induced cognitive impairment is prevalent and long-lasting in cancer survivors, but factors affecting post-therapy cognitive recovery are unclear. We conducted this study to evaluate the associations of age, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and physical activity (PA) with post-therapy cognitive changes in a population-based breast cancer (BC) survivor cohort. We collected information on PA, weight, height, waist and hip circumferences of 1286 BC survivors aged 20-75. We assessed their cognitive functions, including immediate memory, delayed memory, verbal fluency, and attention, at 18 and 36 months after cancer diagnosis. Linear regression models were used to examine the associations of age, BMI, WHR and PA with mean changes in cognitive scores from 18- to 36-month follow-up interview. We found that the post-therapy cognitive changes differed by age and obesity status. Verbal fluency and attention improved in younger patients aged <60 and non-abdominally obese patients, but deteriorated in older patients aged ≥60 (i.e. verbal fluency and attention) and abdominally obese patients (i.e. verbal fluency). Memory improved in all patients, with a smaller improvement in obese patients compared with normal-weight patients. No significant association was found between PA and post-therapy cognitive change. Due to the novelty of our findings and the limitations of our study, further research, including intervention trials, is warranted to confirm the causal relationship between obesity and cognitive impairments.

  15. Trends in the Utilization of Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Kathy; Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony; Pintilie, Melania; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the trends in brachytherapy use in cervical cancer in the United States and to identify factors and survival benefits associated with brachytherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 7359 patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1988 and 2009. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between patients who received brachytherapy and those who did not from 2000 onward (after the National Cancer Institute alert recommending concurrent chemotherapy). Results: Sixty-three percent of the 7359 women received brachytherapy in combination with EBRT, and 37% received EBRT alone. The brachytherapy utilization rate has decreased from 83% in 1988 to 58% in 2009 (P<.001), with a sharp decline of 23% in 2003 to 43%. Factors associated with higher odds of brachytherapy use include younger age, married (vs single) patients, earlier years of diagnosis, earlier stage and certain SEER regions. In the propensity score-matched cohort, brachytherapy treatment was associated with higher 4-year cause-specific survival (CSS; 64.3% vs 51.5%, P<.001) and overall survival (OS; 58.2% vs 46.2%, P<.001). Brachytherapy treatment was independently associated with better CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.71), and OS (HR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.74). Conclusions: This population-based analysis reveals a concerning decline in brachytherapy utilization and significant geographic disparities in the delivery of brachytherapy in the United States. Brachytherapy use is independently associated with significantly higher CSS and OS and should be implemented in all feasible cases.

  16. Biological, clinical, and psychosocial correlates at the interface of cancer and aging research.

    PubMed

    Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Eldadah, Basil A; Trimble, Edward L; Schilsky, Richard L; Cohen, Harvey J; Muss, Hyman B; Schmader, Kenneth E; Ferrell, Betty; Extermann, Martine; Nayfield, Susan G; Hurria, Arti

    2012-04-18

    In September 2010, the Cancer and Aging Research Group, in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging, conducted the first of three planned conferences to discuss research methodology to generate the highest quality research in older adults with cancer and then disseminate these findings among those working in the fields of cancer and aging. Conference speakers discussed the current level of research evidence in geriatric oncology, outlined the current knowledge gaps, and put forth principles for research designs and strategies that would address these gaps within the next 10 years. It was agreed that future oncology research trials that enroll older adults should include: (1) improved standardized geriatric assessment of older oncology patients, (2) substantially enhanced biological assessment of older oncology patients, (3) specific trials for the most vulnerable and/or those older than 75 years, and (4) research infrastructure that specifically targets older adults and substantially strengthened geriatrics and oncology research collaborations. This initial conference laid the foundation for the next two meetings, which will address the research designs and collaborations needed to enhance therapeutic and intervention trials in older adults with cancer.

  17. Effect of Patient Age on Management Decisions in Breast Cancer: Consensus from a National Consultation

    PubMed Central

    Barrett-Lee, Peter J.; Gosney, Margot A.; Willett, Alexis M.; Reed, Malcolm W.; Hammond, Pauline J.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the attitudes, perceptions, and practices of breast cancer specialists with reference to the effect of patient age on management decisions in breast cancer, and attempted to identify national consensus on this issue. One hundred thirty-three relevant specialists, including 75 surgeons and 43 oncologists, participated in a virtual consultation using e-mailed questionnaires and open-ended discussion documents, culminating in the development of proposed consensus statements sent to participants for validation. A strong consensus was seen in favor of incorporating minimum standards of diagnostic services, treatment, and care for older patients with breast cancer into relevant national guidance, endorsed by professional bodies. Similarly, an overwhelming majority of participants agreed that simple, evidence-based protocols or guidelines on standardizing assessment of biological and chronological age should be produced by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and the Scottish Medicines Consortium, developed in collaboration with specialist oncogeriatricians, and endorsed by professional bodies. A further recommendation that all breast cancer patient treatment and diagnostic procedures be undertaken in light of up-to-date, relevant scientific data met with majority support. This study was successful in gauging national specialist opinion regarding the effect of patient age on management decisions in breast cancer in the U.K. PMID:20551430

  18. The role of telomere dynamics in aging and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, Krastan; Goodwin, Edwin

    2006-03-01

    Telomere length changes are far more dynamic than previously thought. In addition to a gradual loss of ˜100 base pairs per telomere in each cell division, losses as well as gains may occur within a single cell cycle. We are investigating how telomere exchange, extension, and deletion affect the proliferative potential of telomerase-negative somatic cells. Experimental techniques are being devised to detect dynamic telomere processes and quantify both the frequency and length changes of each. In parallel, a ``dynamic telomere model'' is being used that incorporates telomere dynamics to study how the telomere size distribution evolves with time. This is an essential step towards understanding the role that telomere dynamics play in the normal aging of tissues and organisms. The model casts light on relationships not otherwise easily explained by a deterministic ``mitotic clock,'' or to what extent the shortest initial telomere determines the onset of senescence. We also expect to identify biomarkers that will correlate with aging better than average telomere length and to shed light on the transition to unlimited growth found in telomerase-negative tumor cells having the ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) phenotype, and to evaluate strategies to suppress the growth of these tumors.

  19. Impact of general practitioners' sex and age on systematic recommendation for cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, François; Pivot, Xavier; Coscas, Yvan; Viguier, Jérôme; Calazel-Benque, Anne; Blay, Jean-Yves; Roussel, Claire; Morère, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    Characteristics of primary-care providers have been associated with their patients' participation in breast cancer screening. A nationwide observational survey, 'EDIFICE', was conducted by telephone from December 2007 to January 2008 on a representative sample of 600 general practitioners (GPs) working in France, to investigate how a GP's characteristics may influence patient participation in screening for breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. For breast cancer screening, systematic recommendation was associated with female physicians [odds ratio (OR) =1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.1]. This systematic recommendation was also correlated with systematic referral for colorectal cancer (OR=1.5; 95% CI=1.0-2.5) and prostate cancer screening (OR=2.7; 95% CI=1.8-4.1). For colorectal cancer screening, the sex of the GP had no significant impact. However, systematic recommendation for both breast and prostate cancer screening was shown to be associated with systematic recommendation for colorectal cancer screening (OR=2.7; 95% CI=1.6-4.7 and OR=1.8; 95% CI=1.1-3.0, respectively). For prostate cancer screening, there was no significant sex specificity. However, systematic recommendation for both breast and colorectal cancer screening was associated with an advice on prostate cancer screening (OR=2.9; 95% CI=2.0-4.4 and OR=2.0; 95% CI=1.3-3.2, respectively). The age of the GP was not associated with a higher rate of systematic recommendation for screening for the three types of cancer. Male GPs were more likely than female GPs to perform digital rectal examinations on male patients (69 vs. 54%; OR=1.86; 95% CI=1.31-2.63). There is a global pattern of physicians being screening-prone (as suggested by the cross impact of recommendations from one cancer type to another). Although the frequency of systematic recommendation for breast cancer screening is higher with female GPs, systematic recommendation for prostate cancer is not higher among male GPs. The factors

  20. Cancer in Women over 50 Years of Age: A Focus on Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Baccaro, Luiz Francisco; Conde, Délio Marques; Costa-Paiva, Lúcia; Machado, Vanessa de Souza Santos; Pinto-Neto, Aarão Mendes

    2015-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy worldwide has resulted in a greater prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with the occurrence of cancer among Brazilian women over the age of 50. A cross-sectional study with 622 women over the age of 50 was performed using a population survey. The outcome variable was the occurrence of a malignant tumor in any location. The independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, self-perception of health, health-related habits and morbidities. Statistical analysis was carried out using the chi-square test and Poisson regression. The mean age of the women was 64.1 years. The prevalence of cancer was 6.8%. The main sites of occurrence of malignant tumors were the breast (31.9%), colorectal (12.7%) and skin (12.7%). In the final statistical model, the only factor associated with cancer was smoking > 15 cigarettes/day either currently or in the past: PR 2.03 (95% CI 1.06–3.89). The results have improved understanding of the prevalence and factors associated with cancer in Brazilian women aged 50 years or more. They should be encouraged to maintain a healthy lifestyle and pay particular attention to modifiable risk factors such as smoking. PMID:25790469

  1. Comprehension of a Colon Cancer Pamphlet among American Adults at Least 50 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chiung-ju

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of comprehension of an educational pamphlet on colon cancer, by adults at least 50 years of age living in the United States. Design: Data were analysed from the "2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy" survey. The survey was designed to assess functional English…

  2. Detectable clonal mosaicism from birth to old age and its relationship to cancer.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Cathy C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Rice, Kenneth; Doheny, Kimberly F; Zelnick, Leila R; McHugh, Caitlin P; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt N; Pugh, Elizabeth W; Amos, Chris; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Li-e; Lee, Jeffrey E; Barnes, Kathleen C; Hansel, Nadia N; Mathias, Rasika; Daley, Denise; Beaty, Terri H; Scott, Alan F; Ruczinski, Ingo; Scharpf, Rob B; Bierut, Laura J; Hartz, Sarah M; Landi, Maria Teresa; Freedman, Neal D; Goldin, Lynn R; Ginsburg, David; Li, Jun; Desch, Karl C; Strom, Sara S; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Ingles, Sue A; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E; Monroe, Kristine R; Heit, John A; de Andrade, Mariza; Armasu, Sebastian M; Regnier, Cynthia; Lowe, William L; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Marazita, Mary L; Feingold, Eleanor; Murray, Jeffrey C; Melbye, Mads; Feenstra, Bjarke; Kang, Jae H; Wiggs, Janey L; Jarvik, Gail P; McDavid, Andrew N; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Mirel, Daniel B; Crenshaw, Andrew; Sharopova, Nataliya; Wise, Anastasia; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David R; Levine, David M; Zheng, Xiuwen; Udren, Jenna I; Bennett, Siiri; Nelson, Sarah C; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Conomos, Matthew P; Heagerty, Patrick; Manolio, Teri; Pasquale, Louis R; Haiman, Christopher A; Caporaso, Neil; Weir, Bruce S

    2012-05-06

    We detected clonal mosaicism for large chromosomal anomalies (duplications, deletions and uniparental disomy) using SNP microarray data from over 50,000 subjects recruited for genome-wide association studies. This detection method requires a relatively high frequency of cells with the same abnormal karyotype (>5-10%; presumably of clonal origin) in the presence of normal cells. The frequency of detectable clonal mosaicism in peripheral blood is low (<0.5%) from birth until 50 years of age, after which it rapidly rises to 2-3% in the elderly. Many of the mosaic anomalies are characteristic of those found in hematological cancers and identify common deleted regions with genes previously associated with these cancers. Although only 3% of subjects with detectable clonal mosaicism had any record of hematological cancer before DNA sampling, those without a previous diagnosis have an estimated tenfold higher risk of a subsequent hematological cancer (95% confidence interval = 6-18).

  3. Psychosocial Adjustment in School-age Girls With a Family History of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Angela R.; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Schwartz, Lisa; Egleston, Brian; Sands, Colleen Burke; Chung, Wendy K.; Glendon, Gord; McDonald, Jasmine A.; Moore, Cynthia; Rauch, Paula; Tuchman, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Frost, Caren J.; Keegan, Theresa H.M.; Knight, Julia A.; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Understanding how young girls respond to growing up with breast cancer family histories is critical given expansion of genetic testing and breast cancer messaging. We examined the impact of breast cancer family history on psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors among >800 girls in the multicenter LEGACY Girls Study. METHODS Girls aged 6 to 13 years with a family history of breast cancer or familial BRCA1/2 mutation (BCFH+), peers without a family history (BCFH−), and their biological mothers completed assessments of psychosocial adjustment (maternal report for 6- to 13-year-olds, self-report for 10- to 13-year-olds), breast cancer–specific distress, perceived risk of breast cancer, and health behaviors (10- to 13-year-olds). RESULTS BCFH+ girls had better general psychosocial adjustment than BCFH− peers by maternal report. Psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors did not differ significantly by self-report among 10- to 13-year-old girls. BCFH+ girls reported higher breast cancer–specific distress (P = .001) and were more likely to report themselves at increased breast cancer risk than BCFH− peers (38.4% vs 13.7%, P < .001), although many girls were unsure of their risk. In multivariable analyses, higher daughter anxiety was associated with higher maternal anxiety and poorer family communication. Higher daughter breast cancer–specific distress was associated with higher maternal breast cancer-specific distress. CONCLUSIONS Although growing up in a family at risk for breast cancer does not negatively affect general psychosocial adjustment among preadolescent girls, those from breast cancer risk families experience greater breast cancer–specific distress. Interventions to address daughter and mother breast cancer concerns and responses to genetic or familial risk might improve psychosocial outcomes of teen daughters. PMID:26482668

  4. Exercise enhances wound healing and prevents cancer progression during aging by targeting macrophage polarity.

    PubMed

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren C

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity, which can include regular and repetitive exercise training, has been shown to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases. Aging is characterized by aberrant immune responses, including impaired wound healing and increased cancer risk. The behavior and polarized phenotype of tissue macrophages are distinct between young and old organisms. The balance of M1 and M2 macrophages is altered in the aged tissue microenvironment, with a tilt towards an M2-dominant macrophage population, as well as its associated signaling pathways. These M2-type responses may result in unresolved inflammation and create an environment that impairs wound healing and is favorable for cancer growth. We discuss the concept that exercise training can improve the regulation of macrophage polarization and normalize the inflammatory process, and thereby exert anticancer effects and enhance wound healing in older humans.

  5. Differences in the prognosis of early gastric cancer according to sex and age

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Do Dam; Oh, Seong Tae; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byung-Sik; Kim, Beom Su

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have compared early gastric cancer (EGC) outcomes according to sex and age. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 2085 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy for EGC between 1989 and 2000. Prognosis and risk factors for nodal involvement were evaluated according to sex and age. Results: Male sex and age were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) but not relapse-free survival (RFS). In young (⩽55 years) patients, there were no significant differences in RFS and OS between men and women. However, older (>55 years) men had a poorer OS and older women had a poorer RFS. Young female patients had a higher proportion of gastric cancer-related death than young male patients. Female sex was an independent risk factor for nodal involvement in younger patients. Conclusions: Young women with EGC should be more intensively treated and monitored than other patient groups and should not be treated by endoscopic resection. PMID:28203280

  6. Differences in breast cancer characteristics and outcomes between Caucasian and Chinese women in the US.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan-Na; Song, Chuan-Gui; Ouyang, Qian-Wen; Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Ye, Fu-Gui; Ma, Fang-Jing; Luo, Rong-Cheng; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-05-20

    Chinese breast cancer patients living in the United States (US) can experience different disease patterns than Caucasians, which might allow for predicting the future epidemiology of breast cancer in China. We aimed to compare the clinicopathologic characteristics and outcomes of Caucasian and Chinese female breast cancer patients residing in the US. The study cohort consisted of 3868 Chinese and 208621 Caucasian women (diagnosed from 1990 to 2009) in the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Compared with the Caucasian patients, the US-residing Chinese patients had a younger age at diagnosis and a higher family income, remained married longer, and more frequently lived in metropolitan areas. Other tumor characteristics were similarly distributed between the two races. Compared with the Caucasians, the Chinese patients had a significantly improved overall survival (OS) but similar breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS). Our analysis suggested that US-residing Chinese patients had significant differences in age, family income, marital status and area of residence, compared with their Caucasian counterparts. No significant disparities were noted in BCSS between the two races, whereas the Chinese patients had a significantly better OS. These findings warrant further investigation and should be considered in the screening and treatment of breast cancer.

  7. A survey of cancer and occupation in young and middle aged men. I. Cancers of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Osmond, C; Acheson, E D

    1986-05-01

    In a search for clues to previously industrial carcinogens the occupational and smoking histories of young and middle aged men with different types of cancer were compared. The study population comprised men aged 18-54 and resident in the counties of Cleveland, Humberside, and Cheshire (including the Wirral). From hospital and cancer registration records 2942 members of the study population in whom cancers were diagnosed during the period 1975-80 were identified retrospectively. The occupational and smoking histories of these patients were sought by a postal questionnaire addressed either to the patients themselves or, if they had died, to their next of kin. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 52.1%. Additionally, limited occupational information was obtained for 89% of cases from their hospital notes. Analysis of these data suggests that no serious bias arose as a consequence of the incomplete response to the questionnaire. This paper concentrates on the results for cancers of the respiratory tract and mesothelioma. Mesothelioma was found to cluster in laggers, electricians, and shipyard workers, and nasal carcinoma in woodworkers. Carcinomas of the larynx and of the bronchus were examined by formal statistical techniques, each being compared with a control group made up of all other cancers combined. Several interesting occupational and industrial associations were shown, in particular, an excess of bronchial carcinoma in the leather industry (RR = 2.6, CI 1.2-6.0), in building labourers (RR = 1.7, CI 1.0-2.9) and other construction workers (RR = 1.8, CI 1.0-3.0), in bakers and pastry cooks (RR = 3.6, CI 1.3-10.4). and in cooks (RR = 2.5, CI 1.2-5.1). In addition, a small cluster of lung tumours was observed in men who had worked as dental mechanics.

  8. A survey of cancer and occupation in young and middle aged men. I. Cancers of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Osmond, C; Acheson, E D

    1986-01-01

    In a search for clues to previously industrial carcinogens the occupational and smoking histories of young and middle aged men with different types of cancer were compared. The study population comprised men aged 18-54 and resident in the counties of Cleveland, Humberside, and Cheshire (including the Wirral). From hospital and cancer registration records 2942 members of the study population in whom cancers were diagnosed during the period 1975-80 were identified retrospectively. The occupational and smoking histories of these patients were sought by a postal questionnaire addressed either to the patients themselves or, if they had died, to their next of kin. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 52.1%. Additionally, limited occupational information was obtained for 89% of cases from their hospital notes. Analysis of these data suggests that no serious bias arose as a consequence of the incomplete response to the questionnaire. This paper concentrates on the results for cancers of the respiratory tract and mesothelioma. Mesothelioma was found to cluster in laggers, electricians, and shipyard workers, and nasal carcinoma in woodworkers. Carcinomas of the larynx and of the bronchus were examined by formal statistical techniques, each being compared with a control group made up of all other cancers combined. Several interesting occupational and industrial associations were shown, in particular, an excess of bronchial carcinoma in the leather industry (RR = 2.6, CI 1.2-6.0), in building labourers (RR = 1.7, CI 1.0-2.9) and other construction workers (RR = 1.8, CI 1.0-3.0), in bakers and pastry cooks (RR = 3.6, CI 1.3-10.4). and in cooks (RR = 2.5, CI 1.2-5.1). In addition, a small cluster of lung tumours was observed in men who had worked as dental mechanics. PMID:3707871

  9. Paternal aging and increased risk of congenital disease, psychiatric disorders, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Simon L; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    As couples are increasingly delaying parenthood, the effect of the aging men and women on reproductive outcomes has been an area of increased interest. Advanced paternal age has been shown to independently affect the entire spectrum of male fertility as assessed by reductions in sperm quality and fertilization (both assisted and unassisted). Moreover, epidemiological data suggest that paternal age can lead to higher rates of adverse birth outcomes and congenital anomalies. Mounting evidence also suggests increased risk of specific pediatric and adult disease states ranging from cancer to behavioral traits. While disease states associated with advancing paternal age have been well described, consensus recommendations for neonatal screening have not been as widely implemented as have been with advanced maternal age. PMID:26975491

  10. Survival of patients with colorectal cancer in Austria by sex, age, and stage.

    PubMed

    Haidinger, Gerald; Waldhoer, Thomas; Hackl, Monika; Vutuc, Christian

    2006-10-01

    This paper for the first time presents Austrian data on survival of patients, diagnosed from 1998 through 2002, with colon cancer and with rectal cancer. Cumulative relative survival rates were calculated by age, standardized for all ages and stages combined, and by age groups (< 50 years, 50-64 years, and =65 years) according to stages (localized, regional metastases and distant metastases). In carcinoma of the colon 5-year relative survival was 66 % in males and 64 % in females. In carcinoma of the rectum 5-year relative survival was 64 % in males and 67 % in females. Compared to the earlier results from the Tyrol (based on patients diagnosed from 1990 through 1994) the 5-year survival of patients with colon cancer increased from 55 % to 66 % in males and from 58 % to 64 % in females. In patients with rectal cancer 5-year survival increased from 44 % to 64 % in males and from 46 % to 67 % in females. This increase in part can be explained by a positive effect of early detection and of better treatment.

  11. Burden of cancer mortality and differences attributable to demographic aging and risk factors in Argentina, 1986-2011.

    PubMed

    Pou, Sonia Alejandra; Tumas, Natalia; Coquet, Julia Becaria; Niclis, Camila; Román, María Dolores; Díaz, María Del Pilar

    2017-03-09

    The world faces an aging population that implies a large number of people affected with chronic diseases. Argentina has reached an advanced stage of demographic transition and presents a comparatively high rate of cancer mortality within Latin America. The objectives of this study were to examine cancer mortality trends in the province of Córdoba, Argentina, between 1986 and 2011, and to analyze the differences attributable to risk variations and demographic changes. Longitudinal series of age-standardized mortality rates for overall, breast and prostate cancers were modeled by Joinpoint regression to estimate the annual percent change. The Bashir & Estève method was used to split crude mortality rate variation into three components: mortality risk, population age structure and population size. A decreasing cancer age-standardized mortality rates trend was observed (1986-2011 annual percent change: -1.4, 95%CI: -1.6, -1.2 in men; -0.8, 95%CI: -1.0, -0.6 in women), with a significant shift in 1996. There were positive crude mortality rate net changes for overall female cancer, breast and prostate cancers, which were primarily attributable to demographic changes. Inversely, overall male cancer crude mortality rate showed a 9.15% decrease, mostly due to mortality risk. Despite favorable age-standardized mortality rates trends, the influence of population aging reinforces the challenge to control cancer in populations with an increasingly aged demographic structure.

  12. Colorectal cancer in patients under 50 years of age: A retrospective analysis of two institutions' experience

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Elizabeth A; Feingold, Daniel L; Forde, Kenneth A; Arnell, Tracey; Jang, Joon Ho; Whelan, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients under 50 years of age across two institutions. METHODS: Records of patients under age 50 years of age who had CRC surgery over a 16 year period were assessed at two institutions. The following documents where reviewed: admission notes, operative notes, and discharge summaries. The main study variables included: age, presenting symptoms, family history, tumor location, operation, stage/differentiation of disease, and post operative complications. Stage of disease was classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system: tumor depth; node status; and metastases. RESULTS: CRC was found in 180 patients under age 50 years (87 females, 93 males; mean age 41.4 ± 6.2 years). Young patients accounted for 11.2% of cases during a 6 year period for which the full data set was available. Eight percent had a 1st degree and 12% a 2nd degree family CRC history. Almost all patients (94%) were symptomatic at diagnosis; common symptoms included: bleeding (59%), obstruction (9%), and abdominal/rectal pain (35%). Evaluation was often delayed and bleeding frequently attributed to hemorrhoids. Advanced stage CRC (Stage 3 or 4) was noted in 53% of patients. Most tumors were distal to the splenic flexure (77%) and 39% involved the rectum. Most patients (95%) had segmental resections; 6 patients had subtotal/total colectomy. Poorly differentiated tumors were noted in 12% and mucinous lesions in 19% of patients of which most had Stage 3 or 4 disease. Twenty-two patients (13%) developed recurrence and/or progression of disease to date. Three patients (ages 42, 42 and 49 years) went on to develop metachronous primary colon cancers within 3 to 4 years of their initial resection. CONCLUSION: CRC was common in young patients with no family history. Young patients with symptoms merit a timely evaluation to avoid presentation with late stage CRC. PMID:24039357

  13. Age Dependent Switching Role of Cyclin D1 in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Carmela; Malara, Natalia Maria; D’Angelo, Rosalia; Sidoti, Antonina; Leotta, Attilio; Lio, Santo; Caparello, Basilio; Ruggeri, Alessia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Amato, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers, including breast cancer, functioning as an oncogene. The aim of this study was to better understand the molecular dynamics of ductal carcinomas with regard to proliferation and the ageing process. Methods: 130 cases of ductal breast cancer in postmenopausal women, aged 52–96 in 3 age classes were selected. Tumoral tissues preserved in formaldehyde solution and subsequently embedded in paraffin were subjected to analysis Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH), Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT- PCR) and immuno-histochemical tests. The molecular variables studied were estimated in relation to the patients’ age. Results: The results obtained suggest that the increment of the levels of cyclin D1 in intra-ductal breast tumors in older woman that we have examined is significantly associated with a lower proliferation rate. Conclusion: Cyclin D1, which characterizes tumor in young women as molecular director involved in strengthening tumoral proliferation mechanisms, may be seen as a potential blocking molecular switch in corresponding tumours in old women. PMID:22231956

  14. A Web Tool for Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Philip S.; Check, David P.; Anderson, William F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Age-period-cohort (APC) analysis can inform registry-based studies of cancer incidence and mortality, but concerns about statistical identifiability and interpretability, as well as the learning curves of statistical software packages, have limited its uptake. METHODS We implemented a panel of easy-to-interpret estimable APC functions and corresponding Wald tests in R code that can be accessed through a user-friendly web tool. RESULTS Input data for the web tool consist of age-specific numbers of events and person-years over time, in the form of a rate matrix of paired columns. Output functions include model-based estimators of cross-sectional and longitudinal age-specific rates; period and cohort rate ratios that incorporate the overall annual percentage change (net drift); and estimators of the age-specific annual percentage change (local drifts). The web tool includes built-in examples for teaching and demonstration. User data can be input from a Microsoft Excel worksheet or by uploading a comma-separated-value (csv) file. Model outputs can be saved in a variety of formats including R and Excel. CONCLUSIONS APC methodology can now be carried out through a freely-available user-friendly web tool. The tool can be accessed at http://analysistools.nci.nih.gov/apc/. IMPACT The web tool can help cancer surveillance researchers make important discoveries about emerging cancer trends and patterns. PMID:25146089

  15. Age-related longitudinal changes in depressive symptoms following breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Avis, Nancy E; Levine, Beverly; Naughton, Michelle J; Case, L Douglas; Naftalis, Elizabeth; Van Zee, Kimberly J

    2013-05-01

    Younger women being treated for breast cancer consistently show greater depression shortly after diagnosis than older women. In this longitudinal study, we examine whether these age differences persist over the first 26 months following diagnosis and identify factors related to change in depressive symptoms. A total of 653 women within 8 months of a first time breast cancer diagnosis completed questionnaires at baseline and three additional timepoints (6, 12, and 18 months after baseline) on contextual/patient characteristics, symptoms, and psychosocial variables. Chart reviews provided cancer and treatment-related data. The primary outcome was depressive symptomatology assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory. Among women younger than age 65, depressive symptoms were highest soon after diagnosis and significantly decreased over time. Depressive symptoms remained stable and low for women aged 65 and older. Age was no longer significantly related to depressive symptoms in multivariable analyses controlling for a wide range of covariates. The primary factors related to levels of and declines in depressive symptomatology were the ability to pay for basics; completing chemotherapy with doxorubicin; and decreases in pain, vasomotor symptoms, illness intrusiveness, and passive coping. Increased sense of meaning/peace and social support were related to decreased depression. Interventions to reduce symptoms and illness intrusiveness, improve a sense of meaning and peace, and increase social support, may help reduce depression and such interventions may be especially relevant for younger women.

  16. Age-based computer-aided diagnosis approach for pancreatic cancer on endoscopic ultrasound images

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Murat; Cakiroglu, Murat; Kocaman, Orhan; Kurt, Mevlut; Yilmaz, Bulent; Can, Guray; Korkmaz, Ugur; Dandil, Emre; Eksi, Ziya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to develop a high-performance computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system with image processing and pattern recognition in diagnosing pancreatic cancer by using endosonography images. Materials and Methods: On the images, regions of interest (ROI) of three groups of patients (<40, 40-60 and >60) were extracted by experts; features were obtained from images using three different techniques and were trained separately for each age group with an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to diagnose cancer. The study was conducted on endosonography images of 202 patients with pancreatic cancer and 130 noncancer patients. Results: 122 features were identified from the 332 endosonography images obtained in the study, and the 20 most appropriate features were selected by using the relief method. Images classified under three age groups (in years; <40, 40-60 and >60) were tested via 200 random tests and the following ratios were obtained in the classification: accuracy: 92%, 88.5%, and 91.7%, respectively; sensitivity: 87.5%, 85.7%, and 93.3%, respectively; and specificity: 94.1%, 91.7%, and 88.9%, respectively. When all the age groups were assessed together, the following values were obtained: accuracy: 87.5%, sensitivity: 83.3%, and specificity: 93.3%. Conclusions: It was observed that the CAD system developed in the study performed better in diagnosing pancreatic cancer images based on classification by patient age compared to diagnosis without classification. Therefore, it is imperative to take patient age into consideration to ensure higher performance. PMID:27080608

  17. Pattern of malignancies in children <15 years of age reported in Hadhramout Cancer Registry, Yemen between 2002 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Jawass, Mazin A.; Al-Ezzi, Jalil I.; Gouth, Hanan S. Bin; Bahwal, Saleh A.; Bamatraf, Fawzia F.; Ba’amer, Abubakir A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the patterns of childhood cancers in Hadhramout Sector, Yemen between January 2002 and December 2014. Methods: This descriptive retrospective study was based on secondary data from Hadhramout Cancer Registry, Hadhramout, Yemen. All Yemeni children under age of 15 years, who were diagnosed with cancer were included. The International Childhood Cancer Classification system was used to categorize cancer types. Results: A total of 406 childhood cancers of both gender <15 years of age were reported. These represented 8.5% of all cases registered. The mean age was 7.34 ± 4.18 years. There were 240 males (59.1%) and 166 females (40.9%) with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Calculated incidence of cancer in children in this population is 1.9 per 100,000. The predominant age group was 5-9 years (35%) followed by 10-14 years (33.7%), and 0-4 years group (31%). The most common group of malignancies were hematological malignancies accounting for 47% of cases, followed by nervous system malignancies (15%). The most frequently reported cancer types were lymphoma (24%), leukemia (23%), carcinoma (13.1%), and central nervous system (CNS) tumors (11.6%). Conclusions: There is a lower frequency of childhood cancer in Hadhramout Sector when compared with developed countries. The most common cancers among children were lymphoma, leukemia, carcinoma, and CNS tumors. PMID:27146613

  18. Tai Ji Quan for the aging cancer survivor: Mitigating the accelerated development of disability, falls, and cardiovascular disease from cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Winters-Stone, Kerri

    2014-03-01

    Currently there are more than 13.7 million cancer survivors living in the U.S., and that figure is projected to increase by 31% in the next decade, adding another 4 million cancer survivors into the healthcare system. Cancer is largely a disease of aging, and the aging of the population will sharply raise the proportion of older cancer survivors, many of whom will be long-term survivors (5+ years post diagnosis). This review will address the potential utility of exercise to address three health problems that are of particular concern for the aging cancer survivor and the healthcare system, i.e., disability, falls, and cardiovascular disease, because the development of these age-related problems may be accelerated by cancer treatment. While there are many different modes of exercise that each produce specific adaptations, Tai Ji Quan may be a particularly suitable strategy to mitigate the development of age- and cancer-treatment-related problems. Based on studies in older adults without cancer, Tai Ji Quan produces musculoskeletal and cardiometabolic adaptations and is more easily performed by older adults due to its low energy cost and slower movement patterns. Since cancer survivors are mostly older, inactive, and often physically limited by the lingering side effects of treatment, they need to engage in safe, practical, and effective modes of exercise. The dearth of published controlled trials examining the efficacy of Tai Ji Quan to mitigate cancer-treatment-related musculoskeletal and cardiovascular side effects points to ample research opportunities to explore the application of this non-Western exercise modality to improve long-term outcomes for aging cancer survivors.

  19. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy and Survival for Pure Tubular Breast Carcinoma-Experience From the SEER Database

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoqing; Chen, Margaret; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Steven L.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pure tubular carcinoma of the breast (PTCB) represents a distinct subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) that is generally thought to be associated with better prognosis than even low-grade IDC. There has been controversy as to the role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in this population. We hypothesized that adjuvant RT would demonstrate a survival improvement. Methods and Materials: We queried the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database for the years 1992-2007 to identify patients with pure tubular carcinomas of the breast. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and surgical and RT treatments were collected. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method for univariate comparisons and Cox proportional hazards modeling for multivariate comparisons, stratifying on the basis of age with a cutoff age of 65. Results: A total of 6465 patients were identified: 3624 (56.1%) patients underwent lumpectomy with RT (LUMP+RT), 1525 (23.6%) patients underwent lumpectomy alone (LUMP), 1266 (19.6%) patients received mastectomy alone (MAST), and 50 (0.8%) patients underwent mastectomy with RT (MAST+RT). When we compared the LUMP+RT and LUMP groups directly, those receiving adjuvant RT tended to be younger and were less likely to be hormone receptor-positive. Overall survival was 95% for LUMP+RT and 90% for LUMP patients at 5 years. For those 65 or younger, the absolute overall survival benefit of LUMP+RT over LUMP was 1% at 5 years and 3% at 10 years. On stratified multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor in both age groups (P=.003 in age {<=}65 and P=.04 in age >65 patients). Other significant unfavorable factors were older age and higher T stage (age >65 only). Conclusions: Since sufficiently powered large scale clinical trials are unlikely, we would recommend that adjuvant radiation be considered in PTCB patients age 65 or younger, although consideration of the small absolute survival benefit is

  20. Variation in Adherence to External Beam Radiotherapy Quality Measures Among Elderly Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Zelefsky, Michael J.; Jang, Thomas L.; Basch, Ethan M.; Schrag, Deborah

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. Methods and Materials: We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged {>=}65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Results: Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. Conclusions: The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes.

  1. A Prognostic Index for Predicting Lymph Node Metastasis in Minor Salivary Gland Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Shane; Yu, James B.; Ross, Douglas A.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Decker, Roy H.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Large studies examining the clinical and pathological factors associated with nodal metastasis in minor salivary gland cancer are lacking in the literature. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 2,667 minor salivary gland cancers with known lymph node status from 1988 to 2004. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with the use of neck dissection, the use of external beam radiation therapy, and the presence of cervical lymph node metastases. Results: Four hundred twenty-six (16.0%) patients had neck nodal involvement. Factors associated with neck nodal involvement on univariate analysis included increasing age, male sex, increasing tumor size, high tumor grade, T3-T4 stage, adenocarcinoma or mucoepidermoid carcinomas, and pharyngeal site of primary malignancy. On multivariate analysis, four statistically significant factors were identified, including male sex, T3-T4 stage, pharyngeal site of primary malignancy, and high-grade adenocarcinoma or high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas. The proportions (and 95% confidence intervals) of patients with lymph node involvement for those with 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 of these prognostic factors were 0.02 (0.01-0.03), 0.09 (0.07-0.11), 0.17 (0.14-0.21), 0.41 (0.33-0.49), and 0.70 (0.54-0.85), respectively. Grade was a significant predictor of metastasis for adenocarcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma but not for adenoid cystic carcinoma. Conclusions: A prognostic index using the four clinicopathological factors listed here can effectively differentiate patients into risk groups of nodal metastasis. The precision of this index is subject to the limitations of SEER data and should be validated in further clinical studies.

  2. Breast cancer and ages at first marriage and first birth: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kinlen, Leo J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine available data on breast cancer and age at first marriage from a new perspective: that is, marriage involves the closest contact and contact effects are relevant to the question of infection, a possibility long considered in this disorder. The large Seven Country Study, carried out in 1964-1968, investigated age at first marriage; its reports were examined carefully for details of possible relevance. Intriguing gaps were noted in the grounds for the conclusion by this study that late age at first birth explained an earlier reported association with late age at marriage, with risks presented by age at first marriage for nulliparous, but not for parous, married women. Only in one centre, Glamorgan Wales, and only for two age groups could risks by combined ages at first marriage and first birth be derived. When both events occurred at age 30 or older, the risk estimate was 7.0 (95% confidence interval: 5.2, 9.1) relative to when both events occurred younger than age 20, whereas the corresponding risk was 1.4 (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.8) when age at first birth was 30 or older but marriage was younger than age 30. The above findings are consistent with an effect of age at first marriage, and a basis in contacts or infection is considered plausible. However, other explanations may exist, and this report primarily aims to encourage examination of the subject in other datasets, particularly where intersexual contrasts in infective exposures have probably existed.

  3. Outcomes and Tolerability of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Aged 75 Years or Older

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, David T.; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review the outcomes and tolerability of full-dose chemoradiation in elderly patients aged 75 years or older with localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed patients aged 75 years or older with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy at two institutions from 2002 to 2007. Patients were analyzed for treatment toxicity, local recurrences, distant metastases, and survival. Results: A total of 42 patients with a median age of 78 years (range, 75-90 years) who received chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer were identified. Of the patients, 24 had locally advanced disease treated with definitive chemoradiation, and 18 had disease treated with surgery and chemoradiation. Before chemoradiotherapy, the mean Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1.0 {+-} 0.8, and the mean 6-month weight loss was 5.3 {+-} 3.8 kg. The mean radiation dose delivered was 48.1 {+-} 9.2 Gy. All patients received fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. In all, 8 patients (19%) were hospitalized, 7 (17%) had an emergency room visit, 15 (36%) required a radiation treatment break, 3 (7%) required a chemotherapy break, 9 (21%) did not complete therapy, and 22 (49%) had at least one of these adverse events. The most common toxicities were nausea, pain, and failure to thrive. Median overall survival was 8.6 months (95% confidence interval, 7.2-13.1) in patients who received definitive chemoradiation therapy and 20.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.5-{infinity}) in patients who underwent resection and chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: In this dataset of very elderly patients with pancreatic cancer and good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, outcomes after chemoradiotherapy were similar to those among historic controls for patients with locally advanced and resected pancreatic cancer, although many patients experienced substantial treatment

  4. Metformin - its potential anti-cancer and anti-aging effects.

    PubMed

    Podhorecka, Monika; Ibanez, Blanca; Dmoszyńska, Anna

    2017-03-02

    The generally accepted mechanism of metformin's effect is stimulation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK is directly activated by an increase in AMP:ATP ratio in metabolic stress conditions including hypoxia and glucose deprivation. Lately, many novel pathways, besides AMPK induction, have been revealed, which can explain some of metformin's beneficial effects. It may help to identify new targets for treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Moreover, metformin is now attracting the attention of researchers in fields other than diabetes, as it has been shown to have anti-cancer, immunoregulatory and anti-aging effects. The aim of this review is to describe the potential anti-cancer and anti-aging properties of metformin and discuss the possible underlying mechanisms.

  5. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  6. Prevalence of aging population in the Middle East and its implications on cancer incidence and care

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, R. R.; Atli, T.; Al-Mandhari, Z.; Oudrhiri, M.; Balducci, L.; Silbermann, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Middle Eastern population is aging rapidly, and as aging is the main risk factor for cancer, the incidence and prevalence of that disease are increasing among all the populations in the region. These developments represent huge challenges to national and community-based health services. At the current state of affairs, most Middle Eastern countries require the cooperation of international agencies in order to cope with such new challenges to their health systems. The focus and emphasis in facing these changing circumstances lie in the education and training of professionals, mainly physicians and nurses, at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels of health services. It is imperative that these training initiatives include clinical practice, with priority given to the creation of multidisciplinary teams both at the cancer centers and for home-based services. PMID:24001758

  7. Cancer Incidence Trends Among Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders in the United States, 1990–2008

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lack of annual population estimates for disaggregated Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (NHOPI) populations limits the ability to examine cancer incidence rates and trends to understand the cancer burdens among NHOPIs. Methods Utilizing 1990 and 2000 population census data, we estimated the annual populations by age and sex for Native Hawaiians, Samoans, and Guamanians/Chamorros for 1990–2008 in regions covered by 13 of the National Cancer Institute’s SEER registries. Cancer diagnoses during 1990–2008 from these registries were used to calculate the age-adjusted (2000 US Standard) incidence rates by sex, calendar year/period, and cancer type for each population. The annual percentage change (APC) in incidence rates was estimated with the 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) calculated for both the rate and APC estimates. Results Statistically significant declining trends were found in Native Hawaiians, in men for lung and stomach cancers (APC = –2.3%; 95% CI = –3.3 to –1.3; and APC = –3.8%; 95% CI = –6.0 to –1.6, respectively), and in women for breast cancer (APC = –4.1%; 95% CI = –5.7 to –2.5) since 1998 and lung cancer (APC = –6.4%; 95% CI = –10.7 to –1.8) since 2001. Rising incidence trends were experienced by Samoans, especially by Samoan women for breast (APC = 2.7%; 95% CI = 0.9 to 4.5) and uterus (APC = 7.3%; 95% CI = 6.2 to 8.4) cancers. With limited data, Guamanians/Chamorros demonstrated lower, but increasing, incidence rates than other NHOPIs. Conclusions Population-based cancer incidence rates for disaggregated NHOPI populations help identify disparities in cancer burden and provide valuable information to improve cancer control efforts among NHOPIs. PMID:23878354

  8. Apoptosis: its origin, history, maintenance and the medical implications for cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-05-11

    Programmed cell death is a basic cellular mechanism. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death (called apoptosis in animals) occurs in both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes, and some apoptotic mechanisms are observed in bacteria. Endosymbiosis between mitochondria and eukaryotic cells took place early in the eukaryotic evolution, and some of the apoptotic-like mechanisms of mitochondria that were retained after this event now serve as parts of the eukaryotic apoptotic machinery. Apoptotic mechanisms have several functions in unicellular organisms: they include kin-selected altruistic suicide that controls population size, sharing common goods, and responding to viral infection. Apoptotic factors also have non-apoptotic functions. Apoptosis is involved in the cellular aging of eukaryotes, including humans. In addition, apoptosis is a key part of the innate tumor-suppression mechanism. Several anticancer drugs induce apoptosis, because apoptotic mechanisms are inactivated during oncogenesis. Because of the ancient history of apoptosis, I hypothesize that there is a deep relationship between mitochondrial metabolism, its role in aerobic versus anaerobic respiration, and the connection between apoptosis and cancer. Whereas normal cells rely primarily on oxidative mitochondrial respiration, most cancer cells use anaerobic metabolism. According to the Warburg hypothesis, the remodeling of the metabolism is one of the processes that leads to cancer. Recent studies indicate that anaerobic, non-mitochondrial respiration is particularly active in embryonic cells, stem cells, and aggressive stem-like cancer cells. Mitochondrial respiration is particularly active during the pathological aging of human cells in neurodegenerative diseases. According to the reversed Warburg hypothesis formulated by Demetrius, pathological aging is induced by mitochondrial respiration. Here, I advance the hypothesis that the stimulation of mitochondrial metabolism leads to pathological aging.

  9. Apoptosis: its origin, history, maintenance and the medical implications for cancer and aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-06-01

    Programmed cell death is a basic cellular mechanism. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death (called apoptosis in animals) occurs in both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes, and some apoptotic mechanisms are observed in bacteria. Endosymbiosis between mitochondria and eukaryotic cells took place early in the eukaryotic evolution, and some of the apoptotic-like mechanisms of mitochondria that were retained after this event now serve as parts of the eukaryotic apoptotic machinery. Apoptotic mechanisms have several functions in unicellular organisms: they include kin-selected altruistic suicide that controls population size, sharing common goods, and responding to viral infection. Apoptotic factors also have non-apoptotic functions. Apoptosis is involved in the cellular aging of eukaryotes, including humans. In addition, apoptosis is a key part of the innate tumor-suppression mechanism. Several anticancer drugs induce apoptosis, because apoptotic mechanisms are inactivated during oncogenesis. Because of the ancient history of apoptosis, I hypothesize that there is a deep relationship between mitochondrial metabolism, its role in aerobic versus anaerobic respiration, and the connection between apoptosis and cancer. Whereas normal cells rely primarily on oxidative mitochondrial respiration, most cancer cells use anaerobic metabolism. According to the Warburg hypothesis, the remodeling of the metabolism is one of the processes that leads to cancer. Recent studies indicate that anaerobic, non-mitochondrial respiration is particularly active in embryonic cells, stem cells, and aggressive stem-like cancer cells. Mitochondrial respiration is particularly active during the pathological aging of human cells in neurodegenerative diseases. According to the reversed Warburg hypothesis formulated by Demetrius, pathological aging is induced by mitochondrial respiration. Here, I advance the hypothesis that the stimulation of mitochondrial metabolism leads to pathological aging.

  10. Increased gene dosage of Ink4a/Arf results in cancer resistance and normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Matheu, Ander; Pantoja, Cristina; Efeyan, Alejo; Criado, Luis M.; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana M.; Klatt, Peter; Serrano, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian genes frequently present allelic variants that differ in their expression levels and that, in the case of tumor suppressor genes, can be of relevance for cancer susceptibility and aging. We report here the characterization of a novel mouse model with increased activity for the Ink4a and Arf tumor suppressors. We have generated a “super Ink4a/Arf” mouse strain carrying a transgenic copy of the entire Ink4a/Arf locus. Cells derived from super Ink4a/Arf mice have increased resistance to in vitro immortalization and oncogenic transformation. Importantly, super Ink4a/Arf mice manifest higher resistance to cancer compared to normal, nontransgenic, mice. Finally, super Ink4a/Arf mice have normal aging and lifespan. Together, these results indicate that modest increases in the activity of the Ink4a/Arf tumor suppressor result in a beneficial cancer-resistant phenotype without affecting normal viability or aging. PMID:15520276

  11. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts drives lactate production, promoting breast cancer tumor growth: understanding the aging and cancer connection.

    PubMed

    Balliet, Renee M; Capparelli, Claudia; Guido, Carmela; Pestell, Timothy G; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Chiavarina, Barbara; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2011-12-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for cancer. Recently, we proposed a new paradigm for understanding the role of the aging and the tumor microenvironment in cancer onset. In this model, cancer cells induce oxidative stress in adjacent stromal fibroblasts. This, in turn, causes several changes in the phenotype of the fibroblast including mitochondrial dysfunction, hydrogen peroxide production, and aerobic glycolysis, resulting in high levels of L-lactate production. L-lactate is then transferred from these glycolytic fibroblasts to adjacent epithelial cancer cells and used as "fuel" for oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.  Here, we created a new pre-clinical model system to directly test this hypothesis experimentally. To synthetically generate glycolytic fibroblasts, we genetically-induced mitochondrial dysfunction by knocking down TFAM using an sh-RNA approach.  TFAM is mitochondrial transcription factor A, which is important in functionally maintaining the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Interestingly, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, with the loss of certain mitochondrial respiratory chain components, and the over-production of hydrogen peroxide and L-lactate. Thus, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts underwent metabolic reprogramming towards aerobic glycolysis.  Most importantly, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts significantly promoted tumor growth, as assayed using a human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) xenograft model. These increases in glycolytic fibroblast driven tumor growth were independent of tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts increased the mitochondrial activity of adjacent epithelial cancer cells in a co-culture system, as seen using MitoTracker. Finally, TFAM-deficient fibroblasts also showed a loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1), a known breast cancer stromal biomarker. Loss of stromal fibroblast Cav-1 is associated with early tumor recurrence, metastasis

  12. Evaluating the physiological reserves of older patients with cancer: the value of potential biomarkers of aging?

    PubMed

    Pallis, Athanasios G; Hatse, Sigrid; Brouwers, Barbara; Pawelec, Graham; Falandry, Claire; Wedding, Ulrich; Lago, Lissandra Dal; Repetto, Lazzaro; Ring, Alistair; Wildiers, Hans

    2014-04-01

    Aging of an individual entails a progressive decline of functional reserves and loss of homeostasis that eventually lead to mortality. This process is highly individualized and is influenced by multiple genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. This individualization and the diversity of factors influencing aging result in a significant heterogeneity among people with the same chronological age, representing a major challenge in daily oncology practice. Thus, many factors other than mere chronological age will contribute to treatment tolerance and outcome in the older patients with cancer. Clinical/comprehensive geriatric assessment can provide information on the general health status of individuals, but is far from perfect as a prognostic/predictive tool for individual patients. On the other hand, aging can also be assessed in terms of biological changes in certain tissues like the blood compartment which result from adaptive alterations due to past history of exposures, as well as intrinsic aging processes. There are major signs of 'aging' in lymphocytes (e.g. lymphocyte subset distribution, telomere length, p16INK4A expression), and also in (inflammatory) cytokine expression and gene expression patterns. These result from a combination of the above two processes, overlaying genetic predispositions which contribute significantly to the aging phenotype. These potential "aging biomarkers" might provide additional prognostic/predictive information supplementing clinical evaluation. The purpose of the current paper is to describe the most relevant potential "aging biomarkers" (markers that indicate the biological functional age of patients) which focus on the biological background, the (limited) available clinical data, and technical challenges. Despite their great potential interest, there is a need for much more (validated) clinical data before these biomarkers could be used in a routine clinical setting. This manuscript tries to provide a guideline on how

  13. Grow-ING, Age-ING and Die-ING: ING proteins link cancer, senescence and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Michael; Berardi, Philip; Gong Wei; Riabowol, Karl . E-mail: karl@ucalgary.ca

    2006-04-15

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) family of plant homeodomain (PHD) proteins induce apoptosis and regulate gene expression through stress-inducible binding of phospholipids with subsequent nuclear and nucleolar localization. Relocalization occurs concomitantly with interaction with a subset of nuclear proteins, including PCNA, p53 and several regulators of acetylation such as the p300/CBP and PCAF histone acetyltransferases (HATs), as well as the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and hSir2. These interactions alter the localized state of chromatin compaction, subsequently affecting the expression of subsets of genes, including those associated with the stress response (Hsp70), apoptosis (Bax, MDM2) and cell cycle regulation (p21{sup WAF1}, cyclin B) in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. The expression levels and subcellular localization of ING proteins are altered in a significant number of human cancer types, while the expression of ING isoforms changes during cellular aging, suggesting that ING proteins may play a role in linking cellular transformation and replicative senescence. The variety of functions attributed to ING proteins suggest that this tumor suppressor serves to link the disparate processes of cell cycle regulation, cell suicide and cellular aging through epigenetic regulation of gene expression. This review examines recent findings in the ING field with a focus on the functions of protein-protein interactions involving ING family members and the mechanisms by which these interactions facilitate the various roles that ING proteins play in tumorigenesis, apoptosis and senescence.

  14. Impact of Age and Comorbidity on Cervical and Breast Cancer Literacy of African Americans, Latina, and Arab women

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Costellia H.; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate and timely screening can significantly reduce breast and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. Racial/ethnic minorities and immigrant populations have lower screening rates and delays in follow-up after abnormal tests. Purpose In this study, we examined the relationship between age, comorbidity, breast and cervical cancer literacy in a sample of African American, Latina, and Arab women (N=371) from Detroit, Michigan. Methods Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (ACC) was used characterize the impact of age and comorbidity has on breast and cervical cancer literacy; Breast Cancer Literacy Assessment Tool was used to assess breast cancer literacy; Cervical Cancer Literacy Assessment Tool was used to assess cervical cancer literacy. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between ACC, breast and cervical cancer screening and group differences. Results There was a statistically significant difference between breast cancer literacy (Breast-CLAT total scores) scores (F(2,367)= 17.31, p= < 0.01). ACC had a greater impact on breast cancer literacy for African American F(2,214) =11, p = <0.01. PMID:26333609

  15. An earlier age of breast cancer diagnosis related to more frequent use of antiperspirants/deodorants and underarm shaving.

    PubMed

    McGrath, K G

    2003-12-01

    Breast cancer incidence suggests a lifestyle cause. A lifestyle factor used near the breast is the application of antiperspirants/deodorants accompanied by axillary shaving. A previous study did not support a link with breast cancer. If these habits have a role in breast cancer development, women using antiperspirants/deodorants and shaving their underarms frequently would be expected to have an earlier age of diagnosis than those doing so less often. An earlier age of diagnosis would also be expected in those starting to use deodorants and shaving at an earlier age. This is the first study to investigate the intensity of underarm exposure in a cohort of breast cancer survivors. Four hundred and thirty-seven females diagnosed with breast cancer were surveyed. Once grouped by their frequency of underarm hygiene habits, the mean age of diagnosis was the primary end point. Secondary end points included the overall frequency of these habits, and potential usage group confounding variables were evaluated. All statistical tests were two-sided. Frequency and earlier onset of antiperspirant/deodorant usage with underarm shaving were associated with an earlier age of breast cancer diagnosis. Combined habits are likely for this earlier age of diagnosis. In conclusion, underarm shaving with antiperspirant/deodorant use may play a role in breast cancer. It is not clear which of these components are involved. Reviewed literature insinuates absorption of aluminium salts facilitated by dermal barrier disruption. Case-controlled investigations are needed before alternative underarm hygiene habits are suggested.

  16. Age-Adjusted PSA Levels in Prostate Cancer Prediction: Updated Results of the Tyrol Prostate Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Isabel; Fritz, Josef; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Objective To reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies in patients with benign prostatic disease, however, without missing significant PCa the present study re-evaluates the age-dependent PSA cut-offs in the Tyrol Prostate Cancer (PCa) early detection program. Patients and Methods The study population included 2225 patients who underwent prostate biopsy due to elevated PSA levels at our department. We divided our patient collective into four age groups: ≤49 years (n = 178), 50-59 years (n = 597), 60-69 years (n = 962) and ≥70 years (n = 488). We simulated different scenarios for PSA cut-off values between 1.25 and 6 ng/mL and fPSA% between 15 and 21% for all four age groups and calculated sensitivity, specificity, confidence intervals and predictive values. Results PCa was detected in 1218 men (54.7%). We found that in combination with free PSA ≤21% the following PSA cut-offs had the best cancer specificity: 1.75 ng/ml for men ≤49 years and 50-59 years, 2.25 ng/ml for men aged 60-69 years and 3.25 ng/ml for men ≥70 years. Using these adjusted PSA cut-off values all significant tumors are recognized in all age groups, yet the number of biopsies is reduced. Overall, one biopsy is avoided in 13 to 14 men (number needed to screen = 13.3, reduction of biopsies = 7.5%) when decision regarding biopsy is done according to the “new” cut-off values instead of the “old” ones. For the different age groups the number needed to screen to avoid one biopsy varied between 9.2 (≤49 years) and 17.4 (50-59 years). Conclusion With “new”, fine-tuned PSA cut-offs we detect all relevant PCa with a significant reduction of biopsies compared to the “old” cut-off values. Optimization of age-specific PSA cut-offs is one step towards a smarter strategy in the Tyrol PCa Early Detection Program. PMID:26218594

  17. Study of Prostate Cancer Screening and Mortality in Black and White Men in the Five Atlanta Area SEER Counties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    William Mkanta, PhD and Nicole Scheys , BS. Dr. Mkanta is the coordinator of the project. He is involved in the day-to-day administration of the...Jacksonville, and VA hospitals. He is also involved in data abstraction, data analysis and IRB issues related to the project. Miss Scheys is responsible... Scheys 5622 SW 8th Pl ● Gainesville, Florida 32607 ● (352) 264-1440 ● nicolescheys@yahoo.com OBJECTIVE To obtain research position that will

  18. The Age Conundrum: A Scoping Review of Younger Age or Adolescent and Young Adult as a Risk Factor for Clinical Distress, Depression, or Anxiety in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michael J; David, Victoria; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2015-12-01

    This scoping review was conducted to understand the extent, range, and nature of current research on adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer and distress, depression, and anxiety (DDA). This information is necessary to find and aggregate valuable data on the AYA population embedded in generalized studies of DDA. Keyword searches of six relevant electronic databases identified 2156 articles, with 316 selected for abstract review and 40 for full text review. Full-text reviews and data extraction resulted in 34 studies being included, which ranged widely in design, sample size, age-range categorization, analysis methods, DDA measurement tool, overall study rigor, and quality of evidence. Studies very seldom reported using theory to guide their age categorization, with only four studies giving any rationale for their age-group definitions. All 34 studies found a significant association between at least one DDA construct and the younger age group relative to the older age groups at some point along the cancer trajectory. However, age as an independent risk factor for DDA is still unclear, as the relationship could be confounded by other age-related factors. Despite the wide range of definitions and effect sizes in the studies included in this review, one thing is clear: adolescents and young adults, however defined, are a distinct group within the cancer population with an elevated risk of DDA. Widespread adoption of a standard AYA age-range definition will be essential to any future meta-analytical psycho-oncology research in this population.

  19. The Age Conundrum: A Scoping Review of Younger Age or Adolescent and Young Adult as a Risk Factor for Clinical Distress, Depression, or Anxiety in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    David, Victoria; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2015-01-01

    This scoping review was conducted to understand the extent, range, and nature of current research on adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer and distress, depression, and anxiety (DDA). This information is necessary to find and aggregate valuable data on the AYA population embedded in generalized studies of DDA. Keyword searches of six relevant electronic databases identified 2156 articles, with 316 selected for abstract review and 40 for full text review. Full-text reviews and data extraction resulted in 34 studies being included, which ranged widely in design, sample size, age-range categorization, analysis methods, DDA measurement tool, overall study rigor, and quality of evidence. Studies very seldom reported using theory to guide their age categorization, with only four studies giving any rationale for their age-group definitions. All 34 studies found a significant association between at least one DDA construct and the younger age group relative to the older age groups at some point along the cancer trajectory. However, age as an independent risk factor for DDA is still unclear, as the relationship could be confounded by other age-related factors. Despite the wide range of definitions and effect sizes in the studies included in this review, one thing is clear: adolescents and young adults, however defined, are a distinct group within the cancer population with an elevated risk of DDA. Widespread adoption of a standard AYA age-range definition will be essential to any future meta-analytical psycho-oncology research in this population. PMID:26697266

  20. Clinical features of colorectal cancer patients in advanced age: a population-based approach.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Stefania; Colantoni, Alessandra; Kaleci, Shaniko; Benatti, Piero; Tesini, Ester; de Leon, Maurizio Ponz

    2016-03-01

    In the immediate future, the number of geriatric patients will continue to rise; consequently we should expect an increase of colorectal cancer, a disease of the elderly population. Through the data of a Cancer Registry, we examined (a) the effect of ageing on the main features of colorectal cancer; (b) changes in management, especially for individuals older than 80 years; and (c) changes in prognosis and survival in subgroups of patients with different age. The Registry provided information on colorectal cancer up to 2010 (27 years). A total of 5293 patients were registered; these were divided into three groups: A (0-64 years), B (65-79) and C (80 or more). Three periods of observation were chosen: 1 (1984-1992), 2 (1993-2001) and 3 (2001-2010). Group A included 1571 patients (29 %), Group B 2539 (48 %) and Group C 1183 (22.3 %). The fraction of old individuals increased during the 27 years of the investigation. In these patients, tumours were predominantly localized to the right colon (42.6 %). The rate of surgery and ratio between curative and palliative approaches were similar among the three groups (p < 0.38). There was disparity (p < 0.002) in the administration of chemotherapy (5.8 % of the elderly vs 34.4 % in remaining patients). Survival increased over time in all three groups. In the elderly, average 5-year survival was 31 % in period 1 and 55 % in period 3. These data show that in Western countries, the standard of care for colorectal cancer diagnosed in geriatric patients has improved over the last 30 years.

  1. Oral contraceptives and survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

    PubMed

    Trivers, Katrina F; Gammon, Marilie D; Abrahamson, Page E; Lund, Mary Jo; Flagg, Elaine W; Moorman, Patricia G; Kaufman, Jay S; Cai, Jianwen; Porter, Peggy L; Brinton, Louise A; Eley, J William; Coates, Ralph J

    2007-09-01

    Recent oral contraceptive (OC) use is associated with modestly higher breast cancer incidence among younger women, but its impact on survival is unclear. This study examined the relationship between OC use before breast cancer diagnosis and survival. A population-based sample of 1,264 women aged 20 to 54 years with a first primary invasive breast cancer during 1990 to 1992 were followed up for 8 to 10 years. OC and covariate data were obtained by interviews conducted shortly after diagnosis and from medial records. All-cause mortality was ascertained through the National Death Index (n = 292 deaths). Age- and income-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated by Cox regression methods. All-cause mortality was not associated with ever use of OCs or duration of use. Compared with nonusers, mortality estimates were elevated among women who were using OCs at diagnosis or stopped use in the previous year (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 0.95-2.61). The HR for use of high-dose estrogen pills within 5 years before diagnosis was double that of nonusers (HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.29-4.41) or, if the most recent pill included the progestin levonorgestrel, compared with nonusers (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.03-3.91). Because subgroup estimates were based on small numbers of OC users, these results should be cautiously interpreted. Overall, most aspects of OC use did not seem to influence survival, although there is limited evidence that OC use just before diagnosis, particularly use of some pill types, may negatively impact survival in breast cancer patients aged 20 to 54 years.

  2. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  3. Stressed out mitochondria: the role of mitochondria in ageing and cancer focussing on strategies and opportunities in human skin.

    PubMed

    Tulah, Asif S; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2013-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA damage has been used as a successful and unique biomarker of tissue stress. A valuable example of this is sun damage in human skin which leads to ageing and skin cancer. The skin is constantly exposed to the harmful effects of sunlight, such as ultraviolet radiation, which causes it to age with observable characteristic features as well as clinical precancerous lesions and skin cancer. Formation of free radicals by the sun's harmful rays which contribute to oxidative stress has been linked to the induction of deletions and mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. These markers of mitochondrial DNA damage have been proposed to contribute to the mechanisms of ageing in many tissues including skin and are associated with many diseases including cancer. In this article we highlight the role of this important organelle in ageing and cancer with particular emphasis on experimental strategies in the skin.

  4. Prior-Cancer Diagnosis in Men with Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer and the Risk of Prostate-Cancer-Specific and All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Hui; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the impact a prior cancer diagnosis had on the risk of prostate-cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and all-cause mortality (ACM) in men with PC. Methods. Using the SEER data registry, 166,104 men (median age: 66) diagnosed with PC between 2004 and 2007 comprised the study cohort. Competing risks and Cox regression were used to evaluate whether a prior cancer diagnosis impacted the risk of PCSM and ACM adjusting for known prognostic factors PSA level, age at and year of diagnosis, race, and whether PC treatment was curative, noncurative, or active surveillance (AS)/watchful waiting (WW). Results. At a median followup of 2.75 years, 12,453 men died: 3,809 (30.6%) from PC. Men with a prior cancer were followed longer, had GS 8 to 10 PC more often, and underwent WW/AS more frequently (P < 0.001). Despite these differences that should increase the risk of PCSM, the adjusted risk of PCSM was significantly decreased (AHR: 0.66 (95% CI: (0.45, 0.97); P = 0.033), while the risk of ACM was increased (AHR: 2.92 (95% CI: 2.64, 3.23); P < 0.001) in men with a prior cancer suggesting that competing risks accounted for the reduction in the risk of PCSM. Conclusion. An assessment of the impact that a prior cancer has on life expectancy is needed at the time of PC diagnosis to determine whether curative treatment for unfavorable-risk PC versus AS is appropriate. PMID:24634786

  5. Mortality of breast cancer in Taiwan, 1971-2010: temporal changes and an age-period-cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Ho, M-L; Hsiao, Y-H; Su, S-Y; Chou, M-C; Liaw, Y-P

    2015-01-01

    The current paper describes the age, period and cohort effects on breast cancer mortality in Taiwan. Female breast cancer mortality data were collected from the Taiwan death registries for 1971-2010. The annual percentage changes, age- standardised mortality rates (ASMR) and age-period-cohort model were calculated. The mortality rates increased with advancing age groups when fixing the period. The percentage change in the breast cancer mortality rate increased from 54.79% at aged 20-44 years, to 149.78% in those aged 45-64 years (between 1971-75 and 2006-10). The mortality rates in the 45-64 age group increased steadily from 1971 to 1975 and 2006-10. The 1951 birth cohorts (actual birth cohort; 1947-55) showed peak mortalities in both the 50-54 and 45-49 age groups. We found that the 1951 birth cohorts had the greatest mortality risk from breast cancer. This might be attributed to the DDT that was used in large amounts to prevent deaths from malaria in Taiwan. However, future researches require DDT data to evaluate the association between breast cancer and DDT use.

  6. AGE/RAGE/Akt pathway contributes to prostate cancer cell proliferation by promoting Rb phosphorylation and degradation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ji-Ming; He, Min-Yi; Liu, Ya-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Hong, Ying-Qia; Luo, Hai-Hua; Ren, Zhong-Lu; Zhao, Shan-Chao; Jiang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomic research has revealed that metabolites play an important role in prostate cancer development and progression. Previous studies have suggested that prostate cancer cell proliferation is induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) exposure, but the mechanism of this induction remains unknown. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the proliferative response of prostate cancer cell to the interaction of AGEs and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). To investigate this mechanism, we used Western blotting to evaluate the responses of the retinoblastoma (Rb), p-Rb and PI3K/Akt pathway to AGEs stimulation. We also examined the effect of knocking down Rb and blocking the PI3K/Akt pathway on AGEs induced PC-3 cell proliferation. Our results indicated that AGE-RAGE interaction enhanced Rb phosphorylation and subsequently decreased total Rb levels. Bioinformatics analysis further indicated a negative correlation between RAGE and RB1 expression in prostate cancer tissue. Furthermore, we observed that AGEs stimulation activated the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and that blocking PI3K/Akt signaling abrogated AGEs-induced cell proliferation. We report, for the first time, that AGE-RAGE interaction enhances prostate cancer cell proliferation by phosphorylation of Rb via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  7. Eribulin Monotherapy in Patients Aged 70 Years and Older With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Javier; Vahdat, Linda T.; Cardoso, Fatima; Twelves, Chris; Wanders, Jantien; Dutcus, Corina E.; Yang, Jay; Seegobin, Seth; O’Shaughnessy, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Following the demonstrated efficacy and safety of eribulin mesylate in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic breast cancer, an exploratory analysis was performed to investigate the effect of age in these patients. Methods. Data were pooled from two single-arm phase II studies and one open-label randomized phase III study in which patients received eribulin mesylate at 1.4 mg/m2 as 2- to 5-minute intravenous infusions on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle. The effect of age on median overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR), clinical benefit rate (CBR), and incidence of adverse events (AEs) was calculated for four age groups (<50 years, 50–59 years, 60–69 years, ≥70 years). Results. Overall, 827 patients were included in the analysis (<50 years, n = 253; 50–59 years, n = 289; 60–69 years, n = 206; ≥70 years, n = 79). Age had no significant impact on OS (11.8 months, 12.3 months, 11.7 months, and 12.5 months, respectively; p = .82), PFS (3.5 months, 2.9 months, 3.8 months, and 4.0 months, respectively; p = .42), ORR (12.7%, 12.5%, 6.3%, and 10.1%, respectively), or CBR (20.2%, 20.8%, 20.4%, and 21.5%, respectively). Although some AEs had higher incidence in either the youngest or the oldest subgroup, there was no overall effect of age on the incidence of AEs (including neuropathy, neutropenia, and leukopenia). Conclusion. Eribulin monotherapy in these selected older patients with good baseline performance status led to OS, PFS, ORR, CBR, and tolerability similar to those of younger patients with metastatic breast cancer. The benefits and risks of eribulin appear to be similar across age groups. PMID:24682463

  8. Colorectal Cancer Screening in US Seniors Ages 76-84 Years.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Shapiro, Jean A; Kobrin, Sarah; Nadel, Marion R; Zapka, Jane M

    2015-08-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends patient-physician discussions about the appropriateness of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among adults ages 76-84 years who have never been screened. In this study, we used data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine patterns of CRC screening and provider recommendation among seniors ages 76-84 years, and made some comparisons to younger adults. Nationally-representative samples of 1379 adults ages 76-84 years and 8797 adults ages 50-75 years responded to questions about CRC screening status, receipt of provider recommendation, and discussion of test options; 22.7% (95% CI 20.1-25.3) of seniors ages 76-84 had never been tested for CRC and therefore were not up-to-date with guidelines; 3.9% (95% CI 2.0-7.6) of these individuals reported a recent provider recommendation for screening. In multivariate analyses, the likelihood of never having been tested was significantly greater for seniors of other/multiple race or Hispanic ethnicity; with high school or less education; without private health insurance coverage; who had ≤ 1 doctor visit in the past year; without recent screening for breast, cervical, or prostate cancer; with no or unknown CRC family history; or with ≤ 1 chronic disease. Among the minority of respondents ages 50-75 and 76-84 reporting a provider recommendation, 73.2% indicated that the provider recommended particular tests, which was overwhelmingly colonoscopy (≥ 89 %). Nearly one-quarter of adults 76-84 have never been screened for CRC, and rates of provider recommendation in this group are very low. Greater attention to informed CRC screening discussions with screening-eligible seniors is needed.

  9. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico's cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico.

  10. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico’s cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico. PMID:26015805

  11. Energy metabolism and metabolic sensors in stem cells: the metabostem crossroads of aging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    We are as old as our adult stem cells are; therefore, stem cell exhaustion is considered a hallmark of aging. Our tumors are as aggressive as the number of cancer stem cells (CSCs) they bear because CSCs can survive treatments with hormones, radiation, chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted drugs, thus increasing the difficulty of curing cancer. Not surprisingly, interest in stem cell research has never been greater among members of the public, politicians, and scientists. But how can we slow the rate at which our adult stem cells decline over our lifetime, reducing the regenerative potential of tissues, while efficiently eliminating the aberrant, life-threatening activity of "selfish", immortal, and migrating CSCs? Frustrated by the gene-centric limitations of conventional approaches to aging diseases, our group and other groups have begun to appreciate that bioenergetic metabolism, i.e., the production of fuel & building blocks for growth and division, and autophagy/mitophagy, i.e., the quality-control, self-cannibalistic system responsible for "cleaning house" and "recycling the trash", can govern the genetic and epigenetic networks that facilitate stem cell behaviors. Indeed, it is reasonable to suggest the existence of a "metabostem" infrastructure that operates as a shared hallmark of aging and cancer, thus making it physiologically plausible to maintain or even increase the functionality of adult stem cells while reducing the incidence of cancer and extending the lifespan. This "metabostemness" property could lead to the discovery of new drugs that reprogram cell metabotypes to increase the structural and functional integrity of adult stem cells and positively influence their lineage determination, while preventing the development and aberrant function of stem cells in cancer tissues. While it is obvious that the antifungal antibiotic rapamycin, the polyphenol resveratrol, and the biguanide metformin already belong to this new family of metabostemness

  12. DNA repair diseases: What do they tell us about cancer and aging?

    PubMed

    Menck, Carlos Fm; Munford, Veridiana

    2014-03-01

    The discovery of DNA repair defects in human syndromes, initially in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) but later in many others, led to striking observations on the association of molecular defects and patients' clinical phenotypes. For example, patients with syndromes resulting from defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) or translesion synthesis (TLS) present high levels of skin cancer in areas exposed to sunlight. However, some defects in NER also lead to more severe symptoms, such as developmental and neurological impairment and signs of premature aging. Skin cancer in XP patients is clearly associated with increased mutagenesis and genomic instability, reflecting the defective repair of DNA lesions. By analogy, more severe symptoms observed in NER-defective patients have also been associated with defective repair, likely involving cell death after transcription blockage of damaged templates. Endogenously induced DNA lesions, particularly through oxidative stress, have been identified as responsible for these severe pathologies. However, this association is not that clear and alternative explanations have been proposed. Despite high levels of exposure to intense sunlight, patients from tropical countries receive little attention or care, which likely also reflects the lack of understanding of how DNA damage causes cancer and premature aging.

  13. Involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA and repair in cancer development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Tudek, Barbara; Winczura, Alicja; Janik, Justyna; Siomek, Agnieszka; Foksinski, Marek; Oliński, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA repair may mediate several cellular processes, like replication and transcription, mutagenesis and apoptosis and thus may be important factors in the development and pathology of an organism, including cancer. DNA is constantly damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) directly and also by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), which form exocyclic adducts to DNA bases. A wide variety of oxidatively-generated DNA lesions are present in living cells. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the best known DNA lesions due to its mutagenic properties. Among LPO-derived DNA base modifications the most intensively studied are ethenoadenine and ethenocytosine, highly miscoding DNA lesions considered as markers of oxidative stress and promutagenic DNA damage. Although at present it is impossible to directly answer the question concerning involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA in cancer etiology, it is likely that oxidatively modified DNA bases may serve as a source of mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and are involved in aging (i.e. they may be causal factors responsible for these processes). To counteract the deleterious effect of oxidatively damaged DNA, all organisms have developed several DNA repair mechanisms. The efficiency of oxidatively damaged DNA repair was frequently found to be decreased in cancer patients. The present work reviews the basis for the biological significance of DNA damage, particularly effects of 8-oxoGua and ethenoadduct occurrence in DNA in the aspect of cancer development, drawing attention to the multiplicity of proteins with repair activities. PMID:20589166

  14. Detectable clonal mosaicism from birth to old age and its relationship to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Cathy C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Rice, Kenneth; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Zelnick, Leila R.; McHugh, Caitlin P.; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Pugh, Elizabeth W.; Amos, Chris; Wei, Qingyi; Wang, Li-e; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Mathias, Rasika; Daley, Denise; Beaty, Terri H.; Scott, Alan F.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Scharpf, Rob B.; Bierut, Laura J.; Hartz, Sarah M.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Freedman, Neal D.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Ginsburg, David; Li, Jun; Desch, Karl C.; Strom, Sara S.; Blot, William J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Ingles, Sue A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Monroe, Kristine R; Heit, John A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Regnier, Cynthia; Lowe, William L.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Marazita, Mary L.; Feingold, Eleanor; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Melbye, Mads; Feenstra, Bjarke; Kang, Jae H.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Jarvik, Gail P.; McDavid, Andrew N.; Seshan, Venkatraman E.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Crenshaw, Andrew; Sharopova, Nataliya; Wise, Anastasia; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David R.; Levine, David M.; Zheng, Xiuwen; Udren, Jenna I; Bennett, Siiri; Nelson, Sarah C.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Conomos, Matthew P.; Heagerty, Patrick; Manolio, Teri; Pasquale, Louis R.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Caporaso, Neil; Weir, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Clonal mosaicism for large chromosomal anomalies (duplications, deletions and uniparental disomy) was detected using SNP microarray data from over 50,000 subjects recruited for genome-wide association studies. This detection method requires a relatively high frequency of cells (>5–10%) with the same abnormal karyotype (presumably of clonal origin) in the presence of normal cells. The frequency of detectable clonal mosaicism in peripheral blood is low (<0.5%) from birth until 50 years of age, after which it rises rapidly to 2–3% in the elderly. Many of the mosaic anomalies are characteristic of those found in hematological cancers and identify common deleted regions that pinpoint the locations of genes previously associated with hematological cancers. Although only 3% of subjects with detectable clonal mosaicism had any record of hematological cancer prior to DNA sampling, those without a prior diagnosis have an estimated 10-fold higher risk of a subsequent hematological cancer (95% confidence interval = 6–18). PMID:22561516

  15. Common genetic variants in prostate cancer risk prediction – Results from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Travis, Ruth C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Andriole, Gerald; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Ganziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Pala, Valeria; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B.; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the goals of personalized medicine is to generate individual risk profiles that could identify individuals in the population that exhibit high risk. The discovery of more than two-dozen independent SNP markers in prostate cancer has raised the possibility for such risk stratification. In this study, we evaluated the discriminative and predictive ability for prostate cancer risk models incorporating 25 common prostate cancer genetic markers, family history of prostate cancer and age. Methods We fit a series of risk models and estimated their performance in 7,509 prostate cancer cases and 7,652 controls within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We also calculated absolute risks based on SEER incidence data. Results The best risk model (C-statistic=0.642) included individual genetic markers and family history of prostate cancer. We observed a decreasing trend in discriminative ability with advancing age (P=0.009), with highest accuracy in men younger than 60 years (C-statistic=0.679). The absolute ten-year risk for 50-year old men with a family history ranged from 1.6% (10th percentile of genetic risk) to 6.7% (90th percentile of genetic risk). For men without family history, the risk ranged from 0.8% (10th percentile) to 3.4% (90th percentile). Conclusions Our results indicate that incorporating genetic information and family history in prostate cancer risk models can be particularly useful for identifying younger men that might benefit from PSA screening. Impact Although adding genetic risk markers improves model performance, the clinical utility of these genetic risk models is limited. PMID:22237985

  16. Designing exercise clinical trials for older adults with cancer: Recommendations from 2015 Cancer and Aging Research Group NCI U13 Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Kilari, Deepak; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Presley, Carolyn J.; Wildes, Tanya M.; Klepin, Heidi D.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Jatoi, Amina; Harrison, Robert; Won, Elizabeth; Mustian, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment can lead to a myriad of adverse events and negatively impact quality of life of older cancer patients and survivors. Unmet physical activity needs vary across the cancer continuum and remain an important yet understudied area of research in this population. Exercise interventions have been shown to be effective in treating both the physical and psychological declines associated with cancer and its treatment, with a potential to improve cancer-related outcomes. Despite the current evidence, exercise is clearly underutilized due to several barriers and knowledge gaps in existing trials that include appropriate population identification, design, and outcome measures selection. The benefits of regular exercise in both the primary and secondary prevention of chronic conditions are well established in the non-cancer population. In older cancer patients and survivors, further research is needed before exercise gains widespread acceptance. The Cancer and Aging Research Group convened experts in exercise, aging and cancer to evaluate current scientific evidence and knowledge gaps in geriatric exercise oncology. This report summarizes these findings and provides future research directions. PMID:27197916

  17. Battling regional (stage III) lung cancer: bumpy road of a cancer survivor in the immunotherapy age.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhonglin; Biddinger, Paul; Schroeder, Carsten; Tariq, Khurram

    2016-07-07

    A 58-year-old woman, a heavy smoker, was diagnosed with stage III squamous cell lung cancer. She was treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with partial response. 2 months later, she had haemoptysis caused by brisk bleeding from the radiated right upper lobe. Fortunately, her bleed was self-limited. 4 months later, a rapidly enlarging renal mass was discovered and turned out to be metastatic from the lung primary. Second-line chemotherapy with docetaxel and ramucirumab did not have effects on the renal mass after 2 cycles. Despite not being eligible for a durvalumab trial because of lack of PD-L1 expression, she had a meaningful response to nivolumab. Once every 2 weeks, infusion of nivolumab resulted in rapid tumour shrinkage in multiple areas. In the next few months, she experienced a variety of side effects, some of which were potentially life-threatening. She had disease progression 9 months into treatment.

  18. The key role of growth hormone — insulin — IGF-1 signaling in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anisimov, Vladimir N.; Bartke, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Studies in mammals have led to the suggestion that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia are important factors in aging. GH/Insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling molecules that have been linked to longevity include daf-2 and InR and their homologues in mammals, and inactivation of the corresponding genes increases lifespan in nematodes, fruit flies and mice. The life-prolonging effects of caloric restriction are likely related to decreasing IGF-1 levels. Evidence has emerged that antidiabetic drugs are promising candidates for both lifespan extension and prevention of cancer. Thus, antidiabetic drugs postpone spontaneous carcinogenesis in mice and rats, as well as chemical and radiation carcinogenesis in mice, rats and hamsters. Furthermore, metformin seems to decrease the risk for cancer in diabetic patients. PMID:23434537

  19. Physiologic aspects of aging: impact on cancer management and decision making, part II.

    PubMed

    Sehl, Mary; Sawhney, Rishi; Naeim, Arash

    2005-01-01

    In this second article of our two-part review, we focus on age-associated physiologic changes involving the nervous, endocrine, hematologic, immune, and musculoskeletal systems, with close attention to the interconnected nature of these systems. There is a well-known connection between the neuroendocrine and immune systems via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and via interaction by means of cytokines, hormones, and neurotransmitters. These changes may lead to a loss of integration and resiliency with age, thus decreasing the ability of the elderly patient with cancer to adapt to stressful circumstances. Prominent changes include decline in memory and cognition, and increased susceptibility to peripheral neuropathy. Hematologic and immune changes like reduced bone marrow reserve and increased susceptibility to infections have far reaching implications for cancer care in the elderly. Gradual decline in hormone levels, and changes in muscle and body composition, can lead to functional decline and frailty. Use of the clinical interventions suggested in this article, along with an appreciation of the interplay of these age-related physiologic changes and their consequences, allows oncology professionals to customize therapy and minimize side effects in the geriatric oncology patient.

  20. Surgery for gastric cancer patients of age 85 and older: Multicenter survey

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Hirotaka; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Itoh, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Kenichiro; Kakihara, Naoki; Takemura, Manabu; Okugawa, Kaori; Uchiyama, Kiyoshi; Nakata, Masashi; Nishi, Hiroshi; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Komatsu, Shuhei; Okamoto, Kazuma; Otsuji, Eigo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the surgical therapies for gastric cancer (GC) patients of age 85 or older in a multicenter survey. METHODS Therapeutic opportunities for elderly GC patients have expanded in conjunction with extended life expectancy. However, the number of cases encountered in a single institution is usually very small and surgical therapies for elderly GC patients have not yet been standardized completely. In the present study, a total of 134 GC patients of age 85 or older who underwent surgery in 9 related facilities were retrospectively investigated. The relationships between surgical therapies and clinicopathological or prognostic features were analyzed. RESULTS Eighty-nine of the patients (66%) presented with a comorbidity, and 26 (19% overall) presented with more than two comorbidities. Radical lymphadenectomy was performed in 59 patients (44%), and no patient received pre- or post-operative chemotherapy. Forty of the patients (30%) experienced perioperative complications, but no surgical or perioperative mortality occurred. Laparoscopic surgery was performed in only 12 of the patients (9.0%). Univariate and multivariate analyses of the 113 patients who underwent R0 or R1 resection identified the factors of pT3/4 and limited lymphadenectomy as predictive of worse prognosis (HR = 4.68, P = 0.02 and HR =2.19, P = 0.05, respectively). Non-cancer-specific death was more common in cStage I patients than in cStage II or III patients. Limited lymphadenectomy correlated with worse cancer-specific survival (P = 0.01), particularly in cStage II patients (P < 0.01). There were no relationships between limited lymphadenectomy and any comorbidities, except for cerebrovascular disease (P = 0.07). CONCLUSION Non-cancer-specific death was not negligible, particularly in cStage I, and gastrectomy with radical lymphadenectomy appears to be an effective treatment for cStage II elderly GC patients. PMID:28275301

  1. Prediction of Female Breast Cancer Incidence among the Aging Society in Kanagawa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kayoko

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the increasing number of elderly “baby boomers” in Japan, the number of cancer patients is also expected to increase. Approximately 2 million baby boomers from nearby local areas are residing in metropolitan areas; hence, the geographical distribution of cancer patients will probably markedly change. We assessed the expected number of breast cancer (BC) patients in different regions (urban, outer city, town, rural) using estimates of the nation’s population and Kanagawa Cancer Registry data. To estimate future BC incidence for each region, we multiplied the 2010 rate by the predicted female population for each region according to age group. The incidence cases of BC in those aged ≥65 years is expected to increase in all areas; in particular, compared to rates in 2010, the BC incidence in urban areas was predicted to increase by 82.6% in 2035 and 102.2% in 2040. Although the incidence in all BC cases in urban areas showed an increasing trend, until peaking in 2040 (increasing 31.2% from 2010), the number of BC patients would continue to decrease in other areas. The number of BC patients per capita BC specialist was 64.3 patients in 2010; this value would increase from 59.3 in 2010 to 77.7 in 2040 in urban areas, but would decrease in other areas. Our findings suggest that the number of elderly BC patients is expected to increase rapidly in urban areas and that the demand for BC treatment would increase in the elderly population in urban areas. PMID:27532126

  2. Colorectal cancer in aged patients. Toward the routine treatment through laparoscopic surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; MARCHESE, S.; FAMOSO, F.; LA CORTE, F.; MARLETTA, S.; LEANZA, G.; ZANGHÌ, G.; LEANZA, V.; INTAGLIATA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in general population. The incidence seems to be higher in older age. Surgery remains the treatment of choice and laparoscopic approach offers numerous benefits. We report our personal experience in elderly patients operated on for colorectal cancer with laparoscopic resection. Patients and methods From January 2003 to September 2013, out of 160 patients aged 65 years or older and operated with minimally invasive techniques, 30 cases affected by colorectal cancer and operated on with laparoscopic approach were analyzed in this study. Results Male/female ratio was 1.35 and mean age 72 years. Constipation, weight loss, anemia and rectal bleeding were the most commonly reported symptoms. Lesions involved descending-sigmoid colon in 53% of cases, rectum in 37% and ascending colon in 10%. Among laparoscopic colorectal operations laparoscopic left colectomy was the most frequently performed, followed by right colectomy, abdominoperineal resection and Hartmann procedure. Operative times ranged from 3 to 5 hours depending on surgical procedure performed. Mean hospital stay was 6 days (range 4–9). Conversion to open approach occurred only in a case of laparoscopic right colectomy (3%) for uncontrolled bleeding. A single case of mortality was reported. In two cases (7%) anastomotic leakage was observed, conservatively treated in one patient and requiring reoperation in the other one. Conclusions Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is feasible and effective for malignancies in elderly population offering several advantages including immunologic and oncologic ones. However an experienced surgical team is essential in reducing risks and complications. PMID:25827663

  3. Two hypotheses of dense breasts and viral infection for explaining incidence of breast cancer by age group in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jong-Myon

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer, the second leading type of cancer in Korean women, has shown increasing incidence over the past 10 years. However, the curves of incidence by age group cast doubt on the birth cohort effect hypothesis. To explain the curves, here I suggest two alternative hypotheses of breast density and viral infection based on pre-existing evidences. Evaluating these hypotheses would require important clues to find unknown risk factors of breast cancer and to plan more effective strategies for breast cancer control in Korean women.

  4. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status and cancer family history of Danish women affected with multifocal or bilateral breast cancer at a young age

    PubMed Central

    Bergthorsson, J; Ejlertsen, B; Olsen, J; Borg, A; Nielsen, K; Barkardottir, R; Klausen, S; Mouridsen, H; Winther, K; Fenger, K; Niebuhr, A; Harboe, T; Niebuhr, E

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION—A small fraction of breast cancer is the result of germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 cancer susceptibility genes. Mutation carriers frequently have a positive family history of breast and ovarian cancer, are often diagnosed at a young age, and may have a higher incidence of double or multiple primary breast tumours than breast cancer patients in general.
OBJECTIVES—To estimate the prevalence and spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in young Danish patients affected with bilateral or multifocal breast cancer and to determine the relationship of mutation status to family history of cancer.
SUBJECTS—From the files of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG), we selected 119 breast cancer patients diagnosed before the age of 46 years with either bilateral (n=59) or multifocal (n=61) disease.
METHODS—DNA from the subjects was screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations using single strand conformation analysis (SSCA) and the protein truncation test (PTT). Observed and expected cancer incidence in first degree relatives of the patients was estimated using data from the Danish Cancer Registry.
RESULTS—Twenty four mutation carriers were identified (20%), of whom 13 had a BRCA1 mutation and 11 carried a BRCA2 mutation. Two mutations in BRCA1 were found repeatedly in the material and accounted for seven of the 24 (29%) mutation carriers. The mutation frequency was about equal in patients with bilateral (22%) and multifocal breast cancer (18%). The incidence of breast and ovarian cancer was greatly increased in first degree relatives of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, but to a much lesser degree in relatives of non-carriers. An increased risk of cancer was also noted in brothers of non-carriers.
CONCLUSIONS—A relatively broad spectrum of germline mutations was observed in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and most of the mutations are present in other populations. Our results indicate that a diagnosis of bilateral and multifocal breast

  5. Risk of Developing Second Cancer From Neutron Dose in Proton Therapy as Function of Field Characteristics, Organ, and Patient Age

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharatou Jarlskog, Christina; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk of a second malignancy after treatment of a primary brain cancer using passive scattered proton beam therapy. The focus was on the cancer risk caused by neutrons outside the treatment volume and the dependency on the patient's age. Methods and Materials: Organ-specific neutron-equivalent doses previously calculated for eight different proton therapy brain fields were considered. Organ-specific models were applied to assess the risk of developing solid cancers and leukemia. Results: The main contributors (>80%) to the neutron-induced risk are neutrons generated in the treatment head. Treatment volume can influence the risk by up to a factor of {approx}2. Young patients are subject to significantly greater risks than are adult patients because of the geometric differences and age dependency of the risk models. Breast cancer should be the main concern for females. For males, the risks of lung cancer, leukemia, and thyroid cancer were significant for pediatric patients. In contrast, leukemia was the leading risk for an adult. Most lifetime risks were <1% (70-Gy treatment). The only exceptions were breast, thyroid, and lung cancer for females. For female thyroid cancer, the treatment risk can exceed the baseline risk. Conclusion: The risk of developing a second malignancy from neutrons from proton beam therapy of a brain lesion is small (i.e., presumably outweighed by the therapeutic benefit) but not negligible (i.e., potentially greater than the baseline risk). The patient's age at treatment plays a major role.

  6. mTOR: from growth signal integration to cancer, diabetes and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Zoncu, Roberto; Sabatini, David M.; Efeyan, Alejo

    2012-01-01

    Preface In all eukaryotes, the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway couples energy and nutrient abundance to the execution of cell growth and division, owing to the ability of TOR protein kinase to simultaneously sense energy, nutrients and stress, and, in metazoan, growth factors. Mammalian TOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2) exert their actions by regulating other important kinases, such as S6K and Akt. In the last few years, a significant advance in our understanding of the regulation and functions of mTOR has revealed its critical involvement in the onset and progression of diabetes, cancer and ageing. PMID:21157483

  7. Challenges in Recruiting Aging Women Holocaust Survivors to a Case Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are underrepresented in medical research for many reasons, including recruitment difficulties. Recruitment of older adults for research studies is often a time-consuming process and can be more challenging when the study involves older adults with unique exposures to traumatic events and from minority groups. The current article provides a brief overview of (a) challenges encountered while recruiting aging women Holocaust survivors for a case control study and (b) strategies used for meeting those challenges. The case group comprised women Holocaust survivors who were recently diagnosed with breast cancer and the control group comprised healthy women from a Holocaust-survivor community in Israel.

  8. RECURRENCE OF HIGH-RISK BLADDER CANCER: A POPULATION-BASED ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Chamie, Karim; Litwin, Mark S.; Bassett, Jeffrey C.; Daskivich, Timothy J.; Lai, Julie; Hanley, Jan M.; Konety, Badrinath R.; Saigal, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with bladder cancer are apt to develop multiple recurrences that require intervention. We examined the recurrence, progression and bladder cancer-related mortality rates in a cohort of individuals with high-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods Using linked SEER-Medicare data, we identified subjects with a diagnosis of high-grade, non-muscle-invasive disease in 1992–2002 and were followed until 2007. We then used multivariate competing-risks regression analyses to examine recurrence, progression, and bladder cancer-related mortality rates. Results Of 7,410 subjects, 2,897 (39.1%) experienced a recurrence without progression, 2,449 (33.0%) experienced disease progression, of whom 981 succumbed to bladder cancer. Using competing-risks regression analysis, we found the 10-year recurrence, progression, and bladder cancer-related mortality rates to be 74.3%, 33.3%, and 12.3%, respectively. Stage T1 was the only variable associated with a higher rate of recurrence. Women, black race, undifferentiated grade, stage Tis and T1 were associated with a higher risk of progression and mortality. Advanced age (≥70) was associated with a higher risk of bladder cancer-related mortality. Conclusions Nearly three-fourths of patients diagnosed with high-risk bladder cancer will recur, progress, or die within ten years of their diagnosis. Even though most patients do not die of bladder cancer, the vast majority endures the morbidity of recurrence and progression of their cancer. Increasing efforts should be made to offer patients intravesical therapy with the goal of minimizing the incidence of recurrences. Furthermore, the high recurrence rate seen during the first two years of diagnosis warrants an intense surveillance schedule. PMID:23737352

  9. Aspiration pneumonia after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Beibei; Boero, Isabel J.; Hwang, Lindsay; Le, Quynh-Thu; Moiseenko, Vitali; Sanghvi, Parag R.; Cohen, Ezra E. W.; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aspiration pneumonia represents an under-reported complication of chemoradiotherapy in head-and-neck cancer. This study evaluated the incidence, risk factors, and mortality of aspiration pneumonia in a large cohort of head-and-neck cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods Patients with head-and-neck cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 were identified from the SEER-Medicare database. Aspiration pneumonia was identified from Medicare billing claims. The cumulative incidence, risk factors, and survival after aspiration pneumonia were estimated and compared to a non-cancer population. Results Of 3,513 head-and-neck cancer patients, 801 patients developed aspiration pneumonia at a median time of 5 months after initiating treatment. The 1- and 5-year cumulative incidence of aspiration pneumonia was 15.8% and 23.8% for head-and-neck cancer patients and 3.6% and 8.7% for non-cancer controls, respectively. Among cancer patients multivariate analysis identified independent risk factors (p<0.05) for aspiration pneumonia including hypopharyngeal and nasopharyngeal tumors, male gender, older age, increased comorbidity, no surgery prior to radiation, and care received at a teaching hospital. Among cancer patients who experienced aspiration pneumonia, 674 (84%) were hospitalized of which 301 (45%) were admitted to an intensive care unit. Thirty-day mortality after hospitalization for aspiration pneumonia was 32.5%. Aspiration pneumonia was associated with a 42% increased risk of death (HR=1.42, p<0.001) after controlling for confounders. Conclusions This study found that nearly one-quarter of elderly patients will develop aspiration pneumonia within 5 years of chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. A better understanding of mitigating factors will help identify patients at risk for this potentially lethal complication. PMID:25537836

  10. Cardiac Mortality Among 200 000 Five-Year Survivors of Cancer Diagnosed at 15 to 39 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Katherine E.; Reulen, Raoul C.; Winter, David L.; Bright, Chloe J.; Fidler, Miranda M.; Frobisher, Clare; Guha, Joyeeta; Wong, Kwok F.; Kelly, Julie; Edgar, Angela B.; McCabe, Martin G.; Whelan, Jeremy; Cutter, David J.; Darby, Sarah C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Survivors of teenage and young adult cancer are acknowledged as understudied. Little is known about their long-term adverse health risks, particularly of cardiac disease that is increased in other cancer populations where cardiotoxic treatments have been used. Methods: The Teenage and Young Adult Cancer Survivor Study cohort comprises 200 945 5-year survivors of cancer diagnosed at 15 to 39 years of age in England and Wales from 1971 to 2006, and followed to 2014. Standardized mortality ratios, absolute excess risks, and cumulative risks were calculated. Results: Two thousand sixteen survivors died of cardiac disease. For all cancers combined, the standardized mortality ratios for all cardiac diseases combined was greatest for individuals diagnosed at 15 to 19 years of age (4.2; 95% confidence interval, 3.4–5.2) decreasing to 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.1–1.3) for individuals aged 35 to 39 years (2P for trend <0.0001). Similar patterns were observed for both standardized mortality ratios and absolute excess risks for ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, and cardiomyopathy. Survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma, acute myeloid leukaemia, genitourinary cancers other than bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, lung cancer, leukaemia other than acute myeloid, central nervous system tumour, cervical cancer, and breast cancer experienced 3.8, 2.7, 2.0, 1.7, 1.7, 1.6, 1.4, 1.3 and 1.2 times the number of cardiac deaths expected from the general population, respectively. Among survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma aged over 60 years, almost 30% of the total excess number of deaths observed were due to heart disease. Conclusions: This study of over 200 000 cancer survivors shows that age at cancer diagnosis was critical in determining subsequent cardiac mortality risk. For the first time, risk estimates of cardiac death after each cancer diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 39 years have been derived from a large population-based cohort with prolonged

  11. Prognostic utility of molecular factors by age at diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCleary, Nadine J; Sato, Kaori; Nishihara, Reiko; Inamura, Kentaro; Morikawa, Teppei; Zhang, Xuehong; Wu, Kana; Yamauchi, Mai; Kim, Sun A; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Mima, Kosuke; Qian, Zhi Rong; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We hypothesized that adverse prognostic associations of specific tumor molecular factors vary by patient age at colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We examined the prognostic associations and interactions by age at CRC diagnosis (<60 vs. 60–74 vs. ≥75 years old) of key molecular factors – CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), microsatellite instability (MSI), KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations, and nuclear CTNNB1 expression status – on CRC-specific survival and overall survival, utilizing 1280 incident CRC cases (median age 69 years, range 38–91 years) within the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS) cohorts. RESULTS MSI-high was associated with better survival while BRAF mutation was associated with worse survival, but these associations did not appreciably differ by age group. Status of CIMP, KRAS mutation, or PIK3CA mutation was not associated with prognosis regardless of age. Nuclear CTNNB1 expression was associated with a trend toward worse prognosis among older adults (age ≥75) [multivariate hazard ratio (HR), 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89 to 3.13 (for CRC-specific survival); multivariate HR 1.44; 95% CI 0.93 to 2.24 (for overall survival)] but not among younger patients, and there was a statistically significant interaction by age (p-interaction=0.03 for CRC-specific survival; p-interaction=0.007 for overall survival). CONCLUSIONS Tumor nuclear CTNNB1 expression may be associated with higher mortality among older CRC patients but not among younger patients. Our findings need to be confirmed in independent datasets. Detailed exploration of tumor molecular signatures in older CRC patients in large populations is warranted. PMID:26490308

  12. Risk of Fracture After Radical Cystectomy and Urinary Diversion for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Atoria, Coral L.; Ehdaie, Behfar; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Rabbani, Farhang; Herr, Harry W.; Bochner, Bernard H.; Elkin, Elena B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Radical cystectomy and urinary diversion may cause chronic metabolic acidosis, leading to long-term bone loss in patients with bladder cancer. However, the risk of fractures after radical cystectomy has not been defined. We assessed whether radical cystectomy and intestinal urinary diversion are associated with increased risk of fracture. Patients and Methods Population-based study using SEER-Medicare–linked data from 2000 through 2007 for patients with stage 0-III bladder cancer. We evaluated the association between radical cystectomy and risk of fracture at any site, controlling for patient and disease characteristics. Results The cohort included 50,520 patients, of whom 4,878 had cystectomy and urinary diversion. The incidence of fracture in the cystectomy group was 6.55 fractures per 100 person-years, compared with 6.39 fractures per 100 person-years in those without cystectomy. Cystectomy was associated with a 21% greater risk of fracture (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.32) compared with no cystectomy, controlling for patient and disease characteristics. There was no evidence of an interaction between radical cystectomy and age, sex, comorbidity score, or cancer stage. Conclusion Patients with bladder cancer who have radical cystectomy and urinary diversion are at increased risk of fracture. PMID:25185104

  13. Age-at-exposure effects on risk estimates for non-cancer mortality in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Muirhead, Colin R; Hunter, Nezahat

    2005-12-01

    Statistically significant increases in non-cancer disease mortality with radiation dose have been observed among survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The increasing trends arise particularly for diseases of the circulatory, digestive, and respiratory systems. Rates for survivors exposed to a dose of 1 Sv are elevated by about 10%, a smaller relative increase than that for cancer. The aetiology of this increased risk is not yet understood. Neither animal nor human studies have found clear evidence for excess non-cancer mortality at the lower range of doses received by A-bomb survivors. In this paper, we examine the age and time patterns of excess risks in the A-bomb survivors. The results suggest that the excess relative risk of non-cancer disease mortality might be highest for exposure at ages 30-49 years, and that those exposed at ages 0-29 years might have a very low excess relative risk compared with those exposed at older ages. The differences in excess relative risk for different age-at-exposure groups imply that the dose response relationships for non-cancer disease mortality need to be modelled with adjustment for age-at-exposure.

  14. Mammographic surveillance in women aged 35-39 at enhanced familial risk of breast cancer (FH02).

    PubMed

    Evans, D G; Thomas, S; Caunt, J; Roberts, L; Howell, A; Wilson, M; Fox, R; Sibbering, D M; Moss, S; Wallis, M G; Eccles, D M; Duffy, S

    2014-03-01

    Although there have been encouraging recent studies showing a potential benefit from annual mammography in women aged 40-49 years of age with an elevated breast cancer risk due to family history there is little evidence of efficacy in women aged <40 years of age. A prospective study (FH02) has been developed to assess the efficacy of mammography screening in women aged 35-39 years of age with a lifetime breast cancer risk of ≥ 17 % who are not receiving MRI screening. Retrospective analyses from five centres with robust recall systems identified 47 breast cancers (n = 12 in situ) with an interval cancer rate of 15/47 (32%). Invasive tumour size, lymph node status and current vital status were all significantly better than in two control groups of unscreened women (including those with a family history) recruited to the POSH study. Further evaluation of the prospective arm of FH02 is required to assess the potential added value of digital mammography and the cancer incidence rates in moderate and high risk women in order to inform cost effectiveness analyses.

  15. Comparison of Secular Trends in Cervical Cancer Mortality in China and the United States: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinyao; Bai, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhenkun; Yu, Chuanhua

    2016-11-17

    Background: As one of the most common cancers in the female population, cervical cancer has ranked as the second most incident gynecological cancer in recent years, trailing only breast cancer. We aimed to assess and compare the secular trends in cervical cancer mortality in China and the United States and analyze the independent effects of chronological age, time period and birth cohort using age-period-cohort (APC) analysis. Methods: We performed an age-period-cohort analysis using the intrinsic estimator method to estimate the independent effects of age, time period, and birth cohort on cervical cancer mortality. We collected mortality data for China and the United States from the WHO Mortality Database and China Health Statistical Yearbook database. Results: We examined the general trends in cervical mortality rates in China and the United States during the periods 1988-2012 and 1953-2012, respectively. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) for cervical cancer in urban China, rural China and the U.S. showed a general decreasing trend during the observation period, except for urban China, which experienced a significant increase beginning in 2002. The mortality rates for cervical cancer in the three areas showed a general increasing trend with age, regardless of the period effect. Period effects declined steadily in both rural China (from 0.19 to -0.26) and the U.S. (from -0.20 to -0.43); however, a slight increasing trend was identified (from -0.25 to 0.33) in urban China, which indicated that the risk of mortality increased with time. Cohort effects peaked in the cohort born in 1911-1915 in both rural China and urban China, declined consistently in the cohort born before 1950, and then decreased again in the cohort born after 1976-1980. The cohort effect in the U.S. peaked in the birth cohort born in 1876-1880, then leveled off and slightly decreased in younger generations. Conclusions: Our study showed that in general, cervical cancer mortality rates

  16. Comparison of Secular Trends in Cervical Cancer Mortality in China and the United States: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyao; Bai, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhenkun; Yu, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Background: As one of the most common cancers in the female population, cervical cancer has ranked as the second most incident gynecological cancer in recent years, trailing only breast cancer. We aimed to assess and compare the secular trends in cervical cancer mortality in China and the United States and analyze the independent effects of chronological age, time period and birth cohort using age-period-cohort (APC) analysis. Methods: We performed an age-period-cohort analysis using the intrinsic estimator method to estimate the independent effects of age, time period, and birth cohort on cervical cancer mortality. We collected mortality data for China and the United States from the WHO Mortality Database and China Health Statistical Yearbook database. Results: We examined the general trends in cervical mortality rates in China and the United States during the periods 1988–2012 and 1953–2012, respectively. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMRs) for cervical cancer in urban China, rural China and the U.S. showed a general decreasing trend during the observation period, except for urban China, which experienced a significant increase beginning in 2002. The mortality rates for cervical cancer in the three areas showed a general increasing trend with age, regardless of the period effect. Period effects declined steadily in both rural China (from 0.19 to −0.26) and the U.S. (from −0.20 to −0.43); however, a slight increasing trend was identified (from −0.25 to 0.33) in urban China, which indicated that the risk of mortality increased with time. Cohort effects peaked in the cohort born in 1911–1915 in both rural China and urban China, declined consistently in the cohort born before 1950, and then decreased again in the cohort born after 1976–1980. The cohort effect in the U.S. peaked in the birth cohort born in 1876–1880, then leveled off and slightly decreased in younger generations. Conclusions: Our study showed that in general, cervical cancer

  17. Involvement of blood mononuclear cells in the infertility, age-associated diseases and cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    Blood mononuclear cells consist of T cells and monocyte derived cells. Beside immunity, the blood mononuclear cells belong to the complex tissue control system (TCS), where they exhibit morphostatic function by stimulating proliferation of tissue stem cells followed by cellular differentiation, that is stopped after attaining the proper functional stage, which differs among various tissue types. Therefore, the term immune and morphostatic system (IMS) should be implied. The TCS-mediated morphostasis also consists of vascular pericytes controlled by autonomic innervation, which is regulating the quantity of distinct tissues in vivo. Lack of proper differentiation of tissue cells by TCS causes either tissue underdevelopment, e.g., muscular dystrophy, or degenerative functional failures, e.g., type 1 diabetes and age-associated diseases. With the gradual IMS regression after 35 years of age the gonadal infertility develops, followed by a growing incidence of age-associated diseases and cancers. Without restoring an altered TCS function in a degenerative disease, the implantation of tissue-specific stem cells alone by regenerative medicine can not be successful. Transfused young blood could temporarily restore fertility to enable parenthood. The young blood could also temporarily alleviate aging diseases, and this can be extended by substances inducing IMS regeneration, like the honey bee propolis. The local and/or systemic use of honey bee propolis stopped hair and teeth loss, regressed varicose veins, improved altered hearing, and lowered high blood pressure and sugar levels. Complete regression of stage IV ovarian cancer with liver metastases after a simple elaborated immunotherapy is also reported. PMID:28074124

  18. Age at immigration and duration of stay in relation to risk for testicular cancer among Finnish immigrants in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ekbom, Anders; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Akre, Olof; Montgomery, Scott M; Sparén, Pär

    2003-08-20

    Although the incidence of testicular cancer is increasing, substantial differences in incidence between countries and populations exist. These differences cannot be explained solely by genetic differences, but environmental exposures, particularly early exposures, have been implicated in the etiology of testicular cancer. To assess whether early exposures contribute to the incidence of testicular cancer, we identified 93 172 Finnish men who immigrated to Sweden between 1969 and 1996 and followed them for the occurrence of testicular cancer. The risk of testicular cancer was lower for Finnish immigrants to Sweden than for the Swedish general population (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] = 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.21 to 0.53). The reduced risk was associated with both seminomas and non-seminomas. Neither age at immigration nor duration of stay in Sweden had any impact on the reduced risk. Although the type of environmental exposures remains unknown, the results strongly indicate that early exposures are major determinants for testicular cancer.

  19. Age factor relevant to the development of radiation pneumonitis in radiotherapy of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, K.; Kusumoto, S.; Watanabe, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Harada, K.; Ebihara, H.

    1988-02-01

    The significance of age factor for the development of radiation pneumonitis is evaluated in 62 patients with lung cancer between 1977 and 1985. The younger group consists of those less than 70 years old and the elderly group of those 70 years old or more. Radiation doses ranged from 1.5 to 2 Gy, 3 to 5 times per week, therefore the delivered doses were converted to nominal single doses (rets dose). Severe radiation pneumonitis was more often observed in the elderly than in the younger regardless of radiation field size and chemotherapy (n.s.). The onset of radiation pneumonitis occurred earlier in a field size of 90 sq cm or more than in that of less than 90 sq cm in both age groups; there was no significant difference between the two age groups in each field size. The pneumonitis was more frequently noted with increasing rets dose in both age groups (n.s.) regardless of field size and chemotherapy. It is concluded that there is no significant difference in the development of radiation pneumonitis between the younger group and the elderly group, but the pneumonitis is inclined to be more severe in the latter.

  20. Tolerability of Combined Modality Therapy for Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients Aged 75 Years and Older

    SciTech Connect

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Clark, Jeffrey; Willett, Christopher G.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of treatment deviations during combined modality therapy for rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of consecutively treated patients with rectal cancer aged 75 years and older treated with combined modality therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital from 2002 to 2007. The primary endpoint was the rate of treatment deviation, defined as a treatment break, dose reduction, early discontinuation of therapy, or hospitalization during combined modality therapy. Patient comorbidity was rated using the validated Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 Test (ACE-27) comorbidity index. Fisher's exact test and the Mantel-Haenszel trend test were used to identify predictors of treatment tolerability. Results: Thirty-six eligible patients had a median age of 79.0 years (range, 75-87 years); 53% (19/36) had no or mild comorbidity and 47% (17/36) had moderate or severe comorbidity. In all, 58% of patients (21/36) were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and 33% (12/36) with postoperative CRT. Although 92% patients (33/36) completed the planned radiotherapy (RT) dose, 25% (9/36) required an RT-treatment break, 11% (4/36) were hospitalized, and 33% (12/36) had a dose reduction, break, or discontinuation of concurrent chemotherapy. In all, 39% of patients (14/36) completed {>=}4 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, and 17% (6/36) completed therapy without a treatment deviation. More patients with no to mild comorbidity completed treatment than did patients with moderate to severe comorbidity (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.66). The rate of deviation did not differ between patients who had preoperative or postoperative CRT (19% vs. 17%, p = 1.0). Conclusions: The majority of elderly patients with rectal cancer in this series required early termination of treatment, treatment interruptions, or dose reductions. These data suggest that further intensification of

  1. A Mitochondrial Paradigm of Metabolic and Degenerative Diseases, Aging, and Cancer: A Dawn for Evolutionary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.

    2005-01-01

    Life is the interplay between structure and energy, yet the role of energy deficiency in human disease has been poorly explored by modern medicine. Since the mitochondria use oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to convert dietary calories into usable energy, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a toxic by-product, I hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in a wide range of age-related disorders and various forms of cancer. Because mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is present in thousands of copies per cell and encodes essential genes for energy production, I propose that the delayed-onset and progressive course of the age-related diseases results from the accumulation of somatic mutations in the mtDNAs of post-mitotic tissues. The tissue-specific manifestations of these diseases may result from the varying energetic roles and needs of the different tissues. The variation in the individual and regional predisposition to degenerative diseases and cancer may result from the interaction of modern dietary caloric intake and ancient mitochondrial genetic polymorphisms. Therefore the mitochondria provide a direct link between our environment and our genes and the mtDNA variants that permitted our forbears to energetically adapt to their ancestral homes are influencing our health today. PMID:16285865

  2. Surveillance After Initial Treatment for Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Study of Variation In and Outcomes of Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    Ft Detrick, MD. THIS PAGE IS UNCLASSIFIED AAD GRANT NUMBER DAMDI7-94-J-4043 TITLE: Surveillance After Initial Treatment for Breast Cancer: A...NUMBERS Surveillance After Initial Treatment for Breast Cancer: DAMDI7-94-J-4043 A Population-Based Study of Variation In and Outcomes of Care 6. AUTHOR(S...ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 We have utilized SEER and Medicare data bases to study patterns of care related to the treatment of local/regional breast cancer. In

  3. Age- and Sex-Specific Trends in Lung Cancer Mortality over 62 Years in a Nation with a Low Effort in Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    John, Ulrich; Hanke, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Background: A decrease in lung cancer mortality among females below 50 years of age has been reported for countries with significant tobacco control efforts. The aim of this study was to describe the lung cancer deaths, including the mortality rates and proportions among total deaths, for females and males by age at death in a country with a high smoking prevalence (Germany) over a time period of 62 years. Methods: The vital statistics data were analyzed using a joinpoint regression analysis stratified by age and sex. An age-period-cohort analysis was used to estimate the potential effects of sex and school education on mortality. Results: After an increase, lung cancer mortality among women aged 35–44 years remained stable from 1989 to 2009 and decreased by 10.8% per year from 2009 to 2013. Conclusions: Lung cancer mortality among females aged 35–44 years has decreased. The potential reasons include an increase in the number of never smokers, following significant increases in school education since 1950, particularly among females. PMID:27023582

  4. Low somatic K-ras mutation frequency in colorectal cancer diagnosed under the age of 45 years.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Kathryn; Mead, Leeanne; Smith, Letitia D; Royce, Simon G; Tesoriero, Andrea A; Young, Joanne P; Haydon, Andrew; Grubb, Garry; Giles, Graham G; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C

    2006-07-01

    Somatic mutation of K-ras is known to be a common event in colorectal cancer tumourigenesis however its association with age at onset has not been widely explored. In this study, we have analyzed tumours from a population-based study of colorectal cancer diagnosed before the age of 45 years, in which cases had been previously screened for germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations and for microsatellite instability. We used a micro-dissection and sequencing approach to search for somatic K-ras mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61 in 101 early-onset colorectal cancers. Six (6%) somatic K-ras mutations were detected; five in codon 12 (4 G>T transitions and 1 G>A) and one in codon 13 (G>A transition). All codon 12 mutations were identified in microsatellite stable tumours and the codon 13 mutation was identified in a MSI-high tumour. Four cases with K-ras mutations had no reported family history of colorectal cancer and two had some family history of colorectal cancer. None were known to carry a germ-line mutation in hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6 or hPMS2. The role of somatic K-ras mutations in early-onset colorectal cancer carcinogenesis appears to be minor, in contrast to its significant role in colorectal cancer of later age of onset.

  5. Data on the distribution of cancer incidence and death across age and sex groups visualized using multilevel spie charts.

    PubMed

    Feitelson, Dror G

    2016-04-01

    Cancer incidence and death statistics are typically recorded for multiple age and sex brackets, leading to large data tables which are difficult to digest. Effective visualizations of this data would allow practitioners, policy makers, and the general public to comprehend the data more readily and act on it appropriately. We introduce multilevel spie charts to create a combined visualization of cancer incidence and death statistics. Spie charts combine multiple pie charts, where the base pie chart (representing the general population) is used to set the angles of slices, and the superimposed ones use variable radii to portray the cancer data. Spie charts of cancer incidence and death statistics from Israel for 2009-2011 are used as an illustration. These charts clearly show various patterns of how cancer incidence and death distribute across age and sex groups, illustrating (1) absolute numbers and (2) rates per 100,000 population for different age and sex brackets. In addition, drawing separate charts for different cancer types illustrates relative mortality, both (3) across cancer types and (4) mortality relative to incidence. Naturally, this graphical depiction can be used for other diseases as well.

  6. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  7. Factors Associated with Self-Reported Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women Aged 18 Years and Older in the United States.

    PubMed

    Miles-Richardson, Stephanie; Allen, Shari; Claridy, Mechelle D; Booker, Elaine Archie; Gerbi, Gemechu

    2017-02-01

    In 2016, an estimated 4120 women will die as a result of cervical cancer. The objective of this study was to examine the factors associated with cervical cancer screening among women 18 years of age and older in the United States (U.S.). Using the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, women over the age of 18 in the U.S. were examined to assess factors associated with cervical cancer screening. Analyses were conducted using SAS 9.2. Of the 272,692 study participants, 258,496 (95 %) had obtained cervical cancer screening. After adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic factors, being non-Hispanic White, Hispanic or Latino, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, in the age group 18-44 years and 75 years and above, having less than a high school education and an annual household income of less than a $25,000, having never married, and residing in the West region of the U.S. reduced the likelihood of participation in cervical cancer screening. Also, after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic factors, being between the ages of 45-74 years of age, having more than a high school education, having a higher income, and residing in the South region of the U.S. increased the likelihood of participation in cervical cancer screening. The results of this study suggest that socio-demographic factors and region of residence are predictors of cervical cancer screening. These findings highlight the need to identify potential prevention strategies to promote cervical cancer screening among at-risk populations and groups.

  8. Lung, gastric and colorectal cancer mortality by occupation and industry among working-aged men in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Hisashi; Wada, Koji; Prieto-Merino, David; Smith, Derek R.

    2017-01-01

    We examined occupational and industrial differences in lung, gastric, and colorectal cancer risk among Japanese men of working age (25–64 years) using the 2010 Japanese national survey data for occupation and industry-specific death rates. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the age-adjusted incident rate ratios by lung, gastric, and colorectal cancers, with manufacturing used as the referent occupation or industry. Unemployed Japanese men and those in manufacturing had an 8–11-fold increased risk of lung, gastric and colorectal cancer. The highest mortality rates for lung and colorectal cancer by occupation were “administrative and managerial” (by occupation) and “mining” (by industry). For gastric cancer, the highest mortality rate was “agriculture” (by occupation) and “mining” (by industry). By occupation; Japanese men in service occupations, those in administrative and managerial positions, those in agriculture, forestry and fisheries, and those in professional and engineering categories had higher relative mortality risks for lung, gastric, and colorectal cancers. By industry; mining, electricity and gas, fisheries, and agriculture and forestry had the higher mortality risks for those cancers. Unemployed men had higher mortality rates than men in any occupation and industry for all three cancers. Overall, this study suggests that for Japanese men, occupations and industries may be a key social determinant of health. PMID:28230191

  9. Lung, gastric and colorectal cancer mortality by occupation and industry among working-aged men in Japan.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Hisashi; Wada, Koji; Prieto-Merino, David; Smith, Derek R

    2017-02-23

    We examined occupational and industrial differences in lung, gastric, and colorectal cancer risk among Japanese men of working age (25-64 years) using the 2010 Japanese national survey data for occupation and industry-specific death rates. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the age-adjusted incident rate ratios by lung, gastric, and colorectal cancers, with manufacturing used as the referent occupation or industry. Unemployed Japanese men and those in manufacturing had an 8-11-fold increased risk of lung, gastric and colorectal cancer. The highest mortality rates for lung and colorectal cancer by occupation were "administrative and managerial" (by occupation) and "mining" (by industry). For gastric cancer, the highest mortality rate was "agriculture" (by occupation) and "mining" (by industry). By occupation; Japanese men in service occupations, those in administrative and managerial positions, those in agriculture, forestry and fisheries, and those in professional and engineering categories had higher relative mortality risks for lung, gastric, and colorectal cancers. By industry; mining, electricity and gas, fisheries, and agriculture and forestry had the higher mortality risks for those cancers. Unemployed men had higher mortality rates than men in any occupation and industry for all three cancers. Overall, this study suggests that for Japanese men, occupations and industries may be a key social determinant of health.

  10. Bowel Obstruction in Elderly Ovarian Cancer Patients: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Stephen J.; Winner, Megan; Hershman, Dawn L.; Wright, Jason D.; Feingold, Daniel L.; Allendorf, John D.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Bowel obstruction is a common pre-terminal event in abdominal/pelvic cancer that has mainly been described in small single-institution studies. We used a large, population-based database to investigate the incidence, management, and outcomes of obstruction in ovarian cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS We identified patients with stages IC-IV ovarian cancer, aged 65 years or older, in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database diagnosed between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 2005. We modeled predictors of inpatient hospitalization for bowel obstruction after cancer diagnosis, categorized management of obstruction, and analyzed the associations between treatment for obstruction and outcomes. RESULTS Of 8607 women with ovarian cancer, 1518 (17.6%) were hospitalized for obstruction subsequent to cancer diagnosis. Obstruction at cancer diagnosis (HR=2.17, 95% CI: 1.86–2.52) and mucinous tumor histology (HR=1.45, 95% CI: 1.15–1.83) were associated with increased risk of subsequent obstruction. Surgical management of obstruction was associated with lower 30-day mortality (13.4% in women managed surgically vs. 20.2% in women managed non-surgically), but equivalent survival after 30 days and equivalent rates of post-obstruction chemotherapy. Median post-obstruction survival was 382 days in women with obstructions of adhesive origin and 93 days in others. CONCLUSION In this large-scale, population-based assessment of patients with advanced ovarian cancer, nearly 20% of women developed bowel obstruction after cancer diagnosis. While obstruction due to adhesions did not signal the end of life, all other obstructions were pre-terminal events for the majority of patients regardless of treatment. PMID:23274561

  11. Financial Insolvency as a Risk Factor for Early Mortality Among Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Aasthaa; Fedorenko, Catherine R.; Blough, David K.; Overstreet, Karen A.; Shankaran, Veena; Newcomb, Polly

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with cancer are more likely to file for bankruptcy than the general population, but the impact of severe financial distress on health outcomes among patients with cancer is not known. Methods We linked Western Washington SEER Cancer Registry records with federal bankruptcy records for the region. By using propensity score matching to account for differences in several demographic and clinical factors between patients who did and did not file for bankruptcy, we then fit Cox proportional hazards models to examine the relationship between bankruptcy filing and survival. Results Between 1995 and 2009, 231,596 persons were diagnosed with cancer. Patients who filed for bankruptcy (n = 4,728) were more likely to be younger, female, and nonwhite, to have local- or regional- (v distant-) stage disease at diagnosis, and have received treatment. After propensity score matching, 3,841 patients remained in each group (bankruptcy v no bankruptcy). In the matched sample, mean age was 53.0 years, 54% were men, mean income was $49,000, and majorities were white (86%), married (60%), and urban (91%) and had local- or regional-stage disease at diagnosis (84%). Both groups received similar initial treatments. The adjusted hazard ratio for mortality among patients with cancer who filed for bankruptcy versus those who did not was 1.79 (95% CI, 1.64 to 1.96). Hazard ratios varied by cancer type: colorectal, prostate, and thyroid cancers had the highest hazard ratios. Excluding patients with distant-stage disease from the models did not have an effect on results. Conclusion Severe financial distress requiring bankruptcy protection after cancer diagnosis appears to be a risk factor for mortality. Further research is needed to understand the process by which extreme financial distress influences survival after cancer diagnosis and to find strategies that could mitigate this risk. PMID:26811521

  12. Brain cancer incidence trends in relation to cellular telephone use in the United States.

    PubMed

    Inskip, Peter D; Hoover, Robert N; Devesa, Susan S

    2010-11-01

    The use of cellular telephones has grown explosively during the past two decades, and there are now more than 279 million wireless subscribers in the United States. If cellular phone use causes brain cancer, as some suggest, the potential public health implications could be considerable. One might expect the effects of such a prevalent exposure to be reflected in general population incidence rates, unless the induction period is very long or confined to very long-term users. To address this issue, we examined temporal trends in brain cancer incidence rates in the United States, using data collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Log-linear models were used to estimate the annual percent change in rates among whites. With the exception of the 20-29-year age group, the trends for 1992-2006 were downward or flat. Among those aged 20-29 years, there was a statistically significant increasing trend between 1992 and 2006 among females but not among males. The recent trend in 20-29-year-old women was driven by a rising incidence of frontal lobe cancers. No increases were apparent for temporal or parietal lobe cancers, or cancers of the cerebellum, which involve the parts of the brain that would be more highly exposed to radiofrequency radiation from cellular phones. Frontal lobe cancer rates also rose among 20-29-year-old males, but the increase began earlier than among females and before cell phone use was highly prevalent. Overall, these incidence data do not provide support to the view that cellular phone use causes brain cancer.

  13. Glucose-derived AGEs promote migration and invasion of colorectal cancer by up-regulating Sp1 expression.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ruyuan; Wu, Huo; Ran, Hui; Kong, Xiang; Hu, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Su, Qing

    2017-02-22

    It is well established that the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) is significantly increased in diabetic patients. As one of main forms of the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that accumulate in vivo, glucose-derived AGEs play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications and may contribute to CRC progression. However, to date, both the contribution of glucose-derived AGEs to the course of CRC and the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, the concentration of glucose-derived AGEs in the serum and tumor tissue of patients with CRC increased. A clinical data analysis demonstrated that the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), Specificity Protein 1 (Sp1), and matrix metallopeptidase -2 (MMP2) was significantly higher in cancerous tissues compared with non-tumor tissue in Chinese Han patients with CRC and that RAGE expression was closely associated with lymph node metastasis and TNM stage. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that AGEs promoted invasion and migration of colorectal cancer, and the AGEs treatment increased the expression of RAGE, Sp1, and MMP2 in a dose-dependent manner. A RAGE blocking antibody and an Sp1-specific siRNA attenuated the AGE-induced effects. Moreover, the AGEs treatment increased the phosphorylation of ERK, and reducing the phosphorylation level of ERK by MEK1/2 inhibitor decreased the expression of Sp1. In conclusion, glucose-derived AGEs promote the invasion and metastasis of CRC partially through the RAGE/ERK/SP1/MMP2 cascade. These findings may provide an explanation for the poor prognoses of colorectal cancer in diabetic patients.

  14. Angiogenic inhibitors for older patients with advanced colorectal cancer: Does the age hold the stage?

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Caterina; Lutrino, Eufemia Stefania; Ferrari, Laura; Casagrande, Mariaelena; Cardellino, Giovanni Gerardo; Rosati, Gerardo; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2013-01-01

    Although major progress has been achieved in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with the employment of antiangiogenic agents, several questions remain on the use of these drugs in older patients. Since cardiovascular, renal and other comorbidities are common in the elderly, an accurate assessment of the patients’ conditions should be performed before a treatment decision is made. Since most CRC patients enrolled in clinical trials testing antiangiogenic drugs were aged < 65 years, the efficacy and tolerability of these agents in elderly patients has not been adequately explored. Data suggest that patients with advanced CRC derive similar benefit from bevacizumab treatment regardless of age, but the advantage of other antiangiogenic drugs in the same class of patients appears more blurred. Literature data suggest that specific antiangiogenic-related toxicities such as hypertension or arterial thromboembolic events may be higher in the elderly than in the younger patients. In addition, it should be emphasized that the patients included in the clinical studies discussed herein were selected and therefore may not be representative of the usual elderly population. Advanced age alone should not discourage the use of bevacizumab. However, a careful patients’ selection and watchful monitoring of toxicities are required to optimize the use of antiangiogenics in this population. PMID:23847406

  15. Trade-off between cancer and aging: What role do other diseases play? Evidence from experimental and human population studies

    PubMed Central

    Yashin, Anatoli I.; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V.; Akushevich, Igor V.; Arbeev, Konstantin G.; Kulminski, Alexander; Akushevich, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    The potential gain in life expectancy which could result from the complete elimination of mortality from cancer in the U.S. would not exceed 3 years if one were to consider cancer independently of other causes of death. In this paper, we review evidence of trade-offs between cancer and aging as well as between cancer and other diseases, which, if taken into account, may substantially increase estimates of gain in life expectancy resulting from cancer eradication. We also used the Multiple Causes of Death (MCD) data to evaluate correlations among mortalities from cancer and other major disorders including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s diseases, and asthma. Our analyses revealed significant negative correlations between cancer and other diseases suggesting stronger population effects of cancer eradication. Possible mechanisms of the observed dependencies and emerging perspectives of using dependent competing risks models for evaluating the effects of reduction of mortality from cancer on life expectancy are discussed. PMID:18452970

  16. Clinicopathological and Prognostic Factors in 106 Prostate Cancer Patients Aged ≤55 Years: A Single-Center Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Yang, Xueling; Si, Tongguo; Yu, Haipeng; Zhang, Weihao; Li, Yong; Guo, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background Early-onset prostate cancer patients (aged ≤55 years) from Western countries have been well characterized in previous studies. However, the clinicopathological and prognostic characteristics of early-onset Chinese prostate cancer patients have not yet been assessed. This study aimed to examine the clinicopathological and prognostic factors of prostate cancer patients aged ≤55 years in a single Chinese center. Material/Methods One hundred six prostate cancer patients aged ≤55 years with complete clinicopathological data who were treated at our hospital between January 2000 and June 2014 were selected for this study. Survival rate was investigated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, and prognostic factors were examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results The median time from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 3.5 months (range, 2–55 months). The median time after endocrine therapy to development of androgen-independent prostate cancer was 10.5 months. A total of 54 patients died (50.9%), of whom 96.2% died from prostate cancer. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates were 88.7%, 66.2%, and 36.0%, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that T staging, visceral metastasis, pathological pattern, and Gleason sum were independent prognostic factors in these patients. Conclusions Prostate cancer patients aged ≤55 years are often omitted or misdiagnosed in China. Furthermore, the pathology patterns in this age group were mostly complicated with a high degree of malignancy. Late staging, visceral metastasis, pathological pattern, and high Gleason score were independent prognostic factors in these patients. Comprehensive therapy combined with local therapy is an effective treatment strategy. PMID:27771734

  17. Dense and Non-dense Mammographic Area and Risk of Breast Cancer by Age and Tumor Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Scott, Christopher G.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Jensen, Matthew R.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Norman, Aaron D.; Visscher, Daniel W.; Couch, Fergus J.; Shepherd, John; Chen, Yunn-Yi; Fan, Bo; Wu, Fang-Fang; Ma, Lin; Beck, Andrew H.; Cummings, Steven R.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Vachon, Celine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mammographic density (MD) is a strong breast cancer risk factor. We previously reported associations of percent MD with larger and node-positive tumors across all ages, and estrogen receptor (ER)-negative status among women ages <55 years. To provide insight into these associations, we examined the components of percent MD (dense area (DA) and non-dense area (NDA) with breast cancer subtypes. Methods Data were pooled from six studies including 4095 breast cancers and 8558 controls. DA and NDA were assessed from digitized film-screen mammograms and standardized across studies. Breast cancer odds by density phenotypes and age according to histopathological characteristics and receptor status were calculated using polytomous logistic regression. Results DA was associated with increased breast cancer risk [odds ratios (OR) for quartiles: 0.65, 1.00(Ref), 1.22, 1.55; p-trend <0.001] and NDA was associated with decreased risk [ORs for quartiles: 1.39, 1.00(Ref), 0.88, 0.72; p-trend <0.001] across all ages and invasive tumor characteristics. There were significant trends in the magnitude of associations of both DA and NDA with breast cancer by increasing tumor size (p-trend<0.001) but no differences by nodal status. Among women <55 years, DA was more strongly associated with increased risk of ER+ vs. ER− tumors [p-heterogeneity (het) = 0.02] while NDA was more strongly associated with decreased risk of ER− vs. ER+ tumors [p-het = 0.03]. Conclusions DA and NDA have differential associations with ER+ vs. ER− tumors that vary by age. Impact DA and NDA are important to consider when developing age- and subtype-specific risk models. PMID:25716949

  18. Guideline-concordant lung cancer care and associated health outcomes among elderly patients in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nadpara, Pramit A.; Madhavan, S. Suresh; Tworek, Cindy; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Hendryx, Michael; Almubarak, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the United States (US), the elderly carry a disproportionate burden of lung cancer. Although evidence-based guidelines for lung cancer care have been published, lack of high quality care still remains a concern among the elderly. This study comprehensively evaluates the variations in guideline-concordant lung cancer care among elderly in the US. Materials and Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database (2002–2007), we identified elderly patients (aged ≥65 years) with lung cancer (n = 42,323) and categorized them by receipt of guideline-concordant care, using evidence-based guidelines from the American College of Chest Physicians. A hierarchical generalized logistic model was constructed to identify variables associated with receipt of guideline-concordant care. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Log Rank test were used for estimation and comparison of the three-year survival. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was constructed to estimate lung cancer mortality risk associated with receipt of guideline-discordant care. Results Only less than half of all patients (44.7%) received guideline-concordant care in the study population. The likelihood of receiving guideline-concordant care significantly decreased with increasing age, non-white race, higher comorbidity score, and lower income. Three-year median survival time significantly increased (exceeded 487 days) in patients receiving guideline-concordant care. Adjusted lung cancer mortality risk significantly increased by 91% (HR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.82–2.00) among patients receiving guideline-discordant care. Conclusion This study highlights the critical need to address disparities in receipt of guideline-concordant lung cancer care among elderly. Although lung cancer diagnostic and management services are covered under the Medicare program, underutilization of these services is a concern. PMID:25604094

  19. Risk of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia post radiation treatment for breast cancer: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Henry; Malmgren, Judith; De Roos, Anneclaire J

    2013-02-01

    Ionizing radiation is a known cause of myeloid leukemia, but it is not known whether therapeutic doses for breast cancer (BC) pose an increased risk. We hypothesized that BC radiation treatment is associated with increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as seen in a previously conducted study. We used 2001-2009 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database records to identify a cohort of women with first primary stage 0 BC who were treated with radiation, a group which is not treated with chemotherapy. We identified subsequent MDS/AML diagnoses in the cohort using SEER to query appropriate ICD-O-3 codes. We compared observed MDS/AML rates in the BC cohort to expected rates, estimated as first primary MDS/AML in the entire female population, and calculated observed/expected rate ratios with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Overall, a very small number of cases of MDS/AML occurred in this cohort with 22 observed cases versus 9.4 expected cases using national incidence data. We estimated an increased risk of 2.34 for MDS/AML in stage 0 BC cases treated with radiation compared to the general population (95 % CI 1.49, 3.46, p < 0.001). The age adjusted relative risk is 1.46, (95 % CI 0.93, 2.16, p = 0.08). Our results suggest that radiation treatment for BC is associated with an increased risk of MDS/AML and affects a very small number of patients.

  20. Cancer and frailty in older adults: a nested case-control study of the Mexican Health and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises; Cárdenas-Cárdenas, Eduardo; Cesari, Matteo; Navarrete-Reyes, Ana Patricia; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Understanding how the convergence between chronic and complex diseases—such as cancer—and emerging conditions of older adults—such as frailty—takes place would help in halting the path that leads to disability in this age group. The objective of this manuscript is to describe the association between a past medical history of cancer and frailty in Mexican older adults. Methods This is a nested in cohort case-control study of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Frailty was categorized by developing a 55-item frailty index that was also used to define cases in two ways: incident frailty (incident >0.25 frailty index score) and worsening frailty (negative residuals from a regression between 2001 and 2012 frailty index scores). Exposition was defined as self-report of cancer between 2001 and 2012. Older adults with a cancer history were further divided into recently diagnosed (<10 years) and remotely diagnosed (>10 years from the initial diagnosis). Odds ratios were estimated by fitting a logistic regression adjusted for confounding variables. Results Out of a total of 8022 older adults with a mean age of 70.6 years, the prevalence of a past medical history of cancer was 3.6 % (n = 288). Among these participants, 45.1 % had been diagnosed with cancer more than 10 years previously. A higher risk of incident frailty compared to controls [odds ratio (OR) 1.53 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.04–2.26, p = 0.03); adjusted model OR 1.74 (95 % CI 1.15–2.61, p = 0.008)] was found in the group with a recent cancer diagnosis. Also, an inverse association between a remote cancer diagnosis and worsening frailty was found [OR = 0.56 (95 % CI 0.39–0.8), p = 0.002; adjusted model OR 0.61 (95 % CI 0.38–0.99, p = 0.046)]. Conclusions Cancer is associated with a higher frailty index, with a potential relevant role of the time that has elapsed since the cancer diagnosis. Implications for cancer survivors Cancer survivors may be more likely to develop frailty or

  1. Trends in 5-year survival rates among breast cancer patients by hormone receptor status and stage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Linden, Hannah M.; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Li, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Improvement in breast cancer survival has been observed in recent decades in the U.S., but it is unclear if similar survival gains are consistent across breast cancer subtypes, especially with regards to more advanced stages of the disease. Methods Data were from 13 population-based cancer registries participating in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program, consisting of women between 20–79 years of age diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 1992 and 2008. 2-year (1992–2008) and 5-year (1992–2006) breast cancer cause-specific survival rates were calculated and stratified by estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) status, stage and race. Annual percent changes in survival rates were assessed. Results From 1992 through 1998–1999, 5-year and 2-year cause specific survival rates significantly improved across ER+/PR+, ER−/PR− and ER+/PR− subtypes, with an annual increase ranging from 0.5%–1.0%. From 1998–1999 to 2006, different patterns were observed by ER/PR subtypes with survival rates slightly improving for ER+/PR+, continuing to improve at a rate of 0.5% per year for ER−/PR−, and dropping 0.3% annually for ER+/PR− No significant survival gains were experienced by patients with ER−/PR+ cancer during the study period. In terms of advanced diseases, greatest annual increases in survival rates were seen for patients with stage III–IV ER+/PR+ and ER−/PR− tumors but less progress was observed for advanced ER+/PR− breast cancers. Conclusion Steady improvements in survival rates for breast cancer have been achieved over the past several decades. However, 5-year survival rates for stage IV disease remained dismally below 20% for most ER/PR subtypes. PMID:25164974

  2. Statins and breast cancer stage and mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinkal; Lehman, Amy; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Kwan, Marilyn L.; Arun, Monica; Manson, JoAnn E.; Lavasani, Sayeh; Wasswertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Sarto, Gloria E.; LeBoff, Meryl; Cauley, Jane; Cote, Michele; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Jay, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between statins and breast cancer stage and mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative. Methods The study population included 128,675 post-menopausal women aged 50–79 years, out of which there were 7,883 newly diagnosed cases of in situ (19 %), local (61 %)-, regional (19 %)- and distant (1 %)-stage breast cancer and 401 deaths due to breast cancer after an average of 11.5 (SD = 3.7) years of follow-up. Stage was coded using SEER criteria and was stratified into early (in situ and local)- versus late (regional and distant)-stage disease. Information on statins and other risk factors were collected by self- and interviewer-administered questionnaires. Cause of death was based on medical record review. Multivariable-adjusted hazards ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) evaluating the relationship between statin use (at baseline only and in a time-dependent manner) and diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer and breast cancer-specific mortality were computed from Cox proportional hazards analyses after adjusting for appropriate confounders. Results Statins were used by 10,474 women (8 %) at baseline. In the multivariable-adjusted time-dependent model, use of lipophilic statins was associated with a reduction in diagnosis of late-stage breast cancer (HR 0.80, 95 % CI 0.64–0.98, p = 0.035) which was also significant among women with estrogen receptor-positive disease (HR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.56–0.93, p = 0.012). Breast cancer mortality was marginally lower in statin users compared with nonusers (HR 0.59, 95 % CI 0.32–1.06, p = 0.075). Conclusions Prior statin use is associated with lower breast cancer stage at diagnosis. PMID:25736184

  3. Long-Term Central Venous Catheter Use and Risk of Infection in Older Adults With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Sepkowitz, Kent A.; Elkin, Elena B.; Pinheiro, Laura C.; Sima, Camelia S.; Son, Crystal H.; Atoria, Coral L.; Bach, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Long-term central venous catheters (CVCs) are often used in patients with cancer to facilitate venous access to administer intravenous fluids and chemotherapy. CVCs can also be a source of bloodstream infections, although this risk is not well understood. We examined the impact of long-term CVC use on infection risk, independent of other risk factors such as chemotherapy, in a population-based cohort of patients with cancer. Patients and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis using SEER-Medicare data for patients age > 65 years diagnosed from 2005 to 2007 with invasive colorectal, head and neck, lung, or pancreatic cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or invasive or noninvasive breast cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the relationship between CVC use and infections, with CVC exposure as a time-dependent predictor. We used multivariable analysis and propensity score methods to control for patient characteristics. Results CVC exposure was associated with a significantly elevated infection risk, adjusting for demographic and disease characteristics. For patients with pancreatic cancer, risk of infections during the exposure period was three-fold greater (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 2.93; 95% CI, 2.58 to 3.33); for those with breast cancer, it was six-fold greater (AHR, 6.19; 95% CI, 5.42 to 7.07). Findings were similar when we accounted for propensity to receive a CVC and limited the cohort to individuals at high risk of infections. Conclusion Long-term CVC use was associated with an increased risk of infections for older adults with cancer. Careful assessment of the need for long-term CVCs and targeted strategies for reducing infections are critical to improving cancer care quality. PMID:24982458

  4. Risk of Cancer among Commercially Insured HIV-Infected Adults on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Ishwori; Casper, Corey; Noy, Ariela; Palefsky, Joel M.; Haigentz, Missak; Krown, Susan E.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the cancer incidence rates among HIV-infected persons with commercial insurance who were on antiretroviral therapy and compare them with those rates in the general population. Paid health insurance claims for 63,221 individuals 18 years or older, with at least one claim with a diagnostic code for HIV and at least one filled prescription for an antiretroviral medication between January 1, 2006, and September 30, 2012, were obtained from the LifeLink® Health Plan Claims Database. The expected number of cancer cases in the general population for each gender-age group (<30, 30–39, 40–49, 50–59, and >60 years) was estimated using incidence rates from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated using their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Compared to the general population, incidence rates for HIV-infected adults were elevated (SIR, 95% CI) for Kaposi sarcoma (46.08; 38.74–48.94), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (4.22; 3.63–4.45), Hodgkin lymphoma (9.83; 7.45–10.84), and anal cancer (30.54; 25.62–32.46) and lower for colorectal cancer (0.69; 0.52–0.76), lung cancer (0.70; 0.54, 0.77), and prostate cancer (0.54; 0.45–0.58). Commercially insured, treated HIV-infected adults had elevated rates for infection-related cancers, but not for common non-AIDS defining cancers. PMID:27882054

  5. The Prognostic Impact of Molecular Subtypes and Very Young Age on Breast Conserving Surgery in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace; Alco, Gul; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Koksal, Ulkuhan I; Elbüken, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Agacayak, Filiz; Ilgun, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Öztürk, Alper; İğdem, Şefik; Okkan, Sait; Eralp, Yeşim; Dincer, Maktav; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Background Premenopausal breast cancer with a triple-negative phenotype (TNBC) has been associated with inferior locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) after breast conserving surgery (BCS). The aim of this study is to analyze the association between age, subtype, and surgical treatment on survival in young women (≤40 years) with early breast cancer in a population with a high rate of breast cancer in young women. Methods Three hundred thirty-two patients ≤40 years old with stage I-II invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2012 were identified retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis evaluated predictors of LRFS, OS, and disease free survival (DFS). Results Most patients (64.2%) underwent BCS. Mean age and follow-up time were 35 (25 ± 3.61) years, and 72 months (range, 24–252), respectively. In multivariate analysis, multicentricity/multifocality and young age (<35 years) independently predicted for poorer DFS and OS. Those aged 35–40 years had higher LRFS and DFS than those <35 in the mastectomy group (p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). Patients with TNBC had lower OS compared with patients with luminal A subtype (p=0.042), and those who underwent BCS had higher OS than patients after mastectomy (p=0.015). Conclusion Young age (< 35 years) is an independent predictor of poorer OS and DFS as compared with ages 35–40, even in countries with a lower average age of breast cancer presentation. In addition, TNBC in the young predicts for poorer OS. BCS can be performed in young patients with TNBC, despite their poorer overall survival. PMID:27433412

  6. A Comparison of the Demographics, Clinical Features, and Survival of Patients with Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of Major and Minor Salivary Glands Versus Less Common Sites within the SEER Registry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Xu, Li; Zhao, Hui; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Sturgis, Erich M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The scientific literature to date lacks population-based studies on the demographics, clinical features, and survival of patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of different anatomic sites. Methods We identified 5349 ACC cases in major salivary glands (N=1850), minor salivary glands (N=2077), breast (N=696), skin (N=291), lung and bronchus (N=203), female genital system (N=132), and eye and orbit (N=100) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Differences in demographics, clinical features, and survival of patients were assessed. Results ACC of the eye and orbit was associated with younger age at presentation (mean=49.9 years). ACC of the skin or breast tended to present with less aggressive prognostic features, while ACC of the lung and bronchus or eye and orbit tended to present with more aggressive prognostic features. In multivariate survival analysis of patients presenting with localized disease, patients with ACC of breast (HR=0.40) or skin (HR=0.40) had a significantly lower risk death than patients with ACC of major salivary glands, while patients with ACC of lung and bronchus (HR=3.72) or eye and orbit (HR=3.67) had a significantly higher risk. For patients presenting with regional disease, the only clear prognostic difference in multivariate analysis was that patients with ACC of skin did significantly better. Conclusions The demographics and clinical features of ACC differ by disease site. Site may be an important predictor of survival for patients presenting with localized disease but is less important for patients presenting with regional disease. PMID:22179977

  7. DNA Glycation from 3-Deoxyglucosone Leads to the Formation of AGEs: Potential Role in Cancer Auto-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Jalaluddin M; Shahab, Uzma; Tabrez, Shams; Lee, Eun Ju; Choi, Inho; Aslam Yusuf, Mohd; Ahmad, Saheem

    2016-03-01

    The non-enzymatic glycation reaction results in the generation of free radicals which play an important role in the pathophysiology of aging, diabetes, and cancer. 3-Deoxyglucosone (3-DG) is a dicarbonyl species which may lead to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). 3-DG also reacts with free amino group of nucleic acids resulting in the formation of DNA-AGEs. While the establishment of nucleoside AGEs has been revealed before, no extensive studies have been done to probe the role of 3-DG in the generation of immunogenicity and induction of cancer auto-antibodies. In this study, we report the immunogenicity of AGEs formed by 3-DG-Arg-Fe(3+) system. Spectroscopic analysis and melting temperature studies suggest structural perturbations in the DNA as a result of modification. Immunogenicity of native and 3-DG-Arg-Fe(3+) DNA was probed in female rabbits. The modified DNA was highly immunogenic eliciting high-titer immunogen-specific antibodies, while the unmodified form was almost non-immunogenic. We also report the presence of auto-antibodies against 3-DG-Arg-Fe(3+)-modified DNA in the sera of patients with different types of cancers. The glycoxidative lesions were also detected in the lymphocyte DNA isolated from selected cancer patients. The results show structural perturbations in 3-DG-Arg-Fe(3+)-DNA generating new epitopes that render the molecule immunogenic.

  8. Breast Cancer Screening for High-Risk Patients of Different Ages and Risk - Which Modality Is Most Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliades, Lauren; Abdalla, Reem

    2016-01-01

    While the guidelines for breast cancer screening in average-risk women are well established, screening in high-risk women is not as clear. For women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, current guidelines recommend screening by clinical breast examination and mammography starting at age 30. For certain high-risk women, additional screening with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is encouraged. This review focuses on differentiating imaging modalities used for screening women at high-risk for breast cancer over the age of 50 by discussing the different imaging techniques, cost versus benefit, detection rates, and impact on survival. While mammography is the only imaging modality proven to reduce mortality from breast cancer, MRI is more sensitive in identifying cancers. MRI can often identify smaller malignancies at a greater resolution at an earlier stage. The use of MRI would be more cost effective as there would be less need for invasive therapeutic procedures. Research thus far has not identified an age-specific preference in imaging modality. There are no guidelines for high-risk women that specify screening with respect to age (i.e., older than 50 years old). More research is needed before screening guidelines in different age groups with various risk factors can be established. PMID:28133583

  9. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  10. Fatty acid proportions in cholesterol esters and risk of premature death from cancer in middle aged French men.

    PubMed Central

    Zureik, M.; Ducimetière, P.; Warnet, J. M.; Orssaud, G.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the association of proportions of fatty acids in cholesterol esters with the risk of premature death from cancer in middle aged men. DESIGN--Prospective cohort study. SETTING--Paris, France. SUBJECTS--3277 working men aged 36-52 in 1981-5. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cancer mortality during an average of 9.3 years of follow up. RESULTS--59 men died of cancer during follow up. The age adjusted relative risks for men in the highest thirds of the distribution of the proportions of linoleic, palmitoleic, and oleic acid in cholesterol esters as compared with those in the corresponding lowest thirds were 0.16 (95% confidence interval 0.05 to 0.51), 3.39 (1.63 to 7.05), and 4.22 (1.95 to 9.12), respectively. Adjustment for and stratification by smoking, alcohol consumption, serum cholesterol concentration, and body mass index did not alter the results. At the time of examination subjects with cancer had a lower intake of polyunsaturated fats, assessed by 24 hour recall, than those without cancer (13.2 v 17.4 g/day, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS--Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids of cholesterol esters are strong biological markers that predict premature death from cancer in French men. Consistently, intake of polyunsaturated fats did not seem to increase the risk of death from cancer. The association of biological markers of dietary fat intake with incidence of and mortality from cancer should be investigated prospectively in other populations. PMID:7496232

  11. Comparison of Age- Standard Incidence Rate Trends of Gynecologic and Breast Cancer in Iran and Other Countries

    PubMed Central

    ARAB, Maliheh; NOGHABAEI, Giti

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Female cancer, especially breast and gynecologic cancers are considered multistage disease, highly influenced by risk and protective factors and/or screening preventive modalities. Consequences of all these factors result in the trend of change over time. Methods In this comparative study, based on data of national cancer registry of Iran 2004 published by Iranian Ministry of Health, age — standard incidence rate (ASR) according to the world population was calculated in all reported gynecologic and breast cancers. Source of all subjects are pathologic based. In the next step, the calculated ASR of Iran and those of the other countries in 2004 were compared to GLOBOCAN ASR reports of 2008. Results In Iran ASR of breast cancer 2004 (24.93) changed to 18.4 in 2008. Ovarian cancer ASR of 2004, 3.07 was 3.1 in 2008. Endometrial cancer ASR in 2004 (2.29) was 1.7 in 2008. Cervical cancer ASR of 1.71 in 2004 was 2.2 in 2008. Conclusions In Iran incidence trend of breast and endometrium are decreasing in the same direction of USA and Australia. Increasing trend of ovary and cervix ASR in Iran is in the inverse direction of USA and Australia which are decreasing. Future studies to find out the same trend or any changes, might develop these findings and improve consequent practical decisions based on results of this study and complementary future studies. PMID:26060699

  12. Age-related changes in CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells and their relationship with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Ying; Qiu, Zhu-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) inhibit the anti-tumour immune response and reduce the effect of cancer immunotherapy. Although studies have demonstrated that the number and suppressive activity of Treg increase with age, it is not clear whether these changes correlate with a higher incidence of tumours in the elderly. This study was designed to explore the relationship between increase in CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg and the higher risk of lung cancer in the elderly. Methods Seventy lung cancer patients and 60 sex- and age-matched controls were recruited. Both groups were divided into three subgroups based on their age (young, middle-aged, or elderly). The proportion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ /CD4+ T cells was detected using flow cytometry, and the level of FOXP3 mRNA in the peripheral blood was examined with real-time RT-PCR. Results The levels of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+/CD4+ T cells and FOXP3 mRNA were significantly higher in lung cancer patients than in healthy controls (t = 7.16, P < 0.01 and t = 3.65, P < 0.01, respectively). Within the healthy groups, the elderly group had larger proportion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg (F = 32.54, P < 0.01) and higher FOXP3 mRNA expression (F = 4.76, P < 0.01) than their younger counterparts. Among the six subgroups, the elderly lung cancer patients exhibited the highest levels of both CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg (11.81 ± 2.40%) and FOXP3 mRNA (3.14 ± 1.30). Conclusions The accumulation of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg with age correlates well with the increasing incidence of lung cancer in the elderly. PMID:28253320

  13. Vascular determinants of cancer stem cell dormancy--do age and coagulation system play a role?

    PubMed

    Rak, Janusz; Milsom, Chloe; Yu, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The inability of tumour-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs) to bring about a net increase in tumour mass could be described as a source of tumour dormancy. While CSCs may be intrinsically capable of driving malignant growth, to do so they require compatible surroundings of supportive cells, growth factors, adhesion molecules and energy sources (e.g. glucose and oxygen), all of which constitute what may be referred to as a 'permissive' CSC niche. However, in some circumstances, the configuration of these factors could be incompatible with CSC growth (a 'non-permissive' niche) and lead to their death or dormancy. CSCs and their niches may also differ between adult and paediatric cancers. In this regard the various facets of the tumour-vascular interface could serve as elements of the CSC niche. Indeed, transformed cells with an increased tumour-initiating capability may preferentially reside in specific zones adjacent to tumour blood vessels, or alternatively originate from poorly perfused and hypoxic areas, to which they have adapted. CSCs themselves may produce increased amounts of angiogenic factors, or rely for this on their progeny or activated host stromal cells. It is likely that 'vascular' properties of tumour-initiating cells and those of their niches may diversify and evolve with tumour progression. The emerging themes in this area include the role of vascular (and bone marrow) aging, vascular and metabolic comorbidities (e.g. atherosclerosis) and the effects of the coagulation system (both at the local and systemic levels), all of which could impact the functionality of CSCs and their niches and affect tumour growth, dormancy and formation of occult as well as overt metastases. In this article we will discuss some of the vascular properties of CSCs relevant to tumour dormancy and progression, including: (i) the role of CSCs in regulating tumour vascular supply, i.e the onset and maintenance of tumour angiogenesis; (ii) the consequences of changing vascular

  14. Age-dependent DNA methylation of genes that are suppressed in stem cells is a hallmark of cancer.

    PubMed

    Teschendorff, Andrew E; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ramus, Susan J; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Shen, Hui; Campan, Mihaela; Noushmehr, Houtan; Bell, Christopher G; Maxwell, A Peter; Savage, David A; Mueller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Marth, Christian; Kocjan, Gabrijela; Gayther, Simon A; Jones, Allison; Beck, Stephan; Wagner, Wolfgang; Laird, Peter W; Jacobs, Ian J; Widschwendter, Martin

    2010-04-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PCGs) are involved in repression of genes that are required for stem cell differentiation. Recently, it was shown that promoters of PCG target genes (PCGTs) are 12-fold more likely to be methylated in cancer than non-PCGTs. Age is the most important demographic risk factor for cancer, and we hypothesized that its carcinogenic potential may be referred by irreversibly stabilizing stem cell features. To test this, we analyzed the methylation status of over 27,000 CpGs mapping to promoters of approximately 14,000 genes in whole blood samples from 261 postmenopausal women. We demonstrate that stem cell PCGTs are far more likely to become methylated with age than non-targets (odds ratio = 5.3 [3.8-7.4], P < 10(-10)), independently of sex, tissue type, disease state, and methylation platform. We identified a specific subset of 69 PCGT CpGs that undergo hypermethylation with age and validated this methylation signature in seven independent data sets encompassing over 900 samples, including normal and cancer solid tissues and a population of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (P < 10(-5)). We find that the age-PCGT methylation signature is present in preneoplastic conditions and may drive gene expression changes associated with carcinogenesis. These findings shed substantial novel insights into the epigenetic effects of aging and support the view that age may predispose to malignant transformation by irreversibly stabilizing stem cell features.

  15. Adoption of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer After Publication of Randomized Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Curry, Heather; Chen, Ronald C.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have established the noninferiority of shorter courses of “hypofractionated” radiation therapy (RT) to the whole breast compared to conventional courses using smaller daily doses in the adjuvant treatment of selected breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy. Hypofractionation is more convenient and less costly. Therefore, we sought to determine uptake of hypofractionated breast RT over time. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked database, we identified 16,096 women with node-negative breast cancer and 4269 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who received lumpectomy followed by more than 12 fractions of RT between 2004 and 2010. Based on Medicare claims, we determined the number of RT treatments given and grouped patients into those receiving hypofractionation (13-24) or those receiving conventional fractionation (≥25). We also determined RT technique (intensity modulated RT or not) using Medicare claims. We evaluated patterns and correlates of hypofractionation receipt using bivariate and multivariable analyses. Results: Hypofractionation use was similar in patients with DCIS and those with invasive disease. Overall, the use of hypofractionation increased from 3.8% in 2006 to 5.4% in 2007, to 9.4% in 2008, and to 13.6% in 2009 and 2010. Multivariable analysis showed increased use of hypofractionation in recent years and in patients with older age, smaller tumors, increased comorbidity, higher regional education, and Western SEER regions. However, even in patients over the age of 80, the hypofractionation rate in 2009 to 2010 was only 25%. Use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) also increased over time (from 9.4% in 2004 to 22.7% in 2009-2010) and did not vary significantly between patients receiving hypofractionation and those receiving traditional fractionation. Conclusions: Hypofractionation use increased among low-risk older US breast cancer patients with

  16. Alzheimer's Disease as Subcellular `Cancer' --- The Scale-Invariant Principles Underlying the Mechanisms of Aging ---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the slow onset of neurodegeneration leading to dementia in many elderly people. The pathological hallmarks of AD are: the extracellular β-amyloid deposition in the senile plaques; the β-amyloid deposition in cerebral blood vessel walls especially in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D); the intracellular neurofibrillary tangle formation composed of paired helical filaments (PHF), the principal component of which is a hyperphosphorylated form of the microtubule-binding protein, tau; and neurological dysfuction and neuronal cell death in limited regions and pathways of the central nervous system. Note that β-amyloid is a truncated form of a cell surface integral membrane glycoprotein: amyloid precursor protein (APP). Despite these hallmarks, the pathogenesis of AD has been poorly understood. In the present paper, a theory of aging is proposed to give a coherent account of the origins and causes of neurodegeneration common to the diverse neurodegenerative disorders such as AD and prion (proteinaceous infectious particles) diseases in comparison with the pathogenesis of cancers. Surprisingly, the self-aggregation of denatured proteins -- such as β-amyloid, PHF and prions -- responsible for neuronal cell death resembles, in many respects, the development (or the clonal evolution) of malignant cells at the expense of the entire organism harboring them. Although neurodegenerative disorders and cancers apparently differe in pathology, they nevertheless seem to follow the same priciples regardless of the level and scale of the biological organization. It is the general principles of heritable variations and natural selection as well as the general principles of self-organization that operate, not only on different molecules, but also at different hierarchical levels and scales of the biological organizaiton, independent of the details of diseases. Traditionally, natural selection, along

  17. Prostate Cancer Prognostic Factors Among Asian Patients Born in the US Compared to Those Born Abroad.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junjun; Goodman, Michael; Jemal, Ahemdin; Fedewa, Stacey A

    2015-06-01

    US surveillance data indicate that incidence of prostate cancer differs by place of birth among Asian men. However, it is less clear if the prognostic factors for prostate cancer also differ by place of birth. The study included 7,824 Asian prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 2004 and 2009 and reported to the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relation of place of birth (foreign born vs. US born) to three outcomes: prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, and T classification, adjusting for age, marital status, Rural-Urban Continuum Code, and SEER registry. All outcome variables were binary using different cutoffs: ≥ 4, ≥ 10 and ≥ 20 ng/ml for PSA; ≥ 7 and ≥ 8 for Gleason score; and ≥ T2 and ≥ T3 for T classification. Elevated PSA was more common among foreign born Asian men regardless of the cut point used. In the analysis comparing foreign born versus US born patients by ethnic group, the association with PSA was most pronounced at cut point of ≥ 20 ng/ml for Chinese men (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.02-2.75), and at cut point of ≥ 4 ng/ml for Japanese men (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.20-6.21). A statistically significant association with Gleason score was only found for Japanese men and only for the cutoff ≥ 7 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.12-2.61). There was no difference in clinical T classification between foreign-born and US-born Asian men. Inclusion of cases with missing place of birth or restriction of data to those who underwent radical prostatectomy did not substantially change the results. The data suggest that foreign-born Asian prostate cancer patients may have moderately elevated PSA levels at diagnosis compared with their US born counterparts. For the other prognostic markers, the associations were less consistent and did not form a discernible pattern.

  18. Patterns and Trends in Age-Specific Black-White Differences in Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality - United States, 1999-2014.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lisa C; Henley, S Jane; Miller, Jacqueline W; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C

    2016-10-14

    Breast cancer continues to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among U.S. women (1). Compared with white women, black women historically have had lower rates of breast cancer incidence and, beginning in the 1980s, higher death rates (1). This report examines age-specific black-white disparities in breast cancer incidence during 1999-2013 and mortality during 2000-2014 in the United States using data from United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) (2). Overall rates of breast cancer incidence were similar, but death rates remained higher for black women compared with white women. During 1999-2013, breast cancer incidence decreased among white women but increased slightly among black women resulting in a similar average incidence at the end of the period. Breast cancer incidence trends differed by race and age, particularly from 1999 to 2004-2005, when rates decreased only among white women aged ≥50 years. Breast cancer death rates decreased significantly during 2000-2014, regardless of age with patterns varying by race. For women aged ≥50 years, death rates declined significantly faster among white women compared with black women; among women aged <50 years, breast cancer death rates decreased at the same rate among black and white women. Although some of molecular factors that lead to more aggressive breast cancer are known, a fuller understanding of the exact mechanisms might lead to more tailored interventions that could decrease mortality disparities. When combined with population-based approaches to increase knowledge of family history of cancer, increase physical activity, promote a healthy diet to maintain a healthy bodyweight, and increase screening for breast cancer, targeted treatment interventions could reduce racial disparities in breast cancer.

  19. Associations of polymorphisms of folate cycle enzymes and risk of breast cancer in a Brazilian population are age dependent.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Barbosa, Rita de Cássia; Menezes, Débora Costa; Freire, Thiago Fernando Vasconcelos; Sales, Diogo Campos; Alencar, Victor Hugo Medeiros; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem

    2012-04-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism have been shown to be implicated in breast cancer risk but with contradictory results. In this case-control study, we investigated the association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C, TYMS 5'-UTR, MTR A2756G and cSHMT C1420T and also the folate carrier (RFC1 G80A) and breast cancer risk in a northeastern Brazilian population. The study included 183 women diagnosed with breast cancer and 183 controls volunteers without any history of cancer. Also a significant number of healthy individuals were included for allelic frequency in the population studied. Risk of breast cancer was estimated by conditional logistic regression. An association with risk was found for women carrying the MTR A2756G polymorphic allele (AG, P = 0.0036; AG/GG, P = 0.0040), and a protective effect in carriers of the RFC1 G80A polymorphic allele (GA, P = 0.0015; AA, P = 0.0042). Stratifying the data by age (cutoff point of 50 years old), different distributions were observed for breast cancer risk. For women ≤50 years, the risk observed in the presence of the polymorphic allele MTR 2756 (AG/GG) in the general analysis was, restricted to this age group (P = 0.0118). Conversely, for women over 50, the risk of breast cancer development was statistically associated with the MTHFR 677CT genotype, but especially significant was risk associated with the presence of the polymorphic allele of cSHMT C1420T (P = 0.0120) and the protective effect associated with the RFC1 G80A polymorphism allele (P = 0.0021), was restrict to this age group. These data indicate that the cutoff age used (50 years old) was appropriate, since it was able to discriminate risk in each age group in the population studied and also to point to the importance of age in the analyses of cancer-associated polymorphisms.

  20. Effects of Prolonged GRP78 Haploinsufficiency on Organ Homeostasis, Behavior, Cancer and Chemotoxic Resistance in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amy S.; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Rangel, Daisy F.; Navarrete, Gerardo; Cohen, Pinchas; Longo, Valter D.; Chen, Jeannie; Groshen, Susan; Morgan, Todd E.; Dubeau, Louis

    2017-01-01

    GRP78, a multifunctional protein with potent cytoprotective properties, is an emerging therapeutic target to combat cancer development, progression and drug resistance. The biological consequences of prolonged reduction in expression of this essential chaperone which so far has been studied primarily in young mice, was investigated in older mice, as older individuals are likely to be important recipients of anti-GRP78 therapy. We followed cohorts of Grp78+/+ and Grp78+/− male and female mice up to 2 years of age in three different genetic backgrounds and characterized them with respect to body weight, organ integrity, behavioral and memory performance, cancer, inflammation and chemotoxic response. Our results reveal that body weight, organ development and integrity were not impaired in aged Grp78+/− mice. No significant effect on cancer incidence and inflammation was observed in aging mice. Interestingly, our studies detected some subtle differential trends between the WT and Grp78+/− mice in some test parameters dependent on gender and genetic background. Our studies provide the first evidence that GRP78 haploinsufficiency for up to 2 years of age has no major deleterious effect in rodents of different genetic background, supporting the merit of anti-GRP78 drugs in treatment of cancer and other diseases affecting the elderly. PMID:28145503

  1. Effects of Prolonged GRP78 Haploinsufficiency on Organ Homeostasis, Behavior, Cancer and Chemotoxic Resistance in Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Amy S; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Rangel, Daisy F; Navarrete, Gerardo; Cohen, Pinchas; Longo, Valter D; Chen, Jeannie; Groshen, Susan; Morgan, Todd E; Dubeau, Louis

    2017-02-01

    GRP78, a multifunctional protein with potent cytoprotective properties, is an emerging therapeutic target to combat cancer development, progression and drug resistance. The biological consequences of prolonged reduction in expression of this essential chaperone which so far has been studied primarily in young mice, was investigated in older mice, as older individuals are likely to be important recipients of anti-GRP78 therapy. We followed cohorts of Grp78(+/+) and Grp78(+/-) male and female mice up to 2 years of age in three different genetic backgrounds and characterized them with respect to body weight, organ integrity, behavioral and memory performance, cancer, inflammation and chemotoxic response. Our results reveal that body weight, organ development and integrity were not impaired in aged Grp78(+/-) mice. No significant effect on cancer incidence and inflammation was observed in aging mice. Interestingly, our studies detected some subtle differential trends between the WT and Grp78(+/-) mice in some test parameters dependent on gender and genetic background. Our studies provide the first evidence that GRP78 haploinsufficiency for up to 2 years of age has no major deleterious effect in rodents of different genetic background, supporting the merit of anti-GRP78 drugs in treatment of cancer and other diseases affecting the elderly.

  2. Is Bax/Bcl-2 Ratio Considered as a Prognostic Marker with Age and Tumor Location in Colorectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Khodapasand, Ehsan; Jafarzadeh, Narges; Farrokhi, Farid; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bax and Bcl-2 are the major members of Bcl-2 family whose play a key role in tumor progression or inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic pathway triggered by mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic members of this family can determine the cellular fate. Methods: In this study, the relative level of mRNA expression of Bax and Bcl-2 genes was determined using RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and RT-qPCR technique from 22 tumoral tissues and adjacent non-tumoral tissues from adenocarcinoma colorectal cancer. Results: The potential prognostic and predictive significance of Bax and Bcl-2 gene expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were demonstrated in colorectal cancer. The significant correlation between qPCR data and different clinicopathologic parameters of colorectal carcinoma, including age, gender, tumor size, tumor stage, tumor location, and tumor differentiation was also examined. Interestingly, no significant correlation was seen between Bax and Bcl-2 expressions and clinicopathological parameters of colorectal cancer. However, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was statistically correlated with age and tumor location. Patients with age above 50 showed decreased levels of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was significantly lower in tumors resected from colon compared to sigmoid colon, rectosigmoid and rectum tumors. Conclusion: This study indicates a significant correlation between age and tumor location with Bax/Bcl-2 expression ratio, suggesting predictive value as a potential molecular marker of colorectal cancer. PMID:25864810

  3. EFFECTS: documentation and verification for a BEIR III cancer risk model based on age, sex, and population dynamics for BIOTRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Gallegos, A.F.

    1985-09-01

    The computer simulation code EFFECTS is coupled with the radionuclide uptake and environmental transport strategies of the BIOTRAN code to predict cancer risks and deaths in a dynamic human population. Total mortalities due to all causes are incorporated with projected radiation-induced cancer mortalities caused by all previous chronic or acute radiation exposures of the population as a function of age and sex. Superpositioning radiation-induced cancer mortalities on current total mortalities in each age group allows a realistic and dynamic estimate of cancer risks for complex radiation exposure scenarios. EFFECTS was developed on the CDC 7600 and can be executed on the Cray computer system at Los Alamos National Laboratory. EFFECTS can simulate the upper boundary of cancer risk estimates where population exposures occur over many years and where organ burdens are integrated over the lifetime of the individual. This report gives new insight on age-specific cancer risks. As part of the code verification, the simulated impacts to a small population from natural background uranium and an accidental release of airborne plutonium are compared. For the long-term continuous exposure to natural background uranium, the impact to the population is very small (2 x 10/sup -6/ to 7 x 10/sup -6/ deaths/10,000 people) with young adults receiving the largest bone doses and risks. For the long-term intakes following a simulated accidental air release of plutonium, young teenagers receive the highest bone doses while young adults receive the largest risk. Simulating these two scenarios, using BIOTRAN/HUMTRN/EFFECTS, illustrates sufficient resolution to predict the age/sex-specific response from human populations from contaminants in our environment. 23 refs., 43 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

    1997-09-04

    Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

  5. Regional, racial, and gender differences in colorectal cancer screening in middle-aged African-Americans and Whites.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Phyllis M; Suzuki, Rie

    2012-12-01

    African-Americans have higher incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer than non-African-Americans. Early detection with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces untimely death because the test can detect abnormalities and precancerous polyps in the colon and rectum. However, African-Americans aged 50 and older continue to have low CRC screening adherence. A retrospective analysis was conducted on data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine trends in self-reported CRC screening by geographic region, race, and gender. African-Americans, particularly men, were less likely to have been screened for colon cancer compared to all races and genders in this study. Individuals in the south were more likely to receive CRC screening than other regions. Colon cancer education and interventions are needed among low-adherent groups to promote the benefits of early detection with CRC screening.

  6. Are the Pathological Characteristics of Prostate Cancer More Aggressive or More Indolent Depending upon the Patient Age?

    PubMed

    Ji, Guangjie; Huang, Cong; Song, Gang; Xiong, Gengyan; Fang, Dong; Wang, He; Hao, Han; Cai, Lin; He, Qun; He, Zhisong; Zhou, Liqun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To identify pathological characteristics of prostate cancer according to patient age at diagnosis. Methods. A retrospective review of 2,929 men diagnosed with prostate cancer was performed. Pathological characteristics were compared across age groups: ≤55, 56-75, and >75 years. Results. The study cohort included 133 patients (4.5%), 2,033 patients (69.5%), and 763 patients (26.0%) in the three age groups, respectively. The median pathological Gleason sums in the three age groups were 8, 7, and 8, respectively. The Gleason sum, primary Gleason score, and second primary Gleason score were significantly different among the three age groups (Z = 12.975, p = 0.002; Z = 9.264, p = 0.010; Z = 6.692, p = 0.035, resp.). The percentages of Gleason pattern 5 tumors for the three age groups were 44.4%, 32.3%, and 36.8%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ(2) = 11.641, p = 0.003). The percentages of tumors with Gleason score grade groups 3-5 for the three age groups were 66.9%, 60.5%, and 66.3%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ(2) = 9.401, p = 0.009). Conclusions. The present study indicated that men aged ≤55 years or >75 years show higher levels of clinically significant prostate cancer compared to patients between the ages of 55 and 75 years. Younger and more elderly male patients are more likely to have a more aggressive disease.

  7. Are the Pathological Characteristics of Prostate Cancer More Aggressive or More Indolent Depending upon the Patient Age?

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guangjie; Huang, Cong; Fang, Dong; Wang, He; Hao, Han; Cai, Lin; He, Qun; He, Zhisong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To identify pathological characteristics of prostate cancer according to patient age at diagnosis. Methods. A retrospective review of 2,929 men diagnosed with prostate cancer was performed. Pathological characteristics were compared across age groups: ≤55, 56–75, and >75 years. Results. The study cohort included 133 patients (4.5%), 2,033 patients (69.5%), and 763 patients (26.0%) in the three age groups, respectively. The median pathological Gleason sums in the three age groups were 8, 7, and 8, respectively. The Gleason sum, primary Gleason score, and second primary Gleason score were significantly different among the three age groups (Z = 12.975, p = 0.002; Z = 9.264, p = 0.010; Z = 6.692, p = 0.035, resp.). The percentages of Gleason pattern 5 tumors for the three age groups were 44.4%, 32.3%, and 36.8%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ2 = 11.641, p = 0.003). The percentages of tumors with Gleason score grade groups 3–5 for the three age groups were 66.9%, 60.5%, and 66.3%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ2 = 9.401, p = 0.009). Conclusions. The present study indicated that men aged ≤55 years or >75 years show higher levels of clinically significant prostate cancer compared to patients between the ages of 55 and 75 years. Younger and more elderly male patients are more likely to have a more aggressive disease. PMID:28265568

  8. QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates* for Top Five Causes of Cancer Death,(†) by Race/Hispanic Ethnicity - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-09-16

    In 2014, the top five causes of cancer deaths for the total population were lung, colorectal, female breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. The non-Hispanic black population had the highest age-adjusted death rates for each of these five cancers, followed by non-Hispanic white and Hispanic groups. The age-adjusted death rate for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death in all groups, was 42.1 per 100,000 standard population for the total population, 45.4 for non-Hispanic white, 45.7 for non-Hispanic black, and 18.3 for Hispanic populations.

  9. Circulating MicroRNAs as Easy-to-Measure Aging Biomarkers in Older Breast Cancer Patients: Correlation with Chronological Age but Not with Fitness/Frailty Status

    PubMed Central

    Hatse, Sigrid; Brouwers, Barbara; Dalmasso, Bruna; Laenen, Annouschka; Kenis, Cindy; Schöffski, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) hold great promise as easily accessible biomarkers for diverse (patho)physiological processes, including aging. We have compared miRNA expression profiles in cell-free blood from older versus young breast cancer patients, in order to identify “aging miRNAs” that can be used in the future to monitor the impact of chemotherapy on the patient’s biological age. First, we assessed 175 miRNAs that may possibly be present in serum/plasma in an exploratory screening in 10 young and 10 older patients. The top-15 ranking miRNAs showing differential expression between young and older subjects were further investigated in an independent cohort consisting of another 10 young and 20 older subjects. Plasma levels of miR-20a-3p, miR-30b-5p, miR106b, miR191 and miR-301a were confirmed to show significant age-related decreases (all p≤0.004). The remaining miRNAs included in the validation study (miR-21, miR-210, miR-320b, miR-378, miR-423-5p, let-7d, miR-140-5p, miR-200c, miR-374a, miR376a) all showed similar trends as observed in the exploratory screening but these differences did not reach statistical significance. Interestingly, the age-associated miRNAs did not show differential expression between fit/healthy and non-fit/frail subjects within the older breast cancer cohort of the validation study and thus merit further investigation as true aging markers that not merely reflect frailty. PMID:25333486

  10. Cancer Incidence and Survival among Adolescents and Young Adults in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Kyeong; Park, Hyeon Jin; Oh, Chang-Mo; Jung, Kyu-Won; Shin, Hee Young; Park, Byung Kiu; Won, Young-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Korea, cancer is the third leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs). However, cancer incidence and survival trends among AYAs (15–29 years) have never been studied in Korea. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the incidence and relative survival rates and their trends among AYAs in Korea. Materials and Methods Cancer incidence data from 1999–2010 were obtained from the Korea Central Cancer Registry (KCCR). Each cancer was classified into subgroups according to the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) AYA site recode. Percent distributions, age-specific incidence rates, age-standardized incidence rates per million, and annual percent changes (APCs) were calculated for AYAs according to sex. Five-year relative survival rates were estimated for cases diagnosed between 1993 and 2010 and followed up to 2011. Results The age-standardized incidence rates of all cancers combined were 196.4 and 367.8 per million for males and females, respectively (male-to-female (M/F) ratio: 0.5). The age-standardized incidence rates increased from 208.7 per million in 1999 to 396.4 per million in 2010, and the APC was 6.3% (P<0.001). The five most common cancers among AYAs were thyroid carcinoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, stomach carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and acute myeloid leukemia. In males, the 5-year relative survival rate improved, from 46.5% in 1993–1995 to 75.9% in 2006–2010. In females, the 5-year relative survival rate also improved, from 66.7% in 1993–1995 to 89.1% in 2006–2010. Conclusions Our study showed increases in cancer incidence and improvements in the 5-year relative survival rate among Korean AYAs. This study also provides additional data regarding temporal and geographic trends in cancer that may enhance future efforts to identify factors affecting cancer incidence and responses to treatment among AYAs. PMID:24789075

  11. Associations Between Physical Fitness Indices and Working Memory in Breast Cancer Survivors and Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle E.; Raine, Lauren B.; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Hillman, Charles H.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study examined the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness, heart rate recovery, and physical activity on working memory in breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls. Method: Using a case-control design, 32 women who had received a breast cancer diagnosis and completed primary treatment within the past 36-months (11 radiation only; 21 chemotherapy) and 30 age-matched women with no previous cancer diagnosis completed a n-back continuous performance task commonly used as an assessment of working memory. In addition, cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery were measured during a submaximal graded exercise test and physical activity was measured using 7-days of accelerometer monitoring. Results: Breast cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy had poorer heart rate recovery (p = .010) and engaged in less physical activity than women who had received radiation only (p = .004) or non-cancer controls (p = .029). Cancer treatment (radiation; chemotherapy) predicted differences in reaction times on the 1-back working memory task (p = .029). However, more rapid heart rate recovery predicted shorter reaction times on the 1-back task in the age-matched control group (p = .002). All participants with greater cardiorespiratory fitness displayed greater accuracy independent of disease status on the 1-back task (p = .017). No significant group differences in reaction times were observed for 2-back target trials between breast cancer survivors and controls. However, greater total physical activity predicted shorter reaction times in breast cancer survivors (radiation, chemotherapy) on the 2-back task (p = .014). In addition, all participants who exhibited more rapid heart rate recovery demonstrated better greater accuracy regardless of disease status (p = .013). Conclusion: These findings support differences in physical activty participation, heart rate recovery, and 1- and 2-back working memory reaction

  12. African American patients' intent to screen for colorectal cancer: Do cultural factors, health literacy, knowledge, age and gender matter?

    PubMed

    Brittain, Kelly; Christy, Shannon M; Rawl, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    African Americans have higher colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality rates. Research suggests that CRC screening interventions targeting African Americans be based upon cultural dimensions. Secondary analysis of data from African-Americans who were not up-to-date with CRC screening (n=817) was conducted to examine: 1) relationships among cultural factors (i.e., provider trust, cancer fatalism, health temporal orientation (HTO)), health literacy, and CRC knowledge; 2) age and gender differences; and 3) relationships among the variables and CRC screening intention. Provider trust, fatalism, HTO, health literacy and CRC knowledge had significant relationships among study variables. The FOBT intention model explained 43% of the variance with age and gender being significant predictors. The colonoscopy intention model explained 41% of the variance with gender being a significant predictor. Results suggest that when developing CRC interventions for African Americans, addressing cultural factors remain important, but particular attention should be given to the age and gender of the patient.

  13. African American patients’ intent to screen for colorectal cancer: Do cultural factors, health literacy, knowledge, age and gender matter?

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, Kelly; Christy, Shannon M.; Rawl, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    African Americans have higher colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality rates. Research suggests that CRC screening interventions targeting African Americans be based upon cultural dimensions. Secondary analysis of data from African-Americans who were not up-to-date with CRC screening (n=817) was conducted to examine: 1) relationships among cultural factors (i.e., provider trust, cancer fatalism, health temporal orientation (HTO)), health literacy, and CRC knowledge; 2) age and gender differences; and 3) relationships among the variables and CRC screening intention. Provider trust, fatalism, HTO, health literacy and CRC knowledge had significant relationships among study variables. The FOBT intention model explained 43% of the variance with age and gender being significant predictors. The colonoscopy intention model explained 41% of the variance with gender being a significant predictor. Results suggest that when developing CRC interventions for African Americans, addressing cultural factors remain important, but particular attention should be given to the age and gender of the patient. PMID:27182187

  14. The increasing toll of adolescent cancer incidence in the US

    PubMed Central

    Kriebel, David; Clapp, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Cancer incidence is rising among adolescents (“teens”). The causes of the increase are unknown but studying incidence patterns and trends may produce insights into etiology. Using data from the US National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program we described trends of cancer incidence among teens (15–19 year olds). We reviewed and summarized incidence patterns for histologic cancer groups and the most frequently diagnosed sites of cancer among teens during 2008–2012 reported by the SEER Cancer Statistics Review. We calculated annual incidence rates for the years 1975–2012 and used linear regression analysis to evaluate trends and calculate rates of change. Incidence for all sites combined increased annually by 0.67% for males and 0.62% for females during the period 1975 through 2012 –resulting in more than a 25% increase over 38 years. The biggest annual incidence increases occurred in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (2.16% females; 1.38% males), thyroid cancer (2.12% females; 1.59% males), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (1.73% females) and testicular cancer (1.55% males). Incidence rates for most histologic groups and sites showed steady long term increases over the 38 years of data. Despite improvements in survival, rising incidence trends mean growing numbers of young adults are undergoing painful and costly cancer treatments. A concerted research program is vital to investigate causes of steadily rising teen cancer rates. PMID:28235028

  15. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze colorectal carcinogenesis and age-related DNA methylation alterations of gene sequences associated with epigenetic clock CpG sites. METHODS In silico DNA methylation analysis of 353 epigenetic clock CpG sites published by Steve Horvath was performed using methylation array data for a set of 123 colonic tissue samples [64 colorectal cancer (CRC), 42 adenoma, 17 normal; GEO accession number: GSE48684]. Among the differentially methylated age-related genes, secreted frizzled related protein 1 (SFRP1) promoter methylation was further investigated in colonic tissue from 8 healthy adults, 19 normal children, 20 adenoma and 8 CRC patients using bisulfite-specific PCR followed by methylation-specific high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. mRNA expression of age-related “epigenetic clock” genes was studied using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus2.0 whole transcriptome data of 153 colonic biopsy samples (49 healthy adult, 49 adenoma, 49 CRC, 6 healthy children) (GEO accession numbers: GSE37364, GSE10714, GSE4183, GSE37267). Whole promoter methylation analysis of genes showing inverse DNA methylation-gene expression data was performed on 30 colonic samples using methyl capture sequencing. RESULTS Fifty-seven age-related CpG sites including hypermethylated PPP1R16B, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated MGP, PIPOX were differentially methylated between CRC and normal tissues (P < 0.05, Δβ ≥ 10%). In the adenoma vs normal comparison, 70 CpG sites differed significantly, including hypermethylated DKK3, SDC2, SFRP1, SYNE1 and hypomethylated CEMIP, SPATA18 (P < 0.05, Δβ ≥ 10%). In MS-HRM analysis, the SFRP1 promoter region was significantly hypermethylated in CRC (55.0% ± 8.4 %) and adenoma tissue samples (49.9% ± 18.1%) compared to normal adult (5.2% ± 2.7%) and young (2.2% ± 0.7%) colonic tissue (P < 0.0001). DNA methylation of SFRP1 promoter was slightly, but significantly increased in healthy adults compared to normal young samples (P < 0.02). This correlated

  16. Are We Appropriately Selecting Therapy For Patients With Cervical Cancer? Longitudinal Patterns-of-Care Analysis for Stage IB-IIB Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Julie A.; Rusthoven, Chad; DeWitt, Peter E.; Davidson, Susan A.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We performed a patterns-of-care analysis evaluating the effects of newer technology and recent research findings on treatment decisions over 26 years to determine whether patients with cervical cancer are being appropriately selected for treatment to optimize the therapeutic ratio. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program from 1983 to 2009. We identified 10,933 women with stage IB-IIB cervical carcinoma. Results: Of the 10,933 subjects identified, 40.1% received surgery, 26.8% received radiation (RT), and 33.1% received surgery plus RT. RT use increased after 2000 compared to prior to 2000, with a corresponding decrease in surgery and surgery plus RT. Among patients with risk factors including tumor size >4 cm, positive parametria, and positive lymph nodes, declining use of surgery plus RT was observed. However, 23% of patients with tumors >4 cm, 20% of patients with positive parametria, and 55% of node-positive patients continued to receive surgery plus RT as of 2009. Factors associated with increased use of surgery plus RT included patient age <50 and node-positive status. Conclusions: In this largest patterns-of-care analysis to date for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, we found a substantial proportion of patients continue to undergo surgery followed by radiation, despite randomized data supporting the use of definitive radiation therapy, with lower morbidity than surgery and radiation.

  17. Trends of Esophageal Cancer Mortality in Rural China from 1989 to 2013: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xudong; Wang, Zhenkun; Kong, Chan; Yang, Fen; Wang, Ying; Tan, Xiaodong

    2017-02-23

    Background: Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in rural China. The aim of this study was to describe the time trends of esophageal cancer mortality in rural China and to better elucidate the causes of these trends. Methods: The mortality data were obtained from the World Health Organization Mortality Database and the China Health Statistical Yearbook Database. The mortality data were analyzed with age-period-cohort (APC) analysis. Results: Our study indicates that the Age-Standardized Mortality Rates (ASMRs) in rural China generally decreased from 1989 to 2003, and thereafter increased until the year 2008 in both sexes. After 2008, the ASMRs decreased again. The results of APC analysis suggest that the general decrease in esophageal cancer mortality in rural China from 1989 to 2003 might be caused by the downtrend of the cohort effects and period effects, while the general increase in mortality from 2004 to 2008 might be caused by the uptrend of the period effects. The decrease in mortality after 2008 may be relevant to the Four Trillion RMB Investment Plan launched by the Chinese Government. Conclusions: The declining cohort effects were probably related to the improvement of socioeconomic status in childhood and the decreasing consumptions of alcohol drinking and smoking, while the trends of the period effects were relevant to the changes in the dietary pattern. Our findings may help predict future changes in esophageal cancer mortality.

  18. Trends of Esophageal Cancer Mortality in Rural China from 1989 to 2013: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xudong; Wang, Zhenkun; Kong, Chan; Yang, Fen; Wang, Ying; Tan, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Background: Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in rural China. The aim of this study was to describe the time trends of esophageal cancer mortality in rural China and to better elucidate the causes of these trends. Methods: The mortality data were obtained from the World Health Organization Mortality Database and the China Health Statistical Yearbook Database. The mortality data were analyzed with age-period-cohort (APC) analysis. Results: Our study indicates that the Age-Standardized Mortality Rates (ASMRs) in rural China generally decreased from 1989 to 2003, and thereafter increased until the year 2008 in both sexes. After 2008, the ASMRs decreased again. The results of APC analysis suggest that the general decrease in esophageal cancer mortality in rural China from 1989 to 2003 might be caused by the downtrend of the cohort effects and period effects, while the general increase in mortality from 2004 to 2008 might be caused by the uptrend of the period effects. The decrease in mortality after 2008 may be relevant to the Four Trillion RMB Investment Plan launched by the Chinese Government. Conclusions: The declining cohort effects were probably related to the improvement of socioeconomic status in childhood and the decreasing consumptions of alcohol drinking and smoking, while the trends of the period effects were relevant to the changes in the dietary pattern. Our findings may help predict future changes in esophageal cancer mortality. PMID:28241504

  19. Swiss Feline Cancer Registry 1965-2008: the Influence of Sex, Breed and Age on Tumour Types and Tumour Locations.

    PubMed

    Graf, R; Grüntzig, K; Boo, G; Hässig, M; Axhausen, K W; Fabrikant, S; Welle, M; Meier, D; Guscetti, F; Folkers, G; Otto, V; Pospischil, A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer registries are valuable sources for epidemiological research investigating risk factors underlying different types of cancer incidence. The present study is based on the Swiss Feline Cancer Registry that comprises 51,322 feline patient records, compiled between 1965 and 2008. In these records, 18,375 tumours were reported. The study analyses the influence of sex, neutering status, breed, time and age on the development of the most common tumour types and on their locations, using a multiple logistic regression model. The largest differences between breeds were found in the development of fibrosarcomas and squamous cell carcinomas, as well as in the development of tumours in the skin/subcutis and mammary gland. Differences, although often small, in sex and neutering status were observed in most analyses. Tumours were more frequent in middle-aged and older cats. The sample size allowed detailed analyses of the influence of sex, neutering status, breed and age. Results of the study are mainly consistent with previous analyses; however, some results cannot be compared with the existing literature. Further investigations are necessary, since feline tumours have not been investigated in depth to date. More accurate comparisons would require the definition of international standards for animal cancer registries.

  20. Prostate cancer: an emerging threat to the health of aging men in Asia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yang, Bao-Xue; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jin-Guo; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhao, Xue-Jian

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and examine the possible reasons for the difference in prostate cancer incidence between Asian men and North American men by literature review. Data regarding cancer incidence and mortality were obtained from the database of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). A literature review was conducted by studying related articles published in peer-reviewed journals such as the The New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of Clinical Oncology, A Cancer Journal for Clinicians and Asian Journal of Andrology. To evaluate the early diagnosis and survival rates, the mortality-to-incidence rate ratio (MR/IR) was calculated from the IARC data. By comparing prostate cancer data between Asian men and North American men, we found that differences in the incidence rate and MR/IR could be attributed largely to a lack of annual prostate cancer screening with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in most Asian countries. It is likely that PSA screening also contributes significantly to the differences in prostate cancer mortality rates. Prostate cancer has the highest incidence rate among five common malignancies in Asian Americans. However, the MR/IR ratio of prostate cancer is the lowest among cancers. These data seem to further support the usefulness of PSA screening, even though the percentage of low risk cancers is greater in prostate cancer than in other cancers. The low incidence rate of prostate cancer does not reflect the actual statistics of this disease in Asia. The data from limited institutions in many Asian countries seem to bias the true incidence and mortality rates. To improve this situation, incorporating PSA screening for prostate cancer, as well as constructing a nationwide cancer registration system, will be helpful.

  1. Benefit/risk for adjuvant breast cancer therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use by age, and race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T; Haque, R; Hedlin, H; Col, N; Paskett, E; Manson, J E; Kubo, J T; Johnson, K C; Wactawski-Wende, J; Pan, K; Anderson, G

    2015-12-01

    In early adjuvant breast cancer trial reports, aromatase inhibitors more effectively reduced breast recurrence with lower risk of thromboembolic events and endometrial cancer than tamoxifen, while aromatase inhibitors had higher fracture and cardiovascular disease risk. We used data from updated patient-level meta-analyses of adjuvant trials in analyses to summarize the benefits and risks of these agents in various clinical circumstances. Baseline incidence rates for health outcomes by age and race/ethnicity, absent aromatase inhibitor, or tamoxifen use were estimated from the Women's Health Initiative. Aromatase inhibitor and tamoxifen effects on distant recurrence were obtained from a meta-analysis of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) and Breast International Group (Big-1-98) clinical trials. Impact on other health outcomes were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials comparing aromatase inhibitor to tamoxifen use and from placebo-controlled chemoprevention trials. All health outcomes were given equal weight when modeling net benefit/risk for aromatase inhibitor compared to tamoxifen use by breast cancer recurrence risk, age (decade), race/ethnicity, hysterectomy (yes/no), and by prior myocardial infarction. Over a 10-year period, the benefit/risk index was more favorable for aromatase inhibitor than for tamoxifen as adjuvant breast cancer therapy in almost all circumstances regardless of patient age, race/ethnicity, breast cancer recurrence risk, or presence or absence of a uterus. Only in older women with prior myocardial infarction and low recurrence risk was an advantage for tamoxifen seen. Using a benefit/risk index for endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy in postmenopausal women, benefit was higher for aromatase inhibitor use in almost all circumstances.

  2. Radiation Therapy, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Cardiac Toxicity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John J.; Wang Jian; McBride, Russell; Neugut, Alfred I.; Grann, Victor R. ||; Jacobson, Judith S. |; Grann, Alison; Hershman, Dawn ||. E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The benefits of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer may be counterbalanced by the risk of cardiac toxicity. We studied the cardiac effects of RT and the impact of pre-existing cardiac risk factors (CRFs) in a population-based sample of older patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database of women {>=}65 years diagnosed with Stages I to III breast cancer from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2000, we used multivariable logistic regression to model the associations of demographic and clinical variables with postmastectomy and postlumpectomy RT. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we then modeled the association between treatment and myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia in the 10 or more years after diagnosis, taking the predictors of treatment into account. Results: Among 48,353 women with breast cancer; 19,897 (42%) were treated with lumpectomy and 26,534 (55%) with mastectomy; the remainder had unknown surgery type (3%). Receipt of RT was associated with later year of diagnosis, younger age, fewer comorbidities, nonrural residence, and chemotherapy. Postlumpectomy RT was also associated with white ethnicity and no prior history of heart disease (HD). The RT did not increase the risk of MI. Presence of MI was associated with age, African American ethnicity, advanced stage, nonrural residence, more than one comorbid condition, a hormone receptor-negative tumor, CRFs and HD. Among patients who received RT, tumor laterality was not associated with MI outcome. The effect of RT on the heart was not influenced by HD or CRFs. Conclusion: It appears unlikely that RT would increase the risk of MI in elderly women with breast cancer, regardless of type of surgery, tumor laterality, or history of CRFs or HD, for at least 10 years.

  3. Metformin inhibits advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced growth and VEGF expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by suppressing AGEs receptor expression via AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Y; Matsui, T; Takeuchi, M; Yamagishi, S

    2013-05-01

    Metformin use has been reported to decrease breast cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients. We have previously shown that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) interaction stimulate growth and/or migration of pancreatic cancer and melanoma cells. However, effects of metformin on AGEs-RAGE axis in breast cancers remain unknown. We examined here whether and how metformin could block the AGEs-induced growth and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was measured with an electron coupling reagent WST-1 based colorimetric assay. Gene expression level was evaluated by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions. AGEs significantly increased cell proliferation of MCF-7 cells, which was completely prevented by the treatment with 0.01 or 0.1 mM metformin or anti-RAGE antibodies. Furthermore, metformin at 0.01 mM completely suppressed the AGEs-induced upregulation of RAGE and VEGF mRNA levels in MCF-7 cells. An inhibitor of AMP-activated protein kinase, compound C significantly blocked the growth-inhibitory and RAGE and VEGF suppressing effects of metformin in AGEs-exposed MCF-7 cells. Our present study suggests that metformin could inhibit the AGEs-induced growth and VEGF expression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by suppressing RAGE gene expression via AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Metformin may protect against breast cancer expansion in diabetic patients by blocking the AGEs-RAGE axis.

  4. Do Older Americans Undergo Stoma Reversal Following Low Anterior Resection for Rectal Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A.; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Hu, Yue-Yung; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective For low-lying rectal cancers, proximal diversion can reduce anastomotic leak after sphincter preserving surgery; however, evidence suggests that such temporary diversions are often not reversed. We aimed to evaluate non-reversal and delayed stoma reversal in elderly patients undergoing low anterior resection (LAR). Design SEER-Medicare linked analysis from 1991-2007. Settings and Participants 1,179 primary stage I-III rectal cancer patients over age 66 who underwent LAR with synchronous diverting stoma. Main Outcome Measures 1) Stoma creation and reversal rates. 2) Time to reversal. 3) Characteristics associated with reversal and shorter time to reversal. Results Within 18 months of LAR, 51% (603/1179) of patients underwent stoma reversal. Stoma reversal was associated with age < 80 years (p<0.0001), male gender (p=0.018), less comorbidities (p=0.017), higher income [quartile 4 vs. 1, (p=0.002)], early tumor stage [1 vs. 3; (p<0.001)], neoadjuvant radiation (p<0.0001), rectal tumor location [vs. rectosigmoid, (p=0.001)], more recent diagnosis (p=0.021), and shorter length of stay on LAR admission (p=0.021). Median time to reversal was 126 days (IQR: 79-249). Longer time to reversal was associated with older age (p=0.031), presence of comorbidities (p=0.014), more advanced tumor stage (p=0.007), positive lymph nodes (p=0.009), receipt of adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.008), more recent diagnosis (p=0.004) and longer LOS on LAR admission (p <0.0001). Conclusions Half of elderly rectal cancer patients who undergo LAR with temporary stoma have not undergone stoma reversal by 18 months. Identifiable risk factors predict both non-reversal and longer time to reversal. These results help inform pre-operative discussions and promote realistic expectations for elderly rectal cancer patients. PMID:23298948

  5. Effectiveness of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy and Radiotherapy for Older Men With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Hahn, Stephen A.; Polsky, Daniel; Armstrong, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether the survival advantage of androgen-deprivation therapy with radiotherapy (ADT plus RT) relative to ADT alone for men with locally advanced prostate cancer reported in two randomized trials holds in real-world clinical practice and extended the evidence to patients poorly represented in the trials. Methods We conducted nonrandomized effectiveness studies of ADT plus RT versus ADT in three groups of patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2007 and observed through 2009 in the SEER-Medicare data set: (1) the randomized clinical trial (RCT) cohort, which included men age 65 to 75 years and was most consistent with participants in the randomized trials; (2) the elderly cohort, which included men age > 75 years with locally advanced prostate cancer; and (3) the screen-detected cohort, which included men age ≥ 65 years with screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer. We evaluated cause-specific and all-cause mortality using propensity score, instrumental variable (IV), and sensitivity analyses. Results In the RCT cohort, ADT plus RT was associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality relative to ADT alone (cause-specific propensity score–adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.49; all-cause propensity score–adjusted HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.67). Effectiveness estimates for the RCT cohort were not significantly different from those from randomized trials (P > .1). In the elderly and screen-detected cohorts, ADT plus RT was also associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality. IV analyses produced estimates similar to those from propensity score–adjusted methods. Conclusion Older men with locally advanced or screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer who receive ADT alone risk decrements in cause-specific and overall survival. PMID:25559808

  6. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  7. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  8. The Incidence Characteristics of Second Primary Malignancy after Diagnosis of Primary Colon and Rectal Cancer: A Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xu; Jin, Yinghu; Chen, Yinggang; Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Zheng; Zhao, Zhixun; Yan, Peng; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Xishan

    2015-01-01

    Background With the expanding population of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors in the United States, one concerning issue is the risk of developing second primary malignancies (SPMs) for these CRC survivors. The present study attempts to identify the incidence characteristics of SPMs after diagnosis of first primary colon cancer (CC) and rectal cancer (RC). Methods 189,890 CC and 83,802 RC cases were identified from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (SEER) database. We performed rate analysis on incidence trend of SPMs in both CC and RC. Expected incidence rates were stratified by age, race and stage, calendar year of first CRC diagnosis and latency period since first CRC diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), measure for estimating risk of SPMs, were calculated for CC and RC respectively. Results The trends of incidence of SPMs in both CC and RC were decreasing from 1992 to 2012. Both CC and RC survivors had higher risk of developing SPMs (SIRCC = 1.13; SIRRC = 1.05). For CC patients, the highest risks of SPM were cancers of small intestine (SIR = 4.03), colon (SIR = 1.87) and rectum (SIR = 1.80). For RC patients, the highest risks of SPMs were cancers of rectum (SIR = 2.88), small intestine (SIR = 2.16) and thyroid (SIR = 1.46). According to stratified analyses, we also identified incidence characteristics which were contributed to higher risk of developing SPMs, including the age between 20 and 40, American Indian/Alaska Native, localized stage, diagnosed at calendar year from 2002 to 2012 and the latency between 12 and 59 months. Conclusions Both CC and RC survivors remain at higher risk of developing SPMs. The identification of incidence characteristics of SPMs is extremely essential for continuous cancer surveillance among CRC survivors. PMID:26571301

  9. Update of HPV-associated female genital cancers in the United States, 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    Watson, Meg; Saraiya, Mona; Wu, Xiaocheng

    2009-11-01

    In 2008, CDC published a supplement to the journal Cancer describing incidence patterns of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers prior to availability of an HPV vaccine. This report updates the information on HPV-associated female genital cancer incidence with more recent data, adds information on trends, and includes American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. We used combined data from two federal cancer surveillance programs, CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and NCI's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, covering 92% of the U.S. population from 1999 to 2004, to examine recent trends and incidence of invasive cervical carcinoma and vaginal and vulvar squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Incidence of in situ vaginal and vulvar SCC are also presented. The average annual age-adjusted rate of cervical cancer among women of all races/ethnicities was 8.5/100,000. Annual cervical cancer incidence rates were highest but declined more rapidly among Hispanic and black women compared with non-Hispanic and white women. The rate of vulvar cancer among all women was 1.7/100,000 and was higher among white women than other racial groups. Vulvar cancer rates rose among black women (+2.9% per year) and were relatively stable among all other racial and ethnic groups over the 6-year period. Vaginal cancer was rare (rate 0.5/100,000); the rate was higher among black women than other racial groups and higher among Hispanic women than among non-Hispanic women. A significant decline of vaginal cancer was observed only among black women (-6.2% per year). This article confirms previous findings on racial disparities in HPV-associated female genital cancers. Any post-HPV vaccine declines in these cancers should be interpreted in light of current declines. Enhancing current cancer surveillance systems, combined with special studies to collect data on in situ or precancerous lesions of these cancers, will provide important information in

  10. The effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on esophageal cancer survival in working-age patients in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Chia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Hsu, Ta-Wen; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Jian-Han; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality. More than 90% of patients with esophageal cancer in Taiwan have squamous cell carcinoma. Survival of such patients is related to socioeconomic status (SES). We studied the association between SES (individual and neighborhood) and the survival of working-age patients with esophageal cancer in Taiwan. A population-based study was conducted of 4097 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between 2002 and 2006. Each was traced for 5 years or until death. Individual SES was defined by enrollee job category. Neighborhood SES was based on household income and dichotomized into advantaged or disadvantaged. Multilevel logistic regression was used to compare the survival rates by SES group after adjustment for possible confounding and risk factors. Hospital and neighborhood SES were used as random effects in multilevel logistic regression. In patients younger than 65 years, 5-year overall survival rates were worst for those with low individual SES living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. After adjustment for patient characteristics, esophageal cancer patients with high individual SES had a 39% lower risk of mortality than those with low individual SES (odds ratio 0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.48–0.77). Patients living in disadvantaged areas with high individual SES were more likely to receive surgery than those with low SES (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.89). Esophageal cancer patients with low individual SES have the worst 5-year survival, even with a universal healthcare system. Public health, education, and social welfare programs should address the inequality of esophageal cancer survival. PMID:27399129

  11. The effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on esophageal cancer survival in working-age patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chin-Chia; Chang, Chun-Ming; Hsu, Ta-Wen; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Jian-Han; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality. More than 90% of patients with esophageal cancer in Taiwan have squamous cell carcinoma. Survival of such patients is related to socioeconomic status (SES). We studied the association between SES (individual and neighborhood) and the survival of working-age patients with esophageal cancer in Taiwan. A population-based study was conducted of 4097 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between 2002 and 2006. Each was traced for 5 years or until death. Individual SES was defined by enrollee job category. Neighborhood SES was based on household income and dichotomized into advantaged or disadvantaged. Multilevel logistic regression was used to compare the survival rates by SES group after adjustment for possible confounding and risk factors. Hospital and neighborhood SES were used as random effects in multilevel logistic regression. In patients younger than 65 years, 5-year overall survival rates were worst for those with low individual SES living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. After adjustment for patient characteristics, esophageal cancer patients with high individual SES had a 39% lower risk of mortality than those with low individual SES (odds ratio 0.61, 95% confidence interval 0.48-0.77). Patients living in disadvantaged areas with high individual SES were more likely to receive surgery than those with low SES (odds ratio 1.45, 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.89). Esophageal cancer patients with low individual SES have the worst 5-year survival, even with a universal healthcare system. Public health, education, and social welfare programs should address the inequality of esophageal cancer survival.

  12. Recent trends of cancer mortality in Romanian adults: mortality is still increasing, although young adults do better than the middle-aged and elderly population.

    PubMed

    Tereanu, Carmen; Baili, Paolo; Berrino, Franco; Micheli, Andrea; Furtunescu, Florentina L; Minca, Dana G; Sant, Milena

    2013-05-01

    We analysed the mortality trends (1986-2009) for all cancers combined and selected cancers in adult Romanians by three age groups (15-49, 50-69 and older than 70 years of age) in comparison with 11 other European countries. We extracted mortality data from the WHO database and grouped the countries into four regions: central and eastern Europe (Romania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary), Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania), western and northern Europe (Austria, the Netherlands and Finland), and southern Europe (Croatia and Slovenia). Mortality rates were age-standardized against the standard European population. Significant changes in mortality trends were identified by Joinpoint regression and annual percentage changes (APCs) were calculated for periods with uniform trends. Cancer mortality in Romania was among the lowest in Europe in 1986, but was higher than most countries by 2009. Despite the declining mortality (APC) in younger Romanians for all cancers combined (men-1.5% from 1997, women-1.2% 1997-2004 and -3.8% 2004-2009), male lung cancer (-2.8% from 1997), female breast (-3.5% from 1999) and cervical (-5.4% from 2004) cancers, mortality has increased in middle-aged and elderly patients for most cancers analysed. The exception was declining stomach cancer mortality in most Romanians, except elderly men. For most cancers analysed, mortality declined in the Baltic countries in young and middle-aged patients, and in western and northern countries for all ages. Lung cancer mortality in women increased in all countries except Latvia. We urge immediate steps to reverse the alarming increase in cancer mortality among middle-aged and elderly Romanians.

  13. Age adjustment in ecological studies: using a study on arsenic ingestion and bladder cancer as an example

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite its limitations, ecological study design is widely applied in epidemiology. In most cases, adjustment for age is necessary, but different methods may lead to different conclusions. To compare three methods of age adjustment, a study on the associations between arsenic in drinking water and incidence of bladder cancer in 243 townships in Taiwan was used as an example. Methods A total of 3068 cases of bladder cancer, including 2276 men and 792 women, were identified during a ten-year study period in the study townships. Three methods were applied to analyze the same data set on the ten-year study period. The first (Direct Method) applied direct standardization to obtain standardized incidence rate and then used it as the dependent variable in the regression analysis. The second (Indirect Method) applied indirect standardization to obtain standardized incidence ratio and then used it as the dependent variable in the regression analysis instead. The third (Variable Method) used proportions of residents in different age groups as a part of the independent variables in the multiple regression models. Results All three methods showed a statistically significant positive association between arsenic exposure above 0.64 mg/L and incidence of bladder cancer in men and women, but different results were observed for the other exposure categories. In addition, the risk estimates obtained by different methods for the same exposure category were all different. Conclusions Using an empirical example, the current study confirmed the argument made by other researchers previously that whereas the three different methods of age adjustment may lead to different conclusions, only the third approach can obtain unbiased estimates of the risks. The third method can also generate estimates of the risk associated with each age group, but the other two are unable to evaluate the effects of age directly. PMID:22014275

  14. Association between screening and the thyroid cancer “epidemic” in South Korea: evidence from a nationwide study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sohee; Oh, Chang-Mo; Cho, Hyunsoon; Jung, Kyu-Won; Jun, Jae Kwan; Won, Young-Joo; Kong, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Kui Son

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether screening for thyroid cancer led to the current “epidemic” in South Korea. Design Review of the medical records of nationally representative samples of patients with a diagnosis of thyroid cancer in 1999, 2005, and 2008. Setting Sample cases were randomly selected from South Korea’s nationwide cancer registry, using a systematic sampling method after stratification by region. Participants 5796 patients with thyroid cancer were included (891 in 1999, 2355 in 2005, and 2550 in 2008). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was age standardised incidence of thyroid cancer and the changes in incidence between 1999 and 2008 according to the methods used to detect tumours (screen detection versus clinical detection versus unspecified). Results Between 1999 and 2008, the incidence of thyroid cancer increased 6.4-fold (95% confidence interval 4.9-fold to 8.4-fold), from 6.4 (95% confidence interval 6.2 to 6.6) per 100 000 population to 40.7 (40.2 to 41.2) per 100 000 population. Of the increase, 94.4% (34.4 per 100 000 population) were for tumours less than 20 mm, which were detected mainly by screening. 97.1% of the total increase was localised and regional tumours according to the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) summary stage. Where cases were clinically detected, 99.9% of the increased incidences (6.4 per 100 000 population) over the same period were tumours less than 20 mm. Conclusion The current “epidemic” of thyroid cancer in South Korea is due to an increase in the detection of small tumours, most likely as a result of overdetection. Concerted efforts are needed at a national level to reduce unnecessary thyroid ultrasound examinations in the asymptomatic general population. PMID:27903497

  15. Adjusted Age-Adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index Score as a Risk Measure of Perioperative Mortality before Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Yin, Wen-Yao; Wei, Chang-Kao; Wu, Chin-Chia; Su, Yu-Chieh; Yu, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of patients at risk of death from cancer surgery should aid in preoperative preparation. The purpose of this study is to assess and adjust the age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index (ACCI) to identify cancer patients with increased risk of perioperative mortality. Methods We identified 156,151 patients undergoing surgery for one of the ten common cancers between 2007 and 2011 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Half of the patients were randomly selected, and a multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop an adjusted-ACCI score for estimating the risk of 90-day mortality by variables from the original ACCI. The score was validated. The association between the score and perioperative mortality was analyzed. Results The adjusted-ACCI score yield a better discrimination on mortality after cancer surgery than the original ACCI score, with c-statics of 0.75 versus 0.71. Over 80 years of age, 70–80 years, and renal disease had the strongest impact on mortality, hazard ratios 8.40, 3.63, and 3.09 (P < 0.001), respectively. The overall 90-day mortality rates in the entire cohort varied from 0.9%, 2.9%, 7.0%, and 13.2% in four risk groups stratifying by the adjusted-ACCI score; the adjusted hazard ratio for score 4–7, 8–11, and ≥ 12 was 2.84, 6.07, and 11.17 (P < 0.001), respectively, in 90-day mortality compared to score 0–3. Conclusions The adjusted-ACCI score helps to identify patients with a higher risk of 90-day mortality after cancer surgery. It might be particularly helpful for preoperative evaluation of patients over 80 years of age. PMID:26848761

  16. Comparison of Clinical and Pathological Differences of Breast Cancer Patients under 35 and above 55 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Emiroğlu, Mustafa; Karaali, Cem; Sert, İsmail; Salimoğlu, Semra; Uğurlu, Levent; Aksoy, Süleyman; Aydın, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical, pathologic and management differences between breast cancer patients under 35 years of age and postmenopausal patients above 55 years of age. Materials and Methods Patients who were operated on for breast cancer between November 2003 and March 2013 in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were separated into two Groups according their age; Group 1 (<35 years) and Group 2 (>55 years). Results 94 patients with breast cancer, 45 patients in Group 1 and 49 patients in Group 2, were included in the study. The mean follow-up was 51 (19–121) months and 50 (19–120) months in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Stages of breast cancer at the time of diagnosis were similar between the two groups. The groups were similar in terms of rates of re-excision (p=0.42), local recurrence (p=0.34) and solid organ metastases (p=0.182). The number of oncoplastic and reconstructive procedures were higher in Group 1 (p=0.04). Regarding pathological results, the rate of grade 3 tumors, those with Ki-67>12 and triple negative breast cancer were found to be higher in Group 1. In addition, the number of patients receiving chemotherapy was significantly higher in Group 1 (p=0.03). Conclusion Oncologic results were similar between young patients and postmenopausal patients. Nevertheless, tumor biology was found to be worse in young patients. In addition, oncoplastic and reconstructive approaches were significantly higher in young patients.

  17. Age- and sex-specific spatio-temporal patterns of colorectal cancer mortality in Spain (1975-2008)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, space-time patterns of colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality risks are studied by sex and age group (50-69, ≥70) in Spanish provinces during the period 1975-2008. Space-time conditional autoregressive models are used to perform the statistical analyses. A pronounced increase in mortality risk has been observed in males for both age-groups. For males between 50 and 69 years of age, trends seem to stabilize from 2001 onward. In females, trends reflect a more stable pattern during the period in both age groups. However, for the 50-69 years group, risks take an upward trend in the period 2006-2008 after the slight decline observed in the second half of the period. This study offers interesting information regarding CRC mortality distribution among different Spanish provinces that could be used to improve prevention policies and resource allocation in different regions. PMID:25136264

  18. Time trend and age-period-cohort effect on kidney cancer mortality in Europe, 1981–2000

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Farinós, Napoleón; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Background The incorporation of diagnostic and therapeutic improvements, as well as the different smoking patterns, may have had an influence on the observed variability in renal cancer mortality across Europe. This study examined time trends in kidney cancer mortality in fourteen European countries during the last two decades of the 20th century. Methods Kidney cancer deaths and population estimates for each country during the period 1981–2000 were drawn from the World Health Organization Mortality Database. Age- and period-adjusted mortality rates, as well as annual percentage changes in age-adjusted mortality rates, were calculated for each country and geographical region. Log-linear Poisson models were also fitted to study the effect of age, death period, and birth cohort on kidney cancer mortality rates within each country. Results For men, the overall standardized kidney cancer mortality rates in the eastern, western, and northern European countries were 20, 25, and 53% higher than those for the southern European countries, respectively. However, age-adjusted mortality rates showed a significant annual decrease of -0.7% in the north of Europe, a moderate rise of 0.7% in the west, and substantial increases of 1.4% in the south and 2.0% in the east. This trend was similar among women, but with lower mortality rates. Age-period-cohort models showed three different birth-cohort patterns for both men and women: a decrease in mortality trend for those generations born after 1920 in the Nordic countries, a similar but lagged decline for cohorts born after 1930 in western and southern European countries, and a continuous increase throughout all birth cohorts in eastern Europe. Similar but more heterogeneous regional patterns were observed for period effects. Conclusion Kidney cancer mortality trends in Europe showed a clear north-south pattern, with high rates on a downward trend in the north, intermediate rates on a more marked rising trend in the east than in the

  19. The value of age and medical history for predicting colorectal cancer and adenomas in people referred for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colonoscopy is an invasive and costly procedure with a risk of serious complications. It would therefore be useful to prioritise colonoscopies by identifying people at higher risk of either cancer or premalignant adenomas. The aim of this study is to assess a model that identifies people with colorectal cancer, advanced, large and small adenomas. Methods Patients seen by gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons between April 2004 and December 2006 completed a validated, structured self-administered questionnaire prior to colonoscopy. Information was collected on symptoms, demographics and medical history. Multinomial logistic regression was used to simultaneously assess factors associated with findings on colonoscopy of cancer, advanced adenomas and adenomas sized 6 -9 mm, and ≤ 5 mm. The area under the curve of ROC curve was used to assess the incremental gain of adding demographic variables, medical history and symptoms (in that order) to a base model that included only age. Results Sociodemographic variables, medical history and symptoms (from 8,204 patients) jointly provide good discrimination between colorectal cancer and no abnormality (AUC 0.83), but discriminate less well between adenomas and no abnormality (AUC advanced adenoma 0.70; other adenomas 0.67). Age is the dominant risk factor for cancer and adenomas of all sizes. Having a colonoscopy within the last 10 years confers protection for cancers and advanced adenomas. Conclusions Our models provide guidance about which factors can assist in identifying people at higher risk of disease using easily elicited information. This would allow colonoscopy to be prioritised for those for whom it would be of most benefit. PMID:21899773

  20. Estimating the Prevalence of Ovarian Cancer Symptoms in Women Aged 50 Years or Older: Problems and Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhuoyu; Gilbert, Lucy; Ciampi, Antonio; Kaufman, Jay S; Basso, Olga

    2016-11-01

    Diagnostic testing is recommended in women with "ovarian cancer symptoms." However, these symptoms are nonspecific. The ongoing Diagnosing Ovarian Cancer Early (DOVE) Study in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, provides diagnostic testing to women aged 50 years or older with symptoms lasting for more than 2 weeks and less than 1 year. The prevalence of ovarian cancer in DOVE is 10 times that of large screening trials, prompting us to estimate the prevalence of these symptoms in this population. We sent a questionnaire to 3,000 randomly sampled women in 2014-2015. Overall, 833 women responded; 81.5% reported at least 1 symptom, and 59.7% reported at least 1 symptom within the duration window specified in DOVE. We explored whether such high prevalence resulted from low survey response by applying inverse probability weighting to correct the estimates. Older women and those from deprived areas were less likely to respond, but only age was associated with symptom reporting. Prevalence was similar in early and late responders. Inverse probability weighting had a minimal impact on estimates, suggesting little evidence of nonresponse bias. This is the first study investigating symptoms that have proven to identify a subset of women with a high prevalence of ovarian cancer. However, the high frequency of symptoms warrants further refinements before symptom-triggered diagnostic testing can be implemented.

  1. HR+/Her2- breast cancer in pre-menopausal women: The impact of younger age on clinical characteristics at diagnosis, disease management and survival.

    PubMed

    De Camargo Cancela, Marianna; Comber, Harry; Sharp, Linda

    2016-12-01

    Young women (20-39 years-old) with breast cancer are diagnosed with more aggressive tumours and consequently have poorer survival. However, there is an evidence gap as to whether age has an independent effect on survival of pre-menopausal women diagnosed with HR+/Her2- tumours. The aim of this population-based study was to compare characteristics at diagnosis, determinants of treatment and survival in women aged 20-39 and 40-49 years diagnosed with HR+/Her2- tumours. From the National Cancer Registry Ireland, we identified women aged 20-49 diagnosed with a first invasive HR+/Her2- breast cancer during 2002-2008. Women aged 20-39 were compared to those aged 40-49 years. Poisson regression with robust error variance was used to explore the impact of age on treatment receipt. Associations between age and survival from all causes was investigated using Cox models. In multivariate models, women aged 20-39 significantly more often having no cancer-directed surgery (IRR=1.49, 95%CI 1.07, 2.08). In those having surgery, younger age was associated with significantly higher likelihood of receiving chemotherapy; age was not associated with receipt of adjuvant radiotherapy or endocrine therapy. Women aged 20-39 undergoing surgery were significantly more likely to die than women aged 40-49 (HR=1.84, 95%CI: 1.31, 2.59). Age is an independent prognostic factor in younger women diagnosed with HR+/Her2- breast cancer, supporting the hypothesis that breast cancer in women under 40 has more aggressive behaviour, even within HR+/Her2- tumours. Future research should explore the reasons for poorer survival in order to inform strategies to improve outcomes in this age group.

  2. Studies on Breast Cancer Cell Interactions with Aged Endothelial Cells in Culture and Rat Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    hydrogen peroxide for 4 h were used as a positive control. Second, fluorescein annexin-V binding (using ApoAlert TM Annexin-V-FITC, Clontech...and BPAECs 4 h after the addition of 1 mM hydrogen peroxide (positive control), but not in the lanes containing the young BPAECs to which MCF-7 cells...reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the cancer cells. Breast cancer cells and other cancer cell types produce ROS including hydrogen peroxide

  3. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in very elderly patients age 85 or older

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ko; Hikichi, Takuto; Nakamura, Jun; Takagi, Tadayuki; Suzuki, Rei; Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Waragai, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Konno, Naoki; Asama, Hiroyuki; Takasumi, Mika; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims The safety and efficacy of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC) in very elderly patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of ESD for EGC in patients age 85 years and older. Patients and methods Patients who underwent ESD for EGC between September 2003 and April 2015 were divided into 3 groups: the very elderly (≥ 85 years; 43 patients), the elderly (65 – 84 years; 511 patients), and the non-elderly ( ≤ 64 years; 161 patients). Adverse events (AEs) were used as the primary endpoint to assess the safety of ESD, and the ESD treatment outcomes (i. e., en bloc resection rate, complete en bloc resection rate, and curative resection rate) and the overall survival rate after ESD were the secondary endpoints. These parameters were retrospectively evaluated in the 3 groups. Results There were no significant differences in AEs (non-elderly, elderly, and very elderly: 7.3, 9.5, and 12.5 %, respectively, P = 0.491) or in the en bloc resection and complete en bloc resection rates among the three groups. However, there was a significant difference in the curative resection rates (non-elderly, elderly, and very elderly: 91.5, 84.1, and 77.1 %, respectively, P = 0.014). Regarding overall survival, there was a significant difference among the three groups (1-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival rates: non-elderly: 98.6, 90.2, and 74.7 %; elderly: 97.2, 86.2, and 61.9 %; and very elderly: 92.7, 66.8, and 34.4 %, respectively, P = 0.001). Moreover, the overall survival rate in the very elderly patients with cardiovascular disease was significantly lower than that in the very elderly patients without cardiovascular disease (P < 0.001). Conclusions ESD is an acceptable treatment for EGC in patients 85 years of age or older in terms of safety. However, the overall survival after ESD in the very elderly patients with cardiovascular

  4. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  5. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  6. Gender and psychological distress among middle- and older-aged colorectal cancer patients and their spouses: an unexpected outcome.

    PubMed

    Goldzweig, Gil; Hubert, Ayala; Walach, Natalio; Brenner, Baruch; Perry, Shlomit; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Baider, Lea

    2009-04-01

    The population in the western world has been aging while the cancer survival rates have been systematically increasing. Knowledge is lacking about psychological processes and effects of gender difference among middle-aged cancer patients and their healthy spouses. This study assesses psychological distress, coping and social support among middle-aged couples, where one of the partners was diagnosed with colon cancer. A repeated-measure MANOVA and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used to assess the relationships between the variables. Levels of social support were found to be negatively correlated to levels of psychological distress among all of the participants. Surprisingly, men (healthy or sick) were found to be more distressed than their wives (p<0.0001). Men also reported receiving more support from their wives than did the female spouses (p<0.0005). The gender differences found in our study imply that men (healthy or sick) tend to receive more support than they give to their wives. It also implies that men do not use the support they receive as effectively as their wives. Thus, although men report higher levels of support from their spouses, they also report higher levels of psychological distress. Practical implications are discussed.

  7. Linkage and microarray analyses of susceptibility genes in ACI/Seg rats: a model for prostate cancers in the aged.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shugo; Nomoto, Tomoko; Kondo, Yasushi; Wakazono, Kuniko; Tsujino, Yoshimi; Sugimura, Takashi; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Homma, Yukio; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2005-04-01

    ACI/Seg (ACI) rats develop prostate cancers spontaneously with aging, similar to humans. Here, to identify genes involved in prostate cancer susceptibility, we did linkage analysis and oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Linkage analysis was done using 118 effective rats, and prostate cancer susceptibility 1 (Pcs1), whose ACI allele dominantly induced prostate cancers, was mapped on chromosome 19 [logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 5.0]. PC resistance 1 (Pcr1), whose ACI allele dominantly and paradoxically suppressed the size of prostate cancers, was mapped on chromosome 2 (LOD score of 5.0). When linkage analysis was done in 51 rats with single or no macroscopic testicular tumors, which had larger prostates and higher testosterone levels than those with bilateral testicular tumors, Pcs2 and Pcr2 were mapped on chromosomes 20 and 1, respectively. By oligonucleotide microarray analysis with 8,800 probe sets and confirmation by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, only two genes within these four loci were found to be differentially expressed >1.8-fold. Membrane metalloendopeptidase (Mme), known to inhibit androgen-independent growth of prostate cancers, on Pcr1 was expressed 2.0- to 5.5-fold higher in the ACI prostate, in accordance with its paradoxical effect. Cdkn1a on Pcs2 was expressed 1.5- to 4.5-fold lower in the ACI prostate. Additionally, genes responsible for testicular tumors and unilateral renal agenesis were mapped on chromosomes 11 and 14, respectively. These results showed that prostate cancer susceptibility of ACI rats involves at least four loci, and suggested Mme and Cdkn1a as candidates for Pcr1 and Pcs2.

  8. Comparative clinicopathological and outcome analysis of differentiated thyroid cancer in Saudi patients aged below 60 years and above 60 years

    PubMed Central

    AL-Qahtani, Khalid Hussain; Tunio, Mutahir A; Asiri, Mushabbab Al; Bayoumi, Yasser; Balbaid, Ali; Aljohani, Naji J; Fatani, Hanadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of differentiated thyroid cancer in Saudi patients aged above 60 years. Materials and methods Comparative analysis was performed in 252 patients aged 46–60 years (Group A) and 118 patients aged above 60 years (Group B), who had thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine-131, and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression therapy between July 2000 and December 2012. Different clinicopathological features, treatment, complications, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were compared. Results Mean age of patients in Group A was 51.9 years (range: 46–60), and mean age of those in Group B was 68.6 years (range: 62–97). Group B patients had higher positive lymph nodes (43.2%), P=0.011. The frequency of extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, and lymphovascular space invasion was seen more in Group B than in Group A. Postsurgical complications (permanent hypoparathyroidism, bleeding, and wound infections) were also seen more in Group B (P=0.043, P=0.011, and P=0.021, respectively). Group B patients experienced more locoregional recurrences (11.0%, P=0.025); similarly, more distant metastases were observed in Group B (15.3%, P=0.003). The 10-year disease-free survival rates were 87.6% in Group A and 70.8% in Group B (P<0.0001). Conclusion Differentiated thyroid cancer in patients aged above 60 years are more aggressive biologically and associated with a worse prognosis, and the morbidity is significantly high as compared to patients aged below 60 years. PMID:27621604

  9. A comparison of criteria to identify inflammatory breast cancer cases from medical records and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data base, 2007-2009.

    PubMed

    Hirko, Kelly A; Soliman, Amr S; Banerjee, Mousumi; Ruterbusch, Julie; Harford, Joe B; Merajver, Sofia D; Schwartz, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a relatively rare and extremely aggressive form of breast cancer that is diagnosed clinically. Standardization of clinical diagnoses is challenging, both nationally and internationally; moreover, IBC coding definitions used by registries have changed over time. This study aimed to compare diagnostic factors of IBC reported in a U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry to clinical criteria found in the medical records of all invasive breast cancer cases at a single institution. We conducted a medical record review of all female invasive breast cancers (n = 915) seen at an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in Detroit from 2007 to 2009. IBC cases were identified based on the presence of the main clinical characteristics of the disease (erythema, edema, peau d'orange). We compared the proportion of IBC out of all breast cancers, using these clinical criteria and the standard SEER IBC codes. In the reviewed cases, the clinical criteria identified significantly more IBC cases (n = 74, 8.1%) than the standard IBC SEER definition (n = 19, 2.1%; p < 0.0001). No IBC cases were identified in the cancer center records using the SEER pathologic coding, which requires the diagnosis of inflammatory carcinoma on the pathology report, a notation that is rarely made. Emphasis must be placed on the documentation of clinical and pathologic characteristics of IBC in the medical record, so that analysis of putative IBC subtypes will be possible. Our results indicate the need for a consensus on the definition of IBC to be utilized in future research.

  10. Is cancer a metabolic rebellion against host aging? In the quest for immortality, tumor cells try to save themselves by boosting mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ertel, Adam; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Birbe, Ruth C; Pavlides, Stephanos; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-01-15

    Aging drives large systemic reductions in oxidative mitochondrial function, shifting the entire body metabolically towards aerobic glycolysis, a.k.a, the Warburg effect. Aging is also one of the most significant risk factors for the development of human cancers, including breast tumors. How are these two findings connected? One simplistic idea is that cancer cells rebel against the aging process by increasing their capacity for oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS). Then, local and systemic aerobic glycolysis in the aging host would provide energy-rich mitochondrial fuels (such as L-lactate and ketones) to directly "fuel" tumor cell growth and metastasis. This would establish a type of parasite-host relationship or "two-compartment tumor metabolism", with glycolytic/oxidative metabolic-coupling. The cancer cells ("the seeds") would flourish in this nutrient-rich microenvironment ("the soil"), which has been fertilized by host aging. In this scenario, cancer cells are only trying to save themselves from the consequences of aging, by engineering a metabolic mutiny, through the amplification of mitochondrial metabolism. We discuss the recent findings of Drs. Ron DePinho (MD Anderson) and Craig Thomspson (Sloan-Kettering) that are also consistent with this new hypothesis, linking cancer progression with metabolic aging. Using data mining and bioinformatics approaches, we also provide key evidence of a role for PGC1a/NRF1 signaling in the pathogenesis of (1) two-compartment tumor metabolism, and (2) mitochondrial biogenesis in human breast cancer cells.

  11. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Gastric Cancer Patients Aged over 80 Years: A Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Kee Wook; Kim, Do Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Kim, Jin-Ho; Han, Seungbong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims The average human life expectancy is increasing worldwide, thus the proportion of elderly gastric cancer patients is also increasing. In this case-control study, we investigated the clinical and oncologic outcomes of gastric cancer in patients over 80 years old. Methods From January 2004 to December 2010, 291 patients aged over 80 years old (case group) were diagnosed and treated with gastric cancer at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. From the same period, 291 patients aged 18 to 80 years old were selected as the control group. The clinical findings and clinical outcomes of gastric cancer were retrospectively reviewed and compared between the two groups. Results There were significant differences in the overall 5-year survival rate between the case and control groups (30.9% vs. 73.8%, respectively; P<0.001). In patients who received the curative treatment, overall 3- and 5-year survival rates showed 74.3% and 57.9% in case group and 91.6% and 86.5% in the control group. When analysis was confined to resectable elderly patients with a favorable performance, the curative resection group showed significantly better overall 3- and 5-year survival rates than the conservative treatment group (73.7% and 58.8% vs. 29.8% and 0%, respectively). Conclusions Although elderly gastric cancer patients show an advanced stage at diagnosis and poor prognosis compared with non-elderly patients, elderly patients with good performance could benefit from curative resection. Thus, the clinical decision whether to undergo curative resection or conservative management should be made on an individualized basis. PMID:27942044

  12. Do Age and Quality of Life of the Cancer Patient Influence Quality of Life of the Caregiver?

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Varun; Lapid, Maria I.; Kung, Simon; Atherton, Pamela J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Clark, Matthew M.; Rummans, Teresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are significant burdens associated with providing care for loved ones with cancer. However, caregiver quality of life (QOL) is often overlooked. With the increasing number of older adults with cancer, it is important to determine whether a patient’s age and QOL have any association with the caregiver’s QOL. Objective The objective of our study was to describe caregiver QOL and explore whether patient age and other psychosocial factors impact caregiver QOL. Design Baseline information from patients with advanced cancer undergoing radiation and their caregivers, who were enrolled in a randomized, controlled clinical trial to test the effectiveness of a structured, multidisciplinary QOL intervention, was analyzed for this study. Measurement Caregivers completed the Caregiver Quality of Life Index—Cancer Scale (CQOLC). Both patients and caregivers completed the Linear Analogue Self-Assessment (LASA) to measure QOL, and Profile of Mood States (POMS) to measure mood states. Results Overall, 131 patient-caregiver pairs participated in the study. At baseline, caregivers of older adults (≥65 years) had higher mental (P=0.01), emotional (P=0.003), spiritual (P<0.01), and social support (P=0.03) LASA QOL scores. Caregivers of older adults also had higher baseline QOL (CQOLC, P=0.003) and mood (POMS, P=0.04) than caregivers of younger adults. Caregivers of patients with higher LASA QOL scores had higher overall (P=0.02), mental (P=0.006), physical (P=0.02), emotional (P=0.002), and spiritual LASA QOL scores (P=0.047). Conclusions Caregivers of older adults with advanced cancer demonstrated better QOL and fewer mood disturbances compared to caregivers of younger patients. When patients have good QOL, caregivers also had good QOL. PMID:24726867

  13. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence in Invasive Anal Cancers in the United States prior to Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Steinau, M; Unger, ER; Hernandez, BY; Goodman, MT; Copeland, G; Hopenhayn, C; Cozen, W; Saber, MS; Huang, Y; Peters, ES; Lynch, CF; Wilkinson, EJ; Rajeevan, MS; Lyu, C; Saraiya, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conduct a representative survey of Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and its genotype distribution in invasive anal cancer specimens in the U.S. Methods Population-based archival anal cancer specimens were identified from Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana and Michigan cancer registries and SEER tissue repositories in Hawaii, Iowa and Los Angeles. Sections from one representative block per case were used for DNA extraction. All extracts were assayed first by Linear Array and re-tested with INNO-LiPA if inadequate or HPV negative. Results Among 146 unique invasive anal cancer cases, 93 (63.7%) were from women and 53 (36.3%) from men. HPV (any type) was detected in 133 (91.1%) cases and 129 (88.4%) contained at least one high risk type, most (80.1%) as a single genotype. HPV16 had the highest prevalence (113 cases, 77.4%); HPV6, 11, 18 and 33 were also found multiple times. Among HPV16 positive cases, 37% were identified as prototype variant Ep and 63% were non-prototypes: 33% Em, 12% E-G131G, 5% Af1, 4% AA/NA-1, 3% E-C109G, 3% E-G131T, 2% As and 1% Af2. No significant differences in the distributions of HPV (any), high-risk types, or HPV16/18 were seen between gender, race or age group. Conclusions The establishment of pre-vaccine HPV prevalence in the U.S. is critical to the surveillance of vaccine efficacy. Almost 80% of anal cancers were positive for the vaccine types HPV16 or HPV18 and in 70% these were the only types detected suggesting that a high proportion might be preventable by current vaccines. PMID:23609590

  14. Identification of Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Using Databases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunhye; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death in women. Many studies have sought to identify specific molecules involved in breast cancer and understand their characteristics. Many biomarkers which are easily measurable, dependable, and inexpensive, with a high sensitivity and specificity have been identified. The rapidly increasing technology development and availability of epigenetic informations play critical roles in cancer. The accumulated data have been collected, stored, and analyzed in various types of databases. It is important to acknowledge useful and available data and retrieve them from databases. Nowadays, many researches utilize the databases, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER), and Embase, to find useful informations on biomarkers for breast cancer. This review summarizes the current databases which have been utilized for identification of biomarkers for breast cancer. The information provided by this review would be beneficial to seeking appropriate strategies for diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:28053957

  15. Effect of reduced oxygen atmosphere and sodium acetate treatment on the microbial quality changes of seer fish (Scomberomorus commerson) steaks stored in ice.

    PubMed

    Mohan, C O; Ravishankar, C N; Srinivasa Gopal, T K; Lalitha, K V; Asok Kumar, K

    2010-06-01

    The effect of reduced oxygen atmosphere and sodium acetate treatment on the microbial quality of seer fish (Scomberomorus commerson) steaks was determined during chilled storage (1-2 degrees C). The O2 absorber reduced the oxygen content in the pack to less than 0.01% corresponding to 99.96% reduction within 24 h. The use of O2 absorber with sodium acetate dip treatment (2% w/v) extended the sensory shelf life up to 25 days compared to only 12 days for control air packs and 20 days for untreated samples with O2 absorber. A prominent lag phase was observed for many bacterium studied, particularly for the sodium acetate treated samples with O2 absorber. On the day of sensory rejection, both the total mesophilic and psychrotrophic counts reached 7.7-8.1 and 7.1-7.9 log cfu/g, respectively. The sodium acetate treatment and reduced O2 atmosphere affected the type of major spoilers. In air packed samples, H2S-producers predominated followed by Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., where as in the untreated samples with O2 absorber, H2S-producers predominated the microbial flora followed by Lactobacillus spp. For treated samples with O2 absorber, B. thermosphacta formed the major micro-flora followed by Lactobacillus spp. The use of O2 absorber inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas spp., and total Enterobacteriaceae.

  16. Incorporation of alpha-fetoprotein(AFP) into subclassification of BCLC C stage hepatocellular carcinoma according to a 5-year survival analysis based on the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Wu, Jing; Du, Ming-yu; Ding, Kai; Huang, Teng; He, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of serum alpha-fetoprotein(AFP) on prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and put forward a proposal to modify BCLC staging system and the recommended treatment of patients with stage C. Results AFP positive was an independent poor prognostic factor of HCC. Race, pathological grade, T stage, M stage were also regarded to be significant predicted factors for poorer prognosis. When combining AFP status with AJCC stage, patients with A1 disease had a worse prognosis compared with those with A0 disease within each stage. Patients with A1 disease of each T/N stage had a worse prognosis than patients with A0 disease of the respective stage, and the prognosis of patients with A1 disease with lower T stages was worse or similar to that of patients with A0 disease of higher T stages. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective study of all patients histologically diagnosed HCC from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2008, from the SEER database. Conclusions AFP can be used as a subclassification index to modify the AJCC staging system of HCC. Since BCLC stage is the most widely used staging system, we recommend routine pre-treatment AFP testing as standard of care in HCC and incorporate AFP status into the BCLC staging system to modify the recommended treatment of patients with stage C. PMID:27835609

  17. A case-control study to assess the impact of mammographic density on breast cancer risk in women aged 40-49 at intermediate familial risk.

    PubMed

    Assi, Valentina; Massat, Nathalie J; Thomas, Susan; MacKay, James; Warwick, Jane; Kataoka, Masako; Warsi, Iqbal; Brentnall, Adam; Warren, Ruth; Duffy, Stephen W

    2015-05-15

    Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but its potential application in risk management is not clear, partly due to uncertainties about its interaction with other breast cancer risk factors. We aimed to quantify the impact of mammographic density on breast cancer risk in women aged 40-49 at intermediate familial risk of breast cancer (average lifetime risk of 23%), in particular in premenopausal women, and to investigate its relationship with other breast cancer risk factors in this population. We present the results from a case-control study nested with the FH01 cohort study of 6,710 women mostly aged 40-49 at intermediate familial risk of breast cancer. One hundred and three cases of breast cancer were age-matched to one or two controls. Density was measured by semiautomated interactive thresholding. Absolute density, but not percent density, was a significant risk factor for breast cancer in this population after adjusting for area of nondense tissue (OR per 10 cm(2) = 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.15, p = 0.04). The effect was stronger in premenopausal women, who made up the majority of the study population. Absolute density remained a significant predictor of breast cancer risk after adjusting for age at menarche, age at first live birth, parity, past or present hormone replacement therapy, and the Tyrer-Cuzick 10-year relative risk estimate of breast cancer. Absolute density can improve breast cancer risk stratification and delineation of high-risk groups alongside the Tyrer-Cuzick 10-year relative risk estimate.

  18. Quality of Life and Functional Status Across the Life Course. Project 2: Investigating Mechanisms to Explain Age Associated Differences in Quality of Life Among Breast Cancer Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    related quality of hfe of women who have been diagnosed with a first-time breast cancer. The study will examine psychosocial factors such as social...this research is to examine mechanisms that may explain age differences in the health- related quality of life of women who have been diagnosed with a...malignancy (excepting basal and squamous skin cancer and stage 0 cervical cancer) 3. Stage IV breast malignancy Women will be screened in clinic or by

  19. Maximizing Wellness in Successful Aging and Cancer Coping: The Importance of Family Communication from a Socioemotional Selectivity Theoretical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Carla L; Nussbaum, Jon F

    Interpersonal communication is a fundamental part of being and key to health. Interactions within family are especially critical to wellness across time. Family communication is a central means of adaptation to stress, coping, and successful aging. Still, no theoretical argument in the discipline exists that prioritizes kin communication in health. Theoretical advances can enhance interventions and policies that improve family life. This article explores socioemotional selectivity theory (SST), which highlights communication in our survival. Communication partner choice is based on one's time perspective, which affects our prioritization of goals to survive-goals sought socially. This is a first test of SST in a family communication study on women's health and aging. More than 300 women of varying ages and health status participated. Two time factors, later adulthood and late-stage breast cancer, lead women to prioritize family communication. Findings provide a theoretical basis for prioritizing family communication issues in health reform.

  20. Hot flushes in healthy aging men differ from those in men with prostate cancer and in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anna-Clara Spetz; Thorell, Lars-Håkan; Theodorsson, Elvar; Hammar, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to be involved in hot flushes in women and in castrated men. Therefore, we studied whether the plasma concentrations of CGRP changed during flushes in a group of healthy aging men. Twelve men (49-71 years) with no history of current or former prostate cancer or hormonal treatment reporting ≥ 20 flushes/week were investigated. Blood samples were drawn during and between flushes for analysis of CGRP and also androgen concentrations, that is, testosterone and bioavailable testosterone were analysed. Skin temperature and skin conductance were monitored. Thirty-five flushes were reported by 10 men. The plasma concentrations of CGRP did not increase during flushes. No significant change in skin temperature or conductance was found. CGRP is probably not involved in the mechanisms of flushes in healthy aging men. Therefore, flushes in aging healthy men seem to be different from flushes in men and women deprived of sex steroids where CGRP increases during flushes.

  1. Metformin against TGFβ-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT): from cancer stem cells to aging-associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cufí, Silvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2010-11-15

    Transforming Growth Factor-b (TGFb) is a major driving force of the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal (EMT) genetic program, which becomes overactive in the pathophysiology of many age-related human diseases.  TGFb-driven EMT is sufficient to generate migrating cancer stem cells by directly linking the acquisition of cellular motility with the maintenance of tumor-initiating (stemness) capacity.  Chronic diseases exhibiting excessive fibrosis can be caused by repeated and sustained infliction of TGFb-driven EMT, which increases collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis.  Pharmacological prevention and/or reversal of TGFb-induced EMT may therefore have important clinical applications in the management of cancer metastasis as well as in the prevention and/or treatment of end-state organ failures.  Earlier studies from our group have revealed that clinically-relevant concentrations of the biguanide derivative metformin, the most widely used oral agent to lower blood glucose concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, notably decreased both the self-renewal and the proliferation of trastuzumab-refractory breast cancer stem cell populations.  Given that: a.) tumor-initiating cancer stem cells display a significant enrichment in the expression of basal/mesenchymal or myoepithelial markers, including an increased secretion of TGFb; b.) metformin treatment impedes the ontogeny of generating the stem cell phenotype by transcriptionally repressing key drivers of the EMT genetic program (e.g. ZEB1, TWIST1, SNAIL2 [Slug], TGFbs), we recently hypothesized that prevention of TGFb-induced EMT might represent a common molecular mechanism underlying the anti-cancer stem cells and anti-fibrotic actions of metformin.  Remarkably, metformin exposure not only impedes TGFb-promoted loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells but it prevents further TGF-induced cell scattering and accumulation of the mesenchymal marker vimentin in

  2. The impact of a breast cancer diagnosis on health-related quality of life. A prospective comparison among middle-aged to elderly women with and without breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Randi V; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Larsen, Matilde B; von Heymann-Horan, Annika B; Appel, Charlotte W; Christensen, Jane; Tjønneland, Anne; Ross, Lone; Johansen, Christoffer; Bidstrup, Pernille E

    2016-06-01

    Background The improved survival after breast cancer has prompted knowledge on the effect of a breast cancer diagnosis on health-related quality of life (HQoL). This study compared changes in HQoL among women from before to after breast cancer diagnosis with longitudinal changes among women who remained breast cancer-free. Material and methods The Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study included 57 053 cancer-free persons aged 50-64 years at baseline (1993-1997). We used data from first follow-up (1999-2002) and second follow-up (2010-2012) on HQoL [Medical Outcomes Survey, short form (SF-36)] obtained from 542 women aged 64-82 years with primary breast cancer (stages I-III) and a randomly matched sample of 729 women who remained breast cancer-free. Linear regression models were used to estimate the differences in changes in HQoL between women with and without breast cancer; the analyses were repeated with stratification according to age, comorbidity, partner support and time since diagnosis. Results Women with breast cancer reported significantly larger decreases in HQoL from before to after diagnosis than those who remained breast cancer-free (physical component summary, -2.0; 95% CI -2.8; -1.2, mental component summary, -1.5, 95% CI -2.3; -0.6). This association was significantly modified by comorbidity and time since diagnosis. Conclusions Women with breast cancer reported significantly larger HQoL declines than breast cancer-free women. Breast cancer diagnosis seems to have the greatest impact on HQoL closest to diagnosis and in women with comorbidity indicating that this group should be offered timely and appropriate follow-up care to prevent HQoL declines.

  3. Sipuleucel-T: harbinger of a new age of therapeutics for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Ravi A.; Gulley, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is the first therapeutic cancer vaccine approved by the U.S. FDA. The approval heralds the long-awaited promise of improved patient survival with minimal toxicity by therapies designed to generate an active, specific anticancer immune response. The development of this first-in-class agent has also led to a better understanding of relevant patient populations and endpoints for clinical trials, findings that are relevant for other clinical trials of therapeutic vaccines in prostate cancer and other cancers. This article discusses the development and approval of sipuleucel-T in the context of other approved therapies for prostate cancer, as well as controversies and novel paradigms brought about by this new agent. PMID:21332262

  4. NIH Study Offers Insight into Why Cancer Incidence Increases with Age

    MedlinePlus

    ... increases cancer risk remains unclear. Researchers suspect that DNA methylation, or the binding of chemical tags, called methyl groups, onto DNA, may be involved. Methyl groups activate or silence ...

  5. What Prevents Men Aged 40–64 Years from Prostate Cancer Screening in Namibia?

    PubMed Central

    Kangmennaang, Joseph; Mkandawire, Paul; Luginaah, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Although a growing body of evidence demonstrates the public health burden of prostate cancer in SSA, relatively little is known about the underlying factors surrounding the low levels of testing for the disease in the context of this region. Using Namibia Demographic Health Survey dataset (NDHS, 2013), we examined the factors that influence men's decision to screen for prostate cancer in Namibia. Methods. We use complementary log-log regression models to explore the determinants of screening for prostate cancer. We also corrected for the effect of unobserved heterogeneity that may affect screening behaviours at the cluster level. Results. The results show that health insurance coverage (OR = 2.95, p = 0.01) is an important predictor of screening for prostate cancer in Namibia. In addition, higher education and discussing reproductive issues with a health worker (OR = 2.02, p = 0.05) were more likely to screening for prostate cancer. Conclusions. A universal health insurance scheme may be necessary to increase uptake of prostate cancer screening. However it needs to be acknowledged that expanded screening can have negative consequences and any allocation of scarce resources towards screening must be guided by evidence obtained from the local context about the costs and benefits of screening. PMID:26880917

  6. Canadian National Breast Screening Study: 1. Breast cancer detection and death rates among women aged 40 to 49 years.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A B; Baines, C J; To, T; Wall, C

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of the combination of annual screening with mammography, physical examination of the breasts and the teaching of breast self-examination in reducing the rate of death from breast cancer among women aged 40 to 49 years on entry. DESIGN: Individually randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Fifteen urban centres in Canada with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PARTICIPANTS: Women with no history of breast cancer and no mammography in the previous 12 months were randomly assigned to undergo either annual mammography and physical examination (MP group) or usual care after an initial physical examination (UC group). The 50,430 women enrolled from January 1980 through March 1985 were followed for a mean of 8.5 years. DATA COLLECTION: Derived from the participants by initial and annual self-administered questionnaires, from the screening examinations, from the patients' physicians, from the provincial cancer registries and by record linkage to the Canadian National Mortality Data Base. Expert panels evaluated histologic and death data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of referral from screening, rates of detection of breast cancer from screening and from community care, nodal status, tumour size, and rates of death from all causes and from breast cancer. RESULTS: Over 90% of the women in each group attended the screening sessions or returned the annual questionnaires, or both, over years 2 to 5. The characteristics of the women in the two groups were similar. Compared with the Canadian population, the participants were more likely to be married, have fewer children, have more education, be in a professional occupation, smoke less and have been born in North America. The rate of screen-detected breast cancer on first examination was 3.89 per 1000 in the MP group and 2.46 per 1000 in the UC group; more node-positive tumours were found in the MP group than in the UC group. During years 2 through 5 the ratios of observed

  7. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive ageing to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I.; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K.; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy E.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A.; Franke, Lude L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Keller, Margaux F.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Nutile, Teresa; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Schick, Ursula M.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Yao, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Corre, Tanguy; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Mangino, Massimo; Smith, Albert V.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Abecasis, Goncalo; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Alice M.; Barbieri, Caterina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bernstein, Leslie; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Blomqvist, Carl; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boutin, Thibaud S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Campbell, Archie; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chapman, J. Ross; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Coviello, Andrea D.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M.; Eicher, John D.; Fasching, Peter A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gandin, Ilaria; Garcia, Melissa E.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Girotto, Giorgia G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grove, Megan L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Henderson, Brian E.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Frank B.; Huang, Jinyan; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Samuel E.; Kabisch, Maria; Karasik, David; Knight, Julia A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooperberg, Charles; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Jingmei; Li, Xin; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Yongmei; Luan, Jian’an; Lubinski, Jan; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Manz, Judith; Margolin, Sara; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Masciullo, Corrado; Meindl, Alfons; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Michael; Neale, Ben M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Newman, Anne B.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Olson, Janet E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peters, Ulrike; Petersmann, Astrid; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Pirastu, Nicola N.; Pirie, Ailith; Pistis, Giorgio; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sanna, Serena; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmidt, Frank; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Scott, Robert A.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Simard, Jacques; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C.; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Swerdlow, Anthony; Taylor, Kent D.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Turner, Stephen T.; Vozzi, Diego; Wang, Qin; Wellons, Melissa; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce B.H.R.; Wright, Alan F.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zheng, Wei; Zygmunt, Marek; Bergmann, Sven; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Montgomery, Grant W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Tim D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Ciullo, Marina; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F.; Gasparini, Paolo P.; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kraft, Peter; McKnight, Barbara; Metspalu, Andres; Morrison, Alanna C.; Reiner, Alex P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Price, Alkes L.; Stefansson, Kari; Visser, Jenny A.; Ong, Ken K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Murabito, Joanne M.; Perry, John R.B.; Murray, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ~70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two harbouring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in/near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses revealed a major association with DNA damage-response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomisation analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (~6% risk increase per-year, P=3×10−14), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure, rather than DDR mechanisms. PMID:26414677

  8. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive aging to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Day, Felix R; Ruth, Katherine S; Thompson, Deborah J; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Andrew D; Elks, Cathy E; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A; Franke, Lude L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Keller, Margaux F; McArdle, Patrick F; Nutile, Teresa; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Schick, Ursula M; Smith, Jennifer A; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Yao, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Corre, Tanguy; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Mangino, Massimo; Smith, Albert V; Tanaka, Toshiko; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antoniou, Antonis C; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Alice M; Barbieri, Caterina; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bernstein, Leslie; Bielinski, Suzette J; Blomqvist, Carl; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boutin, Thibaud S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Campbell, Archie; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chapman, J Ross; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M; Eicher, John D; Fasching, Peter A; Faul, Jessica D; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gandin, Ilaria; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Girotto, Giorgia G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grove, Megan L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Henderson, Brian E; Hocking, Lynne J; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Huang, Jinyan; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Samuel E; Kabisch, Maria; Karasik, David; Knight, Julia A; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooperberg, Charles; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Jingmei; Li, Xin; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Yongmei; Luan, Jian'an; Lubinski, Jan; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Manz, Judith; Margolin, Sara; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G; Masciullo, Corrado; Meindl, Alfons; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Michael; Neale, Benjamin M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Newman, Anne B; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Olson, Janet E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peters, Ulrike; Petersmann, Astrid; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pirastu, Nicola N; Pirie, Ailith; Pistis, Giorgio; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Psaty, Bruce M; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Raffel, Leslie J; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sanna, Serena; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmidt, Frank; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Scott, Robert A; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Simard, Jacques; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Swerdlow, Anthony; Taylor, Kent D; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Turner, Stephen T; Vozzi, Diego; Wang, Qin; Wellons, Melissa; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce B H R; Wright, Alan F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zheng, Wei; Zygmunt, Marek; Bergmann, Sven; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E; Ferrucci, Luigi; Montgomery, Grant W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Tim D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Ciullo, Marina; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F; Gasparini, Paolo P; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Hayward, Caroline; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kraft, Peter; McKnight, Barbara; Metspalu, Andres; Morrison, Alanna C; Reiner, Alex P; Ridker, Paul M; Rotter, Jerome I; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Price, Alkes L; Stefansson, Kari; Visser, Jenny A; Ong, Ken K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Murabito, Joanne M; Perry, John R B; Murray, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ∼70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two regions harboring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in or near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses identified major association with DNA damage response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomization analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (∼6% increase in risk per year; P = 3 × 10(-14)), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure rather than DDR mechanisms.

  9. Computer-aided discovery of biological activity spectra for anti-aging and anti-cancer olive oil oleuropeins.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Santangelo, Elvira; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Micol, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Ariza, Xavier; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; García, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with common conditions, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The type of multi-targeted pharmacological approach necessary to address a complex multifaceted disease such as aging might take advantage of pleiotropic natural polyphenols affecting a wide variety of biological processes. We have recently postulated that the secoiridoids oleuropein aglycone (OA) and decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone (DOA), two complex polyphenols present in health-promoting extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), might constitute a new family of plant-produced gerosuppressant agents. This paper describes an analysis of the biological activity spectra (BAS) of OA and DOA using PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software. PASS can predict thousands of biological activities, as the BAS of a compound is an intrinsic property that is largely dependent on the compound's structure and reflects pharmacological effects, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of action, and specific toxicities. Using Pharmaexpert, a tool that analyzes the PASS-predicted BAS of substances based on thousands of "mechanism-effect" and "effect-mechanism" relationships, we illuminate hypothesis-generating pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and targets that might underlie the anti-aging/anti-cancer activities of the gerosuppressant EVOO oleuropeins.

  10. Computer-aided discovery of biological activity spectra for anti-aging and anti-cancer olive oil oleuropeins

    PubMed Central

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Santangelo, Elvira; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Micol, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Ariza, Xavier; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; García, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with common conditions, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The type of multi-targeted pharmacological approach necessary to address a complex multifaceteddisease such as aging might take advantage of pleiotropic natural polyphenols affecting a wide variety of biological processes. We have recently postulated that the secoiridoids oleuropein aglycone (OA) and decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone (DOA), two complex polyphenols present in health-promoting extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), might constitute anew family of plant-produced gerosuppressant agents. This paper describes an analysis of the biological activity spectra (BAS) of OA and DOA using PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software. PASS can predict thousands of biological activities, as the BAS of a compound is an intrinsic property that is largely dependent on the compound's structure and reflects pharmacological effects, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of action, and specific toxicities. Using Pharmaexpert, a tool that analyzes the PASS-predicted BAS of substances based on thousands of “mechanism-effect” and “effect-mechanism” relationships, we illuminate hypothesis-generating pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and targets that might underlie the anti-aging/anti-cancer activities of the gerosuppressant EVOO oleuropeins. PMID:25324469

  11. Evaluation of a web‐based weight loss intervention in overweight cancer survivors aged 50 years and younger

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, C. T.; Brown, J. C.; Berardi, J. M.; Vaughn, D.; Domchek, S.; Filseth, S.; Branas, A.; Weiss‐Trainor, E.; Schmitz, K. H.; Sarwer, D. B.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Purpose Half of adult cancer survivors under age 50 years are obese. Excess body weight is associated with cancer recurrence, and effective weight loss interventions for younger cancer survivors are needed. Commercially available, online weight loss programmes are readily accessible, but few have been studied in this population. This study employed a single‐arm, pre‐post intervention (baseline‐6 month/baseline‐12 month comparisons) to preliminarily explore feasibility, efficacy and safety of an online, commercially available weight loss programme in breast (n = 30) and testicular (n = 16) cancer survivors under age 50 years. Methods The intervention included three daily components: exercise, nutritional/behavioural modification strategies and health lessons. Intention‐to‐treat and completers analyses were conducted. Feasibility was measured by participation (number of participants enrolled/number screened), retention (number of participants attending 6/12 month study visit/number of enrolled) and self‐reported adherence rates (average of mean percent adherence to each of the three intervention components). Efficacy was assessed by changes in initial weight (percent weight loss). Safety was assessed by adverse events. Results The mean participation rate was 42%. The retention rate was 59% at 6 and 49% at 12 months. The adherence rate for all participants (completers/dropouts/lost‐to‐follow‐up) was 50.1% at 6 and 44% at 12 months. Completers reported adherence rates of 68% at 12 months. Study participants lost 5.3% body weight at 12 months; completers lost 9%. Only three unexpected adverse events (unrelated to the intervention) were reported. Conclusion Clinically significant weight loss was observed, although retention rates were low. Findings generally support preliminary feasibility, efficacy and safety of this online weight loss programme, and future randomized control trials should be explored. PMID:28392934

  12. Looking, Feeling, and Doing: Are There Age Differences in Attention, Mood and Behavioral Responses to Skin Cancer Information?

    PubMed Central

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Choi, YoonSun

    2012-01-01

    Overview Previous studies on aging and attention to emotional information found that older adults may look away from negative stimuli to regulate their moods. However, it is an open question whether older adults’ tendency to look less at negative material comes at the expense of learning when negative information is also health-relevant. This study investigated how age-related changes in attention to negative but relevant information about skin cancer risk reduction influenced both subsequent health behavior and mood regulation. Methods Younger (18-25, n = 78) and older (60-92, n = 77) adults’ fixations toward videos containing negatively-valenced content and risk-reduction information about skin cancer were recorded with eye-tracking. Self-reported mood ratings were measured throughout. Behavioral outcome measures (e.g., answering knowledge questions about skin cancer, choosing a sunscreen, completing a skin self-exam) assessed participants’ learning of key health-relevant information, their interest in seeking additional information, and their engagement in protective behaviors. Results Older adults generally looked less at the negative video content, more rapidly regulated their moods, and learned fewer facts about skin cancer; yet, they engaged in a greater number of protective behaviors than did younger adults. Conclusions Older adults may demonstrate an efficient looking strategy that extracts important information without disrupting their moods, and they may compensate for less learning by engaging in a greater number of protective behaviors. Younger adults may be distracted by disruptions to their mood, constraining their engagement in protective behaviors. PMID:22149125

  13. Age and Comorbid Illness Are Associated With Late Rectal Toxicity Following Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Stenmark, Matt H.; Ritter, Tim; Litzenberg, Dale; Jackson, William; Johnson, Skyler; Albrecht-Unger, Liesel; Donaghy, Alex; Phelps, Laura; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Marsh, Robin; Olson, Karin; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts of patient age and comorbid illness on rectal toxicity following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the Qualitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model in this context. Methods and Materials: Rectal toxicity was analyzed in 718 men previously treated for prostate cancer with EBRT (≥75 Gy). Comorbid illness was scored using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCMI), and the NTCP was evaluated with the QUANTEC model. The influence of clinical and treatment-related parameters on rectal toxicity was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The cumulative incidence of rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was 9.5% and 11.6% at 3 and 5 years and 3.3% and 3.9% at 3 and 5 years for grade ≥3 toxicity, respectively. Each year of age predicted an increasing relative risk of grade ≥2 (P<.03; hazard ratio [HR], 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.06]) and ≥3 rectal toxicity (P<.0001; HR, 1.14 [95% CI,1.07-1.22]). Increasing CCMI predicted rectal toxicity where a history of either myocardial infarction (MI) (P<.0001; HR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.9-13.7]) or congestive heart failure (CHF) (P<.0006; HR, 5.4 [95% CI, 0.6-47.5]) predicted grade ≥3 rectal toxicity, with lesser correlation with grade ≥2 toxicity (P<.02 for MI, and P<.09 for CHF). An age comorbidity model to predict rectal toxicity was developed and confirmed in a validation cohort. The use of anticoagulants increased toxicity independent of age and comorbidity. NTCP was prognostic for grade ≥3 (P=.015) but not grade ≥2 (P=.49) toxicity. On multivariate analysis, age, MI, CHF, and an NTCP >20% all correlated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: Patient