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Sample records for age seer cancer

  1. SEER Cancer Stat Fact Sheets

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  2. Disparities by race, age, and sex in the improvement of survival for major cancers: Results from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program in United States, 1990 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Chenjie; Wen, Wanqing; Morgans, Alicia K.; Pao, William; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Substantial progress has been made in cancer diagnosis and treatment, resulting in a steady improvement in cancer survival. The degree of improvement by age, race and sex remains unclear. OBJECTIVE to quantify the degree of survival improvement over time by age, race and sex in the United States. DESIGN Longitudinal analyses of cancer follow-up data. SETTING Cancer diagnosis data for 1990–2009 and follow-up data to 2010 from nine population-based registries, part of the NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. PARTICIPANTS Approximately 1.02 million patients from SEER registries diagnosed with cancer of the colon/rectum, breast, prostate, lung, liver, pancreas, or ovary from 1990–2009. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for cancer-specific death were estimated for patients diagnosed with any of these cancers during, 1995–1999, 2000–2004, and 2005–2009, compared diagnoses in 1990–1994. RESULTS Significant improvements in survival were found for cancers of the colon/rectum, breast, prostate, lung, and liver. Improvements were more pronounced for younger patients. For example, for patients aged 50–64 and diagnosed between 2005–2009, adjusted HRs (95%CI) were 0.57 (0.55–0.60), 0.48 (0.45–0.51), 0.61 (0.57–0.68), and 0.32 (0.30–0.36), for cancer of the colon/rectum, breast, liver and prostate, respectively, compared with the same age group of patients diagnosed during 1990–94. However, the corresponding HRs (95% CIs) for elderly patients (aged 75–85) were only 0.88 (0.84–0.82), 0.88 (0.84–0.92), 0.76 (0.69–0.84), and 0.65 (0.61–0.70), for the same four cancer sites, respectively. A similar, although weaker, age-related period effect was observed for lung and pancreatic cancers. The adjusted HRs (95%CIs) for lung cancer were 0.75 (95%CI, 0.73–0.77) and 0.84 (95%CI, 0.81–0.86), respectively, for patients aged 50 to 64 years and 75 to 85 years diagnosed

  3. More Fact Sheets - SEER Cancer Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  4. SEER Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute works to provide information on cancer statistics in an effort to reduce the burden of cancer among the U.S. population.

  5. Surgical Treatment of Colon Cancer in Patients Eighty Years of Age and Older: Analysis of 31,574 Patients in the SEER-Medicare Database

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Heather B.; O’Connor, Erin S.; Weiss, Jennifer; LoConte, Noelle K.; Greenblatt, David Y.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Age-related disparities in colon cancer treatment exist, with older patients less likely to receive recommended therapy. However, few studies have focused on receipt of surgery. The objective was to describe patterns of surgery in colon cancer patients ≥80 years and examine outcomes with and without colectomy. Methods Medicare beneficiaries ≥80 years with colon cancer diagnosed from 1992–2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results- Medicare database. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was utilized to assess factors associated with non-operative management. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis determined one-year overall and colon cancer-specific survival. Results Of 31,574 patients, 80% underwent colectomy. 46% occurred during an urgent/emergent admission, with decreased 1-year overall survival (70% vs. 86% during an elective admission). Factors most predictive of non-operative management include older age, black race, more hospital admissions, use of home oxygen, use of a wheel chair, being frail and dementia. For both operative and non-operative patients, one-year overall survival was lower than colon cancer-specific survival (colectomy 78% vs. 89%; no colectomy 58% vs. 78%). Conclusions Most older colon cancer patients are receiving surgery, with improved outcomes compared to non-operative management. However, many patients not selected for surgery die of unrelated causes, reflecting good surgical selection. Patients undergoing surgery during an urgent/emergent admission have an increased short-term mortality. As earlier detection of colon cancer may increase the proportion of older patients undergoing elective surgery, these findings have policy implications for colon cancer screening and suggest that age should not be the only factor driving cancer screening recommendations. PMID:22893570

  6. Representativeness of Participants in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS) Consortium Relative to the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Paul J.; Ayanian, John Z.; Weeks, Jane C.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Landrum, Mary Beth; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Lee, Jeannette; Pendergast, Jane; Harrington, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The research goals of the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance (CanCORS) Consortium are to determine how characteristics and beliefs of patients, providers, and health-care organizations influence the treatments and outcomes of individuals with newly diagnosed lung and colorectal cancers. Because CanCORS results will inform national policy, it is important to know how they generalize to the United States population with these cancers. Research Design This study assessed the representativeness of the CanCORS cohort of 10,547 patients with lung cancer (LC) or colorectal cancer (CRC) enrolled between 2003 and 2005. We compared characteristics (gender, race, age and disease stage) to the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population of 234,464 patients with new onset of these cancers during the CanCORS recruitment period. Results The CanCORS sample is well matched to the SEER Program for both cancers. In CanCORS, 41% LC / 47% CRC were female versus 47% LC / 49% CRC in SEER. African American, Hispanic and Asian cases differed by no more than 5 percentage points between CanCORS and SEER. The SEER population is slightly older, with the percentage of patients over 75 years 33.1% LC / 37.3% CRC in SEER versus 26.9% LC / 29.4% in CanCORS, and also has a slightly higher proportion of early stage patients. We also found that the CanCORS cohort was representative within specific SEER regions that map closely to CanCORS sites. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the CanCORS Consortium was successful in enrolling a demographically representative sample within the CanCORS regions. PMID:22406968

  7. Comparison of SEER Treatment Data With Medicare Claims

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Jennifer L.; Mariotto, Angela; Cronin, Kathleen; McNeel, Timothy; Deapen, Dennis; Warren, Joan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries collect information on first-course treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and hormone therapy. However, the SEER program does not release data on chemotherapy or hormone therapy due to uncertainties regarding data completeness. Activities are ongoing to investigate the opportunity to supplement SEER treatment data with other data sources. Methods: Using the linked SEER-Medicare data, we examined the validity of the SEER data to identify receipt of chemotherapy and radiation therapy among those aged 65 and older diagnosed from 2000 to 2006 with bladder, female breast, colorectal, lung, ovarian, pancreas, or prostate cancer and hormone therapy among men diagnosed with prostate cancer at age 65 or older. Treatment collected by SEER was compared with treatment as determined by Medicare claims, using Medicare claims as the gold standard. The κ, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values were calculated for the receipt of each treatment modality. Results: The overall sensitivity of SEER data to identify chemotherapy, radiation, and hormone therapy receipt was moderate (68%, 80%, and 69%, respectively) and varied by cancer site, stage, and patient characteristics. The overall positive predictive value was high (>85%) for all treatment types and cancer sites except chemotherapy for prostate cancer. Conclusions: SEER data should not generally be used for comparisons of treated and untreated individuals or to estimate the proportion of treated individuals in the population. Augmenting SEER data with other data sources will provide the most accurate treatment information. PMID:24638121

  8. Changing incidence of esophageal cancer among white women: analysis of SEER data (1992–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Rachna; Deorah, Sundeep; McDowell, Bradley D.; Hejleh, Taher Abu; Lynch, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse trends in the incidence rates of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus (ACE and SCC, respectively) in white women between 1992 and 2010. Material and methods We used data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER program to identify cases of esophageal cancer). Age adjusted incidence rates (IR) were calculated for ACE and SCC for two different time periods (1992–1996 and 2006–2010) and stratified by age, stage, and histologic type. We used joinpoint analysis to detect changes in rates between 1992 and 2010. Results Between the time periods 1992–1996 and 2006–2010, the age-adjusted incidence rates for SCC in white women decreased from 1.2/100,000 to 0.8/100,000 personyears, and for ACE it increased from 0.5/100,000 to 0.7/100,000 personyears. Similar to white men, the increase in the incidence of ACE was consistent for all stages and all age groups in white women. However, it was most pronounced in women aged 45–59 years, where the incidence of ACE (0.9/100,000 person-years) in 2006–2010 exceeded the incidence of SCC (0.6/100,000 person-years). On joinpoint regression analysis, an inflection point was seen in 1999 for ACE, indicating a slower rate of increase for ACE after 1999 (annual percentage change of 8.00 before 1999 vs. 0.88 starting in 1999). Conclusions The incidence of ACE is increasing in white women, irrespective of age or stage. Indeed, ACE is now more common than SCC in white women between 45 and 59 years of age. PMID:26557784

  9. The Association of Statin Use after Cancer Diagnosis with Survival in Pancreatic Cancer Patients: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.; Wu, Bechien; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Merz, Noel Bairey; Goodman, Marc T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer has poor prognosis and existing interventions provide a modest benefit. Statin has anti-cancer properties that might enhance survival in pancreatic cancer patients. We sought to determine whether statin treatment after cancer diagnosis is associated with longer survival in those with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Methods We analyzed data on 7813 elderly patients with PDAC using the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) - Medicare claims files. Information on the type, intensity and duration of statin use after cancer diagnosis was extracted from Medicare Part D. We treated statin as a time-dependent variable in a Cox regression model to determine the association with overall survival adjusting for follow-up, age, sex, race, neighborhood income, stage, grade, tumor size, pancreatectomy, chemotherapy, radiation, obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes, chronic pancreatitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Results Overall, statin use after cancer diagnosis was not significantly associated with survival when all PDAC patients were considered (HR = 0.94, 95%CI 0.89, 1.01). However, statin use after cancer diagnosis was associated with a 21% reduced hazard of death (Hazard ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67, 0.93) in those with grade I or II PDAC and to a similar extent in those who had undergone a pancreatectomy, in those with chronic pancreatitis and in those who had not been treated with statin prior to cancer diagnosis. Conclusions We found that statin treatment after cancer diagnosis is associated with enhanced survival in patients with low-grade, resectable PDAC. PMID:25830309

  10. Lung Cancer Survival Prediction using Ensemble Data Mining on Seer Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agrawal, Ankit; Misra, Sanchit; Narayanan, Ramanathan; Polepeddi, Lalith; Choudhary, Alok

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the lung cancer data available from the SEER program with the aim of developing accurate survival prediction models for lung cancer. Carefully designed preprocessing steps resulted in removal/modification/splitting of several attributes, and 2 of the 11 derived attributes were found to have significant predictive power. Several supervised classification methods were used on the preprocessed data along with various data mining optimizations and validations. In our experiments, ensemble voting of five decision tree based classifiers and meta-classifiers was found to result in the best prediction performance in terms of accuracy and area under the ROC curve. We have developedmore » an on-line lung cancer outcome calculator for estimating the risk of mortality after 6 months, 9 months, 1 year, 2 year and 5 years of diagnosis, for which a smaller non-redundant subset of 13 attributes was carefully selected using attribute selection techniques, while trying to retain the predictive power of the original set of attributes. Further, ensemble voting models were also created for predicting conditional survival outcome for lung cancer (estimating risk of mortality after 5 years of diagnosis, given that the patient has already survived for a period of time), and included in the calculator. The on-line lung cancer outcome calculator developed as a result of this study is available at http://info.eecs.northwestern.edu:8080/LungCancerOutcomeCalculator/.« less

  11. Revisiting the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Cancer Registry and Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (SEER-MHOS) Linked Data Resource for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research in Older Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erin E; Malinoff, Rochelle; Rozjabek, Heather M; Ambs, Anita; Clauser, Steven B; Topor, Marie A; Yuan, Gigi; Burroughs, James; Rodgers, Anne B; DeMichele, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the value of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to better characterize people's health and experiences with illness and care. Considering the rising prevalence of cancer in adults aged 65 and older, PRO data are particularly relevant for older adults with cancer, who often require complex cancer care and have additional comorbid conditions. A data linkage between the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was created through a partnership between the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that created the opportunity to examine PROs in Medicare Advantage enrollees with and without cancer. The December 2013 linkage of SEER-MHOS data included the linked data for 12 cohorts, bringing the number of individuals in the linked data set to 95,723 with cancer and 1,510,127 without. This article reviews the features of the resource and provides information on some descriptive characteristics of the individuals in the data set (health-related quality of life, body mass index, fall risk management, number of unhealthy days in the past month). Individuals without (n=258,108) and with (n=3,440) cancer (1,311 men with prostate cancer, 982 women with breast cancer, 689 with colorectal cancer, 458 with lung cancer) were included in the current descriptive analysis. Given increasing longevity, advances in effective therapies and earlier detection, and population growth, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with cancer is expected to reach more than 12 million by 2020. SEER-MHOS provides population-level, self-reported, cancer registry-linked data for person-centered surveillance research on this growing population. PMID:26782871

  12. Anal Cancer Incidence and Survival: Comparing the Greater San-Francisco Bay Area to Other SEER Cancer Registries

    PubMed Central

    Amirian, E. Susan; Fickey, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the anus, anal canal, and anorectum (SCCA) has increased over time. However, there are still no national guidelines on screening for SCCA among high-risk populations. Providers at University of California, San Francisco have been at the forefront of providing anal dysplasia screening. To determine whether such a screening program allows for earlier detection of abnormalities and consequently, improves patient survival, we conducted an ecological study using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program to compare the San Francisco-Oakland catchment area (SF-O) to other SEER sites where routine screening has not been as accessible. Cox regression models were utilized to assess the impact of residing in the SF-O region, versus other SEER sites, on cause-specific mortality hazard. Logistic regression was used to determine if site was associated with the probability of having an in situ versus invasive tumor among SCCA cases. All analyses were stratified on calendar time (1985–1995 and 1996–2008) to compare differences pre- and post- highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Among SCCA cases, being reported by the SF-O registry was associated with a four fold higher probability of having an in situ tumor (rather than an invasive tumor) [95% CI: 3.48–4.61], compared to sites outside of California, between 1996 and 2008. Cases reported from the SF-O region between 1996 and 2008 had a 39% lower mortality risk than those reported from registries outside California (95% CI: 0.51–0.72). However, there was no decrease in the rate of invasive SCCA over this period. This is the first ecological study to evaluate whether access to anal cancer screening programs may help improve patient survival by allowing for earlier detection of lesions. Our results imply that routine screening programs may help detect SCCA at an earlier stage and thus, potentially impact patient survival. PMID:23484057

  13. Patterns of Care and Locoregional Treatment Outcomes in Older Esophageal Cancer Patients: The SEER-Medicare Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Liao Zhongxing; Jeter, Melenda; Swisher, Stephen G. M.D.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; McAleer, Mary F.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Optimal management of elderly patients with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer is unclear. Outcomes data after locoregional treatment are lacking for this group. Methods: We assessed outcomes associated with standard locoregional treatments in 2,626 patients (age > 65 years) from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort diagnosed with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer from 1992 to 2002. In patients treated with radiotherapy alone (RT), surgery alone (S), chemoradiotherapy (CRT), or preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery (CRT + S), overall and disease-free survival were compared using proportional hazards regression. Postoperative complications were compared using logistic regression. Results: Mean age was 76 {+-} 6 years. Seven percent underwent CRT + S, 39% CRT, 30% S, and 24% RT. One-year survival was 68% (CRT + S), 52% (CRT), 53% (S), and 16% (RT), respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who underwent CRT + S demonstrated improved overall survival compared with S alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.98; p = 0.03) and RT (HR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.35-0.55; p < 0.0001); and comparable survival to CRT (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.67-1.01; p = 0.06). Patients who underwent CRT + S also had comparable postoperative mortality (HR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.87-1.07; p = 0.45) and complications (OR = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.70-1.14; p = 0.36) compared with S alone. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy may be an acceptable treatment option in appropriately selected older esophageal cancer patients. This treatment modality did not appear to increase surgical complications and offered potential therapeutic benefit, particularly compared with surgery alone.

  14. Neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant treatment of Siewert type II gastroesophageal junction cancer: an analysis of data from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry

    PubMed Central

    Miccio, Joseph A.; Oladeru, Oluwadamilola T.; Yang, Jie; Xue, Yaqi; Choi, Minsig; Zhang, Yue; Yoon, Hannah; Ryu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) has been rising in incidence in recent years. The role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of GEJ cancer remains unclear, as the largest prospective trials advocating for either adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) combine GEJ cancer with either gastric or esophageal cancer. The aim of the present study is to examine the association of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant treatment with overall and disease-specific survival (DSS) for patients with surgically resected cancer of the true GEJ (Siewert type II). Methods The surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) registry database (2001–2011) was queried for cases of surgically resected Siewert type II GEJ cancer. A total of 1,497 patients with resectable GEJ cancer were identified, with 746 receiving adjuvant RT and 751 receiving neoadjuvant RT. Retrospective analysis was performed with the endpoints of overall and DSS. Results Using cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, race, stage, grade, histology, and year of diagnosis), we showed that adjuvant RT was associated with a significantly lower death risk [hazard ratio (HR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.73–0.97; P value=0.0168] and significantly lower disease-specific death risk (HR, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–0.97; P value=0.0211) as compared to neoadjuvant RT. Conclusions This analysis of SEER data showed that adjuvant RT was associated with a survival benefit as compared to neoadjuvant RT for the treatment of Siewert type II GEJ cancer. We suggest future prospective studies to compare outcomes of adjuvant versus neoadjuvant treatment for true GEJ cancer. PMID:27284473

  15. Severity of comorbid conditions and early-stage breast cancer therapy: linked SEER-medicare data from 1993 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Yasmeen, Shagufta; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Xing, Guibo; Morris, Cyllene R; Romano, Patrick S

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Comorbidity burden has been suggested as influencing early-stage breast cancer therapy but previous studies have not considered the severity of these comorbidities. Therefore, we examined the influence of comorbidity severity by age and race/ethnicity on early-stage breast cancer treatment over time. We used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to determine whether comorbidity severity influences receipt of definitive and preferred early-stage breast cancer treatment and explains racial/ethnic and age disparities in receiving such therapy. Definitive surgical therapy was defined as any primary surgery other than breast conserving surgery (BCS) without radiation therapy (RT). Preferred surgical therapy was defined as BCS plus RT. Comorbidities were defined as either “unstable” (life threatening or difficult to control) or “stable” (less serious but with potential to influence daily activity). Surgical treatment trends from 1993 to 2005 were analyzed in regression models adjusting for comorbidity burden, age, and race/ethnicity in 93,596 elderly female Medicare beneficiaries with stage 1–2 invasive breast cancer. Receipt of BCS alone (compared with any definitive surgical therapy) was independently associated with neighborhood socioeconomic status, unmarried status (OR [odds ratio] 1.18, 95% CI: 1.12–1.23), tumor size (OR 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69–0.87 for tumors ≥4 cm vs. <2 cm), tumor grade (OR = 0.89, 0.88, and 0.81 for grades 2–4 vs. 1, respectively), stable comorbidities (OR = 0.76, 0.71, and 0.72 for 1, 2, and 3 vs. 0 stable comorbidities, respectively), and unstable comorbidities (OR 1.20, 95% CI: 1.14–1.28). Black women were 4–5% more likely to receive suboptimal therapy (BCS alone), even after adjusting for all available patient, tumor, and regional characteristics. Black race/ethnicity was associated with higher probability of receiving suboptimal treatment, independent of comorbidities

  16. Radiation-induced mesothelioma among long-term solid cancer survivors: a longitudinal analysis of SEER database.

    PubMed

    Farioli, Andrea; Ottone, Marta; Morganti, Alessio G; Compagnone, Gaetano; Romani, Fabrizio; Cammelli, Silvia; Mattioli, Stefano; Violante, Francesco S

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma among long-term (>5 years) solid cancer survivors. We analyzed data from the US Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program (1973-2012). We fitted survival models adjusted by age, gender, race, year, surgery, and relative risk of primary mesothelioma in the county of residence (proxy for individual asbestos exposure). We estimated hazard ratios [HR] with reference to nonirradiated patients. We distinguished between scattered and direct irradiation to study the dose-response. We observed 301 mesotheliomas (265 pleural; 32 peritoneal; 4 others) among 935,637 patients. EBRT increased the risk of mesothelioma (any site; HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.04-1.77). We observed an increased risk of pleural mesothelioma (HR for EBRT 1.34, 95% CI 1.01-1.77), but we did not find signs of a dose-response relationship (HR for scattered irradiation 1.38; HR for direct irradiation 1.23). On the opposite, only direct peritoneal irradiation was associated with peritoneal mesothelioma (HR 2.20, 95% CI 0.99-4.88), particularly for latencies ≥10 years (HR 3.28, 95% CI 1.14-9.43). A competing risks analysis revealed that the clinical impact of radiation-induced mesothelioma was limited by the high frequency of competing events. The cumulative incidence function of mesothelioma after 40 years of observation was very low (nonirradiated patients 0.00032, irradiated patients 0.00055).EBRT might be a determinant of mesothelioma. Longer latency periods are associated with higher risks, while the dose-response seems nonlinear. The clinical impact of mesothelioma after EBRT for primary solid cancers is limited. PMID:26860323

  17. Neoadjuvant Radiation Is Associated With Improved Survival in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: An Analysis of Data From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Stessin, Alexander M.; Meyer, Joshua E.; Sherr, David L.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation has been investigated in several trials as a strategy for downstaging locally advanced disease to resectability. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of neoadjuvant radiation therapy (RT) vs. other treatments on long-term survival for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer in a large population-based sample group. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database (1994-2003) was queried for cases of surgically resected pancreatic cancer. Retrospective analysis was performed. The endpoint of the study was overall survival. Results: Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we found that the median overall survival of patients receiving neoadjuvant RT was 23 months vs. 12 months with no RT and 17 months with adjuvant RT. Using Cox regression and controlling for independent covariates (age, sex, stage, grade, and year of diagnosis), we found that neoadjuvant RT results in significantly higher rates of survival than other treatments (hazard ratio [HR], 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.79; p = 0.001). Specifically comparing adjuvant with neoadjuvant RT, we found a significantly lower HR for death in patients receiving neoadjuvant RT rather than adjuvant RT (HR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.90; p = 0.03). Conclusions: This analysis of SEER data showed a survival benefit for the use of neoadjuvant RT over surgery alone or surgery with adjuvant RT in treating pancreatic cancer. Therapeutic strategies that use neoadjuvant RT should be further explored for patients with resectable pancreatic cancer.

  18. Do US thyroid cancer incidence rates increase with socioeconomic status among people with health insurance? An observational study using SEER population-based data

    PubMed Central

    Altekruse, Sean; Das, Anita; Cho, Hyunsoon; Petkov, Valentina; Yu, Mandi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The US thyroid cancer incidence rates are rising while mortality remains stable. Trends are driven by papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), the predominant cancer subtype which has a very good prognosis. We hypothesised that health insurance and high census tract socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with PTC risk. Design Relationships between thyroid cancer incidence, insurance and census tract SES during 2007–2010 were examined in population-based cancer registries. Cases were stratified by tumour histology, size and demography. Setting Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries covering 30% of the US population. Results PTCs accounted for 88% of incident thyroid cancer cases. Small PTCs (≤2 cm) accounted for 60% of cases. Unlike non-PTC cases, the majority of those diagnosed with PTC were <50 years of age and had ≤2 cm tumours. Rate ratios (RR) of PTC diagnoses increased monotonically with SES among fully insured cases. The effect was strongest for small PTCs, high-SES versus low-SES quintile RR=2.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 2.9, two-sided trend test p<0.0001. For small PTC cases with insurance, the monotonic increase in incidence rates with rising SES persisted among cases younger than 50 years of age (RR=3.3, 95% CI 3.0 to 3.5), women (RR=2.6, 95% CI 2.5 to 2.8) and Caucasians (RR=2.5, 95% CI 2.4 to 2.7). Among the less than fully insured, rates generally decreased with increasing SES. Conclusions The >2.5-fold increase in risk of PTC diagnosis among insured individuals associated with high SES may be informative with respect to the contemporary issue of PTC overdiagnosis. PMID:26644126

  19. Adjuvant Brachytherapy Removes Survival Disadvantage of Local Disease Extension in Stage IIIC Endometrial Cancer: A SEER Registry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Peter J. Jani, Ashesh B.; Horowitz, Ira R.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of radiotherapy (RT) in women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The 17-registry Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was searched for patients with lymph node-positive non-Stage IV epithelial endometrial cancer diagnosed and treated between 1988 and 1998. Two subgroups were identified: those with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and those with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. RT was coded as external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). Observed survival (OS) was reported with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up; the survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. Results: The therapy data revealed 611 women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer during this period. Of these women, 51% were treated with adjuvant EBRT, 21% with EBRT and BT, and 28% with no additional RT (NAT). Of the 611 patients, 293 had organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and 318 patients had Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. The 5-year OS rate for all patients was 40% with NAT, 56% after EBRT, and 64% after EBRT/BT. Adjuvant RT improved survival compared with NAT (p <0.001). In patients with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer, the 5-year OS rate was 50% for NAT, 64% for EBRT, and 67% for EBRT/BT. Again, adjuvant RT contributed to improved survival compared with NAT (p = 0.02). In patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and direct tumor extension, the 5-year OS rate was 34% for NAT, 47% for EBRT, and 63% for EBRT/BT. RT improved OS compared with NAT (p <0.001). Also, in this high-risk subgroup, adding BT to EBRT was superior to EBRT alone (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer receiving adjuvant EBRT and EBRT/BT had improved OS compared with patients receiving NAT. When direct extension of the primary tumor was present, the addition of BT to EBRT was even more beneficial.

  20. Disparities in long-term radiographic follow-up after cystectomy for bladder cancer: Analysis of the SEER-Medicare database

    PubMed Central

    Alanee, Shaheen; Ganai, Sabha; Gupta, Priyanka; Holland, Bradley; Dynda, Danuta; Slaton, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is uncertain whether there are disparities related to receiving long-term radiographic follow-up after cystectomy performed for bladder cancer, and whether intensive follow-up influences survival. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 2080 patients treated with cystectomy between 1992 and 2004 isolated from the SEER-Medicare database. The number of abdominal computerized tomography scans performed in patients surviving 2 years after surgery was used as an indicator of long-term radiographic follow-up to exclude patients with early failures. Results: Patients were mainly males (83.18%), had a mean age at diagnosis of 73.4 ± 6.6 (standard deviation) years, and mean survival of 4.6 ± 3.2 years. Multivariate analysis showed age >70 (odds ratio [OR]: 0.796, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.651–0.974), African American race (OR: 0.180, 95% CI: 0.081–0.279), and Charlson comorbidity score >2 (OR: 0.694, 95% CI: 0.505–0.954) to be associated with lower odds of long-term radiographic follow-up. Higher disease stage (Stage T4N1) (OR: 1.873, 95% CI: 1.491–2.353), higher quartile for education (OR: 5.203, 95% CI: 1.072–9.350) and higher quartile for income (OR: 6.940, 95% CI: 1.444–12.436) were associated with increased odds of long-term radiographic follow-up. Interestingly, more follow-up with imaging after cystectomy did not improve cancer-specific or overall survival in these patients. Conclusion: There are significant age, race, and socioeconomic disparities in long-term radiographic follow-up after radical cystectomy. However, more radiographic follow-up may not be associated with better survival. PMID:27141188

  1. Trends in Esophageal Cancer Survival in United States Adults from 1973 to 2009: A SEER Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Njei, Basile; McCarty, Thomas R.; Birk, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The rise in incidence of esophageal cancer (EC) in the United States (U.S.) over the last four decades has been well documented; however, data on trends in long-term survival and impact on modern therapies associated with survival is lacking. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was queried to identify patients with confirmed EC. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine independent mortality factors. Results Of 93,167 patients diagnosed with EC between 1973 and 2009, 49% had a histologic diagnosis of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). There was an increase (almost double) in the proportion of patients with adenocarcinoma from the 1970's to 2000's (n = 2,350; 35% to n = 32,212; 61%, p<0.001). Surgery was performed for localized disease in a majority of EC regardless of type (n = 46,683; 89%). Use of surgical treatment increased significantly over the study period (49% to 64%, p<0.001). There was also an increase in overall median survival (6 months versus 10 months, p<0.001) and 5-year survival rate (9% to 22%, p<0.001). Median survival increased consistently for EAC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) until the 1990's. After this period, median survival of EAC continued to increase more rapidly while SCC remained relatively stable. Conclusion A significant survival improvement in esophageal cancer was seen from 1973 to 2009, largely due to earlier detection at a curative stage and greater utilization of treatment modalities (especially surgery). Despite the rising prevalence, patients with EAC have better long-term survival outcomes than those SCC. PMID:26749521

  2. Medical cost analysis: application to colorectal cancer data from the SEER Medicare database.

    PubMed

    Bang, Heejung

    2005-10-01

    Incompleteness is a key feature of most survival data. Numerous well established statistical methodologies and algorithms exist for analyzing life or failure time data. However, induced censorship invalidates the use of those standard analytic tools for some survival-type data such as medical costs. In this paper, some valid methods currently available for analyzing censored medical cost data are reviewed. Some cautionary findings under different assumptions are envisioned through application to medical costs from colorectal cancer patients. Cost analysis should be suitably planned and carefully interpreted under various meaningful scenarios even with judiciously selected statistical methods. This approach would be greatly helpful to policy makers who seek to prioritize health care expenditures and to assess the elements of resource use. PMID:16084777

  3. Clinical and Prognostic Factors for Renal Parenchymal, Pelvis, and Ureter Cancers in SEER Registries: Collaborative Stage Data Collection System, Version 2

    PubMed Central

    Altekruse, Sean F.; Dickie, Lois; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Hsieh, Mei-Chin; Wu, Manxia; Lee, Richard; Delacroix, Scott

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The American Joint Committee on Cancer’s (AJCC) 7th edition cancer staging manual reflects recent changes in cancer care practices. This report assesses changes from the AJCC 6th to the AJCC 7th edition stage distributions and the quality of site-specific factors (SSFs). METHODS Incidence data for renal parenchyma and pelvis and ureter cancers from 18 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries were examined, including staging trends during 2004–2010, stage distribution changes between the AJCC 6th and 7th editions, and SSF completeness for cases diagnosed in 2010. RESULTS From 2004 to 2010, the percentage of stage I renal parenchyma cancers increased from 50% to 58%, whereas stage IV and unknown stage cases decreased (18% to 15%, and 10% to 6%, respectively). During this period, the percentage of stage 0a renal pelvis and ureter cancers increased from 21% to 25%, and stage IV and unknown stage tumors decreased (20% to 18%, and 7% to 5%, respectively). Stage distributions under the AJCC 6th and 7th editions were about the same. For renal parenchymal cancers, 71%–90% of cases had known values for 6 required SSFs. For renal pelvis and ureter cancers, 74% of cases were coded as known for SSF1 (WHO/ISUP grade) and 47% as known for SSF2 (depth of renal parenchymal invasion). SSF values were known for larger proportions of cases with reported resections. CONCLUSIONS Stage distributions between the AJCC 6th and 7th editions were similar. SSFs were known for more than two-thirds of cases, providing more detail in the SEER database relevant to prognosis. PMID:25412394

  4. Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, May Reis, Isildinha M.; Hamilton, Kara

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p <0.0001). The age-adjusted rate of late SPC ({>=}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

  5. The Extent of Axillary Surgery Is Associated With Breast Cancer-specific Survival in T1-2 Breast Cancer Patients With 1 or 2 Positive Lymph Nodes: A SEER-Population Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunrong; Liu, Fengtao; Chen, Kai; Rao, Nanyan; Xie, Yufen; Su, Fengxi; Zhu, Liling

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) of a nonclinical trial population of T1-2 breast cancer patients with 1 to 2 positive lymph nodes who received breast-conserving surgery and either sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) or axillary lymph node dissection (ALND).We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to identify 17,028 patients with a median follow-up of 7.1 years. We assigned the patients into a SLNB-cohort (≤5 nodes) and an ALND-cohort (>5 nodes) based on the number of removed lymph nodes. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to estimate the cumulative BCSS and used Cox-regression analysis to study the risk factors. We also performed subgroup analysis by the patients' age and hormonal receptor (HR) status.The cumulative BCSS and Overall Survival (OS) of the entire population were 94.4% and 91.4% at 5 years and 88.2% and 79.9% at 10 years, respectively. Axillary surgery (ALND vs SLNB) had no association with BCSS when adjusted for stage, HR status, tumor grade, or other factors. In subgroup analysis by age and HR status, ALND was associated with a significantly improved BCSS relative to SNLB (HR = 0.70, HR = 0.026, 95% confidence interval 0.51-0.96) only in patients younger than 50 years with HR- disease (N = 1281), but not in other subgroup of patients.In early-stage breast cancer patients with limited lymph node metastasis, ALND had better BCSS than SLNB only in patients younger than 50 years and with HR- disease. More studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27057872

  6. Breast Cancer by Age at Diagnosis in the Gharbiah, Egypt, Population-Based Registry Compared to the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, 2004–2008

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Jennifer A.; Soliman, Amr S.; Schairer, Catherine; Harford, Joe B.; Hablas, Ahmed; Ramadan, Mohamed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim; Merajver, Sofia D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Although breast cancers (BCs) in young women often display more aggressive features, younger women are generally not screened for early detection. It is important to understand the characteristics of young onset breast cancer to increase awareness in this population. This analysis includes all ages, with emphasis placed on younger onset BC in Egypt as compared to the United States. Methods. BC cases in the Gharbiah cancer registry (GCR), Egypt, were compared to those in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. This analysis included 3,819 cases from the GCR and 273,019 from SEER diagnosed 2004–2008. Results. GCR cases were diagnosed at later stages, with <5% diagnosed at Stage I and 12% diagnosed at Stage IV. 48% of all SEER cases were diagnosed at Stage I, dropping to 30% among those ≤40. Significant differences in age, tumor grade, hormone receptor status, histology, and stage exist between GCR and SEER BCs. After adjustment, GCR cases were nearly 45 times more likely to be diagnosed at stage III and 16 times more likely to be diagnosed at stage IV than SEER cases. Conclusions. Future research should examine ways to increase literacy about early detection and prompt therapy in young cases. PMID:26495294

  7. Prevalence and safety of off-label use of chemotherapeutic agents in older breast cancer patients: estimates from SEER-Medicare data

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Anne A.; Sima, Camelia S.; Panageas, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The practice of prescribing oncology drugs outside of the label indication is legal and may reflect standard practice. However, some off-label use is against practice guidelines and may be inappropriate. We aimed to measure the prevalence and safety of off-label use in accordance with NCCN guidelines and off-label use inconsistent with guidelines in older breast cancer patients. Patients and Methods The SEER-Medicare dataset was used to identify women diagnosed with a first primary breast cancer between 2000-2007. Intravenous chemotherapy agents were identified using Medicare claims and classified as on-label, off-label/NCCN supported or off-label/unsupported using contemporary FDA approvals and NCCN guidelines. Off-label/unsupported regimens were matched to off-label/supported and on-label regimens using 1:1:1 matching on patient factors, and hospitalization/ER admission rates were compared across indication categories using conditional logistic regression. Results 13,347 women were treated with 16,127 regimens (12% of women switched to a new regimen during followup). Sixty-four percent (10,391) of regimens were off-label/supported, 25% (3,987) were on-label and 11% (1,749) were off-label/unsupported. Drugs never supported for breast cancer accounted for 19% of off-label/unsupported use and 1% of total use. Hospitalization/ER admission occurred in 32% of off-label/unsupported regimens, compared to 27% of off-label/supported and 25% of on-label regimens (p<.0001). Conclusions Off-label use of chemotherapy without scientific support was not common in this cohort. Off-label/supported use accounted for 64% of use, reflecting the fact that widely-accepted indications are often not tested in registration trials. Off-label/supported use will likely increase as more drugs are expected to have activity across cancer sites, and understanding the safety implications of such use is critical. PMID:26733555

  8. Aging, cancer, and cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    World population has experienced continuous growth since 1400 A.D. Current projections show a continued increase - but a steady decline in the population growth rate - with the number expected to reach between 8 and 10.5 billion people within 40 years. The elderly population is rapidly rising: in 1950 there were 205 million people aged 60 or older, while in 2000 there were 606 million. By 2050, the global population aged 60 or over is projected to expand by more than three times, reaching nearly 2 billion people [1]. Most cancers are age-related diseases: in the US, 50% of all malignancies occur in people aged 65-95. 60% of all cancers are expected to be diagnosed in elderly patients by 2020 [2]. Further, cancer-related mortality increases with age: 70% of all malignancy-related deaths are registered in people aged 65 years or older [3]. Here we introduce the microscopic aspects of aging, the pro-inflammatory phenotype of the elderly, and the changes related to immunosenescence. Then we deal with cancer disease and its development, the difficulty of treatment administration in the geriatric population, and the importance of a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Finally, we aim to analyze the complex interactions of aging with cancer and cancer vaccinology, and the importance of this last approach as a complementary therapy to different levels of prevention and treatment. Cancer vaccines, in fact, should at present be recommended in association to a stronger cancer prevention and conventional therapies (surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy), both for curative and palliative intent, in order to reduce morbidity and mortality associated to cancer progression. PMID:22510392

  9. Marital status independently predicts gastric cancer survival after surgical resection--an analysis of the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Pan, Gaofeng; Zhang, Ziping; Wang, WeiHua; Liu, Shaoqun; Zhang, Dongbin; Jiang, Daowen; Liu, Weiyan

    2016-01-01

    Marital status was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival in various cancer types, but it hasn't been studied in gastric cancer. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database was used to compare survival outcomes with marital status. A total of 16,106 eligible patients were identified. Patients in the widowed group had the highest proportion of women, more common site of stomach, more prevalence of elderly patients, higher percentage of adenocarcinoma, and more tumors at localized stage (P < 0.05). Patients in married group had better 5year cause-specific survival (CSS) than those unmarried (P < 0.05). Further analysis showed that widowed patients always presented the lowest CSS compared with that of other groups. Widowed patients had 7.1% reduction in 5-year CSS compared with married patients at Localized stage (77.2% vs 70.1%, P < 0.001), 9.6% reduction at Regional stage (38.2% vs 28.6%, P < 0.001), and 4.7% reduction at Distant stage (13.3% vs 8.6%, P < 0.001). These results showed that unmarried patients were at greater risk of cancer specific mortality. Despite favorable clinicpathological characteristics, widowed patients were at highest risk of death compared with other groups. PMID:26840093

  10. Sex, Race, and Age Disparities in the Improvement of Survival for Gastrointestinal Cancer over Time

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jue-feng; Yang, Li-feng; Shen, Yun-zhu; Jia, Hui-xun; Zhu, Ji; Li, Gui-chao; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    There have been notable improvements in survival over the past 2 decades for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. However, the degree of improvement by age, race, and sex remains unclear. We analyzed data from 9 population-based cancer registries included in the SEER program of the National Cancer Institute (SEER 9) in 1990 to 2009 (n = 288,337). The degree of survival improvement over time by age, race, and sex was longitudinally measured. From 1990 to 2009, improvements in survival were greater for younger age groups. For patients aged 20 to 49 years and diagnosed from 2005 to 2009, adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.74 (95% CI, 0.66–0.83), 0.49 (95% CI, 0.37–0.64), 0.69 (95% CI, 0.65–0.76), 0.62 (95% CI, 0.54–0.69), and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.42–0.76), for cancer of the stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum and anus, respectively, compared with the same age groups of patients diagnosed during 1990 to 1994. Compared with African Americans, whites experienced greater improvement in small intestinal and anal cancer survival. Female anal cancer and regional anal cancer patients experienced no improvement. Our data suggest that different improvement in survival in age, sex and race exists. PMID:27406065

  11. Aging and Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Chandra, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer vaccination is less effective at old than at young age, due to T cell unresponsiveness. This is caused by age-related changes of the immune system. Major immune defects at older age are lack of naïve T cells, impaired activation pathways of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), and age-related changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME). Also innate immune responses are affected by aging, but this seems less abundant than adaptive immune responses. In this review we compared various cancer vaccine studies at young and old age, demonstrating the importance of both innate and adaptive immune responses for cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, we found suggestive evidence that innate immune responses could help improve adaptive immune responses through cancer vaccination in old age. PMID:24579737

  12. Age and Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    White, Mary C.; Holman, Dawn M.; Boehm, Jennifer E.; Peipins, Lucy A.; Grossman, Melissa; Henley, S. Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges the idea that cancer cannot be prevented among older adults by examining different aspects of the relationship between age and cancer. Although the sequential patterns of aging cannot be changed, several age-related factors that contribute to disease risk can be. For most adults, age is coincidentally associated with preventable chronic conditions, avoidable exposures, and modifiable risk behaviors that are causally associated with cancer. Midlife is a period of life when the prevalence of multiple cancer risk factors is high and incidence rates begin to increase for many types of cancer. However, current evidence suggests that for most adults, cancer does not have to be an inevitable consequence of growing older. Interventions that support healthy environments, help people manage chronic conditions, and promote healthy behaviors may help people make a healthier transition from midlife to older age and reduce the likelihood of developing cancer. Because the number of adults reaching older ages is increasing rapidly, the number of new cancer cases will also increase if current incidence rates remain unchanged. Thus, the need to translate the available research into practice to promote cancer prevention, especially for adults at midlife, has never been greater. PMID:24512933

  13. Head and Neck Sarcomas: Analysis of the SEER Database

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kevin A.; Grogan, Tristan; Wang, Marilene B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To summarize the epidemiology of sarcomas occurring in the head and neck and identify prognostic factors for patient survival. Study Design and Setting Cross-sectional analysis of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Methods The SEER 18 registries, comprising sarcoma diagnoses made from 1973 to 2010, were queried for sarcomas arising in the head and neck. Pediatric and adult patients were analyzed separately, and multivariate and propensity-matched analyses were performed to identify predictors of disease-specific survival. Results In all, 11,481 adult cases and 1244 pediatric cases were identified. In adults, the most common histologic subtypes were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), Kaposi sarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma, while in the pediatric cohort, the most common histologic subtypes were rhabdomyosar-coma, MFH, and osteosarcoma. Cause-specific 2-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 76%, 66%, and 61% for adults and 84%, 73%, and 71% for pediatric patients. Multivariate analysis performed for adults revealed that male gender, absence of radiation therapy, and stage I disease were associated with improved cause-specific survival reaching statistical significance. However, a propensity-matched model demonstrated no significant difference in cause-specific survival between patients who received radiation and those who did not. Conclusion Sarcomas, a heterogeneous group of malignant mesenchymal tumors, are uncommonly found in the head and neck. This study represents the largest analysis of patients with head and neck sarcomas in the literature and demonstrates the impact of age, gender, primary site, histology, and radiation status on overall prognosis. PMID:25135525

  14. Pediatric choroid plexus tumors: epidemiology, treatments, and outcome analysis on 202 children from the SEER database.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Roy W R; Torok, Michelle R; Gallegos, Danielle; Liu, Arthur K; Handler, Michael H; Hankinson, Todd C

    2015-01-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs) and carcinomas (CPCs) are rare neoplasms that affect mostly children. Due to their rarity, their epidemiology and outcomes are incompletely understood. The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program is a well-established population-based group of registries that collects and publishes cancer incidence and survival data representing approximately 28 % of the US population. SEER-STAT v8.1.2 was used to identify patients with ICD-O-3 codes for choroid plexus tumors in patients aged 0-19. Demographics, initial treatment, and follow-up data were collected. Statistical methods including Kaplan-Meier curves, log rank tests, and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to estimate associations between independent variables and survival. The SEER registries contained 107 CPPs (2004-2010) and 95 CPCs (1978-2010). Median follow-up was 38 and 40 months, respectively. More than 75 % of CPCs were diagnosed before the age of 5 years, versus 48 % for CPPs. Sixty-five percent of CPCs and 57 % of CPPs occurred in males. In both groups at least 90 % of children underwent surgical resection. Gross total resection (GTR) was achieved in 67.0 % of CPCs and 63.6 % of CPPs. Almost 17 % of CPCs were treated with radiation versus only 0.9 % of CPPs. More than 98 % of patients with CPP were alive at the last follow-up, versus 62 % of CPC patients. For CPC, surgery was significantly associated with increased overall survival, but contrary to previous reports, extent of surgical resection was not associated with survival. Age, sex, race, and radiation treatment also had no effect on survival. This report, using the SEER datasets, corroborates many findings of previous smaller studies on CPTs. CPC occurs in younger children, with a male predominance, and a much worse prognosis than CPP. As such, these tumors have been treated aggressively with high rates of GTR and radiation treatment. Despite these treatments

  15. Breast cancer racial differences before age 40--implications for screening.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Edwin T.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most authorities advocate mammogram screening for breast cancer beginning at age 40 based on the age-specific distribution and incidence of breast cancer in the general population. This policy has been bolstered by studies that demonstrate that, for the general population, mammography in the 40-49 age bracket reduces mortality. However, it also has been reported that African-American breast cancer patients are diagnosed more often than white patients below the age of 40. Young African-American women are also more likely to have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis with predictably higher mortality. The purpose of this investigation is to explore the question, whether a subset of African-American women, age 30-39, by virtue of increased vulnerability, would benefit from early mammogram screening. STUDY DESIGN: The age-specific distribution (age 30-84) of African-American and white breast cancer patients in five State cancer registries were compared. Prognostic indicators (tumor size and nodal status) in two of the five registries in African-American and white breast cancer cases below the age of 40 were compared. Age-specific incidence in the 30-39 age group and the relative populations of black and white women in the United States were noted in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Report (SEER) (1994-1998) and The U.S. Census 2000. RESULTS: The differences of age-specific distribution and age-specific incidence of African-American and white breast cancer patients were found to be significant. More than 10% of African-American women with breast cancer were diagnosed before age 40 compared to 5% of white patients. The incidence of breast cancer (SEER Report 1994-1998) in the 30-39-age bracket for African-American and white women was 48.9 and 40.2 at the 95% confidence level, while the proportion of African-American and white women reported by the Census Bureau was not too dissimilar, 15.8% and 14.6% respectively. Prognostic indicators (tumor size

  16. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    ScienceCinema

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-05-29

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  17. Cell Senescence: Aging and Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Scientists have identified a molecular cause behind the ravages of old age and in doing so have also shown how a natural process for fighting cancer in younger persons can actually promote cancer in older individuals.

  18. CANCER VACCINES IN OLD AGE

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of cancer has increased over the last decade, mainly due to an increase in the elderly population. Vaccine therapy for cancer is less toxic than chemotherapy or radiation and could be, therefore, especially effective in older, more frail cancer patients. However, it has been shown that older individuals do not respond to vaccine therapy as well as younger adults. This has been attributed to T cell unresponsiveness, a phenomenon also observed in cancer patients per se. This review summarizes the current knowledge of T cell unresponsiveness in cancer patients and elderly, the results of cancer vaccination in preclinical models and in clinical trials, and recent data of cancer vaccination at young and old age in preclinical models. Finally, experimental approaches will be proposed how to make cancer vaccines more effective at older age. PMID:17197144

  19. Pediatric Low Grade Ganglioglioma/Gangliocytoma: epidemiology, treatments, and outcome analysis on 348 children from the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Roy W.R.; Torok, Michelle R.; Gallegos, Danielle R.; Mulcahy-Levy, Jean M.; Hoffman, Lindsey M.; Liu, Arthur K.; Handler, Michael H.; Hankinson, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-grade gangliogliomas/gangliocytomas (GG) are rare tumors of the CNS, which occur mostly in young people. Due to their rarity, large-scale, population-based studies focusing on epidemiology and outcomes are lacking. Objective To use the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) datasets of the National Cancer Institute to study demographics, tumor location, initial treatment, and outcome data on low-grade GG in children. Methods SEER-STAT v8.1.2 identified all patients aged 0-19 years in the SEER datasets with low-grade GGs. Using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard regression, we examined associations between these characteristics and survival. Results There were 348 children with low-grade GG diagnosed from 2004-2010, with a median follow-up of 37 months. Tumors were more prevalent in males (n=208, 59.8%) than females (n=140, 40.2%) (p<0.001). Almost 63% percent occurred in children >10 years, while only 3.5% were found in those <1 year old. Approximately 50% were located in the temporal lobes, while only 3.7% and 3.5% were located in the brainstem and spinal cord, respectively. Surgery was performed on 91.6% of cases, with gross total resection (GTR) achieved in 68.3%. Radiation was used in 3.2%. Young age (<1yrs) and brainstem location were associated with worse overall survival (OS). Conclusion This study shows that low-grade GG occur in older children with a male preference. GTR is achieved in the majority of cases, and radiation is rarely used. While the majority of patients have an excellent prognosis, infants and patients with brainstem tumors have worse survival rates. PMID:25603107

  20. The Trend of Age-Group Effect on Prognosis in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong-Liang; Qu, Ning; Liao, Tian; Wei, Wen-Jun; Wang, Yu-Long; Ji, Qing-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Age has been included in various prognostic scoring systems for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The aim of this study is to re-examine the relationship between age and prognosis by using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based database. We identified 51,061 DTC patients between 2004 and 2012. Patients were separated into 10-year age groups. Cancer cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) data were obtained. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox models were built to analyze the outcomes and risk factors. Increasing age gradient with a 10-year interval was associated with the trend of higher proportions for male gender, grade III/IV and summary stage of distant metastases. Both CSS and OS continued to worsen with increasing age, being poorest in in the oldest age group (≥71); multivariate analysis confirmed that CSS continued to fall with each age decade, significantly starting at 60 years (HR = 7.5, 95% 1.0-54.1, p = 0.047) compared to the young group (≤20). Similarly, multivariate analysis suggested that OS continued worsening with increasing age, but starting at 40 years (HR = 3.7, 95% 1.4-10.1, p = 0.009) compared to the young group. The current study suggests that an age exceeding 60 years itself represents an unfavorable prognostic factor and high risk for cancer-specific death in DTC. PMID:27272218

  1. The Trend of Age-Group Effect on Prognosis in Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Rong-liang; Qu, Ning; Liao, Tian; Wei, Wen-jun; Wang, Yu-Long; Ji, Qing-hai

    2016-01-01

    Age has been included in various prognostic scoring systems for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The aim of this study is to re-examine the relationship between age and prognosis by using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based database. We identified 51,061 DTC patients between 2004 and 2012. Patients were separated into 10-year age groups. Cancer cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) data were obtained. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox models were built to analyze the outcomes and risk factors. Increasing age gradient with a 10-year interval was associated with the trend of higher proportions for male gender, grade III/IV and summary stage of distant metastases. Both CSS and OS continued to worsen with increasing age, being poorest in in the oldest age group (≥71); multivariate analysis confirmed that CSS continued to fall with each age decade, significantly starting at 60 years (HR = 7.5, 95% 1.0–54.1, p = 0.047) compared to the young group (≤20). Similarly, multivariate analysis suggested that OS continued worsening with increasing age, but starting at 40 years (HR = 3.7, 95% 1.4–10.1, p = 0.009) compared to the young group. The current study suggests that an age exceeding 60 years itself represents an unfavorable prognostic factor and high risk for cancer-specific death in DTC. PMID:27272218

  2. SEER Informational Guidebook Training Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Paula

    This book includes topics on the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results reporting of human cancer. An anatomy section describes various systems of the human body, emphasizing those sites with high incidence of cancer. A general reference section describes weights and measures, pathology and histology, diagnostic techniques, and medical…

  3. Use of External Beam Radiotherapy Is Associated With Reduced Incidence of Second Primary Head and Neck Cancer: A SEER Database Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle; Chen Changhu Raben, David; Kavanagh, Brian

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Patients with head and neck cancer have a significant risk of developing a second primary cancer of the head and neck. We hypothesized that treatment with external beam radiotherapy (RT) might reduce this risk, because RT can eradicate occult foci of second head and neck cancer (HNCA). Methods and Materials: The data of patients with Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Historic Stage A localized squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, larynx, and pharynx were queried using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. For patients treated with or without RT, the incidence of second HNCA was determined and compared using the log-rank method. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed for each site, evaluating the influence of covariates on the risk of second HNCA. Results: Between 1973 and 1997, 27,985 patients were entered with localized HNCA. Of these patients, 44% had received RT and 56% had not. The 15-year incidence of second HNCA was 7.7% with RT vs. 10.5% without RT (hazard ratio 0.71, p <0.0001). The effect of RT was more profound in patients diagnosed between 1988 and 1997 (hazard ratio 0.53, p <0.0001) and those with pharynx primaries (hazard ratio 0.47, p <0.0001). On multivariate analysis, RT was associated with a reduced risk of second HNCA for pharynx (p <0.0001) and larynx (p = 0.04) tumors. For oral cavity primaries, RT was associated with an increased risk of second HNCA in patients treated before 1988 (p <0.001), but had no influence on patients treated between 1988 and 1997 (p = 0.91). Conclusion: For localized HNCA, RT is associated with a reduced incidence of second HNCA. These observations are consistent with the eradication of microscopic foci of second HNCA with external beam RT.

  4. Aging, Cellular Senescence, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith

    2014-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyper-plastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  5. Aging, cellular senescence, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Judith

    2013-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  6. Genome instability, cancer and aging

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Alexander Y.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage-driven genome instability underlies the diversity of life forms generated by the evolutionary process but is detrimental to the somatic cells of individual organisms. The cellular response to DNA damage can be roughly divided in two parts. First, when damage is severe, programmed cell death may occur or, alternatively, temporary or permanent cell cycle arrest. This protects against cancer but can have negative effects on the long term, e.g., by depleting stem cell reservoirs. Second, damage can be repaired through one or more of the many sophisticated genome maintenance pathways. However, erroneous DNA repair and incomplete restoration of chromatin after damage is resolved, produce mutations and epimutations, respectively, both of which have been shown to accumulate with age. An increased burden of mutations and/or epimutations in aged tissues increases cancer risk and adversely affects gene transcriptional regulation, leading to progressive decline in organ function. Cellular degeneration and uncontrolled cell proliferation are both major hallmarks of aging. Despite the fact that one seems to exclude the other, they both may be driven by a common mechanism. Here, we review age related changes in the mammalian genome and their possible functional consequences, with special emphasis on genome instability in stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19344750

  7. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jonathan; Xu, Beibei; Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Le, Quynh-Thu; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  8. Myxopapillary ependymoma: a SEER analysis of epidemiology and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bates, James E; Choi, Gyujae; Milano, Michael T

    2016-09-01

    Myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) is an exceedingly rare tumor histology. While surgery is clearly the treatment of choice, controversy exists regarding the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Using the Surveillence, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) database, we aimed to determine the epidemiology, prognostic factors, and treatment-related outcomes for MPE. A total of 773 cases were found in the SEER database. The incidence in the American population was found to be 1.00 per million person-years. On multivariate analysis, receipt of surgery (HR = 0.14, CI = 0.06-0.35, p < 0.001), receipt of RT (HR = 4.06, CI = 1.87-8.81, p < 0.001), age less than 30 (HR = 0.24, CI = 0.08-0.72, p = 0.01), and Caucasian race (HR = 0.37, CI = 0.13-0.996, p = 0.049) were statistically significant prognostic factors. The mean tumor size among those receiving RT (4.6 cm) was significantly larger than among those not receiving RT (3.2 cm, p = 0.0002). Those who lived in metropolitan areas were more likely to receive RT than those who did not. Given multiple previous studies show that RT improves PFS and the discrepancy in tumor size, selection bias is likely a significant contributor to the apparent negative impact of RT on OS. Regardless, surgery remains the most crucial aspect in the care of patients with MPE. PMID:27306443

  9. Telomeres in cancer and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Donate, Luis E.; Blasco, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Telomeres protect the chromosome ends from unscheduled DNA repair and degradation. Telomeres are heterochromatic domains composed of repetitive DNA (TTAGGG repeats) bound to an array of specialized proteins. The length of telomere repeats and the integrity of telomere-binding proteins are both important for telomere protection. Furthermore, telomere length and integrity are regulated by a number of epigenetic modifications, thus pointing to higher order control of telomere function. In this regard, we have recently discovered that telomeres are transcribed generating long, non-coding RNAs, which remain associated with the telomeric chromatin and are likely to have important roles in telomere regulation. In the past, we showed that telomere length and the catalytic component of telomerase, Tert, are critical determinants for the mobilization of stem cells. These effects of telomerase and telomere length on stem cell behaviour anticipate the premature ageing and cancer phenotypes of telomerase mutant mice. Recently, we have demonstrated the anti-ageing activity of telomerase by forcing telomerase expression in mice with augmented cancer resistance. Shelterin is the major protein complex bound to mammalian telomeres; however, its potential relevance for cancer and ageing remained unaddressed to date. To this end, we have generated mice conditionally deleted for the shelterin proteins TRF1, TPP1 and Rap1. The study of these mice demonstrates that telomere dysfunction, even if telomeres are of a normal length, is sufficient to produce premature tissue degeneration, acquisition of chromosomal aberrations and initiation of neoplastic lesions. These new mouse models, together with the telomerase-deficient mouse model, are valuable tools for understanding human pathologies produced by telomere dysfunction. PMID:21115533

  10. SEER*Educate: Use of Abstracting Quality Index Scores to Monitor Improvement of All Employees.

    PubMed

    Potts, Mary S; Scott, Tim; Hafterson, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Integral parts of the Seattle-Puget Sound's Cancer Surveillance System registry's continuous improvement model include the incorporation of SEER*Educate into its training program for all staff and analyzing assessment results using the Abstracting Quality Index (AQI). The AQI offers a comprehensive measure of overall performance in SEER*Educate, which is a Web-based application used to personalize learning and diagnostically pinpoint each staff member's place on the AQI continuum. The assessment results are tallied from 6 abstracting standards within 2 domains: incidence reporting and coding accuracy. More than 100 data items are aligned to 1 or more of the 6 standards to build an aggregated score that is placed on a continuum for continuous improvement. The AQI score accurately identifies those individuals who have a good understanding of how to apply the 6 abstracting standards to reliably generate high quality abstracts. PMID:27556839

  11. Different patterns in the prognostic value of age for bladder cancer-specific survival depending on tumor stages

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huan; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jiajun; Lu, Xiaozhe

    2015-01-01

    To compare the pathological features and long-term survival of bladder cancer (BCa) in young patients with elderly counterparts. Using the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) population-based data, we identified 93115 patients with non-metastatic bladder cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2003. Patients were categorized into young (50 years and under) and elderly groups (over 50 years of age). The overall and five-year bladder cancer specific survival (BCSS) data were obtained using Kaplan-Meier plots. Multivariable Cox regression models were built for the analysis of long-term survival outcomes and risk factors. There were significant differences between the two groups in primary site, pathologic grading, histologic type, AJCC stage (p<0.001). The overall and 5-year cancer specific survival rates were 88.1% and 90.8% in young group, 64.8% and 81.3% in elderly group, which had significant difference in both univariate and multivariate analysis (p<0.001). Further analysis showed this significant difference existed across all the AJCC stage patients. The study findings show different patterns in the prognostic value of age for determining BCSS, depending on the tumor stages. Compared with elderly patients, young patients with bladder cancer surgery appear to have unique characteristics and a higher overall and cancer specific survival rate. PMID:26269768

  12. Is cancer vaccination feasible at older age?

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Jahangir, Arthee

    2014-01-01

    Age-related defects of the immune system are responsible for T cell unresponsiveness to cancer vaccination at older age. Major immune defects at older age are lack of naïve T cells, impaired activation pathways of T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC), and age-related changes in the tumor microenvironment (TME). This raises the question whether cancer vaccination is feasible at older age. We compared various cancer vaccine studies at young and old age, thereby focusing on the importance of both innate and adaptive immune responses for cancer immunotherapy. These analyses suggest that creating an immune-stimulating environment with help of the innate immune system may improve T cell responses in cancer vaccination at older age. PMID:24509231

  13. Strategies for Energy Efficient Remodeling: SEER 2003 Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    The goal of the Strategies for Energy Efficiency in Remodeling (SEER) project is to provide information, based on research and case studies, to remodelers and consumers about opportunities to increase home energy performance.

  14. Cancer and Aging: A Complex Biological Association.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Reyes, Ana Patricia; Soto-Pérez-de-Celis, Enrique; Hurria, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in both developing and developed countries. It is also a particularly significant health problem in older populations since half of all malignancies occur in patients aged 70 years or older. Cancer is a disease of aging, and as such there is a strong biological association between the mechanisms of aging and carcinogenesis. During the past few decades, mechanisms of aging exerting pro- and anti-oncogenic effects have been described, and the role of these mechanisms in cancer treatment and prognosis is currently being investigated. In this review we describe the different theories of aging and the evidence on the biological link between these mechanisms and carcinogenesis. Additionally, we review the implications of the biology of aging on the treatment and prognosis of older adults with cancer, and the opportunities for translational research into biomarkers of aging in this patient population. PMID:27028173

  15. Improved survival following surgery and radiation therapy for olfactory neuroblastoma: analysis of the SEER database

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Olfactory Neuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of the olfactory tract. Reports in the literature comparing treatment modalities for this tumor are limited. Methods The SEER database (1973-2006) was queried by diagnosis code to identify patients with Olfactory Neuroblastoma. Kaplan-Meier was used to estimate survival distributions based on treatment modality. Differences in survival distributions were determined by the log-rank test. A Cox multiple regression analysis was then performed using treatment, race, SEER historic stage, sex, age at diagnosis, year at diagnosis and SEER geographic registry. Results A total of 511 Olfactory Neuroblastoma cases were reported. Five year overall survival, stratified by treatment modality was: 73% for surgery with radiotherapy, 68% for surgery only, 35% for radiotherapy only, and 26% for neither surgery nor radiotherapy. There was a significant difference in overall survival between the four treatment groups (p < 0.01). At ten years, overall survival stratified by treatment modality and stage, there was no significant improvement in survival with the addition of radiation to surgery. Conclusions Best survival results were obtained for surgery with radiotherapy. PMID:21518449

  16. Case-based visualization of a patient cohort using SEER epidemiologic data.

    PubMed

    Maier, Christian; Bürkle, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Data from cancer registries can be used to track the epidemiology of cancer and can potentially serve to guide individual diagnostic and treatment decisions. Even though some cancer registry datasets have been made publicly available for scientific and clinical use, few applications have so far provided direct access to these data from within the patient context of an electronic patient record. The goal of this project was to implement a proof-of-concept integration of the public SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) cancer registry dataset with a digital breast cancer tumor board at a German university hospital and to determine its utility in the clinical settings. The integration was successfully established, using data from routine documentation to provide dynamic visualizations of cohort composition and Kaplan-Meier survival plots. Evaluation feedback was favorable regarding the concept and implementation, but highlighted that important data elements, e.g. receptor status data, were missing in the SEER dataset, limiting clinical value of the system. PMID:24825695

  17. Age, Race and Regional Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Incidence Rates in Georgia between 2000 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wonsuk; De, Subhendu; Wilkins, Thad; Smith, Selina A.; Blumenthal, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence rates and mortality have been decreasing in the United States. Currently, states in the South have the smallest reduction in CRC mortality. The trends of CRC incidence rates in Georgia in comparison to the United States have not been investigated. We analyzed age-adjusted incidence rates of CRC in Georgia and the United States from 2000 to 2012 using data from SEER 18 registries. Age-adjusted incidence rates (95% CI) were calculated as cases per 100,000 to the 2000 US Standard population. CRC incidence rates were calculated for groupings based on age at time of diagnosis, race, sex, and geographic location within Georgia. Incidence rates were higher in males compared to females in Georgia. In Georgians age 50–64, incidence rates were higher compared to the US, while those ages 65+ displayed lower incidence rates. Black Georgians age 50–64 generally exhibited higher incidence rates of CRC and lower rates of decrease in incidence compared to other races in Georgia. Asian/Pacific Islander females age 50–64 in Georgia exhibited an increasing trend in incidence rate. Whites and blacks Georgians age 50–64 displayed higher incidence rates compared to the US, while Asian/Pacific Islanders displayed lower incidence rates. Greater incidence rates of CRC in rural and Greater Georgia were seen across all races when compared to overall rates in Georgia. Efforts should be made to address disparities in Georgia based on race and geographic location. Increased screening by colonoscopy or fecal occult blood testing, reduction of risk factors and promotion of healthy lifestyles can reduce CRC incidence rates. PMID:27042701

  18. Survival of children with brain tumors: SEER Program, 1973-1980.

    PubMed

    Duffner, P K; Cohen, M E; Myers, M H; Heise, H W

    1986-05-01

    Eight hundred eighty-seven children with brain tumors were identified by the SEER registries (1973-1980). Twenty-five percent were low-grade supratentorial astrocytomas, medulloblastomas were 23%, cerebellar astrocytomas 12%, high-grade supratentorial astrocytomas 11%, brainstem gliomas 9%, and ependymomas 8%. The worst survivals were in children less than 2 years of age, and the best were in those aged 10 to 14 years. Five-year survivals of children with cerebellar astrocytomas were 91%, low-grade supratentorial astrocytomas 71%, high-grade supratentorial astrocytomas 35%, medulloblastomas 39%, ependymomas 28%, and brainstem gliomas 18%. PMID:3703257

  19. Aging: Balancing regeneration and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beausejour, Christian M.; Campisi, Judith

    2006-08-24

    The proliferation of cells must balance the longevity assured by tissue renewal against the risk of developing cancer. The tumor-suppressor protein p16{sup INK4a} seems to act at the pivot of this delicate equilibrium.

  20. Increased Age and Race-Specific Incidence of Cervical Cancer After Correction for Hysterectomy Prevalence in the United States From 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Rositch, Anne F.; Nowak, Rebecca G.; Gravitt, Patti E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Invasive cervical cancer is thought to decline in women over 65 years old, the age at which cessation of routine cervical cancer screening is recommended. However, national cervical cancer incidence rates do not account for the high prevalence of hysterectomy in the United States. METHODS Using estimates of hysterectomy prevalence from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), hysterectomy-corrected age-standardized and age-specific incidence rates of cervical cancer were calculated from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 registry in the United States from 2000 to 2009. Trends in corrected cervical cancer incidence across age were analyzed using Joinpoint regression. RESULTS Unlike the relative decline in uncorrected rates, corrected rates continue to increase after age 35–39 (APCCORRECTED = 10.43) but at a slower rate than in 20–34 years (APCCORRECTED = 161.29). The highest corrected incidence was among 65- to 69-year-old women, with a rate of 27.4 cases per 100,000 women as opposed to the highest uncorrected rate of 15.6 cases per 100,000 aged 40 to 44 years. Correction for hysterectomy had the largest impact on older, black women given their high prevalence of hysterectomy. CONCLUSIONS Correction for hysterectomy resulted in higher age-specific cervical cancer incidence rates, a shift in the peak incidence to older women, and an increase in the disparity in cervical cancer incidence between black and white women. Given the high and nondeclining rate of cervical cancer in women over the age of 60 to 65 years, when women are eligible to exit screening, risk and screening guidelines for cervical cancer in older women may need to be reconsidered. PMID:24821088

  1. Difference in characteristics and outcomes between medullary breast carcinoma and invasive ductal carcinoma: a population based study from SEER 18 database

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Jing; Song, Chuan-Gui; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Medullary breast carcinoma (MBC) is a unique histological subtype of breast cancer. Our study was designed to identify difference in characteristics and outcomes between MBC and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), and further confirm the prognostic factors of MBC. Utilizing Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER), we identified 84,764 eligible patients, including 309 MBC and 84,455 IDC. Compared with the IDC group, the MBC group was associated with younger age at diagnosis, higher grade, more advanced stage, larger tumor size, and higher proportion of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Kaplan-Meier analysis and univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model showed that patients with IDC had significantly better breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) compared to MBC, but they had similar overall survival (OS). However, MBC histology was no longer a surrogate for worse BCSS or OS after 1:1 matching by age, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, grade and breast subtype. In addition, it was exposed that not married status, high grade, large tumor size, positive nodal status, the subtype of TNBC and no receipt of radiation therapy were significantly associated with poor BCSS and OS. In conclusion, MBC demonstrated more aggressive behavior but similar outcomes compared to IDC, which may be determined by prognostic factors such as breast subtype. These results not only confer deeper insight into MBC but contribute to individualized and tailored therapy, and thereby may improve clinical management and outcomes. PMID:27009810

  2. Regulation of Senescence in Cancer and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yahui; Cui, Hang; Ramkumar, Charusheila; Zhang, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Senescence is regarded as a physiological response of cells to stress, including telomere dysfunction, aberrant oncogenic activation, DNA damage, and oxidative stress. This stress response has an antagonistically pleiotropic effect to organisms: beneficial as a tumor suppressor, but detrimental by contributing to aging. The emergence of senescence as an effective tumor suppression mechanism is highlighted by recent demonstration that senescence prevents proliferation of cells at risk of neoplastic transformation. Consequently, induction of senescence is recognized as a potential treatment of cancer. Substantial evidence also suggests that senescence plays an important role in aging, particularly in aging of stem cells. In this paper, we will discuss the molecular regulation of senescence its role in cancer and aging. The potential utility of senescence in cancer therapeutics will also be discussed. PMID:21423549

  3. Telomeres, lifestyle, cancer, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, Masood A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review There has been growing evidence that lifestyle factors may affect the health and lifespan of an individual by affecting telomere length. The purpose of this review was to highlight the importance of telomeres in human health and aging and to summarize possible lifestyle factors that may affect health and longevity by altering the rate of telomere shortening. Recent findings Recent studies indicate that telomere length, which can be affected by various lifestyle factors, can affect the pace of aging and onset of age-associated diseases. Summary Telomere length shortens with age. Progressive shortening of telomeres leads to senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of somatic cells, affecting the health and lifespan of an individual. Shorter telomeres have been associated with increased incidence of diseases and poor survival. The rate of telomere shortening can be either increased or decreased by specific lifestyle factors. Better choice of diet and activities has great potential to reduce the rate of telomere shortening or at least prevent excessive telomere attrition, leading to delayed onset of age-associated diseases and increased lifespan. This review highlights the role of telomeres in aging and describes the lifestyle factors which may affect telomeres, human health, and aging. PMID:21102320

  4. Time-to-Progression of NSCLC from Early to Advanced Stages: An Analysis of data from SEER Registry and a Single Institute

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ping; Cao, Jin Lin; Rustam, Azmat; Zhang, Chong; Yuan, Xiao Shuai; Bao, Fei Chao; Lv, Wang; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The average time required for cancers to progress through stages can be reflected in the average age of the patients diagnosed at each stage of disease. To estimate the time it takes for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to progress through different tumor, node and metastasis (TNM) stages and sizes, we compared the mean adjusted age of 45904 NSCLC patients with different stages and tumor sizes from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry database and our institute. Multiple-linear-regression models for age were generated adjusting for various factors. Caucasian, African-American and Asian patients with stage IA cancers were on average 0.8, 1.0 and 1.38 adjusted years younger, respectively, than those with stage IIIB cancers (p < 0.001). And these with T1a cancers were on average 0.84, 0.92 and 1.21 adjusted years younger, respectively, than patients with T3 cancers (p < 0.001). Patients with tumors measuring larger than 8 cm in diameter were on average 0.85 adjusted years older than these with tumors smaller than 1 cm (p < 0.001), with Caucasian demonstrating the shortest age span (0.79 years, P < 0.001). In conclusion, the time-to-progression of NSCLC from early to advanced stages varied among ethnicities, Caucasian patients demonstrating a more rapid progression nature of tumor than their African-American and Asian counterparts. PMID:27346236

  5. DAMPs, ageing, and cancer: The 'DAMP Hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Xie, Yangchun; Sun, Xiaofang; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Lotze, Michael T; Tang, Daolin

    2015-11-01

    Ageing is a complex and multifactorial process characterized by the accumulation of many forms of damage at the molecular, cellular, and tissue level with advancing age. Ageing increases the risk of the onset of chronic inflammation-associated diseases such as cancer, diabetes, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. In particular, ageing and cancer share some common origins and hallmarks such as genomic instability, epigenetic alteration, aberrant telomeres, inflammation and immune injury, reprogrammed metabolism, and degradation system impairment (including within the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagic machinery). Recent advances indicate that damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) such as high mobility group box 1, histones, S100, and heat shock proteins play location-dependent roles inside and outside the cell. These provide interaction platforms at molecular levels linked to common hallmarks of ageing and cancer. They can act as inducers, sensors, and mediators of stress through individual plasma membrane receptors, intracellular recognition receptors (e.g., advanced glycosylation end product-specific receptors, AIM2-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, and NOD1-like receptors, and toll-like receptors), or following endocytic uptake. Thus, the DAMP Hypothesis is novel and complements other theories that explain the features of ageing. DAMPs represent ideal biomarkers of ageing and provide an attractive target for interventions in ageing and age-associated diseases. PMID:25446804

  6. Determinants of Survival in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Study of 14,228 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Taioli, Emanuela; Wolf, Andrea S.; Camacho-Rivera, Marlene; Kaufman, Andrew; Lee, Dong-Seok; Nicastri, Daniel; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Flores, Raja M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Left untreated, malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is associated with uniformly poor prognosis. Better survival has been reported with surgery-based multimodality therapy, but to date, no trial has demonstrated survival benefit of surgery over other therapies. We evaluated whether cancer-directed surgery influenced survival independently from other predictors in a large population-based dataset. Methods The SEER database was explored from 1973 to 2009 to identify all cases of pathologically-proven MPM. Age, sex, race, year of diagnosis, histology stage, cancer-directed surgery, radiation, and vital status were analyzed. The association between prognostic factors and survival was estimated using Cox regression and propensity matched analysis. Results There were 14,228 patients with pathologic diagnosis of MPM. On multivariable analysis, female gender, younger age, early stage, and treatment with surgery were independent predictors of longer survival. In comparison to no treatment, surgery alone was associated with significant improvement in survival [adjusted hazard ratio (adj HR) 0.64 (0.61–0.67)], but not radiation [adj HR 1.15 (1.08–1.23)]. Surgery and radiation combined had similar survival as surgery alone [adj HR 0.69 (0.64–0.76)]. Results were similar when cases diagnosed between 1973 and 1999 were compared to cases diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Conclusions Despite developments in surgical and radiation techniques, the prognosis for MPM patients has not improved over the past 4 decades. Cancer-directed surgery is independently associated with better survival, suggesting that multimodal surgery-based therapy can benefit these patients. Further research in adjuvant treatment is necessary to improve prognosis in this challenging disease. PMID:26660351

  7. SEER 2008 Keynote Address: The Importance of Evaluation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinch, Katherine J.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the keynote address given by Katherine J. Pinch at the 2008 Annual Symposium on Experiential Education Research (SEER). Pinch discusses the importance of evaluation research and argues that the realm of evaluation is where the margins of research and practice have the potential to intersect with the greatest ease. She…

  8. Cancer and aging. An evolving panorama.

    PubMed

    Balducci, L; Extermann, M

    2000-02-01

    This article illustrates how the nosology of cancer evolves with the patient's age. If the current trends are maintained, 70% of all neoplasms will occur in persons aged 65 years and over by the year 2020, leading to increased cancer-related morbidity among older persons. Cancer control in the older person involves chemoprevention, early diagnosis, and timely and effective treatment that entails both antineoplastic therapy and symptom management. These interventions must be individualized based on a multidimensional assessment that can predict life expectancy and treatment complications and that may evaluate the quality of life of the older person. This article suggests a number of interventions that may improve cancer control in the aged. Public education is needed to illustrate the benefits of health maintenance and early detection of cancer even among older individuals, to create realistic expectations, and to heighten awareness of early symptoms and signs of cancer. Professional education is needed to train students and practitioners in the evaluation and management of the older person. Of special interest is the current initiative of the Hartford Foundation offering combined fellowships in oncology and geriatrics and incorporating principles of geriatric medicine in medical specialty training. Prudent pharmacologic principles must be followed in managing older persons with cytotoxic chemotherapy. These principles include adjusting the dose according to the patient's renal function, using epoietin to maintain hemoglobin levels of 12 g/dL or more, and using hemopoietic growth factors in persons aged 70 years and older receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy of moderate toxicity (e.g., CHOP). To assure uniformity of data, a cooperative oncology group should formulate a geriatric package outlining a common plan for evaluating function and comorbidity. This article also suggests several important areas of research items: Molecular interactions of age and cancer Host

  9. ANOVA like analysis of cancer death age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areia, Aníbal; Mexia, João T.

    2016-06-01

    We use ANOVA to study the influence of year, sex, country and location on the average cancer death age. The data used was from the World Health Organization (WHO) files for 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011. The locations considered were: kidney, leukaemia, melanoma of skin and oesophagus and the countries: Portugal, Norway, Greece and Romania.

  10. Incorporating Biomarkers Into Cancer and Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Joleen M.; Cohen, Harvey J.; Muss, Hyman B.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in treating the older adult with cancer is accurately accounting for and adapting management to the heterogeneity in health status of the individual patient. Many oncologists recognize that chronological age alone should not be the determinant when deciding on a treatment regimen. Easily measurable markers that provide an assessment of functional age would be ideal to assess frailty, which may predispose the patient to complications from cancer treatment, including increased toxicity, functional decline, decreased quality of life, and poorer survival. Several categories of potential markers, including chronic inflammatory markers, markers of cellular senescence, and imaging to assess muscle mass to detect sarcopenia, may provide insight into the likelihood of treatment-related complications. This article discusses candidate markers and strategies to evaluate these markers in cancer treatment trials, with the aim of developing a method to assess risk of oncologic outcomes and guide management decisions for both the physician and patient. PMID:25071114

  11. DNA Methylation in Cancer and Aging.

    PubMed

    Klutstein, Michael; Nejman, Deborah; Greenfield, Razi; Cedar, Howard

    2016-06-15

    DNA methylation is known to be abnormal in all forms of cancer, but it is not really understood how this occurs and what is its role in tumorigenesis. In this review, we take a wide view of this problem by analyzing the strategies involved in setting up normal DNA methylation patterns and understanding how this stable epigenetic mark works to prevent gene activation during development. Aberrant DNA methylation in cancer can be generated either prior to or following cell transformation through mutations. Increasing evidence suggests, however, that most methylation changes are generated in a programmed manner and occur in a subpopulation of tissue cells during normal aging, probably predisposing them for tumorigenesis. It is likely that this methylation contributes to the tumor state by inhibiting the plasticity of cell differentiation processes. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3446-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27256564

  12. Comparison of survival and clinicopathologic features in colorectal cancer among African American, Caucasian, and Chinese patients treated in the United States: Results from the surveillance epidemiology and end results (SEER) database.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junzhong; Qiu, Miaozhen; Xu, Ruihua; Dobs, Adrian Sandra

    2015-10-20

    African American patients of colorectal cancer (CRC) were found to have a worse prognosis than Caucasians, but it has not been fully understood about the survival difference among Chinese and these two races above. In this study, we used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database to analyze the survival difference among these three race/ethnicities in the United States. Adenocarcinoma patients of colorectal cancer with a race/ethnicity of Caucasian, Chinese and African American were enrolled for study. Patients were excluded if they had more than one primary cancer but the CRC was not the first one, had unknown cause of death or unknown survival months. The 5-year cause specific survival (CSS) was our primary endpoint. Totally, there were 585,670 eligible patients for analysis. Chinese patients had the best and African American patients had the worst 5-year CSS (66.7% vs 55.9%), P < 0.001. The 5-year CSS for Caucasian patients was 62.9%. Race/ethnicity was an independent prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis, P < 0.001. The comparison of clinicopathologic factors among these three race/ethnicities showed that the insurance coverage rate, income, percentage that completing high school and percentage of urban residence was lowest in the African American patients. Chinese patients had the highest percentage of married, while African American patients ranked lowest. More African American patients were diagnosed as stage IV and had high percentage of signet ring cell and mucinous adenocarcinoma. It is likely that biological differences as well as socioeconomic status both contribute to the survival disparity among the different race/ethnicities. PMID:26375551

  13. Epigenetic linkage of aging, cancer and nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Michael; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play a pivotal role in the expression of genes and can be influenced by both the quality and quantity of diet. Dietary compounds such as sulforaphane (SFN) found in cruciferous vegetables and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in green tea exhibit the ability to affect various epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibition, histone modifications via histone deacetylase (HDAC), histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibition, or noncoding RNA expression. Regulation of these epigenetic mechanisms has been shown to have notable influences on the formation and progression of various neoplasms. We have shown that an epigenetic diet can influence both cellular longevity and carcinogenesis through the modulation of certain key genes that encode telomerase and p16. Caloric restriction (CR) can also play a crucial role in aging and cancer. Reductions in caloric intake have been shown to increase both the life- and health-span in a variety of animal models. Moreover, restriction of glucose has been demonstrated to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases such as cancer and diabetes. A diet rich in compounds such as genistein, SFN and EGCG can positively modulate the epigenome and lead to many health benefits. Also, reducing the quantity of calories and glucose in the diet can confer an increased health-span, including reduced cancer incidence. PMID:25568452

  14. TimeSeer: Scagnostics for high-dimensional time series.

    PubMed

    Dang, Tuan Nhon; Anand, Anushka; Wilkinson, Leland

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a method (Scagnostic time series) and an application (TimeSeer) for organizing multivariate time series and for guiding interactive exploration through high-dimensional data. The method is based on nine characterizations of the 2D distributions of orthogonal pairwise projections on a set of points in multidimensional euclidean space. These characterizations include measures, such as, density, skewness, shape, outliers, and texture. Working directly with these Scagnostic measures, we can locate anomalous or interesting subseries for further analysis. Our application is designed to handle the types of doubly multivariate data series that are often found in security, financial, social, and other sectors. PMID:23307611

  15. The Intricate Interplay between Mechanisms Underlying Aging and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Amanda; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    Age is the major risk factor in the incidence of cancer, a hyperplastic disease associated with aging. Here, we discuss the complex interplay between mechanisms underlying aging and cancer as a reciprocal relationship. This relationship progresses with organismal age, follows the history of cell proliferation and senescence, is driven by common or antagonistic causes underlying aging and cancer in an age-dependent fashion, and is maintained via age-related convergent and divergent mechanisms. We summarize our knowledge of these mechanisms, outline the most important unanswered questions and suggest directions for future research. PMID:25657853

  16. Cancer and Aging: General Principles, Biology, and Geriatric Assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Daneng; de Glas, Nienke A; Hurria, Arti

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is a disease of aging as older adults are much more likely to develop cancer compared with their younger counterparts. Understanding the biology of cancer and aging remains complex, and numerous theories regarding the relationship between the two have been proposed. Cancer treatment decisions in older patients are particularly challenging, because the evidence is scarce and the risk of toxicity increases with age. Determination of biologic age is essential due to heterogeneity of functional status, comorbidity, and physiologic reserves between patients of the same chronologic age. PMID:26614857

  17. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.

    2014-03-01

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  18. Online CME Series Can Nutrition Simultaneously Affect Cancer and Aging? | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Aging is considered by some scientists to be a normal physiological process, while others believe it is a disease. Increased cancer risk in the elderly raises the question regarding the common pathways for cancer and aging. Undeniably, nutrition plays an important role in both cases and this webinar will explore whether nutrition can simultaneously affect cancer and aging. |

  19. Predictors of IMRT and Conformal Radiotherapy Use in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A SEER-Medicare Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Neville, Bridget A.; Chen, Aileen B.; Schrag, Deborah

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The extent to which new techniques for the delivery of radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) have diffused into clinical practice is unclear, including the use of 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database, we identified 2,495 Medicare patients with Stage I-IVB HNSCC diagnosed at age 65 years or older between 2000 and 2005 and treated with either definitive (80%) or adjuvant (20%) radiotherapy. Our primary aim was to analyze the trends and predictors of IMRT use over this time, and the secondary aim was a similar description of the trends and predictors of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) use, defined as treatment with either 3D-RT or IMRT. Results: Three hundred sixty-four (15%) patients were treated with IMRT, and 1,190 patients (48%) were treated with 3D-RT. Claims for IMRT and CRT rose from 0% to 33% and 39% to 86%, respectively, between 2000 and 2005. On multivariable analysis, IMRT use was associated with SEER region (West 18%; Northeast 11%; South 12%; Midwest 13%), advanced stage (advanced, 21%; early, 9%), non-larynx site (non-larynx, 23%; larynx, 7%), higher median census tract income (highest vs. lowest quartile, 18% vs. 10%), treatment year (2003-2005, 31%; 2000-2002, 6%), use of chemotherapy (26% with; 9% without), and higher radiation oncologist treatment volume (highest vs. lowest tertile, 23% vs. 8%). With CRT as the outcome, only SEER region, treatment year, use of chemotherapy, and increasing radiation oncologist HNSCC volume were significant on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and CRT by Medicare beneficiaries with HNSCC rose significantly between 2000 and 2005 and was associated with both clinical and non-clinical factors, with treatment era and radiation oncologist HNSCC treatment volume serving as the strongest predictors of IMRT use.

  20. Muddy Water? Variation in Reporting Receipt of Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy by Population-Based Tumor Registries

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Gary V.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Williams, Melanie; Jiang, Jing; Niu, Jiangong; MacKinnon, Jill; Anderson, Patricia; Wohler, Brad; Sinclair, Amber H.; Boscoe, Francis P.; Schymura, Maria J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in the setting of breast cancer, the accuracy of registry radiation therapy (RT) coding compared with the gold standard of Medicare claims. Methods and Materials: Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)–Medicare data, we identified 73,077 patients aged ≥66 years diagnosed with breast cancer in the period 2001-2007. Underascertainment (1 - sensitivity), sensitivity, specificity, κ, and χ{sup 2} were calculated for RT receipt determined by registry data versus claims. Multivariate logistic regression characterized patient, treatment, and geographic factors associated with underascertainment of RT. Findings in the SEER–Medicare registries were compared with three non-SEER registries (Florida, New York, and Texas). Results: In the SEER–Medicare registries, 41.6% (n=30,386) of patients received RT according to registry coding, versus 49.3% (n=36,047) according to Medicare claims (P<.001). Underascertainment of RT was more likely if patients resided in a newer SEER registry (odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-1.80; P<.001), rural county (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.21-1.48; P<.001), or if RT was delayed (OR 1.006/day, 95% CI 1.006-1.007; P<.001). Underascertainment of RT receipt in SEER registries was 18.7% (95% CI 18.6-18.8%), compared with 44.3% (95% CI 44.0-44.5%) in non-SEER registries. Conclusions: Population-based tumor registries are highly variable in ascertainment of RT receipt and should be augmented with other data sources when evaluating quality of breast cancer care. Future work should identify opportunities for the radiation oncology community to partner with registries to improve accuracy of treatment data.

  1. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-01-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease. PMID:24345884

  2. Age and cancer risk: a potentially modifiable relationship.

    PubMed

    White, Mary C; Holman, Dawn M; Boehm, Jennifer E; Peipins, Lucy A; Grossman, Melissa; Henley, S Jane

    2014-03-01

    This article challenges the idea that cancer cannot be prevented among older adults by examining different aspects of the relationship between age and cancer. Although the sequential patterns of aging cannot be changed, several age-related factors that contribute to disease risk can be. For most adults, age is coincidentally associated with preventable chronic conditions, avoidable exposures, and modifiable risk behaviors that are causally associated with cancer. Midlife is a period of life when the prevalence of multiple cancer risk factors is high and incidence rates begin to increase for many types of cancer. However, current evidence suggests that for most adults, cancer does not have to be an inevitable consequence of growing older. Interventions that support healthy environments, help people manage chronic conditions, and promote healthy behaviors may help people make a healthier transition from midlife to older age and reduce the likelihood of developing cancer. Because the number of adults reaching older ages is increasing rapidly, the number of new cancer cases will also increase if current incidence rates remain unchanged. Thus, the need to translate the available research into practice to promote cancer prevention, especially for adults at midlife, has never been greater. PMID:24512933

  3. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes of Invasive Cribriform Carcinoma of Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi-Yu; Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Liu, Yi-Rong; Zuo, Wen-Jia; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Invasive cribriform carcinoma (ICC) is a rare histologic subtype of breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of ICC.Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 233,337 female patients diagnosed with ICC (n = 618) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,719). Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were utilized to calculate and compare disease-specific survival (DSS) and overall survival (OS). A 1:1 paired match was carried out on age, tumor stage, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER) status, and progesterone receptor (PR) status. Baseline characteristics and survival outcomes were also analyzed in ER-positive tumors. Subgroup analyses summarized the hazard ratio (HR) of IDC versus ICC using a forest plot.ICCs presented smaller size, lower grade, higher ER and PR positive rate, less nodal metastasis, and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy compared to IDCs. Five-year DSS rates were significantly better for patients with ICC than for patients with IDC (98.8% vs. 93%, P < 0.001). Five-year OS rates were 95.3% versus 90.1% (P < 0.001). After adjustment for common clinicopathological factors in the multivariate analysis, patients with ICC showed limited DSS advantage over the IDC group (HR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.38-1.51, P = 0.421). No significant difference in DSS nor OS was observed in matched groups between ICC and IDC. Analysis among ER-positive patients revealed similar prognostic factors as among all patients. Survival analysis in different tumor grade subgroups showed no significant difference between ICC and IDC.ICCs have unique clinicopathological characteristics, higher rates of breast-conserving surgery, and more favorable prognosis compared to the overall IDC population. Difference in tumor grade between the 2 groups may partially explain the different outcome. Improved clinical and biological understanding of ICC

  4. AGE metabolites: a biomarker linked to cancer disparity?

    PubMed

    Foster, Dion; Spruill, Laura; Walter, Katherine R; Nogueira, Lourdes M; Fedarovich, Hleb; Turner, Ryan Y; Ahmed, Mahtabuddin; Salley, Judith D; Ford, Marvella E; Findlay, Victoria J; Turner, David P

    2014-10-01

    Socioeconomic and environmental influences are established factors promoting cancer disparity, but the contribution of biologic factors is not clear. We report a mechanistic link between carbohydrate-derived metabolites and cancer that may provide a biologic consequence of established factors of cancer disparity. Glycation is the nonenzymatic glycosylation of carbohydrates to macromolecules, which produces reactive metabolites called advanced glycation end products (AGE). A sedentary lifestyle and poor diet all promote disease and the AGE accumulation pool in our bodies and also increase cancer risk. We examined AGE metabolites in clinical specimens of African American and European American patients with prostate cancer and found a higher AGE concentration in these specimens among African American patients when compared with European American patients. Elevated AGE levels corresponded with expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE or AGER). We show that AGE-mediated increases in cancer-associated processes are dependent upon RAGE. Aberrant AGE accumulation may represent a metabolic susceptibility difference that contributes to cancer disparity. PMID:25053712

  5. AGE metabolites: A biomarker linked to cancer disparity?

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Dion; Spruill, Laura; Walter, Katherine R.; Nogueira, Lourdes M.; Fedarovich, Hleb; Turner, Ryan Y.; Ahmed, Mahtabuddin; Salley, Judith D.; Ford, Marvella E.; Findlay, Victoria J.; Turner, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Socioeconomic and environmental influences are established factors promoting cancer disparity but the contribution of biological factors is not clear. We report a mechanistic link between carbohydrate derived metabolites and cancer which may provide a biological consequence of established factors of cancer disparity. Glycation is the non-enzymatic glycosylation of carbohydrates to macromolecules which produces reactive metabolites called advanced glycation end products (AGEs). A sedentary lifestyle and poor diet all promote disease and the AGE accumulation pool in our bodies and also increase cancer risk. We examined AGE metabolites in clinical specimens of African American and European American prostate cancer patients and found a higher AGE concentration in these specimens among African American patients when compared to European American patients. Elevated AGE levels corresponded with expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE or AGER). We show that AGE mediated increases in cancer associated processes is dependent upon RAGE. Aberrant AGE accumulation may represent a metabolic susceptibility difference that contributes to cancer disparity. PMID:25053712

  6. Predictors of short-term post-operative survival after elective colectomy in colon cancer patients ≥80 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Heather B.; Weiss, Jennifer M.; Leverson, Glen; O'Connor, Erin S.; Greenblatt, David Y.; LoConte, Noelle K.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals ≥80 years of age represent an increasing proportion of colon cancer diagnoses. Selecting these patients for elective surgery is challenging due to diminished overall health, functional decline, and limited data to guide decisions. The objective was to identify overall health measures that are predictive of poor survival after elective surgery in these oldest-old colon cancer patients. Methods Medicare beneficiaries ≥80 years who underwent elective colectomy for stage I-III colon cancer from 1992-2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results(SEER)-Medicare database. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis determined 90-day and 1-year overall survival. Multivariable logistic regression assessed factors associated with short-term post-operative survival. Results Overall survival for the 12,979 oldest-old patients undergoing elective colectomy for colon cancer was 93.4% and 85.7%, at 90-days and 1-year. Older age, male gender, frailty, increased hospitalizations in prior year, and dementia were most strongly associated with decreased survival. In addition, AJCC stage III (versus stage I) disease and widowed (versus married) were highly associated with decreased survival at 1-year. Although only 4.4% of patients were considered frail, this had the strongest association with mortality, with an odds ratio of 8.4 (95% confidence interval 6.4-11.1). Discussion Although most oldest-old colon cancer patients do well after elective colectomy, a significant proportion (6.6%) dies by post-operative day 90 and frailty is the strongest predictor. The ability to identify frailty through billing claims is intriguing and suggests the potential to prospectively identify, through the electronic medical record, patients at highest risk of decreased survival. PMID:23292483

  7. Telomerase at the intersection of cancer and aging

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Bruno Bernardes; Blasco, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Although cancer and aging have been studied as independent diseases, mounting evidence suggest that cancer is an aging-associated disease and that cancer and aging share many molecular pathways. In particular, recent studies validated telomerase activation as a potential therapeutic target for age-related diseases, and at the same time, abnormal telomerase expression and telomerase mutations have been associated with many different types of human tumors. Here, we revisit the connection of telomerase to cancer and aging in light of recent findings supporting a role for telomerase not only in telomere elongation, but also in metabolic fitness and Wnt activation. Understanding the physiological impact of telomerase regulation is fundamental considering the therapeutic strategies that are being developed involving telomerase modulation. PMID:23876621

  8. Skeletal Plasmacytoma: Progression of disease and impact of local treatment; an analysis of SEER database

    PubMed Central

    Jawad, Muhammad Umar; Scully, Sean P

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous reports suggest an as yet unidentifiable subset of patients with plasmacytoma will progress to myeloma. The current study sought to establish the risk of developing myeloma and determine the prognostic factors affecting the progression of disease. Methods Patients with plasmacytoma diagnosed between 1973 and 2005 were identified in the SEER database(1164 patients). Patient demographics and clinical characteristics, treatment(s), cause of death, and survival were extracted. Kaplan-Meier, log-rank, and Cox regression were used to analyze prognostic factors. Results The five year survival among patients initially diagnosed with plasmacytoma that later progressed to multiple myeloma and those initially diagnosed with multiple myeloma were almost identical (25% and 23%; respectively). Five year survival for patients with plasmacytoma that did not progress to multiple myeloma was significantly better (72%). Age > 60 years was the only factor that correlated with progression of disease (p = 0.027). Discussion Plasmacytoma consists of two cohorts of patients with different overall survival; those patients that do not progress to systemic disease and those that develop myeloma. Age > 60 years is associated with disease progression. Identifying patients with systemic disease early in the treatment will permit aggressive and novel treatment strategies to be implemented. PMID:19778427

  9. Age Effects and Temporal Trends in HPV-Related and HPV-Unrelated Oral Cancer in the United States: A Multistage Carcinogenesis Modeling Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Andrew F; Eisenberg, Marisa C; Meza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Differences in prognosis in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral (oropharyngeal and oral cavity) squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) and increasing incidence of HPV-related cancers have spurred interest in demographic and temporal trends in OSCC incidence. We leverage multistage clonal expansion (MSCE) models coupled with age-period-cohort (APC) epidemiological models to analyze OSCC data in the SEER cancer registry (1973-2012). MSCE models are based on the initiation-promotion-malignant conversion paradigm in carcinogenesis and allow for interpretation of trends in terms of biological mechanisms. APC models seek to differentiate between the temporal effects of age, period, and birth cohort on cancer risk. Previous studies have looked at the effect of period and cohort on tumor initiation, and we extend this to compare model fits of period and cohort effects on each of tumor initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion rates. HPV-related, HPV-unrelated except oral tongue, and HPV-unrelated oral tongue sites are best described by placing period and cohort effects on the initiation rate. HPV-related and non-oral-tongue HPV-unrelated cancers have similar promotion rates, suggesting similar tumorigenesis dynamics once initiated. Estimates of promotion rates at oral tongue sites are lower, corresponding to a longer sojourn time; this finding is consistent with the hypothesis of an etiology distinct from HPV or alcohol and tobacco use. Finally, for the three subsite groups, men have higher initiation rates than women of the same race, and black people have higher promotion than white people of the same sex. These differences explain part of the racial and sex differences in OSCC incidence. PMID:26963717

  10. Studying Health Histories of Cancer: A New Model Connecting Cancer Incidence and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Yashin, Anatoli I.; Akushevich, Igor; Arbeev, Konstantin; Akushevich, Lucy; Kulminski, Alexander; Ukraintseva, Svetlana

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent experimental and epidemiological studies provide evidence on the connection between carcinogenesis, cancer progression, and aging. Existing models, however, are traditionally focused only on one of these aspects of health deterioration. In this paper, we derive a new model of cancer, which describes the connection between the age at disease onset, the duration of disease, and life span of respective individuals. The model combines ideas used in the two hits model of carcinogenesis with those used in the Le Bras multistate model of aging with constant transition intensities. The model is used in the joint analyses of the U.S. demographic mortality data and SEER data for selected cancers. The results show that the developed approach is capable of explaining links among health history data and provides useful insights on mechanisms of cancer occurrence, disease progression, other aging-related changes, and mortality. Further developments of this model are discussed. PMID:19167410

  11. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer. PMID:24857069

  12. Overview of ultraviolet radiation and cancer: what is the link? How are we doing?

    PubMed

    Weinstock, M A

    1995-11-01

    Sun exposure has now been established as the most important avoidable cause of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma. With specific reference to melanoma, there are several key issues that remain to be resolved. These include definition of the action spectrum, the importance of systemic effects of sun exposure, whether a tan is protective, the risk of tanning booth exposures, and the efficacy of sunscreens. Also the role, if any, of sun exposure in noncutaneous malignancies remains to be established. Melanoma incidence and mortality have increased dramatically over the past several decades, but these increases have now slowed, and for mortality among those 15 to 45 years of age, decreasing rates are now observed. Improving the coverage of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries by requiring pathology laboratories in non-SEER areas to report cancers among SEER area residents will allow correct interpretation of these trends in the future at minimal cost. The available data on trends in NMSC incidence and mortality are suboptimal but suggest a pattern of declining mortality despite increasing incidence. Trends in NMSC morbidity have not been defined. Establishing NMSC registries in a few diverse sentinel areas would allow more reliable inference and monitoring. Techniques are being developed for reducing sun exposures and increasing early detection of skin cancers in the general population, but improved monitoring of incidence, mortality, and morbidity is required to monitor the effects of current and future ozone depletion and to evaluate prevention and early detection measures. PMID:8741793

  13. Age Effects and Temporal Trends in HPV-Related and HPV-Unrelated Oral Cancer in the United States: A Multistage Carcinogenesis Modeling Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Andrew F.; Eisenberg, Marisa C.; Meza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Differences in prognosis in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral (oropharyngeal and oral cavity) squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) and increasing incidence of HPV-related cancers have spurred interest in demographic and temporal trends in OSCC incidence. We leverage multistage clonal expansion (MSCE) models coupled with age—period—cohort (APC) epidemiological models to analyze OSCC data in the SEER cancer registry (1973–2012). MSCE models are based on the initiation—promotion—malignant conversion paradigm in carcinogenesis and allow for interpretation of trends in terms of biological mechanisms. APC models seek to differentiate between the temporal effects of age, period, and birth cohort on cancer risk. Previous studies have looked at the effect of period and cohort on tumor initiation, and we extend this to compare model fits of period and cohort effects on each of tumor initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion rates. HPV-related, HPV-unrelated except oral tongue, and HPV-unrelated oral tongue sites are best described by placing period and cohort effects on the initiation rate. HPV-related and non-oral-tongue HPV-unrelated cancers have similar promotion rates, suggesting similar tumorigenesis dynamics once initiated. Estimates of promotion rates at oral tongue sites are lower, corresponding to a longer sojourn time; this finding is consistent with the hypothesis of an etiology distinct from HPV or alcohol and tobacco use. Finally, for the three subsite groups, men have higher initiation rates than women of the same race, and black people have higher promotion than white people of the same sex. These differences explain part of the racial and sex differences in OSCC incidence. PMID:26963717

  14. Treatment of early-stage human epidermal growth factor 2-positive cancers among medicare enrollees: age and race strongly associated with non-use of trastuzumab.

    PubMed

    Vaz-Luis, Ines; Lin, Nancy U; Keating, Nancy L; Barry, William T; Lii, Joyce; Burstein, Harold J; Winer, Eric P; Freedman, Rachel A

    2016-08-01

    Adjuvant trastuzumab for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer is highly efficacious regardless of age. Recent data suggested that many older patients with HER2-positive disease do not receive adjuvant trastuzumab. Nevertheless, some of this 'under-treatment' may be clinically appropriate. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify patients aged ≥ 66 with stage ≥ Ib-III, HER2-positive breast cancer diagnosed during 2010-2011 (HER2 status available) who did not have a history of congestive heart failure. We described all systemic treatments received and sociodemographic and clinical characteristics associated with treatment patterns. Among 770 women 44.4 % did not receive trastuzumab, including 21.8 % who received endocrine therapy only, 6.3 % who received chemotherapy (±endocrine therapy) and 16.2 % who did not receive any systemic therapy. In addition to age and grade, race was strongly associated with non-use of trastuzumab (64.4 % of Non-Hispanic blacks vs. 43.6 % of whites did not receive trastuzumab, adjusted ORNon-Hispanic black vs. white = 3.14, 95 %CI = 1.38-7.17), and many patients with stage III disease did not receive trastuzumab. Further, 16.2 % of patients did not receive any systemic treatment and this occurred more frequently for black patients. Over 40 % of older patients with indication to receive adjuvant trastuzumab did not receive it and nearly 20 % of these patients did not receive any other treatment. Although treatment omission may be appropriate in some cases, we observed concerning differences in trastuzumab receipt, particularly for black women. Strategies to optimize care for older patients and to eliminate treatment disparities are urgently needed. PMID:27484879

  15. Opportunities for Cancer Prevention Among Adults Aged 45 to 64

    PubMed Central

    Zonderman, Alan B.; Ejiogu, Ngozi; Norbeck, Jennifer; Evans, Michele K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advances in cancer medicine and the resultant 20% decline in cancer death rates for Americans since 1991, there remain distinct cancer health disparities among African Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans, and the those living in poverty. Minorities and the poor continue to bear the disproportionate burden of cancer especially in terms of stage at diagnosis, incidence and mortality. Cancer health disparities are persistent reminders that state-of-the art cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are not equally effective for and accessible to all Americans. The cancer prevention model must take into account the phenotype of accelerated aging associated with health disparities as well as the important interplay of biological and sociocultural factors that lead to disparate health outcomes. The building blocks of this prevention model will include: interdisciplinary prevention modalities that encourage partnerships across medical and nonmedical entities, community-based participatory research, development of ethnically and racially diverse research cohorts, and full actualization of the prevention benefits outlined in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, the most essential facet should be a thoughtful integration of cancer prevention and screening into prevention, screening, and disease management activities for hypertension and diabetes mellitus since these chronic medical illnesses have a substantial prevalence in populations at risk for cancer disparities and cause considerable comorbidity and likely complicate effective treatment and contribute to disproportionate cancer death rates. PMID:24512936

  16. Assessment of survival of patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma after radical cytoreductive nephrectomy versus no surgery: a SEER analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wen-Jun; Zhu, Yao; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hai-Liang; Ye, Ding-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purposes To examine the factors related to the choice of cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mCCRCC), and compare the population-based survival rates of patients treated with or without surgery in the modern targeted therapy era. Materials and Methods From 2006 to 2009, patients with mCCRCC were identified from SEER database. The factors that affected patients to be submitted to CN were examined and propensity scores for each patient were calculated. Then patients were matched based upon propensity scores. Univariable and multivariable cox regression models were used to compare survival rates of patients treated with or without surgery. Finally, sensitivity analysis for the cox model on a hazard ratio scale was performed. Results Age, race, tumor size, T stage and N stage were associated with nephrectomy univariablely. After the match based upon propensity scores, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year cancer-specific survival rate estimates were 45.1%, 27.9%, and 21.7% for the no-surgery group vs 70.6%, 52.2%, and 41.7% for the surgery group, respectively (hazard ratio 0.42, 95%CI: 0.35-0.52, log-rank P<0.001). In multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression model, race, T stage, N stage and median household income were significantly associated with survival. Sensitivity analysis on a hazard ratio scale indicated that the hazard ratio might be above 1.00 only when the unknown factor had an opposite effect on survival which was 3-fold than CN. Conclusion The results of our study showed that CN significantly improves the survival of patients with metastatic CCRCC even in the targeted therapy era. PMID:26005970

  17. Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the Pediatric Population: A Population Based Clinical Outcomes Study Involving 257 Patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result (SEER) Database (1973–2011)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Christine S. M.; Mahendraraj, Krishnaraj; Chamberlain, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a rare pediatric cancer accounting for 0.5% of all pediatric malignancies. This study examines a large cohort of HCC patients in an effort to define the factors impacting clinical outcomes in pediatric HCC patients compared to adults. Methods. Demographic and clinical data on 63,771 HCC patients (257 pediatric patients ≤ 19 and 63,514 adult patients age ≥ 20) were abstracted from the SEER database (1973–2011). Results. HCC was more common among males (59.5% pediatric and 75.1% adults) and Caucasians (50.4% and 50.5%), p < 0.05. Children more often presented with fibrolamellar variant HCC (24.1% versus 0.3%, p = 0.71) and advanced HCC, including distant disease (33.1% versus 20.8%, p < 0.001), and tumors > 4 cm in size (79.6% versus 62.0%, p = 0.02). Pediatric HCC patients undergoing surgery (13.107 versus 8.324 years, p < 0.001) had longer survival than adult HCC patients. Overall mortality was lower (65.8% versus 82.0%, p < 0.001) in the pediatric HCC group. Conclusion. HCC is a rare pediatric malignancy that presents most often as an advanced tumor, >4 cm in Caucasian males. Children with HCC achieve significantly longer mean overall survival compared to adults with HCC, primarily attributable to the more favorable fibrolamellar histologic variant, and more aggressive surgical intervention, which significantly improves survival. PMID:26663981

  18. Trends in malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in US adults from 1990 to 2010: a SEER database analysis

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R.; Njei, Basile

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are precancerous lesions with a well-described adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Although the risk of malignant transformation has been well studied, data on trends in long-term survival and important prognostic factors associated with survival in malignant IPMN are lacking. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was queried to identify patients with confirmed malignant IPMN based upon pathologic diagnosis or radiographic evidence concerning for malignant potential. Median survival and age-adjusted incidence were calculated. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine independent mortality factors. Results: Based upon the SEER database query, 2651 patients were diagnosed with malignant IPMN between 1990 and 2010. The age-adjusted incidence of IPMN in 1990 was 0.361 per 100 000 persons (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.285–0.451) with a steady decline observed through 2010 (0.135 per 100 000 persons, 95% CI: 0.098–0.186). A total of 564 patients (21.3%) underwent a surgical procedure, though the number of patients who underwent surgery from 1990 to 2010 also decreased (1990–1995, n = 132 to 2006–2010, n = 96, respectively). The overall median survival was 4 months and remained relatively stable from 1990 to 2010. Performance of surgery (HR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.40–0.53, P < 0.001) was associated with a decreased risk of death. Conclusion: A significant decrease in the incidence of malignant IPMN was seen from 1990 to 2010. There was also no improvement observed in long-term survival. The small percentage of eligible cases receiving surgical treatment suggests that there is room for further improvement in survival, with increased utilization of surgery. PMID:26818977

  19. Age-related somatic mutations in the cancer genome

    PubMed Central

    Milholland, Brandon; Auton, Adam; Suh, Yousin; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increased risk of cancer, possibly in part because of an age-related increase in mutations in normal tissues. Due to their extremely low abundance, somatic mutations in normal tissues frequently escape detection. Tumors, as clonal expansions of single cells, can provide information about the somatic mutations present in these cells prior to tumorigenesis. Here, we used data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), to systematically study the frequency and spectrum of somatic mutations in a total of 6,969 patients and 34 different tumor types as a function of the age of the patient. After using linear modeling to control for the age structure of different tumor types, we found that the number of identified somatic mutations increases exponentially with age. Using additional data from the literature, we found that accumulation of somatic mutations is associated with cell division rate, cancer risk and cigarette smoking, with the latter also associated with a distinct spectrum of mutations. Our results confirm that aging is associated with the accumulation of somatic mutations, and strongly suggest that the level of genome instability of normal cells, modified by both endogenous and environmental factors, is the main risk factor for cancer. PMID:26384365

  20. Breast cancer screening among women of child-bearing age.

    PubMed

    Munyaradzi, Daphne; January, James; Maradzika, Julita

    2014-01-01

    We explored behavioral factors that contributed to late presentation of breast cancer. A cross-sectional survey of 120 women of child-bearing age was employed, and data were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires addressing predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors associated with breast cancer screening. A total of 53.5% knew what breast cancer screening was; breast self-exam was the most commonly known form of screening, although only 7.5% practiced it. Lack of awareness (p =.004) and the knowledge of someone who previously had breast cancer (p =.0004) were prominent predictors for breast cancer screening, leading to either delay in or early presentation of the condition, respectively. PMID:24875862

  1. Lung cancer in patients under the age of 40 years

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Grzegorz; Porębska, Irena; Szmygin-Milanowska, Katarzyna; Gołecki, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study In the paper clinical cases of individuals diagnosed with lung cancer below the age of 40 years have been analyzed. Material and methods The analysis included: sex, age, clinical symptoms found before and at the moment of diagnosis, character of changes visible in radiological imaging, time that passed from the first symptoms to reporting to a doctor and to establishing a diagnosis, type of diagnostic method used in establishing the final diagnosis, histopathologic type of cancer, degree of cancer progression. Results The results have been compared with a peer group who had been diagnosed 20 years earlier. Currently 7% of patients were diagnosed at the age of 25 or younger, whereas in the previous cohort patients in this age constituted 2%. The predominant pathological type was adenocarcinoma (currently 33%, previously 4%) in contrast to the earlier group in which 57% of patients had small cell lung cancer (57%). The incidence is equally distributed between both sexes, although there is an evident increase in female lung cancer cases. In the majority of patients the clinical presentation is a peripheral mass on chest X-ray. 20% of patients present pleural effusion on diagnosis. Patients reported the following complaints: breathlessness, chest pain, weight loss and fatigue. The majority of cases were diagnosed in advanced stages on the basis of a bronchoscopy acquired specimen. Time course from symptoms to diagnosis tends to be shorter than 20 years ago. PMID:23788919

  2. Universality of aging: family caregivers for elderly cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baider, Lea; Surbone, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging, with the proportion of older people (65+ years) expected to reach 21% in 2050 and to exceed the number of younger people (aged 15 or less) for the first time in history. Because cancer is particularly a chronic disease of older people, a large increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer is anticipated. The estimated number of new cancer cases worldwide among people over 65 is expected to grow from about 6 million in 2008 to more than 11 million during the coming decade. By 2030, individuals over 65 are expected to account for 70% of all cancer patients in the Western world. Along with the increase in oncology patients, the number of older people caring for their ill spouses or other relatives is also growing, with the ensuing toll on these caregivers causing major concern, especially in western countries. In different societies the characteristics of family caregiver stressors, cultural norms concerning caregiving, and the availability of support have a huge impact on those providing care. Any study of older caregivers of older cancer patients requires an integrative evaluation of aging that takes into account cultural, social, psychological, and behavioral variables. This review proposes a critical discussion of the multidimensionality of the caregiving and of the impact that age, culture, and gender have on it. PMID:25076927

  3. Is Repeat Prostate Biopsy Associated with a Greater Risk of Hospitalization? Data from SEER-Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Carter, H. Ballentine; Berndt, Sonja I.; Ricker, Winnie; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We recently reported an increasing risk over time of hospitalization among Medicare participants after undergoing an initial prostate biopsy. Less is known about the relative risks of repeat prostate biopsies, which are frequently performed in prostate cancer screening and in active surveillance programs. We determined whether repeat biopsies are associated with an increased risk of hospitalization compared to the initial biopsy. Materials and Methods Using SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results)-Medicare linked data from 1991 to 2007 we identified 13,883 men who underwent a single prostate biopsy and 3,640 who had multiple biopsies. The 30-day hospitalization rates were compared between these groups, and with a randomly selected control population of 134,977. ICD-9 codes were then used to examine the frequency of serious infectious and noninfectious urological complications as the primary diagnosis for hospital admissions. Results Initial and repeat biopsies were associated with a significantly increased risk of hospitalization within a 30-day period compared to randomly selected controls (p <0.0001). However, the repeat biopsy session was not associated with a greater risk of infectious (OR 0.81, 95% 0.49–1.32, p = 0.39) or serious noninfectious urological complications (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.54–1.62, p = 0.82) compared to the initial biopsy. Conclusions Each biopsy was associated with a significant risk of complications compared to randomly selected controls. However, the repeat biopsy procedure itself was not associated with a greater risk of serious complications requiring hospital admission compared to the initial biopsy. PMID:23063634

  4. Clinical Nomogram for Predicting Survival of Esophageal Cancer Patients after Esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jinlin; Yuan, Ping; Wang, Luming; Wang, Yiqing; Ma, Honghai; Yuan, Xiaoshuai; Lv, Wang; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an effective clinical nomogram for predicting the survival of esophageal cancer patients after esophagectomy. We identified esophageal cancer patients (n = 4,281) who underwent esophagectomy between 1988 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 18 registries database. Clinically significant parameters for survival were used to construct a nomogram based on Cox regression analyses. The model was validated using bootstrap resampling and a Chinese cohort (n = 145). A total of 4,109 patients from the SEER database were included for analysis. The multivariate analyses showed that the factors of age, race, histology, tumor site, tumor size, grade and depth of invasion, and the numbers of metastases and retrieved nodes were independent prognostic factors. All of these factors were selected into the nomogram. The nomogram showed a clear prognostic superiority over the seventh AJCC-TNM classification (C-index: SEER cohort, 0.716 vs 0.693, respectively; P < 0.01; Chinese cohort, 0.699 vs 0.680, respectively; P < 0.01). Calibration of the nomogram predicted the probabilities of 3- and 5-year survival, which corresponded closely with the actual survival rates. This novel prognostic model may improve clinicians’ abilities to predict individualized survival and to make treatment recommendations. PMID:27215834

  5. Aging Impacts Transcriptome but not Genome of Hormone-dependentBreast Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Christina; Fedele, Vita; Roydasgupta, Ritu; Fridlyand, Jane; Hubbard, Alan; Gray, Joe W.; Chew, Karen; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Moore, DanH.; Schittulli, Francesco; Tommasi, Stefania; Paradiso, Angelo; Albertson, Donna G.; Benz, Christopher C.

    2007-10-09

    Age is one of the most important risk factors for human malignancies, including breast cancer; in addition, age-at-diagnosis has been shown to be an independent indicator of breast cancer prognosis. However, except for inherited forms of breast cancer, there is little genetic or epigenetic understanding of the biological basis linking aging with sporadic breast cancer incidence and its clinical behavior.

  6. p53 as an intervention target for cancer and aging

    PubMed Central

    Hasty, Paul; Christy, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    p53 is well known for suppressing tumors but could also affect other aging processes not associated with tumor suppression. As a transcription factor, p53 responds to a variety of stresses to either induce apoptosis (cell death) or cell cycle arrest (cell preservation) to suppress tumor development. Yet, the effect p53 has on the non-cancer aspects of aging is complicated and not well understood. On one side, p53 could induce cellular senescence or apoptosis to suppress cancer but as an unintended consequence enhance the aging process especially if these responses diminish stem and progenitor cell populations. But on the flip side, p53 could reduce growth and growth-related stress to enable cell survival and ultimately delay the aging process. A better understanding of diverse functions of p53 is essential to elucidate its influences on the aging process and the possibility of targeting p53 or p53 transcriptional targets to treat cancer and ameliorate general aging. PMID:24124625

  7. Aggressive thyroid cancer in low-risk age population

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, I.B.; Bowden, J.; Luk, S.C.; Simpson, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    Seventy-eight patients under the age of 40 (low-risk patients) who had undergone surgical treatment for well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma were referred from 1979 to 1986 to our hospital for adjuvant therapy. A subgroup of 37 patients, 14 with apparent aggressive cancer, was studied. This study group consisted of 27 female and 10 male patients with mixed papillary and follicular cancer, who ranged in age from 11 to 40 years. Nodal disease occurred in 27 (73%) patients and invasiveness in 30 (81%) patients and involved multiple areas in 9 (24%) patients. Recurrence occurred in 14 (38%) patients and visceral metastases occurred in eight (22%) patients. All patients underwent appropriate surgery, but microscopic residual disease was seen in 15 patients and gross residual disease in seven patients, so that 31 patients underwent iodine-131 therapy, and 17 of these patients also underwent external radiation therapy. Three patients died of their disease, whereas 24 (65%) patients are free of disease and 9 (24%) patients are alive with disease. An additional 7 (19%) patients were initially seen in the fifth to seventh decade after decades of neglected thyroid disease, which culminated in residual cancer and death. Although low-risk categorization for thyroid cancer appears valid, its rigid application in support of conservative treatment may lead to inadequate primary treatment and underdiagnosis of cancer in thyroid nodule disease in the low-risk age population.

  8. Analysis of cancer genomes reveals basic features of human aging and its role in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Podolskiy, Dmitriy I; Lobanov, Alexei V; Kryukov, Gregory V; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations have long been implicated in aging and disease, but their impact on fitness and function is difficult to assess. Here by analysing human cancer genomes we identify mutational patterns associated with aging. Our analyses suggest that age-associated mutation load and burden double approximately every 8 years, similar to the all-cause mortality doubling time. This analysis further reveals variance in the rate of aging among different human tissues, for example, slightly accelerated aging of the reproductive system. Age-adjusted mutation load and burden correlate with the corresponding cancer incidence and precede it on average by 15 years, pointing to pre-clinical cancer development times. Behaviour of mutation load also exhibits gender differences and late-life reversals, explaining some gender-specific and late-life patterns in cancer incidence rates. Overall, this study characterizes some features of human aging and offers a mechanism for age being a risk factor for the onset of cancer. PMID:27515585

  9. Analysis of cancer genomes reveals basic features of human aging and its role in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Podolskiy, Dmitriy I.; Lobanov, Alexei V.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations have long been implicated in aging and disease, but their impact on fitness and function is difficult to assess. Here by analysing human cancer genomes we identify mutational patterns associated with aging. Our analyses suggest that age-associated mutation load and burden double approximately every 8 years, similar to the all-cause mortality doubling time. This analysis further reveals variance in the rate of aging among different human tissues, for example, slightly accelerated aging of the reproductive system. Age-adjusted mutation load and burden correlate with the corresponding cancer incidence and precede it on average by 15 years, pointing to pre-clinical cancer development times. Behaviour of mutation load also exhibits gender differences and late-life reversals, explaining some gender-specific and late-life patterns in cancer incidence rates. Overall, this study characterizes some features of human aging and offers a mechanism for age being a risk factor for the onset of cancer. PMID:27515585

  10. Aging, tumor suppression and cancer: High-wire act!

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Judith

    2004-08-15

    Evolutionary theory holds that aging is a consequence of the declining force of natural selection with age. We discuss here the evidence that among the causes of aging in complex multicellular organisms, such as mammals, is the antagonistically pleiotropic effects of the cellular responses that protect the organism from cancer. Cancer is relatively rare in young mammals, owing in large measure to the activity of tumor suppressor mechanisms. These mechanisms either protect the genome from damage and/or mutations, or they elicit cellular responses--apoptosis or senescence--that eliminate or prevent the proliferation of somatic cells at risk for neoplastic transformation.We focus here on the senescence response, reviewing its causes, regulation and effects. In addition, we describe recent data that support the idea that both senescence and apoptosis may indeed be the double-edged swords predicted by the evolutionary hypothesis of antagonistic pleiotropy--protecting organisms from cancer early in life, but promoting aging phenotypes, including late life cancer, in older organisms.

  11. Role of cancer stem cells in age-related rise in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nangia-Makker, Pratima; Yu, Yingjie; Majumdar, Adhip PN

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that comprises about 50% of estimated gastrointestinal cancers remains a high mortality malignancy. It is estimated that CRC will result in 9% of all cancer related deaths. CRC is the third leading malignancy affecting both males and females equally; with 9% of the estimated new cancer cases and 9% cancer related deaths. Sporadic CRC, whose incidence increases markedly with advancing age, occurs in 80%-85% patients diagnosed with CRC. Little is known about the precise biochemical mechanisms responsible for the rise in CRC with aging. However, many probable reasons for this increase have been suggested; among others they include altered carcinogen metabolism and the cumulative effects of long-term exposure to cancer-causing agents. Herein, we propose a role for self-renewing, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in regulating these cellular events. In this editorial, we have briefly described the recent work on the evolution of CSCs in gastro-intestinal track especially in the colon, and how they are involved in the age-related rise in CRC. Focus of this editorial is to provide a description of (1) CSC; (2) epigenetic and genetic mechanisms giving rise to CSCs; (3) markers of CSC; (4) characteristics; and (5) age-related increase in CSC in the colonic crypt. PMID:26600965

  12. Contraceptive Practices Among Female Cancer Survivors of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Dominick, Sally A.; McLean, Mamie R.; Whitcomb, Brian W.; Gorman, Jessica R.; Mersereau, Jennifer E.; Bouknight, Janet M.; Su, H. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of contraception between reproductive-aged cancer survivors and women in the general U.S. population. Among survivors, the study examined factors associated with use of contraception and emergency contraception. Methods This study analyzed enrollment data from an ongoing national prospective cohort study on reproductive health after cancer entitled the Fertility Information Research Study. We compared current contraceptive use in survivors with that of the general population ascertained by the 2006–2010 National Survey for Family Growth. Log-binomial regression models estimated relative risks for characteristics associated with use of contraception, World Health Organization tiers I–II (sterilization and hormonal) contraceptive methods, and emergency contraception in survivors. Results Data from 295 survivors (mean age 31.6 ± 5.7 years, range 20–44 years) enrolled in this prospective study (85% response rate) were examined. Age-adjusted rates of using tiers I–II contraceptive methods were lower in survivors than the general population (34% [28.8–40.0] compared with 53% [51.5–54.5], P<.01). Only 56% of survivors reported receiving family planning services (counseling, prescription or procedure related to birth control) since cancer diagnosis. In adjusted analysis, receipt of family planning services was associated with both increased use of tiers I–II contraceptive methods (relative risk 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–1.5) and accessing emergency contraception (relative risk 5.0, 95% CI 1.6–16.3) in survivors. Conclusion Lower rates of using Tiers I–II contraceptive methods were found in reproductive-aged cancer survivors compared to the general population of U.S. women. Exposure to family planning services across the cancer care continuum may improve contraception utilization among these women. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01843140. PMID:26181090

  13. The intersection of cancer and aging: establishing the need for breast cancer rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Kathryn H; Cappola, Anne R; Stricker, Carrie T; Sweeney, Carol; Norman, Sandra A

    2007-05-01

    The increasing success of treatments for common cancers has resulted in growing awareness of the unique health care needs of cancer survivors. Cancer treatments can be toxic and have long-lasting effects on health, potentially accelerating the aging process and producing associated declines in physical function. In this synthesis of the literature, we critically examine the strength of existing evidence that breast cancer diagnosis and treatment are associated with a disproportionate decline in physical function compared with the effects of living without cancer for the same number of years. There is some observational epidemiologic evidence that women treated for breast cancer report greater declines in physical function than their peers. Discerning the factors associated with such declines and their clinical significance remains to be addressed. Physiologic, psychological, and behavioral changes associated with both aging and cancer treatment are reviewed. Parallels are proposed between existing preventive and rehabilitative programs and possibilities for similar interventions aimed at preventing, reversing, or halting declines in physical function in cancer survivors. Finally, a program of research is proposed to evaluate whether there is some subset of breast cancer survivors for whom prevention or rehabilitation of functional status declines is needed, as well as development of targeted, mechanistically driven interventions. PMID:17507607

  14. Premature aging and cancer in nucleotide excision repair-disorders

    PubMed Central

    Diderich, K.; Alanazi, M.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    During past decades the major impact of DNA damage on cancer as ‘disease of the genes’ has become abundantly apparent. In addition to cancer recent years have also uncovered a very strong association of DNA damage with many features of (premature) aging. The notion that DNA repair systems not only protect against cancer but equally against too fast aging has become evident from a systematic, integral analysis of a variety of mouse mutants carrying defects in e.g. transcription-coupled repair with or without an additional impairment of global genome nucleotide excision repair and the corresponding segmental premature aging syndromes in man. A striking correlation between the degree of the DNA repair deficiency and the acceleration of specific progeroid symptoms has been discovered for those repair systems that primarily protect from the cytotoxic and cytostatic effects of DNA damage. These observations are explained from the perspective of nucleotide excision repair mouse mutant and human syndromes. However, similar principles likely apply to other DNA repair pathways including interstrand crosslink repair and double strand break repair and genome maintenance systems in general, supporting the notion that DNA damage constitutes an important intermediate in the process of aging. PMID:21680258

  15. Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kevin B; Yeager, Meredith; Zhou, Weiyin; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin; Hutchinson, Amy; Deng, Xiang; Liu, Chenwei; Horner, Marie-Josephe; Cullen, Michael; Epstein, Caroline G; Burdett, Laurie; Dean, Michael C; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Sampson, Joshua; Chung, Charles C; Kovaks, Joseph; Gapstur, Susan M; Stevens, Victoria L; Teras, Lauren T; Gaudet, Mia M; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Taylor, Philip R; Freedman, Neal D; Abnet, Christian C; Goldstein, Alisa M; Hu, Nan; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Liao, Linda; Ding, Ti; Qiao, You-Lin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Koh, Woon-Puay; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Fan, Jin-Hu; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Harris, Curtis C; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; McNeill, Lorna H; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Schwartz, Ann G; Signorello, Lisa B; Spitz, Margaret R; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Xifeng; Zanetti, Krista A; Ziegler, Regina G; Figueroa, Jonine D; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Malats, Nuria; Marenne, Gaelle; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Baris, Dalsu; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Landi, Maria Teresa; Goldin, Lynn; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Rotunno, Melissa; Rajaraman, Preetha; Andersson, Ulrika; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Berg, Christine D; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreon, Tania; Feychting, Maria; Ahlbom, Anders; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henriksson, Roger; Inskip, Peter D; Johansen, Christoffer; Landgren, Annelie; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Michaud, Dominique S; Melin, Beatrice S; Peters, Ulrike; Ruder, Avima M; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Visvanathan, Kala; White, Emily; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Silverman, Debra T; Kogevinas, Manolis; Gonzalez, Juan R; Villa, Olaya; Li, Donghui; Duell, Eric J; Risch, Harvey A; Olson, Sara H; Kooperberg, Charles; Wolpin, Brian M; Jiao, Li; Hassan, Manal; Wheeler, William; Arslan, Alan A; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H; Fuchs, Charles S; Gallinger, Steven; Gross, Myron D; Holly, Elizabeth A; Klein, Alison P; LaCroix, Andrea; Mandelson, Margaret T; Petersen, Gloria; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Canzian, Federico; Chang, Kenneth; Cotterchio, Michelle; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Jenab, Mazda; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; McWilliams, Robert R; Mendelsohn, Julie B; Rabe, Kari G; Riboli, Elio; Tjønneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Elena, Joanne W; Yu, Herbert; Amundadottir, Laufey; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stram, Daniel; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Wunder, Jay S; García, Ana Patiño; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Barkauskas, Donald A; Gorlick, Richard G; Purdue, Mark; Chow, Wong-Ho; Moore, Lee E; Schwartz, Kendra L; Davis, Faith G; Hsing, Ann W; Berndt, Sonja I; Black, Amanda; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; McGlynn, Katherine A; Cook, Michael B; Graubard, Barry I; Kratz, Christian P; Greene, Mark H; Erickson, Ralph L; Hunter, David J; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Real, Francisco X; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Caporaso, Neil E; Tucker, Margaret; Rothman, Nathaniel; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Chanock, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls drawn from 13 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones from DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. Mosaic chromosomal abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of size >2 Mb were observed in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%) with abnormal cell proportions between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, the frequency increased with age; 0.23% under 50 and 1.91% between 75 and 79 (p=4.8×10−8). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid-tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals, OR=1.25, p=0.016), with a stronger association for cases who had DNA collected prior to diagnosis or treatment (OR=1.45, p=0.0005). Detectable clonal mosaicism was common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least one year prior to diagnosis of leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR=35.4, p=3.8×10−11). These findings underscore the importance of the role and time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and other late-onset diseases. PMID:22561519

  16. Infertility in reproductive-age female cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Levine, Jennifer M; Kelvin, Joanne Frankel; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2015-05-15

    Improved survival rates among reproductive-age females diagnosed with cancer have increased the focus on long-term quality of life, including maintenance of the ability to conceive biological children. Cancer-directed therapies such as high-dose alkylating agents and radiation to the pelvis, which deplete ovarian reserve, radiation to the brain, which affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and surgical resection of reproductive structures can decrease the likelihood of having biological children. Standard fertility preservation strategies such as embryo and oocyte cryopreservation before the onset of therapy offer the opportunity to conserve fertility, but they may not be feasible because of the urgency to start cancer therapy, financial limitations, and a lack of access to reproductive endocrinologists. Ovarian tissue freezing is considered experimental, with limited data related to pregnancies, but it minimizes treatment delay. Studies evaluating gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues have had mixed results, although a recent randomized, prospective study in women with breast cancer demonstrated a protective effect. Fertility preservation programs are increasingly being developed within cancer programs. In this article, we describe risks to infertility and options for preservation, raise psychosocial and ethical issues, and propose elements for establishing an effective fertility preservation program. PMID:25649243

  17. Aging and the Dendritic Cell System: Implications for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shurin, Michael R.; Shurin, Galina V.; Chatta, Gurkamal S.

    2007-01-01

    The immune system shows a decline in responsiveness to antigens both with aging, as well as in the presence of tumors. The malfunction of the immune system with age can be attributed to developmental and functional alterations in several cell populations. Previous studies have shown defects in humoral responses and abnormalities in T cell function in aged individuals, but have not distinguished between abnormalities in antigen presentation and intrinsic T cell or B cell defects in aged individuals. Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in regulating immune responses by presenting antigens to naïve T lymphocytes, modulating Th1/Th2/Treg balance, producing numerous regulatory cytokines and chemokines, and modifying survival of immune effectors. DC are receiving increased attention due to their involvement in the immunobiology of tolerance and autoimmunity, as well as their potential role as biological adjuvants in tumor vaccines. Recent advances in the molecular and cell biology of different DC populations allow for addressing the issue of DC and aging both in rodents and humans. Since DC play a crucial role in initiating and regulating immune responses, it is reasonable to hypothesize that they are directly involved in altered antitumor immunity in aging. However, the results of studies focusing on DC in the elderly are conflicting. The present review summarizes the available human and experimental animal data on quantitative and qualitative alterations of DC in aging and discusses the potential role of the DC system in the increased incidence of cancer in the elderly. PMID:17446082

  18. Breast Cancer Subtypes in Patients Aged 70 Years and Older.

    PubMed

    Königsberg, Robert; Pfeiler, Georg; Hammerschmid, Nicole; Holub, Oliver; Glössmann, Kerstin; Larcher-Senn, Julian; Dittrich, Christian

    2016-05-27

    Recurrence and survival pattern in breast cancer (bc) patients (pts) ≥ 70 years subcategorized according to subtype and age are still an area of uncertainty. Tumor characteristics, patient demographics, therapies applied, and recurrence pattern were compared between luminal A (LA), luminal B (LB), Her2/neu overexpressing (Her+) and triple-negative (TN) bc subtypes and the age subcategories 70-74, 75-79, ≥80 years. Based on univariate Cox-regression-analyses distant-disease-free-survival (DDFS) differed significantly for bc subtypes (p = 0.0002), notably for Her+ vs. LA (p = 0.0014), TN vs. LA (p < 0.001), and TN vs. LB (p = 0.0086). Not age, but Her+ and TN represented prognostic factors for DDFS. PMID:27215407

  19. Cancer and aging: The importance of telomeres in genome maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Rodier, Francis; Kim, Sahn-ho; Nijjar, Tarlochan; Yaswen, Paul; Campisi, Judith

    2004-10-01

    Telomeres are the specialized DNA-protein structures that cap the ends of linear chromosomes, thereby protecting them from degradation and fusion by cellular DNA repair processes. In vertebrate cells, telomeres consist of several kilobase pairs of DNA having the sequence TTAGGG, a few hundred base pairs of single-stranded DNA at the 3' end of the telomeric DNA tract, and a host of proteins that organize the telomeric double and single stranded DNA into a protective structure. Functional telomeres are essential for maintaining the integrity and stability of genomes. When combined with loss of cell cycle checkpoint controls, telomere dysfunction can lead to genomic instability, a common cause and hallmark of cancer. Consequently, normal mammalian cells respond to dysfunctional telomeres by undergoing apoptosis (programmed cell death) or cellular senescence (permanent cell cycle arrest), two cellular tumor suppressor mechanisms. These tumor suppressor mechanisms are potent suppressors of cancer, but recent evidence suggests that they can antagonistically also contribute to aging phenotypes. Here, we review what is known about the structure and function of telomeres in mammalian cells, particularly human cells, and how telomere dysfunction may arise and contribute to cancer and aging phenotypes.

  20. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes in Invasive Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi-Zi; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of invasive papillary carcinoma (IPC), we identified 233,171 female patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database who had IPC (n = 524) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,647). Generally, IPCs occurred in older women (≥50 years old) and presented with smaller sizes, lower grades, higher rates of oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) positivity, and reduced lymph node (LN) involvement and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy than patients with IDC. The five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were significantly better in IPC than in IDC (97.5% vs. 93%, respectively; P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, patients with IPC showed a DSS that was similar to that of IDC (hazard ratio = 0.556, 95% confidence interval 0.289–1.070, P = 0.079). No significant difference was observed in DSS between matched IPC and IDC groups (P = 0.085). Differences in outcomes may be partially explained by differences in tumour grade, LN status, and ER and PR status between the 2 groups. Gaining an improved clinical and biological understanding of IPC might result in more tailored and effective therapies in breast cancer patients. PMID:27053333

  1. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes in Invasive Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast: A SEER Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi-Zi; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of invasive papillary carcinoma (IPC), we identified 233,171 female patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database who had IPC (n = 524) or infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) (n = 232,647). Generally, IPCs occurred in older women (≥ 50 years old) and presented with smaller sizes, lower grades, higher rates of oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) positivity, and reduced lymph node (LN) involvement and were less likely to be treated with mastectomy than patients with IDC. The five-year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates were significantly better in IPC than in IDC (97.5% vs. 93%, respectively; P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, patients with IPC showed a DSS that was similar to that of IDC (hazard ratio = 0.556, 95% confidence interval 0.289-1.070, P = 0.079). No significant difference was observed in DSS between matched IPC and IDC groups (P = 0.085). Differences in outcomes may be partially explained by differences in tumour grade, LN status, and ER and PR status between the 2 groups. Gaining an improved clinical and biological understanding of IPC might result in more tailored and effective therapies in breast cancer patients. PMID:27053333

  2. The Use of Radiation Therapy Appears to Improve Outcome in Patients With Malignant Primary Tracheal Tumors: A SEER-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Liyi; Fan Min; Sheets, Nathan C.; Chen, Ronald C.; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To conduct a matched pair analysis assessing the impact of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with resectable and unresectable primary malignant tracheal tumors using Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Patients and Methods: The SEER registry was used to identify every patient (or 'case') who received RT between 1988 and 2007 for primary malignant tracheal tumors, and to search for corresponding 'controls' (not treated with RT), with the same prognostic and treatment factors (surgery on the trachea, disease extension, histology, and gender). Overall survival (OS) was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier methods. Results of OS and cumulative incidence of death from tracheal cancer in the cases and controls, and in various subsets, were compared using log-rank and Gray's tests. Results: Two hundred fifty-eight patients who received RT were identified, and 78 of these had appropriate matched controls identified, forming the basis of this analysis. In the 78 (+RT) cases, the median follow-up was 60 months (range, 10-192) in the survivors vs. 55 months (range, 2-187) in the controls (no-RT group). Patients in RT group had significantly better OS, and a lower cumulative incidence of death from tracheal cancer than no-RT patients (p < 0.05). Treatment with radiation was associated with improved survival in patients with squamous cell histology [p < 0.0001], regional disease extension [p = 0.030], or those that did not undergo resection [p = 0.038]. There were four deaths in RT group and three in no-RT group attributed to cardiac and respiratory causes. Conclusion: Our data suggest a survival benefit for the use of RT broadly for all patients with tracheal cancer. Nevertheless, the retrospective nature of this observational study limits its interpretation.

  3. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  4. Anthropometric measures at different ages and endometrial cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Maso, L Dal; Tavani, A; Zucchetto, A; Montella, M; Ferraroni, M; Negri, E; Polesel, J; Decarli, A; Talamini, R; La Vecchia, C; Franceschi, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endometrial cancer is strongly associated with body mass index (BMI), but the influence of BMI history and of different types of obesity is uncertain. Ethods: M A case–control study was carried out in Italy including 454 cases and 908 controls admitted to hospital for acute non-hormone-related conditions. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using multivariate logistic and spline regression models. Results: The OR for BMI >30 at diagnosis compared with 20 to <25 kg m−2 was 4.08 (95% CI: 2.90–5.74). The association for BMI was monotonic with a possible steeper increase for BMI above 28. Conversely, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) showed a bell shaped curve with increased OR (2.10; 95% CI: 1.43–3.09) in the intermediate tertile only. After stratification by BMI at diagnosis, history of weight loss and BMI at age 30 did not influence endometrial cancer risk. History of obesity in middle age had a weak and not significant adverse effect among obese women (OR=1.60; 95% CI: 0.52–4.96). Conclusion: The predominant importance of recent weight compared to lifetime history, justifies encouraging weight reduction in women at any age. PMID:21386846

  5. Defining Early-Onset Kidney Cancer: Implications for Germline and Somatic Mutation Testing and Clinical Management

    PubMed Central

    Shuch, Brian; Vourganti, Srinivas; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Middleton, Lindsay; Peterson, James; Merino, Maria J.; Metwalli, Adam R.; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Linehan, W. Marston

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 5% to 8% of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is hereditary. No guidelines exist for patient selection for RCC germline mutation testing. We evaluate how age of onset could indicate the need for germline mutation testing for detection of inherited forms of kidney cancer. Patients and Methods We analyzed the age distribution of RCC cases in the SEER-17 program and in our institutional hereditary kidney cancer population. The age distributions were compared by sex, race, histology, and hereditary cancer syndrome. Models were established to evaluate the specific age thresholds for genetic testing. Results The median age of patients with RCC in SEER-17 was 64 years, with the distribution closely approaching normalcy. Statistical differences were observed by race, sex, and subtype (P < .05). The bottom decile cutoff was ≤ 46 years of age and slightly differed by sex, race, and histology. The mean and median ages at presentation of 608 patients with hereditary kidney cancer were 39.3 years and 37 years, respectively. Although age varied by specific syndrome, 70% of these cases were found to lie at or below the bottom age decile. Modeling age-based genetic testing thresholds demonstrated that the 10th percentile maximized sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Early age of onset might be a sign of hereditary RCC. Even in the absence of clinical manifestations and personal/family history, an age of onset of 46 years or younger should trigger consideration for genetic counseling/germline mutation testing and may serve as a useful cutoff when establishing genetic testing guidelines. PMID:24378414

  6. Reduced Ovarian Cancer Incidence in Women Exposed to Low Dose Ionizing Background Radiation or Radiation to the Ovaries after Treatment for Breast Cancer or Rectosigmoid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-01-01

    Background High dose ionizing radiation can induce ovarian cancer, but the effect of low dose radiation on the development of ovarian cancer has not been extensively studied. We evaluated the effect of low dose radiation and total background radiation, and the radiation delivered to the ovaries during the treatment of rectosigmoid cancer and breast cancer on ovarian cancer incidence. Materials and Methods Background radiation measurements are from Assessment of Variations in Radiation Exposure in the United States, 2011. Ovarian cancer incidence data are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) of ovarian cancer following breast cancer and rectosigmoid cancer are from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data. Obesity data by US state are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mean ages of US state populations are from the United States Census Bureau. Results We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data, which reveal that in 194,042 cases of breast cancer treated with beam radiation, there were 796 cases of ovarian cancer by 120+ months of treatment (0.41%); in 283, 875 cases of breast cancer not treated with radiation, there were 1,531 cases of ovarian cancer by 120+ months (0.54%). The difference in ovarian cancer incidence in the two groups was significant (p < 0.001, two tailed Fisher exact test). The small dose of scattered ovarian radiation (about 3.09 cGy) from beam radiation to the breast appears to have reduced the risk of ovarian cancer by 24%. In 13,099 cases of rectal or rectosigmoid junction cancer treated with beam radiation in the SEER data, there were 20 cases of ovarian cancer by 120+ months of treatment (0.15%). In 33,305 cases of rectal or rectosigmoid junction cancer not treated with radiation, there were 91 cases of ovarian cancer by 120+ months (0.27%). The difference in ovarian cancer incidence in the

  7. Morbidity risks among older adults with pre-existing age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Akushevich, Igor; Kravchenko, Julia; Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Arbeev, Konstantin; Kulminski, Alexander; Yashin, Anatoliy I

    2013-12-01

    Multi-morbidity is common among older adults; however, for many aging-related diseases there is no information for U.S. elderly population on how earlier-manifested disease affects the risk of another disease manifested later during patient's lifetime. Quantitative evaluation of risks of cancer and non-cancer diseases for older adults with pre-existing conditions is performed using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Registry data linked to the Medicare Files of Service Use (MFSU). Using the SEER-Medicare data containing individual records for 2,154,598 individuals, we empirically evaluated age patterns of incidence of age-associated diseases diagnosed after the onset of earlier manifested disease and compared these patterns with those in general population. Individual medical histories were reconstructed using information on diagnoses coded in MFSU, dates of medical services/procedures, and Medicare enrollment/disenrollment. More than threefold increase of subsequent diseases risk was observed for 15 disease pairs, majority of them were i) diseases of the same organ and/or system (e.g., Parkinson disease for patients with Alzheimer disease, HR=3.77, kidney cancer for patients with renal failure, HR=3.28) or ii) disease pairs with primary diseases being fast-progressive cancers (i.e., lung, kidney, and pancreas), e.g., ulcer (HR=4.68) and melanoma (HR=4.15) for patients with pancreatic cancer. Lower risk of subsequent disease was registered for 20 disease pairs, mostly among patients with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, e.g., decreased lung cancer risk among patients with Alzheimer's (HR=0.64) and Parkinson's (HR=0.60) disease. Synergistic and antagonistic dependences in geriatric disease risks were observed among US elderly confirming known and detecting new associations of wide spectrum of age-associated diseases. The results can be used in optimization of screening, prevention and treatment strategies of chronic diseases among U.S. elderly

  8. Breast cancer under age 40: a different approach.

    PubMed

    Ribnikar, D; Ribeiro, J M; Pinto, D; Sousa, B; Pinto, A C; Gomes, E; Moser, E C; Cardoso, M J; Cardoso, F

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer (BC) under age 40 is a complex disease to manage due to the additionally fertility-related factors to be taken in consideration. More than 90% of young patients with BC are symptomatic. Women<40 years are more likely to develop BC with worse clinicopathological features and more aggressive subtype. This has been frequently associated with inferior outcomes. Recently, the prognostic significance of age<40 has been shown to differ according to the BC subtype, being associated with worst recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) for luminal BC. The biology of BC<40 has also been explored through analysis of large genomic data set, and specific pathways overexpressed in these tumors have been identified which can lead to the development of targeted therapy in the future. A multidisciplinary tumor board should determine the optimal locoregional and systemic management strategies for every individual patient with BC before the start of any therapy including surgery. This applies to both early (early breast cancer (EBC)) and advanced (advanced breast cancer (ABC)) disease, before the start of any therapy. Mastectomy even in young patients confers no overall survival advantage when compared to breast-conserving treatment (BCT), followed by radiotherapy. Regarding axillary approach, indications are identical to other age groups. Young age is one of the most important risk factors for local recurrence after both breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and mastectomy, associated with a higher risk of distant metastasis and death. Radiation after BCS reduces local recurrence from 19.5 to 10.2% in BC patients 40 years and younger. The indications for and the choice of systemic treatment for invasive BC (both early and advanced disease) should not be based on age alone but driven by the biological characteristics of the individual tumor (including hormone receptor status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) status, grade, and proliferative

  9. Ink4-Arf locus in cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Sherr, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Three tumor suppressor genes at the small (<50 kb) INK4-ARF (CDKN2A/B) locus on human chromosome 9p21 coordinate a signaling network that depends on the activities of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and the p53 transcription factor. Disruption of this circuitry, frequently by codeletion of INK4-ARF, is a hallmark of cancer, begging the question of why the intimate genetic linkage of these tumor suppressor genes has been maintained in mammals despite the risk of their coinactivation. The INK4-ARF locus is not highly expressed under normal physiologic conditions in young mammals, but its induction becomes more pronounced as animals age. Notably, INK4-ARF is actively silenced en bloc in embryonic, fetal, and adult stem cells but becomes poised to respond to oncogenic stress signals as stem cells lose their self-renewal capacity and differentiate, thereby providing a potent barrier to tumor formation. Epigenetic remodeling of the locus as a whole provides a mechanism for coordinating the activities of RB and p53. A hypothesis is that the INK4-ARF locus may have evolved to physiologically restrict the self-renewal capacities and numbers of stem and progenitor cells with the attendant consequence of limiting tissue regenerative capacity, particularly as animals age. Deletion of INK4-ARF contributes to the aberrant self-renewal capacity of tumor cells and occurs frequently in many forms of human cancer. PMID:22960768

  10. Racial Disparities in Stage-Specific Colorectal Cancer Mortality: 1960–2005

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shally Shalini; Armstrong, Katrina; Asch, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether racial disparities in stage-specific colorectal cancer survival changed between 1960 and 2005. Methods. We used US Mortality Multiple-Cause-of-Death Data Files and intercensal estimates to calculate standardized mortality rates by gender and race from 1960 to 2005. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data to estimate stage-specific colorectal cancer survival. To account for SEER sampling uncertainty, we used a bootstrap resampling procedure and fit a Cox proportional hazards model. Results. Between 1960–2005, patterns of decline in mortality rate as a result of colorectal cancer differed greatly by gender and race: 54% reduction for White women, 14% reduction for Black women, 39% reduction for White men, and 28% increase for Black men. Blacks consistently experienced worse rates of stage-specific survival and life expectancy than did Whites for both genders, across all age groups, and for localized, regional, and distant stages of the disease. Conclusions. The rates of stage-specific colorectal cancer survival differed among Blacks when compared with Whites during the 4-decade study period. Differences in stage-specific life expectancy were the result of differences in access to care or quality of care. More attention should be given to racial disparities in colorectal cancer management. PMID:20724684

  11. Middle-Aged More Often Diagnosed with Late-Stage Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Middle-Aged More Often Diagnosed With Late-Stage Lung Cancer British study highlights the need for better early ... more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage lung cancer than those who are slightly older, a new ...

  12. Opposite phenotypes of cancer and aging arise from alternative regulation of common signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2003-12-01

    Phenotypic features of malignant and senescent cells are in many instances opposite. Cancer cells do not "age"; their metabolic, proliferative, and growth characteristics are opposite to those observed with cellular aging (both replicative and functional). In many such characteristics cancer cells resemble embryonic cells. One can say that cancer manifests itself as a local, uncontrolled "rejuvenation" in an organism. Available evidence from human and animal studies suggests that the opposite phenotypic features of aging and cancer arise from the opposite regulation of genes participating in apoptosis/growth arrest or growth signal transduction pathways in cells. This fact may be applicable in the development of new anti-aging treatments. Genes that are contrarily regulated in cancer and aging cells (e.g., proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressors) could be candidate targets for anti-aging interventions. Their "cancer-like" regulation, if strictly controlled, might help to rejuvenate the human organism. PMID:15033776

  13. Global and regional estimates of cancer mortality and incidence by site: I. Application of regional cancer survival model to estimate cancer mortality distribution by site

    PubMed Central

    Mathers, Colin D; Shibuya, Kenji; Boschi-Pinto, Cynthia; Lopez, Alan D; Murray, Christopher JL

    2002-01-01

    Background The Global Burden of Disease 2000 (GBD 2000) study starts from an analysis of the overall mortality envelope in order to ensure that the cause-specific estimates add to the total all cause mortality by age and sex. For regions where information on the distribution of cancer deaths is not available, a site-specific survival model was developed to estimate the distribution of cancer deaths by site. Methods An age-period-cohort model of cancer survival was developed based on data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER). The model was further adjusted for the level of economic development in each region. Combined with the available incidence data, cancer death distributions were estimated and the model estimates were validated against vital registration data from regions other than the United States. Results Comparison with cancer mortality distribution from vital registration confirmed the validity of this approach. The model also yielded the cancer mortality distribution which is consistent with the estimates based on regional cancer registries. There was a significant variation in relative interval survival across regions, in particular for cancers of bladder, breast, melanoma of the skin, prostate and haematological malignancies. Moderate variations were observed among cancers of colon, rectum, and uterus. Cancers with very poor prognosis such as liver, lung, and pancreas cancers showed very small variations across the regions. Conclusions The survival model presented here offers a new approach to the calculation of the distribution of deaths for areas where mortality data are either scarce or unavailable. PMID:12502433

  14. What Makes You Stronger: Age and Cohort Differences in Personal Growth after Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pudrovska, Tetyana

    2012-01-01

    Using two waves of the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States, I compare changes in personal growth over a 10-year period among cancer survivors and individuals without cancer. Moreover, I examine joint effects of age and cohort on personal growth after a cancer diagnosis. The theoretical framework of this study integrates impairment, resilience, and thriving perspectives. Findings reveal that, although personal growth declines with age for all individuals regardless of cohort and cancer status, cancer slows the decline in personal growth with age in 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s birth cohorts, yet accelerates the age-related decline in the 1920s cohort. I argue that a sociological perspective can enhance our understanding of the interplay of developmental and socio-cultural influences on psychological adjustment to cancer. Seemingly idiosyncratic psychological reactions to cancer partly reflect macro-level processes represented by cohort differences. PMID:20943589

  15. Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; McDonald, Mark W.; Chang, Andrew L.; Esiashvili, Natia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation

  16. MindSeer: a portable and extensible tool for visualization of structural and functional neuroimaging data

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eider B; Poliakov, Andrew V; Lincoln, Peter; Brinkley, James F

    2007-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of multimodality neuroimaging data provides a powerful technique for viewing the relationship between structure and function. A number of applications are available that include some aspect of 3-D visualization, including both free and commercial products. These applications range from highly specific programs for a single modality, to general purpose toolkits that include many image processing functions in addition to visualization. However, few if any of these combine both stand-alone and remote multi-modality visualization in an open source, portable and extensible tool that is easy to install and use, yet can be included as a component of a larger information system. Results We have developed a new open source multimodality 3-D visualization application, called MindSeer, that has these features: integrated and interactive 3-D volume and surface visualization, Java and Java3D for true cross-platform portability, one-click installation and startup, integrated data management to help organize large studies, extensibility through plugins, transparent remote visualization, and the ability to be integrated into larger information management systems. We describe the design and implementation of the system, as well as several case studies that demonstrate its utility. These case studies are available as tutorials or demos on the associated website: . Conclusion MindSeer provides a powerful visualization tool for multimodality neuroimaging data. Its architecture and unique features also allow it to be extended into other visualization domains within biomedicine. PMID:17937818

  17. Increasing Age and Treatment Modality Are Predictors for Subsequent Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer Following Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anurag K.; Mashtare, Terry L.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Seixas-Mikelus, Stefanie A.; Kim, Hyung L.; May, Kilian Salerno

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of prostate cancer therapy (surgery or external beam irradiation, or both or none) on the actuarial incidence of subsequent bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry from 1973 to 2005 was analyzed. Treatment was stratified as radiotherapy, surgery, both surgery and adjuvant radiation, and neither modality. Brachytherapy was excluded. Results: In all, 555,337 prostate carcinoma patients were identified; 124,141 patients were irradiated; 235,341 patients were treated surgically; 32,744 patients had both surgery and radiation; and 163,111 patients received neither modality. Bladder cancers were diagnosed in: 1,836 (1.48%) men who were irradiated (mean age, 69.4 years), 2,753 (1.09%) men who were treated surgically (mean age, 66.9 years); 683 (2.09%) men who received both modalities (mean age, 67.4 years), and 1,603 (0.98%) men who were treated with neither modality (mean age, 71.8 years). In each treatment cohort, Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that increasing age (by decade) was a significant predictor of developing bladder cancer (p < 0.0001). Incidence of bladder cancer was significantly different for either radiation or surgery alone versus no treatment, radiation versus surgery alone, and both surgery and radiation versus either modality alone (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, age and irradiation were highly significant predictors of being diagnosed with bladder cancer. Conclusions: Following prostate cancer, increasing age and irradiation were highly significant predictors of being diagnosed with bladder cancer. While use of radiation increased the risk of bladder cancer compared to surgery alone or no treatment, the overall incidence of subsequent bladder cancer remained low. Routine bladder cancer surveillance is not warranted.

  18. Historical Trends in the Use of Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Cancers: 1973-2008

    SciTech Connect

    Jairam, Vikram; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Yu, James B.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess historical trends in the use of radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric cancers over the past 4 decades. Methods: The National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the 9 original tumor registries (SEER-9) was queried to identify patients aged 0 to 19 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, bone and joint cancer, cancer of the brain and nervous system, Hodgkin lymphoma, neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, Wilms tumor, or retinoblastoma from 1973 to 2008. Patients were grouped into 4-year time epochs. The number and percentage of patients who received RT as part of their initial treatment were calculated per epoch by each diagnosis group from 1973 to 2008. Results: RT use for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and retinoblastoma declined sharply from 57%, 57%, and 30% in 1973 to 1976 to 11%, 15%, and 2%, respectively, in 2005 to 2008. Similarly, smaller declines in RT use were also seen in brain cancer (70%-39%), bone cancer (41%-21%), Wilms tumor (75%-53%), and neuroblastoma (60%-25%). RT use curves for Wilms tumor and neuroblastoma were nonlinear with nadirs in 1993 to 1996 at 39% and 19%, respectively. There were minimal changes in RT use for Hodgkin lymphoma, soft tissue cancer, or acute myeloid leukemia, roughly stable at 72%, 40%, and 11%, respectively. Almost all patients treated with RT were given external beam RT exclusively. However, from 1985 to 2008, treatments involving brachytherapy, radioisotopes, or combination therapy increased in frequency, comprising 1.8%, 4.6%, and 11.9% of RT treatments in brain cancer, soft tissue cancer, and retinoblastoma, respectively. Conclusions: The use of RT is declining over time in 7 of 10 pediatric cancer categories. A limitation of this study is a potential under-ascertainment of RT use in the SEER-9 database including the delayed use of RT.

  19. Effects of Age on the Detection and Management of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew; Brown, James A. L.; Malone, Carmel; McLaughlin, Ray; Kerin, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, breast cancer affects approximately 12% of women worldwide. While the incidence of breast cancer rises with age, a younger age at diagnosis is linked to increased mortality. We discuss age related factors affecting breast cancer diagnosis, management and treatment, exploring key concepts and identifying critical areas requiring further research. We examine age as a factor in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment relating it to factors such as genetic status, breast cancer subtype, hormone factors and nodal status. We examine the effects of age as seen through the adoption of population wide breast cancer screening programs. Assessing the incidence rates of each breast cancer subtype, in the context of age, we examine the observed correlations. We explore how age affects patient’s prognosis, exploring the effects of age on stage and subtype incidence. Finally we discuss the future of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, examining the potential of emerging tests and technologies (such as microRNA) and how novel research findings are being translated into clinically relevant practices. PMID:26010605

  20. Functional Outcomes by Age for Inpatient Cancer Rehabilitation: A Retrospective Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Elizabeth G.; Baltisberger, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-related impairments result in disabilities similar to those typically encountered in inpatient rehabilitation settings; however, the use of rehabilitation services by cancer survivors is low. This is particularly important for older adults as they are at higher risk for cancer. This retrospective study collected data from medical records from 215 charts of patients admitted to an inpatient physical rehabilitation hospital, within a 5-year period, with a primary diagnosis of cancer. Mean age was 61 years (SD = 15.7) for 109 (51%) females and 106 (49%) males. Regardless of age, patients achieved significant functional improvement, as shown by their FIM scores (t = 23.06, p < .0001), from admission to discharge. The results have several important implications related to cancer survivorship among older adults. With a push toward aging in place, maintaining optimal physical functioning is crucial. Physical rehabilitation benefited the functional outcomes of this group of cancer survivors regardless of age. PMID:23908563

  1. NFKB1: a suppressor of inflammation, ageing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Tyrell; Perkins, Neil D; L Wilson, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    The pleiotropic consequences of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NF-κB) pathway activation result from the combinatorial effects of the five subunits that form the homo- and heterodimeric NF-κB complexes. Although biochemical and gene knockout studies have demonstrated overlapping and distinct functions for these proteins, much is still not known about the mechanisms determining context-dependent functions, the formation of different dimer complexes and transcriptional control in response to diverse stimuli. Here we discuss recent results that reveal that the nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1 (NFKB1) (p105/p50) subunit is an important regulator of NF-κB activity in vivo. These effects are not restricted to being a dimer partner for other NF-κB subunits. Rather p50 homodimers have a critical role as suppressors of the NF-κB response, while the p105 precursor has a variety of NF-κB-independent functions. The importance of Nfkb1 function can be seen in mouse models, where Nfkb1(-/-) mice display increased inflammation and susceptibility to certain forms of DNA damage, leading to cancer, and a rapid ageing phenotype. In humans, low expression of Kip1 ubiquitination-promoting complex 1 (KPC1), a ubiquitin ligase required for p105 to p50 processing, was shown to correlate with a reduction in p50 and glioblastoma incidence. Therefore, while the majority of research in this field has focused on the upstream signalling pathways leading to NF-κB activation or the function of other NF-κB subunits, such as RelA (p65), these data demonstrate a critical role for NFKB1, potentially revealing new strategies for targeting this pathway in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:26663363

  2. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer presenting as metastatic kidney cancer at 18 years of age: implications for surveillance.

    PubMed

    van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Badeloe, Sadhanna; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Semmelink, Harry J F; van Moorselaar, R Jeroen A; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Menko, Fred H

    2012-03-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skin piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Previously, we proposed renal imaging for FH mutation carriers starting at the age of 20 years. However, recently an 18-year-old woman from a Dutch family with HLRCC presented with metastatic renal cancer. We describe the patient and family data, evaluate current evidence on renal cancer risk and surveillance in HLRCC and consider the advantages and disadvantages of starting surveillance for renal cancer in childhood. We also discuss the targeted therapies administered to our patient. PMID:22086304

  3. Short-term mortality following surgical procedures for the diagnosis of pediatric brain tumors: outcome analysis in 5533 children from SEER, 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Todd C; Dudley, Roy W R; Torok, Michelle R; Patibandla, Mohana Rao; Dorris, Kathleen; Poonia, Seerat; Wilkinson, C Corbett; Bruny, Jennifer L; Handler, Michael H; Liu, Arthur K

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Thirty-day mortality is increasingly a reference metric regarding surgical outcomes. Recent data estimate a 30-day mortality rate of 1.4-2.7% after craniotomy for tumors in children. No detailed analysis of short-term mortality following a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure (e.g., resection or tissue biopsy) for tumor in the US pediatric population has been conducted. METHODS The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data sets identified patients ≤ 21 years who underwent a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure for primary intracranial tumor from 2004 to 2011. One- and two-month mortality was estimated. Standard statistical methods estimated associations between independent variables and mortality. RESULTS A total of 5533 patients met criteria for inclusion. Death occurred within the calendar month of surgery in 64 patients (1.16%) and by the conclusion of the calendar month following surgery in 95 patients (1.72%). Within the first calendar month, patients < 1 year of age (n = 318) had a risk of death of 5.66%, while those from 1 to 21 years (n = 5215) had a risk of 0.88% (p < 0.0001). By the end of the calendar month following surgery, patients < 1 year (n = 318) had a risk of death of 7.23%, while those from 1 to 21 years (n = 5215) had a risk of 1.38% (p < 0.0001). Children < 1 year at diagnosis were more likely to harbor a high-grade lesion than older children (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.4). CONCLUSIONS In the SEER data sets, the risk of death within 30 days of a diagnostic neurosurgical procedure for a primary pediatric brain tumor is between 1.16% and 1.72%, consistent with contemporary data from European populations. The risk of mortality in infants is considerably higher, between 5.66% and 7.23%, and they harbor more aggressive lesions. PMID:26588456

  4. Follicular Thyroid Cancer Incidence Patterns in the United States, 1980–2009

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Raymon H.; Ward, Mary H.; Kaplan, Edwin; Devesa, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The increases in thyroid cancer overall and in the predominant papillary type have been well documented, but trends for follicular thyroid cancer, a less common but more aggressive variant, have not been as well characterized. In this study, we determined the incidence patterns for follicular thyroid cancer and compared trends between the follicular and papillary thyroid cancers in the United States. Methods We used the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program to examine incidence in the United States during 1980–2009, stratified by demographic and tumor characteristics. Incidence rates (IR) were calculated, relative risks were expressed as incidence rate ratios (IRR), and temporal trends were expressed as percentage changes and plotted. Results Overall we observed a modest increase in age-adjusted follicular thyroid cancer rates among women (31.89%) and men (35.88%). Rates increased most dramatically for regional stage tumors compared to localized tumors in women, whereas the rates for all tumor sizes rose. These findings reveal increases in more aggressive tumors in women in addition to small and localized tumors. The trends for males were different from those among females. Among males, the largest increase was observed for regional and smaller size tumors. The papillary-to-follicular IRR overall was 7.07 [95% confidence interval 6.91–7.24], which varied from 7.37 among Whites to 3.86 among Blacks (SEER race/ethnicity categories), and increased significantly from 3.98 during 1980–1984 to 9.88 during 2005–2009. Conclusion The different trends for follicular and papillary types of thyroid cancer illustrate that thyroid cancer is a heterogeneous disease. Our results do not support the hypothesis that increasing thyroid cancer rates are largely due to improvements in detection, and suggest the importance of evaluating thyroid cancer types separately in future studies. PMID:23360496

  5. Age-period-cohort analysis on the cancer mortality in rural China: 1990–2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer has become a global health problem. China still suffers continuous increasing cancer mortality. To study the trend of cancer mortality in rural China, this paper established an Age-Period-Cohort model to discuss the age effect, period effect and cohort effect on cancer mortality in rural China. Methods The data were collected from the “China Health Statistical Yearbook” from 1990 to 2010. Collected data were analyzed by Age-Period-Cohort model and Intrinsic Estimation method. Results The age effect on the total cancer mortality represented a V trend. Compared with Group 0–4, Group 5–9 showed 71.87% lower cancer mortality risk. Compared with Group 5–9, Group 75–79 showed 38 times higher cancer mortality risk. The period effect on the total cancer mortality risk weakened firstly but then increased. It increased by 35.70% from 1990 to 2010, showing an annual average growth of 1.79%. The cohort effect on the total cancer mortality risk weakened by totally 84.94% from 1906–1910 to 2005–2010. Three “deterioration periods” and three “improvement periods” were witnessed during this period. The malignant cancer mortality varied similarly with the total cancer mortality, while benign cancer mortality and other cancer mortality represented different variation laws. Conclusions Although the total cancer mortality risk is increasing at an accelerated rate, cancer mortality risk in recent born year is decreasing, indicating very important impact of social change on the cancer mortality in rural China. PMID:24383432

  6. Reproductive aging-associated common genetic variants and the risk of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A younger age at menarche and an older age at menopause are well established risk factors for breast cancer. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several novel genetic loci associated with these two traits. However, the association between these loci and breast cancer risk is unknown. Methods In this study, we investigated 19 and 17 newly identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the ReproGen Consortium that have been associated with age at menarche and age at natural menopause, respectively, and assessed their associations with breast cancer risk in 6 population-based studies among up to 3,683 breast cancer cases and 34,174 controls in white women of European ancestry. In addition, we used these SNPs to calculate genetic risk scores (GRSs) based on their associations with each trait. Results After adjusting for age and potential population stratification, two age at menarche associated SNPs (rs1079866 and rs7821178) and one age at natural menopause associated SNP (rs2517388) were associated with breast cancer risk (p values, 0.003, 0.009 and 0.023, respectively). The odds ratios for breast cancer corresponding to per-risk-allele were 1.14 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.24), 1.08 (95% CI, 1.02 to 1.15) and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20), respectively, and were in the direction predicted by their associations with age at menarche or age at natural menopause. These associations did not appear to be attenuated by further controlling for self-reported age at menarche, age at natural menopause, or known breast cancer susceptibility loci. Although we did not observe a statistically significant association between any GRS for reproductive aging and breast cancer risk, the 4th and 5th highest quintiles of the younger age at menarche GRS had odds ratios of 1.14 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.28) and 1.13 (95% CI, 1.00 to 1.27), respectively, compared to the lowest quintile. Conclusions Our study suggests that three genetic variants, independent of their

  7. Use of Palliative Radiotherapy Among Patients With Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, James A. Abrahamse, Paul H.; Lakhani, Indu; Earle, Craig C.; Katz, Steven J.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is known to effectively palliate many symptoms of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anecdotally, RT is believed to be commonly used in this setting, but limited population-based data are available. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization patterns of palliative RT among elderly patients with Stage IV NSCLC and, in particular, to identify factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify 11,084 Medicare beneficiaries aged {>=}65 years who presented with Stage IV NSCLC in the 11 SEER regions between 1991 and 1996. The primary outcome was receipt of RT. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with receipt of RT. Results: A total of 58% of these patients received RT, with its use decreasing over time (p = 0.01). Increasing age was negatively associated with receipt of treatment (p <0.001), as was increasing comorbidities (p <0.001). Factors positively associated with the receipt of RT included income (p = 0.001), hospitalization (p <0.001), and treatment with chemotherapy (p <0.001). Although the use varied across the SEER regions (p = 0.001), gender, race/ethnicity, and distance to the nearest RT facility were not associated with treatment. Conclusions: Elderly patients with metastatic NSCLC frequently receive palliative RT, but its use varies, especially with age and receipt of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to determine whether this variability reflects good quality care.

  8. MicroRNA-Based Linkage between Aging and Cancer: from Epigenetics View Point.

    PubMed

    Saeidimehr, Saeid; Ebrahimi, Ammar; Saki, Najmaldin; Goodarzi, Parisa; Rahim, Fakher

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is a complex process and a broad spectrum of physical, psychological, and social changes over time. Accompanying diseases and disabilities, which can interfere with cancer treatment and recovery, occur in old ages. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a set of small non-coding RNAs, which have considerable roles in post-transcriptional regulation at gene expression level. In this review, we attempted to summarize the current knowledge of miRNAs functions in ageing, with mainly focuses on malignancies and all underlying genetic, molecular and epigenetics mechanisms. The evidences indicated the complex and dynamic nature of miRNA-based linkage of ageing and cancer at genomics and epigenomics levels which might be generally crucial for understanding the mechanisms of age-related cancer and ageing. Recently in the field of cancer and ageing, scientists claimed that uric acid can be used to regulate reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cancer and ageing prevention; these findings highlight the role of miRNA-based inhibition of the SLC2A9 antioxidant pathway in cancer, as a novel way to kill malignant cells, while a patient is fighting with cancer. PMID:27540517

  9. MicroRNA-Based Linkage between Aging and Cancer: from Epigenetics View Point

    PubMed Central

    Saeidimehr, Saeid; Ebrahimi, Ammar; Saki, Najmaldin; Goodarzi, Parisa; Rahim, Fakher

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is a complex process and a broad spectrum of physical, psychological, and social changes over time. Accompanying diseases and disabilities, which can interfere with cancer treatment and recovery, occur in old ages. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a set of small non-coding RNAs, which have considerable roles in post-transcriptional regulation at gene expression level. In this review, we attempted to summarize the current knowledge of miRNAs functions in ageing, with mainly focuses on malignancies and all underlying genetic, molecular and epigenetics mechanisms. The evidences indicated the complex and dynamic nature of miRNA-based linkage of ageing and cancer at genomics and epigenomics levels which might be generally crucial for understanding the mechanisms of age-related cancer and ageing. Recently in the field of cancer and ageing, scientists claimed that uric acid can be used to regulate reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cancer and ageing prevention; these findings highlight the role of miRNA-based inhibition of the SLC2A9 antioxidant pathway in cancer, as a novel way to kill malignant cells, while a patient is fighting with cancer. PMID:27540517

  10. Colorectal Cancer Screening Based on Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C.S.; Ching, Jessica Y.L.; Chan, Victor C.W.; Lam, Thomas Y.T.; Luk, Arthur K.C.; Wong, Sunny H.; Ng, Siew C.; Ng, Simon S.M.; Wu, Justin C.Y.; Chan, Francis K.L.; Sung, Joseph J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated whether age- and gender-based colorectal cancer screening is cost-effective. Recent studies in the United States identified age and gender as 2 important variables predicting advanced proximal neoplasia, and that women aged <60 to 70 years were more suited for sigmoidoscopy screening due to their low risk of proximal neoplasia. Yet, quantitative assessment of the incremental benefits, risks, and cost remains to be performed. Primary care screening practice (2008–2015). A Markov modeling was constructed using data from a screening cohort. The following strategies were compared according to the Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) for 1 life-year saved: flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) 5 yearly; colonoscopy 10 yearly; FS for each woman at 50- and 55-year old followed by colonoscopy at 60- and 70-year old; FS for each woman at 50-, 55-, 60-, and 65-year old followed by colonoscopy at 70-year old; FS for each woman at 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, and 70-year old. All male subjects received colonoscopy at 50-, 60-, and 70-year old under strategies 3 to 5. From a hypothetical population of 100,000 asymptomatic subjects, strategy 2 could save the largest number of life-years (4226 vs 2268 to 3841 by other strategies). When compared with no screening, strategy 5 had the lowest ICER (US$42,515), followed by strategy 3 (US$43,517), strategy 2 (US$43,739), strategy 4 (US$47,710), and strategy 1 (US$56,510). Strategy 2 leads to the highest number of bleeding and perforations, and required a prohibitive number of colonoscopy procedures. Strategy 5 remains the most cost-effective when assessed with a wide range of deterministic sensitivity analyses around the base case. From the cost effectiveness analysis, FS for women and colonoscopy for men represent an economically favorable screening strategy. These findings could inform physicians and policy-makers in triaging eligible subjects for risk-based screening, especially in countries with limited colonoscopic

  11. Breast cancer and age in Black and White women in South East England.

    PubMed

    Jack, Ruth H; Davies, Elizabeth A; Møller, Henrik

    2012-03-01

    Black women have lower age-standardized breast cancer incidence rates than White women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about such differences in risk in separate age groups. Records on female residents of South East England diagnosed with breast cancer between 1998 and 2003 were extracted from the Thames Cancer Registry database. Age-specific incidence rates were calculated for each 5-year age group using 2001 Census population data for White, Black Caribbean and Black African women. Black Caribbean and Black African breast cancer patients were younger than both the White patients and those with no ethnicity recorded. Black Caribbean and Black African women in the population also had a younger age profile than White women. The computed age-specific incidence rates in women aged under 50 were similar in the different ethnic groups, whereas in women aged 50 and over White women had higher rates. The younger age of Black Caribbean and Black African breast cancer patients in South East England reflects the younger age of these populations, rather than an increased risk of disease at younger ages. PMID:21445965

  12. Impact of age on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tsuyoshi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Suda, Kenichi; Soh, Junichi; Yatabe, Yasushi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Aging is one of the best, but rarely referred, risk factors for various types of cancer including lung cancer, because age could be a surrogate for accumulation of genetic events in cancers. Smoking inversely associates with the presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in lung cancer, but its strong confounding with age and sex makes it difficult to evaluate sole impact of age. To clarify an impact of age on EGFR mutation, we conducted a cross-sectional study based on data of 1262 lung cancer patients. The associations between EGFR mutation and age, considering sex, smoking and histology, were evaluated using logistic regression models. In multivariate analysis, we found a significant increase of EGFR mutation prevalence by increase of age (p-trend=0.0004). Consistent trend was observed among never-smoking females (p-trend=0.011) and never-smoking males also showed similar trend although not significant. These were consistently observed when we limit the subject to those with adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, age independently associates with EGFR mutation among lung cancer. Positive association between EGFR mutation and age among never-smokers regardless of sex might indicate that EGFR mutation occurs cumulatively by unidentified internal/external factors other than smoking. PMID:23036155

  13. Blood Telomere Length Attrition and Cancer Development in the Normative Aging Study Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lifang; Joyce, Brian Thomas; Gao, Tao; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Yinan; Penedo, Frank J.; Liu, Siran; Zhang, Wei; Bergan, Raymond; Dai, Qi; Vokonas, Pantel; Hoxha, Mirjam; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Accelerated telomere shortening may cause cancer via chromosomal instability, making it a potentially useful biomarker. However, publications on blood telomere length (BTL) and cancer are inconsistent. We prospectively examined BTL measures over time and cancer incidence. Methods We included 792 Normative Aging Study participants with 1–4 BTL measurements from 1999 to 2012. We used linear mixed-effects models to examine BTL attrition by cancer status (relative to increasing age and decreasing years pre-diagnosis), Cox models for time-dependent associations, and logistic regression for cancer incidence stratified by years between BTL measurement and diagnosis. Findings Age-related BTL attrition was faster in cancer cases pre-diagnosis than in cancer-free participants (pdifference = 0.017); all participants had similar age-adjusted BTL 8–14 years pre-diagnosis, followed by decelerated attrition in cancer cases resulting in longer BTL three (p = 0.003) and four (p = 0.012) years pre-diagnosis. Longer time-dependent BTL was associated with prostate cancer (HR = 1.79, p = 0.03), and longer BTL measured ≤ 4 years pre-diagnosis with any (OR = 3.27, p < 0.001) and prostate cancers (OR = 6.87, p < 0.001). Interpretation Age-related BTL attrition was faster in cancer cases but their age-adjusted BTL attrition began decelerating as diagnosis approached. This may explain prior inconsistencies and help develop BTL as a cancer detection biomarker. PMID:26288820

  14. Age at last birth in relation to risk of endometrial cancer: pooled analysis in the epidemiology of endometrial cancer consortium.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Pike, Malcolm C; Karageorgi, Stalo; Deming, Sandra L; Anderson, Kristin; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A; Cai, Hui; Cerhan, James R; Cozen, Wendy; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer; Freudenheim, Jo L; Goodman, Marc T; Hankinson, Susan E; Lacey, James V; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Lurie, Galina; Mack, Thomas; Matsuno, Rayna K; McCann, Susan; Moysich, Kirsten B; Olson, Sara H; Rastogi, Radhai; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Risch, Harvey; Robien, Kim; Schairer, Catherine; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Spurdle, Amanda B; Strom, Brian L; Thompson, Pamela J; Ursin, Giske; Webb, Penelope M; Weiss, Noel S; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yang, Hannah P; Yu, Herbert; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2012-08-15

    Childbearing at an older age has been associated with a lower risk of endometrial cancer, but whether the association is independent of the number of births or other factors remains unclear. Individual-level data from 4 cohort and 13 case-control studies in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium were pooled. A total of 8,671 cases of endometrial cancer and 16,562 controls were included in the analysis. After adjustment for known risk factors, endometrial cancer risk declined with increasing age at last birth (P(trend) < 0.0001). The pooled odds ratio per 5-year increase in age at last birth was 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 0.90). Women who last gave birth at 40 years of age or older had a 44% decreased risk compared with women who had their last birth under the age of 25 years (95% confidence interval: 47, 66). The protective association was similar across the different age-at-diagnosis groups and for the 2 major tumor histologic subtypes (type I and type II). No effect modification was observed by body mass index, parity, or exogenous hormone use. In this large pooled analysis, late age at last birth was independently associated with a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, and the reduced risk persisted for many years. PMID:22831825

  15. Confocal imaging of transmembrane voltage by SEER of di-8-ANEPPS.

    PubMed

    Manno, Carlo; Figueroa, Lourdes; Fitts, Robert; Ríos, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    Imaging, optical mapping, and optical multisite recording of transmembrane potential (V(m)) are essential for studying excitable cells and systems. The naphthylstyryl voltage-sensitive dyes, including di-8-ANEPPS, shift both their fluorescence excitation and emission spectra upon changes in V(m). Accordingly, they have been used for monitoring V(m) in nonratioing and both emission and excitation ratioing modes. Their changes in fluorescence are usually much less than 10% per 100 mV. Conventional ratioing increases sensitivity to between 3 and 15% per 100 mV. Low sensitivity limits the value of these dyes, especially when imaged with low light systems like confocal scanners. Here we demonstrate the improvement afforded by shifted excitation and emission ratioing (SEER) as applied to imaging membrane potential in flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers of adult mice. SEER--the ratioing of two images of fluorescence, obtained with different excitation wavelengths in different emission bands-was implemented in two commercial confocal systems. A conventional pinhole scanner, affording optimal setting of emission bands but less than ideal excitation wavelengths, achieved a sensitivity of up to 27% per 100 mV, nearly doubling the value found by conventional ratioing of the same data. A better pair of excitation lights should increase the sensitivity further, to 35% per 100 mV. The maximum acquisition rate with this system was 1 kHz. A fast "slit scanner" increased the effective rate to 8 kHz, but sensitivity was lower. In its high-sensitivity implementation, the technique demonstrated progressive deterioration of action potentials upon fatiguing tetani induced by stimulation patterns at >40 Hz, thereby identifying action potential decay as a contributor to fatigue onset. Using the fast implementation, we could image for the first time an action potential simultaneously at multiple locations along the t-tubule system. These images resolved the radially varying lag associated

  16. Analysis of Environmental Chemical Mixtures and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in the NCI-SEER NHL Study

    PubMed Central

    Czarnota, Jenna; Gennings, Chris; Colt, Joanne S.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Cerhan, James R.; Severson, Richard K.; Hartge, Patricia; Ward, Mary H.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are several suspected environmental risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The associations between NHL and environmental chemical exposures have typically been evaluated for individual chemicals (i.e., one-by-one). Objectives We determined the association between a mixture of 27 correlated chemicals measured in house dust and NHL risk. Methods We conducted a population-based case–control study of NHL in four National Cancer Institute–Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results centers—Detroit, Michigan; Iowa; Los Angeles County, California; and Seattle, Washington—from 1998 to 2000. We used weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression to model the association of a mixture of chemicals and risk of NHL. The WQS index was a sum of weighted quartiles for 5 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 7 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 15 pesticides. We estimated chemical mixture weights and effects for study sites combined and for each site individually, and also for histologic subtypes of NHL. Results The WQS index was statistically significantly associated with NHL overall [odds ratio (OR) = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.56; p = 0.006; for one quartile increase] and in the study sites of Detroit (OR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.92; p = 0.045), Los Angeles (OR = 1.44; 95% CI: 1.00, 2.08; p = 0.049), and Iowa (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.23, 2.53; p = 0.002). The index was marginally statistically significant in Seattle (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.99; p = 0.071). The most highly weighted chemicals for predicting risk overall were PCB congener 180 and propoxur. Highly weighted chemicals varied by study site; PCBs were more highly weighted in Detroit, and pesticides were more highly weighted in Iowa. Conclusions An index of chemical mixtures was significantly associated with NHL. Our results show the importance of evaluating chemical mixtures when studying cancer risk. Citation Czarnota J, Gennings C, Colt JS, De Roos AJ, Cerhan JR, Severson RK, Hartge P, Ward MH

  17. Age at exposure to ionising radiation and cancer mortality among Hanford workers: follow up through 1994

    PubMed Central

    Wing, S; Richardson, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: Studies of workers at the plutonium production factory in Hanford, WA have led to conflicting conclusions about the role of age at exposure as a modifier of associations between ionising radiation and cancer. Aims: To evaluate the influence of age at exposure on radiation risk estimates in an updated follow up of Hanford workers. Methods: A cohort of 26 389 workers hired between 1944 and 1978 was followed through 1994 to ascertain vital status and causes of death. External radiation dose estimates were derived from personal dosimeters. Poisson regression was used to estimate associations between mortality and cumulative external radiation dose at all ages, and in specific age ranges. Results: A total of 8153 deaths were identified, 2265 of which included cancer as an underlying or contributory cause. Estimates of the excess relative risk per Sievert (ERR/Sv) for cumulative radiation doses at all ages combined were negative for all cause and leukaemia and positive for all cancer and lung cancer. Cumulative doses accrued at ages below 35, 35–44, and 45–54 showed little association with mortality. For cumulative dose accrued at ages 55 and above (10 year lag), the estimated ERR/Sv for all cancers was 3.24 (90% CI: 0.80 to 6.17), primarily due to an association with lung cancer (ERR/Sv: 9.05, 90% CI: 2.96 to 17.92). Conclusions: Associations between radiation and cancer mortality in this cohort are primarily a function of doses at older ages and deaths from lung cancer. The association of older age radiation exposures and cancer mortality is similar to observations from several other occupational studies. PMID:15961623

  18. Treating cancer with embryonic stem cells: rationale comes from aging studies.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2005-01-01

    In an earlier poster paper (1) we proposed that cancer can be viewed not only as a fatal disease but also as a local aberrant, rejuvenation, in an organism, and this fact can be useful for developing new anti-aging and anti-cancer treatments. In this paper we provide additional evidence from human and experimental animal studies in support of this view. First, we discuss cancer genes as candidate targets for anti-aging interventions. We review examples in which the life of experimental animals has been prolonged in situations of increased activity of proto-oncogenes - or decreased activity of tumor suppressors - in normal (non-cancerous) cells in vivo. Studies of genetic polymorphisms revealed similar effects on longevity in humans. Second, we discuss the possibility of treating cancer with embryonic stem cells. The fact that cancer cells do not, age, means that these cells overcome aging host cells. However, cancer cells can be suppressed by young and quickly proliferating non-cancer cells, such as embryonic stem cells. The grafting of these cells in the tumor environment could be a prospective non-toxic anti-cancer treatment. We discuss recent evidence in support of this view. PMID:15569600

  19. Predicting Fear of Breast Cancer Recurrence and Self-Efficacy in Survivors by Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziner, Kim Wagler; Sledge, George W.; Bell, Cynthia J.; Johns, Shelley; Miller, Kathy D.; Champion, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine the effect that age at diagnosis has on fear of breast cancer recurrence and to identify the predictors of fear of recurrence using self-efficacy as a mediator. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Two university cancer centers and one cooperative group in the midwestern United States. Sample 1,128 long-term survivors. Methods Survivors were eligible if they were aged 18–45 years (younger group) or 55–70 years (older group) at cancer diagnosis, had received chemotherapy, and were three to eight years postdiagnosis. Fear of recurrence was compared between younger and older groups. Multiple regression analyses were used to test variables’ prediction of fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, as well as breast cancer survivor self-efficacy mediation effects. Main Research Variables Fear of recurrence, breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, and age at diagnosis. Findings Survivors diagnosed at a younger age had significantly higher fear of recurrence, as well as health, role, womanhood, death, and parenting worries. Perceived risk of recurrence, trait anxiety, and breast cancer reminders explained significant variance in fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy. Breast cancer survivor self-efficacy partially mediated the effects of variables on fear of recurrence. Conclusions The findings suggest that breast cancer survivor self-efficacy may have a protective effect for survivors who are younger at diagnosis and have higher perceived risk of recurrence, higher trait anxiety, and more breast cancer reminders. Oncology nurses already use the skills required to support self-efficacy. Additional research is needed to define and test breast cancer survivor self-efficacy interventions. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses are in a key role to assess fear of recurrence and provide self-efficacy interventions to reduce it in breast cancer survivors. Strategies to efficiently address fear of

  20. Chromosomal abnormalities are associated with aging and cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Two new studies have found that large structural abnormalities in chromosomes, some of which have been associated with increased risk of cancer, can be detected in a small fraction of people without a prior history of cancer. The studies found that these

  1. Why have ovarian cancer mortality rates declined? Part I. Incidence.

    PubMed

    Sopik, Victoria; Iqbal, Javaid; Rosen, Barry; Narod, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    The age-adjusted mortality rate from ovarian cancer in the United States has declined over the past several decades. The decline in mortality might be the consequence of a reduced number of cases (incidence) or a reduction in the proportion of patients who die from their cancer (case-fatality). In part I of this three-part series, we examine rates of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry database and we explore to what extent the observed decline in mortality can be explained by a downward shift in the stage distribution of ovarian cancer (i.e. due to early detection) or by fewer cases of ovarian cancer (i.e. due to a change in risk factors). The proportion of localized ovarian cancers did not increase, suggesting that a stage-shift did not contribute to the decline in mortality. The observed decline in mortality paralleled a decline in incidence. The trends in ovarian cancer incidence coincided with temporal changes in the exposure of women from different birth cohorts to various reproductive risk factors, in particular, to changes in the use of the oral contraceptive pill and to declining parity. Based on recent changes in risk factor propensity, we predict that the trend of the declining age-adjusted incidence rate of ovarian cancer in the United States will reverse and rates will increase in coming years. PMID:26080287

  2. The Age Specific Incidence Anomaly Suggests that Cancers Originate During Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, James P.

    The accumulation of genetic alterations causes cancers. Since this accumulation takes time, the incidence of most cancers is thought to increase exponentially with age. However, careful measurements of the age-specific incidence show that the specific incidence for many forms of cancer rises with age to a maximum, and then decreases. This decrease in the age-specific incidence with age is an anomaly. Understanding this anomaly should lead to a better understanding of how tumors develop and grow. Here we derive the shape of the age-specific incidence, showing that it should follow the shape of a Weibull distribution. Measurements indicate that the age-specific incidence for colon cancer does indeed follow a Weibull distribution. This analysis leads to the interpretation that for colon cancer two subpopulations exist in the general population: a susceptible population and an immune population. Colon tumors will only occur in the susceptible population. This analysis is consistent with the developmental origins of disease hypothesis and generalizable to many other common forms of cancer.

  3. The Age Specific Incidence Anomaly Suggests that Cancers Originate During Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, James P.

    2014-05-01

    The accumulation of genetic alterations causes cancers. Since this accumulation takes time, the incidence of most cancers is thought to increase exponentially with age. However, careful measurements of the age-specific incidence show that the specific incidence for many forms of cancer rises with age to a maximum, and then decreases. This decrease in the age-specific incidence with age is an anomaly. Understanding this anomaly should lead to a better understanding of how tumors develop and grow. Here we derive the shape of the age-specific incidence, showing that it should follow the shape of a Weibull distribution. Measurements indicate that the age-specific incidence for colon cancer does indeed follow a Weibull distribution. This analysis leads to the interpretation that for colon cancer two subpopulations exist in the general population: a susceptible population and an immune population. Colon tumors will only occur in the susceptible population. This analysis is consistent with the developmental origins of disease hypothesis and generalizable to many other common forms of cancer.

  4. Does Cancer Reduce Labor Market Entry? Evidence for Prime-Age Females

    PubMed Central

    Moran, John R.; Short, Pamela Farley

    2014-01-01

    Existing studies of the labor market status of cancer survivors have focused on the extent to which cancer disrupts the employment of individuals who were working when diagnosed with cancer. We examine how surviving cancer affects labor market entry and usual hours of work among females age 28-54 who were not working when first diagnosed. We find that prime-age females have employment rates two to six years after diagnosis that are 12 percentage points lower than otherwise similar women who were initially out of the labor force, full-time employment rates that are 10 percentage points lower, and usual hours of work that are 5 hours per week lower. These estimates are somewhat larger than estimates for prime-age women employed at the time of diagnosis and highlight the importance of considering non-working females when assessing the economic and psychosocial burden of cancer. PMID:24243912

  5. Fatigued Breast Cancer Survivors: The Role of Sleep Quality, Depressed Mood, Stage, and Age

    PubMed Central

    Banthia, Rajni; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Ko, Celine M.; Varni, James W.; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue is associated with lower health-related quality of life and the majority of breast cancer survivors experience persistent fatigue after finishing treatment. The present study examined age, cancer stage, sleep quality, and depressed mood as predictors of five dimensions of fatigue in seventy fatigued breast cancer survivors who no longer evidenced any signs of cancer and were finished with treatment. Discriminant function analyses were used to predict fatigue subgroup membership (higher, lower) from age, stage, mood, and sleep for five subtypes: General, Mental, Emotional, and Physical Fatigue, and Vigor. Significant discriminant functions were found for all subtypes. Findings suggest that age, staging, mood, and sleep are all important predictors, but there are differential relationships when subtypes of fatigue are considered. Given current limitations in treating fatigue directly, interventions targeting mood and sleep should be considered as alternate approaches to reduce fatigue. PMID:20205039

  6. Survival benefit of radiotherapy to patients with small cell esophagus carcinoma - an analysis of Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xilei; Pan, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Small cell esophageal carcinoma (SCEC) is a rare malignant tumor. So far, few studies are found to research the effect of radiotherapy (RT) to it. This study is designed to explore the prognostic factors, and analyze survival benefit of RT to patients with SCEC. Results Patients with SCEC were more likely to be in female, older, higher disease stage than those with non-small cell esophageal carcinoma. RT was used in more than 50% SCEC patients. RT tended be reduced as the disease stage raise in SCEC. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that age, year, disease stage, and RT were the prognostic factors of survival (P < 0.05). RT reduced nearly 75% risks of death in localized stage (P < 0.05), nearly 50% risks of death in regional stage (P > 0.05) and nearly 30% risks of death in distant stage (P > 0.05). Methods SCEC patients between 1973 and 2012 were searched from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data. Clinical factors including age, year, sex, race, stage, surgery, and RT were summarized. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to explore the independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Cox regression survival analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of RT to SCEC based on different stages. Conclusions Stage, age, year, and RT are independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Survival benefit of RT exists in any disease stage, but is only statistically significant in localized stage of SCEC. PMID:26943276

  7. The descriptive epidemiology of gastric cancer in Central America and comparison with United States Hispanic populations

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Juan E.; Delgado Hurtado, Juan J.; Domínguez, Ricardo L.; de Cuéllar, Marisabel Valdez; Cruz, Carlos Balmore; Morgan, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Delineate the epidemiology of gastric adenocarcinoma in Central America and contrast it with Hispanic-Latino populations in the U.S. Methods Published literature and Central America Ministry of Health databases were used as primary data sources, including national, population-based and hospital-based registries. U.S. data was obtained from the NCI-SEER registry. Incident gastric adenocarcinoma cases were analyzed for available data between 1985–2011, including demographic variables and pathology information. Results In Central America, 19,741 incident gastric adenocarcinomas were identified. Two-thirds of cases were male, 20.5% were under age 55, and 58.5% were from rural areas. In the SEER database (n=7,871), 57.8% were male, and 28.9% were under age 55. Among the U.S. Hispanics born in Central America with gastric cancer (n=1,210), 50.3% of cases were male, and 38.1% were under age 55. Noncardia gastric cancer was more common in Central America (83.3%), among U.S. Hispanics (80.2%), and Hispanics born in Central America (86.3%). Cancers of the antrum were more common in Central America (73.6%), whereas cancers of the corpus were slightly more common among U.S. Hispanics (54.0%). Adenocarcinoma of the diffuse subtype was relatively common, both in Central America (35.7%), and U.S. Hispanics (69.5%), although Lauren classification was reported in only 50% of cases. Conclusions A significant burden of gastric adenocarcinoma is observed in Central America based upon limited available data. Differences are noted between Central America and U.S. Hispanics. Strengthening population-based registries is needed for improved cancer control in Central America, which may have implications for the growing U.S. Hispanic population. PMID:25412859

  8. Esophageal cancer epidemiology in blacks and whites: racial and gender disparities in incidence, mortality, survival rates and histology.

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Commiskey, Patricia; Mack, Kelly; Meltzer, Stephen; Mishra, Shiraz I.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Esophageal cancer rate disparities are pronounced for blacks and whites. This study presents black-white esophageal cancer incidence, mortality, relative survival rates, histology and trends for two five-year time periods--1991-1995 and 1996-2000--and for the time period 1991-2000. METHODS: The study used data from the National Cancer Institute's population-based Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) program with submission dates 1991-2000. Age-adjusted incidence, mortality, relative survival rates and histology for esophageal carcinoma were calculated for nine SEER cancer registries for 1991-2000. Rates were analyzed by race and gender for changes over specified time periods. RESULTS: Esophageal cancer age-adjusted incidence of blacks was about twice that of whites (8.63 vs. 4.39/100,000, p < 0.05). Age-adjusted mortality for blacks, although showing a declining trend, was nearly twice that of whites (7.79 vs. 3.96, p < 0.05). Although survival was poor for all groups, it was significantly poorer in blacks than in whites. Squamous cell carcinoma was more commonly diagnosed in blacks and white females, whereas adenocarcinoma was more common among white males (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Racial disparities in esophageal cancer incidence, mortality, survival and histology exist. Survival rates from this disease have not significantly improved over the decade. These data support the need for advances in prevention, early detection biomarker research and research on new, more effective treatment modalities for this disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:16334494

  9. A novel web informatics approach for automated surveillance of cancer mortality trends.

    PubMed

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua

    2016-06-01

    Cancer surveillance data are collected every year in the United States via the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). General trends are closely monitored to measure the nation's progress against cancer. The objective of this study was to apply a novel web informatics approach for enabling fully automated monitoring of cancer mortality trends. The approach involves automated collection and text mining of online obituaries to derive the age distribution, geospatial, and temporal trends of cancer deaths in the US. Using breast and lung cancer as examples, we mined 23,850 cancer-related and 413,024 general online obituaries spanning the timeframe 2008-2012. There was high correlation between the web-derived mortality trends and the official surveillance statistics reported by NCI with respect to the age distribution (ρ=0.981 for breast; ρ=0.994 for lung), the geospatial distribution (ρ=0.939 for breast; ρ=0.881 for lung), and the annual rates of cancer deaths (ρ=0.661 for breast; ρ=0.839 for lung). Additional experiments investigated the effect of sample size on the consistency of the web-based findings. Overall, our study findings support web informatics as a promising, cost-effective way to dynamically monitor spatiotemporal cancer mortality trends. PMID:27044930

  10. Recent progress in genetics of aging, senescence and longevity: focusing on cancer-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Albert E.; Leontieva, Olga V.; Natarajan, Venkatesh; McCubrey, James A.; Demidenko, Zoya N.; Nikiforov, Mikhail A.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that aging results from the accumulation of molecular damage, including damage of DNA and mitochondria and accumulation of molecular garbage both inside and outside of the cell. Recently, this paradigm is being replaced by the “hyperfunction theory”, which postulates that aging is caused by activation of signal transduction pathways such as TOR (Target of Rapamycin). These pathways consist of different enzymes, mostly kinases, but also phosphatases, deacetylases, GTPases, and some other molecules that cause overactivation of normal cellular functions. Overactivation of these sensory signal transduction pathways can cause cellular senescence, age-related diseases, including cancer, and shorten life span. Here we review some of the numerous very recent publications on the role of signal transduction molecules in aging and age-related diseases. As was emphasized by the author of the “hyperfunction model”, many (or actually all) of them also play roles in cancer. So these “participants” in pro-aging signaling pathways are actually very well acquainted to cancer researchers. A cancer-related journal such as Oncotarget is the perfect place for publication of such experimental studies, reviews and perspectives, as it can bridge the gap between cancer and aging researchers. PMID:23455653

  11. Specker’s parable of the overprotective seer: A road to contextuality, nonlocality and complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yeong-Cherng; Spekkens, Robert W.; Wiseman, Howard M.

    2011-09-01

    In 1960, the mathematician Ernst Specker described a simple example of nonclassical correlations, the counter-intuitive features of which he dramatized using a parable about a seer, who sets an impossible prediction task to his daughter’s suitors. We revisit this example here, using it as an entrée to three central concepts in quantum foundations: contextuality, Bell-nonlocality, and complementarity. Specifically, we show that Specker’s parable offers a narrative thread that weaves together a large number of results, including the following: the impossibility of measurement-noncontextual and outcome-deterministic ontological models of quantum theory (the 1967 Kochen-Specker theorem), in particular, the recent state-specific pentagram proof of Klyachko; the impossibility of Bell-local models of quantum theory (Bell’s theorem), especially the proofs by Mermin and Hardy and extensions thereof; the impossibility of a preparation-noncontextual ontological model of quantum theory; the existence of triples of positive operator valued measures (POVMs) that can be measured jointly pairwise but not triplewise. Along the way, several novel results are presented: a generalization of a theorem by Fine connecting the existence of a joint distribution over outcomes of counterfactual measurements to the existence of a measurement-noncontextual and outcome-deterministic ontological model; a generalization of Klyachko’s proof of the Kochen-Specker theorem from pentagrams to a family of star polygons; a proof of the Kochen-Specker theorem in the style of Hardy’s proof of Bell’s theorem (i.e., one that makes use of the failure of the transitivity of implication for counterfactual statements); a categorization of contextual and Bell-nonlocal correlations in terms of frustrated networks; a derivation of a new inequality testing preparation noncontextuality; some novel results on the joint measurability of POVMs and the question of whether these can be modeled

  12. Modeling age-specific cancer incidences using logistic growth equations: implications for data collection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xing-Rong; Feng, Rui; Chai, Jing; Cheng, Jing; Wang, De-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Large scale secular registry or surveillance systems have been accumulating vast data that allow mathematical modeling of cancer incidence and mortality rates. Most contemporary models in this regard use time series and APC (age-period-cohort) methods and focus primarily on predicting or analyzing cancer epidemiology with little attention being paid to implications for designing cancer registry, surveillance or evaluation initiatives. This research models age-specific cancer incidence rates using logistic growth equations and explores their performance under different scenarios of data completeness in the hope of deriving clues for reshaping relevant data collection. The study used China Cancer Registry Report 2012 as the data source. It employed 3-parameter logistic growth equations and modeled the age-specific incidence rates of all and the top 10 cancers presented in the registry report. The study performed 3 types of modeling, namely full age-span by fitting, multiple 5-year- segment fitting and single-segment fitting. Measurement of model performance adopted adjusted goodness of fit that combines sum of squred residuals and relative errors. Both model simulation and performance evalation utilized self-developed algorithms programed using C# languade and MS Visual Studio 2008. For models built upon full age-span data, predicted age-specific cancer incidence rates fitted very well with observed values for most (except cervical and breast) cancers with estimated goodness of fit (Rs) being over 0.96. When a given cancer is concerned, the R valuae of the logistic growth model derived using observed data from urban residents was greater than or at least equal to that of the same model built on data from rural people. For models based on multiple-5-year-segment data, the Rs remained fairly high (over 0.89) until 3-fourths of the data segments were excluded. For models using a fixed length single-segment of observed data, the older the age covered by the corresponding

  13. Factors Associated With Cancer Worry Among People Aged 50 or Older, Spain, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Sotos, Joseba Rabanales; Herráez, María José Simarro; Rosa, Monchi Campos; López, Jaime López-Torres; Ortiz, María Pilar Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cancer worry varies among patients and may influence their participation in preventive activities. We tested whether sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, locus of control, comorbidity, and perceived health status were associated with the level of cancer worry among adults aged 50 or older. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 666 adults in Spain aged 50 or older. Participants were selected by simple random sampling and asked to visit their designated health center for a personal interview. The study variables were level of cancer worry (measured by Cancer Worry Scale [CWS]), sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, personal history or family history of cancer, comorbidity, self-perceived health, locus of control, and social support. Results More than half of participants, 58.1%, were women; mean age was 60.5 years (standard deviation [SD], 6.8 y). Measurement of the frequency and severity of cancer worry (possible scale of 6–24 points) yielded a mean CWS score of 9.3 (95% confidence interval, 9.0–9.5); 31.9% of participants reported being concerned about cancer. Scores were higher among women (9.7 [SD, 3.3]) than men (8.7 [SD, 2.7]) (P < .001) and among participants in rural settings (10.0 [SD, 3.4]) than in urban settings (9.0 [SD, 3.0]) (P < .001). Multiple linear regression showed a greater degree of cancer worry among people with personal or family history of cancer, more health problems, worse self-perceived health, and lower social support. Conclusion Cancer worry is frequent among older adults, and the level of such concern is related not only to personal characteristics but also to lifestyle and health status. Further research is required to understand how contextual factors can influence cancer worry and how such concern changes behavior patterns related to cancer prevention activities. PMID:26704444

  14. Inclusive fitness effects can select for cancer suppression into old age

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joel S.; Aktipis, C. Athena

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection can favour health at youth or middle age (high reproductive value) over health at old age (low reproductive value). This means, all else being equal, selection for cancer suppression should dramatically drop after reproductive age. However, in species with significant parental investment, the capacity to enhance inclusive fitness may increase the reproductive value of older individuals or even those past reproductive age. Variation in parental investment levels could therefore contribute to variation in cancer susceptibility across species. In this article, we describe a simple model and framework for the evolution of cancer suppression with varying levels of parental investment and use this model to make testable predictions about variation in cancer suppression across species. This model can be extended to show that selection for cancer suppression is stronger in species with cooperative breeding systems and intergenerational transfers. We consider three cases that can select for cancer suppression into old age: (i) extended parental care that increases the survivorship of their offspring, (ii) grandparents contributing to higher fecundity of their children and (iii) cooperative breeding where helpers forgo reproduction or even survivorship to assist parents in having higher fecundity. PMID:26056358

  15. Relationship of oral cancer with age, sex, site distribution and habits.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mandakini Mansukh; Pandya, Amrish N

    2004-04-01

    Many studies are carried out regarding age incidence, tobacco smoking and sites of oral cancer, but in Gujarat tobacco chewing in form of Gutkha is more common than smoking and start during preteen years. Tobacco chewing causing chronic inflammation, submucous fibrosis and oral cancer. This study was conducted on 504 patients to find out if there is increasing incidence of oral cancer in lower age group and its relation with sex as well which site was commonly affected. There was statistically significant increase in oral cancer in lower age group, and anatomically anterior part of oral cavity showed involvement in 61.32% of cases. Though males were affected more but female cases were 25%. So tobacco chewing has got detrimental effect on oral cavity. PMID:16295466

  16. Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Treatment in Elderly Prostate Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Carpenter, William R.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Bainbridge, John; Wang, Andrew Z.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the proportion of elderly prostate cancer patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: A total of 29,001 men diagnosed in 2004-2007 with localized prostate cancer, aged 66 to 79 years, were included. We characterized the proportion of men who received treatment concordant with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, stratified by risk group and age. Logistic regression was used to examine covariates associated with receipt of guideline-concordant management. Results: Guideline concordance was 79%-89% for patients with low- or intermediate-risk disease. Among high-risk patients, 66.6% of those aged 66-69 years received guideline-concordant management, compared with 51.9% of those aged 75-79 years. Discordance was mainly due to conservative management—no treatment or hormone therapy alone. Among the subgroup of patients aged ≤76 years with no measured comorbidity, findings were similar. On multivariable analysis, older age (75-79 vs 66-69 years, odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.57) was associated with a lower likelihood of guideline concordance for high-risk prostate cancer, but comorbidity was not. Conclusions: There is undertreatment of elderly but healthy patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the most aggressive form of this disease.

  17. The p53 network: Cellular and systemic DNA damage responses in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, H. Christian; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Genome instability contributes to cancer development and accelerates age-related pathologies as evidenced by a variety of congenital cancer susceptibility and progeroid syndromes that are caused by defects in genome maintenance mechanisms. DNA damage response pathways that are mediated through the tumor suppressor p53 play an important role in the cell intrinsic responses to genome instability, including a transient cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. Both senescence and apoptosis are powerful tumor suppressive pathways preventing the uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells. However, both pathways can potentially deplete stem and progenitor cell pools, thus promoting tissue degeneration and organ failure, which are both hallmarks of aging. p53 signaling is also involved in mediating non-cell autonomous interactions with the innate immune system and in the systemic adjustments during the aging process. The network of p53 target genes thus functions as an important regulator of cancer prevention and the physiology of aging. PMID:22265392

  18. Age at diagnosis of female breast cancer in Oman: Issues and implications

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Itrat; Monem, Essam Abdul; Al Bahrani, Bassim Jaffar; Al Kharusi, Suad; Nada, Ayman Mohammad; Al Lawati, Jawad; Al Lawati, Najla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Female breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent malignancy diagnosed globally, about 23% of the diagnosed cancers. BC incidence varies geographically, highest in Western Europe and lowest in Africa. BC in females is strongly correlated to age, the highest incidence rate amongst older women reinforcing the importance of hormonal status. BC in young females has an aggressive phenotype. There is a shared observation amongst practicing oncologists that BC in Middle East and the developing world presents at an earlier age. Aim and Objective: The aims of this study are to evaluate the age at presentation of female BC in Oman, and to compare our data with international and regional published data. It discusses the impact of young age Breast Cancer. Materials and Methods: All diagnosed female BC cases registered from 1996-2010 all over the country, were retrieved from the National Cancer Registry, Ministry of Health. BC cases were analyzed with respect to age at presentation. The data were compared with regional and international data. Results: A total of 14,109 cancer cases were recorded during the period of study. BC was the leading malignancy as 1,294 cases (9.1%). Female BC patients were 1,230; denoting 19.2% of all female cancers. 53.5% of female BC presented below 50 years of age. Male BC constituted 5% of total, with 67% of male BC occurring over 50 years of age. Compared with data from Oman, the highest rates in UK and other Western countries are above 50 years of age. These rates are four to 10 times higher than local in different age groups. Interestingly, these rates increase with increasing age in UK from 40-45 to up to 85+, keep on increasing and go up to four times higher with higher age. This phenomenon, of increasing incidence rates with age, is not observed in our local population. Discussion: BC is significantly correlated to age as reported from Western population. BC is reported at a younger age from developing and Arab World, which need to

  19. Inflamma-miRs in Aging and Breast Cancer: Are They Reliable Players?

    PubMed Central

    Cătană, Cristina Sorina; Calin, George A.; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    Human aging is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation known as “inflammaging.” Persistent low-level inflammation also plays a key role in all stages of breast cancer since “inflammaging” is the potential link between cancer and aging through NF-kB pathways highly influenced by specific miRs. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at a posttranscriptional level. Inflamma-miRs have been implicated in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. Their abnormal expression contributes to the chronic pro-inflammatory status documented in normal aging and major age-related diseases (ARDs), inflammaging being a significant mortality risk factor in both cases. Nevertheless, the correct diagnosis of inflammaging is difficult to make and its hidden contribution to negative health outcomes remains unknown. This methodological work flow was aimed at defining crucial unanswered questions about inflammaging that can be used to clarify aging-related miRNAs in serum and cell lines as well as their targets, thus confirming their role in aging and breast cancer tumorigenesis. Moreover, we aim to highlight the links between the pro-inflammatory mechanism underlying the cancer and aging processes and the precise function of certain miRNAs in cellular senescence (CS). In addition, miRNAs and cancer genes represent the basis for new therapeutic findings indicating that both cancer and ARDs genes are possible candidates involved in CS and vice versa. Our goal is to obtain a focused review that could facilitate future approaches in the investigation of the mechanisms by which miRNAs control the aging process by acting as efficient ARDs inflammatory biomarkers. An understanding of the sources and modulation of inflamma-miRs along with the identification of their specific target genes could enhance their therapeutic potential. PMID:26697428

  20. Colorectal cancer screening awareness among physicians in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Xilomenos, Apostolos; Mauri, Davide; Kamposioras, Konstantinos; Gkinosati, Athanasia; Zacharias, Georgios; Sidiropoulou, Varvara; Papadopoulos, Panagiotis; Chatzimichalis, Georgios; Golfinopoulos, Vassilis; Peponi, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Background Data comparison between SEER and EUROCARE database provided evidence that colorectal cancer survival in USA is higher than in European countries. Since adjustment for stage at diagnosis markedly reduces the survival differences, a screening bias was hypothesized. Considering the important role of primary care in screening activities, the purpose of the study was to investigate the colorectal cancer screening awareness among Hellenic physicians. Methods 211 primary care physicians were surveyed by mean of a self-reported prescription-habits questionnaire. Both physicians' colorectal cancer screening behaviors and colorectal cancer screening recommendations during usual check-up visits were analyzed. Results Only 50% of physicians were found to recommend screening for colorectal cancer during usual check-up visits, and only 25% prescribed cost-effective procedures. The percentage of physicians recommending stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy was 24% and 4% respectively. Only 48% and 23% of physicians recognized a cancer screening value for stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy. Colorectal screening recommendations were statistically lower among physicians aged 30 or less (p = 0.012). No differences were found when gender, level and type of specialization were analyzed, even though specialists in general practice showed a trend for better prescription (p = 0.054). Conclusion Contemporary recommendations for colorectal cancer screening are not followed by implementation in primary care setting. Education on presymptomatic control and screening practice monitoring are required if primary care is to make a major impact on colorectal cancer mortality. PMID:16756674

  1. Variation in Insurance Status by Patient Demographics and Tumor Site Among Nonelderly Adult Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Stephen R.; Walker, Gary V.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Koshy, Matthew; Allen, Pamela K.; Mahmood, Usama

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In the United States, an estimated 48 million individuals live without health insurance. The purpose of the current study was to explore the variation in insurance status by patient demographics and tumor site among nonelderly adult patients with cancer. METHODS A total of 688,794 patients aged 18 to 64 years who were diagnosed with one of the top 25 incident cancers (representing 95% of all cancer diagnoses) between 2007 and 2010 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database were analyzed. Patient characteristics included age, race, sex, marital status, and rural or urban residence. County-level demographics included percent poverty level. Insurance status was defined as having non-Medicaid insurance, Medicaid coverage, or no insurance. RESULTS On multivariate logistic regression analyses, younger age, male sex, nonwhite race, being unmarried, residence in counties with higher levels of poverty, and rural residence were associated with being uninsured versus having non-Medicaid insurance (all P <.001). The highest rates of non-Medicaid insurance were noted among patients with prostate cancer (92.3%), melanoma of the skin (92.5%), and thyroid cancer (89.5%), whereas the lowest rates of non-Medicaid insurance were observed among patients with cervical cancer (64.2%), liver cancer (67.9%), and stomach cancer (70.9%) (P <.001). Among uninsured individuals, the most prevalent cancers were lung cancer (14.9%), colorectal cancer (12.1%), and breast cancer (10.2%) (P <.001). Lung cancer caused the majority of cancer mortality in all insurance groups. CONCLUSIONS Rates of insurance coverage vary greatly by demographics and by cancer type. The expansion of health insurance coverage would be expected to disproportionally benefit certain demographic populations and cancer types. PMID:25917222

  2. Age-Dependent Metastatic Spread and Survival: Cancer of Unknown Primary as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Pavlidis, Nicholas; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Sundquist, Kristina; Ji, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    In order to describe a novel approach for the clinical study of metastases, we provide here age-specific incidence and survival data for cancer of unknown primary (CUP). Metastases in various organs are found at CUP diagnosis, which have implications for prognosis, and we hypothesize similar prognostic implications for metastases found at diagnosis of primary cancers. We identified 33,224 CUP patients from the Swedish Cancer Registry and calculated incidence rates (IRs) for CUP development. Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for relative survival in CUP patients compared to the general population. In age-group specific analyses, a maximal IR was reached at age 85–89 years, followed by a marked decline to age 90+ (7-fold in men and 3-fold in women). The overall HR for relative survival declined systematically by age. CUP may be applied as an epidemiological age-incidence model for cancer metastases providing evidence in line with autopsy data that the metastatic potential, as shown by the incidence of CUP, appears to weaken markedly at age 85 years, depending on metastatic locations. The relative death rates were highest among young patients, which was probably entirely due to the low death rates in young background population. PMID:27009354

  3. Disparities in Stage at Diagnosis, Treatment, and Survival in Nonelderly Adult Patients With Cancer According to Insurance Status

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Gary V.; Grant, Stephen R.; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Hoffman, Karen E.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Koshy, Matthew; Allen, Pamela K.; Mahmood, Usama

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the association of insurance status with disease stage at presentation, treatment, and survival among the top 10 most deadly cancers using the SEER database. Patients and Methods A total of 473,722 patients age 18 to 64 years who were diagnosed with one of the 10 most deadly cancers in the SEER database from 2007 to 2010 were analyzed. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariable analyses to assess the effect of patient and tumor characteristics on cause-specific death. Results Overall, patients with non-Medicaid insurance were less likely to present with distant disease (16.9%) than those with Medicaid coverage (29.1%) or without insurance coverage (34.7%; P < .001). Patients with non-Medicaid insurance were more likely to receive cancer-directed surgery and/or radiation therapy (79.6%) compared with those with Medicaid coverage (67.9%) or without insurance coverage (62.1%; P < .001). In a Cox regression that adjusted for age, race, sex, marital status, residence, percent of county below federal poverty level, site, stage, and receipt of cancer-directed surgery and/or radiation therapy, patients were more likely to die as a result of their disease if they had Medicaid coverage (hazard ratio [HR], 1.44; 95% CI, 1.41 to 1.47; P < .001) or no insurance (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.51; P < .001) compared with non-Medicaid insurance. Conclusion Among patients with the 10 most deadly cancers, those with Medicaid coverage or without insurance were more likely to present with advanced disease, were less likely to receive cancer-directed surgery and/or radiation therapy, and experienced worse survival. PMID:25092774

  4. Natural history of age-related lobular involution and impact on breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Radisky, Derek C; Visscher, Daniel W; Frank, Ryan D; Vierkant, Robert A; Winham, Stacey; Stallings-Mann, Melody; Hoskin, Tanya L; Nassar, Aziza; Vachon, Celine M; Denison, Lori A; Hartmann, Lynn C; Frost, Marlene H; Degnim, Amy C

    2016-02-01

    Age-related lobular involution (LI) is a physiological process in which the terminal duct lobular units of the breast regress as a woman ages. Analyses of breast biopsies from women with benign breast disease (BBD) have found that extent of LI is negatively associated with subsequent breast cancer development. Here we assess the natural course of LI within individual women, and the impact of progressive LI on breast cancer risk. The Mayo Clinic BBD cohort consists of 13,455 women with BBD from 1967 to 2001. The BBD cohort includes 1115 women who had multiple benign biopsies, 106 of whom had developed breast cancer. Within this multiple biopsy cohort, the progression of the LI process was examined by age at initial biopsy and time between biopsies. The relationship between LI progression and breast cancer risk was assessed using standardized incidence ratios and by Cox proportional hazards analysis. Women who had multiple biopsies were younger age and had a slightly higher family history of breast cancer as compared with the overall BBD cohort. Extent of LI at subsequent biopsy was greater with increasing time between biopsies and for women age 55 + at initial biopsy. Among women with multiple biopsies, there was a significant association of higher breast cancer risk among those with involution stasis (lack of progression, HR 1.63) as compared with those with involution progression, p = 0.036. The multiple biopsy BBD cohort allows for a longitudinal study of the natural progression of LI. The majority of women in the multiple biopsy cohort showed progression of LI status between benign biopsies, and extent of progression was highest for women who were in the perimenopausal age range at initial biopsy. Progression of LI status between initial and subsequent biopsy was associated with decreased breast cancer risk. PMID:26846985

  5. Most Patients with Colorectal Tumors at Young Age Do Not Visit a Cancer Genetics Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Overbeek, Lucia I. H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Krieken, Joannes H. J. M.; Nagengast, Fokko M.; Ruers, Theo J. M.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the referral process for genetic counseling at a cancer genetics clinic in patients with colorectal cancer and to search for determinants of variation in this referral process. Methods Patients who were recently diagnosed with colorectal cancer at a young age or multiple cancers associated with Lynch syndrome, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, (N = 119) were selected from PALGA, the nationwide network and registry of histopathology and cytopathology in the Netherlands. In a retrospective analysis, we examined whether these patients visited a cancer genetics clinic and identified determinants for referral to such a clinic. Factors of patients, professional practice, and hospital setting were explored with logistic regression modeling. Results Thirty-six (30 percent) patients visited a cancer genetics clinic. Seventy percent of patients whom the surgeon referred to a cancer genetics clinic decided to visit such a clinic. Analysis of determinants showed that patients with whom the surgeon discussed referral and that were treated in a teaching hospital were more likely to visit a cancer genetics clinic. Conclusion The referral process is not optimally carried out. To deliver optimal care for patients suspected of hereditary colorectal cancer, this process must be improved with interventions focusing on patient referral by surgeons and raising awareness in nonteaching hospitals. PMID:18536968

  6. Secondary Cancers After Radiation Therapy for Primary Prostate or Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yen-Chien; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Li, Chung-Yi; Chuang, Jen-Pin; Lee, Jenq-Chang

    2016-04-01

    Literature about the risk of secondary cancer after radiation therapy (RT) of prostate and rectal cancer reveals contradictory results. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine whether the RT induces secondary rectal or prostate cancer in patients, respectively, with prostate or rectal cancer. All studies published in Medline or Pubmed up to March 3, 2015, containing RT of primary rectal or prostate cancer, and providing risk estimates of secondary prostate or rectal cancer were considered as eligible. Relative risk (RR) and standardized incidence ratios (SIR) were calculated using the random-effects model. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria. 12 of them were from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. For prostate cancer patients, pooled adjusted RRs or SIRs did not show an effect on the risk of secondary rectal cancer. However, notwithstanding the limitations of SEER-based studies, the subgroup of prostate cancer patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) showed an increased risk of rectal cancer. For rectal cancer patients, pooled adjusted RR of prostate cancer was 1.12 (95 % CI, 0.44-2.8) and SIR was 0.40 (95 % CI, 0.29-0.55). All studies included in the SIR analysis of rectal cancer were derived from the SEER data source. Based on current evidence, RT for prostate cancer patients had no effect on rectal cancer incidence, except for patients who received EBRT therapy. However, compared with the general population, RT for rectal cancer is associated with a decreased prostate cancer risk as found in SEER-based studies. PMID:26711638

  7. Historical Trends in the use of radiation for pediatric cancers: 1973–2008

    PubMed Central

    Jairam, Vikram; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Yu, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was undertaken to assess historical trends in the use of radiation therapy (RT) for pediatric cancers over the past 4 decades. Methods The National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database of the 9 original tumor registries (SEER9) was queried to identify patients aged 0–19 years with acute lympholytic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), bone and joint, brain and other nervous system, Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL), neuroblastoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), soft tissue, Wilms tumor, or retinoblastoma from 1973 to 2008. Patients were grouped into 4 year time epochs. Number and percentage of patients who received RT as a part of initial treatment were calculated per epoch by each diagnosis group from 1973–2008. Results RT usage for ALL, NHL, and retinoblastoma declined sharply from 57%, 57%, and 30% in 1973–76 to 11%, 15%, and 2% in 2005–08, respectively. Similarly, smaller declines in RT usage were also seen in brain (70% to 39%), bone (41% to 21%), Wilms tumors (75% to 53%), and neuroblastoma (60% to 25%). RT usage curves for Wilms tumors and neuroblastoma were nonlinear with nadirs in 1993–96 at 39% and 19%, respectively. There were minimal changes in RT use for HL, soft tissue cancers, or AML, roughly stable at 72%, 40%, and 11%, respectively. Almost all patients treated with RT were given exclusively external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). However, from 1985–2008, treatments involving brachytherapy, radioisotopes, or combination therapy increased in frequency, comprising 1.8%, 4.6%, and 11.9% of RT treatments in brain cancer, soft tissue cancer, and retinoblastoma, respectively. Conclusions The use of RT is declining over time in seven out of ten pediatric cancer categories. A limitation of this study is a potential underascertainment of radiotherapy usage in the SEER9 database including the delayed use of RT. PMID:23273995

  8. Patients with Old Age or Proximal Tumors Benefit from Metabolic Syndrome in Early Stage Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Liu, Jian-xin; Yu, Hong-mei; Liang, Wei-ping; Jin, Ying; Ren, Chao; He, Ming-ming; Chen, Wei-wei; Luo, Hui-yan; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhang, Dong-sheng; Wang, Feng-hua; Li, Yu-hong; Xu, Rui-hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome and/or its components have been demonstrated to be risk factors for several cancers. They are also found to influence survival in breast, colon and prostate cancer, but the prognostic value of metabolic syndrome in gastric cancer has not been investigated. Methods Clinical data and pre-treatment information of metabolic syndrome of 587 patients diagnosed with early stage gastric cancer were retrospectively collected. The associations of metabolic syndrome and/or its components with clinical characteristics and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer were analyzed. Results Metabolic syndrome was identified to be associated with a higher tumor cell differentiation (P = 0.036). Metabolic syndrome was also demonstrated to be a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients aged >50 years old (P = 0.009 in multivariate analysis) or patients with proximal gastric cancer (P = 0.047 in multivariate analysis). No association was found between single metabolic syndrome component and overall survival in early stage gastric cancer. In addition, patients with hypertension might have a trend of better survival through a good control of blood pressure (P = 0.052 in univariate analysis). Conclusions Metabolic syndrome was associated with a better tumor cell differentiation in patients with early stage gastric cancer. Moreover, metabolic syndrome was a significant and independent predictor for better survival in patients with old age or proximal tumors. PMID:24599168

  9. A theory of the cancer age-specific incidence data based on extreme value distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Ortiz, Luis; Brody, James P.

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of cancers varies with age, if normalized this is called the age-specific incidence. A mathematical model that describes this variation should provide a better understanding of how cancers develop. We suggest that the age-specific incidence should follow an extreme value distribution, based on three widely accepted assumptions: (1) a tumor develops from a single cell, (2) many potential tumor progenitor cells exist in a tissue, and (3) cancer is diagnosed when the first of these many potential tumor cells develops into a tumor. We tested this by comparing the predicted distribution to the age-specific incidence data for colon and prostate carcinomas collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results network of 17 cancer registries. We found that colon carcinoma age-specific incidence data is consistent with an extreme value distribution, while prostate carcinomas age-specific incidence data generally follows the distribution. This model indicates that both colon and prostate carcinomas only occur in a subset of the population (22% for prostate and 13.5% for colon.) Because of their very general nature, extreme value distributions might be applicable to understanding other chronic human diseases.

  10. Defining a Valid Age Cutoff in Staging of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Iain J.; Kuk, Deborah; Wreesmann, Volkert; Morris, Luc; Palmer, Frank L.; Ganly, Ian; Patel, Snehal G.; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Tuttle, R. Michael; Shaha, Ashok R.; Gönen, Mithat; Shah, Jatin P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Age 45 years is used as a cutoff in the staging of well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) as it represents the median age of most datasets. The aim of this study was to determine a statistically optimized age threshold using a large dataset of patients treated at a comprehensive cancer center. Methods Overall, 1807 patients with a median follow-up of 109 months were included in the study. Recursive partitioning was used to determine which American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) variables were most predictive of disease-specific death, and whether a different cutoff for age would be found. From the resulting tree, a new age cutoff was picked and patients were restaged using this new cutoff. Results The 10-year disease-specific survival (DSS) by Union for International Cancer Control (AJCC/UICC) stage was 99.6, 100, 96, and 81 % for stages I–IV, respectively. Using recursive partitioning, the presence of distant metastasis was the most powerful predictor of DSS. For M0 patients, age was the next most powerful predictor, with a cutoff of 56 years. For M1 patients, a cutoff at 54 years was most predictive. Having reviewed the analysis, age 55 years was selected as a more robust age cutoff than 45 years. The 10-year DSS by new stage (using age 55 years as the cutoff) was 99.2, 98, 100, and 74 % for stages I–IV, respectively. Conclusion A change in age cutoff in the AJCC/UICC staging for WDTC to 55 years would improve the accuracy of the system and appropriately prevent low-risk patients being overstaged and overtreated. PMID:26215199

  11. Impact of Age and Comorbidity on Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatment in Older Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sunny; Wong, Melisa L.; Hamilton, Nathan; Davoren, J. Ben; Jahan, Thierry M.; Walter, Louise C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Because comorbidity affects cancer treatment outcomes, guidelines recommend considering comorbidity when making treatment decisions in older patients with lung cancer. Yet, it is unclear whether treatment is targeted to healthier older adults who might reasonably benefit. Patients and Methods Receipt of first-line guideline-recommended treatment was assessed for 20,511 veterans age ≥ 65 years with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the Veterans Affairs (VA) Central Cancer Registry from 2003 to 2008. Patients were stratified by age (65 to 74, 75 to 84, ≥ 85 years), Charlson comorbidity index score (0, 1 to 3, ≥ 4), and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (I to II, IIIA to IIIB, IIIB with malignant effusion to IV). Comorbidity and patient characteristics were obtained from VA claims and registry data. Multivariate analysis identified predictors of receipt of guideline-recommended treatment. Results In all, 51% of patients with local, 35% with regional, and 27% with metastatic disease received guideline-recommended treatment. Treatment rates decreased more with advancing age than with worsening comorbidity for all stages, such that older patients with no comorbidity had lower rates than younger patients with severe comorbidity. For example, 50% of patients with local disease age 75 to 84 years with no comorbidity received surgery compared with 57% of patients age 65 to 74 years with severe comorbidity (P < .001). In multivariate analysis, age and histology remained strong negative predictors of treatment for all stages, whereas comorbidity and nonclinical factors had a minor effect. Conclusion Advancing age is a much stronger negative predictor of treatment receipt among older veterans with NSCLC than comorbidity. Individualized decisions that go beyond age and include comorbidity are needed to better target NSCLC treatments to older patients who may reasonably benefit. PMID:22454424

  12. Anal Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Colón-López, Vivian; Ortiz, Ana P.; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Torres-Cintrón, Mariela; Mercado-Acosta, Juan José; Suárez, Erick

    2013-01-01

    Objective Anal cancer is a rare tumor that is associated with oncogenic HPV genotypes. This study aims to compare the age-standardized rates (ASRs) of anal cancer incidence and mortality in men and women living in Puerto Rico (PR) with those of non-Hispanic whites (NHW), non-Hispanic blacks (NHB), and Hispanics (USH) living in the continental United States (US). Methods ASRs were calculated based on cancer data that came from the PR Cancer Central Registry and from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. The age-specific relative risks (RR) and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) were estimated using Poisson regression models. Results Comparing the period of 2001 to 2004 to that of 1992 to 1996, the incidence of anal cancer increased among NHW, NHB, and PR men. In females, an increase in the incidence was observed for all racial groups except for Puerto Rican women. When evaluating findings by age groups, Puerto Rican men younger than 60 years old had a 20% higher incidence of anal cancer than did USH men of the same age strata (RR: 2.20; 95% CI = 1.48–3.29). However, Puerto Rican females had a lower incidence of anal cancer than NHW and NHB women. An increased percent change in mortality was observed only in NHW and NHB men. A decreasing trend was observed in all racial/ethnic groups except for NHW women. Conclusion Our results support the notion that there are racial/ethnic differences in anal cancer incidence and mortality, with potential disparities among men and women in PR compared with USH men and women. Given the increasing incidence trends in anal cancer, particularly among PR, NHW, and NHB men, further investigation is needed to better elucidate screening practices that can aid in the prevention of anal cancer. PMID:23781623

  13. Does the Breast Cancer Age at Diagnosis Differ by Ethnicity? A Study on Immigrants to Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Kari; Sundquist, Jan; Brandt, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Background. Age-specific incidence rates for breast cancer in low-risk and high-risk ethnic populations differ by age at which the incidence maximum is reached: around 50 years in low-risk populations and over 60 years in high-risk populations. The interpretation of these differences remains unsettled, one line primarily referring to biological differences, the second one to cohort effects of rapidly increasing rates in young populations, and the third one to incomplete registration of cancer in the elderly. Methods. The nationwide Family-Cancer Database was used to analyze standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and age at diagnosis of breast cancer in female immigrants to Sweden by their region of origin compared with women native to Sweden matched on birth year and other relevant factors. Results. We showed first that the SIRs for breast cancer were lower in many immigrant groups compared with natives of Sweden; women from Turkey had the lowest SIR of 0.45, followed by those from Chile (0.54) and Southeast Asia (0.57). Women from nine regions showed an earlier mean age at diagnosis than their matched Swedish controls, the largest differences being 5.5 years for women from Turkey, 5.1 years for those from Asian Arab and “Other African” countries, 4.3 years for those from Iran, and 4.0 years for those from Iraq. Conclusions. The results show that in many immigrant groups, the diagnostic age is earlier (<50 years) than in natives of Sweden (>50 years), suggesting that true biological factors underlie the differences. These factors may explain much of the international variation in breast cancer incidence. Identifying these factors should advance understanding of breast cancer etiology and prevention. PMID:21266400

  14. Aging-Induced Stem Cell Mutations as Drivers for Disease and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Adams, Peter D; Jasper, Heinrich; Rudolph, K Lenhard

    2015-06-01

    Aging is characterized by a decrease in genome integrity, impaired organ maintenance, and an increased risk of cancer, which coincide with clonal dominance of expanded mutant stem and progenitor cell populations in aging tissues, such as the intestinal epithelium, the hematopoietic system, and the male germline. Here we discuss possible explanations for age-associated increases in the initiation and/or progression of mutant stem/progenitor clones and highlight the roles of stem cell quiescence, replication-associated DNA damage, telomere shortening, epigenetic alterations, and metabolic challenges as determinants of stem cell mutations and clonal dominance in aging. PMID:26046760

  15. Confocal imaging of transmembrane voltage by SEER of di-8-ANEPPS

    PubMed Central

    Manno, Carlo; Figueroa, Lourdes; Fitts, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Imaging, optical mapping, and optical multisite recording of transmembrane potential (Vm) are essential for studying excitable cells and systems. The naphthylstyryl voltage-sensitive dyes, including di-8-ANEPPS, shift both their fluorescence excitation and emission spectra upon changes in Vm. Accordingly, they have been used for monitoring Vm in nonratioing and both emission and excitation ratioing modes. Their changes in fluorescence are usually much less than 10% per 100 mV. Conventional ratioing increases sensitivity to between 3 and 15% per 100 mV. Low sensitivity limits the value of these dyes, especially when imaged with low light systems like confocal scanners. Here we demonstrate the improvement afforded by shifted excitation and emission ratioing (SEER) as applied to imaging membrane potential in flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers of adult mice. SEER—the ratioing of two images of fluorescence, obtained with different excitation wavelengths in different emission bands—was implemented in two commercial confocal systems. A conventional pinhole scanner, affording optimal setting of emission bands but less than ideal excitation wavelengths, achieved a sensitivity of up to 27% per 100 mV, nearly doubling the value found by conventional ratioing of the same data. A better pair of excitation lights should increase the sensitivity further, to 35% per 100 mV. The maximum acquisition rate with this system was 1 kHz. A fast “slit scanner” increased the effective rate to 8 kHz, but sensitivity was lower. In its high-sensitivity implementation, the technique demonstrated progressive deterioration of action potentials upon fatiguing tetani induced by stimulation patterns at >40 Hz, thereby identifying action potential decay as a contributor to fatigue onset. Using the fast implementation, we could image for the first time an action potential simultaneously at multiple locations along the t-tubule system. These images resolved the radially varying lag

  16. Should all colorectal cancer patients over age 60 be screened for prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Aizer, Ayal A; D'Amico, Anthony V

    2013-10-01

    Two large, randomized studies have demonstrated a prostate cancer-specific survival benefit to prostate cancer screening using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assay. Yet, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended against PSA-based screening for prostate cancer, claiming it results in more harm than good, given concerns regarding overtreatment. The purpose of this article is to characterize the patients with colorectal cancer who are most likely to benefit from PSA-based screening for prostate cancer. Because the survival benefit due to PSA-based screening does not manifest until 7 years after screening is initiated, we conclude that PSA screening is most appropriate for men with a remaining life expectancy of at least 10 years. Accordingly, younger men with stage I-II colorectal cancers at diagnosis (or stage III colorectal cancer that has not recurred 5 years after treatment) who have no or minimal comorbidities and who are at increased risk for either a diagnosis of prostate cancer or mortality secondary to prostate cancer (patients who have a positive family history or are African-American, respectively) are most likely to experience more good outcomes than harmful ones as a result of undergoing PSA-based screening. PMID:24367864

  17. Prediction of Breast Cancer Survival Through Knowledge Discovery in Databases

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hadi Lotfnezhad; Ahmadi, Maryam; Roudbari, Masoud; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    The collection of large volumes of medical data has offered an opportunity to develop prediction models for survival by the medical research community. Medical researchers who seek to discover and extract hidden patterns and relationships among large number of variables use knowledge discovery in databases (KDD) to predict the outcome of a disease. The study was conducted to develop predictive models and discover relationships between certain predictor variables and survival in the context of breast cancer. This study is Cross sectional. After data preparation, data of 22,763 female patients, mean age 59.4 years, stored in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) breast cancer dataset were analyzed anonymously. IBM SPSS Statistics 16, Access 2003 and Excel 2003 were used in the data preparation and IBM SPSS Modeler 14.2 was used in the model design. Support Vector Machine (SVM) model outperformed other models in the prediction of breast cancer survival. Analysis showed SVM model detected ten important predictor variables contributing mostly to prediction of breast cancer survival. Among important variables, behavior of tumor as the most important variable and stage of malignancy as the least important variable were identified. In current study, applying of the knowledge discovery method in the breast cancer dataset predicted the survival condition of breast cancer patients with high confidence and identified the most important variables participating in breast cancer survival. PMID:25946945

  18. Value of Symptom-Triggered Diagnostic Evaluation for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, M. Robyn; Lowe, Kimberly A.; Goff, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential harms and ovarian cancer outcomes associated with symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation of all women with symptoms of ovarian cancer. Methods Five thousand-twelve women over age 40 were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study of proactive symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation. Women who tested positive on a Symptom Index were offered testing with CA125 and transvaginal ultrasound. Results of these tests and any subsequent procedures were recorded. Assessment of ovarian cancer outcomes for all participants through Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) was performed a year after enrollment was complete. Results A positive Symptom Index was found in 241 (4.8%) of participating patients and 211 (88%) participated in CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, or both CA125 and transvaginal ultrasound. Twenty surgical procedures (laparoscopy, laparotomy, vaginal) were performed in the study population (0.4% of participating women). However, only six (0.12%) were performed for a suspicious ovarian mass and only 4 (0.08%) were performed solely due to study participation. A total of eight ovarian cancers were diagnosed, 31–843days after symptom assessment (50% distant, 50% local or regional). Of the two cancers diagnosed within 6 months, one was Symptom Index-positive. Conclusions Proactive symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation for ovarian cancer results in minimal unindicated surgery. A small number of ovarian cancers were identified solely on the basis of symptom-triggered diagnostic testing. PMID:24463666

  19. The Cost of Cancer-Related Physician Services to Medicare

    PubMed Central

    Maroongroge, Sean; Kim, Simon P.; Mougalian, Sarah; Johung, Kimberly; Decker, Roy H.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Long, Jessica B.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Although physician services represent a substantial portion of cancer care costs, little is known about trends in the costs of physician cancer services in the fee-for-service Medicare program. We analyzed aggregated data from all Part B Medicare claims for physician and supplier services attributed to cancer patients from 1999 to 2012 to characterize how billing and payments have changed over time for the most common cancer types. Billing and expenditure data are from the Medicare Statistical Supplement, and age-adjusted incidence data are from SEER. Physician services for cancer patients grew from $7.6 billion in 1999 to $12.3 billion in 2012 (60 percent increase). Reimbursements for physician and supplier services for cancer treatment in Medicare Part B beneficiaries steadily grew from 1999 to 2005 and then plateaued through 2012, led by a decrease in reimbursements for prostate cancer care. These trends may reflect shifts toward hospital-based care or changes in aggressiveness of care. PMID:26029009

  20. Socioeconomic factors, immigration status, and cancer screening among Mexican American women aged 75 and older

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A.; Markides, Kyriakos S.

    2011-01-01

    To explore the association between socioeconomic factors and acculturation with cancer screening methods, we analyzed data from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly, on 1,272 women aged 75 and older residing in the United States in 2004-2005. We found that lower Pap smear or mammography uses were associated with older age, lower education, and having public health insurance compared to private. Other factors associated with mammography use were depressive symptoms, cognition and functional limitations. In sum, socioeconomic factors and health insurance coverage determine cancer screening utilization in very old Mexican American women but not acculturation. PMID:21058091

  1. For Working-Age Cancer Survivors, Medical Debt And Bankruptcy Create Financial Hardships.

    PubMed

    Banegas, Matthew P; Guy, Gery P; de Moor, Janet S; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Virgo, Katherine S; Kent, Erin E; Nutt, Stephanie; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Rechis, Ruth; Yabroff, K Robin

    2016-01-01

    The rising medical costs associated with cancer have led to considerable financial hardship for patients and their families in the United States. Using data from the LIVESTRONG 2012 survey of 4,719 cancer survivors ages 18-64, we examined the proportions of survivors who reported going into debt or filing for bankruptcy as a result of cancer, as well as the amount of debt incurred. Approximately one-third of the survivors had gone into debt, and 3 percent had filed for bankruptcy. Of those who had gone into debt, 55 percent incurred obligations of $10,000 or more. Cancer survivors who were younger, had lower incomes, and had public health insurance were more likely to go into debt or file for bankruptcy, compared to those who were older, had higher incomes, and had private insurance, respectively. Future longitudinal population-based studies are needed to improve understanding of financial hardship among US working-age cancer survivors throughout the cancer care trajectory and, ultimately, to help stakeholders develop evidence-based interventions and policies to reduce the financial hardship of cancer. PMID:26733701

  2. Late age at first full term birth is strongly associated with lobular breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, PA; Trentham-Dietz, A; Hampton, JM; Egan, KM; Titus-Ernstoff, L; Andersen, S Warren; Greenberg, ER; Willett, WC

    2010-01-01

    Background Late age at first full-term birth (AFB) and nulliparity are known to increase breast cancer risk. The frequency of these risk factors has increased in recent decades. Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study to examine associations between parity, AFB, and specific histological subtypes of breast cancer. Women with breast cancer (N=21,266) were identified from cancer registries in Wisconsin, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire. Control women (N=26,677) were randomly selected from population lists. Interviews collected information on reproductive histories and other risk factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of ductal, lobular, and mixed ductal-lobular breast cancer diagnosis in association with AFB and nulliparity. Results AFB ≥ 30 years of age was associated with a 2.4-fold increase in risk of lobular breast cancer compared to AFB < 20 years (OR 2.4; 95%CI 1.9–2.9). The association was less pronounced for ductal breast cancer (OR 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2–1.4). Nulliparity was associated with increased risk for all breast cancer subtypes, compared to women with AFB <20 years, but the association was stronger for lobular (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.20) than for ductal (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.08–1.31) subtypes (P=0.004). The adverse effects of later AFB was stronger with obesity (P=0.03) in lobular, but not ductal, breast cancer. Conclusion Stronger associations observed for late AFB and nulliparity suggests that these preferentially stimulate growth of lobular breast carcinomas. Recent temporal changes in reproductive patterns and rates of obesity may impact the histological presentation of breast cancer. PMID:21509772

  3. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US

  4. Skin cancer risk perceptions: A comparison across ethnicity, age, education, gender, and income

    PubMed Central

    Buster, Kesha J.; You, Zhiying; Fouad, Mona; Elmets, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of non-cutaneous and cutaneous malignancies support the hypothesis that poor risk-perception status contributes to health disparity. Objective We evaluated skin cancer risk perceptions across race and other demographic markers using the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) and compared them to discover differences in perception that may contribute to the disparities in skin cancer diagnosis and treatment. Methods Respondents with no prior history of skin cancer were randomly selected to answer questions assessing perceived risk and knowledge of preventive strategies of skin cancer. Logistic regression was performed to identify associations between perceptions of skin cancer and demographic variables including self-described race, age, sex, education, income, and health insurance status. Results Blacks, the elderly, and people with less education perceived themselves as at lower risk of developing skin cancer. They, along with Hispanics, were also more likely to believe that one cannot lower their skin cancer risk and that there are so many different recommendations on how to prevent skin cancer that it makes it difficult to know which ones to follow. Lower education also correlated with greater reluctance to have a skin exam. Limitations HINTS is a cross-sectional instrument, thus it only provides a snapshot of skin cancer perceptions. Conclusion Uncertainty and altered perceptions are more common in the skin cancer risk perceptions of ethnic minorities, the elderly, and those with less education. These are the same groups that are subject to disparities in skin cancer outcomes. Educational programs directed at these demographic groups may help to reduce the skin cancer-related health disparities. PMID:21875760

  5. Predictors of Surgery Types after Neoadjuvant Therapy for Advanced Stage Breast Cancer: Analysis from Florida Population-Based Cancer Registry (1996–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Azhri, Jamila; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Miao, Feng; Saclarides, Constantine; Byrne, Margaret M.; Avisar, Eli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite the established guidelines for breast cancer treatment, there is still variability in surgical treatment after neoadjuvant therapy (NT) for women with large breast tumors. Our objective was to identify predictors of the type of surgical treatment: mastectomy versus breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in women with T3/T4 breast cancer who received NT. METHODS Population-based Florida Cancer Data System Registry, Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration, and US census from 1996 to 2009 were linked for women diagnosed with T3/T4 breast cancer and received NT followed by either BCS or mastectomy. Analysis of multiple variables, such as sociodemographic characteristics (race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, age, marital status, and urban/rural residency), tumor’s characteristics (estrogen/progesterone receptor status, histology, grade, SEER stage, and regional nodes positivity), treatment facilities (hospital volume and teaching status), patients’ comorbidities, and type of NT, was performed. RESULTS Of 1,056 patients treated with NT for T3/T4 breast cancer, 107 (10%) had BCS and 949 (90%) had mastectomy. After adjusting with extensive covariables, Hispanic patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = [3.50], 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38–8.84, P = 0.008) were more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to localized SEER stage, regional stage with direct extension (aOR = [3.24], 95% CI: 1.60–6.54, P = 0.001), regional stage with direct extension and nodes (aOR = [4.35], 95% CI: 1.72–11.03, P = 0.002), and distant stage (aOR = [4.44], 95% CI: 1.81–10.88, P = 0.001) were significantly more likely to have mastectomy than BCS. Compared to patients who received both chemotherapy and hormonal therapy, patients who received hormonal NT only (aOR = [0.29], 95% CI: 0.12–0.68, P = 0.004) were less likely to receive mastectomy. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that Hispanic ethnicity, advanced SEER stage, and type of NT are significant

  6. A survey of cancer and occupation in young and middle aged men. II. Non-respiratory cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Osmond, C; Acheson, E D

    1986-01-01

    In a search for clues to previously unrecognised industrial carcinogens the occupational and smoking histories of young and middle aged men with different types of cancer have been compared. The study population comprised men aged 18-54 and resident in the counties of Cleveland, Humberside, and Cheshire (including the Wirral). Within this population 2942 patients in whom cancers were first diagnosed during the period 1975-80 were identified retrospectively from hospital and cancer registration records. Lifetime occupational and smoking histories were then sought from these subjects (or if they had died by proxy from their next of kin), using a postal questionnaire. The overall response rate was 52.1%. Analysis of limited occupational data obtained from the hospital notes of 89% of the patients suggests that no serious bias arose from the incomplete response to the questionnaire. The present paper describes the findings for non-respiratory cancers. Some tumours did not occur with sufficient frequency to warrant formal statistical analysis. Nevertheless, examination of the histories of patients with these cancers showed several interesting occupational clusters. In particular, five out of 29 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia had worked in electrical trades. The more common cancers were studied by statistical techniques. A large number of possible occupational associations were examined, and some will probably have achieved conventional levels of statistical significance by chance. The results should therefore be interpreted with caution, taking into account evidence from other studies and the biological plausibility of suggested hazards. Among the more interesting findings were an excess of bladder cancer in lorry drivers (RR=1.6, CI 1.0-2.4) and in men employed in the manufacture of vegetable and animal oils and fats (RR = 4.8, CI 1.8-12.9). PMID:3718882

  7. One-carbon metabolism: An aging-cancer crossroad for the gerosuppressant metformin

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A.; Joven, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The gerosuppressant metformin operates as an efficient inhibitor of the mTOR/S6K1 gerogenic pathway due to its ability to ultimately activate the energy-sensor AMPK. If an aging-related decline in the AMPK sensitivity to cellular stress is a crucial event for mTOR-driven aging and aging-related diseases, including cancer, unraveling new proximal causes through which AMPK activation endows its gerosuppressive effects may offer not only a better understanding of metformin function but also the likely possibility of repositioning our existing gerosuppressant drugs. Here we provide our perspective on recent findings suggesting that de novo biosynthesis of purine nucleotides, which is based on the metabolism of one-carbon compounds, is a new target for metformin's actions at the crossroads of aging and cancer. PMID:23525940

  8. Prospective Predictors of Mental Health after the Development of Breast Cancer in Middle-Aged Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Tracey D.; Lee, Christina

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigated the prospective predictors of mental health after breast cancer diagnosis among mid-aged Australian women (initially aged 45-50 years). Two waves of data collected 2 years apart from a longitudinal population-based survey of 12,177 women identified a group of 63 women who reported onset of BC between T1 (T1) and Time 2…

  9. Structured additive regression modeling of age of menarche and menopause in a breast cancer screening program.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Elisa; de Sousa, Bruno; Cadarso-Suarez, Carmen; Rodrigues, Vitor; Kneib, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer risk is believed to be associated with several reproductive factors, such as early menarche and late menopause. This study is based on the registries of the first time a woman enters the screening program, and presents a spatio-temporal analysis of the variables age of menarche and age of menopause along with other reproductive and socioeconomic factors. The database was provided by the Portuguese Cancer League (LPCC), a private nonprofit organization dealing with multiple issues related to oncology of which the Breast Cancer Screening Program is one of its main activities. The registry consists of 259,652 records of women who entered the screening program for the first time between 1990 and 2007 (45-69-year age group). Structured Additive Regression (STAR) models were used to explore spatial and temporal correlations with a wide range of covariates. These models are flexible enough to deal with a variety of complex datasets, allowing us to reveal possible relationships among the variables considered in this study. The analysis shows that early menarche occurs in younger women and in municipalities located in the interior of central Portugal. Women living in inland municipalities register later ages for menopause, and those born in central Portugal after 1933 show a decreasing trend in the age of menopause. Younger ages of menarche and late menopause are observed in municipalities with a higher purchasing power index. The analysis performed in this study portrays the time evolution of the age of menarche and age of menopause and their spatial characterization, adding to the identification of factors that could be of the utmost importance in future breast cancer incidence research. PMID:24615881

  10. DNA methylation of oxidative stress genes and cancer risk in the Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tao; Joyce, Brian Thomas; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Yinan; Dai, Qi; Zhang, Zhou; Zhang, Wei; Shrubsole, Martha J; Tao, Meng-Hua; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea; Hou, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a primary mechanism of carcinogenesis, and methylation of genes related to it may play a role in cancer development. In this study, we examined the prospective association between blood DNA methylation of four oxidative stress genes and cancer incidence. Our study population included a total of 582 participants in the Normative Aging Study (NAS) who had blood drawn during 1-4 visits from 1999-2012 (mean follow up 9.0 years). Promoter DNA methylation of CRAT, iNOS, OGG1 and GCR in blood leukocytes was measured using pyrosequencing. We used Cox regression models to examine prospective associations between cancer incidence and both methylation at the baseline visit and methylation rate of changes over time. Baseline OGG1 methylation was associated with higher risk of all-cancer (HR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.15-1.78) and prostate cancer (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.03-2.25) incidence. Compared with participants remaining cancer-free, those who eventually developed cancer had significantly accelerated CRAT methylation (p = 0.04) and decelerated iNOS methylation (p<0.01) over time prior to cancer diagnosis. Accelerated CRAT methylation was associated with higher all-cancer incidence (HR: 3.88, 95% CI: 1.06-14.30), whereas accelerated iNOS methylation was associated with lower all-cancer incidence (HR: 0.08, 95% CI 0.02-0.38). Our results suggest that methylation and its dynamic change over time in OS-related genes, including OGG1, CRAT and iNOS, may play an important role in carcinogenesis. These results can potentially facilitate the development of early detection biomarkers and new treatments for a variety of cancers. PMID:27186424

  11. Standard errors of non-standardised and age-standardised relative survival of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, L; Hakulinen, T; Brenner, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: Relative survival estimates cancer survival in the absence of other causes of death. Previous work has shown that standard errors of non-standardised relative survival may be substantially overestimated by the conventionally used method. However, evidence was restricted to non-standardised relative survival estimates using Hakulinen's method. Here, we provide a more comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of standard errors including age-standardised survival and estimation by the Ederer II method. Methods: Five- and ten-year non-standardised and age-standardised relative survival was estimated for patients diagnosed with 25 common forms of cancer in Finland in 1989–1993, using data from the nationwide Finnish Cancer Registry. Standard errors of mutually comparable non-standardised and age-standardised relative survival were computed by the conventionally used method and compared with bootstrap standard errors. Results: When using Hakulinen's method, standard errors of non-standardised relative survival were overestimated by up to 28%. In contrast, standard errors of age-standardised relative survival were accurately estimated. When using the Ederer II method, deviations of the standard errors of non-standardised and age-standardised relative survival were generally small to negligible. Conclusion: In most cases, overestimations of standard errors are effectively overcome by age standardisation and by using Ederer II rather than Hakulinen's method. PMID:22173672

  12. The role of telomere dynamics in aging and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, Krastan; Goodwin, Edwin

    2006-03-01

    Telomere length changes are far more dynamic than previously thought. In addition to a gradual loss of ˜100 base pairs per telomere in each cell division, losses as well as gains may occur within a single cell cycle. We are investigating how telomere exchange, extension, and deletion affect the proliferative potential of telomerase-negative somatic cells. Experimental techniques are being devised to detect dynamic telomere processes and quantify both the frequency and length changes of each. In parallel, a ``dynamic telomere model'' is being used that incorporates telomere dynamics to study how the telomere size distribution evolves with time. This is an essential step towards understanding the role that telomere dynamics play in the normal aging of tissues and organisms. The model casts light on relationships not otherwise easily explained by a deterministic ``mitotic clock,'' or to what extent the shortest initial telomere determines the onset of senescence. We also expect to identify biomarkers that will correlate with aging better than average telomere length and to shed light on the transition to unlimited growth found in telomerase-negative tumor cells having the ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) phenotype, and to evaluate strategies to suppress the growth of these tumors.

  13. Risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-negative hereditary breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Kauff, Noah D; Mitra, Nandita; Robson, Mark E; Hurley, Karen E; Chuai, Shaokun; Goldfrank, Deborah; Wadsworth, Eve; Lee, Johanna; Cigler, Tessa; Borgen, Patrick I; Norton, Larry; Barakat, Richard R; Offit, Kenneth

    2005-09-21

    Women from site-specific hereditary breast cancer families who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation are at increased risk for ovarian cancer. It is less clear, however, whether individuals from hereditary breast cancer families who do not carry such a mutation are also at increased ovarian cancer risk. To determine whether women from BRCA mutation-negative hereditary breast cancer families are at increased risk for ovarian cancer, 199 probands from BRCA mutation-negative, site-specific breast cancer kindreds who consented to prospective follow-up at the time of genetic testing were identified. The incidence of new breast and ovarian cancers in probands and their families since receipt of their genetic test results was determined by questionnaire. The expected number of cancers and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were determined from age-specific cancer incidence rates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program by using the method of Byar. All statistical tests were two-sided. During 2534 women-years of follow-up in 165 kindreds, 19 new cases of breast cancer were diagnosed, whereas only 6.07 were expected (SIR = 3.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.88 to 4.89; P < .001), and one case of ovarian cancer was diagnosed, whereas only 0.66 was expected (SIR = 1.52, 95% CI = 0.02 to 8.46; P = .48). These results suggest that women from BRCA mutation-negative, site-specific breast cancer families are not at increased risk for ovarian cancer. PMID:16174860

  14. Cardiovascular medication after cancer at a young age in Finland: A nationwide registry linkage study.

    PubMed

    Kero, A E; Madanat-Harjuoja, L M; Järvelä, L S; Malila, N; Matomäki, J; Lähteenmäki, P M

    2016-08-01

    Despite improved survival rates, childhood and young adult (YA) cancer survivors face elevated risks for life-threatening morbidities, especially cardiovascular complications. Our nationwide Finnish registry study investigated the purchases of cardiovascular medication from 1993 to 2011 in patients diagnosed with cancer aged below 35 years (N = 8,197) between 1993 and 2004 compared to siblings (N = 29,974) via linkage to the drug purchase registry. The cumulative incidence for purchasing cardiovascular medications was higher in childhood and YA cancer patients compared to siblings with a rising trend over time. After childhood cancer, the highest hazard ratio (HR) was found for purchasing anticoagulants (HR 19.8, 95% CI 8.5-45.9). The HRs for any cardiovascular medication (HR 7.2, 95% CI 5.1-10.1) and cardiac medication (HR 4.8, 95% CI 3.3-6.9) were markedly elevated after childhood cancer as well. Regarding YA cancer patients, the respective HRs were 2.5 (95% CI 2.0-3.2) for anticoagulants, HR 1.7 (95% CI 1.5-1.9) for any cardiovascular medication and HR 1.5 (95% CI 1.3-1.7) for cardiac medication. Among cancer patients, highest HRs for cardiovascular medication were observed after childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and bone tumors (HR 10.2, 95% CI 6.8-15.5 and HR 7.4, 95% CI 4.0-13.7) and YA ALL and acute myeloid leukemia (HR 5.1, 95% CI 3.5-7.1 and HR 2.8, 95% CI 1.8-4.0). Our study demonstrated increased HRs for purchasing cardiovascular medication after early-onset cancer compared to siblings reflecting elevated cardiovascular morbidity. Thus, the implementation of long-term cardiovascular disease screening is imperative to prevent, detect and adequately treat cardiovascular late effects after cancer at a young age. PMID:26610262

  15. Biological, Clinical, and Psychosocial Correlates at the Interface of Cancer and Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G.; Eldadah, Basil A.; Trimble, Edward L.; Schilsky, Richard L.; Cohen, Harvey J.; Muss, Hyman B.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Ferrell, Betty; Extermann, Martine; Nayfield, Susan G.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the Cancer and Aging Research Group, in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Aging, conducted the first of three planned conferences to discuss research methodology to generate the highest quality research in older adults with cancer and then disseminate these findings among those working in the fields of cancer and aging. Conference speakers discussed the current level of research evidence in geriatric oncology, outlined the current knowledge gaps, and put forth principles for research designs and strategies that would address these gaps within the next 10 years. It was agreed that future oncology research trials that enroll older adults should include: 1) improved standardized geriatric assessment of older oncology patients, 2) substantially enhanced biological assessment of older oncology patients, 3) specific trials for the most vulnerable and/or those older than 75 years, and 4) research infrastructure that specifically targets older adults and substantially strengthened geriatrics and oncology research collaborations. This initial conference laid the foundation for the next two meetings, which will address the research designs and collaborations needed to enhance therapeutic and intervention trials in older adults with cancer. PMID:22457474

  16. Oncofertility for gynecologic and non-gynecologic cancers: fertility sparing in young women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Polat; Doğan, N Utku; Ayhan, Ali

    2014-12-01

    About ten percent of all female cancer survivors is younger than 40 years of age. For these young women the primary goal is to ensure the highest possibility of cure and to maintain the reproductive functions as well. Oncofertility is a new concept including both oncology and reproductive medicine. By this recently defined concept young women will have maximal chance to make an optimal decision without any significant impact and delay in oncologic outcome. Oncofertility concept could be applied for genital cancer as well as non-genital cancer of reproductive age. Currently sperm and embryo banking are the standard methods used for young patients with cancer whose future fertility is under risk. In contrary oocyte banking, ovarian tissue cryopreservation are all controversial procedures and still accepted as experimental by many authors although American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) consideres oocyte cryopreservation "no longer experimental". For genital cancers procedures for oncofertility depends on the type of the cancer and the treatment of choice. In this review the current data and concepts regarding oncofertility concept including the gynecologic oncologic perspective is reviewed. PMID:25090914

  17. Middle-Aged More Often Diagnosed with Late-Stage Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Middle-Aged More Often Diagnosed With Late-Stage Lung Cancer British study highlights the need for better early detection, researchers say To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. (*this news item will not ...

  18. Age Differences in Understandings of Disease Causality: AIDS, Colds, and Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Asked 9, 11, and 13 year olds and college students about risk factors for AIDS, colds, and cancer. Found that knowledge of risk factors became more accurate with age; knowledge of risk factors was largely independent of knowledge of nonrisk factors; and knowledge about 1 disease was largely independent of knowledge about another. (MDM)

  19. Molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting in cancer and ageing: cachexia versus sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Argilés, Josep M; Busquets, Sílvia; Felipe, Antonio; López-Soriano, Francisco J

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize and evaluate the different mechanisms and catabolic mediators involved in cancer cachexia and ageing sarcopenia since they may represent targets for future promising clinical investigations. Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by a marked weight loss, anorexia, asthenia and anemia. In fact, many patients who die with advanced cancer suffer from cachexia. The degree of cachexia is inversely correlated with the survival time of the patient and it always implies a poor prognosis. Unfortunately, at the clinical level, cachexia is not treated until the patient suffers from a considerable weight loss and wasting. At this point, the cachectic syndrome is almost irreversible. The cachectic state is often associated with the presence and growth of the tumour and leads to a malnutrition status due to the induction of anorexia. In recent years, age-related diseases and disabilities have become of major health interest and importance. This holds particularly for muscle wasting, also known as sarcopenia, that decreases the quality of life of the geriatric population, increasing morbidity and decreasing life expectancy. The cachectic factors (associated with both depletion of fat stores and muscular tissue) can be divided into two categories: of tumour origin and humoural factors. In conclusion, more research should be devoted to the understanding of muscle wasting mediators, both in cancer and ageing, in particular the identification of common mediators may prove as a good therapeutic strategies for both prevention and treatment of wasting both in disease and during healthy ageing. PMID:15743680

  20. Comprehension of a Colon Cancer Pamphlet among American Adults at Least 50 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chiung-ju

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of comprehension of an educational pamphlet on colon cancer, by adults at least 50 years of age living in the United States. Design: Data were analysed from the "2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy" survey. The survey was designed to assess functional English literacy, which…

  1. Family Support, Age, and Emotional States of Terminally Ill Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Kitty K. Y.

    1991-01-01

    Explored emotional states of dying patients, age, and family support. Findings from 26 terminally ill female cancer patients revealed that younger patients expressed more bargaining and complaints than older patients who revealed more depression and acceptance. Patients with immediate family support expressed less depression and more fears than…

  2. Can we demonstrate that breast cancer “Integrative Oncology” is effective? A methodology to evaluate the effectiveness of integrative oncology offered in community clinics

    PubMed Central

    Standish, Leanna J.; Sweet, Erin; Naydis, Eleonora; Andersen, M. Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Many women diagnosed with breast cancer receive both standard cancer treatment and care from providers trained in the emerging field of medicine called ‘integrative oncology’ (IO) in which science-based complementary and alternative medical1 therapies are prescribed by physicians. The effectiveness of IO services has not been fully studied, so is yet unknown. Purpose Determine if a matched case-controlled prospective outcomes study evaluating the efficacy and safety of breast cancer IO care is feasible. Methods Methodological proof of principle requires demonstration that 1) it is possible to find matched control breast cancer patients using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program’s western Washington Cancer Surveillance System (CSS), and 2) an IO clinic can recruit breast cancer patients into a matched controlled study. Results A pilot study was conducted in 2008 (N=14) to determine if matched controlled women could be identified in the western Washington SEER database. All 14 women who were approached agreed to participate. The cases were matched to the CSS along five variables - age and stage at diagnosis, race, marital and ER/PR status. Multiple matches were found for 12 of the 14 participants. Conclusion A prospective cohort study with a matched comparison group is a feasible and potentially rigorous study design with high patient acceptability. It may provide valuable data for the evaluation of the effectiveness of IO care on patient health, relapse rate, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). A federally funded matched-case controlled outcomes study is currently underway at Bastyr University and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. PMID:22740079

  3. Barriers to Cervical Cancer Screening among Middle-aged and Older Rural Appalachian Women

    PubMed Central

    Studts, Christina R.; Tarasenko, Yelena N.; Schoenberg, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    Although cervical cancer rates in the United States have declined sharply in recent decades, certain groups of women remain at elevated risk, including middle-aged and older women in central Appalachia. Cross-sectional baseline data from a community-based randomized controlled trial were examined to identify barriers to cervical cancer screening. Questionnaires assessing barriers were administered to 345 Appalachian women aged 40-64, years when Pap testing declines and cervical cancer rates increase. Consistent with the PRECEDE/PROCEED framework, participants identified barriers included predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors. Descriptive and bivariate analyses are reported, identifying (a) the most frequently endorsed barriers to screening, and (b) significant associations of barriers with sociodemographic characteristics in the sample. Recommendations are provided to decrease these barriers and, ultimately, improve rates of Pap tests among this traditionally underserved and disproportionately affected group. PMID:23179390

  4. Outcomes in Ovarian Cancer among Hispanic Women Living in the United States: A Population-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ibeanu, Okechukwu A.; Díaz-Montes, Teresa P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer in the United States. There is limited data on presentation and outcomes among Hispanic women with ovarian cancer. Objective. To investigate how ovarian cancer presents among Hispanic women in the USA and to analyze differences in presentation, staging, and survival between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women with ovarian cancer. Methods. Data from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2004 were extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Results. The study sample comprised 1215 Hispanics (10%), 10 652 non-Hispanic whites (83%), and 905 non-Hispanic blacks (7%). Hispanic women were diagnosed with ovarian cancer at a younger age and earlier stage when compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks; P < 0.001. Similar proportion of Hispanics (33%), non-Hispanic whites (32%), and non-Hispanic blacks (24%) underwent lymphadenectomy; P < 0.001. Hispanics with epithelial ovarian cancer histology had longer five-year survival of 30.6 months compared to non-Hispanic whites (22.8 months) and non-Hispanic blacks (23.3 months); P  =  0.001. Conclusion. Hispanic women with ovarian cancer have a statistically significantly longer median survival compared to whites and blacks. This survival difference was most apparent in patients with epithelial cancers and patients with stage IV disease. PMID:23509667

  5. Age and Prostate-Specific Antigen Level Prior to Diagnosis Predict Risk of Death from Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    MacKintosh, F. Roy; Sprenkle, Preston C.; Walter, Louise C.; Rawson, Lori; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Morrell, Christopher H.; Kattan, Michael W.; Nawaf, Cayce B.; Neville, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    A single early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level has been correlated with a higher likelihood of prostate cancer diagnosis and death in younger men. PSA testing in older men has been considered of limited utility. We evaluated prostate cancer death in relation to age and PSA level immediately prior to prostate cancer diagnosis. Using the Veterans Affairs database, we identified 230,081 men aged 50–89 years diagnosed with prostate cancer and at least one prior PSA test between 1999 and 2009. Prostate cancer-specific death over time was calculated for patients stratified by age group (e.g., 50–59 years, through 80–89 years) and PSA range at diagnosis (10 ranges) using Kaplan–Meier methods. Risk of 10-year prostate cancer mortality across age and PSA was compared using log-rank tests with a Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing. 10.5% of men diagnosed with prostate cancer died of cancer during the 10-year study period (mean follow-up = 3.7 years). Higher PSA values prior to diagnosis predict a higher risk of death in all age groups (p < 0.0001). Within the same PSA range, older age groups are at increased risk for death from prostate cancer (p < 0.0001). For PSA of 7–10 ng/mL, cancer-specific death, 10 years after diagnosis, increased from 7% for age 50–59 years to 51% for age 80–89 years. Men older than 70 years are more likely to die of prostate cancer at any PSA level than younger men, suggesting prostate cancer remains a significant problem among older men (even those aged 80+) and deserves additional study. PMID:27446803

  6. Alcohol consumption and risk of prostate cancer in middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Schoonen, W Marieke; Salinas, Claudia A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Stanford, Janet L

    2005-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a modifiable lifestyle factor that may affect prostate cancer risk. Alcohol alters the hormonal milieu and contains chemical substances such as flavonoids (red wine), which may alter tumor cell growth. Data from a population-based case-control study in King County, WA, were utilized to evaluate the association of alcohol consumption with prostate cancer in middle-aged men. A total of 753 newly diagnosed prostate cancer cases, 40-64 years of age, participated in the study. Seven hundred three control subjects, frequency matched to cases by age, were selected through random digit dialing. All participants completed an in-person interview on lifetime alcohol consumption and other risk factors for prostate cancer. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and assess significance (95% confidence intervals [CI]). All tests of statistical significance were two-sided. No clear association with prostate cancer risk was seen for overall alcohol consumption. Each additional glass of red wine consumed per week showed a statistically significant 6% decrease in relative risk (OR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.90-0.98), and there was evidence for a decline in risk estimates across increasing categories of red wine intake (trend p = 0.02). No clear associations were seen for consumption of beer or liquor. Our present study suggests that consumption of beer or liquor is not associated with prostate cancer. There may be, however, a reduced relative risk associated with increasing level of red wine consumption. Further research is needed to evaluate the potential negative association between red wine intake and prostate cancer risk. PMID:15386436

  7. Age-specific prevalence of HPV16/18 genotypes in cervical cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Anne; Rositch, Anne; Qeadan, Fares; Gravitt, Patti E; Blaakaer, Jan

    2016-06-15

    The prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer has been reported to decline with age in some papers. However, whether this decline in proportion of cancers positive for HPV16/18 is consistently observed across studies remains to be elucidated. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify papers reporting data on age-specific prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer and to summarize the results. We employed MEDLINE and Embase for a systematic literature search and thereby identified a total of 644 papers published in the period 1999-2015, of which 15 papers, reporting cross-sectional data, were included for review (11,526 cervical cancers). The prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer declined significantly with age (ρ = -0.83, p = 0.04) from 74.8% (95% CI 67.6-80.8) in women aged 30-39 years to 56.8% (95% CI 43.9-68.8) in women aged ≥70 years. As the HPV16/18 positive cancers are prevented in fully vaccinated cohorts, the age-specific epidemiology of cervical cancer is anticipated to change, with a shift in peak incidence rate to older ages. It will be important for integrated vaccination and screening strategies to consider predicted change in the age-specific epidemiology of cervical cancer. PMID:26661889

  8. Psychosocial Adjustment in School-age Girls With a Family History of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, Angela R.; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Schwartz, Lisa; Egleston, Brian; Sands, Colleen Burke; Chung, Wendy K.; Glendon, Gord; McDonald, Jasmine A.; Moore, Cynthia; Rauch, Paula; Tuchman, Lisa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Frost, Caren J.; Keegan, Theresa H.M.; Knight, Julia A.; Terry, Mary Beth; John, Esther M.; Daly, Mary B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Understanding how young girls respond to growing up with breast cancer family histories is critical given expansion of genetic testing and breast cancer messaging. We examined the impact of breast cancer family history on psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors among >800 girls in the multicenter LEGACY Girls Study. METHODS Girls aged 6 to 13 years with a family history of breast cancer or familial BRCA1/2 mutation (BCFH+), peers without a family history (BCFH−), and their biological mothers completed assessments of psychosocial adjustment (maternal report for 6- to 13-year-olds, self-report for 10- to 13-year-olds), breast cancer–specific distress, perceived risk of breast cancer, and health behaviors (10- to 13-year-olds). RESULTS BCFH+ girls had better general psychosocial adjustment than BCFH− peers by maternal report. Psychosocial adjustment and health behaviors did not differ significantly by self-report among 10- to 13-year-old girls. BCFH+ girls reported higher breast cancer–specific distress (P = .001) and were more likely to report themselves at increased breast cancer risk than BCFH− peers (38.4% vs 13.7%, P < .001), although many girls were unsure of their risk. In multivariable analyses, higher daughter anxiety was associated with higher maternal anxiety and poorer family communication. Higher daughter breast cancer–specific distress was associated with higher maternal breast cancer-specific distress. CONCLUSIONS Although growing up in a family at risk for breast cancer does not negatively affect general psychosocial adjustment among preadolescent girls, those from breast cancer risk families experience greater breast cancer–specific distress. Interventions to address daughter and mother breast cancer concerns and responses to genetic or familial risk might improve psychosocial outcomes of teen daughters. PMID:26482668

  9. WHEN DOES AN EPISODE OF CARE FOR CANCER BEGIN?

    PubMed Central

    Hornbrook, Mark C.; Fishman, Paul A.; Ritzwoller, Debra P.; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen C.; Salloum, Ramzi G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the medical care resources devoted to diagnosing and treating cancer-related symptoms prior to a definitive cancer diagnosis. Previous research using SEER-Medicare data to measure incremental costs and utilization associated with cancer started with the date of diagnosis. We hypothesized that health care use increases prior to diagnosis of a new primary cancer. Methods We used a longitudinal case-control design to estimate incremental medical care utilization rates. Cases were 121,293 persons enrolled between January, 2000 and December, 2008 with one or more primary cancers. We selected 522,839 controls randomly from among all health plan members who had no tumor registry evidence of cancer prior to January, 2009, and we frequency matched controls to cancer cases on a five-to-one ratio by age group, gender, and having health plan eligibility in the year of diagnosis of the index cancer case. Utilization data were extracted for all cases and controls for the period 2000-2008 from standardized distributed data warehouses. To determine when and the extent to which patterns of medical care use change preceding a cancer diagnosis, we compute hospitalization rates, hospital days, emergency department visits, same-day surgical procedures, ambulatory medical office visits, imaging procedures, laboratory tests, and ambulatory prescription dispensings per 1,000 persons per month within integrated delivery systems. Results One- to three-fold increases in monthly utilization rates were observed during the three to five months prior to a cancer diagnosis, compared to matched non-cancer control groups. This pattern was consistent for both aged and non-aged cancer patients. Aged cancer patients had higher utilization rates than non-aged cancer patients throughout the year prior to a cancer diagnosis. Conclusion The pre-diagnosis phase is a resource-intensive component of cancer care episodes and should be included in cost of cancer estimates. More

  10. Hematopoietic Age at Onset of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Dictates Disease Aggressiveness and Progression.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Timothy; Wong, Irene; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Barakat, Amey; Qin, Yuanbo; Sjödin, Andreas; Alspach, Elise; Nilsson, Björn; Stewart, Sheila A; McAllister, Sandra S

    2016-05-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is considered an early onset subtype of breast cancer that carries with it a poorer prognosis in young rather than older women for reasons that remain poorly understood. Hematopoiesis in the bone marrow becomes altered with age and may therefore affect the composition of tumor-infiltrating hematopoietic cells and subsequent tumor progression. In this study, we investigated how age- and tumor-dependent changes to bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells impact TNBC progression. Using multiple mouse models of TNBC tumorigenesis and metastasis, we found that a specific population of bone marrow cells (BMC) upregulated CSF-1R and secreted the growth factor granulin to support stromal activation and robust tumor growth in young mice. However, the same cell population in old mice expressed low levels of CSF1R and granulin and failed to promote tumor outgrowth, suggesting that age influences the tumorigenic capacity of BMCs in response to tumor-associated signals. Importantly, BMCs from young mice were sufficient to activate a tumor-supportive microenvironment and induce tumor progression in old mice. These results indicate that hematopoietic age is an important determinant of TNBC aggressiveness and provide rationale for investigating age-stratified therapies designed to prevent the protumorigenic effects of activated BMCs. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2932-43. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197230

  11. Loss of antigenicity with tissue age in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Combs, Susan E; Han, Gang; Mani, Nikita; Beruti, Susan; Nerenberg, Michael; Rimm, David L

    2016-03-01

    Archived tumor specimens, particularly those collected by large cooperative groups and trials, provide a wealth of material for post hoc clinical investigation. As these tissues are rigorously collected and preserved for many decades, subsequent use of the specimens to answer clinical questions must rely on the assumption that expression and detection of target biomarkers are not degraded with time. To test this assumption, we measured the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki67 in human breast carcinoma using quantitative immunofluorescence (QIF) in a series of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from 1295 individual patients preserved for 7 to 53 years in four cohorts on tissue microarrays. Protein expression was measured using the automated quantitative analysis method for QIF. Change in quantitative protein expression over time was estimated in positive cases using both Pearson's correlation and a polynomial regression analysis with a random effects model. The average signal decreased with preservation time for all biomarkers measured. For ER and HER2, there was an average of 10% signal loss after 9.9 years and 8.5 years, respectively, compared with the most recent tissue. Detection of Ki67 expression was lost more rapidly, with 10% signal loss in just 4.5 years. Overall, these results demonstrate the need for adjustment of tissue age when studying FFPE biospecimens. The rate of antigenicity loss is biomarker specific and should be considered as an important variable for studies using archived tissues. PMID:26568292

  12. Exercise enhances wound healing and prevents cancer progression during aging by targeting macrophage polarity.

    PubMed

    Goh, Jorming; Ladiges, Warren C

    2014-07-01

    Physical activity, which can include regular and repetitive exercise training, has been shown to decrease the incidence of age-related diseases. Aging is characterized by aberrant immune responses, including impaired wound healing and increased cancer risk. The behavior and polarized phenotype of tissue macrophages are distinct between young and old organisms. The balance of M1 and M2 macrophages is altered in the aged tissue microenvironment, with a tilt towards an M2-dominant macrophage population, as well as its associated signaling pathways. These M2-type responses may result in unresolved inflammation and create an environment that impairs wound healing and is favorable for cancer growth. We discuss the concept that exercise training can improve the regulation of macrophage polarization and normalize the inflammatory process, and thereby exert anticancer effects and enhance wound healing in older humans. PMID:24932991

  13. Breast cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Crivellari, Diana; Aapro, Matti; Leonard, Robert; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Brain, Etienne; Goldhirsch, Aron; Veronesi, Andrea; Muss, Hyman

    2007-05-10

    Screening and adjuvant postoperative therapies have increased survival among women with breast cancer. These tools are seldom applied in elderly patients, although the usually reported incidence of breast cancer is close to 50% in women 65 years or older, reaching 47% after 70 years in the updated Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Elderly breast cancer patients, even if in good medical health, were frequently excluded from adjuvant clinical trials. Women age 70 years who are fit actually have a median life expectancy of 15.5 years, ie, half of them will live much longer and will remain exposed for enough time to the potentially preventable risks of a relapse and specific death. In the last few years, a new concern about this issue has developed. Treatment now faces two major end points, as in younger women: to improve disease-free survival in the early stages, and to palliate symptoms in advanced disease. However, in both settings, the absolute benefit of treatment is critical because protecting quality of life and all its related aspects (especially functional status and independence), is crucial in older persons who have more limited life expectancy. Furthermore, the new hormonal compounds (aromatase inhibitors) and chemotherapeutic drugs (capecitabine, liposomal doxorubicin), are potentially less toxic than and equally as effective as older more established therapies. These new treatments bring new challenges including higher cost, and defining their benefit in elderly breast cancer must include an analysis of the cost/benefit ratio. These issues emphasize the urgent need to develop and support clinical trials for this older population of breast cancer patients both in the adjuvant and metastatic settings, a move that will take us from a prejudiced, age-based medicine to an evidence-based medicine. PMID:17488987

  14. Paternal aging and increased risk of congenital disease, psychiatric disorders, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Conti, Simon L; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    As couples are increasingly delaying parenthood, the effect of the aging men and women on reproductive outcomes has been an area of increased interest. Advanced paternal age has been shown to independently affect the entire spectrum of male fertility as assessed by reductions in sperm quality and fertilization (both assisted and unassisted). Moreover, epidemiological data suggest that paternal age can lead to higher rates of adverse birth outcomes and congenital anomalies. Mounting evidence also suggests increased risk of specific pediatric and adult disease states ranging from cancer to behavioral traits. While disease states associated with advancing paternal age have been well described, consensus recommendations for neonatal screening have not been as widely implemented as have been with advanced maternal age. PMID:26975491

  15. Paternal aging and increased risk of congenital disease, psychiatric disorders, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Simon L; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    As couples are increasingly delaying parenthood, the effect of the aging men and women on reproductive outcomes has been an area of increased interest. Advanced paternal age has been shown to independently affect the entire spectrum of male fertility as assessed by reductions in sperm quality and fertilization (both assisted and unassisted). Moreover, epidemiological data suggest that paternal age can lead to higher rates of adverse birth outcomes and congenital anomalies. Mounting evidence also suggests increased risk of specific pediatric and adult disease states ranging from cancer to behavioral traits. While disease states associated with advancing paternal age have been well described, consensus recommendations for neonatal screening have not been as widely implemented as have been with advanced maternal age. PMID:26975491

  16. Comparing Trends in Cancer Rates Across Overlapping Regions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Tiwari, Ram C.

    2008-01-01

    Monitoring and comparing trends in cancer rates across geographic regions or over different time periods has been one main task of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program as it profiles health care quality as well as decides health care resource allocations within a spatial-temporal framework. A fundamental difficulty, however, arises when such comparisons have to be made for regions or time intervals that overlap, e.g. comparing the change in trends of mortality rates in a local area (e.g. the mortality rate of Breast Cancer in California) with a more global level (i.e. the national mortality rate of Breast Cancer). In view of sparsity of available methodologies, this paper develops a simple corrected Z-test that accounts for such overlapping. The performance of the proposed test over the two-sample “pooled” t-test that assumes independence across comparison groups is assessed via the Pitman asymptotic relative efficiency as well as Monte Carlo simulations and applications to the SEER cancer data. The proposed test will be important for the SEER*STAT software, maintained by the NCI, for the analysis of the SEER data. PMID:18371122

  17. A survey of cancer and occupation in young and middle aged men. I. Cancers of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed Central

    Coggon, D; Pannett, B; Osmond, C; Acheson, E D

    1986-01-01

    In a search for clues to previously industrial carcinogens the occupational and smoking histories of young and middle aged men with different types of cancer were compared. The study population comprised men aged 18-54 and resident in the counties of Cleveland, Humberside, and Cheshire (including the Wirral). From hospital and cancer registration records 2942 members of the study population in whom cancers were diagnosed during the period 1975-80 were identified retrospectively. The occupational and smoking histories of these patients were sought by a postal questionnaire addressed either to the patients themselves or, if they had died, to their next of kin. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 52.1%. Additionally, limited occupational information was obtained for 89% of cases from their hospital notes. Analysis of these data suggests that no serious bias arose as a consequence of the incomplete response to the questionnaire. This paper concentrates on the results for cancers of the respiratory tract and mesothelioma. Mesothelioma was found to cluster in laggers, electricians, and shipyard workers, and nasal carcinoma in woodworkers. Carcinomas of the larynx and of the bronchus were examined by formal statistical techniques, each being compared with a control group made up of all other cancers combined. Several interesting occupational and industrial associations were shown, in particular, an excess of bronchial carcinoma in the leather industry (RR = 2.6, CI 1.2-6.0), in building labourers (RR = 1.7, CI 1.0-2.9) and other construction workers (RR = 1.8, CI 1.0-3.0), in bakers and pastry cooks (RR = 3.6, CI 1.3-10.4). and in cooks (RR = 2.5, CI 1.2-5.1). In addition, a small cluster of lung tumours was observed in men who had worked as dental mechanics. PMID:3707871

  18. Prognostic significance and optimal cutoff of age in medullary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-long; Li, Duan-shu; Wang, Yu; Huang, Cai-ping; Ji, Qing-hai

    2016-01-01

    Age has been found to correlate with the prognosis for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). This study was conducted to investigate whether age can predict long-term unfavorable prognosis and evaluate its predictive accuracy associated with TNM staging, using data of patients diagnosed with MTC between 2000 and 2010 from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database. The relationship between the patients’ age at diagnosis and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was evaluated using multivariate Cox regression analysis. Age stratifications were combined into a nomogram model to predict the CSS of MTC. The X-tile program determined 49 and 69 as optimal age cutoff values for CSS. On multivariate analysis, independent factors for survival were age (50–69 years, HR 2.853, 95% CI 1.631–4.991; ≥70 years, HR 5.804, 95% CI 2.91–11.555), race (white, HR 0.344, 95% CI 0.188–0.630), T (T3/4, HR 3.931, 95% CI 2.093–7.381), N (N1a, HR 3.269, 95% CI 1.386–7.710) and M (M1, HR 3.998, 95% CI 2.419–6.606). The C-index for CSS prediction with TNM, age (cutoff of 45)/sex/race/TNM and age (cutoff of 49 and 69)/sex/race/TNM were 0.832 (95% CI 0.763–0.901), 0.863 (95% CI 0.799–0.928), and 0.876 (95% CI 0.817–0.935), respectively. Subgroup multivariate analyses also showed that age significantly increased the risk for CSS in females, non-Hispanic white patients, and those with stage IV MTC. In conclusion, CSS was independently associated with ages between 49 and 69 years, which might be applied for risk stratification in MTC patients. PMID:26910117

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae pharyngeal colonization in school-age children and adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Preti, Valentina; Gaspari, Stefania; Colombini, Antonella; Zecca, Marco; Terranova, Leonardo; Cefalo, Maria Giuseppina; Ierardi, Valentina; Pelucchi, Claudio; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Patients with cancer, particularly those with hematologic malignancies, are at an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and they are included in the list of subjects for whom pneumococcal vaccination is recommended. The main aim of this study was to evaluate Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in school-aged children and adolescents with cancer to determine the potential protective efficacy of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). An oropharyngeal swab was obtained from 277 patients (age range 6-17 years) with cancer during routine clinical visits and analyzed for S. pneumoniae using real-time polymerase chain reaction. S. pneumoniae was identified in 52 patients (18.8%), including 47/235 (20.0%) with hematologic malignancies and 5/42 (11.9%) with solid tumors. Colonization declined significantly with an increase in age (odds ratio [OR] 0.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.71, and OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.11-0.82 in children aged 10-14 and ≥15 years, respectively, as compared to those <10 years). Carriage was more common among patients with leukemia or lymphoma than in children with solid tumors. Co-trimoxazole prophylaxis was significantly associated with reduced pneumococcal carriage (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19-0.89). A total of 15/58 (25.9%) and 26/216 (12.0%) children were colonized by PCV13 serotypes among cancer patients previously vaccinated and not vaccinated with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), respectively. In conclusion, this study indicates that children and adolescents with cancer are frequently colonized by S. pneumoniae. Because most of the carried serotypes are included in PCV13, this vaccine is presently the best solution to reduce the risk of IPD in these patients. PMID:26367101

  20. [Cancer of the larynx in patients under 40 years of age].

    PubMed

    Kozuch-Gdak, W; Peszyński, J; Boguszewska, D

    1990-01-01

    440 patients with the plano-epithelial laryngeal cancer were radically treated by radiotherapy in Oncologic Department ZOZ in Lublin during the years 1976-1985. Among them were 23 (5.2%) "young" patients, aged below 40. In this group 10 patients (43%) revealed the first grade of clinical stage of the disease, whereas in remaining material there were 25% of cases in the first grade. The therapeutic effects in "young" group were the same as in the rest of cases. The percentage of "young" cancer patients became greater during the time: in 1976-80-4.1%, in 1981-85-6.1%. PMID:2255555

  1. CAM Provider Use and Expenditures by Cancer Treatment Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lafferty, William E.; Tyree, Patrick T.; Devlin, Sean M.; Andersen, M. Robyn; Diehr, Paula K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess cancer patients’ utilization of complementary and alternative medical providers and the associated expenditures by specific treatment phases. Study Design Cross-sectional analysis of medical services utilization and expenditures during three therapeutic intervals: an initial treatment phase, continuing care, and end-of-life. Methods Analysis of an insurance claims database that had been matched to the Washington State SEER cancer registry. Results Of 2,900 registry-matched cancer patients 63.2% were female, the median age was 54 years, and 92.7% were white. Breast cancer was the most frequent diagnosis (52.7%), followed by prostate cancer (24.7%), lung cancer (10.1%), colon cancer (7.0%), and hematologic malignancies (5.6%). CAM provider using patients were 26.5% of the overall cohort (18.5% used chiropractors, 7.7% naturopathic physicians, 5.3% massage therapists, and 4.2% saw acupuncturists). The proportion of CAM using patients was similar during each treatment phase. All patients used some conventional care. Female gender, a breast cancer diagnosis, age, and white race were significant predictors of CAM use. Diagnosis of a musculoskeletal problem occurred at sometime during the study for 72.1% of cancer patients. CAM provider visits were 7.2% of total outpatient medical visits and 85.1% of CAM visits resulted in a musculoskeletal diagnosis. Expenditures for CAM providers were 0.3%, 1.0%, and 0.1% of all expenditures during the initial, continuing, and end-of-life phases respectively. Conclusion For cancer patients, musculoskeletal issues were the most commonly listed diagnosis made by a CAM provider. Although expenditures associated with CAM are a small proportion of the total, additional studies are necessary to determine the importance patients place on access to these services. PMID:18471036

  2. Factors associated with cervical cancer screening amongst women of reproductive age from Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Conde-Ferraez, Laura; Suarez Allen, Rosa Etelvina; Carrillo Martinez, Jorge Ramiro; Ayora-Talavera, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Losa, Maria Del Refugio

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the participation of women of reproductive age in a cancer screening program, and survey reasons for non-screening in a region from Mexico with high cervical cancer mortality. A total of 281 obstetric patients from a previous HPV study in a social security hospital during 2008-2009 were included. Reasons for not participating in the screening were directly asked. HPV positive patients were invited to participate in an informative workshop, and they filled in a knowledge questionnaire. The women ranged in age from 14-47 years; 123 (43.8%) had never participated in screening, of which 97 (78.9%) had their first sexual intercourse 2 to 10 years ago, resulting in 25% HPV positive. Screening history was strongly associated with 2 or more gestations (OR= 10.07, p=0.00) and older age (OR=6.69 p=0.00). When 197 women were contacted and interviewed, reasons referred for non-screening were ignorance, lack of interest or time, recent sexual onset, shame and fear. More than 50% of the workshop participants showed knowledge of HPV, while 38.9% and 25% knew about Pap smear and cervical cancer. A high percentage of women of reproductive age have never had a Pap smear. Promoting the screening program in medical facilities seems to be important in this population. New approaches to inform vulnerable individuals on the benefits of screening need to be implemented, especially for young women. PMID:23167409

  3. Age-based computer-aided diagnosis approach for pancreatic cancer on endoscopic ultrasound images

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Murat; Cakiroglu, Murat; Kocaman, Orhan; Kurt, Mevlut; Yilmaz, Bulent; Can, Guray; Korkmaz, Ugur; Dandil, Emre; Eksi, Ziya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to develop a high-performance computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system with image processing and pattern recognition in diagnosing pancreatic cancer by using endosonography images. Materials and Methods: On the images, regions of interest (ROI) of three groups of patients (<40, 40-60 and >60) were extracted by experts; features were obtained from images using three different techniques and were trained separately for each age group with an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to diagnose cancer. The study was conducted on endosonography images of 202 patients with pancreatic cancer and 130 noncancer patients. Results: 122 features were identified from the 332 endosonography images obtained in the study, and the 20 most appropriate features were selected by using the relief method. Images classified under three age groups (in years; <40, 40-60 and >60) were tested via 200 random tests and the following ratios were obtained in the classification: accuracy: 92%, 88.5%, and 91.7%, respectively; sensitivity: 87.5%, 85.7%, and 93.3%, respectively; and specificity: 94.1%, 91.7%, and 88.9%, respectively. When all the age groups were assessed together, the following values were obtained: accuracy: 87.5%, sensitivity: 83.3%, and specificity: 93.3%. Conclusions: It was observed that the CAD system developed in the study performed better in diagnosing pancreatic cancer images based on classification by patient age compared to diagnosis without classification. Therefore, it is imperative to take patient age into consideration to ensure higher performance. PMID:27080608

  4. Glycative stress from advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and dicarbonyls: An emerging biological factor in cancer onset and progression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jer-An; Wu, Chi-Hao; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Hsia, Shih-Min; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, glycative stress from exogenous or endogenous advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and highly reactive dicarbonyls has gained great attention for its putative effects on cancer development. AGEs are a group of compounds formed from the complex chemical reaction of reducing sugars with compounds containing an amino group. AGEs bind to and activate the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), which is a predominant modulator of inflammation-associated cancer, and AGEs induce reactive oxygen species that are an important regulator of the hallmarks of cancer. Dicarbonyls, which are formed during glycolysis, lipid oxidation, or protein degradation, include glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone and are regarded as major precursors of AGEs. These dicarbonyls not only fuel the AGE pool in living organisms but also evoke carbonyl stress, which may contribute to the carbonylative damage of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, or DNA. Carbonylative damage then leads to many lesions, some of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, studies regarding the effects of AGEs and dicarbonyls on cancer onset or progression are systematically discussed, and the utilization of AGE inhibitors and dicarbonyl scavengers in cancer therapy are noted. PMID:26774083

  5. Pattern of malignancies in children <15 years of age reported in Hadhramout Cancer Registry, Yemen between 2002 and 2014

    PubMed Central

    Jawass, Mazin A.; Al-Ezzi, Jalil I.; Gouth, Hanan S. Bin; Bahwal, Saleh A.; Bamatraf, Fawzia F.; Ba’amer, Abubakir A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the patterns of childhood cancers in Hadhramout Sector, Yemen between January 2002 and December 2014. Methods: This descriptive retrospective study was based on secondary data from Hadhramout Cancer Registry, Hadhramout, Yemen. All Yemeni children under age of 15 years, who were diagnosed with cancer were included. The International Childhood Cancer Classification system was used to categorize cancer types. Results: A total of 406 childhood cancers of both gender <15 years of age were reported. These represented 8.5% of all cases registered. The mean age was 7.34 ± 4.18 years. There were 240 males (59.1%) and 166 females (40.9%) with a male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Calculated incidence of cancer in children in this population is 1.9 per 100,000. The predominant age group was 5-9 years (35%) followed by 10-14 years (33.7%), and 0-4 years group (31%). The most common group of malignancies were hematological malignancies accounting for 47% of cases, followed by nervous system malignancies (15%). The most frequently reported cancer types were lymphoma (24%), leukemia (23%), carcinoma (13.1%), and central nervous system (CNS) tumors (11.6%). Conclusions: There is a lower frequency of childhood cancer in Hadhramout Sector when compared with developed countries. The most common cancers among children were lymphoma, leukemia, carcinoma, and CNS tumors. PMID:27146613

  6. Tai Ji Quan for the aging cancer survivor: Mitigating the accelerated development of disability, falls, and cardiovascular disease from cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Winters-Stone, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are more than 13.7 million cancer survivors living in the U.S., and that figure is projected to increase by 31% in the next decade, adding another 4 million cancer survivors into the healthcare system. Cancer is largely a disease of aging, and the aging of the population will sharply raise the proportion of older cancer survivors, many of whom will be long-term survivors (5+ years post diagnosis). This review will address the potential utility of exercise to address three health problems that are of particular concern for the aging cancer survivor and the healthcare system, i.e., disability, falls, and cardiovascular disease, because the development of these age-related problems may be accelerated by cancer treatment. While there are many different modes of exercise that each produce specific adaptations, Tai Ji Quan may be a particularly suitable strategy to mitigate the development of age- and cancer-treatment-related problems. Based on studies in older adults without cancer, Tai Ji Quan produces musculoskeletal and cardiometabolic adaptations and is more easily performed by older adults due to its low energy cost and slower movement patterns. Since cancer survivors are mostly older, inactive, and often physically limited by the lingering side effects of treatment, they need to engage in safe, practical, and effective modes of exercise. The dearth of published controlled trials examining the efficacy of Tai Ji Quan to mitigate cancer-treatment-related musculoskeletal and cardiovascular side effects points to ample research opportunities to explore the application of this non-Western exercise modality to improve long-term outcomes for aging cancer survivors. PMID:25285233

  7. A Population-based Study of Age Inequalities in Access to Palliative Care Among Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Frederick I.; Lawson, Beverley J.; Johnston, Grace M.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Background Inequalities in access to palliative care programs (PCP) by age have been shown to exist in Canada and elsewhere. Few studies have been able to provide greater insight by simultaneously adjusting for multiple demographic, health service, and socio-cultural indicators. Objective To re-examine the relationship between age and registration to specialized community-based PCP programs among cancer patients and identify the multiple indicators contributing to these inequalities. Methods This retrospective, population-based study was a secondary data analysis of linked individual level information extracted from 6 administrative health databases and contextual (neighborhood level) data from provincial and census information. Subjects included all adults who died due to cancer between 1998 and 2003 living within 2 District Health Authorities in the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. The relationship between registration in a PCP and age was examined using hierarchical nonlinear regression modeling techniques. Identification of potential patient and ecologic contributing indicators was guided by Andersen’s conceptual model of health service utilization. Results Overall, 66% of 7511 subjects were registered with a PCP. Older subjects were significantly less likely than those <65 years of age to be registered with a PCP, in particular those aged 85 years and older (adjusted odds ratio: 0.4; 95% confidence interval: 0.3–0.5). Distance to the closest cancer center had a major impact on registration. Conclusions Age continues to be a significant predictor of PCP registration in Nova Scotia even after controlling for the confounding effects of many new demographic, health service, and ecologic indicators. PMID:19300309

  8. Hypothesis: cell signalling influences age-related risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina L

    2015-01-01

    We propose that ageing is linked to colonic carcinogenesis through crosstalk between Wnt activity and signalling pathways related to ageing and senescence: progerin, klotho and mTOR. Mutations in the Wnt signalling pathway are responsible for the majority of colorectal cancers (CRCs); however, hyperactivation of Wnt signalling by butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fibre, induces CRC cell apoptosis. This effect of butyrate may in part explain the protective action of fibre against CRC. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature ageing disorder caused by accumulation of the progerin protein; however, healthy individuals also produce progerin in the course of their normal ageing. Progerin activates expression of the Wnt inhibitors HES1 and TLE1. Thus, we hypothesize that with age, the increasing expression of progerin suppresses butyrate-mediated Wnt hyperactivation and apoptosis, leading to increased CRC risk. Wild-type klotho contributes to a significantly increased lifespan; however, Klotho gene variants differ significantly between newborns and elderly. Klotho inhibits basal Wnt signalling activity; thus, the protein may function as a tumour suppressor for CRC. However, similar to progerin, klotho variants associated with lifespan differences may repress butyrate-mediated Wnt hyperactivation, and thus increase the risk of CRC. Finally, mTOR signalling has also been linked to human ageing, and crosstalk between Wnt and mTOR signalling may influence colonic tumourigenesis. Understanding how progerin, klotho and mTOR link ageing with colonic neoplastic development may lead to novel preventive and therapeutic strategies against CRC associated with age. PMID:25388238

  9. Telomerase gene therapy in adult and old mice delays aging and increases longevity without increasing cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes de Jesus, Bruno; Vera, Elsa; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Tejera, Agueda M; Ayuso, Eduard; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in aging research is to improve health during aging. In the case of mice, genetic manipulations that shorten or lengthen telomeres result, respectively, in decreased or increased longevity. Based on this, we have tested the effects of a telomerase gene therapy in adult (1 year of age) and old (2 years of age) mice. Treatment of 1- and 2-year old mice with an adeno associated virus (AAV) of wide tropism expressing mouse TERT had remarkable beneficial effects on health and fitness, including insulin sensitivity, osteoporosis, neuromuscular coordination and several molecular biomarkers of aging. Importantly, telomerase-treated mice did not develop more cancer than their control littermates, suggesting that the known tumorigenic activity of telomerase is severely decreased when expressed in adult or old organisms using AAV vectors. Finally, telomerase-treated mice, both at 1-year and at 2-year of age, had an increase in median lifespan of 24 and 13%, respectively. These beneficial effects were not observed with a catalytically inactive TERT, demonstrating that they require telomerase activity. Together, these results constitute a proof-of-principle of a role of TERT in delaying physiological aging and extending longevity in normal mice through a telomerase-based treatment, and demonstrate the feasibility of anti-aging gene therapy. PMID:22585399

  10. The identification of age-associated cancer markers by an integrative analysis of dynamic DNA methylation changes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Jingyu; Xiao, Xingjun; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Fang; Li, Song; Wen, Yanhua; Wei, Yanjun; Su, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yunming; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most widely studied epigenetic modifications, DNA methylation has an important influence on human traits and cancers. Dynamic variations in DNA methylation have been reported in malignant neoplasm and aging; however, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. By constructing an age-associated and cancer-related weighted network (ACWN) based on the correlation of the methylation level and the protein-protein interaction, we found that DNA methylation changes associated with age were closely related to the occurrence of cancer. Additional analysis of 102 module genes mined from the ACWN revealed discrimination based on two main patterns. One pattern involved methylation levels that increased with aging and were higher in cancer patients compared with normal controls (HH pattern). The other pattern involved methylation levels that decreased with aging and were lower in cancer compared with normal (LL pattern). Upon incorporation with gene expression levels, 25 genes were filtered based on negative regulation by DNA methylation. These genes were regarded as potential cancer risk markers that were influenced by age in the process of carcinogenesis. Our results will facilitate further studies regarding the impact of the epigenetic effects of aging on diseases and will aid in the development of tailored cancer preventive strategies. PMID:26949191

  11. The identification of age-associated cancer markers by an integrative analysis of dynamic DNA methylation changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Jingyu; Xiao, Xingjun; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Fang; Li, Song; Wen, Yanhua; Wei, Yanjun; Su, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yunming; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most widely studied epigenetic modifications, DNA methylation has an important influence on human traits and cancers. Dynamic variations in DNA methylation have been reported in malignant neoplasm and aging; however, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. By constructing an age-associated and cancer-related weighted network (ACWN) based on the correlation of the methylation level and the protein-protein interaction, we found that DNA methylation changes associated with age were closely related to the occurrence of cancer. Additional analysis of 102 module genes mined from the ACWN revealed discrimination based on two main patterns. One pattern involved methylation levels that increased with aging and were higher in cancer patients compared with normal controls (HH pattern). The other pattern involved methylation levels that decreased with aging and were lower in cancer compared with normal (LL pattern). Upon incorporation with gene expression levels, 25 genes were filtered based on negative regulation by DNA methylation. These genes were regarded as potential cancer risk markers that were influenced by age in the process of carcinogenesis. Our results will facilitate further studies regarding the impact of the epigenetic effects of aging on diseases and will aid in the development of tailored cancer preventive strategies. PMID:26949191

  12. Aged garlic extract prevents a decline of NK cell number and activity in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hideki; Saeki, Tomoko; Otani, Toru; Suzuki, Takaichiro; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Nishino, Hoyoku; Fukuda, Sanae; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2006-03-01

    Aged garlic extract (AGE) has manifold biological activities including immunomodulative and antioxidative effects. It is used as a major component of nonprescription tonics and cold-prevention medicines or dietary supplements. Advanced-cancer patients decline in immune functions and quality of life (QOL). The study's subjects were patients with inoperable colorectal, liver, or pancreatic cancer. In a randomized double-blind trial, AGE was administered to one group and a placebo was administered to another for 6 mo. The primary endpoint was a QOL questionnaire based on the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT). The subendpoints were changes in the natural-killer (NK) cell activity the salivary cortisol level from before and after administering AGE. Out of 55 patients invited to participate in the trial, 50 (91%) consented to enroll. They consisted of 42 patients with liver cancer (84%), 7 patients with pancreatic cancer (14%), and 1 patient with colon cancer (2%). Drug compliance was relatively good in both the AGE and placebo groups. Although no difference was observed in QOL, both the number of NK cells and the NK cell activity increased significantly in the AGE group. No adverse effect was observed in either group. The study showed that administering AGE to patients with advanced cancer of the digestive system improved NK cell activity, but caused no improvement in QOL. PMID:16484572

  13. Variation in Positron Emission Tomography Use After Colon Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christina E.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y. Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D.; Chang, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. Patients and Methods: We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. Conclusion: PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. PMID:25852143

  14. Outcomes and Tolerability of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Aged 75 Years or Older

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, David T.; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review the outcomes and tolerability of full-dose chemoradiation in elderly patients aged 75 years or older with localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed patients aged 75 years or older with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy at two institutions from 2002 to 2007. Patients were analyzed for treatment toxicity, local recurrences, distant metastases, and survival. Results: A total of 42 patients with a median age of 78 years (range, 75-90 years) who received chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer were identified. Of the patients, 24 had locally advanced disease treated with definitive chemoradiation, and 18 had disease treated with surgery and chemoradiation. Before chemoradiotherapy, the mean Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1.0 {+-} 0.8, and the mean 6-month weight loss was 5.3 {+-} 3.8 kg. The mean radiation dose delivered was 48.1 {+-} 9.2 Gy. All patients received fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. In all, 8 patients (19%) were hospitalized, 7 (17%) had an emergency room visit, 15 (36%) required a radiation treatment break, 3 (7%) required a chemotherapy break, 9 (21%) did not complete therapy, and 22 (49%) had at least one of these adverse events. The most common toxicities were nausea, pain, and failure to thrive. Median overall survival was 8.6 months (95% confidence interval, 7.2-13.1) in patients who received definitive chemoradiation therapy and 20.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.5-{infinity}) in patients who underwent resection and chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: In this dataset of very elderly patients with pancreatic cancer and good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, outcomes after chemoradiotherapy were similar to those among historic controls for patients with locally advanced and resected pancreatic cancer, although many patients experienced substantial treatment

  15. DNA repair, insulin signaling and sirtuins: at the crossroads between cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2008-01-01

    For many years organismal aging and cancer were viewed as separate entities. Recent studies however have suggested that these two seemingly disparate biological processes may in fact share common biochemical pathways. One area of emerging convergence involves the intersection of pathways known to mediate DNA repair with pathways previously implicated in insulin signaling. Recent evidence suggests that the sirtuin family of proteins act as central mediators of this molecular crosstalk. The coordination of DNA repair with overall energy balance may be essential for reducing the risk of developing cancer as well as for determining the rate at which we age. This review will summarize our current knowledge on how the maintenance of genomic integrity and insulin signaling intersect, the potential regulation of sirtuins in this crosstalk, and how this coordinated regulation may have important implication for both tumor-free and overall survival. PMID:18508709

  16. Prevalence of aging population in the Middle East and its implications on cancer incidence and care

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, R. R.; Atli, T.; Al-Mandhari, Z.; Oudrhiri, M.; Balducci, L.; Silbermann, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Middle Eastern population is aging rapidly, and as aging is the main risk factor for cancer, the incidence and prevalence of that disease are increasing among all the populations in the region. These developments represent huge challenges to national and community-based health services. At the current state of affairs, most Middle Eastern countries require the cooperation of international agencies in order to cope with such new challenges to their health systems. The focus and emphasis in facing these changing circumstances lie in the education and training of professionals, mainly physicians and nurses, at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels of health services. It is imperative that these training initiatives include clinical practice, with priority given to the creation of multidisciplinary teams both at the cancer centers and for home-based services. PMID:24001758

  17. Cancer Survivorship Issues: Life After Treatment and Implications for an Aging Population

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Julia H.; Bellizzi, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    The US population of cancer survivors age ≥ 65 years will continue to grow rapidly over the next few decades. This growth will be driven largely by the aging of the national population. With the diffusion of earlier detection and more effective therapies, the majority of these individuals can expect to live long term after diagnosis. This often vulnerable group of survivors poses significant challenges for both researchers and clinicians with regard to how best to document and address its unique health care needs. In this article, we briefly review the long-term and late-occurring effects of cancer and its treatment in older survivors, review information on current patterns of post-treatment care and the evolving guidelines for this care, and discuss opportunities for future research. PMID:25071099

  18. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  19. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk of malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation and branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts – the ability to alter epithelial differentiation – that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging. PMID:15657080

  20. Stage III Colon Cancer: The Individualized Strategy of Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Aged Under and Over 70

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chieh-Sheng; Chang, Ping-Ying; Chen, Yu-Guang; Chen, Jia-Hong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Ho, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the specific chemoregimens selected for adjuvant therapy in the patients with stage III colon cancer. We investigated the trends in chemotherapeutic prescribing patterns and looked for adequate therapeutic setting for these patients. Methods 288 patients presenting with stage III colon cancer and undergoing adjuvant therapies after curative surgery for more than 3-month were enrolled between January 2006 and December 2011. Demographic characteristics and therapeutic factors were analyzed, including age, gender, histological grade, tumor sizes, tumor location, pathologic stage, performance status, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, regimens selection, interval from the operation to the start of adjuvant therapy and prolonged adjuvant therapy. Kaplan– Meier methods were utilized for drawing survival curves and Cox model was used to analyze survival, prognostic factors. Results The analysis showed that the patients aged under 70 received more intensive therapies than those aged over 70 (P<0.001). Later, advanced analysis in therapeutic factors was conducted between the patients aged under 70 and those over 70. In the patients aged under 70, significant differences in 4-year overall survival (OS) were noted between UFUR (oral tegafur-uracil plus leucovorin) groups and FOLFOX (5-FU plus oxaliplatin) [65.6% versus (vs) 89.8%, relative risk (RR) 3.780, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.263–11.315, P = 0.017]. There were also differences in 4-year OS between these patients with and without oxaliplatin-contained regimens (92.1% vs 83.4%, respectively, RR 0.385, 95% CI 0.157–0.946, P = 0.037). In addition, the patients who received intravenous or combined therapy also had higher 4-year OS than those only received oral regimens (92.1% vs 76.6%, P = 0.077), though the finding did not reach statistical significance. In contrast to the survival benefits of above therapeutic settings for the patients aged under 70, there was less

  1. Prostate cancer and consistency of reporting sexual histories in men over age 50.

    PubMed

    Dennis, L K; Ritchie, J M; Resnick, M I

    2005-01-01

    We conducted an in-person interview to examine the reliability of reported sexual histories among men over age 50 y with and without prostate cancer. Marriage and cohabitation were used as memory cues to recall sexual activity. High correlations on test-retest for questions evaluating sexual histories suggest reliable answers for most factors, and specifically for age at first sexual activity, and lifetime number of sexual partners. Low correlations were seen for ill-defined and socially undesirable items. These data suggest that men consistently report most measures of sexual activity when using marriage and cohabitation as memory cues to recall sexual histories. PMID:15983628

  2. Age distribution types of bladder cancers and their relationship with opium consumption and smoking

    PubMed Central

    Aliramaji, Arsalan; Kaseean, Aliakbar; Yousefnia Pasha, Yousef Reza; Shafi, Hamid; Kamali, Sekineh; Safari, Mohsen; Moudi, Emaduddin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recognition of the predisposing factors of bladder cancer is very important and provides possible prevention measures. The aim of this study was to investigate the types, distribution of bladder tumors and their relationship with opium consumption and smoking in patients who referred to Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Babol, Iran. Methods: In this case-control study, all patients diagnosed with bladder cancer who underwent surgery during 2001-2012 were enrolled. The subjects of the control group were selected among the patients who underwent ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) for gallstone and had no tumors and genitourinary problems. Data regarding demographic, pathology reports and tumor type, smoking status, history of opium consumption and its duration were collected. Patients and controls were compared using t-test and chi-square test. SPSS software Version 20 was used for analysis. Results: In this study, 175 patients with an average age of 63.30±15.29 years and 175 age- matched controls were studied. A significant association was observed between smoking and opium consumption with bladder cancer (P=0.001 for both). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that opium consumption and smoking are associated with bladder cancer PMID:26221505

  3. Apoptosis: its origin, history, maintenance and the medical implications for cancer and aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-06-01

    Programmed cell death is a basic cellular mechanism. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death (called apoptosis in animals) occurs in both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes, and some apoptotic mechanisms are observed in bacteria. Endosymbiosis between mitochondria and eukaryotic cells took place early in the eukaryotic evolution, and some of the apoptotic-like mechanisms of mitochondria that were retained after this event now serve as parts of the eukaryotic apoptotic machinery. Apoptotic mechanisms have several functions in unicellular organisms: they include kin-selected altruistic suicide that controls population size, sharing common goods, and responding to viral infection. Apoptotic factors also have non-apoptotic functions. Apoptosis is involved in the cellular aging of eukaryotes, including humans. In addition, apoptosis is a key part of the innate tumor-suppression mechanism. Several anticancer drugs induce apoptosis, because apoptotic mechanisms are inactivated during oncogenesis. Because of the ancient history of apoptosis, I hypothesize that there is a deep relationship between mitochondrial metabolism, its role in aerobic versus anaerobic respiration, and the connection between apoptosis and cancer. Whereas normal cells rely primarily on oxidative mitochondrial respiration, most cancer cells use anaerobic metabolism. According to the Warburg hypothesis, the remodeling of the metabolism is one of the processes that leads to cancer. Recent studies indicate that anaerobic, non-mitochondrial respiration is particularly active in embryonic cells, stem cells, and aggressive stem-like cancer cells. Mitochondrial respiration is particularly active during the pathological aging of human cells in neurodegenerative diseases. According to the reversed Warburg hypothesis formulated by Demetrius, pathological aging is induced by mitochondrial respiration. Here, I advance the hypothesis that the stimulation of mitochondrial metabolism leads to pathological aging.

  4. Apoptosis: its origin, history, maintenance and the medical implications for cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Kaczanowski, Szymon

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a basic cellular mechanism. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death (called apoptosis in animals) occurs in both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes, and some apoptotic mechanisms are observed in bacteria. Endosymbiosis between mitochondria and eukaryotic cells took place early in the eukaryotic evolution, and some of the apoptotic-like mechanisms of mitochondria that were retained after this event now serve as parts of the eukaryotic apoptotic machinery. Apoptotic mechanisms have several functions in unicellular organisms: they include kin-selected altruistic suicide that controls population size, sharing common goods, and responding to viral infection. Apoptotic factors also have non-apoptotic functions. Apoptosis is involved in the cellular aging of eukaryotes, including humans. In addition, apoptosis is a key part of the innate tumor-suppression mechanism. Several anticancer drugs induce apoptosis, because apoptotic mechanisms are inactivated during oncogenesis. Because of the ancient history of apoptosis, I hypothesize that there is a deep relationship between mitochondrial metabolism, its role in aerobic versus anaerobic respiration, and the connection between apoptosis and cancer. Whereas normal cells rely primarily on oxidative mitochondrial respiration, most cancer cells use anaerobic metabolism. According to the Warburg hypothesis, the remodeling of the metabolism is one of the processes that leads to cancer. Recent studies indicate that anaerobic, non-mitochondrial respiration is particularly active in embryonic cells, stem cells, and aggressive stem-like cancer cells. Mitochondrial respiration is particularly active during the pathological aging of human cells in neurodegenerative diseases. According to the reversed Warburg hypothesis formulated by Demetrius, pathological aging is induced by mitochondrial respiration. Here, I advance the hypothesis that the stimulation of mitochondrial metabolism leads to pathological aging

  5. Body Fatness at Young Ages and Risk of Breast Cancer Throughout Life

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Heather J.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Willett, Walter C.

    2010-01-01

    Body fatness at young ages may be related to breast cancer risk independently of adult adiposity. The authors conducted a prospective analysis among 188,860 women (7,582 breast cancer cases) in the Nurses’ Health Study (1988–2004) and Nurses’ Health Study II (1989–2005) who recalled their body fatness at ages 5, 10, and 20 years using a 9-level pictogram (level 1: most lean; level 9: most overweight). Body fatness at young ages was inversely associated with risk of both premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer (per 1-unit increase in adolescent body fatness, relative risk (RR) = 0.88 and RR = 0.91, respectively; Ptrend < 0.0001). Among all women, the RR for adolescent body fatness of level 6.5 or higher versus level 1 was 0.57 (per 1-unit increase, RR = 0.90; Ptrend < 0.0001) and was unaffected by adjustment for current body mass index. The association was stronger for women with birth weights under 8.5 pounds (<3.9 kg) than for women with birth weights of 8.5 pounds or more (≥3.9 kg) (per 1-unit increase, RR = 0.89 and RR = 0.94, respectively; Pinteraction = 0.04) and stronger for estrogen receptor-negative tumors than for estrogen receptor-positive tumors (per 1-unit increase, RR = 0.86 and RR = 0.92, respectively; Pheterogeneity = 0.03). Body fatness at young ages has a strong and independent inverse relation to breast cancer risk throughout life. PMID:20460303

  6. Effect of Age and Race Upon Quality of Life of Young Breast Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, P.K.; Broxson, A.C.; Munsell, M.F.; Basen-Enquist, K.; Rosenblum, C.K.; Schover, L.R.; Nguyen, L.H.; Hsu, L.; Castillo, L.; Hahn, K.M.E.; Litton, J.K.; Mattair, D.M.; Hortobagyi, G.N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Given their early age of diagnosis, young breast cancer (BC) survivors face issues that differ widely from their older counterparts. Patients and Methods We mailed a survey to 2209 patients who were ≤45 years at time of BC diagnosis. Each survey was comprised of: the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors instrument, Menopause Symptom Scale, and questions aimed at obtaining pertinent background information. Results 1090 patients completed the survey. Mean age at time of diagnosis was 39.5 years; median years from diagnosis was 6.6 years. Distress related to vaginal dryness (p=0.0002) and pain from intercourse (p=0.0014) was significantly higher in patients who were <5 years from diagnosis, compared to those >10 years from diagnosis. In the area of financial problems, black women had greater distress than white women (p=0.0010). Compared to white women, Hispanic women had worse family distress scores (p=0.0028) and summary cancer specific scores (p=0.0076). Patients >10 years from diagnosis had poorer sexual interest (p=0.003) than women who were closer to diagnosis. Women ≥40 years at diagnosis had significantly lower sexual interest (p=0.0016) than women <40 years. Stage and neoadjuvant chemotherapy did not have a significant effect on QOL. Conclusion Even in comparison to stage and neoadjuvant chemotherapy, race, age at diagnosis, and time from diagnosis have significant long term effects on QOL following BC treatment. PMID:24461458

  7. Sirtuins and the Estrogen Receptor as Regulators of the Mammalian Mitochondrial UPR in Cancer and Aging.

    PubMed

    Germain, D

    2016-01-01

    By being both the source of ATP and the mediator of apoptosis, the mitochondria are key regulators of cellular life and death. Not surprisingly alterations in the biology of the mitochondria have implications in a wide array of diseases including cancer and age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration. To protect the mitochondria against damage the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) orchestrates several pathways, including the protein quality controls, the antioxidant machinery, oxidative phosphorylation, mitophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis. While several reports have implicated an array of transcription factors in the UPR(mt), most of the focus has been on studies of Caenorhabditis elegans, which led to the identification of ATFS-1, for which the mammalian homolog remains unknown. Meanwhile, there are studies which link the UPR(mt) to sirtuins and transcription factors of the Foxo family in both C. elegans and mammalian cells but those have been largely overlooked. This review aims at emphasizing the potential importance of these studies by building on the large body of literature supporting the key role of the sirtuins in the maintenance of the integrity of the mitochondria in both cancer and aging. Further, the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are known to confer protection against mitochondrial stress, and at least ERα has been linked to the UPR(mt). Considering the difference in gender longevity, this chapter also includes a discussion of the link between the ERα and ERβ and the mitochondria in cancer and aging. PMID:27037754

  8. Grow-ING, Age-ING and Die-ING: ING proteins link cancer, senescence and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Michael; Berardi, Philip; Gong Wei; Riabowol, Karl . E-mail: karl@ucalgary.ca

    2006-04-15

    The INhibitor of Growth (ING) family of plant homeodomain (PHD) proteins induce apoptosis and regulate gene expression through stress-inducible binding of phospholipids with subsequent nuclear and nucleolar localization. Relocalization occurs concomitantly with interaction with a subset of nuclear proteins, including PCNA, p53 and several regulators of acetylation such as the p300/CBP and PCAF histone acetyltransferases (HATs), as well as the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and hSir2. These interactions alter the localized state of chromatin compaction, subsequently affecting the expression of subsets of genes, including those associated with the stress response (Hsp70), apoptosis (Bax, MDM2) and cell cycle regulation (p21{sup WAF1}, cyclin B) in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. The expression levels and subcellular localization of ING proteins are altered in a significant number of human cancer types, while the expression of ING isoforms changes during cellular aging, suggesting that ING proteins may play a role in linking cellular transformation and replicative senescence. The variety of functions attributed to ING proteins suggest that this tumor suppressor serves to link the disparate processes of cell cycle regulation, cell suicide and cellular aging through epigenetic regulation of gene expression. This review examines recent findings in the ING field with a focus on the functions of protein-protein interactions involving ING family members and the mechanisms by which these interactions facilitate the various roles that ING proteins play in tumorigenesis, apoptosis and senescence.

  9. Mitochondrial Lon protease at the crossroads of oxidative stress, ageing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Pinti, Marcello; Gibellini, Lara; Liu, Yongzhang; Xu, Shan; Lu, Bin; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Lon protease is a nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial enzyme highly conserved throughout evolution, involved in the degradation of damaged and oxidized proteins of the mitochondrial matrix, in the correct folding of proteins imported in mitochondria, and in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. Lon expression is induced by various stimuli, including hypoxia and reactive oxygen species, and provides protection against cell stress. Lon down-regulation is associated with ageing and with cell senescence, while up-regulation is observed in tumour cells, and is correlated with a more aggressive phenotype of cancer. Lon up-regulation contributes to metabolic reprogramming observed in cancer, favours the switch from a respiratory to a glycolytic metabolism, helping cancer cell survival in the tumour microenvironment, and contributes to epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Silencing of Lon, or pharmacological inhibition of its activity, causes cell death in various cancer cells. Thus, Lon can be included in the growing class of proteins that are not responsible for oncogenic transformation, but that are essential for survival and proliferation of cancer cells, and that can be considered as a new target for development of anticancer drugs. PMID:26363553

  10. TMPRSS2-ERG fusions are strongly linked to young patient age in low-grade prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Steurer, Stefan; Mayer, Pascale Sophia; Adam, Meike; Krohn, Antje; Koop, Christina; Ospina-Klinck, Daniel; Tehrani, Ali Attarchi; Simon, Ronald; Tennstedt, Pierre; Graefen, Markus; Wittmer, Corinna; Brors, Benedikt; Plass, Christoph; Korbel, Jan; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Sauter, Guido; Huland, Hartwig; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Minner, Sarah; Schlomm, Thorsten

    2014-12-01

    Based on next-generation sequencing of early-onset prostate cancer (PCa), we earlier demonstrated that PCa in young patients is prone to rearrangements involving androgen-regulated genes-such as transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)-v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (ERG) fusion-and provided data suggesting that this situation might be caused by increased androgen signaling in younger men. In the same study, an accumulation of chromosomal deletions was found in cancers of elderly patients. To determine how age-dependent molecular features relate to cancer phenotype, an existing data set of 11,152 PCas was expanded by additional fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), 6q15 and 5q21. The results demonstrate that the decrease in TMPRSS2-ERG fusions with increasing patient age is limited to low-grade cancers (Gleason ≤3+4) and that the significant increase in the deletion frequency with age was strictly limited to ERG-negative cancers for 6q15 and 5q21 but to ERG-positive cancers for PTEN. These data suggest that the accumulation of non-androgen-linked genomic alterations with advanced patient age may require an appropriate microenvironment, such as a positive or negative ERG status. The strong link of ERG activation to young patient age and low-grade cancers may help to explain a slight predominance of low-grade cancers in young patients. PMID:25015038

  11. Age-Adjusted PSA Levels in Prostate Cancer Prediction: Updated Results of the Tyrol Prostate Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Isabel; Fritz, Josef; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Objective To reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies in patients with benign prostatic disease, however, without missing significant PCa the present study re-evaluates the age-dependent PSA cut-offs in the Tyrol Prostate Cancer (PCa) early detection program. Patients and Methods The study population included 2225 patients who underwent prostate biopsy due to elevated PSA levels at our department. We divided our patient collective into four age groups: ≤49 years (n = 178), 50-59 years (n = 597), 60-69 years (n = 962) and ≥70 years (n = 488). We simulated different scenarios for PSA cut-off values between 1.25 and 6 ng/mL and fPSA% between 15 and 21% for all four age groups and calculated sensitivity, specificity, confidence intervals and predictive values. Results PCa was detected in 1218 men (54.7%). We found that in combination with free PSA ≤21% the following PSA cut-offs had the best cancer specificity: 1.75 ng/ml for men ≤49 years and 50-59 years, 2.25 ng/ml for men aged 60-69 years and 3.25 ng/ml for men ≥70 years. Using these adjusted PSA cut-off values all significant tumors are recognized in all age groups, yet the number of biopsies is reduced. Overall, one biopsy is avoided in 13 to 14 men (number needed to screen = 13.3, reduction of biopsies = 7.5%) when decision regarding biopsy is done according to the “new” cut-off values instead of the “old” ones. For the different age groups the number needed to screen to avoid one biopsy varied between 9.2 (≤49 years) and 17.4 (50-59 years). Conclusion With “new”, fine-tuned PSA cut-offs we detect all relevant PCa with a significant reduction of biopsies compared to the “old” cut-off values. Optimization of age-specific PSA cut-offs is one step towards a smarter strategy in the Tyrol PCa Early Detection Program. PMID:26218594

  12. Trends in the Utilization of Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Kathy; Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony; Pintilie, Melania; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the trends in brachytherapy use in cervical cancer in the United States and to identify factors and survival benefits associated with brachytherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 7359 patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1988 and 2009. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between patients who received brachytherapy and those who did not from 2000 onward (after the National Cancer Institute alert recommending concurrent chemotherapy). Results: Sixty-three percent of the 7359 women received brachytherapy in combination with EBRT, and 37% received EBRT alone. The brachytherapy utilization rate has decreased from 83% in 1988 to 58% in 2009 (P<.001), with a sharp decline of 23% in 2003 to 43%. Factors associated with higher odds of brachytherapy use include younger age, married (vs single) patients, earlier years of diagnosis, earlier stage and certain SEER regions. In the propensity score-matched cohort, brachytherapy treatment was associated with higher 4-year cause-specific survival (CSS; 64.3% vs 51.5%, P<.001) and overall survival (OS; 58.2% vs 46.2%, P<.001). Brachytherapy treatment was independently associated with better CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.71), and OS (HR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.74). Conclusions: This population-based analysis reveals a concerning decline in brachytherapy utilization and significant geographic disparities in the delivery of brachytherapy in the United States. Brachytherapy use is independently associated with significantly higher CSS and OS and should be implemented in all feasible cases.

  13. Impact of Age and Comorbidity on Cervical and Breast Cancer Literacy of African Americans, Latina, and Arab women

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Costellia H.; Williams, Karen Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate and timely screening can significantly reduce breast and cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. Racial/ethnic minorities and immigrant populations have lower screening rates and delays in follow-up after abnormal tests. Purpose In this study, we examined the relationship between age, comorbidity, breast and cervical cancer literacy in a sample of African American, Latina, and Arab women (N=371) from Detroit, Michigan. Methods Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (ACC) was used characterize the impact of age and comorbidity has on breast and cervical cancer literacy; Breast Cancer Literacy Assessment Tool was used to assess breast cancer literacy; Cervical Cancer Literacy Assessment Tool was used to assess cervical cancer literacy. ANOVA was used to assess the relationship between ACC, breast and cervical cancer screening and group differences. Results There was a statistically significant difference between breast cancer literacy (Breast-CLAT total scores) scores (F(2,367)= 17.31, p= < 0.01). ACC had a greater impact on breast cancer literacy for African American F(2,214) =11, p = <0.01. PMID:26333609

  14. The Age Conundrum: A Scoping Review of Younger Age or Adolescent and Young Adult as a Risk Factor for Clinical Distress, Depression, or Anxiety in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michael J; David, Victoria; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2015-12-01

    This scoping review was conducted to understand the extent, range, and nature of current research on adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer and distress, depression, and anxiety (DDA). This information is necessary to find and aggregate valuable data on the AYA population embedded in generalized studies of DDA. Keyword searches of six relevant electronic databases identified 2156 articles, with 316 selected for abstract review and 40 for full text review. Full-text reviews and data extraction resulted in 34 studies being included, which ranged widely in design, sample size, age-range categorization, analysis methods, DDA measurement tool, overall study rigor, and quality of evidence. Studies very seldom reported using theory to guide their age categorization, with only four studies giving any rationale for their age-group definitions. All 34 studies found a significant association between at least one DDA construct and the younger age group relative to the older age groups at some point along the cancer trajectory. However, age as an independent risk factor for DDA is still unclear, as the relationship could be confounded by other age-related factors. Despite the wide range of definitions and effect sizes in the studies included in this review, one thing is clear: adolescents and young adults, however defined, are a distinct group within the cancer population with an elevated risk of DDA. Widespread adoption of a standard AYA age-range definition will be essential to any future meta-analytical psycho-oncology research in this population. PMID:26697266

  15. Metformin use and young age lung cancer: A case series report

    PubMed Central

    DENG, BO; WANG, YI; XIE, DONG; STODDARD, SHAWN M.; YANG, PING

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, a widely-prescribed antihyperglycemic drug for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-II), has been demonstrated to be antineoplastic in vivo and in vitro. However, various preclinical and epidemiological studies investigating the effects of metformin on lung cancer have obtained inconclusive results. The aim of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of metformin, for the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-II), on the onset of lung cancer. In the present study, the pathological features of ten consecutive young age lung cancer cases, aged between 15 and 45 years old at the time of diagnosis and exhibiting existing primary DM, were investigated using the Mayo Clinic Lung Cancer Cohort database. Amongst this cohort, there were 2 cases of DM type 1 (DM-I) and 8 cases of DM-II. Of these patients, two exhibiting adenocarcinoma and DM-II had not been administered metformin; however, 1 patient exhibiting lymphoma and 4 patients with pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) had been administered metformin at least 12 months prior to lung cancer diagnosis. The remaining 3 patients exhibiting NETs and DM-II had been treated with insulin therapy. The present study hypothesized that the high proportion of NETs observed in the cases of metformin-treated DM-II was unlikely to be a random event. It was suggested that metformin treatment was not effective in the prevention of pulmonary NETs, and that metformin may instead induce the occurrence of NETs via as yet unknown signaling pathways. The present hypothesis may potentially serve as a novel indicator for the requirement to monitor young patients with diabetes, who are being treated with metformin, for the occurrence of pulmonary NETs. PMID:27073573

  16. Survival After Solid Cancers in Antithrombotic Trials.

    PubMed

    Serebruany, Victor L; Tomek, Ales; Kim, Moo Hyun

    2015-09-15

    The impact of antithrombotics on cancer is currently under intense investigation because of the excess of solid cancers in trials after thienopyridines such as TRITON (prasugrel), DAPT (prasugrel and clopidogrel), PAR-1 thrombin antagonist in TRACER (vorapaxar), pyrimidines in PEGASUS (ticagrelor), and in APPRAISE-2 after apixaban. However, whether patient survival after solid cancer (SASC) in antithrombotic trials may be affected is unknown. We matched the 1-year SASC rate in antithrombotic trials reported by Food and Drug Administration with the census averages in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program by the US National Cancer Institute and World Health Organization (WHO) surveys. The Food and Drug Administration provided the SASC data for 3 trials with similar cancer survival of about 70% for the first year of follow-up in TRITON, APPRAISE-2, and ARISTOTEL. Adjusted cancers in TRITON with SEER (odds ratio 0.92; 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 1.59, p = 0.4351) and WHO (odds ratio 0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.57 to 1.7, p = 1.00) revealed very close if not identical SASC rates in antithrombotic trials compared to epidemiologic census estimates. In conclusion, SASC rates in patients enrolled in antithrombotic trials do not differ from SEER or World Health Organization averages. PMID:26189037

  17. Colorectal Cancer Screening in US Seniors Ages 76-84 Years.

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Carrie N; Shapiro, Jean A; Kobrin, Sarah; Nadel, Marion R; Zapka, Jane M

    2015-08-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends patient-physician discussions about the appropriateness of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among adults ages 76-84 years who have never been screened. In this study, we used data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey to examine patterns of CRC screening and provider recommendation among seniors ages 76-84 years, and made some comparisons to younger adults. Nationally-representative samples of 1379 adults ages 76-84 years and 8797 adults ages 50-75 years responded to questions about CRC screening status, receipt of provider recommendation, and discussion of test options; 22.7% (95% CI 20.1-25.3) of seniors ages 76-84 had never been tested for CRC and therefore were not up-to-date with guidelines; 3.9% (95% CI 2.0-7.6) of these individuals reported a recent provider recommendation for screening. In multivariate analyses, the likelihood of never having been tested was significantly greater for seniors of other/multiple race or Hispanic ethnicity; with high school or less education; without private health insurance coverage; who had ≤ 1 doctor visit in the past year; without recent screening for breast, cervical, or prostate cancer; with no or unknown CRC family history; or with ≤ 1 chronic disease. Among the minority of respondents ages 50-75 and 76-84 reporting a provider recommendation, 73.2% indicated that the provider recommended particular tests, which was overwhelmingly colonoscopy (≥ 89 %). Nearly one-quarter of adults 76-84 have never been screened for CRC, and rates of provider recommendation in this group are very low. Greater attention to informed CRC screening discussions with screening-eligible seniors is needed. PMID:25716518

  18. Mortality of breast cancer in Taiwan, 1971-2010: temporal changes and an age-period-cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Ho, M-L; Hsiao, Y-H; Su, S-Y; Chou, M-C; Liaw, Y-P

    2015-01-01

    The current paper describes the age, period and cohort effects on breast cancer mortality in Taiwan. Female breast cancer mortality data were collected from the Taiwan death registries for 1971-2010. The annual percentage changes, age- standardised mortality rates (ASMR) and age-period-cohort model were calculated. The mortality rates increased with advancing age groups when fixing the period. The percentage change in the breast cancer mortality rate increased from 54.79% at aged 20-44 years, to 149.78% in those aged 45-64 years (between 1971-75 and 2006-10). The mortality rates in the 45-64 age group increased steadily from 1971 to 1975 and 2006-10. The 1951 birth cohorts (actual birth cohort; 1947-55) showed peak mortalities in both the 50-54 and 45-49 age groups. We found that the 1951 birth cohorts had the greatest mortality risk from breast cancer. This might be attributed to the DDT that was used in large amounts to prevent deaths from malaria in Taiwan. However, future researches require DDT data to evaluate the association between breast cancer and DDT use. PMID:25020211

  19. AB044. AGE/RAGE/Akt pathway contributes to prostate cancer cell proliferation by promoting Rb phosphorylation and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jiming; Bao, Yawei; Zhao, Shanchao; He, Minyi; Luo, Haihua; Ren, Zhonglu; Lv, Yongjie; Hong, Yingqia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolomic research has revealed that metabolites play an important role in prostate cancer development and progression. Previous studies have suggested that prostate cancer cell proliferation is induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) exposure, but the mechanism of this induction remains unknown. This study aim to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the proliferative response of prostate cancer cell to the interaction of AGEs and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Methods To investigate this mechanism, we used Western blotting to evaluate the responses of the retinoblastoma (Rb), p-Rb and PI3K/Akt pathway to AGEs stimulation. We also examined the effect of knocking down Rb and blocking the PI3K/Akt pathway on AGEs induced PC-3 cell proliferation. Results Our results indicated that AGE-RAGE interaction enhanced Rb phosphorylation and subsequently decreased total Rb levels. Bioinformatics analysis further indicated a negative correlation between RAGE and RB1 expression in prostate cancer tissue. Furthermore, we observed that AGEs stimulation activated the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and that blocking PI3K/Akt signaling abrogated AGEs-induced cell proliferation. Conclusions We report, for the first time, that AGE-RAGE interaction enhances prostate cancer cell proliferation by phosphorylation of Rb via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  20. Colorectal cancer screening awareness and intentions among low income, sociodemographically diverse adults under age 50.

    PubMed

    Emmons, Karen; Puleo, Elaine; McNeill, Lorna H; Bennett, Gary; Chan, Sophia; Syngal, Sapna

    2008-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates in the US are suboptimal, particularly among lower income and racial/ethnically diverse groups. If specific populations have limited awareness of screening when they reach age 50, there may be delays in screening adoption. This study investigated sociodemographic and social contextual factors associated with awareness of CRC and intentions to be screened at age 50 among 692 low income, racial, and ethnic minority adults living in low income housing. The majority of respondents (62%) were between ages 30 and 49, and 94% had some form of health insurance (e.g., Medicaid). About 70% reported having heard about CRC screening; 66% reported intentions to be screened at age 50. In multivariable analyses, screening awareness was associated with age and education. Immigrants who had English as a second language had lower awareness. Females tended to have higher awareness if they had private insurance; there were no differences among males. Multivariable analyses found that screening intentions were higher among men, those with more role responsibilities, more role conflicts, and higher levels of social cohesion. It is important to identify opportunities for maximizing screening uptake among those who become age-eligible for screening if we are to make a significant impact on CRC disparities. PMID:18478340

  1. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  2. Lifestyle and reproductive risk factors associated with anal cancer in women aged over 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, K; Beral, V; Green, J; Reeves, G; Barnes, I

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anal cancer incidence increases with age and is higher in women than men. Risk factors in this group other than high-risk human papillomavirus infection are unclear. Methods: In all, 1.3 million women were recruited in 1996–2001 and followed for incident anal cancer. Cox regression models were used to calculate relative risks (RRs) for anal cancer by various potential risk factors. Results: Five hundred and seventeen incident anal cancers were registered over 13 years of follow-up. The largest RR was associated with a history of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN 3; RR=4.03, 95% CI 2.59–6.28). Other factors associated with significantly increased risks in multivariate analyses were: ever smoking (RR=1.49, 1.24–1.80); previous use of oral contraceptives (RR=1.51, 1.24–1.83); nulliparity (RR=1.61, 1.24–2.07); tubal ligation (RR=1.39, 1.13–1.70) and not living with a partner (RR=1.82, 1.40–2.38). The association with smoking was significantly greater for squamous cell carcinoma than adenocarcinoma of the anus (RR 1.66 vs 0.89, P for heterogeneity=0.04). Conclusions: History of CIN 3, smoking, past oral contraceptive use, nulliparity, tubal ligation and not living with a partner are risk factors for anal cancer in women. There was a significant increase in risk associated with smoking for squamous cell anal cancers but not adenocarcinomas. PMID:25867258

  3. Energy metabolism and metabolic sensors in stem cells: the metabostem crossroads of aging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    We are as old as our adult stem cells are; therefore, stem cell exhaustion is considered a hallmark of aging. Our tumors are as aggressive as the number of cancer stem cells (CSCs) they bear because CSCs can survive treatments with hormones, radiation, chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted drugs, thus increasing the difficulty of curing cancer. Not surprisingly, interest in stem cell research has never been greater among members of the public, politicians, and scientists. But how can we slow the rate at which our adult stem cells decline over our lifetime, reducing the regenerative potential of tissues, while efficiently eliminating the aberrant, life-threatening activity of "selfish", immortal, and migrating CSCs? Frustrated by the gene-centric limitations of conventional approaches to aging diseases, our group and other groups have begun to appreciate that bioenergetic metabolism, i.e., the production of fuel & building blocks for growth and division, and autophagy/mitophagy, i.e., the quality-control, self-cannibalistic system responsible for "cleaning house" and "recycling the trash", can govern the genetic and epigenetic networks that facilitate stem cell behaviors. Indeed, it is reasonable to suggest the existence of a "metabostem" infrastructure that operates as a shared hallmark of aging and cancer, thus making it physiologically plausible to maintain or even increase the functionality of adult stem cells while reducing the incidence of cancer and extending the lifespan. This "metabostemness" property could lead to the discovery of new drugs that reprogram cell metabotypes to increase the structural and functional integrity of adult stem cells and positively influence their lineage determination, while preventing the development and aberrant function of stem cells in cancer tissues. While it is obvious that the antifungal antibiotic rapamycin, the polyphenol resveratrol, and the biguanide metformin already belong to this new family of metabostemness

  4. DNA repair diseases: What do they tell us about cancer and aging?

    PubMed Central

    Menck, Carlos FM; Munford, Veridiana

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of DNA repair defects in human syndromes, initially in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) but later in many others, led to striking observations on the association of molecular defects and patients’ clinical phenotypes. For example, patients with syndromes resulting from defective nucleotide excision repair (NER) or translesion synthesis (TLS) present high levels of skin cancer in areas exposed to sunlight. However, some defects in NER also lead to more severe symptoms, such as developmental and neurological impairment and signs of premature aging. Skin cancer in XP patients is clearly associated with increased mutagenesis and genomic instability, reflecting the defective repair of DNA lesions. By analogy, more severe symptoms observed in NER-defective patients have also been associated with defective repair, likely involving cell death after transcription blockage of damaged templates. Endogenously induced DNA lesions, particularly through oxidative stress, have been identified as responsible for these severe pathologies. However, this association is not that clear and alternative explanations have been proposed. Despite high levels of exposure to intense sunlight, patients from tropical countries receive little attention or care, which likely also reflects the lack of understanding of how DNA damage causes cancer and premature aging. PMID:24764756

  5. [Metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: Systemic treatment of patients aged 70 and over].

    PubMed

    Quoix, Elisabeth; Ducoloné, Alain; Mennecier, Bertrand; Fraisse, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Patients aged 70 and over represent the third of the population of patients with lung cancer. There has been for a long time a certain nihilism regarding the treatment of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer as well from medical doctors but also from families and patients themselves with the false belief of an indolent course of the disease in elderly patients. As a result, clinical trials devoted to elderly patients were quite scarce until the end of the last decade. Nevertheless, an important trial was published in 1999 with the comparison of vinorelbine as a single agent versus best supportive care only in patients aged 70 and over with an advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The survival benefit with vinorelbine was important. Then two trials were published comparing monotherapy with either vinorelbine or gemcitabine to the doublet vinorelbine and gemcitabine without convincing results. As a consequence, the ASCO 2004 recommendations were to treat elderly patients with a monotherapy (gemcitabine or vinorelbine). Recently an IFCT trial was presented at the plenary session of the ASCO 2010. A carboplatin (every 4weeks)+weekly paclitaxel doublet was compared to a vinorelbine or gemcitabine (choice of the center). The survival benefit was of such magnitude that the paradigm of treatment of elderly patients PS 0-2 with advanced NSCLC should be modified in favor of the tested doublet. There should be a reappraisal of the geriatric indexes recommended by the oncogeriatricians regarding their exact prognostic or predictive role. PMID:21388776

  6. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico's cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico. PMID:26015805

  7. The challenge of cancer in middle-income countries with an ageing population: Mexico as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Unger-Saldaña, Karla; Lewison, Grant; Sullivan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is undergoing rapid population ageing as a result of its epidemiological transition. This study explores the interface between this rapid population ageing and the burden of cancer. The number of new cancer cases is expected to increase by nearly 75% by 2030 (107,000 additional cases per annum), with 60% of cases in the elderly (aged ≥ 65). A review of the literature was supplemented by a bibliometric analysis of Mexico’s cancer research output. Cancer incidence projections for selected sites were estimated with Globocan software. Data were obtained from recent national census, surveys, and cancer death registrations. The elderly, especially women and those living in rural areas, face high levels of poverty, have low rates of educational attainment, and many are not covered by health insurance schemes. Out of pocket payments and private health care usage remain high, despite the implementation of Seguro Popular that was designed to achieve financial protection for the lowest income groups. A number of cancers that predominate in elderly persons are not covered by the scheme and individuals face catastrophic expenditure in seeking treatment. There is limited research output in those cancer sites that have a high burden in the elderly Mexican population, especially research that focuses on outcomes. The elderly population in Mexico is vulnerable to the effects of the rising cancer burden and faces challenges in accessing high quality cancer care. Based on our evidence, we recommend that geriatric oncology should be an urgent public policy priority for Mexico. PMID:26015805

  8. Battling regional (stage III) lung cancer: bumpy road of a cancer survivor in the immunotherapy age.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhonglin; Biddinger, Paul; Schroeder, Carsten; Tariq, Khurram

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman, a heavy smoker, was diagnosed with stage III squamous cell lung cancer. She was treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, with partial response. 2 months later, she had haemoptysis caused by brisk bleeding from the radiated right upper lobe. Fortunately, her bleed was self-limited. 4 months later, a rapidly enlarging renal mass was discovered and turned out to be metastatic from the lung primary. Second-line chemotherapy with docetaxel and ramucirumab did not have effects on the renal mass after 2 cycles. Despite not being eligible for a durvalumab trial because of lack of PD-L1 expression, she had a meaningful response to nivolumab. Once every 2 weeks, infusion of nivolumab resulted in rapid tumour shrinkage in multiple areas. In the next few months, she experienced a variety of side effects, some of which were potentially life-threatening. She had disease progression 9 months into treatment. PMID:27389724

  9. Age-time patterns of radiogenic cancer risk: their nature and likely explanations.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Donald A

    2002-09-01

    It is important for both radiation protection and scientific reasons to understand the age-time patterns of radiation cancer risk. This is surprisingly difficult even for acute exposures and much more so for prolonged exposures. I shall provide current information on this for solid cancers among atomic-bomb survivors, pointing out some of the difficulties in description and interpretation. I shall then take up some stochastic considerations regarding accumulation of mutations, which may help in dealing with these difficulties. These considerations are highly idealised, and their consequences should mainly be used only for guidance rather than as a primary basis for descriptive analyses. They are particularly suitable for this because they provide insights fairly independent of parameter values in the stochastic models involved. PMID:12400964

  10. Designing exercise clinical trials for older adults with cancer: Recommendations from 2015 Cancer and Aging Research Group NCI U13 Meeting.

    PubMed

    Kilari, Deepak; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Presley, Carolyn J; Wildes, Tanya M; Klepin, Heidi D; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Jatoi, Amina; Harrison, Robert; Won, Elizabeth; Mustian, Karen M

    2016-07-01

    Cancer and its treatment can lead to a myriad of adverse events and negatively impact quality of life of older cancer patients and survivors. Unmet physical activity needs vary across the cancer continuum and remain an important yet understudied area of research in this population. Exercise interventions have been shown to be effective in treating both the physical and psychological declines associated with cancer and its treatment, with a potential to improve cancer-related outcomes. Despite the current evidence, exercise is clearly underutilized due to several barriers and knowledge gaps in existing trials that include appropriate population identification, design, and outcome measures selection. The benefits of regular exercise in both the primary and secondary prevention of chronic conditions are well established in the non-cancer population. In older cancer patients and survivors, further research is needed before exercise gains widespread acceptance. The Cancer and Aging Research Group convened experts in exercise, aging and cancer to evaluate current scientific evidence and knowledge gaps in geriatric exercise oncology. This report summarizes these findings and provides future research directions. PMID:27197916

  11. Designing exercise clinical trials for older adults with cancer: Recommendations from 2015 Cancer and Aging Research Group NCI U13 Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Kilari, Deepak; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Mohile, Supriya Gupta; Alibhai, Shabbir M.H.; Presley, Carolyn J.; Wildes, Tanya M.; Klepin, Heidi D.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Jatoi, Amina; Harrison, Robert; Won, Elizabeth; Mustian, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment can lead to a myriad of adverse events and negatively impact quality of life of older cancer patients and survivors. Unmet physical activity needs vary across the cancer continuum and remain an important yet understudied area of research in this population. Exercise interventions have been shown to be effective in treating both the physical and psychological declines associated with cancer and its treatment, with a potential to improve cancer-related outcomes. Despite the current evidence, exercise is clearly underutilized due to several barriers and knowledge gaps in existing trials that include appropriate population identification, design, and outcome measures selection. The benefits of regular exercise in both the primary and secondary prevention of chronic conditions are well established in the non-cancer population. In older cancer patients and survivors, further research is needed before exercise gains widespread acceptance. The Cancer and Aging Research Group convened experts in exercise, aging and cancer to evaluate current scientific evidence and knowledge gaps in geriatric exercise oncology. This report summarizes these findings and provides future research directions. PMID:27197916

  12. Population-based retrospective study to investigate preexisting and new depression diagnosis among head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rieke, Katherine; Boilesen, Eugene; Lydiatt, William; Schmid, Kendra K; Houfek, Julia; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to estimate the pre-cancer prevalence and post-cancer incidence of depression in older adult head and neck cancer patients. Using SEER-Medicare files, cancer was identified from SEER data and depression diagnosis was identified using Medicare claims. Of 3533 head and neck cancer patients, 10.6% were diagnosed with depression during the two years prior to cancer diagnosis, and an additional 8.9% developed depression in the year following cancer diagnosis. This study supports the critical need of screening for depression throughout cancer diagnosis and treatment, as well as a preventative approach in depression development in the older head and neck cancer patient population. PMID:27391545

  13. Prediction of Female Breast Cancer Incidence among the Aging Society in Kanagawa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kayoko

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the increasing number of elderly “baby boomers” in Japan, the number of cancer patients is also expected to increase. Approximately 2 million baby boomers from nearby local areas are residing in metropolitan areas; hence, the geographical distribution of cancer patients will probably markedly change. We assessed the expected number of breast cancer (BC) patients in different regions (urban, outer city, town, rural) using estimates of the nation’s population and Kanagawa Cancer Registry data. To estimate future BC incidence for each region, we multiplied the 2010 rate by the predicted female population for each region according to age group. The incidence cases of BC in those aged ≥65 years is expected to increase in all areas; in particular, compared to rates in 2010, the BC incidence in urban areas was predicted to increase by 82.6% in 2035 and 102.2% in 2040. Although the incidence in all BC cases in urban areas showed an increasing trend, until peaking in 2040 (increasing 31.2% from 2010), the number of BC patients would continue to decrease in other areas. The number of BC patients per capita BC specialist was 64.3 patients in 2010; this value would increase from 59.3 in 2010 to 77.7 in 2040 in urban areas, but would decrease in other areas. Our findings suggest that the number of elderly BC patients is expected to increase rapidly in urban areas and that the demand for BC treatment would increase in the elderly population in urban areas. PMID:27532126

  14. Colorectal cancer in aged patients. Toward the routine treatment through laparoscopic surgical approach

    PubMed Central

    VECCHIO, R.; MARCHESE, S.; FAMOSO, F.; LA CORTE, F.; MARLETTA, S.; LEANZA, G.; ZANGHÌ, G.; LEANZA, V.; INTAGLIATA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in general population. The incidence seems to be higher in older age. Surgery remains the treatment of choice and laparoscopic approach offers numerous benefits. We report our personal experience in elderly patients operated on for colorectal cancer with laparoscopic resection. Patients and methods From January 2003 to September 2013, out of 160 patients aged 65 years or older and operated with minimally invasive techniques, 30 cases affected by colorectal cancer and operated on with laparoscopic approach were analyzed in this study. Results Male/female ratio was 1.35 and mean age 72 years. Constipation, weight loss, anemia and rectal bleeding were the most commonly reported symptoms. Lesions involved descending-sigmoid colon in 53% of cases, rectum in 37% and ascending colon in 10%. Among laparoscopic colorectal operations laparoscopic left colectomy was the most frequently performed, followed by right colectomy, abdominoperineal resection and Hartmann procedure. Operative times ranged from 3 to 5 hours depending on surgical procedure performed. Mean hospital stay was 6 days (range 4–9). Conversion to open approach occurred only in a case of laparoscopic right colectomy (3%) for uncontrolled bleeding. A single case of mortality was reported. In two cases (7%) anastomotic leakage was observed, conservatively treated in one patient and requiring reoperation in the other one. Conclusions Laparoscopic colorectal surgery is feasible and effective for malignancies in elderly population offering several advantages including immunologic and oncologic ones. However an experienced surgical team is essential in reducing risks and complications. PMID:25827663

  15. Challenges in Recruiting Aging Women Holocaust Survivors to a Case Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are underrepresented in medical research for many reasons, including recruitment difficulties. Recruitment of older adults for research studies is often a time-consuming process and can be more challenging when the study involves older adults with unique exposures to traumatic events and from minority groups. The current article provides a brief overview of (a) challenges encountered while recruiting aging women Holocaust survivors for a case control study and (b) strategies used for meeting those challenges. The case group comprised women Holocaust survivors who were recently diagnosed with breast cancer and the control group comprised healthy women from a Holocaust-survivor community in Israel. PMID:26020580

  16. Risk of Developing Second Cancer From Neutron Dose in Proton Therapy as Function of Field Characteristics, Organ, and Patient Age

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharatou Jarlskog, Christina; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk of a second malignancy after treatment of a primary brain cancer using passive scattered proton beam therapy. The focus was on the cancer risk caused by neutrons outside the treatment volume and the dependency on the patient's age. Methods and Materials: Organ-specific neutron-equivalent doses previously calculated for eight different proton therapy brain fields were considered. Organ-specific models were applied to assess the risk of developing solid cancers and leukemia. Results: The main contributors (>80%) to the neutron-induced risk are neutrons generated in the treatment head. Treatment volume can influence the risk by up to a factor of {approx}2. Young patients are subject to significantly greater risks than are adult patients because of the geometric differences and age dependency of the risk models. Breast cancer should be the main concern for females. For males, the risks of lung cancer, leukemia, and thyroid cancer were significant for pediatric patients. In contrast, leukemia was the leading risk for an adult. Most lifetime risks were <1% (70-Gy treatment). The only exceptions were breast, thyroid, and lung cancer for females. For female thyroid cancer, the treatment risk can exceed the baseline risk. Conclusion: The risk of developing a second malignancy from neutrons from proton beam therapy of a brain lesion is small (i.e., presumably outweighed by the therapeutic benefit) but not negligible (i.e., potentially greater than the baseline risk). The patient's age at treatment plays a major role.

  17. Variation of benefits and harms of breast cancer screening with age.

    PubMed

    Harris, R

    1997-01-01

    The critical issue in deciding whether to recommend breast cancer screening for women in their forties is to determine whether potential benefits are substantially greater than potential harms. Recent evidence from randomized clinical trials makes it likely that, after 10-12 years of follow-up, there is a real benefit from screening women ages 40-49, on the order of a 15-20% reduction in the relative risk of breast cancer death. This relative risk reduction translates into an absolute risk reduction of 1-2 women whose lives are extended from screening 1,000 women in their forties annually for 10 years (i.e., about one life extended per 5,000 mammograms). The absolute benefit of screening increases with age. Evidence about potential harms is less well established, but it is compelling that there are 15-40 times as many false positive as true positive mammograms (depending on the patient's age), and that at least some of the women with false positive mammograms have ongoing psychological distress as a result. Some 30% of all women who are screened annually during their forties will have at least one false positive mammogram and this probability likely decreases with advancing age. If the balance between benefits and harms is judged to be a "close call" for women in their forties, a blanket recommendation for all is inappropriate. Instead, each woman in her forties should be helped to understand the pros and cons of screening, to clarify her own values, and to consider with her primary care physician what decision would be best for her. PMID:9709290

  18. A Prognostic Index for Predicting Lymph Node Metastasis in Minor Salivary Gland Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Shane; Yu, James B.; Ross, Douglas A.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Decker, Roy H.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Large studies examining the clinical and pathological factors associated with nodal metastasis in minor salivary gland cancer are lacking in the literature. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 2,667 minor salivary gland cancers with known lymph node status from 1988 to 2004. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with the use of neck dissection, the use of external beam radiation therapy, and the presence of cervical lymph node metastases. Results: Four hundred twenty-six (16.0%) patients had neck nodal involvement. Factors associated with neck nodal involvement on univariate analysis included increasing age, male sex, increasing tumor size, high tumor grade, T3-T4 stage, adenocarcinoma or mucoepidermoid carcinomas, and pharyngeal site of primary malignancy. On multivariate analysis, four statistically significant factors were identified, including male sex, T3-T4 stage, pharyngeal site of primary malignancy, and high-grade adenocarcinoma or high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinomas. The proportions (and 95% confidence intervals) of patients with lymph node involvement for those with 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 of these prognostic factors were 0.02 (0.01-0.03), 0.09 (0.07-0.11), 0.17 (0.14-0.21), 0.41 (0.33-0.49), and 0.70 (0.54-0.85), respectively. Grade was a significant predictor of metastasis for adenocarcinoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma but not for adenoid cystic carcinoma. Conclusions: A prognostic index using the four clinicopathological factors listed here can effectively differentiate patients into risk groups of nodal metastasis. The precision of this index is subject to the limitations of SEER data and should be validated in further clinical studies.

  19. Variation in Adherence to External Beam Radiotherapy Quality Measures Among Elderly Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Zelefsky, Michael J.; Jang, Thomas L.; Basch, Ethan M.; Schrag, Deborah

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. Methods and Materials: We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged {>=}65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Results: Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. Conclusions: The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes.

  20. Basic Equations and Computing Procedures for Frailty Modeling of Carcinogenesis: Application to Pancreatic Cancer Data

    PubMed Central

    Mdzinarishvili, Tengiz; Sherman, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Modeling of cancer hazards at age t deals with a dichotomous population, a small part of which (the fraction at risk) will get cancer, while the other part will not. Therefore, we conditioned the hazard function, h(t), the probability density function (pdf), f(t), and the survival function, S(t), on frailty α in individuals. Assuming α has the Bernoulli distribution, we obtained equations relating the unconditional (population level) hazard function, hU(t), cumulative hazard function, HU(t), and overall cumulative hazard, H0, with the h(t), f(t), and S(t) for individuals from the fraction at risk. Computing procedures for estimating h(t), f(t), and S(t) were developed and used to fit the pancreatic cancer data collected by SEER9 registries from 1975 through 2004 with the Weibull pdf suggested by the Armitage-Doll model. The parameters of the obtained excellent fit suggest that age of pancreatic cancer presentation has a time shift about 17 years and five mutations are needed for pancreatic cells to become malignant. PMID:23471174

  1. Self-Perceptions of Age among 292 Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients: Exploring Associations with Symptoms and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ming Y.; Stephens, Elisabeth K.; Novotny, Paul; Price, Katharine; Salayi, Marcia; Roeker, Lindsey; Peethambaram, Prema; Jatoi, Aminah

    2013-01-01

    Background A growing literature suggests that older individuals who report feeling younger than their actual chronological age enjoy better health and survival. The purpose of this study was to explore similar associations in patients with cancer. Methods Chemotherapy-treated cancer patients completed a previously-validated questionnaire item on their self-perception of age. Concurrent patient-reported number of symptoms and pain severity were recorded. In addition, baseline and longitudinal data captured demographics and vital status, respectively. Results Among 292 patients, 185 (63%) reported that they perceived themselves as younger than their actual age, 45 as older (15%), 56 (19%) as the same age (unable to be determined in 6). The mean actual chronological age (standard deviation) among those who perceived themselves as younger, older, or the same age were 63 years (11), 54 (12), and 60 (10); (p< 0.0001). An inverse relationship was observed between self-perceived age and actual age (odds ratio 1.05 with 95% confidence interval of 1.02, 1.07; p=0.0001) but, otherwise, no statistically significant relationships were observed with gender, cancer curability potential, number of symptoms, or pain severity. Improved survival was associated with fewer symptoms and the potential for curing the cancer but not with patients’ age perceptions. Qualitative themes such as positive thinking, staying engaged with life, the importance of family, and maintaining a sense of humor emerged among those who felt younger. Conclusion A substantial percentage of patients with cancer -- particularly older ones -- report feeling younger than their actual age; this perception appears to have no relevance to symptoms or survival. PMID:23795225

  2. Aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Choon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2013-09-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  3. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  4. Tolerability of Combined Modality Therapy for Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients Aged 75 Years and Older

    SciTech Connect

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Clark, Jeffrey; Willett, Christopher G.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of treatment deviations during combined modality therapy for rectal cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years and older. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of consecutively treated patients with rectal cancer aged 75 years and older treated with combined modality therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital from 2002 to 2007. The primary endpoint was the rate of treatment deviation, defined as a treatment break, dose reduction, early discontinuation of therapy, or hospitalization during combined modality therapy. Patient comorbidity was rated using the validated Adult Comorbidity Evaluation 27 Test (ACE-27) comorbidity index. Fisher's exact test and the Mantel-Haenszel trend test were used to identify predictors of treatment tolerability. Results: Thirty-six eligible patients had a median age of 79.0 years (range, 75-87 years); 53% (19/36) had no or mild comorbidity and 47% (17/36) had moderate or severe comorbidity. In all, 58% of patients (21/36) were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and 33% (12/36) with postoperative CRT. Although 92% patients (33/36) completed the planned radiotherapy (RT) dose, 25% (9/36) required an RT-treatment break, 11% (4/36) were hospitalized, and 33% (12/36) had a dose reduction, break, or discontinuation of concurrent chemotherapy. In all, 39% of patients (14/36) completed {>=}4 months of adjuvant chemotherapy, and 17% (6/36) completed therapy without a treatment deviation. More patients with no to mild comorbidity completed treatment than did patients with moderate to severe comorbidity (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.66). The rate of deviation did not differ between patients who had preoperative or postoperative CRT (19% vs. 17%, p = 1.0). Conclusions: The majority of elderly patients with rectal cancer in this series required early termination of treatment, treatment interruptions, or dose reductions. These data suggest that further intensification of

  5. Incidence and Mortality Trends in German Women with Breast Cancer Using Age, Period and Cohort 1999 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    Berkemeyer, Shoma; Lemke, Dorothea; Hense, Hans Werner

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal analysis investigates period (P), often as years. Additional scales of time are age (A) and birth cohort (C) Aim of our study was to use ecological APC analysis for women breast cancer incidence and mortality in Germany. Nation-wide new cases and deaths were obtained from Robert Koch Institute and female population from federal statistics, 1999–2008. Data was stratified into ten 5-years age-groups starting 20–24 years, ten birth cohorts starting 1939–43, and two calendar periods 1999–2003 and 2004–2008. Annual incidence and mortality were calculated: cases to 100,000 women per year. Data was analyzed using glm and apc packages of R. Breast cancer incidence and mortality increased with age. Secular rise in breast cancer incidence and decline in mortality was observed for period1999-2008. Breast cancer incidence and mortality declined with cohorts; cohorts 1950s showed highest incidence and mortality. Age-cohort best explained incidence and mortality followed by age-period-cohort with overall declining trends. Declining age-cohort mortality could be probable. Declining age-cohort incidence would require future biological explanations or rendered statistical artefact. Cohorts 1949–1958 could be unique in having highest incidence and mortality in recent time or future period associations could emerge relatively stronger to cohort to provide additional explanation of temporal change over cohorts. PMID:26933878

  6. Age- and Sex-Specific Trends in Lung Cancer Mortality over 62 Years in a Nation with a Low Effort in Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    John, Ulrich; Hanke, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Background: A decrease in lung cancer mortality among females below 50 years of age has been reported for countries with significant tobacco control efforts. The aim of this study was to describe the lung cancer deaths, including the mortality rates and proportions among total deaths, for females and males by age at death in a country with a high smoking prevalence (Germany) over a time period of 62 years. Methods: The vital statistics data were analyzed using a joinpoint regression analysis stratified by age and sex. An age-period-cohort analysis was used to estimate the potential effects of sex and school education on mortality. Results: After an increase, lung cancer mortality among women aged 35–44 years remained stable from 1989 to 2009 and decreased by 10.8% per year from 2009 to 2013. Conclusions: Lung cancer mortality among females aged 35–44 years has decreased. The potential reasons include an increase in the number of never smokers, following significant increases in school education since 1950, particularly among females. PMID:27023582

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the mitochondrial displacement loop and age-at-onset of familial breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haiping; Geng, Cuizhi; Cheng, Meng; Lee, Zheng; Guo, Zhanjun

    2016-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are accumulated frequently in the mitochondrial displacement loop (D-loop) in various types of cancer, and their association with cancer risk and disease outcome has been extensively identified. We have identified specific risk-associated SNP for familial breast cancer patients previously. In this study, we investigated the association between age-at-onset and the SNPs in familial breast cancer patients. The SNP sites of nucleotides 16 311 T/C were identified for their association with age-at-onset using the log-rank test. The age-at-onset of the patients with the minor allele C genotype was significantly earlier than that of patients carrying the T genotype at the site 16 311 (p = 0.032). Accordingly, the genetic polymorphisms in the mitochondrial D-loop are predictive markers for age-at-onset in familial breast cancer patients, which may help to identify familial breast cancer patient subgroups at high risk of early onset. PMID:27158866

  8. Data on the distribution of cancer incidence and death across age and sex groups visualized using multilevel spie charts.

    PubMed

    Feitelson, Dror G

    2016-04-01

    Cancer incidence and death statistics are typically recorded for multiple age and sex brackets, leading to large data tables which are difficult to digest. Effective visualizations of this data would allow practitioners, policy makers, and the general public to comprehend the data more readily and act on it appropriately. We introduce multilevel spie charts to create a combined visualization of cancer incidence and death statistics. Spie charts combine multiple pie charts, where the base pie chart (representing the general population) is used to set the angles of slices, and the superimposed ones use variable radii to portray the cancer data. Spie charts of cancer incidence and death statistics from Israel for 2009-2011 are used as an illustration. These charts clearly show various patterns of how cancer incidence and death distribute across age and sex groups, illustrating (1) absolute numbers and (2) rates per 100,000 population for different age and sex brackets. In addition, drawing separate charts for different cancer types illustrates relative mortality, both (3) across cancer types and (4) mortality relative to incidence. Naturally, this graphical depiction can be used for other diseases as well. PMID:26560991

  9. An interactive Bayesian model for prediction of lymph node ratio and survival in pancreatic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian J; Mezhir, James J

    2014-01-01

    Background Regional lymph node status has long been used as a dichotomous predictor of clinical outcomes in cancer patients. More recently, interest has turned to the prognostic utility of lymph node ratio (LNR), quantified as the proportion of positive nodes examined. However, statistical tools for the joint modeling of LNR and its effect on cancer survival are lacking. Methods Data were obtained from the NCI SEER cancer registry on 6400 patients diagnosed with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from 2004 to 2010 and who underwent radical oncologic resection. A novel Bayesian statistical approach was developed and applied to model simultaneously patients’ true, but unobservable, LNR statuses and overall survival. New web development tools were then employed to create an interactive web application for individualized patient prediction. Results Histologic grade and T and M stages were important predictors of LNR status. Significant predictors of survival included age, gender, marital status, grade, histology, T and M stages, tumor size, and radiation therapy. LNR was found to have a highly significant, non-linear effect on survival. Furthermore, predictive performance of the survival model compared favorably to those from studies with more homogeneous patients and individualized predictors. Conclusions We provide a new approach and tool set for the prediction of LNR and survival that are generally applicable to a host of cancer types, including breast, colon, melanoma, and stomach. Our methods are illustrated with the development of a validated model and web applications for the prediction of survival in a large set of pancreatic cancer patients. PMID:24444460

  10. Testicular cancer incidence trends in the United States (1975−2004): Plateau or shifting racial paradigm?

    PubMed Central

    L, Holmes; C, Escalante; O, Garrison; BX, Foldi; GO, Ogungbade; EJ, Essien; D, Ward

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Plateau in testicular cancer incidence in some parts of the United States (US) especially among non-Hispanic white males in Los Angeles had been observed. We conducted three decades temporal trends analysis to assess the evidence of such a plateau, and to examine whether the rate remains stable across racial/ethnic groups as well as the influence of age at diagnosis on the incidence rate. STUDY DESIGN: Population-based temporal trends analysis. METHODS: Using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER), we identified between 1975 and 2004, 16,580 of newly diagnosed testicular cancer cases, aged 15−49 years. The incidence rates were examined by calculating the age-adjusted rates and their 95% Confidence Interval (CI) for the age at diagnosis, SEER areas, and race by the year of diagnosis. The percent change and annual percent change were examined for trends. RESULTS: Incidence of testicular cancer continues to increase among US males, albeit the plateau of the 1990s. Between 1975 and 2004 the age-adjusted incidence rate for ages, 15−49 years increased from 2.9 (1975) to 5.1(2004) per 100,000. The trends indicated a percent change of 71.9% and a statistically significant annual percent change of 1.6 %,( 95% CI, 1.3−2.0), p < 0.05. Though the rates in blacks remained strikingly low, 0.3 to 1.4 per 100,000, the highest annual percent change was observed among blacks, 2.3%, (95%, CI, 0.8−3.9), p < 0.05 for trends. The rates were intermediate among Asians/ Pacific Islanders and American Indian and Alaska Natives 0.7 to 2.9 per 100,000, percent change (117.3%) and a statistically significant annual change of 1.5%, (95% CI, 0.3−2.7) p < 0.05 for trends. The highest rates were reported among Whites, 3.2 to 6.3 per 100,000, percent change (90.4%) , with a statistically significant annual percent change of 2.0%, (95% CI, 1.6−2.3), p < 0.05. The peak age at diagnosis was, 30−34 years while the lowest rates were reported in 15−19 age group

  11. The incidence of pelvic and para-aortic lymph node metastasis in uterine papillary serous and clear cell carcinoma according to the SEER registry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer C.; Metzger, Daniel J.; Ashamalla, Hani; Katsoulakis, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study we utilized the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER) registry to identify risk factors for lymphatic spread and determine the incidence of pelvic and para-aortic lymph node metastases in patients with uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) and uterine clear cell carcinoma (UCCC) who underwent complete surgical staging and lymph node dissection. Methods Nine hundred seventy-two eligible patients diagnosed between 1998 to 2009 with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) 1988 stage IA-IVA UPSC (n=685) or UCCC (n=287) were identified for analysis. Binomial logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for lymph node metastasis, with the incidence of pelvic and para-aortic lymph node metastases reported for each FIGO primary tumor stage. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine factors associated with overall survival. Results FIGO primary tumor stage was the only independent risk factor for lymph node metastasis (p<0.01). The incidence of pelvis-only and para-aortic lymph node involvement according to the FIGO primary tumor stage were as follows: IA (2.3%/3.8%), IB (7.5%/5.2%), IC (22.5%/16.9%), IIA (20.8%/13.2%), IIB (25.7%/14.9%), and III/IV (25.7%/24.3%). Prognostic factors for overall survival included lymph node involvement (hazard ratio [HR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09 to 1.85; p<0.01), patient age >60 years (HR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.21 to 2.41; p<0.01), and advanced FIGO primary tumor stage (p<0.01). Tumor grade, histologic subtype, and patient race did not predict for either lymph node metastasis or overall survival. Conclusion There is a high incidence of both pelvic and para-aortic lymph node metastases for FIGO stages IC and above uterine papillary serous and clear cell carcinomas, suggesting a potential role for lymph node-directed therapy for these patients. PMID:25310855

  12. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy and Survival for Pure Tubular Breast Carcinoma-Experience From the SEER Database

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoqing; Chen, Margaret; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Chen, Allen M.; Chen, Steven L.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pure tubular carcinoma of the breast (PTCB) represents a distinct subtype of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) that is generally thought to be associated with better prognosis than even low-grade IDC. There has been controversy as to the role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) in this population. We hypothesized that adjuvant RT would demonstrate a survival improvement. Methods and Materials: We queried the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database for the years 1992-2007 to identify patients with pure tubular carcinomas of the breast. Patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and surgical and RT treatments were collected. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method for univariate comparisons and Cox proportional hazards modeling for multivariate comparisons, stratifying on the basis of age with a cutoff age of 65. Results: A total of 6465 patients were identified: 3624 (56.1%) patients underwent lumpectomy with RT (LUMP+RT), 1525 (23.6%) patients underwent lumpectomy alone (LUMP), 1266 (19.6%) patients received mastectomy alone (MAST), and 50 (0.8%) patients underwent mastectomy with RT (MAST+RT). When we compared the LUMP+RT and LUMP groups directly, those receiving adjuvant RT tended to be younger and were less likely to be hormone receptor-positive. Overall survival was 95% for LUMP+RT and 90% for LUMP patients at 5 years. For those 65 or younger, the absolute overall survival benefit of LUMP+RT over LUMP was 1% at 5 years and 3% at 10 years. On stratified multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT remained a significant predictor in both age groups (P=.003 in age {<=}65 and P=.04 in age >65 patients). Other significant unfavorable factors were older age and higher T stage (age >65 only). Conclusions: Since sufficiently powered large scale clinical trials are unlikely, we would recommend that adjuvant radiation be considered in PTCB patients age 65 or younger, although consideration of the small absolute survival benefit is

  13. Palliative chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients 80 years of age and older

    PubMed Central

    Lai, P.; Sud, S.; Zhang, T.; Asmis, T.; Wheatley-Price, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (crc) has a median diagnostic age of 68 years. Despite significant progress in chemotherapy (ctx) options, few data on outcomes or toxicity from ctx in patients 80 years of age and older are available. We investigated ctx in such patients with metastatic crc (mcrc), hypothesizing high rates of hospitalization and toxicity. Methods A retrospective chart review identified patients 80 years of age and older with mcrc who initiated ctx between 2005–2010 at our institution. Patient demographics and ctx data were collected. Endpoints included rates of hospitalization, ctx discontinuation because of toxicity, and overall survival. Results In 60 patients, ctx was initiated on 88 occasions. Median age in the cohort was 83 years; 52% were men; 72% lived with family; 53% had a modified Charlson comorbidity index of 2 or greater; and 31% were taking 6 or more prescription medications at baseline. At baseline, 33% of the patients were anemic (hemoglobin < 100 g/L), 36% had leukocytosis (white blood cells > 11×109/L), and 48% had renal impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2). In 53%, ctx was given as first-line treatment. The initial ctx dose was adjusted in 67%, and capecitabine was the most common chemotherapeutic agent (45%). In 19 instances (22%), the patient was hospitalized during or within 30 days of ctx; in 26 instances (30%), the ctx was discontinued because of toxicity, and in 48 instances (55%), the patient required at least 1 dose reduction, omission, or delay. Median overall survival was 17.8 months (95% confidence interval: 14.3 to 20.8 months). Conclusions In the population 80 years of age and older, ctx for mcrc is feasible; however, most recipients will require dose adjustments, and a significant proportion will be hospitalized or stop ctx because of toxicity. Prospective research incorporating geriatric assessment tools is required to better select these older patients for ctx. PMID:27330342

  14. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  15. Cardiopulmonary Function and Age-Related Decline Across the Breast Cancer Survivorship Continuum

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lee W.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Mackey, John R.; Muss, Hyman B.; Pituskin, Edith N.; Scott, Jessica M.; Hornsby, Whitney E.; Coan, April D.; Herndon, James E.; Douglas, Pamela S.; Haykowsky, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate cardiopulmonary function (as measured by peak oxygen consumption [VO2peak]) across the breast cancer continuum and its prognostic significance in women with metastatic disease. Patients and Methods Patients with breast cancer representing four cross-sectional cohorts—that is, (1) before, (2) during, and (3) after adjuvant therapy for nonmetastatic disease, and (4) during therapy in metastatic disease—were studied. A cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) with expired gas analysis was used to assess VO2peak. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of death according to VO2peak category (< 15.4 v ≥ 15.4 mL · kg−1 · min−1) with adjustment for clinical factors. Results A total of 248 women (age, 55 ± 8 years) completed a CPET. Mean VO2peak was 17.8 ± a standard deviation of 4.3 mL · kg−1 · min−1, the equivalent of 27% ± 17% below age-matched healthy sedentary women. For the entire cohort, 32% had a VO2peak less than 15.4 mL · kg−1 · min−1—the VO2peak required for functional independence. VO2peak was significantly different across breast cancer cohorts for relative (mL · kg−1 · min−1) and absolute (L · min−1) VO2peak (P = .017 and P < .001, respectively); VO2peak was lowest in women with metastatic disease. In patients with metastatic disease (n = 52), compared with patients achieving a VO2peak ≤ 1.09 L · min−1, the adjusted hazard ratio for death was 0.32 (95% CI, 0.16 to 0.67, P = .002) for a VO2peak more than 1.09 L · min−1. Conclusion Patients with breast cancer have marked impairment in VO2peak across the entire survivorship continuum. VO2peak may be an independent predictor of survival in metastatic disease. PMID:22614980

  16. Common genetic variants in prostate cancer risk prediction – Results from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Travis, Ruth C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Andriole, Gerald; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Ganziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Pala, Valeria; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B.; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the goals of personalized medicine is to generate individual risk profiles that could identify individuals in the population that exhibit high risk. The discovery of more than two-dozen independent SNP markers in prostate cancer has raised the possibility for such risk stratification. In this study, we evaluated the discriminative and predictive ability for prostate cancer risk models incorporating 25 common prostate cancer genetic markers, family history of prostate cancer and age. Methods We fit a series of risk models and estimated their performance in 7,509 prostate cancer cases and 7,652 controls within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We also calculated absolute risks based on SEER incidence data. Results The best risk model (C-statistic=0.642) included individual genetic markers and family history of prostate cancer. We observed a decreasing trend in discriminative ability with advancing age (P=0.009), with highest accuracy in men younger than 60 years (C-statistic=0.679). The absolute ten-year risk for 50-year old men with a family history ranged from 1.6% (10th percentile of genetic risk) to 6.7% (90th percentile of genetic risk). For men without family history, the risk ranged from 0.8% (10th percentile) to 3.4% (90th percentile). Conclusions Our results indicate that incorporating genetic information and family history in prostate cancer risk models can be particularly useful for identifying younger men that might benefit from PSA screening. Impact Although adding genetic risk markers improves model performance, the clinical utility of these genetic risk models is limited. PMID:22237985

  17. Association of Prion Protein Expression with Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Survival in the SEER Residual Tissue Repository

    PubMed Central

    Sy, Man-Sun; Altekruse, Sean F.; Li, Chaoyang; Lynch, Charles F.; Goodman, Marc T.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Huang, Xiaoran; Saber, Maria Sibug; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Xin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an important cause of cancer death with no clear prognostic biomarker. Expression of prion (PrP) has been reported to be a marker of poor prognosis in a series of Caucasian PDAC cases. We determined the prognostic value of PrP in a racially and geographically diverse population-based series of PDAC cases. PrP expression was examined in 142 PDAC cases from three cancer registries. Cases included 71 Caucasian, 54 Asian/Pacific Islanders and 17 Blacks diagnosed from 1983–2000, and followed through 2008. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of PrP expression with survival were computed after adjustment for case attributes. The risk of death was about four times higher (HR=3.8; 95% CI: 2.2, 6.5) among 108 PDAC cases with PrP+ tumors (median survival 5 months) compared to the 34 cases with PrP− tumors (median survival 20 months). Of 51 cases with resected, localized PDAC median survival was 74 months for 17 cases with PrP− tumors versus 14 months for 34 cases with PrP+ tumors (HR=6.7; 95% CI: 2.6, 17.4). All 6 surviving cases had PrP− negative tumors (median survival, >10 years). PrP may have potential as a prognostic biomarker in PDAC patient management. PMID:22820080

  18. Cancer-related PTSD symptoms in a veteran sample: association with age, combat PTSD, and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Wachen, Jennifer Schuster; Patidar, Seema M.; Mulligan, Elizabeth A.; Naik, Aanand D.; Moye, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis and treatment of cancer is a potentially traumatic experience that may evoke posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) among survivors. This paper describes the rates of endorsement of cancer-related PTSS along with the relationship of demographic, cancer, and combat variables on PTSS and quality of life. Methods Veterans (N = 166) with head and neck, esophageal, gastric, or colorectal cancers were recruited through tumor registries at two regional Veterans Administration Medical Centers. Standardized scales were used to assess self-report of PTSS, combat, and quality of life. Results Most participants (86%) reported experiencing at least some cancer-related PTSS; 10% scored above a clinical cutoff for probable PTSD. In linear regressions, younger age and current combat PTSS were associated with cancer-related PTSS, whereas disease and treatment characteristics were not; in turn, cancer-related PTSS were negatively associated with physical and social quality of life. Conclusions Individual characteristics and psychosocial factors may play a larger role than disease-related variables in determining how an individual responds to the stress of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Given the rates of reported cancer-related PTSS in this sample, and other non-veteran samples, clinicians should consider screening these following diagnosis and treatment, particularly in younger adults and those with previous trauma histories. PMID:24519893

  19. Cancer and frailty in older adults: a nested case-control study of the Mexican Health and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises; Cárdenas-Cárdenas, Eduardo; Cesari, Matteo; Navarrete-Reyes, Ana Patricia; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Understanding how the convergence between chronic and complex diseases—such as cancer—and emerging conditions of older adults—such as frailty—takes place would help in halting the path that leads to disability in this age group. The objective of this manuscript is to describe the association between a past medical history of cancer and frailty in Mexican older adults. Methods This is a nested in cohort case-control study of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Frailty was categorized by developing a 55-item frailty index that was also used to define cases in two ways: incident frailty (incident >0.25 frailty index score) and worsening frailty (negative residuals from a regression between 2001 and 2012 frailty index scores). Exposition was defined as self-report of cancer between 2001 and 2012. Older adults with a cancer history were further divided into recently diagnosed (<10 years) and remotely diagnosed (>10 years from the initial diagnosis). Odds ratios were estimated by fitting a logistic regression adjusted for confounding variables. Results Out of a total of 8022 older adults with a mean age of 70.6 years, the prevalence of a past medical history of cancer was 3.6 % (n = 288). Among these participants, 45.1 % had been diagnosed with cancer more than 10 years previously. A higher risk of incident frailty compared to controls [odds ratio (OR) 1.53 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.04–2.26, p = 0.03); adjusted model OR 1.74 (95 % CI 1.15–2.61, p = 0.008)] was found in the group with a recent cancer diagnosis. Also, an inverse association between a remote cancer diagnosis and worsening frailty was found [OR = 0.56 (95 % CI 0.39–0.8), p = 0.002; adjusted model OR 0.61 (95 % CI 0.38–0.99, p = 0.046)]. Conclusions Cancer is associated with a higher frailty index, with a potential relevant role of the time that has elapsed since the cancer diagnosis. Implications for cancer survivors Cancer survivors may be more likely to develop frailty or

  20. Survivors of Childhood Cancer in the United States: Prevalence and Burden of Morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Siobhan M.; Padgett, Lynne S.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stratton, Kayla K.; Bishop, Ken; Krull, Kevin R.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Gibson, Todd M.; de Moor, Janet S.; Hartigan, Danielle Blanch; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Rowland, Julia H.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Mariotto, Angela B.

    2015-01-01

    Background No studies have estimated the population-level burden of morbidity in individuals diagnosed with cancer as children (ages 0-19 years). We updated prevalence estimates of childhood cancer survivors as of 2011 and burden of morbidity in this population reflected by chronic conditions, neurocognitive dysfunction, compromised health-related quality of life and health status (general health, mental health, functional impairment, functional limitations, pain and fear/anxiety). Methods Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Program data from 1975 to 2011 were used to update the prevalence of survivors of childhood cancers in the US. Childhood Cancer Survivor Study data were used to obtain estimates of morbidity burden indicators which were then extrapolated to SEER data to obtain population-level estimates. Results There were an estimated 388,501 survivors of childhood cancer in the US as of January 1, 2011, of whom 83.5% are ≥5 years post-diagnosis. The prevalence of any chronic condition among ≥5-year survivors ranged from 66% (ages 5-19) to 88% (ages 40-49). Estimates for specific morbidities ranged from 12% (pain) to 35% (neurocognitive dysfunction). Generally, morbidities increased by age. However, mental health and anxiety remained fairly stable and neurocognitive dysfunction exhibited initial decline and then remained stable by time since diagnosis. Conclusions The estimated prevalence of survivors of childhood cancer is increasing, as is the estimated prevalence of morbidity in those ≥5 years post-diagnosis. Impact Efforts to understand how to effectively decrease morbidity burden and incorporate effective care coordination and rehabilitation models to optimize longevity and well-being in this population should be a priority. PMID:25834148

  1. Impact of age on efficacy of postoperative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yong-xi; Sun, Jing-xu; Chen, Xiao-wan; Zhao, Jun-hua; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-ning

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines focusing on age-related adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer are currently limited. The present study aimed to explore the impact of age on the efficacy of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked database from 1992–2009. We enrolled patients with yp stages I–III rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent curative resection. The age-related survival benefit of adding oxaliplatin to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy was evaluated using Kaplan–Meier survival analysis with propensity score-matching and Cox proportional hazards models. Results Comparing the oxaliplatin group with the 5-FU group, there were significant interactions between age and chemotherapy efficacy in terms of overall survival (OS) (p for interaction = 0.017) among patients with positive lymph nodes (ypN+). Adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong survival in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category, and but did not translate into survival benefits in patients aged ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category. No significant interactions were observed among ypN− patients, and oxaliplatin did not significantly improve OS, regardless of age. Conclusions In patients with rectal cancer who have already received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and undergone curative resection, adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong OS in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category. However, adding oxaliplatin did not translate into survival benefits in patients age ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category, or in ypN− patients. PMID:26910371

  2. Relationship between vascularity, age and survival in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Chandrachud, L. M.; Pendleton, N.; Chisholm, D. M.; Horan, M. A.; Schor, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Lung tumours in the elderly show reduced growth potential; impaired angiogenesis may contribute to this phenomenon. Recent studies have suggested that the angiogenic potential of a tumour may be inferred by the vascularity measured in histological sections. The purpose of this study has been to determine whether vascularity is related to age, survival or other clinical parameters in resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A group of 88 consecutive patients with a follow-up period of at least 5 years was selected. The group exhibited a wide age range (37-78 years) and similar survival characteristics to those of the general NSCLC population. Tumour sections were stained with a pan-endothelial antibody (vWF) and vascularity was quantitated, without knowledge of the clinical details, by three methods: highest microvascular density; average microvascular density; and average microvascular volume. The results were analysed by non-parametric statistical tests. A correlation was found between all three methods of quantitation. Vascularity was not associated with age, sex, tumour type, stage, volume, size (TNM-T) nodal status (TNM-N) or survival. However, survival time was generally longer for patients with higher vascularity, reaching borderline significance (P = 0.06) for the average microvascular density values. Higher tumour volume (P = 0.02) and stage (P = 0.05) were associated with lower survival times. Using multivariate survival analysis, tumour volume was the only factor related to survival. We conclude that vascularity is not associated with age and has no significant prognostic value in NSCLC. Images Figure 1 PMID:9374385

  3. Age at first birth and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Lubinski, Jan; Lynch, Henry T; Klijn, Jan; Ghadirian, Parviz; Neuhausen, Susan L; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Foulkes, William D; Moller, Pal; Isaacs, Claudine; Domchek, Susan; Randall, Susan; Offit, Kenneth; Tung, Nadine; Ainsworth, Peter; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Eisen, Andrea; Daly, Mary; Karlan, Beth; Saal, Howard M; Couch, Fergus; Pasini, Barbara; Wagner, Teresa; Friedman, Eitan; Rennert, Gad; Eng, Charis; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A; Garber, J; Osborne, M; Fishman, D; McLennan, J; McKinnon, W; Merajver, S; Olsson, H; Provencher, D; Pasche, B; Evans, G; Meschino, W S; Lemire, E; Chudley, A; Rayson, D; Bellati, C

    2007-10-01

    An early age at first full-term birth is associated with a reduction in the subsequent development of breast cancer among women in the general population. A similar effect has not yet been reported among women who carry an inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. We conducted a matched case-control study on 1816 pairs of women with a BRCA1 (n = 1405) or BRCA2 (n = 411) mutation in an attempt to elucidate the relationship between age at first full-term pregnancy and the risk of developing breast cancer. Information about the age at first childbirth and other pregnancy-related variables was derived from a questionnaire administered to women during the course of genetic counselling. There was no difference in the mean age at first full-term birth in the cases and controls (24.9 years vs. 24.8 years; P = 0.81, respectively). Compared to women whose first child was born at or before 18 years of age, a later age at first full-term birth did not influence the risk of developing breast cancer (OR = 1.00 per year; 95% CI 0.98-1.03; P-trend = 0.67). Stratification by mutation status did not affect the results. These findings suggest that an early first full-term birth does not confer protection against breast cancer in BRCA mutation carriers. Nonetheless, BRCA mutation carriers opting for a prophylactic oophorectomy as a breast and/or ovarian cancer risk-reducing strategy should complete childbearing prior to age 40 when this prevention modality is most effective. PMID:17245541

  4. The Prognostic Impact of Molecular Subtypes and Very Young Age on Breast Conserving Surgery in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Kandace; Alco, Gul; Nur Pilanci, Kezban; Koksal, Ulkuhan I; Elbüken, Filiz; Erdogan, Zeynep; Agacayak, Filiz; Ilgun, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Öztürk, Alper; İğdem, Şefik; Okkan, Sait; Eralp, Yeşim; Dincer, Maktav; Ozmen, Vahit

    2016-01-01

    Background Premenopausal breast cancer with a triple-negative phenotype (TNBC) has been associated with inferior locoregional recurrence free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) after breast conserving surgery (BCS). The aim of this study is to analyze the association between age, subtype, and surgical treatment on survival in young women (≤40 years) with early breast cancer in a population with a high rate of breast cancer in young women. Methods Three hundred thirty-two patients ≤40 years old with stage I-II invasive breast cancer who underwent surgery at a single institution between 1998 and 2012 were identified retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis evaluated predictors of LRFS, OS, and disease free survival (DFS). Results Most patients (64.2%) underwent BCS. Mean age and follow-up time were 35 (25 ± 3.61) years, and 72 months (range, 24–252), respectively. In multivariate analysis, multicentricity/multifocality and young age (<35 years) independently predicted for poorer DFS and OS. Those aged 35–40 years had higher LRFS and DFS than those <35 in the mastectomy group (p=0.007 and p=0.039, respectively). Patients with TNBC had lower OS compared with patients with luminal A subtype (p=0.042), and those who underwent BCS had higher OS than patients after mastectomy (p=0.015). Conclusion Young age (< 35 years) is an independent predictor of poorer OS and DFS as compared with ages 35–40, even in countries with a lower average age of breast cancer presentation. In addition, TNBC in the young predicts for poorer OS. BCS can be performed in young patients with TNBC, despite their poorer overall survival. PMID:27433412

  5. Population-based mammography screening below age 50: balancing radiation-induced vs prevented breast cancer deaths

    PubMed Central

    de Gelder, R; Draisma, G; Heijnsdijk, E A M; de Koning, H J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Exposure to ionizing radiation at mammography screening may cause breast cancer. Because the radiation risk increases with lower exposure age, advancing the lower age limit may affect the balance between screening benefits and risks. The present study explores the benefit–risk ratio of screening before age 50. Methods: The benefits of biennial mammography screening, starting at various ages between 40 and 50, and continuing up to age 74 were examined using micro-simulation. In contrast with previous studies that commonly used excess relative risk models, we assessed the radiation risks using the latest BEIR-VII excess absolute rate exposure-risk model. Results: The estimated radiation risk is lower than previously assessed. At a mean glandular dose of 1.3 mGy per view that was recently measured in the Netherlands, biennial mammography screening between age 50 and 74 was predicted to induce 1.6 breast cancer deaths per 100 000 women aged 0–100 (range 1.3–6.3 extra deaths at a glandular dose of 1–5 mGy per view), against 1121 avoided deaths in this population. Advancing the lower age limit for screening to include women aged 40–74 was predicted to induce 3.7 breast cancer deaths per 100 000 women aged 0–100 (range 2.9–14.4) at biennial screening, but would also prevent 1302 deaths. Conclusion: The benefits of mammography screening between age 40 and 74 were predicted to outweigh the radiation risks. PMID:21364575

  6. RECURRENCE OF HIGH-RISK BLADDER CANCER: A POPULATION-BASED ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Chamie, Karim; Litwin, Mark S.; Bassett, Jeffrey C.; Daskivich, Timothy J.; Lai, Julie; Hanley, Jan M.; Konety, Badrinath R.; Saigal, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with bladder cancer are apt to develop multiple recurrences that require intervention. We examined the recurrence, progression and bladder cancer-related mortality rates in a cohort of individuals with high-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods Using linked SEER-Medicare data, we identified subjects with a diagnosis of high-grade, non-muscle-invasive disease in 1992–2002 and were followed until 2007. We then used multivariate competing-risks regression analyses to examine recurrence, progression, and bladder cancer-related mortality rates. Results Of 7,410 subjects, 2,897 (39.1%) experienced a recurrence without progression, 2,449 (33.0%) experienced disease progression, of whom 981 succumbed to bladder cancer. Using competing-risks regression analysis, we found the 10-year recurrence, progression, and bladder cancer-related mortality rates to be 74.3%, 33.3%, and 12.3%, respectively. Stage T1 was the only variable associated with a higher rate of recurrence. Women, black race, undifferentiated grade, stage Tis and T1 were associated with a higher risk of progression and mortality. Advanced age (≥70) was associated with a higher risk of bladder cancer-related mortality. Conclusions Nearly three-fourths of patients diagnosed with high-risk bladder cancer will recur, progress, or die within ten years of their diagnosis. Even though most patients do not die of bladder cancer, the vast majority endures the morbidity of recurrence and progression of their cancer. Increasing efforts should be made to offer patients intravesical therapy with the goal of minimizing the incidence of recurrences. Furthermore, the high recurrence rate seen during the first two years of diagnosis warrants an intense surveillance schedule. PMID:23737352

  7. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia Liver cancer Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Ovarian cancer Pancreatic cancer Testicular cancer Thyroid cancer Uterine cancer ... have any symptoms. In certain cancers, such as pancreatic cancer, symptoms often do not start until the disease ...

  8. Interplay of Race, Socioeconomic Status and Treatment on Survival of Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Kendra; Powell, Isaac J.; Underwood, Willie; George, Julie; Yee, Cecilia; Banerjee, Mousumi

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We compared overall and prostate cancer-specific survival, using Detroit SEER registry data, among 8,679 Detroit-area black and white men with localized or regional stage prostate cancer diagnosed 1988-1992 to determine if racial disparities in survival remained after adjusting for treatment type and socioeconomic status (SES). Methods Cases were geocoded to census block-group and SES data obtained from the 1990 U.S. Census. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio of death from any cause. Median follow-up was 16.5 years. Results Among 7770 localized stage cases (22% black, 78% white), and 909 regional cases (24% black, 76% white), black men were more likely to receive non-surgical treatment (p <0.001), and to be of low SES (p<0.0001). Survival analyses were stratified by stage; for both stages, black men had poorer survival than white men in the unadjusted model. Adjustment for age and tumor grade had little effect on survival differences, while adjustment for SES and treatment erased the survival differences. Conclusions Low SES and non-surgical treatment were associated with higher risk of death among men with prostate cancer, which explains much of the survival disadvantage for black men with prostate cancer. PMID:19962532

  9. Childhood cancer incidence patterns by race, sex and age for 2000-2006: a report from the South African National Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Friederike; Kielkowski, Danuta; Schonfeld, Sara J; Kellett, Patricia; Stanulla, Martin; Dickens, Caroline; Kaatsch, Peter; Singh, Elvira; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-06-01

    Higher childhood cancer incidence rates are generally reported for high income countries although high quality information on descriptive patterns of childhood cancer incidence for low or middle income countries is limited, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. There is a need to quantify global differences by cancer types, and to investigate whether they reflect true incidence differences or can be attributed to under-diagnosis or under-reporting. For the first time, we describe childhood cancer data reported to the pathology report-based National Cancer Registry of South Africa in 2000-2006 and compare our results to incidence data from Germany, a high income country. The overall age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) for South Africa in 2000-2006 was 45.7 per million children. We observed substantial differences by cancer types within South Africa by racial group; ASRs tended to be 3-4-fold higher in South African Whites compared to Blacks. ASRs among both Black and White South Africans were generally lower than those from Germany with the greatest differences observed between the Black population in South Africa and Germany, although there was marked variation between cancer types. Age-specific rates were particularly low comparing South African Whites and Blacks with German infants. Overall, patterns across South African population groups and in comparison to Germans were similar for boys and girls. Genetic and environmental reasons may probably explain rather a small proportion of the observed differences. More research is needed to understand the extent to which under-ascertainment and under-diagnosis of childhood cancers drives differences in observed rates. PMID:25363616

  10. A Diversified Recruitment Approach Incorporating Social Media Leads to Research Participation Among Young Adult-Aged Female Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jessica R; Roberts, Samantha C; Dominick, Sally A; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Dietz, Andrew C; Su, H Irene

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Cancer survivors in their adolescent and young adult (AYA) years are an understudied population, possibly in part because of the high effort required to recruit them into research studies. The aim of this paper is to describe the specific recruitment strategies used in four studies recruiting AYA-aged female cancer survivors and to identify the highest yielding approaches. We also discuss challenges and recommendations. Methods: We recruited AYA-aged female cancer survivors for two studies conducted locally and two conducted nationally. Recruitment strategies included outreach and referral via: healthcare providers and clinics; social media and the internet; community and word of mouth; and a national fertility information hotline. We calculated the yield of each recruitment approach for the local and national studies by comparing the number that participated to the number of potential participants. Results: We recruited a total of 534 participants into four research studies. Seventy-one percent were diagnosed as young adults and 61% were within 3 years of their cancer diagnosis. The highest-yielding local recruitment strategy was healthcare provider and clinic referral. Nationally, social media and internet outreach yielded the highest rate of participation. Overall, internet-based recruitment resulted in the highest number and yield of participants. Conclusion: Our results suggest that outreach through social media and the internet are effective approaches to recruiting AYA-aged female cancer survivors. Forging collaborative relationships with survivor advocacy groups' members and healthcare providers also proved beneficial. PMID:24940529

  11. Alzheimer's Disease as Subcellular `Cancer' --- The Scale-Invariant Principles Underlying the Mechanisms of Aging ---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the slow onset of neurodegeneration leading to dementia in many elderly people. The pathological hallmarks of AD are: the extracellular β-amyloid deposition in the senile plaques; the β-amyloid deposition in cerebral blood vessel walls especially in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D); the intracellular neurofibrillary tangle formation composed of paired helical filaments (PHF), the principal component of which is a hyperphosphorylated form of the microtubule-binding protein, tau; and neurological dysfuction and neuronal cell death in limited regions and pathways of the central nervous system. Note that β-amyloid is a truncated form of a cell surface integral membrane glycoprotein: amyloid precursor protein (APP). Despite these hallmarks, the pathogenesis of AD has been poorly understood. In the present paper, a theory of aging is proposed to give a coherent account of the origins and causes of neurodegeneration common to the diverse neurodegenerative disorders such as AD and prion (proteinaceous infectious particles) diseases in comparison with the pathogenesis of cancers. Surprisingly, the self-aggregation of denatured proteins -- such as β-amyloid, PHF and prions -- responsible for neuronal cell death resembles, in many respects, the development (or the clonal evolution) of malignant cells at the expense of the entire organism harboring them. Although neurodegenerative disorders and cancers apparently differe in pathology, they nevertheless seem to follow the same priciples regardless of the level and scale of the biological organization. It is the general principles of heritable variations and natural selection as well as the general principles of self-organization that operate, not only on different molecules, but also at different hierarchical levels and scales of the biological organizaiton, independent of the details of diseases. Traditionally, natural selection, along

  12. Multi-mutational model for cancer based on age-time patterns of radiation effects: 2. Biological aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.; Pierce, P.A.

    1997-09-04

    Biological properties of relevance when modeling cancers induced in the atom bomb survivors include the wide distribution of the induced cancers across all organs, their biological indistinguishability from background cancers, their rates being proportional to background cancer rates, their rates steadily increasing over at least 50 years as the survivors age, and their radiation dose response being linear. We have successfully described this array of properties with a modified Armitage-Doll model using 5 to 6 somatic mutations, no intermediate growth, and the dose-related replacement of any one of these time-driven mutations by a radiation-induced mutation. Such a model is contrasted to prevailing models that use fewer mutations combined with intervening growth. While the rationale and effectiveness of our model is compelling for carcinogenesis in the atom bomb survivors, the lack of a promotional component may limit the generality of the model for other types of human carcinogenesis.

  13. Implications of age and conditional survival estimates for patients with melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Mousumi; Lao, Christopher D.; Wancata, Lauren M.; Muenz, Daniel G.; Haymart, Megan R.; Wong, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Overall cancer incidence is decreasing while melanoma cases increase. Conditional survival estimates offer a more accurate prognosis for patients as they survive past diagnosis. It is unknown the effect age and stage has on a melanoma patient’s conditional survival estimate. Methods Surveillance, Epidemiology, End Results (SEER) data was utilized, identifying new diagnosis cutaneous melanoma patients (N=95,041), from 1998–2005, with up to 12 year follow up. Estimates of disease-specific survival by stage and age were determined by Cox regression and transformed to estimate conditional five-year survival. Results Localized melanoma patients have an excellent five-year survival at diagnosis and subsequent years. For patients with localized and regional disease, an age effect is present for disease-specific mortality when comparing older patients (70–79 years) to younger patients (<30 years): hazard ratio (HR) for mortality 3.79 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.01–4.84) and HR 2.36 (95% CI 1.93–2.91), respectively. No age effect difference is observed in disease-specific survival for advanced disease: HR 1.14 (95% CI 0.87–1.53). Over time conditional survival estimates improve for older patients with localized and regional disease. This improvement is not seen in distant disease nor is the age gradient. Conclusions Disease-specific mortality and conditional survival for patients with localized and regional melanoma is initially impacted by older age with effects dissipating over time. Age does not affect survival in patients with advanced disease. Understanding the conditional five-year disease-specific survival of melanoma based on age and stage can help patients and physicians, informing decision making about treatment and surveillance. PMID:26479218

  14. Age and origin of two common MLH1 mutations predisposing to hereditary colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moisio, A. L.; Sistonen, P.; Weissenbach, J.; de la Chapelle, A.; Peltomäki, P.

    1996-01-01

    Two mutations in the DNA mismatch repair gene MLH1, referred to as mutations 1 and 2, are frequent among Finnish kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). In order to assess the ages and origins of these mutations, we constructed a map of 15 microsatellite markers around MLH1 and used this information in haplotype analyses of 19 kindreds with mutation 1 and 6 kindreds with mutation 2. All kindreds with mutation 1 showed a single allele for the intragenic marker D3S1611 that was not observed on any unaffected chromosome. They also shared portions of a haplotype of 4-15 markers encompassing 2.0-19.0 cM around MLH1. All kindreds with mutation 2 shared another allele for D3S1611 and a conserved haplotype of 5-14 markers spanning 2.0-15.0 cM around MLH1. The degree of haplotype conservation was used to estimate the ages of these two mutations. While some recessive disease genes have been estimated to have existed and spread for as long as thousands of generations worldwide and hundreds of generations in the Finnish population, our analyses suggest that the spread of mutation 1 started 16-43 generations (400-1,075 years) ago and that of mutation 2 some 5-21 generations (125-525 years) ago. These datings are compatible with our genealogical results identifying a common ancestor born in the 16th and 18th century, respectively. Overall, our results indicate that all Finnish kindreds studied to date showing either mutation 1 or mutation 2 are due to single ancestral founding mutations relatively recent in origin in the population. Alternatively, the mutations arose elsewhere earlier and were introduced in Finland more recently. PMID:8940269

  15. Targeted Screening With Combined Age- and Morphology-Based Criteria Enriches Detection of Lynch Syndrome in Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Douglas I; Hecht, Jonathan L

    2016-06-01

    Endometrial cancer is associated with Lynch syndrome in 2% to 6% of cases. Adequate screening may prevent of a second cancer and incident cancers in family members via risk-reducing strategies. The goal of the study was to evaluate the detection rate of Lynch syndrome via a targeted screening approach. In 2009, we incorporated targeted Lynch syndrome screening via immunohistochemistry for MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6, followed by MLH1 promoter hypermethylation, in select cases of endometrial carcinoma. Criteria for patient selection included (1) all patients <50 years; (2) patients of any age with tumors showing features of microsatellite instability (lower uterine segment-centered tumors, hard to classify carcinomas, increased peritumoral or tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and cases with synchronous ovarian carcinomas); (3) clinician's request based on family or personal history; and (4) ad hoc retrospective testing based on the established criteria on patients discovered on follow-up visits. By using a targeted screening approach in a 4.5-year period, approximately 2.1% of endometrial cancers (7 of 328) were potentially associated with Lynch syndrome. Therefore, targeted screening with combined age and morphology based criteria enriches detection of Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancer. However, the detection rate is lower than the rates from published series that offer universal screening. PMID:26842347

  16. Benefit/risk for adjuvant breast cancer therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor use by age, and race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Chlebowski, R T; Haque, R; Hedlin, H; Col, N; Paskett, E; Manson, J E; Kubo, J T; Johnson, K C; Wactawski-Wende, J; Pan, K; Anderson, G

    2015-12-01

    In early adjuvant breast cancer trial reports, aromatase inhibitors more effectively reduced breast recurrence with lower risk of thromboembolic events and endometrial cancer than tamoxifen, while aromatase inhibitors had higher fracture and cardiovascular disease risk. We used data from updated patient-level meta-analyses of adjuvant trials in analyses to summarize the benefits and risks of these agents in various clinical circumstances. Baseline incidence rates for health outcomes by age and race/ethnicity, absent aromatase inhibitor, or tamoxifen use were estimated from the Women's Health Initiative. Aromatase inhibitor and tamoxifen effects on distant recurrence were obtained from a meta-analysis of the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) and Breast International Group (Big-1-98) clinical trials. Impact on other health outcomes were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials comparing aromatase inhibitor to tamoxifen use and from placebo-controlled chemoprevention trials. All health outcomes were given equal weight when modeling net benefit/risk for aromatase inhibitor compared to tamoxifen use by breast cancer recurrence risk, age (decade), race/ethnicity, hysterectomy (yes/no), and by prior myocardial infarction. Over a 10-year period, the benefit/risk index was more favorable for aromatase inhibitor than for tamoxifen as adjuvant breast cancer therapy in almost all circumstances regardless of patient age, race/ethnicity, breast cancer recurrence risk, or presence or absence of a uterus. Only in older women with prior myocardial infarction and low recurrence risk was an advantage for tamoxifen seen. Using a benefit/risk index for endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy in postmenopausal women, benefit was higher for aromatase inhibitor use in almost all circumstances. PMID:26602222

  17. Mechanisms of Superoxide Signaling in Epigenetic Processes: Relation to Aging and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Afanas’ev, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide is a precursor of many free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems. It has been shown that superoxide regulates major epigenetic processes of DNA methylation, histone methylation, and histone acetylation. We suggested that superoxide, being a radical anion and a strong nucleophile, could participate in DNA methylation and histone methylation and acetylation through mechanism of nucleophilic substitution and free radical abstraction. In nucleophilic reactions superoxide is able to neutralize positive charges of methyl donors S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) enhancing their nucleophilic capacity or to deprotonate cytosine. In the reversed free radical reactions of demethylation and deacetylation superoxide is formed catalytically by the (Tet) family of dioxygenates and converted into the iron form of hydroxyl radical with subsequent oxidation and final eradication of methyl substituents. Double role of superoxide in these epigenetic processes might be of importance for understanding of ROS effects under physiological and pathological conditions including cancer and aging. PMID:26029480

  18. Role of UV light in photodamage, skin aging, and skin cancer: importance of photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Evelyn R

    2009-01-01

    Solar, and particularly UV, radiation causes molecular and cellular damage with resultant histopathologic and clinical degenerative changes, leading in turn to photosensitivity, photo-aging, and skin cancer. While our bodies have some natural UV defenses, additional protection from the sun is essential, including sun avoidance, physical protection, and sunscreen use. Sun avoidance includes limiting exposure during peak UV times (10am-4pm), avoiding UV-reflective surfaces such as sand, snow and water, and eliminating photosensitizing drugs. Physical protection includes wearing photoprotective clothing such as a broad-brimmed hat and long sleeves and use of UV-blocking films on windows. Sunscreen containing avobenzone, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide or encamsule should be used daily and frequently reapplied. To guard against the UVB spectrum, zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are particularly recommended. Sunscreen is generally under-applied at only 25% of the recommended dose, seriously compromising photoprotection. Dosage guidelines recommend using more than half a teaspoon each on head and neck area and each arm, and more than a teaspoon each on anterior torso, posterior torso, and each leg (approximately 2 mg/cm(2)). PMID:19209950

  19. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  20. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  1. Impact of age, comorbidity and symptoms on physical function in long-term breast cancer survivors (CALGB 70803).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Harvey Jay; Lan, Lan; Archer, Laura; Kornblith, Alice B

    2012-04-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of aging, comorbidities and symptoms on physical function in patients surviving 20 years since adjuvant treatment for breast cancer. PATIENTS #ENTITYSTARTX00026; METHODS: Patients were originally treated on CALGB 7581 (from 1975-1980), a randomized trial of three adjuvant therapies and reassessed (153 of 193 eligible survivors) 20 years from the onset of therapy for physical function and symptoms by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and comorbidities by the OARS questionnaire. RESULTS: The average age at reassessment was 64.5 years. 66% of patients had at least two comorbidities and 22% had four or more, but relatively little interference with activities. Older patients had greater multimorbidity. Physical function was generally high and comparable to matched population norms. Older patients had greater difficulty with strenuous activities. For every increase in number of comorbidities, physical function score decreased by 5.1 (p<.001). Symptoms were also frequent (80%) and correlated strongly with decreases in function (0-100u scale) (p <.001), to an even greater degree than comorbidities. CONCLUSION: Very long-term cancer survivors have changes in physical function and symptoms largely consistent with their aging suggesting that the impact of cancer and its treatment is attenuated over time and largely replaced by the impact of age-related comorbidities and functional decline. PMID:22707996

  2. External Beam Radiotherapy for Colon Cancer: Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Emily F.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Moody, John S.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Despite its common and well characterized use in other gastrointestinal malignancies, little is known about radiotherapy (RT) use in nonmetastatic colon cancer in the United States. To address the paucity of data regarding RT use in colon cancer management, we examined the RT patterns of care in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonmetastatic colon cancer, diagnosed between 1988 and 2005, were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Univariate and multivariate methods were used to identify factors associated with RT use. Results: On univariate analysis, tumor location, age, sex, race, T stage, N stage, and geographic location were each associated with differences in RT use (all p < 0.01). In general, younger patients, male patients, and patients with more advanced disease were more likely to receive RT. On multivariate analysis, tumor location, age, gender, T and N stage, time of diagnosis and geographic location were significantly associated with RT use (all p < 0.001). Race, however, was not associated with RT use. On multivariate analysis, patients diagnosed in 1988 were 2.5 times more likely to receive RT than those diagnosed in 2005 (p = 0.001). Temporal changes in RT use reflect a responsiveness to evolving evidence related to the therapeutic benefits of adjuvant RT. Conclusions: External beam RT is infrequently used for colon cancer, and its use varies according to patient and tumor characteristics. RT use has declined markedly since the late 1980s; however, it continues to be used for nonmetastatic disease in a highly individualized manner.

  3. Prognosis of Pregnancy-Associated Gastric Cancer: An Age-, Sex-, and Stage-Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min Jeong; Park, Young Soo; Song, Ho June; Park, Se Jeong; Ahn, Ji Yong; Choi, Kee Don; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Byung Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Pregnancy-associated gastric cancer is a rare condition. This case-control study was performed to identify the clinicopathological features and prognostic factors of pregnancy-associated gastric cancer. Methods All consecutive patients who presented to our tertiary referral hospital with pregnancy-associated gastric cancer from 1991 to 2012 were identified. Two age-, sex-, and stage-matched controls for each case were also identified from the records. Clinicopathological, gynecological, and oncological outcomes were recorded. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor, and E-cadherin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed for fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. Results The median overall survival rates of the pregnancy-associated gastric cancer and control groups were 7.0 months and 15.0 months, respectively (p=0.189). Poor prognostic factors included advanced stage and tumor location in the corpus or the entire stomach but not pregnancy status or loss of E-cadherin. Pregnancy-associated gastric cancer was associated with a longer time from diagnosis to treatment (21 days vs 7 days, p=0.021). The two groups did not differ in the expression of the receptors or E-cadherin. Conclusions The dismal prognosis of pregnancy-associated gastric cancer may related to the tumor stage and location rather than to pregnancy itself. PMID:27114414

  4. Childhood Cancer Survivors' Familiarity With and Opinions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Echo L.; Park, Elyse R.; Stroup, Antoinette; Kinney, Anita Y.; Kirchhoff, Anne C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) offers avenues to increase insurance options and access to care; however, it is unknown whether populations with pre-existing conditions, such as cancer survivors, will benefit from the expanded coverage options. We explored childhood cancer survivors' familiarity with and opinion of the ACA to understand how survivors' insurance coverage may be affected. Materials and Methods: From April to July 2012 we conducted in-depth, semistructured telephone interviews with 53 adult survivors recruited from the Utah Cancer SEER Registry. Participants were randomly selected from sex, age, and rural/urban strata and were younger than 21 years at time of diagnosis. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed with NVivo 9 by two coders (kappa = 0.94). We report on the 49 participants who had heard of the ACA. Results: Most survivors were unaware of ACA provisions beyond the insurance mandate. Few knew about coverage for children up to age 26 or pre-existing insurance options. Although one third believed the ACA could potentially benefit them via expanded insurance coverage, many were concerned that the ACA would lead to rising health care costs and decreasing quality of care. Survivors had concerns specific to their cancer history, including fears of future health care rationing if they developed subsequent health problems. Conclusion: Childhood cancer survivors have a low level of familiarity with the ACA and are unaware of how it may affect them given their cancer history. These survivors require targeted education to increase knowledge about the ACA. PMID:23943900

  5. Influence of Age on Incident Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Prostate Cancer Survivors Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Alicia K.; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Koyama, Tatsuki; Albertsen, Peter C.; Goodman, Michael; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Resnick, Matthew J.; Barocas, Daniel A.; Penson, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Observational data suggest that androgen deprivation therapy increases the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Using data from the population based PCOS we evaluated whether age at diagnosis and comorbidity impact the association of androgen deprivation therapy with incident diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods We identified men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer diagnosed from 1994 to 1995 who were followed through 2009 to 2010. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the relationship of androgen deprivation therapy exposure (2 or fewer years, greater than 2 years or none) with incident diabetes and cardiovascular disease, adjusting for age at diagnosis, race, stage and comorbidity. Results Of 3,526 eligible study participants 2,985 without diabetes and 3,112 without cardiovascular disease comprised the cohorts at risk. Androgen deprivation therapy was not associated with an increased risk of diabetes or cardiovascular disease in men diagnosed with prostate cancer before age 70 years. Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy and increasing age at diagnosis in older men was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (at age 76 years OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.0–4.4) and cardiovascular disease (at age 74 years OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0–3.5). Men with comorbidities were at greater risk for diabetes (OR 4.3, 95% CI 2.3–7.9) and cardiovascular disease (OR 8.1, 95% CI 4.3–15.5) than men without comorbidities. Conclusions Prolonged androgen deprivation therapy exposure increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in men diagnosed with prostate cancer who are older than approximately 75 years, especially those with other comorbidities. Older men who receive prolonged androgen deprivation therapy should be closely monitored for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:25451829

  6. Age- and sex-specific spatio-temporal patterns of colorectal cancer mortality in Spain (1975-2008)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, space-time patterns of colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality risks are studied by sex and age group (50-69, ≥70) in Spanish provinces during the period 1975-2008. Space-time conditional autoregressive models are used to perform the statistical analyses. A pronounced increase in mortality risk has been observed in males for both age-groups. For males between 50 and 69 years of age, trends seem to stabilize from 2001 onward. In females, trends reflect a more stable pattern during the period in both age groups. However, for the 50-69 years group, risks take an upward trend in the period 2006-2008 after the slight decline observed in the second half of the period. This study offers interesting information regarding CRC mortality distribution among different Spanish provinces that could be used to improve prevention policies and resource allocation in different regions. PMID:25136264

  7. Time trend and age-period-cohort effect on kidney cancer mortality in Europe, 1981–2000

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Farinós, Napoleón; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    Background The incorporation of diagnostic and therapeutic improvements, as well as the different smoking patterns, may have had an influence on the observed variability in renal cancer mortality across Europe. This study examined time trends in kidney cancer mortality in fourteen European countries during the last two decades of the 20th century. Methods Kidney cancer deaths and population estimates for each country during the period 1981–2000 were drawn from the World Health Organization Mortality Database. Age- and period-adjusted mortality rates, as well as annual percentage changes in age-adjusted mortality rates, were calculated for each country and geographical region. Log-linear Poisson models were also fitted to study the effect of age, death period, and birth cohort on kidney cancer mortality rates within each country. Results For men, the overall standardized kidney cancer mortality rates in the eastern, western, and northern European countries were 20, 25, and 53% higher than those for the southern European countries, respectively. However, age-adjusted mortality rates showed a significant annual decrease of -0.7% in the north of Europe, a moderate rise of 0.7% in the west, and substantial increases of 1.4% in the south and 2.0% in the east. This trend was similar among women, but with lower mortality rates. Age-period-cohort models showed three different birth-cohort patterns for both men and women: a decrease in mortality trend for those generations born after 1920 in the Nordic countries, a similar but lagged decline for cohorts born after 1930 in western and southern European countries, and a continuous increase throughout all birth cohorts in eastern Europe. Similar but more heterogeneous regional patterns were observed for period effects. Conclusion Kidney cancer mortality trends in Europe showed a clear north-south pattern, with high rates on a downward trend in the north, intermediate rates on a more marked rising trend in the east than in the

  8. Population density and cancer mortality by gender and age in England and Wales and the Western World 1963-93.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, C; Evans, B

    1997-07-01

    The aetiology of malignant disease is multi-factorial, including contributory environmental factors. Based upon the premise that increases in the density of population will be coterminous with a worsening of the environment, it is hypothesised that such changes should be reflected in an increase in cancer mortality in general and in elderly populations. By focusing upon changes in the elderly (+75) deaths between two time periods, the study corrects for age factors related to cancer mortality. The study tests this hypothesis via correlations between population density and malignancy death rates in general and elderly age bands over a thirty year period. It was found that there were positive and significant correlations between population density and malignancy mortality rates in the Western World, especially amongst men, but all correlations strengthened in the direction hypothesised. The findings were not an artefact of longevity, further research is required to give a better understanding of these findings. PMID:9242033

  9. The value of age and medical history for predicting colorectal cancer and adenomas in people referred for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colonoscopy is an invasive and costly procedure with a risk of serious complications. It would therefore be useful to prioritise colonoscopies by identifying people at higher risk of either cancer or premalignant adenomas. The aim of this study is to assess a model that identifies people with colorectal cancer, advanced, large and small adenomas. Methods Patients seen by gastroenterologists and colorectal surgeons between April 2004 and December 2006 completed a validated, structured self-administered questionnaire prior to colonoscopy. Information was collected on symptoms, demographics and medical history. Multinomial logistic regression was used to simultaneously assess factors associated with findings on colonoscopy of cancer, advanced adenomas and adenomas sized 6 -9 mm, and ≤ 5 mm. The area under the curve of ROC curve was used to assess the incremental gain of adding demographic variables, medical history and symptoms (in that order) to a base model that included only age. Results Sociodemographic variables, medical history and symptoms (from 8,204 patients) jointly provide good discrimination between colorectal cancer and no abnormality (AUC 0.83), but discriminate less well between adenomas and no abnormality (AUC advanced adenoma 0.70; other adenomas 0.67). Age is the dominant risk factor for cancer and adenomas of all sizes. Having a colonoscopy within the last 10 years confers protection for cancers and advanced adenomas. Conclusions Our models provide guidance about which factors can assist in identifying people at higher risk of disease using easily elicited information. This would allow colonoscopy to be prioritised for those for whom it would be of most benefit. PMID:21899773

  10. Racial disparities in individual breast cancer outcomes by hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status and healthcare resources

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Moore, Justin Xavier; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Waterbor, John W.; Altekruse, Sean F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of area-level socio-economic status and healthcare access in addition to tumor hormone-receptor subtype on individual breast cancer stage, treatment, and mortality among Non-Hispanic (NH)-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic US adults. Analysis was based on 456,217 breast cancer patients in the SEER database from 2000 to 2010. Multilevel and multivariable-adjusted logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to account for clustering by SEER registry of diagnosis. NH-Black women had greater area-level access to healthcare resources compared with women of other races. For instance, the average numbers of oncology hospitals per million population in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 8.1, 7.7, and 5.0 respectively; average numbers of medical doctors per million in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 100.7, 854.0, and 866.3 respectively; and average number of Ob/Gyn in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women was 155.6, 127.4, and 127.3, respectively (all p values <0.001). Regardless, NH-Black women (HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.36–1.43) and Hispanic women (HR 1.05, 95 % CI 1.03–1.08) had significantly higher breast cancer mortality compared with NH-White women even after adjusting for hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socioeconomic status, and area-level healthcare access. In addition, lower county-level socio-economic status and healthcare access measures were significantly and independently associated with stage at presentation, surgery, and radiation treatment as well as mortality after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and HR subtype. Although breast cancer HR subtype is a strong, important, and consistent predictor of breast cancer outcomes, we still observed significant and independent influences of area-level SES and HCA on breast cancer outcomes that deserve further study and may be critical to eliminating breast cancer outcome

  11. Racial disparities in individual breast cancer outcomes by hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status and healthcare resources.

    PubMed

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Moore, Justin Xavier; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Waterbor, John W; Altekruse, Sean F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of area-level socio-economic status and healthcare access in addition to tumor hormone-receptor subtype on individual breast cancer stage, treatment, and mortality among Non-Hispanic (NH)-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic US adults. Analysis was based on 456,217 breast cancer patients in the SEER database from 2000 to 2010. Multilevel and multivariable-adjusted logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to account for clustering by SEER registry of diagnosis. NH-Black women had greater area-level access to healthcare resources compared with women of other races. For instance, the average numbers of oncology hospitals per million population in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 8.1, 7.7, and 5.0 respectively; average numbers of medical doctors per million in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 100.7, 854.0, and 866.3 respectively; and average number of Ob/Gyn in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women was 155.6, 127.4, and 127.3, respectively (all p values <0.001). Regardless, NH-Black women (HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.36-1.43) and Hispanic women (HR 1.05, 95 % CI 1.03-1.08) had significantly higher breast cancer mortality compared with NH-White women even after adjusting for hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status, and area-level healthcare access. In addition, lower county-level socio-economic status and healthcare access measures were significantly and independently associated with stage at presentation, surgery, and radiation treatment as well as mortality after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and HR subtype. Although breast cancer HR subtype is a strong, important, and consistent predictor of breast cancer outcomes, we still observed significant and independent influences of area-level SES and HCA on breast cancer outcomes that deserve further study and may be critical to eliminating breast cancer outcome

  12. Equity of use of specialist palliative care by age: cross-sectional study of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Burt, Jenni; Plant, Hilary; Omar, Rumana; Raine, Rosalind

    2010-09-01

    The equitable provision of care is a core principle of the National Health Service. Previous research has suggested that older cancer patients may be less likely to use specialist palliative care, but such research has been limited by retrospective design and the failure to measure clinical need. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which the use of specialist palliative care in lung cancer patients varies by age, after accounting for need. A cross-sectional survey of patients and their carers attending four hospital lung cancer clinics in London was conducted between June 2006 and April 2007. Two hundred and fifty-two patients and 137 carers participated in the study. Thirty-nine percent of participants received specialist palliative care. Metastatic disease, global quality of life and the clinic where treatment was provided were associated with use of specialist palliative care. Age, gender, deprivation, living alone, current or most recent line of treatment, number of co-morbidities and carer stress were not associated with receipt of such services. This suggests that, for patients within the specialist cancer care system, access to specialist palliative care is offered on the basis of need. PMID:20395355

  13. Age-Period-Cohort approaches to back-calculation of cancer incidence rate

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Cheongeun; Holford, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    A compartment model for cancer incidence and mortality is developed in which healthy subjects may develop cancer, and subsequently die of cancer or another cause. In order to adequately represent the experience of a defined population, it is also necessary to allow for subjects who are diagnosed at death, as well as subjects who migrate and are subsequently lost to follow-up. Expressions are derived for the number of cancer deaths as a function of the number of incidence cases and vice versa, which allows for the use of mortality statistics to obtain estimates of incidence using survival information. In addition, the model can be used to obtain estimates of cancer prevalence, which is useful for health care planning. The method is illustrated using data on lung cancer among males in Connecticut. PMID:25715831

  14. Adoption of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer After Publication of Randomized Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Curry, Heather; Chen, Ronald C.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have established the noninferiority of shorter courses of “hypofractionated” radiation therapy (RT) to the whole breast compared to conventional courses using smaller daily doses in the adjuvant treatment of selected breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy. Hypofractionation is more convenient and less costly. Therefore, we sought to determine uptake of hypofractionated breast RT over time. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked database, we identified 16,096 women with node-negative breast cancer and 4269 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who received lumpectomy followed by more than 12 fractions of RT between 2004 and 2010. Based on Medicare claims, we determined the number of RT treatments given and grouped patients into those receiving hypofractionation (13-24) or those receiving conventional fractionation (≥25). We also determined RT technique (intensity modulated RT or not) using Medicare claims. We evaluated patterns and correlates of hypofractionation receipt using bivariate and multivariable analyses. Results: Hypofractionation use was similar in patients with DCIS and those with invasive disease. Overall, the use of hypofractionation increased from 3.8% in 2006 to 5.4% in 2007, to 9.4% in 2008, and to 13.6% in 2009 and 2010. Multivariable analysis showed increased use of hypofractionation in recent years and in patients with older age, smaller tumors, increased comorbidity, higher regional education, and Western SEER regions. However, even in patients over the age of 80, the hypofractionation rate in 2009 to 2010 was only 25%. Use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) also increased over time (from 9.4% in 2004 to 22.7% in 2009-2010) and did not vary significantly between patients receiving hypofractionation and those receiving traditional fractionation. Conclusions: Hypofractionation use increased among low-risk older US breast cancer patients with

  15. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  16. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  17. Impact of Comorbidity and Age on Determinants Therapeutic Strategies in Advanced Pancreatic Head Cancer Patients With Obstructive Jaundices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Guang; Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Dai, Ming-Shen; Lin, Chin; Lu, Chieh-Sheng; Su, Sui-Lung; Chang, Ping-Ying; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Chen, Jia-Hong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Yeu-Chin; Ho, Ching Liang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The current retrospective study aimed to investigate the relationship between prognostic factors and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced pancreatic head cancers who initially presented with obstructive jaundice. Furthermore, the impact of age and comorbidities on therapeutic strategies in such patients was evaluated. A total of 79 advanced pancreatic head cancer patients who were treated at our institution between January 2006 and November 2013 were reviewed. We analyzed OS risk factors including sex, age, laboratory characteristics, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, Charlson Comorbidity Index Scores (CCIS), and therapeutic strategies using Cox proportional hazards regression models. There was no difference in the OS of patients according to the type biliary drainage procedure they underwent. Other related factors, such as better performance status, lower CCIS, and receiving chemotherapy significantly correlated with survival in multivariate analyses. There was a significant survival benefit in systemic chemotherapy compared to best supportive care (BSC) or local radiotherapy. However, no survival benefit was found in elderly patients (age >70 years) undergoing systemic therapy compared to younger patients, except in those elderly patients with CCIS ≤ 1. In advanced pancreatic head cancer patients with obstructive jaundice, systemic therapy and adequate biliary drainage were still the most effective procedures for improving OS in the general population. However, in elderly patients with relatively higher CCIS, BSC with adequate biliary drainage was palliative and no less effective than systemic/local therapies. PMID:26252308

  18. Prostate Cancer Prognostic Factors Among Asian Patients Born in the US Compared to Those Born Abroad.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junjun; Goodman, Michael; Jemal, Ahemdin; Fedewa, Stacey A

    2015-06-01

    US surveillance data indicate that incidence of prostate cancer differs by place of birth among Asian men. However, it is less clear if the prognostic factors for prostate cancer also differ by place of birth. The study included 7,824 Asian prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 2004 and 2009 and reported to the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relation of place of birth (foreign born vs. US born) to three outcomes: prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, and T classification, adjusting for age, marital status, Rural-Urban Continuum Code, and SEER registry. All outcome variables were binary using different cutoffs: ≥ 4, ≥ 10 and ≥ 20 ng/ml for PSA; ≥ 7 and ≥ 8 for Gleason score; and ≥ T2 and ≥ T3 for T classification. Elevated PSA was more common among foreign born Asian men regardless of the cut point used. In the analysis comparing foreign born versus US born patients by ethnic group, the association with PSA was most pronounced at cut point of ≥ 20 ng/ml for Chinese men (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.02-2.75), and at cut point of ≥ 4 ng/ml for Japanese men (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.20-6.21). A statistically significant association with Gleason score was only found for Japanese men and only for the cutoff ≥ 7 (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.12-2.61). There was no difference in clinical T classification between foreign-born and US-born Asian men. Inclusion of cases with missing place of birth or restriction of data to those who underwent radical prostatectomy did not substantially change the results. The data suggest that foreign-born Asian prostate cancer patients may have moderately elevated PSA levels at diagnosis compared with their US born counterparts. For the other prognostic markers, the associations were less consistent and did not form a discernible pattern. PMID:24748076

  19. Chronic inflammation and risk of colorectal and other obesity-related cancers: The health, aging and body composition study.

    PubMed

    Izano, Monika; Wei, Esther K; Tai, Caroline; Swede, Helen; Gregorich, Steven; Harris, Tamara B; Klepin, Heidi; Satterfield, Suzanne; Murphy, Rachel; Newman, Anne B; Rubin, Susan M; Braithwaite, Dejana

    2016-03-01

    Evidence of the association between chronic inflammation and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and other obesity-related cancers (OBRC) remains inconsistent, possibly due to a paucity of studies examining repeated measures of inflammation. In the Health ABC prospective study of 2,490 adults aged 70-79 years at baseline, we assessed whether circulating levels of three markers of systemic inflammation, IL-6, CRP and TNF-α, were associated with the risk of CRC and OBRC, a cluster including cancers of pancreas, prostate, breast and endometrium. Inflammatory markers were measured in stored fasting blood samples. While only baseline measures of TNF-α were available, IL-6 and CRP were additionally measured at Years 2, 4, 6 and 8. Multivariable Cox models were fit to determine whether tertiles and log-transformed baseline, updated and averaged measures of CRP and IL-6 and baseline measures of TNF-α were associated with the risk of incident cancer(s). During a median follow-up of 11.9 years, we observed 55 and 172 cases of CRC and OBRC, respectively. The hazard of CRC in the highest tertile of updated CRP was more than double that in the lowest tertile (HR = 2.29; 95% CI: 1.08-4.86). No significant associations were seen between colorectal cancer and IL-6 or TNF-α. Additionally, no significant associations were found between obesity-related cancers and the three inflammatory markers overall, but we observed a suggestion of effect modification by BMI and NSAID use. In summary, in this population, higher CRP levels were associated with increased risk of CRC, but not of OBRC. The findings provide new evidence that chronically elevated levels of CRP, as reflected by repeated measures of this marker, may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis in older adults. PMID:26413860

  20. Body Mass Index and Cancer Mortality Among Korean Older Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae-Seok; Yi, Sang-Wook; Yi, Jee-Jeon; Hong, Seri; Ohrr, Heechoul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The association of body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) with overall and site-specific cancer mortality in Asians is not well understood. A total of 113,478 men from the Korean Veterans Health Study who returned a postal survey in 2004 were followed up until 2010. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of cancer mortality were calculated using a Cox model. During 6.4 years of follow-up, 3478 men died from cancer. A reverse J-curve association with a nadir at 25.0 to 27.4 kg/m2 was observed. Below 25 kg/m2, the HRs of death for each 5 kg/m2 decrease in BMI were 1.72 (95% confidence interval = 1.57–1.90) for overall cancer; 3.63 (2.57–5.12) for upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) cancers, including oral cavity and larynx [HR = 4.21 (2.18–8.12)] and esophagus [HR = 2.96 (1.82–4.81)] cancers; 1.52 (1.35–1.71) for non-UADT and non-lung cancers, including stomach [HR = 2.72 (2.13–3.48)] and large intestine [HR = 1.68 (1.20–2.36)] cancers; and 1.93 (1.59–2.34) for lung cancer. In the range of 25 to 47 kg/m2, the HRs for each 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI were 1.27 (1.03–1.56) for overall cancer mortality and 1.57 (1.02–2.43) for lung cancer mortality. In individuals <25 kg/m2, inverse associations with mortality from overall cancer and non-UADT and non-lung cancer were stronger in never-smokers than in current smokers. Both low and high BMI were strong predictors of mortality from overall and several site-specific cancers in Korean men. Further research is needed to evaluate whether interventions involving weight change (loss or gain) reduce the risk of cancer or improve the survival. PMID:27227928

  1. Comparative clinicopathological and outcome analysis of differentiated thyroid cancer in Saudi patients aged below 60 years and above 60 years

    PubMed Central

    AL-Qahtani, Khalid Hussain; Tunio, Mutahir A; Asiri, Mushabbab Al; Bayoumi, Yasser; Balbaid, Ali; Aljohani, Naji J; Fatani, Hanadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of differentiated thyroid cancer in Saudi patients aged above 60 years. Materials and methods Comparative analysis was performed in 252 patients aged 46–60 years (Group A) and 118 patients aged above 60 years (Group B), who had thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine-131, and thyroid-stimulating hormone suppression therapy between July 2000 and December 2012. Different clinicopathological features, treatment, complications, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were compared. Results Mean age of patients in Group A was 51.9 years (range: 46–60), and mean age of those in Group B was 68.6 years (range: 62–97). Group B patients had higher positive lymph nodes (43.2%), P=0.011. The frequency of extrathyroidal extension, multifocality, and lymphovascular space invasion was seen more in Group B than in Group A. Postsurgical complications (permanent hypoparathyroidism, bleeding, and wound infections) were also seen more in Group B (P=0.043, P=0.011, and P=0.021, respectively). Group B patients experienced more locoregional recurrences (11.0%, P=0.025); similarly, more distant metastases were observed in Group B (15.3%, P=0.003). The 10-year disease-free survival rates were 87.6% in Group A and 70.8% in Group B (P<0.0001). Conclusion Differentiated thyroid cancer in patients aged above 60 years are more aggressive biologically and associated with a worse prognosis, and the morbidity is significantly high as compared to patients aged below 60 years. PMID:27621604

  2. A New Class of Minimum Power Divergence Estimators with Applications to Cancer Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Nirian; Li, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The Annual Percent Change (APC) has been adopted as a useful measure for analyzing the changing trends of cancer mortality and incidence rates by the NCI SEER program. Difficulties, however, arise when comparing the sample APCs between two overlapping regions because of the induced dependence (e.g., comparing the cancer mortality change rate of California with the national level). This paper deals with a new perspective of understanding the sample distribution of the test statistics for comparing the APCs between overlapping regions. Our proposal allows for computational readiness and easy interpretability. We further propose a more general family of estimators, namely, the so-called minimum power divergence estimators, including the maximum likelihood estimators as a special case. Our simulation experiments support the superiority of the proposed estimator to the conventional maximum likelihood estimator. The proposed method is illustrated by the analysis of the SEER cancer mortality rates observed from 1991 to 2006. PMID:22368308

  3. Current Operative Management of Breast Cancer: An Age of Smaller Resections and Bigger Cures

    PubMed Central

    Rostas, Jack W.; Dyess, Donna Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Surgical resection was the first effective treatment for breast cancer and remains the most important treatment modality for curative intent. Refinements in operative techniques along with the use of adjuvant radiotherapy and advanced chemotherapeutic agents have facilitated increasingly focused breast cancer operations. Surgical management of breast cancer has shifted from extensive and highly morbid procedures, to the modern concept obtaining the best possible cosmetic result in tandem with the appropriate oncological resection. An ever-growing comprehension of breast cancer biology has led to substantial advances in molecular diagnosis and targeted therapies. An emerging frontier involves the breast cancer microenvironment, as a thorough understanding, while currently lacking, represents a critical opportunity for diagnosis and treatment. Collectively, these improvements will continue to push all therapeutic interventions, including operative, toward the goal of becoming more focused, targeted, and less morbid. PMID:22295246

  4. Cancer Survivorship in the Age of YouTube and Social Media: A Narrative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Yvonne; Folkers, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background As evidenced by the increasing popularity of YouTube (www.youtube.com), personal narratives shared through social media are an area of rapid development in communication among cancer survivors. Identifying the thematic and linguistic characteristics of YouTube cancer stories can provide a better understanding of this naturally occurring communication channel and inform social media communication efforts aiming to use personal stories to reach individuals with serious illnesses. Objective The objective of our study was to provide an in-depth description of authentic personal cancer stories. Through a linguistically based narrative analysis of YouTube stories, the analysis explicates the common attributes of these narratives. Methods Informed by narrative theories, we conducted an iterative, bottom-up analysis of 35 YouTube videos identified by the search terms “cancer survivor” and “cancer stories”. A list of shared thematic and linguistic characteristics was identified and analyzed. Results A subnarrative on the cancer diagnosis was present in 86% (30/35) of the stories under analysis. These diagnostic narratives were characterized by dramatic tension, emotional engagement, markers of the loss of agency or control, depersonalized reference to the medical personnel, and the unexpectedness of a cancer diagnosis. The analysis highlights the themes of story authenticity and emotional engagement in this online communication medium. Conclusions Internet advances have enabled new and efficient exchange of personal stories, including the sharing of personal cancer experience among cancer survivors and their caregivers. The analytic results of this descriptive study point to the common characteristics of authentic cancer survivorship stories online. Furthermore, the results of this descriptive study may inform development of narrative-based communication, particularly in maintaining authenticity and emotional engagement. PMID:21247864

  5. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body. Cancerous cells are also called malignant cells. Causes Cancer grows out of cells in the body. Normal ... of many cancers remains unknown. The most common cause of cancer-related death is lung cancer. In the U.S., ...

  6. The Evaluation of More Lymph Nodes in Colon Cancer Is Associated with Improved Survival in Patients of All Ages

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvement in survival of patients with colon cancer is reduced in elderly patients compared to younger patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the removal of ≥ 12 lymph nodes can explain differences in survival rates between elderly and younger patients diagnosed with colon cancer. Methods In a population-based cohort study, all patients (N = 41,074) diagnosed with colon cancer stage I to III from 2003 through 2010 from the Netherlands Cancer Registry were included. Age groups were defined as < 66, 66–75 and > 75 years of age. Main outcome measures were overall and relative survival, the latter as a proxy for disease specific survival. Results Over an eight years time period there was a 41.2% increase in patients with ≥ 12 lymph nodes removed, whereas the percentage of patients with the presence of lymph node metastases remained stable (35.7% to 37.5%). After adjustment for patient and tumour characteristics and adjuvant chemotherapy, it was found that for patients in which ≥ 12 lymph nodes were removed compared to patients with < 12 lymph nodes removed, there was a statistically significant higher overall survival (< 66: HR: 0.858 (95% CI, 0.789–0.933); 66–75: HR: 0.763 (95% CI, 0.714–0.814); > 75: HR: 0.734 (95% CI, 0.700–0.771)) and relative survival (< 66: RER: 0.783 (95% CI, 0.708–0.865); 66–75: RER: 0.672 (95% CI, 0.611–0.739); > 75: RER: 0.621 (95% CI, 0.567–0.681)) in all three age groups. Conclusions The removal of ≥ 12 lymph nodes is associated with an improvement in both overall and relative survival in all patients. This association was stronger in the elderly patient. The biology of this association needs further clarification. PMID:27196666

  7. Chondrocyte Senescence and Telomere Regulation: Implications in Cartilage Aging and Cancer (A Brief Review)

    PubMed Central

    Mollano, Anthony V; Martin, James A; Buckwalter, Joseph A

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies on osteoarthritis and the cartilage aging in our laboratory demonstrate that chronologic age correlates with molecular changes in human chondrocytes that affect cell cycle control and replicative life span. These findings indicate that age-related changes in chondrocytes may explain the heightened risk for development of primary osteoarthritis (OA) with increasing age. Concomitant studies of human chondrosarcoma suggest that these aging mechanisms may also play a role in preventing the malignant transformation of chondrocytes. The convergence at the molecular level of these seemingly dissimilar biologic processes provides an excellent opportunity to deepen our understanding of the fundamental processes underlying cartilage neoplasia, cartilage aging, and osteoarthritis. PMID:12180600

  8. Screening for Colorectal Cancer in African Americans: Determinants and Rationale for an Earlier Age to Commence Screening

    PubMed Central

    Carethers, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is a highly cost-effective approach to reduce morbidity and mortality of patients, as well as reduce the prevalence of CRC in populations. Current recommendations for CRC screening for the asymptomatic general population begin at age 50 years, an age after which ~95% of cancers occur. Determinants that modify the timing and frequency for screening include a personal or family history of adenomatous polyps or CRC, the age of onset of these colonic lesions, and the presence or potential for a patient to harbor a higher-risk syndrome such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), or Lynch syndrome.. Although race, like family history, is a heritable factor, it has not engendered inclusion in the same broad systematic screening recommendations despite multiple studies demonstrating a disparity in the incidence and mortality from CRC, and the potential for targeted screening to reduce the disparity. In particular, African Americans, when compared to Caucasians, (a) have lower CRC screening utilization rates, (b) have an earlier presentation of CRC (0-8 years younger than Caucasians) and, more often have aggressive biological features more prone to metastasis, (c) have a higher CRC prevalence at all ages and a higher proportion of CRCs before 50 years of age (~11% vs 5% in Caucasians), (d) are less likely to know or transmit personal or family history of adenomas or CRC that might change their screening to an earlier age, (e) present with 7-15% excess right-sided CRCs that are not microsatellite unstable, (f) show higher frequencies of high-risk adenomas at every decile of age, and an excess of high-risk proximal adenomas that mirror the excess of proximal CRCs, (g) have cancers that demonstrate lower proportions of good prognostic biomarkers such as MSI and higher proportions of bad prognosticators such as EMAST, (h) may possess gut microbiota more conducive to initiating and/or propagating colonic

  9. Morphometric studies of age related changes in normal human breast and their significance for evolution of mammary cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, S W; Cowen, P N; Bird, C C

    1985-01-01

    Ageing changes in the normal human female breast were studied to determine their significance for the evolution of mammary cancer. Employing the morphometric techniques of point counting and planimetry, objective quantitative measurements were made of the structure of the normal female breast in 58 subjects from the prepubertal to late postreproductive period. The relative amounts of epithelial and connective tissue varied with age, and the epithelial elements (combined lobular and extralobular) were unevenly distributed within the gland, with lower containing more than upper quadrants. The upper outer quadrant, however, usually contained the largest proportion of lobular units, which may relate to the higher incidence of lobular carcinoma found in this quadrant. Involution was shown to be a premenopausal rather than postmenopausal phenomenon. Mammary dysplastic changes were uncommon in all age groups. Images PMID:3973052

  10. Maximizing Wellness in Successful Aging and Cancer Coping: The Importance of Family Communication from a Socioemotional Selectivity Theoretical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Carla L.; Nussbaum, Jon F.

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal communication is a fundamental part of being and key to health. Interactions within family are especially critical to wellness across time. Family communication is a central means of adaptation to stress, coping, and successful aging. Still, no theoretical argument in the discipline exists that prioritizes kin communication in health. Theoretical advances can enhance interventions and policies that improve family life. This article explores socioemotional selectivity theory (SST), which highlights communication in our survival. Communication partner choice is based on one's time perspective, which affects our prioritization of goals to survive—goals sought socially. This is a first test of SST in a family communication study on women's health and aging. More than 300 women of varying ages and health status participated. Two time factors, later adulthood and late-stage breast cancer, lead women to prioritize family communication. Findings provide a theoretical basis for prioritizing family communication issues in health reform. PMID:26997920

  11. Are We Appropriately Selecting Therapy For Patients With Cervical Cancer? Longitudinal Patterns-of-Care Analysis for Stage IB-IIB Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Julie A.; Rusthoven, Chad; DeWitt, Peter E.; Davidson, Susan A.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We performed a patterns-of-care analysis evaluating the effects of newer technology and recent research findings on treatment decisions over 26 years to determine whether patients with cervical cancer are being appropriately selected for treatment to optimize the therapeutic ratio. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program from 1983 to 2009. We identified 10,933 women with stage IB-IIB cervical carcinoma. Results: Of the 10,933 subjects identified, 40.1% received surgery, 26.8% received radiation (RT), and 33.1% received surgery plus RT. RT use increased after 2000 compared to prior to 2000, with a corresponding decrease in surgery and surgery plus RT. Among patients with risk factors including tumor size >4 cm, positive parametria, and positive lymph nodes, declining use of surgery plus RT was observed. However, 23% of patients with tumors >4 cm, 20% of patients with positive parametria, and 55% of node-positive patients continued to receive surgery plus RT as of 2009. Factors associated with increased use of surgery plus RT included patient age <50 and node-positive status. Conclusions: In this largest patterns-of-care analysis to date for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, we found a substantial proportion of patients continue to undergo surgery followed by radiation, despite randomized data supporting the use of definitive radiation therapy, with lower morbidity than surgery and radiation.

  12. Radiation Therapy, Cardiac Risk Factors, and Cardiac Toxicity in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, John J.; Wang Jian; McBride, Russell; Neugut, Alfred I.; Grann, Victor R. ||; Jacobson, Judith S. |; Grann, Alison; Hershman, Dawn ||. E-mail: dlh23@columbia.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The benefits of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer may be counterbalanced by the risk of cardiac toxicity. We studied the cardiac effects of RT and the impact of pre-existing cardiac risk factors (CRFs) in a population-based sample of older patients with breast cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database of women {>=}65 years diagnosed with Stages I to III breast cancer from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2000, we used multivariable logistic regression to model the associations of demographic and clinical variables with postmastectomy and postlumpectomy RT. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we then modeled the association between treatment and myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemia in the 10 or more years after diagnosis, taking the predictors of treatment into account. Results: Among 48,353 women with breast cancer; 19,897 (42%) were treated with lumpectomy and 26,534 (55%) with mastectomy; the remainder had unknown surgery type (3%). Receipt of RT was associated with later year of diagnosis, younger age, fewer comorbidities, nonrural residence, and chemotherapy. Postlumpectomy RT was also associated with white ethnicity and no prior history of heart disease (HD). The RT did not increase the risk of MI. Presence of MI was associated with age, African American ethnicity, advanced stage, nonrural residence, more than one comorbid condition, a hormone receptor-negative tumor, CRFs and HD. Among patients who received RT, tumor laterality was not associated with MI outcome. The effect of RT on the heart was not influenced by HD or CRFs. Conclusion: It appears unlikely that RT would increase the risk of MI in elderly women with breast cancer, regardless of type of surgery, tumor laterality, or history of CRFs or HD, for at least 10 years.

  13. Effectiveness of Androgen-Deprivation Therapy and Radiotherapy for Older Men With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Hahn, Stephen A.; Polsky, Daniel; Armstrong, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined whether the survival advantage of androgen-deprivation therapy with radiotherapy (ADT plus RT) relative to ADT alone for men with locally advanced prostate cancer reported in two randomized trials holds in real-world clinical practice and extended the evidence to patients poorly represented in the trials. Methods We conducted nonrandomized effectiveness studies of ADT plus RT versus ADT in three groups of patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2007 and observed through 2009 in the SEER-Medicare data set: (1) the randomized clinical trial (RCT) cohort, which included men age 65 to 75 years and was most consistent with participants in the randomized trials; (2) the elderly cohort, which included men age > 75 years with locally advanced prostate cancer; and (3) the screen-detected cohort, which included men age ≥ 65 years with screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer. We evaluated cause-specific and all-cause mortality using propensity score, instrumental variable (IV), and sensitivity analyses. Results In the RCT cohort, ADT plus RT was associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality relative to ADT alone (cause-specific propensity score–adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.49; all-cause propensity score–adjusted HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.67). Effectiveness estimates for the RCT cohort were not significantly different from those from randomized trials (P > .1). In the elderly and screen-detected cohorts, ADT plus RT was also associated with reduced cause-specific and all-cause mortality. IV analyses produced estimates similar to those from propensity score–adjusted methods. Conclusion Older men with locally advanced or screen-detected high-risk prostate cancer who receive ADT alone risk decrements in cause-specific and overall survival. PMID:25559808

  14. The Moderating Effect of Age on the 12-Month Prevalence of Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Adults with a Lifetime History of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simning, Adam; Conwell, Yeates; Mohile, Supriya G.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine how age may modulate the association of a history of cancer with a 12-month history of anxiety and depressive disorders. Design Population-based, cross-sectional surveys. Setting The Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES) occurred in the United States and were conducted in 2001-2003. Participants CPES included 16,423 adult participants, of whom 702 reported a cancer history. Measurements The Composite International Diagnostic Interview evaluated the presence of a 12-month history of anxiety and depressive disorders. Results Among those with a cancer history, older adults (≥ 60 years old) were less likely than younger adults (18-59 years old) to have a 12-month history of an anxiety or depressive disorder. Compared to their peers without cancer, younger adults with a cancer history had more anxiety (23.8% vs. 13.9%) and depressive (16.0% vs. 9.5%) disorders, whereas older adults with a cancer history had lower levels of anxiety (3.7% vs. 6.3%) and depressive (1.9% vs. 3.9%) disorders. In multivariable modeling, there was a statistically significant interaction between age group and cancer history, with the risk for anxiety and depressive disorders elevated in the younger age group with a cancer history (OR=5.84 and OR=6.13, respectively), but decreased in the older age group with a cancer history (OR=0.55 and OR=0.45). Conclusions Our findings suggest that there is considerable age-dependent variation with regard to anxiety and depressive disorders in adults with a cancer history. Investigation of the mechanisms contributing to this apparent age differential in risk could have important mental illness treatment implications in this population. PMID:24080385

  15. Are Cancer Registries Unconstitutional?

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Robert H; Clarke, Christina A; Crawley, LaVera M; Glaser, Sally L

    2010-01-01

    Population-based cancer registration, mandated throughout the United States, is central to quantifying the breadth and impact of cancer. It facilitates research to learn what causes cancer to develop and, in many cases, lead to death. However, as concerns about privacy increase, cancer registration has come under question. Recently, its constitutionality was challenged on the basis of 1) the vagueness of statutory aims to pursue public health versus the individual privacy interests of cancer patients, and 2) the alleged indignity of one's individual medical information being transmitted to government authorities. Examining cancer registry statutes in states covered by the US National Cancer Institute's SEER Program and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Program of Cancer Registries, we found that cancer registration laws do state specific public health benefits, and offer reasonable limits and safeguards on the government's possession of private medical information. Thus, we argue that cancer registration would survive constitutional review, is compatible with the civil liberties protected by privacy rights in the U.S., satisfies the conditions that justify public health expenditures, and serves human rights to enjoy the highest attainable standards of health, the advances of science, and the benefits of government efforts to prevent and control disease. PMID:20199835

  16. The Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients with Stage III Colorectal Cancer is Independent of Age and Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Wildes, Tanya M.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Powers, Brian; Vlahiotis, Anna; Mutch, Matthew; Spitznagel, Edward L.; Tan, Benjamin; Piccirillo, Jay F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the combined effect of age and comorbidity on receipt of chemotherapy and its impact on survival in elderly patients with stage III colorectal cancer (CRC). Materials and methods All patients over age 65 with Stage III CRC diagnosed 1996–2006 were identified from the Barnes-Jewish Hospital Oncology Data Services registry. An age/comorbidity staging system was created using the ACE-27 comorbidity index and data from both Stage II and III CRC. The staging system was then applied to patients with Stage III CRC. Odds of receiving chemotherapy were calculated, and survival analyses determined the impact of chemotherapy on overall survival in each age/comorbidity stage. Results 435 patients with Stage III CRC were evaluated [median age 75 years (range 65–99)]. Advancing age/comorbidity stage (Alpha, Beta, Gamma) was associated with decreasing odds of receiving chemotherapy for Stage III CRC [Odds Ratio 0.83 (95% CI, 0.51–1.35) for Beta and 0.14 (95% CI, 0.08–0.24) for Gamma, compared to Alpha]. Chemotherapy was associated with lower risk of death in each of the age/comorbidity stages, compared to those who underwent surgery only. The hazard ratio for death in patients who did not receive chemotherapy, relative to those who did, within each age/comorbidity stage was 1.8 [95%CI 1.06–3.06] for Alpha, 2.24 [95%CI 1.38–3.63] for Beta and 2.10 [95% CI 1.23–3.57] for Gamma. Conclusion While stage III CRC patients with increasing age and comorbidity are less likely to receive chemotherapy, receipt of chemotherapy is associated with a lower risk of death. PMID:21113435

  17. Factors Associated With Unplanned Hospitalizations Among Patients With Nonmetastatic Colorectal Cancers Intended for Treatment in the Ambulatory Setting

    PubMed Central

    Fessele, Kristen L.; Hayat, Matthew J.; Mayer, Deborah K.; Atkins, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy administration and supportive management for solid tumors is intended to take place in the ambulatory setting, but little is known about why some patients experience treatment-related, adverse events so severe as to require acute inpatient care. Objective Identify predictors of initial and repeated unplanned hospitalizations and potential financial impact among Medicare patients with early-stage (stages I–III) colorectal cancer receiving outpatient chemotherapy. Methods Advanced statistical modeling was used to analyze a cohort of patients (N = 1485) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)–Medicare database diagnosed from 2003–2007 with colorectal cancer as their first primary malignancy. Patients were age 66 and older at diagnosis, had uninterrupted Medicare Parts A and B coverage with no health maintenance organization (HMO) component, and received chemotherapy at least one time. Results Female sex, younger age, multiple comorbidities, rural geography, higher high school completion rates, and lower median income per census tract were significant predictors of the likelihood of initial unplanned hospitalizations. Non-White race, receipt of radiation therapy, rural geography and higher weighted comorbidity scores were factors associated with the number of hospitalizations experienced. The total Medicare charges calculated for these admissions was $38,976,171, with the median charge per admission at $20,412. Discussion Demographic and clinical factors were identified that form the foundation of work towards development of a risk factor profile for unplanned hospitalization. Further work is needed to incorporate additional clinical data to create a clinically applicable model. PMID:26657478

  18. Mutational Analysis in Pediatric Thyroid Cancer and Correlations with Age, Ethnicity, and Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Nikita, Maria Eleni; Jiang, Wen; Cheng, Shih-Min; Hantash, Feras M.; McPhaul, Michael J.; Newbury, Robert O.; Phillips, Susan A.; Reitz, Richard E.; Waldman, Frederic M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) incidence in pediatrics is rising, most being papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The objective of the study was to assess the prevalence of different mutations in pediatric WDTC and correlate the genotype with the clinical phenotype. Methods: This is a single-center retrospective study. Thyroid tissue blocks from 42 consecutive pediatric WDTC patients who underwent thyroidectomy between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed at Quest Diagnostics for BRAFV600E, RAS mutations (N,K,H), and RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ rearrangements, using validated molecular methods. Thyroid carcinomas included PTC, follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC), and follicular variant of PTC (FVPTC). Results: Thirty-nine samples (29 females) were genotyped. The mean age at diagnosis was 14.7 years (range 7.9–18.4 years), and most were Hispanic (56.4%) or Caucasian (35.9%). The mean follow-up period was 2.9 years. Mutations were noted in 21/39 (53.8%), with both BRAFV600E (n = 9), and RET/PTC (n = 6) detected only in PTC. Mutations were detected in 2/5 FTC (PAX8/PPARγ and NRAS) and 3/6 FVPTC cases (PAX8/PPARγ). Of 28 PTC patients, 57.1% had mutations: 32.1% with BRAFV600E, 21.4% with RET/PTC, and 3.6% with NRAS. Of patients with BRAFV600E, 77.8% were Hispanic and 88.9% were >15 years, while all RET/PTC-positive patients were ≤15 years (p = 0.003). Tumor size, lymph node involvement, and distant metastasis at diagnosis (or soon after 131I ablation) did not vary significantly based on the mutation. Conclusions: BRAFV600E was the most common mutation, especially in older and Hispanic adolescents. A larger, ethnically diverse pediatric cohort followed long term will enable the genotypic variability, clinical presentation, and response to therapy to be better assessed. PMID:26649796

  19. The association of insurance and stage at diagnosis among patients aged 55 to 74 years in the national cancer database.

    PubMed

    Ward, Elizabeth M; Fedewa, Stacey A; Cokkinides, Vilma; Virgo, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated that individuals without health insurance are less likely to have a usual source of health care and receive preventive services including cancer screening and are more likely to be diagnosed at late stages of cancer. To examine the potential impact of health care reform on stage at diagnosis, we analyzed the relationship between stage at diagnosis and insurance status for patients who were nearly elderly (55-64 years old) and younger elderly (65-74 years old). We examined patients diagnosed with 8 common cancers from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2007, using data from the National Cancer Database, a hospital-based cancer registry jointly sponsored by the American Cancer Society and the American College of Surgeons, which includes approximately 70% of all malignant cancers in the United States treated at 1400 facilities throughout the United States. Cancer site-specific multivariable log binomial models were used to generate risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) estimates for advanced stage of disease at diagnosis (stage III or IV vs stage I) by insurance category, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, and area level education. The final analytic cohort contained 843,177 patients. For each cancer site, uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients had the highest proportion of American Joint Committee on Cancer stages III and IV cancers at diagnosis, and those with private insurance and Medicare plus supplemental insurance the lowest. Risk ratios (95% CI) for uninsured patients compared with privately insured patients were 1.75 (1.64-1.86) for prostate, 1.12 (1.11-1.14) for lung/bronchus, 2.08 (1.98-2.17) for breast, 1.25 (1.22-1.27) for colorectal, 1.51 (1.40-1.64) for uterine corpus, 1.91 (1.73-2.12) for urinary bladder, 1.80 (1.62-2.01) for melanoma, and 1.37 (1.24-1.51) for thyroid cancers. Lower RRs (95% CI) observed for patients with Medicare coverage alone were 1.23 (1.17-1.29) for prostate, 1.05 (1.03-1.06) for lung

  20. The Incidence Characteristics of Second Primary Malignancy after Diagnosis of Primary Colon and Rectal Cancer: A Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xu; Jin, Yinghu; Chen, Yinggang; Jiang, Zheng; Liu, Zheng; Zhao, Zhixun; Yan, Peng; Wang, Guiyu; Wang, Xishan

    2015-01-01

    Background With the expanding population of colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors in the United States, one concerning issue is the risk of developing second primary malignancies (SPMs) for these CRC survivors. The present study attempts to identify the incidence characteristics of SPMs after diagnosis of first primary colon cancer (CC) and rectal cancer (RC). Methods 189,890 CC and 83,802 RC cases were identified from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (SEER) database. We performed rate analysis on incidence trend of SPMs in both CC and RC. Expected incidence rates were stratified by age, race and stage, calendar year of first CRC diagnosis and latency period since first CRC diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs), measure for estimating risk of SPMs, were calculated for CC and RC respectively. Results The trends of incidence of SPMs in both CC and RC were decreasing from 1992 to 2012. Both CC and RC survivors had higher risk of developing SPMs (SIRCC = 1.13; SIRRC = 1.05). For CC patients, the highest risks of SPM were cancers of small intestine (SIR = 4.03), colon (SIR = 1.87) and rectum (SIR = 1.80). For RC patients, the highest risks of SPMs were cancers of rectum (SIR = 2.88), small intestine (SIR = 2.16) and thyroid (SIR = 1.46). According to stratified analyses, we also identified incidence characteristics which were contributed to higher risk of developing SPMs, including the age between 20 and 40, American Indian/Alaska Native, localized stage, diagnosed at calendar year from 2002 to 2012 and the latency between 12 and 59 months. Conclusions Both CC and RC survivors remain at higher risk of developing SPMs. The identification of incidence characteristics of SPMs is extremely essential for continuous cancer surveillance among CRC survivors. PMID:26571301

  1. Prenatal famine exposure and adult mortality from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other causes through age 63 years.

    PubMed

    Ekamper, Peter; van Poppel, Frans; Stein, Aryeh D; Bijwaard, Govert E; Lumey, L H

    2015-02-15

    Nutritional conditions in early life may affect adult health, but prior studies of mortality have been limited to small samples. We evaluated the relationship between pre-/perinatal famine exposure during the Dutch Hunger Winter of 1944-1945 and mortality through age 63 years among 41,096 men born in 1944-1947 and examined at age 18 years for universal military service in the Netherlands. Of these men, 22,952 had been born around the time of the Dutch famine in 6 affected cities; the remainder served as unexposed controls. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios for death from cancer, heart disease, other natural causes, and external causes. After 1,853,023 person-years of follow-up, we recorded 1,938 deaths from cancer, 1,040 from heart disease, 1,418 from other natural causes, and 523 from external causes. We found no increase in mortality from cancer or cardiovascular disease after prenatal famine exposure. However, there were increases in mortality from other natural causes (hazard ratio = 1.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.49) and external causes (hazard ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 1.97) after famine exposure in the first trimester of gestation. Further follow-up of the cohort is needed to provide more accurate risk estimates of mortality from specific causes of death after nutritional disturbances during gestation and very early life. PMID:25632050

  2. NIH Study Offers Insight into Why Cancer Incidence Increases with Age

    MedlinePlus

    ... increases cancer risk remains unclear. Researchers suspect that DNA methylation, or the binding of chemical tags, called methyl groups, onto DNA, may be involved. Methyl groups activate or silence ...

  3. [Clinical and prognostic features of surgical treatment in gastric cancer in aged patients].

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng; Zhu, Zhenggang

    2016-05-25

    The incidence of gastric cancer in the elderly is increasing because of increased life expectancy and improved medical care. Gastric cancer in the elderly is characterized by specific clinicopathological features, including a male-predominance gender tendency, more comorbid diseases, more advanced clinical stage, distinct histopathological findings, absence of family history, etc. The incidence of surgery-related post-operative complication shows no significant difference between elderly and non-elderly patients. However, the incidence of non-surgery-related complications is relatively higher in elderly patients. Although the overall survival rate of elderly patients is lower, the disease-specific survival rate of elderly patients is comparable with non-elderly patients. Therefore, surgery is still an effective way to improve the prognosis of elderly gastric cancer patients, and care should be taken while dealing with the comorbid diseases in elderly gastric cancer patients to improve the survival. PMID:27215533

  4. The impact of a breast cancer diagnosis on health-related quality of life. A prospective comparison among middle-aged to elderly women with and without breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Randi V; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Larsen, Matilde B; von Heymann-Horan, Annika B; Appel, Charlotte W; Christensen, Jane; Tjønneland, Anne; Ross, Lone; Johansen, Christoffer; Bidstrup, Pernille E

    2016-06-01

    Background The improved survival after breast cancer has prompted knowledge on the effect of a breast cancer diagnosis on health-related quality of life (HQoL). This study compared changes in HQoL among women from before to after breast cancer diagnosis with longitudinal changes among women who remained breast cancer-free. Material and methods The Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study included 57 053 cancer-free persons aged 50-64 years at baseline (1993-1997). We used data from first follow-up (1999-2002) and second follow-up (2010-2012) on HQoL [Medical Outcomes Survey, short form (SF-36)] obtained from 542 women aged 64-82 years with primary breast cancer (stages I-III) and a randomly matched sample of 729 women who remained breast cancer-free. Linear regression models were used to estimate the differences in changes in HQoL between women with and without breast cancer; the analyses were repeated with stratification according to age, comorbidity, partner support and time since diagnosis. Results Women with breast cancer reported significantly larger decreases in HQoL from before to after diagnosis than those who remained breast cancer-free (physical component summary, -2.0; 95% CI -2.8; -1.2, mental component summary, -1.5, 95% CI -2.3; -0.6). This association was significantly modified by comorbidity and time since diagnosis. Conclusions Women with breast cancer reported significantly larger HQoL declines than breast cancer-free women. Breast cancer diagnosis seems to have the greatest impact on HQoL closest to diagnosis and in women with comorbidity indicating that this group should be offered timely and appropriate follow-up care to prevent HQoL declines. PMID:26942569

  5. Lung cancer treatment is influenced by income, education, age and place of residence in a country with universal health coverage.

    PubMed

    Nilssen, Yngvar; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Fjellbirkeland, Lars; Bartnes, Kristian; Brustugun, Odd Terje; O'Connell, Dianne L; Yu, Xue Qin; Møller, Bjørn

    2016-03-15

    Selection of lung cancer treatment should be based on tumour characteristics, physiological reserves and preferences of the patient. Our aims were to identify and quantify other factors associated with treatment received. Lung cancer patient data from 2002 to 2011 were obtained from the national population-based Cancer Registry of Norway, Statistics Norway and the Norwegian Patient Register. Multivariable logistic regression examined whether year of diagnosis, age, sex, education, income, health trust, smoking status, extent of disease, histology and comorbidities were associated with choice of treatment; surgery or radical or palliative radiotherapy, within 1 year of diagnosis. Among the 24,324 lung cancer patients identified, the resection rate remained constant while the proportion of radical radiotherapy administered increased from 8.6 to 14.1%. Older patients, those with lower household incomes and certain health trusts were less likely to receive any treatment. Lower education and the male gender were identified as negative predictors for receiving surgery. Smoking history was positively associated with both radical and palliative radiotherapy, while comorbidity and symptoms were independently associated with receiving surgery and palliative radiotherapy. Although Norway is a highly egalitarian country with a free, universal healthcare system, this study indicates that surgery and radical and palliative radiotherapy were under-used among the elderly, those with a lower socioeconomic status and those living in certain health trusts. PMID:26421593

  6. Age-dependent Characteristics in Women with Breast Cancer: Mastectomy and Reconstructive Trends at an Urban Academic Institution.

    PubMed

    Rodby, Katherine A; Robinson, Emilie; Danielson, Kirstie K; Quinn, Karina P; Antony, Anuja K

    2016-03-01

    Breast reconstruction is an important aspect of treatment after breast cancer. Postmastectomy reconstruction bears a significant impact on a woman's postsurgical confidence, sexuality, and overall well-being. Previous studies have inferred that women under age 40 years have unique characteristics that distinguish them from an older cohort. Identifying age-dependent trends will assist with counseling women on mastectomy and reconstruction. To identify age-dependent trends, 100 consecutive women were sampled from a prospectively maintained breast reconstruction database at an urban academic institution from June 2010 through June 2013. Women were placed into two cohorts <40 and ≥40 as well cohorts by decade (20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s). Statistical trends were reported as odds of risk per year of increasing age using logistic regression; linear regression, χ(2), and Fischer's exact were used to compare <40 and ≥40 and split cohorts for comparison. Comorbidities, tumor staging, oncologic treatment including chemotherapy and radiation, disease characteristics and genetics, and mastectomy, reconstructive and symmetry procedures were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. In 100 patients of the sample study cohort, 151 reconstructions were performed. Increasing age was associated with one or more comorbidities [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, P = 0.005], whereas younger age was associated with metastatic disease (OR = 0.88, P = 0.006), chemotherapy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.01), and radiation (OR = 0.94, P = 0.006); split cohorts demonstrated similar trends (P < 0.005). Mastectomy and reconstructive characteristics associated with younger age included bilateral mastectomy (OR = 0.94, P = 0.004), tissue expander (versus autologous flap) (OR = 0.94, P = 0.009), extra high implant type (OR = 0.94, P = 0.049), whereas increasing use of autologous flaps and contralateral mastopexy symmetry procedures (OR = 1.09, P = 0.02) were associated with an aging cohort

  7. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers in hairy cell leukaemia: a Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results population analysis and the 30-year experience at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Watts, Justin M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hsu, Meier; Lacouture, Mario E; Postow, Michael A; Park, Jae H; Stein, Eytan M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Devlin, Sean M; Tallman, Martin S

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) incidence rates after a diagnosis of hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). We assessed 267 HCL patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for melanoma and NMSC incidence rates after HCL. Incidence data from MSKCC patients demonstrated a 10-year combined melanoma and NMSC skin cancer rate of 11·3%, melanoma 4·4% and NMSC 6·9%. Molecular analysis of skin cancers from MSKCC patients revealed activating RAS mutations in 3/9 patients, including one patient with melanoma. Of 4750 SEER patients with HCL, 55 (1·2%) had a subsequent diagnosis of melanoma. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) did not show that melanoma was more common in HCL patients versus the general population (SIR 1·3, 95% CI 0·78-2·03). Analysis of SEER HCL patients diagnosed before and after 1990 (approximately before and after purine analogue therapy was introduced) showed no evidence of an increased incidence after 1990. A better understanding of any potential association between HCL and skin cancer is highly relevant given ongoing trials using BRAF inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, for relapsed HCL, as RAS-mutant skin cancers could be paradoxically activated in these patients. PMID:26115047

  8. What Prevents Men Aged 40–64 Years from Prostate Cancer Screening in Namibia?

    PubMed Central

    Kangmennaang, Joseph; Mkandawire, Paul; Luginaah, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Although a growing body of evidence demonstrates the public health burden of prostate cancer in SSA, relatively little is known about the underlying factors surrounding the low levels of testing for the disease in the context of this region. Using Namibia Demographic Health Survey dataset (NDHS, 2013), we examined the factors that influence men's decision to screen for prostate cancer in Namibia. Methods. We use complementary log-log regression models to explore the determinants of screening for prostate cancer. We also corrected for the effect of unobserved heterogeneity that may affect screening behaviours at the cluster level. Results. The results show that health insurance coverage (OR = 2.95, p = 0.01) is an important predictor of screening for prostate cancer in Namibia. In addition, higher education and discussing reproductive issues with a health worker (OR = 2.02, p = 0.05) were more likely to screening for prostate cancer. Conclusions. A universal health insurance scheme may be necessary to increase uptake of prostate cancer screening. However it needs to be acknowledged that expanded screening can have negative consequences and any allocation of scarce resources towards screening must be guided by evidence obtained from the local context about the costs and benefits of screening. PMID:26880917

  9. Nativity disparities in late-stage diagnosis and cause-specific survival among Hispanic women with invasive cervical cancer: An analysis of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre, Jane R.; Zhou, Renke; Amirian, E. Susan; Follen, Michele; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While cervical cancer screening and risk behaviors have been found to vary among U.S.- and foreign-born Hispanic women, many cancer epidemiology studies have conceptualized Hispanics as a homogenous group. Here we examine differences in cervical cancer stage at diagnosis and survival among Hispanic women by nativity. Methods We use data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, 1998–2008. Nativity was based on place of birth and was categorized as U.S.- versus foreign-born. Distant and regional tumors were classified as late-stage, while local tumors were classified as early-stage. Results Forty seven percent of cases of invasive cervical cancer among Hispanics were diagnosed at a late stage and over half of invasive cervical cancer cases were among foreign-born women. Foreign-born Hispanic women were significantly more likely than U.S.-born Hispanics to have late-stage diagnosis, after adjusting for age at diagnosis and tumor histology (adjusted odds ration= 1.09, p-value = 0.003). There was heterogeneity in the association between nativity and survival by stage at diagnosis. Among cases with early-stage diagnosis, survival was poorer among foreign-born versus U.S.-born Hispanics after adjusting for age at diagnosis, histology, and cancer-directed therapy (adjusted HR = 1.31, p-value = 0.030). However, among cases with late-stage diagnosis, survival was better among foreign--born Hispanics (adjusted HR = 0.81, p-value < 0.001). Conclusions We hypothesize that nativity differences in survival may be indicative of diverse risk, screening, and treatment profiles. Given such differences, it may be inappropriate to aggregate Hispanics as a single group for cervical cancer research. PMID:23934001

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening in Women over Age 30 in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jane J.; Ortendahl, Jesse; Goldie, Sue J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Women over the age of 30 are the main beneficiaries of improved cervical cancer screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing. The role of vaccination against HPV types 16 and 18, recommended routinely in pre-adolescent girls, is unclear in this age group. Objective To assess the health and economic outcomes of HPV vaccination in older women participating in the U.S. screening program. Design Cost-effectiveness analysis with an empirically-calibrated model. Data Sources Published literature. Target Population U.S. women, ages 35–45. Time Horizon Lifetime. Perspective Societal. Interventions HPV vaccination added to screening strategies that differ by test (cytology, HPV DNA testing), frequency, and start age, versus screening alone. Outcome Measures Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (2006 U.S. dollars per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained). Results of Base-Case Analysis In the context of annual or biennial screening, HPV vaccination of women ages 35–45 ranged from $116,950 to $272,350 per QALY using cytology with HPV DNA testing for triage of equivocal results, and from $193,690 to $381,590 per QALY using combination cytology and HPV DNA testing, depending on age and screening frequency. Results of Sensitivity Analysis Probabilistic sensitivity analysis revealed that the probability of HPV vaccination being cost-effective for women ages 35–45 was 0% when screening occurred annually or biennially, and <5% when screening occurred triennially, at thresholds considered good value for money. Limitations Uncertainty in the natural history of disease and vaccine efficacy in older women. Conclusions Given currently available information, the effectiveness of HPV vaccination of screened women over age 30 appears, on average, to be small. Compared with current screening that uses sensitive HPV DNA testing, HPV vaccination in this older population is associated with cost-effectiveness ratios that are less attractive than well

  11. Experience of Southern Chinese: new challenges in treating young female breast cancer patients at child-bearing age--a call for multi-disciplinary collaboration.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Ava; Chu, Annie Tsz-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Compared with western populations, Southern Chinese, especially those residing in Hong Kong, are experiencing increasing breast cancer incidence and also a younger onset of breast cancer. Combating this problem and treating young women with breast cancer poses specific challenges and complicated considerations. With reference to the postponement in the age of marriage and reproduction in modern societies, the issue of fertility after breast cancer, especially for high-risk young patients, is one significant quality of life concern that cannot be underestimated as a secondary medical topic. While the issue has its significance and is confronting front-line breast cancer care teams of different disciplines, related research is mostly on Caucasians. In cultures where the traditional expectation on women for child-bearing is still prominent, young breast cancer patients may endure significant distress over fertility options after breast cancer. There is a lack of related data on Asian breast cancer survivors at child-bearing age, which calls for a pressing need to encourage qualitative groundwork, case reports, and cohort experiences in hope for providing insight and arouse research interest. In order to provide a long-term comprehensive multidisciplinary management service with encouragement to encompass prospects for a positive future among young breast cancer survivors, relevant disciplines need to collaborate and work efficaciously together both on clinical and research aspects of cancer-related fertility issues. PMID:22994790

  12. DiffVar: a new method for detecting differential variability with application to methylation in cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Phipson, Belinda; Oshlack, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of DNA is known to be essential to development and dramatically altered in cancers. The Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip has been used extensively as a cost-effective way to profile nearly half a million CpG sites across the human genome. Here we present DiffVar, a novel method to test for differential variability between sample groups. DiffVar employs an empirical Bayes model framework that can take into account any experimental design and is robust to outliers. We applied DiffVar to several datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas, as well as an aging dataset. DiffVar is available in the missMethyl Bioconductor R package. PMID:25245051

  13. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive aging to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Day, Felix R; Ruth, Katherine S; Thompson, Deborah J; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Andrew D; Elks, Cathy E; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A; Franke, Lude L; Huffman, Jennifer E; Keller, Margaux F; McArdle, Patrick F; Nutile, Teresa; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Schick, Ursula M; Smith, Jennifer A; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Yao, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Corre, Tanguy; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Mangino, Massimo; Smith, Albert V; Tanaka, Toshiko; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antoniou, Antonis C; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Alice M; Barbieri, Caterina; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bernstein, Leslie; Bielinski, Suzette J; Blomqvist, Carl; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boutin, Thibaud S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Campbell, Archie; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chapman, J Ross; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M; Eicher, John D; Fasching, Peter A; Faul, Jessica D; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gandin, Ilaria; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G; Girotto, Giorgia G; Goldberg, Mark S; González-Neira, Anna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grove, Megan L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Henderson, Brian E; Hocking, Lynne J; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Huang, Jinyan; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Samuel E; Kabisch, Maria; Karasik, David; Knight, Julia A; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooperberg, Charles; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Jingmei; Li, Xin; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Yongmei; Luan, Jian'an; Lubinski, Jan; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Manz, Judith; Margolin, Sara; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G; Masciullo, Corrado; Meindl, Alfons; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Michael; Neale, Benjamin M; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Newman, Anne B; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Olson, Janet E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peters, Ulrike; Petersmann, Astrid; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Pirastu, Nicola N; Pirie, Ailith; Pistis, Giorgio; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Psaty, Bruce M; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Raffel, Leslie J; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sanna, Serena; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmidt, Frank; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Scott, Robert A; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Simard, Jacques; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Swerdlow, Anthony; Taylor, Kent D; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Turner, Stephen T; Vozzi, Diego; Wang, Qin; Wellons, Melissa; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce B H R; Wright, Alan F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zheng, Wei; Zygmunt, Marek; Bergmann, Sven; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E; Ferrucci, Luigi; Montgomery, Grant W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Tim D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Ciullo, Marina; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F; Gasparini, Paolo P; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Hayward, Caroline; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kraft, Peter; McKnight, Barbara; Metspalu, Andres; Morrison, Alanna C; Reiner, Alex P; Ridker, Paul M; Rotter, Jerome I; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Price, Alkes L; Stefansson, Kari; Visser, Jenny A; Ong, Ken K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Murabito, Joanne M; Perry, John R B; Murray, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ∼70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two regions harboring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in or near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses identified major association with DNA damage response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomization analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (∼6% increase in risk per year; P = 3 × 10(-14)), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure rather than DDR mechanisms. PMID:26414677

  14. [Age differences in psychosocial resources and psychological well-being of cancer patients at the start of chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Pinquart, M; Fröhlich, C; Silbereisen, R K

    2006-10-01

    It has been suggested that older patients would have fewer resources than younger patients. We assessed psychosocial resources in 361 recently diagnosed cancer patients. Older patients had a stronger internal health-related locus of control but also less hope than younger patients. No age differences were found for self-esteem and perceived social support. In addition, older patients reported lower levels of negative and positive affect. Curative-intended therapy and social support were associated with a more positive affect only in younger patients, whereas hope was only related to older patients' psychological well-being. It is concluded that older cancer patients have similar levels of psychosocial resources compared to younger patients, but that lack of hope is a vulnerability factor for older patients in particular. PMID:17039289

  15. Large-scale genomic analyses link reproductive ageing to hypothalamic signaling, breast cancer susceptibility and BRCA1-mediated DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Pervjakova, Natalia; Chasman, Daniel I.; Stolk, Lisette; Finucane, Hilary K.; Sulem, Patrick; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Andrew D.; Elks, Cathy E.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Brody, Jennifer A.; Franke, Lude L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Keller, Margaux F.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Nutile, Teresa; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Schick, Ursula M.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Teumer, Alexander; Traglia, Michela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Yao, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Corre, Tanguy; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Mangino, Massimo; Smith, Albert V.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Abecasis, Goncalo; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Alice M.; Barbieri, Caterina; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bernstein, Leslie; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Blomqvist, Carl; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boutin, Thibaud S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Campbell, Archie; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chapman, J. Ross; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Coviello, Andrea D.; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dunning, Alison M.; Eicher, John D.; Fasching, Peter A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gandin, Ilaria; Garcia, Melissa E.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Girotto, Giorgia G.; Goldberg, Mark S.; González-Neira, Anna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grove, Megan L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Henderson, Brian E.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Frank B.; Huang, Jinyan; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jones, Samuel E.; Kabisch, Maria; Karasik, David; Knight, Julia A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kooperberg, Charles; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kristensen, Vessela; Lambrechts, Diether; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Jingmei; Li, Xin; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Yongmei; Luan, Jian’an; Lubinski, Jan; Mägi, Reedik; Mannermaa, Arto; Manz, Judith; Margolin, Sara; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Masciullo, Corrado; Meindl, Alfons; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nalls, Michael; Neale, Ben M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Newman, Anne B.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Olson, Janet E.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peters, Ulrike; Petersmann, Astrid; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Pirastu, Nicola N.; Pirie, Ailith; Pistis, Giorgio; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rudolph, Anja; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sanna, Serena; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmidt, Frank; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Scott, Robert A.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Simard, Jacques; Sorice, Rossella; Southey, Melissa C.; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Swerdlow, Anthony; Taylor, Kent D.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Turner, Stephen T.; Vozzi, Diego; Wang, Qin; Wellons, Melissa; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce B.H.R.; Wright, Alan F.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zheng, Wei; Zygmunt, Marek; Bergmann, Sven; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Montgomery, Grant W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Tim D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Ciullo, Marina; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F.; Gasparini, Paolo P.; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kraft, Peter; McKnight, Barbara; Metspalu, Andres; Morrison, Alanna C.; Reiner, Alex P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Price, Alkes L.; Stefansson, Kari; Visser, Jenny A.; Ong, Ken K.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Murabito, Joanne M.; Perry, John R.B.; Murray, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Menopause timing has a substantial impact on infertility and risk of disease, including breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report a dual strategy in ~70,000 women to identify common and low-frequency protein-coding variation associated with age at natural menopause (ANM). We identified 44 regions with common variants, including two harbouring additional rare missense alleles of large effect. We found enrichment of signals in/near genes involved in delayed puberty, highlighting the first molecular links between the onset and end of reproductive lifespan. Pathway analyses revealed a major association with DNA damage-response (DDR) genes, including the first common coding variant in BRCA1 associated with any complex trait. Mendelian randomisation analyses supported a causal effect of later ANM on breast cancer risk (~6% risk increase per-year, P=3×10−14), likely mediated by prolonged sex hormone exposure, rather than DDR mechanisms. PMID:26414677

  16. Surgery for gallbladder cancer in the US: a need for greater lymph node clearance

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Nicholas N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is a rare malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Often identified incidentally after laparoscopic cholecystectomy for presumably benign biliary disease, reoperation with partial hepatic resection and periportal lymph node dissection (LND) is frequently performed. The impact of lymph node (LN) clearance for GBC remains unclear. Methods The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was queried for patients diagnosed with GBC between 1988 and 2009. Survival was calculated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of survival. Results A total of 11,815 patients diagnosed with GBC were identified. Cancer-directed surgery was performed in 8,436 (71.3%) patients. Optimal LN clearance (defined as ≥4 LNs) is associated with young age, advanced T-stage, no radiation therapy, and radical surgery (all <0.001). Greater LND improves survival for all stages (P<0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariable analysis of patients with node-negative disease demonstrated that early stage, greater LND, and radical surgery were strong independent predictors of survival. Conclusions Extensive lymphadenectomy correlates with longer survival even in node negative patients. Extensive LND should be performed in patients with GBC as many patients in the USA are undertreated. PMID:26487937

  17. Age and Comorbid Illness Are Associated With Late Rectal Toxicity Following Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Stenmark, Matt H.; Ritter, Tim; Litzenberg, Dale; Jackson, William; Johnson, Skyler; Albrecht-Unger, Liesel; Donaghy, Alex; Phelps, Laura; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Marsh, Robin; Olson, Karin; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts of patient age and comorbid illness on rectal toxicity following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the Qualitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model in this context. Methods and Materials: Rectal toxicity was analyzed in 718 men previously treated for prostate cancer with EBRT (≥75 Gy). Comorbid illness was scored using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCMI), and the NTCP was evaluated with the QUANTEC model. The influence of clinical and treatment-related parameters on rectal toxicity was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The cumulative incidence of rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was 9.5% and 11.6% at 3 and 5 years and 3.3% and 3.9% at 3 and 5 years for grade ≥3 toxicity, respectively. Each year of age predicted an increasing relative risk of grade ≥2 (P<.03; hazard ratio [HR], 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.06]) and ≥3 rectal toxicity (P<.0001; HR, 1.14 [95% CI,1.07-1.22]). Increasing CCMI predicted rectal toxicity where a history of either myocardial infarction (MI) (P<.0001; HR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.9-13.7]) or congestive heart failure (CHF) (P<.0006; HR, 5.4 [95% CI, 0.6-47.5]) predicted grade ≥3 rectal toxicity, with lesser correlation with grade ≥2 toxicity (P<.02 for MI, and P<.09 for CHF). An age comorbidity model to predict rectal toxicity was developed and confirmed in a validation cohort. The use of anticoagulants increased toxicity independent of age and comorbidity. NTCP was prognostic for grade ≥3 (P=.015) but not grade ≥2 (P=.49) toxicity. On multivariate analysis, age, MI, CHF, and an NTCP >20% all correlated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: Patient age and a history of MI or CHF significantly impact rectal toxicity following EBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer, even after controlling for NTCP.

  18. The aging of the 2000 and 2011 Hallmarks of Cancer reviews: a critique.

    PubMed

    Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2013-09-01

    Two review articles published in 2000 and 2011 by Hanahan and Weinberg have dominated the discourse about carcinogenesis among researchers in the recent past. The basic tenets of their arguments favour considering cancer as a cell-based, genetic disease whereby DNA mutations cause uncontrolled cell proliferation. Their explanation of cancer phenotypes is based on the premises adopted by the somatic mutation theory (SMT) and its cell-centered variants. From their perspective, eight broad features have been identified as so-called 'Hallmarks of Cancer'. Here, we criticize the value of these features based on the numerous intrinsic inconsistencies in the data and in the rationale behind SMT. An alternative interpretation of the same data plus data mostly ignored by Hanahan and Weinberg is proposed, based instead on evolutionarily relevant premises. From such a perspective, cancer is viewed as a tissue-based disease. This alternative, called the tissue organization field theory, incorporates the premise that proliferation and motility are the default state of all cells, and that carcinogenesis is due to alterations on the reciprocal interactions among cells and between cells and their extracellular matrix. In this view, cancer is development gone awry. PMID:23938395

  19. Adjuvant Trastuzumab in HER2-Positive Early Breast Cancer by Age and Hormone Receptor Status: A Cost-Utility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, William; Kvizhinadze, Giorgi; Nair, Nisha; Blakely, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Background The anti–human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) monoclonal antibody trastuzumab improves outcomes in patients with node-positive HER2+ early breast cancer. Given trastuzumab’s high cost, we aimed to estimate its cost-effectiveness by heterogeneity in age and estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status, which has previously been unexplored, to assist prioritisation. Methods and Findings A cost-utility analysis was performed using a Markov macro-simulation model, with a lifetime horizon, comparing a 12-mo regimen of trastuzumab with chemotherapy alone using the latest (2014) effectiveness measures from landmark randomised trials. A New Zealand (NZ) health system perspective was adopted, employing high-quality national administrative data. Incremental quality-adjusted life-years for trastuzumab versus chemotherapy alone are two times higher (2.33 times for the age group 50–54 y; 95% CI 2.29–2.37) for the worst prognosis (ER−/PR−) subtype compared to the best prognosis (ER+/PR+) subtype, causing incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for the former to be less than half those of the latter for the age groups from 25–29 to 90–94 y (0.44 times for the age group 50–54 y; 95% CI 0.43–0.45). If we were to strictly apply an arbitrary cost-effectiveness threshold equal to the NZ gross domestic product per capita (2011 purchasing power parity [PPP]–adjusted: US$30,300; €23,700; £21,200), our study suggests that trastuzumab (2011 PPP-adjusted US$45,400/€35,900/£21,900 for 1 y at formulary prices) may not be cost-effective for ER+ (which are 61% of all) node-positive HER2+ early breast cancer patients but cost-effective for ER−/PR− subtypes (37% of all cases) to age 69 y. Market entry of trastuzumab biosimilars will likely reduce the ICER to below this threshold for premenopausal ER+/PR− cancer but not for ER+/PR+ cancer. Sensitivity analysis using the best-case effectiveness measure for ER+ cancer had

  20. Tea consumption and risk of cancer of the colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Cerhan, J R; Putnam, S D; Bianchi, G D; Parker, A S; Lynch, C F; Cantor, K P

    2001-01-01

    The association between tea consumption and risk of colon and rectal cancers was investigated in a population-based case-control study conducted in Iowa (United States). Colon (n = 685) and rectal (n = 655) cancer cases age 40-85 yr were identified through the Iowa Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Cancer Registry (86% response rate); controls (n = 2,434) were frequency matched by sex and 5-yr age group (80% response rate). The usual adult consumption of tea (hot and iced), along with other information including dietary data, was self-reported using a mailed questionnaire. Total tea consumption (cups/day) was categorized as none (reference category), low (< 3.1), medium (3.1-5.0), and high (> 5.0), with cut points for tea consumers based on the 75th and 90th percentiles of use among controls. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals. There was no association between total tea consumption and colon cancer (ORs = 1.0, 1.1, 1.3, and 0.7) or rectal cancer (ORs = 1.0, 0.9, 1.4, and 1.0) after adjustment for age, sex, education, physical activity, smoking history, and intake of coffee, fiber, and fruits and vegetables. Results were similar when hot tea and iced tea were evaluated individually. Further adjustment for other colorectal cancer risk factors did not alter these results. There was no association with proximal or distal colon cancer. There was also no interaction between tea consumption and any of the dietary variables or total fluid on risk of colon or rectal cancer, with the exception of a suggestive positive association between an increasing frequency of tea consumption and colon cancer risk among current smokers (multivariate ORs = 1.0, 1.4, 2.0, and 1.8; P for trend = 0.1), but not among never smokers (multivariate ORs = 1.0, 1.0, 1.1, and 0.4; P for trend = 0.3). These data do not support an overall association, either positive or negative, between tea consumption and risk of

  1. High-throughput transcriptomic analysis nominates proteasomal genes as age-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, S G; Jackson, W C; Kothari, V; Schipper, M J; Erho, N; Evans, J R; Speers, C; Hamstra, D A; Niknafs, Y S; Nguyen, P L; Schaeffer, E M; Ross, A E; Den, R B; Klein, E A; Jenkins, R B; Davicioni, E; Feng, F Y

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although prostate cancer (PCa) is hypothesized to differ in nature between younger versus older patients, the underlying molecular distinctions are poorly understood. We hypothesized that high-throughput transcriptomic analysis would elucidate biological differences in PCas arising in younger versus older men, and would nominate potential age-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Methods: The high-density Affymetrix GeneChip platform, encompassing >1 million genomic loci, was utilized to assess gene expression in 1090 radical prostatectomy samples from patients with long-term follow-up. We identified genes associated with metastatic progression by 10 years post-treatment in younger (age<65) versus older (age⩾65) patients, and ranked these genes by their prognostic value. We performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) to nominate biological concepts that demonstrated age-specific effects, and validated a target by treating with a clinically available drug in three PCa cell lines derived from younger men. Results: Over 80% of the top 1000 prognostic genes in younger and older men were specific to that age group. GSEA nominated the proteasome pathway as the most differentially prognostic in younger versus older patients. High expression of proteasomal genes conferred worse prognosis in younger but not older men on univariate and multivariate analysis. Bortezomib, a Food and Drug Administration approved proteasome inhibitor, decreased proliferation in three PCa cell lines derived from younger patients. Conclusions: Our data show significant global differences in prognostic genes between older versus younger men. We nominate proteasomeal gene expression as an age-specific biomarker and potential therapeutic target specifically in younger men. Limitations of our study include clinical differences between cohorts, and increased comorbidities and lower survival in older patients. These intriguing findings suggest that current models of PCa biology do

  2. Search for "weapons of mass destruction" for cancer -- immuno/ gene therapy comes of age.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming Q; Metharom, Pat; Ellem, Kay A O; Barth, Stefan

    2005-10-01

    The complexity of a cancer, such as cell heterogeneity, and the existence of hypoxia, stromal cells and stem cells has so far prevented successful development and treatment of patients suffering from the later stages of cancers. At present, the use of conventional therapies, such as chemo/radio therapy is limited, and only therapies that are focused on utilizing the patient's immune response to combat against the disease appear to be the most reliable and promising. Two decades ago, cytokines were discovered to be able to activate the immune systems and mount an anti-tumour response. Then, dendritic cells were hailed as the most significant regulators of immunity and are employed in a variety of cancer management schemes. This review introduces current development in the field, focusing on combination of the components of the rapidly growing fields of immunotherapy and gene transfer/therapy, providing useful and significant detailed information for readers of cellular and molecular immunology. PMID:16368061

  3. The Effectiveness of Alternative Cancer Education Programs in Promoting Knowledge, Attitudes, and Self-Examination Behavior in a Population of College-Aged Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Phillip J.; McDermott, Robert J.

    A study determined whether changes in knowledge, selected attitudes, and self-examination behavior occurred among college-aged men after exposure to alternative cancer education programs. College-aged men (n=128) from two large health education classes at a mid-western university were randomly assigned to two treatment groups. The first group…

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening Service Uptake and Associated Factors among Age Eligible Women in Mekelle Zone, Northern Ethiopia, 2015: A Community Based Study Using Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    Bayu, Hinsermu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide, with about 500,000 new patients diagnosed and over 250,000 deaths every year. Cervical cancer screening offers protective benefits and is associated with a reduction in the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and cervical cancer mortality. But there is very low participation rate in screening for cervical cancer among low and middle-income countries. Objective This study aimed to determine cervical cancer screening service uptake and its associated factor among age eligible women in Mekelle zone, northern Ethiopia, 2015. Methods A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Mekelle zone among age eligible women from February to June 2015. Systematic sampling technique was used to select 1286 women in to the study. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect relevant data. Data was entered and cleaned using EPINFO and analyzed using SPSS version 20 software package. Bivariate and Multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess association between dependent and independent variables with 95% CI and p-value less than 0.05 was set for association. Results The study revealed that among 1186 age eligible women, only 235(19.8%) have been screened for cervical cancer. Age (AOR = 1.799, 95%CI = 1.182–2.739), history of multiple sexual partners (AOR = 1.635, 95%CI = 1.094–2.443), history of sexually transmitted disease (AOR = 1.635,95%CI = 1.094–2.443), HIV sero status (AOR = 5.614, 95%CI = 2.595–12.144), perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer (AOR = 2.225, 95%CI = 1.308–3.783), perceived barriers to premalignant cervical lesions screening (AOR = 2.256, 95%CI = 1.447–3.517) and knowledge on cervical cancer and screening (AOR = 2.355, 95%CI = 1.155–4.802) were significant predictors of cervical cancer screening service uptake. Conclusion Magnitude of cervical cancer screening service uptake among age eligible women is still unacceptably

  5. The Contribution of Mammography Screening to Breast Cancer Incidence Trends in the United States: An Updated Age-period-cohort Model

    PubMed Central

    Gangnon, Ronald E.; Sprague, Brian L.; Stout, Natasha K.; Alagoz, Oguz; Weedon-Fekjær, Harald; Holford, Theodore R.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of screening mammography on breast cancer incidence is difficult to disentangle from cohort- and age-related effects on incidence. Methods We developed an age-period-cohort model of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive breast cancer incidence in U.S. females using cancer registry data. Five functions were included in the model to estimate stage-specific effects for age, premenopausal birth cohorts, postmenopausal birth cohorts, period (for all years of diagnosis), and a mammography period effect limited to women aged ≥40 years after 1982. Incidence with and without the mammography period effect was calculated. Results More recent birth cohorts have elevated underlying risk compared to earlier cohorts for both pre- and postmenopausal women. Comparing models with and without the mammography period effect showed that overall breast cancer incidence would have been 23.1% lower in the absence of mammography in 2010 (95% CI 18.8, 27.4), including 14.7% (9.5, 19.3) lower for invasive breast cancer and 54.5% (47.4, 59.6) lower for DCIS. Incidence of distant-staged breast cancer in 2010 would have been 29.0% (13.1, 48.1) greater in the absence of mammography screening. Conclusions Mammography contributes to markedly elevated rates of DCIS and early stage invasive cancers, but also contributes to substantial reductions in the incidence of metastatic breast cancer. Impact Mammography is an important tool for reducing the burden of breast cancer, but future work is needed to identify risk factors accounting for increasing underlying incidence and to distinguish between indolent and potentially lethal early stage breast cancers that are detected via mammography. PMID:25787716

  6. Modification of breast cancer risk according to age and menopausal status: A combined analysis of five population-based case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Sprague, Brian L.; Hampton, John M.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Nelson, Heidi D.; Titus, Linda J.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Remington, Patrick L.; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While several risk factors for breast cancer have been identified, studies have not consistently shown whether these factors operate more strongly at certain ages or for just pre- or postmenopausal women. We evaluated whether risk factors for breast cancer differ according to age or menopausal status. Methods Data from five population-based case-control studies conducted during 1988-2008 were combined and analyzed. Cases (N=23,959) and population controls (N=28,304) completed telephone interviews. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals and tests for interaction by age and menopausal status. Results Odds ratios for first-degree family history of breast cancer were strongest for younger women—reaching two-fold elevations—but were still statistically significantly elevated by 58-69% among older women. Obesity was inversely associated with breast cancer among younger women and positively associated with risk for older women (interaction P<0.0001). Recent alcohol intake was more strongly related to breast cancer risk among older women, although consumption of 3 or more drinks/day among younger women also was associated with elevated odd ratios (P<0.0001). Associations with benign breast disease and most reproductive/menstrual factors did not vary by age. Repeating analysis stratifying by menopausal status produced similar results. Conclusions With few exceptions, menstrual and lifestyle factors are associated with breast cancer risk regardless of age or menopausal status. Variation in the association of family history, obesity, and alcohol use with breast cancer risk by age and menopausal status may need to be considered when determining individual risk for breast cancer. PMID:24647890

  7. Risk Prediction for Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancer in White Women Aged 50 y or Older: Derivation and Validation from Population-Based Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Park, Yikyung; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lacey, James V.; Pee, David; Greenlee, Robert T.; Buys, Saundra S.; Hollenbeck, Albert; Rosner, Bernard; Gail, Mitchell H.; Hartge, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers share some hormonal and epidemiologic risk factors. While several models predict absolute risk of breast cancer, there are few models for ovarian cancer in the general population, and none for endometrial cancer. Methods and Findings Using data on white, non-Hispanic women aged 50+ y from two large population-based cohorts (the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial [PLCO] and the National Institutes of Health–AARP Diet and Health Study [NIH-AARP]), we estimated relative and attributable risks and combined them with age-specific US-population incidence and competing mortality rates. All models included parity. The breast cancer model additionally included estrogen and progestin menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use, other MHT use, age at first live birth, menopausal status, age at menopause, family history of breast or ovarian cancer, benign breast disease/biopsies, alcohol consumption, and body mass index (BMI); the endometrial model included menopausal status, age at menopause, BMI, smoking, oral contraceptive use, MHT use, and an interaction term between BMI and MHT use; the ovarian model included oral contraceptive use, MHT use, and family history or breast or ovarian cancer. In independent validation data (Nurses' Health Study cohort) the breast and ovarian cancer models were well calibrated; expected to observed cancer ratios were 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.96–1.04) for breast cancer and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.97–1.19) for ovarian cancer. The number of endometrial cancers was significantly overestimated, expected/observed = 1.20 (95% CI: 1.11–1.29). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs; discriminatory power) were 0.58 (95% CI: 0.57–0.59), 0.59 (95% CI: 0.56–0.63), and 0.68 (95% CI: 0.66–0.70) for the breast, ovarian, and endometrial models, respectively. Conclusions These models predict absolute risks for breast, endometrial, and

  8. Cancer survival differences between South Asians and non-South Asians of England in 1986–2004, accounting for age at diagnosis and deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Maringe, C; Li, R; Mangtani, P; Coleman, M P; Rachet, B

    2015-01-01

    Background: South Asian migrants show lower cancer incidence than their host population in England for most major cancers. We seek to study the ethnic differences in survival from cancer. Methods: We described and modelled the effect of ethnicity, time, age and deprivation on survival for the five most incident cancers in each sex in South Asians in England between 1986 and 2004 using national cancer registry data. South Asian ethnicity was flagged using the validated name-recognition algorithm SANGRA (South Asian Names and Group Recognition Algorithm). Results: We observed survival advantage in South Asians in earlier periods. This ethnic gap either remained constant or narrowed over time. By 2004, age-standardised net survival was comparable for all cancers except three in men, where South Asians had higher survival 5 years after diagnosis: colorectal (58.9% vs 53.6%), liver (15.0% vs 9.4%) and lung (15.9% vs 9.3%). Compared with non-South Asians, South Asians experienced a slower increase in breast and prostate cancer survival, both cancers associated with either a screening programme or an early diagnosis test. We did not find differential patterns in survival by deprivation between both ethnicities. Conclusions: Considering recent survival trends, appropriate action is required to avoid deficits in cancer survival among South Asians in the near future. PMID:26079299

  9. Triple-negative breast cancers are increased in black women regardless of age or body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Stead, Lesley A; Lash, Timothy L; Sobieraj, Jerome E; Chi, Dorcas D; Westrup, Jennifer L; Charlot, Marjory; Blanchard, Rita A; Lee, John C; King, Thomas C; Rosenberg, Carol L

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We investigated clinical and pathologic features of breast cancers (BC) in an unselected series of patients diagnosed in a tertiary care hospital serving a diverse population. We focused on triple-negative (Tneg) tumours (oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 negative), which are associated with poor prognosis. Methods We identified female patients with invasive BC diagnosed between 1998 and 2006, with data available on tumor grade, stage, ER, PR and HER2 status, and patient age, body mass index (BMI) and self-identified racial/ethnic group. We determined associations between patient and tumour characteristics using contingency tables and multivariate logistic regression. Results 415 cases were identified. Patients were racially and ethnically diverse (born in 44 countries, 36% white, 43% black, 10% Hispanic and 11% other). 47% were obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2). 72% of tumours were ER+ and/or PR+, 20% were Tneg and 13% were HER2+. The odds of having a Tneg tumour were 3-fold higher (95% CI 1.6, 5.5; p = 0.0001) in black compared with white women. Tneg tumours were equally common in black women diagnosed before and after age 50 (31% vs 29%; p = NS), and who were obese and non-obese (29% vs 31%; p = NS). Considering all patients, as BMI increased, the proportion of Tneg tumours decreased (p = 0.08). Conclusions Black women of diverse background have 3-fold more Tneg tumours than non-black women, regardless of age and BMI. Other factors must determine tumour subtype. The higher prevalence of Tneg tumours in black women in all age and weight categories likely contributes to black women's unfavorable breast cancer prognosis. PMID:19320967

  10. The aging of the 2000 and 2011 Hallmarks of Cancer reviews: A critique

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    Two review articles published in 2000 and 2011 by Hanahan and Weinberg have dominated the discourse about carcinogenesis among researchers in the recent past. The basic tenets of their arguments favour considering cancer as a cell-based, genetic disease whereby DNA mutations cause uncontrolled cell proliferation. Their explanation of cancer phenotypes is based on the premises adopted by the somatic mutation theory (SMT) and its cell-centered variants. From their perspective, eight broad features have been identified as so-called ‘Hallmarks of Cancer’. Here, we criticize the value of these features based on the numerous intrinsic inconsistencies in the data and in the rationale behind SMT. An alternative interpretation of the same data plus data mostly ignored by Hanahan and Weinberg is proposed, based instead on evolutionarily relevant premises. From such a perspective, cancer is viewed as a tissue-based disease. This alternative, called the tissue organization field theory, incorporates the premise that proliferation and motility are the default state of all cells, and that carcinogenesis is due to alterations on the reciprocal interactions among cells and between cells and their extracellular matrix. In this view, cancer is development gone awry. PMID:23938395

  11. Aged black garlic extract inhibits HT29 colon cancer cell growth via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Menghua; Yang, Guiqing; Liu, Hanchen; Liu, Xiaoxu; Lin, Sixiang; Sun, Dongning; Wang, Yishan

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that aged black garlic extract (ABGE) may prove beneficial in preventing or inhibiting oncogenesis; however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of ABGE on the proliferation and apoptosis of HT29 colon cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that ABGE inhibited HT29 cell growth via the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. We further investigated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) signal transduction pathway and the molecular mechanisms underlying the ABGE-induced inhibition of HT29 cell proliferation. We observed that ABGE may regulate the function of the PI3K/Akt pathway through upregulating PTEN and downregulating Akt and p-Akt expression, as well as suppressing its downstream target, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathway is crucial for the development of colon cancer. ABGE inhibited the growth and induced apoptosis in HT29 cells through the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway, suggesting that ABGE may be effective in the prevention and treatment of colon cancer in humans. PMID:24649105

  12. Physical, Heritable and Age-Related Factors as Modifiers of Radiation Cancer Risk in Patched Heterozygous Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pazzaglia, Simonetta Pasquali, Emanuela M.Sc.; Tanori, Mirella; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Di Majo, Vincenzo; Rebessi, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To address the tumorigenic potential of exposure to low/intermediate doses of ionizing radiation and to identify biological factors influencing tumor response in a mouse model highly susceptible to radiogenic cancer. Methods and Materials: Newborn Ptc1 heterozygous mice were exposed to X-ray doses of 100, 250, and 500 mGy, and tumor development was monitored for their lifetime. Additional groups were irradiated with the same doses and sacrificed at fixed times for determination of short-term endpoints, such as apoptosis and early preneoplastic lesions in cerebellum. Finally, groups of Ptc1 heterozygous mice were bred on the C57BL/6 background to study the influence of common variant genes on radiation response. Results: We have identified a significant effect of low-intermediate doses of radiation (250 and 500 mGy) in shortening mean survival and inducing early and more progressed stages of tumor development in the cerebellum of Ptc1{sup +/-} mice. In addition, we show that age at exposure and heritable factors are potent modifiers of radiation-related cancer risk. Conclusions: The Ptc1 knockout mouse model offers a highly sensitive system that may potentially help to improve understanding and quantification of risk at low doses, such as doses experienced in occupational and medical exposures, and clarify the complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors underlying cancer susceptibility.

  13. Ovarian Function, Not Age, Predicts the Benefit from Ovarian Suppression or Ablation for Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ye; Wang, Shusen; Shi, Yanxia; An, Xin; Xu, Fei; Yuan, Zhongyu

    2016-01-01

    The role of adjuvant ovarian suppression or ablation (OS/OA) in premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to examine which patients might benefit from the addition of OS/OA to tamoxifen. We analyzed the data of 2065 premenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive invasive ductal carcinomas who were treated at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center from 2000 to 2008. The five-year disease-free survival rate (DFSR) and overall survival rate (OSR) were compared by menstrual status and treatment. Compared with patients older than forty years of age, patients younger than forty years old had significant lower DFSRs and OSRs. The addition of OS/OA to tamoxifen increased the DFSR and OSR of patients with normal menstrual cycles after chemotherapy, regardless of their age at diagnosis. Patients with normal menstrual cycles after chemotherapy are the main beneficiaries of an adjuvant OS/OA. PMID:26866810

  14. The impact of sociodemographic, treatment, and work support on missed work after breast cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mujahid, Mahasin S.; Janz, Nancy K.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Griggs, Jennifer J.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Katz, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Work loss is a potential adverse consequence of cancer. There is limited research on patterns and correlates of paid work after diagnosis of breast cancer, especially among ethnic minorities. Women with non-metastatic breast cancer diagnosed from June 2005 to May 2006 who reported to the Los Angeles County SEER registry were identified and asked to complete the survey after initial treatment (median time from diagnosis = 8.9 months). Latina and African American women were over-sampled. Analyses were restricted to women working at the time of diagnosis, <65 years of age, and who had complete covariate information (N = 589). The outcome of the study was missed paid work (≤ month, >1 month, stopped all together). Approximately 44, 24, and 32% of women missed ≤1 month, >1 month, or stopped working, respectively. African Americans and Latinas were more likely to stop working when compared with Whites [OR for stop working vs. missed ≤1 month: 3.0, 3.4, (P < 0.001), respectively]. Women receiving mastectomy and those receiving chemotherapy were also more likely to stop working, independent of sociodemographic and treatment factors [ORs for stopped working vs. missed ≤1 month: 4.2, P < 0.001; 7.9, P < 0.001, respectively]. Not having a flexible work schedule available through work was detrimental to working [ORs for stopped working 18.9, P < 0.001 after adjusting for sociodemographic and treatment factors]. Many women stop working altogether after a diagnosis of breast cancer, particularly if they are racial/ethnic minorities, receive chemotherapy, or those who are employed in an unsupportive work settings. Health care providers need to be aware of these adverse consequences of breast cancer diagnosis and initial treatment. PMID:19360466

  15. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence in Invasive Anal Cancers in the United States prior to Vaccine Introduction

    PubMed Central

    Steinau, M; Unger, ER; Hernandez, BY; Goodman, MT; Copeland, G; Hopenhayn, C; Cozen, W; Saber, MS; Huang, Y; Peters, ES; Lynch, CF; Wilkinson, EJ; Rajeevan, MS; Lyu, C; Saraiya, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Conduct a representative survey of Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and its genotype distribution in invasive anal cancer specimens in the U.S. Methods Population-based archival anal cancer specimens were identified from Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana and Michigan cancer registries and SEER tissue repositories in Hawaii, Iowa and Los Angeles. Sections from one representative block per case were used for DNA extraction. All extracts were assayed first by Linear Array and re-tested with INNO-LiPA if inadequate or HPV negative. Results Among 146 unique invasive anal cancer cases, 93 (63.7%) were from women and 53 (36.3%) from men. HPV (any type) was detected in 133 (91.1%) cases and 129 (88.4%) contained at least one high risk type, most (80.1%) as a single genotype. HPV16 had the highest prevalence (113 cases, 77.4%); HPV6, 11, 18 and 33 were also found multiple times. Among HPV16 positive cases, 37% were identified as prototype variant Ep and 63% were non-prototypes: 33% Em, 12% E-G131G, 5% Af1, 4% AA/NA-1, 3% E-C109G, 3% E-G131T, 2% As and 1% Af2. No significant differences in the distributions of HPV (any), high-risk types, or HPV16/18 were seen between gender, race or age group. Conclusions The establishment of pre-vaccine HPV prevalence in the U.S. is critical to the surveillance of vaccine efficacy. Almost 80% of anal cancers were positive for the vaccine types HPV16 or HPV18 and in 70% these were the only types detected suggesting that a high proportion might be preventable by current vaccines. PMID:23609590

  16. Epstein-Barr virus patterns in US Burkitt lymphoma tumors from the SEER residual tissue repository during 1979-2009.

    PubMed

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Pullarkat, Sheeja T; Nathwani, Bharat N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Rao, Nagesh; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Lynch, Charles F; Hernandez, Brenda; Neppalli, Vishala; Hawes, Debra; Cockburn, Myles G; Kim, Andre; Williams, Makeda; Altekruse, Sean; Bhatia, Kishor; Goodman, Marc T; Cozen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) occurs at all ages, but the patterns of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positivity in relation to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), immunoprofiles and age have not been fully explored. BL tissues from residual tissue repositories, and two academic centers in the United States were examined by expert hematopathologists for morphology, immunohistochemistry, MYC rearrangement, EBV-encoded RNA (EBER), and diagnosed according to the 2008 WHO lymphoma classification. Analysis was done using frequency tables, Chi-squared statistics, and Student's t-test. Of 117 cases examined, 91 were confirmed as BL. The age distribution was 26%, 15%, 19%, and 29% for 0-19, 20-34, 35-59, 60+ years, and missing in 11%. MYC rearrangement was found in 89% and EBER positivity in 29% of 82 cases with results. EBER positivity varied with age (from 13% in age group 0-19 to 55% in age group 20-34, and fell to 25% in age group 60+ years, p = 0.08); with race (56% in Blacks/Hispanics vs 21% in Whites/Asians/Pacific Islanders, p = 0.006); and by HIV status (64% in HIV positive vs 22% in HIV negative cases, p = 0.03). EBER positivity was demonstrated in about one-third of tumors and it was strongly associated with race and HIV status, and marginally with age-group. PMID:23607450

  17. Usefulness of Photodynamic Diagnosis and Therapy using Talaporfin Sodium for an Advanced-aged Patient with Inoperable Gastric Cancer (a secondary publication)

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: In Japan the rise in the average life expectancy has caused an increase in the proportion of the population who are classed as geriatric. Accordingly, the number of elderly people being treated for cancer is increasing concomitantly. However, with the increase in age, the numbers of prior complications also increase. This is especially so in the advanced-aged patients, defined in Japan as those over the age of 85. Such complications may be too high risk for radical surgery and a less invasive treatment is warranted. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment approved by the Japanese National Health Insurance for the treatment of early stage superficial type esophageal and gastric cancers, early stage uterine cervical cancers and dysplasia, and early and advanced lung cancer. We report herein on the efficacy of palliative PDT using talaporfin sodium (Laserphyrin®) for a case of inoperable gastric cancer. Material and methods: The patient was an 87-year-old-man, a diabetic with histories of diabetic nephropathy, cerebral infarction and myocardial infarction. This patient was first diagnosed as having gastric cancer in 2007 but surgery and chemotherapy were contraindicated due to his poor physical status and poor renal function, respectively, owing to the anticipated side effects. The patient was referred to our institution after hearing of PDT in 2009. He was treated with 1 course of porfimer sodium PDT and 3 courses of talaporfin sodium PDT with photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) during the period from September, 2009 to June, 2011. Results: The massive gastric cancer located in the cardia was successfully treated with 4 PDT sessions without any serious complications; therefore the patient was able to orally ingest food until his death due to natural causes other than the cancer, in October, 2011. Conclusion: Talaporfin sodium PDT is safe and effective treatment for advanced-aged patients suffering from inoperable gastric cancer. PMID

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of multiple DNA repair pathways impact age at diagnosis and TP53 mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tasha R; Liu-Mares, Wen; Van Emburgh, Beth O; Levine, Edward A; Allen, Glenn O; Hill, Jeff W; Reis, Isildinha M; Kresty, Laura A; Pegram, Mark D; Miller, Mark S; Hu, Jennifer J

    2011-09-01

    Defective DNA repair may contribute to early age and late stage at time of diagnosis and mutations in critical tumor suppressor genes, such as TP53 in breast cancer. Using DNA samples from 436 breast cancer cases (374 Caucasians and 62 African-Americans), we tested these associations with 18 non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in four DNA repair pathways: (i) base excision repair: ADPRT V762A, APE1 D148E, XRCC1 R194W/R280H/R399Q and POLD1 R119H; (ii) double-strand break repair: NBS1 E185Q and XRCC3 T241M; (iii) mismatch repair: MLH1 I219V, MSH3 R940Q/T1036A and MSH6 G39E and (iv) nucleotide excision repair: ERCC2 D312N/K751Q, ERCC4 R415Q, ERCC5 D1104H and XPC A499V/K939Q. Younger age at diagnosis (<50) was associated with ERCC2 312 DN/NN genotypes [odds ratio (OR) = 1.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10, 2.81] and NBS1 185 QQ genotype (OR = 3.09; 95% CI = 1.47, 6.49). The XPC 939 QQ genotype was associated with TP53 mutations (OR = 5.80; 95% CI = 2.23, 15.09). There was a significant trend associating younger age at diagnosis (<50) with increasing numbers of risk genotypes for ERCC2 312 DN/NN, MSH6 39 EE and NBS1 185 QQ (P(trend) < 0.001). A similar significant trend was also observed associating TP53 mutations with increasing numbers of risk genotypes for XRCC1 399 QQ, XPC 939 QQ, ERCC4 415 QQ and XPC 499 AA (P(trend) < 0.001). Our pilot data suggest that nsSNPs of multiple DNA repair pathways are associated with younger age at diagnosis and TP53 mutations in breast cancer and larger studies are warranted to further evaluate these associations. PMID:21700777

  19. The Biology of Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprott, Richard L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen articles in this special issue discuss aging theories, biomarkers of aging, aging research, disease, cancer biology, Alzheimer's disease, stress, oxidation of proteins, gene therapy, service delivery, biogerontology, and ethics and aging research. (SK)

  20. Life Priorities in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Between Ages of 45 to 65.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Hasan Huseyin; Ahmadov, Asif; Cebeci, Suleyman; Binar, Murat; Karahatay, Serdar

    2016-06-01

    Diseases in head and neck cancer patients and applied therapies according to former affect life quality to a higher extent. In this paper, life priorities in 49 patients with head and neck cancer who referred to Gulhane Military Medical Academy for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and the relationship between these priorities and sociodemographic properties have been studied. Following life priorities have been observed more important for the patients: to communicate with people in social places, to eat without any help by themselves, external appearance, taste and odor sense, continuing sexual life. Other priorities have been observed less important for the patients: attending social activities like cinema and theater, swimming pool and sea sports, money required for check-ups, necessities like time. Besides, these necessities do not show dissimilarities to any significant extent according to sociodemographic properties of the patients. PMID:27244211

  1. Menopausal Estrogen Therapy Benefits and Risks Vary by Age, WHI Analysis Suggests | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term follow-up data from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) provide important new information about the potential risks and benefits of hormone therapy to treat symptoms or conditions related to menopause, including its effect on breast cancer risk. The results were published April 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. |

  2. Collaborative Biomedicine in the Age of Big Data: The Case of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Butte, Atul J; Schully, Sheri D; Dalton, William S; Khoury, Muin J; Hesse, Bradford W

    2014-01-01

    Biomedicine is undergoing a revolution driven by high throughput and connective computing that is transforming medical research and practice. Using oncology as an example, the speed and capacity of genomic sequencing technologies is advancing the utility of individual genetic profiles for anticipating risk and targeting therapeutics. The goal is to enable an era of “P4” medicine that will become increasingly more predictive, personalized, preemptive, and participative over time. This vision hinges on leveraging potentially innovative and disruptive technologies in medicine to accelerate discovery and to reorient clinical practice for patient-centered care. Based on a panel discussion at the Medicine 2.0 conference in Boston with representatives from the National Cancer Institute, Moffitt Cancer Center, and Stanford University School of Medicine, this paper explores how emerging sociotechnical frameworks, informatics platforms, and health-related policy can be used to encourage data liquidity and innovation. This builds on the Institute of Medicine’s vision for a “rapid learning health care system” to enable an open source, population-based approach to cancer prevention and control. PMID:24711045

  3. Lung cancer diagnosis and staging in the minimally invasive age with increasing demands for tissue analysis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Daniel B.; Wright, Jeffrey; VanderLaan, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of patients with lung cancer in recent decades has increasingly relied on minimally invasive tissue sampling techniques, such as endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) needle aspiration, transbronchial biopsy, and transthoracic image guided core needle biopsy. These modalities have been shown to have low complication rates, and provide adequate cellular material for pathologic diagnosis and necessary ancillary molecular testing. As an important component to a multidisciplinary team approach in the care of patients with lung cancer, these minimally invasive modalities have proven invaluable for the rapid and safe acquisition of tissue used for the diagnosis, staging, and molecular testing of tumors to identify the best evidence-based treatment plan. The continuous evolution of the field of lung cancer staging and treatment has translated into improvements in survival and quality of life for patients. Although differences in clinical practice between academic and community hospital settings still exist, improvements in physician education and training as well as adoption of technological advancements should help narrow this gap going forward. PMID:26380180

  4. Genetic variation at CYP3A is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer risk: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age ≤50 years. Methods We further investigated the association of rs10235235 with breast cancer risk in a large case control study of 47,346 cases and 47,570 controls from 52 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping of rs10235235 was conducted using a custom Illumina Infinium array. Stratified analyses were conducted to determine whether this association was modified by age at diagnosis, ethnicity, age at menarche or tumor characteristics. Results We confirmed the association of rs10235235 with breast cancer risk for women of European ancestry but found no evidence that this association differed with age at diagnosis. Heterozygote and homozygote odds ratios (ORs) were OR = 0.98 (95% CI 0.94, 1.01; P = 0.2) and OR = 0.80 (95% CI 0.69, 0.93; P = 0.004), respectively (Ptrend = 0.02). There was no evidence of effect modification by tumor characteristics. rs10235235 was, however, associated with age at menarche in controls (Ptrend = 0.005) but not cases (Ptrend = 0.97). Consequently the association between rs10235235 and breast cancer risk differed according to age at menarche (Phet = 0.02); the rare allele of rs10235235 was associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk for women who had their menarche age ≥15 years (ORhet = 0.84, 95% CI 0.75, 0.94; ORhom = 0.81, 95% CI 0.51, 1.30; Ptrend = 0.002) but not for those who had their menarche age ≤11 years (ORhet = 1.06, 95% CI 0.95, 1.19, ORhom = 1.07, 95% CI 0.67, 1.72; Ptrend = 0.29). Conclusions To our knowledge rs10235235 is the first single nucleotide polymorphism to be associated with both breast cancer risk and age at menarche consistent with the well-documented association between later age at

  5. A breast cancer meta-analysis of two expression measures of chromosomal instability reveals a relationship with younger age at diagnosis and high risk histopathological variables

    PubMed Central

    Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Szallasi, Zoltan; Kschischo, Maik; Graham, Trevor A.; Swanton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer in younger patients often presents with adverse histopathological features, including increased frequency of estrogen receptor negative and lymph node positive disease status. Chromosomal instability (CIN) is increasingly recognised as an important prognostic variable in solid tumours. In a breast cancer meta-analysis of 2423 patients we examine the relationship between clinicopathological parameters and two distinct chromosomal instability gene expression signatures in order to address whether younger age at diagnosis is associated with increased tumour genome instability. We find that CIN, assessed by the two independently derived CIN expression signatures, is significantly associated with increased tumour size, ER negative or HER2 positive disease, higher tumour grade and younger age at diagnosis in ER negative breast cancer. These data support the hypothesis that chromosomal instability may be a defining feature of breast cancer biology and clinical outcome. PMID:21709316

  6. A breast cancer meta-analysis of two expression measures of chromosomal instability reveals a relationship with younger age at diagnosis and high risk histopathological variables.

    PubMed

    Endesfelder, David; McGranahan, Nicholas; Birkbak, Nicolai J; Szallasi, Zoltan; Kschischo, Maik; Graham, Trevor A; Swanton, Charles

    2011-07-01

    Breast cancer in younger patients often presents with adverse histopathological features, including increased frequency of estrogen receptor negative and lymph node positive disease status. Chromosomal instability (CIN) is increasingly recognised as an important prognostic variable in solid tumours. In a breast cancer meta-analysis of 2423 patients we examine the relationship between clinicopathological parameters and two distinct chromosomal instability gene expression signatures in order to address whether younger age at diagnosis is associated with increased tumour genome instability. We find that CIN, assessed by the two independently derived CIN expression signatures, is significantly associated with increased tumour size, ER negative or HER2 positive disease, higher tumour grade and younger age at diagnosis in ER negative breast cancer. These data support the hypothesis that chromosomal instability may be a defining feature of breast cancer biology and clinical outcome. PMID:21709316

  7. Recent trends in hormone therapy utilization and breast cancer incidence rates in the high incidence population of Marin County, California

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent declines in invasive breast cancer have been reported in the US, with many studies linking these declines to reductions in the use of combination estrogen/progestin hormone therapy (EPHT). We evaluated the changing use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, mammography screening rates, and the decline in breast cancer incidence specifically for Marin County, California, a population with historically elevated breast cancer incidence rates. Methods The Marin Women's Study (MWS) is a community-based, prospective cohort study launched in 2006 to monitor changes in breast cancer, breast density, and personal and biologic risk factors among women living in Marin County. The MWS enrolled 1,833 women following routine screening mammography between October 2006 and July 2007. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that included items regarding historical hormone therapy regimen (estrogen only, progesterone only, EPHT), age of first and last use, total years of use, and reason(s) for stopping, as well as information regarding complementary hormone use. Questionnaire items were analyzed for 1,083 non-Hispanic white participants ages 50 and over. Breast cancer incidence rates were assessed overall and by tumor histology and estrogen receptor (ER) status for the years 1990-2007 using data from the Northern California Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry. Results Prevalence of EPHT use among non-Hispanic white women ages 50 and over declined sharply from 21.2% in 1998 to 6.7% by 2006-07. Estrogen only use declined from 26.9% in 1998 to 22.4% by 2006-07. Invasive breast cancer incidence rates declined 33.4% between 2001 and 2004, with drops most pronounced for ER+ cancers. These rate reductions corresponded to declines of about 50 cases per year, consistent with population attributable fraction estimates for EPHT-related breast cancer. Self-reported screening mammography rates did not change during this period. Use of

  8. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  9. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another part of the body is more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 ...

  10. Is it time for a new paradigm for systemic cancer treatment? Lessons from a century of cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    U.S. SEER (Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results) data for age-adjusted mortality rates for all cancers combined for all races show only a modest overall 13% decline over the past 35 years. Moreover, the greatest contributor to cancer mortality is treatment-resistant metastatic disease. The accepted therapeutic paradigm for the past half-century for the treatment of advanced cancers has involved the use of systemic chemotherapy drugs cytotoxic for cycling cells (both normal and malignant) during DNA synthesis and/or mitosis. The failure of this therapeutic modality to achieve high-level, consistent rates of disease-free survival for some of the most common cancers, including tumors of the lung, colon breast, brain, melanoma, and others is the focus of this paper. A retrospective assessment of critical milestones in cancer chemotherapy indicates that most successful therapeutic regimens use cytotoxic cell cycle inhibitors in combined, maximum tolerated, dose-dense acute treatment regimens originally developed to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia and some lymphomas. Early clinical successes in this area led to their wholesale application to the treatment of solid tumor malignancies that, unfortunately, has not produced consistent, long-term high cure rates for many common cancers. Important differences in therapeutic sensitivity of leukemias/lymphomas versus solid tumors can be explained by key biological differences that define the treatment-resistant solid tumor phenotype. A review of these clinical outcome data in the context of recent developments in our understanding of drug resistance mechanisms characteristic of solid tumors suggests the need for a new paradigm for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant cancers. In contrast to reductionist approaches, the systemic approach targets both microenvironmental and systemic factors that drive and sustain tumor progression. These systemic factors include dysregulated inflammatory and oxidation pathways shown to

  11. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your life Being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer Being at risk for skin cancer Depending on ... than nonsmokers. Other forms of tobacco can also cause cancer, such as cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff. If ...

  12. Impact of marital status on survival of gastric adenocarcinoma patients: Results from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Database

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Miaozhen; Yang, Dajun; Xu, Ruihua

    2016-01-01

    Marital status was found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival in various cancer types. In this study, we used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database to analyze the survival difference among different marital status in the United States. Gastric adenocarcinoma patients from 2004–2012 were enrolled for study. The 5-year cause specific survival (CSS) was our primary endpoint. Totally 29,074 eligible patients were identified. We found that more male patients were married than female. Asian patients had the highest percentages of married than the other races. More married patients were covered by the insurance. Married patients had better 5-year CSS than unmarried, 30.6% vs 25.7%, P < 0.001. The median overall CSS was 17.87 and 13.61 months for the married and unmarried patients, hazard ratio: 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.17), P = 0.027. The survival difference was significant in the insured but not in the uninsured patients. Widowed patients had the worst prognosis compared with other groups even though they had more stage I disease and more well / moderate differentiated tumors. These results indicated that unmarried gastric adenocarcinoma patients were at greater risk of cancer specific mortality. We recommend every patient should have access to best available gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26876653

  13. A Reanalysis of Curvature in the Dose Response for Cancer and Modifications by Age at Exposure Following Radiation Therapy for Benign Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Little, Mark P.; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose response for various cancer endpoints and modifiers by age and time. Methods and Materials: Reanalysis of the US peptic ulcer data testin