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Sample records for age skin color

  1. Differences in tooth shade value according to age, gender and skin color: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Veeraganta, Sumanth K.; Savadi, Ravindra C.; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The purpose was to investigate the differences in tooth shade value according to age, gender and skin color among a sample of the local population in Bengaluru, India. Methodology: The study comprised 100 subjects belonging to both gender between the age groups of 16 years to 55 years. Tooth shade values of permanent maxillary left or right central incisors were recorded using the Vitapan 3D-Master shade guide. Skin color was matched using the Radiance compact makeup shades as a guide. Results: Chi-square statistical test demonstrated that younger subjects have lighter tooth shade values. No statistically significant differences were recorded in tooth shade value according to gender or skin color. Conclusion: Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that tooth shade value is significantly influenced by age. Gender and skin color appear not to have a significant relation to tooth shade value. PMID:26929500

  2. Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it ... treated early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins ...

  3. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  4. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  5. Skin aging and dry skin.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hideo

    2004-08-01

    Skin aging appears to be the result of both scheduled and continuous "wear and tear" processes that damage cellular DNA and proteins. Two types of aging, chronological skin aging and photoaging, have distinct clinical and histological features. Chronological skin aging is a universal and inevitable process characterized primarily by physiologic alterations in skin function. In this case, keratinocytes are unable to properly terminally differentiate to form a functional stratum corneum, and the rate of formation of neutral lipids that contribute to the barrier function slows, causing dry, pale skin with fine wrinkles. In contrast, photoaging results from the UVR of sunlight and the damage thus becomes apparent in sun-exposed skin. Characteristics of this aging type are dry and sallow skin displaying fine wrinkles as well as deep furrows, resulting from the disorganization of epidermal and dermal components associated with elastosis and heliodermatitis. Understanding of the functions of the skin and the basic principles of moisturizer use and application is important for the prevention of skin aging. Successful treatment of dry skin with appropriate skin care products gives the impression of eternal youth.

  6. Skin Care and Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Skin Care and Aging How Aging Affects Skin Your skin changes with age. It becomes thinner, ... to make it feel and look better. Dry Skin and Itching Click for more information Many older ...

  7. Aging Differences in Ethnic Skin

    PubMed Central

    Buainain De Castro Maymone, Mayra; Kundu, Roopal V.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable and complex process that can be described clinically as features of wrinkles, sunspots, uneven skin color, and sagging skin. These cutaneous effects are influenced by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors and often are varied based on ethnic origin given underlying structural and functional differences. The authors sought to provide updated information on facets of aging and how it relates to ethnic variation given innate differences in skin structure and function. Publications describing structural and functional principles of ethnic and aging skin were primarily found through a PubMed literature search and supplemented with a review of textbook chapters. The most common signs of skin aging despite skin type are dark spots, loss of elasticity, loss of volume, and rhytides. Skin of color has many characteristics that make its aging process unique. Those of Asian, Hispanic, and African American descent have distinct facial structures. Differences in the concentration of epidermal melanin makes darkly pigmented persons more vulnerable to dyspigmentation, while a thicker and more compact dermis makes facial lines less noticeable. Ethnic skin comprises a large portion of the world population. Therefore, it is important to understand the unique structural and functional differences among ethnicities to adequately treat the signs of aging. PMID:26962390

  8. Estrogens and aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, M. Julie

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies. PMID:24194966

  9. Common conditions in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Ali; Elbuluk, Nada

    2016-12-01

    The skin of color population is rapidly growing in the United States. This population has numerous unique and more commonly occurring dermatologic conditions. Additionally, certain cutaneous conditions can present differently in darker versus lighter skin types. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of common conditions that occur in skin of color, including their clinical presentations, pathogenesis, differential diagnoses, and treatments.

  10. Genetics and skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Bekou, Vassiliki; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex process and underlies multiple influences with the probable involvement of heritable and various environmental factors. Several theories have been conducted regarding the pathomechanisms of aged skin, however fundamental mechanisms still remain poorly understood. This article addresses the influence of genetics on skin aging and in particular deals with the differences observed in ethnic populations and between both genders. Recent studies indicate that male and female aged skin differs as far as the type, the consistency and the sensitivity to external factors is concerned. The same has been also documented between elderly people of different origin. Consequently, the aging process taking place in both genders and in diverse ethnic groups should be examined separately and products specialized to each population should be developed in order to satisfy the special needs. PMID:23467395

  11. Depigmented Skin and Phantom Color Measurements for Realistic Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Paul; Leachman, Sancy; Boucher, Kenneth; Ozçelik, Tunçer Burak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regardless of human skin phototype, areas of depigmented skin, as seen in vitiligo, are optically indistinguishable among skin phototypes. The average of the depigmented skin measurements can be used to develop the base color of realistic prostheses. Methods and Materials Data from 20 of 32 recruited vitiligo study participants. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements were made from depigmented skin and adjacent pigmented skin, then compared to 66 pigmented polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to determine pigment concentrations in turbid media for making realistic facial prostheses. Results The Area Under spectral intensity Curve (AUC) was calculated for average spectroscopy measurements of pigmented sites in relation to skin phototype (p=0.0505) and depigmented skin in relation to skin phototype (p=0.59). No significant relationship exists between skin phototypes and depigmented skin spectroscopy measurements. The average of the depigmented skin measurements (AUC 19,129) was the closest match to phantom 6.4 (AUC 19,162) Conclusions Areas of depigmented skin are visibly indistinguishable per skin phototype, yet spectrometry shows that depigmented skin measurements varied and were unrelated to skin phototype. Possible sources of optical variation of depigmented skin include age, body site, blood flow, quantity/quality of collagen, and other chromophores. The average of all depigmented skin measurements can be used to derive the pigment composition and concentration for realistic facial prostheses. PMID:23750920

  12. Children's Color Perception in Relation to Habitat and Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Rosslyn; Powell, Gloria J.

    1981-01-01

    Developmental color perception of 278 four- and eight-year-old Black and White children in three societies was examined in relation to the theories that proximity to the equator and that fundus pigmentation (as measured by skin color) reduce shortwave (blue-green) in comparison to long-wave perception. (Author/MP)

  13. The color of health: skin color, ethnoracial classification, and discrimination in the health of Latin Americans.

    PubMed

    Perreira, Krista M; Telles, Edward E

    2014-09-01

    Latin America is one of the most ethnoracially heterogeneous regions of the world. Despite this, health disparities research in Latin America tends to focus on gender, class and regional health differences while downplaying ethnoracial differences. Few scholars have conducted studies of ethnoracial identification and health disparities in Latin America. Research that examines multiple measures of ethnoracial identification is rarer still. Official data on race/ethnicity in Latin America are based on self-identification which can differ from interviewer-ascribed or phenotypic classification based on skin color. We use data from Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru to examine associations of interviewer-ascribed skin color, interviewer-ascribed race/ethnicity, and self-reported race/ethnicity with self-rated health among Latin American adults (ages 18-65). We also examine associations of observer-ascribed skin color with three additional correlates of health - skin color discrimination, class discrimination, and socio-economic status. We find a significant gradient in self-rated health by skin color. Those with darker skin colors report poorer health. Darker skin color influences self-rated health primarily by increasing exposure to class discrimination and low socio-economic status.

  14. The Color of Health: Skin Color, Ethnoracial Classification, and Discrimination in the Health of Latin Americans

    PubMed Central

    Perreira, Krista M.; Telles, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Latin America is one of the most ethnoracially heterogeneous regions of the world. Despite this, health disparities research in Latin America tends to focus on gender, class and regional health differences while downplaying ethnoracial differences. Few scholars have conducted studies of ethnoracial identification and health disparities in Latin America. Research that examines multiple measures of ethnoracial identification is rarer still. Official data on race/ethnicity in Latin America are based on self-identification which can differ from interviewer-ascribed or phenotypic classification based on skin color. We use data from Brazil, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru to examine associations of interviewer-ascribed skin color, interviewer-ascribed race/ethnicity, and self-reported race/ethnicity with self-rated health among Latin American adults (ages 18-65). We also examine associations of observer-ascribed skin color with three additional correlates of health – skin color discrimination, class discrimination, and socio-economic status. We find a significant gradient in self-rated health by skin color. Those with darker skin colors report poorer health. Darker skin color influences self-rated health primarily by increasing exposure to class discrimination and low socio-economic status. PMID:24957692

  15. Natural considerations for skin of color.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Leslie; Rodriguez, David; Taylor, Susan C; Wu, Jessica

    2006-12-01

    Changing US demographics indicate that dermatologists will treat an increasing number of individuals of color. Early research on cutaneous anatomy and physiology was performed mostly in white populations. However, new research is elucidating similarities and differences in skin of color and white skin with regard to skin barrier, pigmentation, and sensitivity. Two of the most important issues are skin lightening and brightening. Products for use on skin of color typically should be gentle because of the proclivity of more deeply pigmented skin to develop pigmentary abnormalities in response to skin irritation or trauma. Increasing patient interest in natural remedies has been matched by research on the use of natural ingredients in dermatology. The relative gentleness of many of these products, coupled with excellent efficacy, makes natural ingredients such as soy and licorice excellent choices in the treatment of disorders such as postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) and melasma. For daily skin care, ingredients such as oatmeal and feverfew are good choices for gentle cleansing and moisturizing of dry, sensitive, or ashy skin. Sun protection is an increasing concern due to rising rates of melanoma. Several botanical products are useful in augmenting photoprotection with conventional sunscreens.

  16. Neuromodulators for Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ...

  17. Revisiting "Color Names and Color Notions": a contemporary examination of the language and attitudes of skin color among young black women.

    PubMed

    Wilder, JeffriAnne

    2010-01-01

    Employing the pioneering work of Charles Parrish as a basis of comparison, this study serves as a follow-up to “Color Names and Color Notions” by deconstructing the contemporary language and attitudes surrounding skin color. Nine focus groups with 58 black women between the ages of 18 and 25 reveal that the color names and color notions offered were consistent with many of the terms and stereotypes that Parrish found, thereby indicating that there has been no change in colorist ideology among African Americans. Participants discussed 40 color names regularly employed to describe light, medium, and dark skin tones. The terms and attitudes associated with light skin tones were generally negative; conversely, the terms and attitudes associated with dark skin tones were derogatory. The language and beliefs connected to medium skin tones indicate that colorism operates as a three-tiered structure rather than the traditionally situated binary paradigm.

  18. Characteristics of the Aging Skin

    PubMed Central

    Farage, Miranda A.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Elsner, Peter; Maibach, Howard I.

    2013-01-01

    Significance Although most researches into the changes in skin with age focus on the unwelcome aesthetic aspects of the aging skin, skin deterioration with age is more than a merely cosmetic problem. Although mortality from skin disease is primarily restricted to melanoma, dermatological disorders are ubiquitous in older people with a significant impact on quality of life. The structural and functional deterioration of the skin that occurs with age has numerous clinical presentations, ranging from benign but potentially excruciating disorders like pruritus to the more threatening carcinomas and melanomas. Recent Advances The degenerative changes that occur in the aging skin are increasingly understood at both the molecular and cellular level, facilitating a deeper understanding of the structural and functional deterioration that these changes produce. Critical Issues A loss of both function and structural stability in skin proceeds unavoidably as individuals age, which is the result of both intrinsic and extrinsic processes, which contribute simultaneously to a progressive loss of skin integrity. Intrinsic aging proceeds at a genetically determined pace, primarily caused by the buildup of damaging products of cellular metabolism as well as an increasing biological aging of the cells. Estrogen levels strongly influence skin integrity in women as well; falling levels in midlife, therefore, produce premature aging as compared with similarly aged men. Extrinsic insults from the environment add to the dermatological signs of aging. Future Directions A deeper understanding of the physiological basis of skin aging will facilitate progress in the treatment of the unwelcome sequelae of aging skin, both cosmetic and pathogenic. PMID:24527317

  19. Skin Transcriptome Profiles Associated with Skin Color in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianqin; Liu, Fuzhu; Cao, Junting; Liu, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional and medicinal benefits have been attributed to the consumption of tissues from the black-boned chickens in oriental countries. Lueyang black-boned chicken is one of the native chicken breeds. However, some birds may instead have white or lighter skin, which directly causes economic losses every year. Previous studies of pigmentation have focused on a number of genes that may play important roles in coat color regulation. Illumina2000 sequencing technology was used to catalog the global gene expression profiles in the skin of the Lueyang chicken with white versus black skin. A total of 18,608 unigenes were assembled from the reads obtained from the skin of the white and black chickens. A total of 649 known genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, with 314 genes that were up regulated and 335 genes that were down-regulated, and a total of 162 novel genes were differentially expressed in the black versus white chickens, consisting of 73 genes that were up-regulated (including 4 highly expressed genes that were expressed exclusively in the skin of the black chickens) and 89 genes that were down-regulated. There were also a total of 8 known coat-color genes expressed in previous studies (ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R). In this study, 4 of which showed greater expression in the black chickens, and several were up-regulated, such as KIT, ASIP, TYR and OCA2. To our surprise, KITLG, MITF and MC1R showed no significant difference in expression between the black- and white-skinned chickens, and the expression of TYRP1 was not detected in either skin color. The expression of ASIP, TYR, KIT, TYRP1, OCA2, KITLG, MITF and MC1R was validated by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and the results of the qPCR were consistent with the RNA-seq. This study provides several candidate genes that may be associated with the development of black versus white skin. More importantly, the fact that the MC1R

  20. Aging changes in skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... sun exposure with areas that are protected from sunlight. Natural pigments seem to provide some protection against ... Exposures to industrial and household chemicals Indoor heating Sunlight can cause: Loss of elasticity (elastosis) Noncancerous skin ...

  1. Realistic fetus skin color processing for ultrasound volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Tae; Kim, Kyuhong; Park, Sung-Chan; Kang, Jooyoung; Kim, Jung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes realistic fetus skin color processing using a 2D color map and a tone mapping function (TMF) for ultrasound volume rendering. The contributions of this paper are a 2D color map generated through a gamut model of skin color and a TMF that depends on the lighting position. First, the gamut model of fetus skin color is calculated by color distribution of baby images. The 2D color map is created using a gamut model for tone mapping of ray casting. For the translucent effect, a 2D color map in which lightness is inverted is generated. Second, to enhance the contrast of rendered images, the luminance, color, and tone curve TMF parameters are changed using 2D Gaussian function that depends on the lighting position. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves better realistic skin color reproduction than the conventional method.

  2. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Nozile, Wallace; Adgerson, Cheri N; Cohen, George F

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CLE) is a common manifestation in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. In a significant population of patients, CLE is the predominant feature and, in some cases, patients suffer from cutaneous disease alone. Chronic Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus (CCLE) is a scarring subtype, more prevalent in blacks. Patients with skin of color may pose a challenge to physicians due to exaggerated cutaneous findings and increased risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and hypertrophic scarring. With the demographics of the United States rapidly shifting towards a greater population of non-Caucasian racial and ethnic groups, it is imperative that we expand on the limited research into molecular variation, clinical presentation, and therapeutic efficacy in CLE. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to the unique and severe aspects of CLE in persons of color, which calls for early and aggressive treatment.

  3. Illuminant color estimation based on pigmentation separation from human skin color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satomi; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Kamijo, Naohiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2015-03-01

    Human has the visual system called "color constancy" that maintains the perceptive colors of same object across various light sources. The effective method of color constancy algorithm was proposed to use the human facial color in a digital color image, however, this method has wrong estimation results by the difference of individual facial colors. In this paper, we present the novel color constancy algorithm based on skin color analysis. The skin color analysis is the method to separate the skin color into the components of melanin, hemoglobin and shading. We use the stationary property of Japanese facial color, and this property is calculated from the components of melanin and hemoglobin. As a result, we achieve to propose the method to use subject's facial color in image and not depend on the individual difference among Japanese facial color.

  4. Skin anti-aging strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ganceviciene, Ruta; Liakou, Aikaterini I.; Theodoridis, Athanasios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin aging is a complex biological process influenced by a combination of endogenous or intrinsic and exogenous or extrinsic factors. Because of the fact that skin health and beauty is considered one of the principal factors representing overall “well-being” and the perception of “health” in humans, several anti-aging strategies have been developed during the last years. It is the intention of this article to review the most important anti-aging strategies that dermatologists have nowadays in hand, including including preventive measurements, cosmetological strategies, topical and systemic therapeutic agents and invasive procedures. PMID:23467476

  5. Skin anti-aging strategies.

    PubMed

    Ganceviciene, Ruta; Liakou, Aikaterini I; Theodoridis, Athanasios; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2012-07-01

    Skin aging is a complex biological process influenced by a combination of endogenous or intrinsic and exogenous or extrinsic factors. Because of the fact that skin health and beauty is considered one of the principal factors representing overall "well-being" and the perception of "health" in humans, several anti-aging strategies have been developed during the last years. It is the intention of this article to review the most important anti-aging strategies that dermatologists have nowadays in hand, including including preventive measurements, cosmetological strategies, topical and systemic therapeutic agents and invasive procedures.

  6. Analysis on unevenness of skin color using the melanin and hemoglobin components separated by independent component analysis of skin color image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, Nobutoshi; Fujiwara, Izumi; Inoue, Yayoi; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Iwata, Kayoko

    2011-03-01

    Uneven distribution of skin color is one of the biggest concerns about facial skin appearance. Recently several techniques to analyze skin color have been introduced by separating skin color information into chromophore components, such as melanin and hemoglobin. However, there are not many reports on quantitative analysis of unevenness of skin color by considering type of chromophore, clusters of different sizes and concentration of the each chromophore. We propose a new image analysis and simulation method based on chromophore analysis and spatial frequency analysis. This method is mainly composed of three techniques: independent component analysis (ICA) to extract hemoglobin and melanin chromophores from a single skin color image, an image pyramid technique which decomposes each chromophore into multi-resolution images, which can be used for identifying different sizes of clusters or spatial frequencies, and analysis of the histogram obtained from each multi-resolution image to extract unevenness parameters. As the application of the method, we also introduce an image processing technique to change unevenness of melanin component. As the result, the method showed high capabilities to analyze unevenness of each skin chromophore: 1) Vague unevenness on skin could be discriminated from noticeable pigmentation such as freckles or acne. 2) By analyzing the unevenness parameters obtained from each multi-resolution image for Japanese ladies, agerelated changes were observed in the parameters of middle spatial frequency. 3) An image processing system modulating the parameters was proposed to change unevenness of skin images along the axis of the obtained age-related change in real time.

  7. Molecular aspects of skin ageing.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Elizabeth C; Watson, Rachel E B; Sherratt, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    Ageing of human skin may result from both the passage of time (intrinsic ageing) and from cumulative exposure to external influences (extrinsic ageing) such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) which promote wrinkle formation and loss of tissue elasticity. Whilst both ageing processes are associated with phenotypic changes in cutaneous cells, the major functional manifestations of ageing occur as a consequence of structural and compositional remodeling of normally long-lived dermal extracellular matrix proteins. This review briefly considers the effects of ageing on dermal collagens and proteoglycans before focusing on the mechanisms, functional consequences and treatment of elastic fibre remodeling in ageing skin. The early stages of photoageing are characterised by the differential degradation of elastic fibre proteins and whilst the activity of extracellular matrix proteases is increased in photoexposed skin, the substrate specificity of these enzymes is low. We have recently shown however, that isolated fibrillin microfibrils are susceptible to direct degradation by physiologically attainable doses of UV-B radiation and that elastic fibre proteins as a group are highly enriched in UV-absorbing amino acid residues. Functionally, elastic fibre remodeling events may adversely impact on: the mechanical properties of tissues, the recruitment and activation of immune cells, the expression of matrix metalloproteinases and cytokine signaling (by perturbing fibrillin microfibril sequestration of TGFβ). Finally, newly developed topical interventions appear to be capable of regenerating elements of the elastic fibre system in ageing skin, whilst systemic treatments may potentially prevent the pathological tissue remodeling events which occur in response to elastic fibre degradation.

  8. Prototypical colors of skin, green plant, and blue sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Huanzhao; Luo, Ronnier

    2013-02-01

    Colors of skin, green plant, and blue sky of digital photographic images were studied for modeling and detection of these three important memory color regions. The color modeling of these three regions in CIELAB and CAM02-UCS was presented, and the properties of these three color groups were investigated.

  9. Novel skin brightener used as monotherapy for moderate melasma in skin of color.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Pearl E

    2014-03-01

    Melasma is a chronic, relapsing disorder that can be disfiguring and can have adverse effects on quality of life. Recently, a unique hydroquinone-free topical product addressing multiple pathways involved in pigmentation was shown to have similar efficacy and equally well tolerated as 4% hydroquinone in females with facial hyperpigmentation. The goal herein was to further assess the efficacy and tolerability of this new multimodality product for the control of moderate melasma in skin of color. Six female subjects with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-V in good general health between the ages of 46 and 63 years with moderate epidermal facial melasma are presented herein. Subjects applied the skin brightener twice daily, morning and evening, and returned to the clinic at weeks 4, 8, and 12. By week 12, Investigator Overall Hyperpigmentation scores and MASI scores improved by an average of 22% and 38% from baseline, respectively. Additionally, 100% of subjects showed at least a 25% increase in Global Improvement at week 12. The skin brightener was well tolerated with no reports of erythema, edema, scaling, burning/stinging, or itching. Results from these case studies suggest that this multimodality skin brightener may provide an alternative treatment to hydroquinone for moderate melasma in skin of color. However additional clinical studies would be needed.

  10. Daily Consumption of a Fruit and Vegetable Smoothie Alters Facial Skin Color.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Wei; Graf, Brigitte A; Mitra, Soma R; Stephen, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of dietary carotenoids or carotenoid supplements can alter the color (yellowness) of human skin through increased carotenoid deposition in the skin. As fruit and vegetables are the main dietary sources of carotenoids, skin yellowness may be a function of regular fruit and vegetable consumption. However, most previous studies have used tablets or capsules to supplement carotenoid intake, and less is known of the impact of increased fruit and vegetable consumption on skin color. Here, we examined skin color changes in an Asian population (Malaysian Chinese ethnicity) over a six week dietary intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie. Eighty one university students (34 males, 47 females; mean age 20.48) were assigned randomly to consuming either a fruit smoothie (intervention group) or mineral water (control group) daily for six weeks. Participants' skin yellowness (CIELab b*), redness (a*) and luminance (L*) were measured at baseline, twice during the intervention period and at a two-week follow-up, using a handheld reflectance spectrophotometer. Results showed a large increment in skin yellowness (p<0.001) and slight increment in skin redness (p<0.001) after 4 weeks of intervention for participants in the intervention group. Skin yellowness and skin redness remained elevated at the two week follow up measurement. In conclusion, intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie is associated with increased skin redness and yellowness in an Asian population. Changes in the reflectance spectrum of the skin suggest that this color change was caused by carotenoid deposition in the skin.

  11. [Skin ageing and its prevention].

    PubMed

    Passeron, Thierry; Ortonne, Jean-Paul

    2003-09-27

    INTRINSIC AND EXTRINSIC FACTORS: Skin ageing is due to the conjunction of intrinsic (chronological ageing) and extrinsic factors (fundamentally photo-ageing). The physiopathological mechanisms of intrinsic ageing rejoin those of the ageing of all the other organs. Among the intrinsic causes, tobacco and above all ultra-violet radiation, UVB and also UVA, play a preponderant role. Photo-ageing is secondary to complex mechanisms that are increasingly known. The UVB directly interact with the DNA of the cutaneous cells. The deleterious effects of UVA are principally due to the formation of free radical oxygen, which result in an alteration in the nuclear and also mitochondrial DNA, but also an activation of the enzymes, metalloproteinase, capable of damaging the extra-cellular matrix. DELETERIOUS CONSEQUENCES: The phenomena of ageing provoke the decline in defence, healing and perception mechanisms and in the thermoregulation of the skin tissue. There are numerous and often unsightly clinical manifestations. Photo-ageing can be considered as a marker of risk of photo-carcinogenesis requiring increased clinical surveillance. PREVENTIVE AND CURATIVE MEASURES: The prevention of skin ageing must be based on the use of sunscreens protecting against both UVB and UVA, but, in order for them to be effective, they require a change in general life style. There are many efficient therapeutic means, but the possible side effects must be known and explained to the patient. Retinoids, in view of their innocuousness and efficacy not only in prevention but also treatment of skin ageing, should be considered as a therapeutic option of choice.

  12. Genetics of hair and skin color.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jonathan L

    2003-01-01

    Differences in skin and hair color are principally genetically determined and are due to variation in the amount, type, and packaging of melanin polymers produced by melanocytes secreted into keratinocytes. Pigmentary phenotype is genetically complex and at a physiological level complicated. Genes determining a number of rare Mendelian disorders of pigmentation such as albinism have been identified, but only one gene, the melanocortin 1 receptor (MCR1), has so far been identified to explain variation in the normal population such as that leading to red hair, freckling, and sun-sensitivity. Genotype-phenotype relations of the MC1R are reviewed, as well as methods to improve the phenotypic assessment of human pigmentary status. It is argued that given advances in model systems, increases in technical facility, and the lower cost of genotype assessment, the lack of standardized phenotype assessment is now a major limit on advance.

  13. Multimodal digital color imaging system for facial skin lesion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Youngwoo; Lee, Youn-Heum; Jung, Byungjo

    2008-02-01

    In dermatology, various digital imaging modalities have been used as an important tool to quantitatively evaluate the treatment effect of skin lesions. Cross-polarization color image was used to evaluate skin chromophores (melanin and hemoglobin) information and parallel-polarization image to evaluate skin texture information. In addition, UV-A induced fluorescent image has been widely used to evaluate various skin conditions such as sebum, keratosis, sun damages, and vitiligo. In order to maximize the evaluation efficacy of various skin lesions, it is necessary to integrate various imaging modalities into an imaging system. In this study, we propose a multimodal digital color imaging system, which provides four different digital color images of standard color image, parallel and cross-polarization color image, and UV-A induced fluorescent color image. Herein, we describe the imaging system and present the examples of image analysis. By analyzing the color information and morphological features of facial skin lesions, we are able to comparably and simultaneously evaluate various skin lesions. In conclusion, we are sure that the multimodal color imaging system can be utilized as an important assistant tool in dermatology.

  14. [Experimental models of human skin aging].

    PubMed

    Nikolakis, G; Zoschke, C; Makrantonaki, E; Hausmann, C; Schäfer-Korting, M; Zouboulis, C C

    2016-02-01

    The skin is a representative model for the study of human aging. Despite the high regenerative capacity of the skin, skin physiology changes over the course of life. Medical and cosmetic research is trying to prevent aging, to slow, to stop, or to reverse it. Effects of age-related DNA damage and of changing skin structure on pharmacological parameters are largely unknown. This review article summarizes the state of scientific knowledge in the field of experimental models of human skin aging and shows approaches to improve organotypic skin models, to develop predictive models of aging, and improve aging research.

  15. Skin Deep: Women Writing on Color, Culture and Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Featherston, Elena, Ed.

    This anthology contains 48 selections about being a woman of color in the United States. The first section, "The Paradox of Color: Living in an 'Unsane' World," considers the emotional amputations as well as the spiritual powers that are derived from the woman's struggle to "be" in her skin. The second section, "On Becoming 'AdNormal': Finding,…

  16. Skin Color, Social Classification, and Blood Pressure in Southeastern Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Gravlee, Clarence C.; Dressler, William W.; Bernard, H. Russell

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We tested competing hypotheses for the skin color–blood pressure relationship by analyzing the association between blood pressure and 2 skin color variables: skin pigmentation and social classification. Methods. We measured skin pigmentation by reflectance spectrophotometry and social classification by linking respondents to ethnographic data on the cultural model of “color” in southeastern Puerto Rico. We used multiple regression analysis to test the associations between these variables and blood pressure in a community-based sample of Puerto Rican adults aged 25–55 years (n=100). Regression models included age, gender, body mass index (BMI), self-reported use of antihypertensive medication, and socioeconomic status (SES). Results. Social classification, but not skin pigmentation, is associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure through a statistical interaction with SES, independent of age, gender, BMI, self-reported use of antihypertensive medication, and skin reflectance. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that sociocultural processes mediate the relationship between skin color and blood pressure. They also help to clarify the meaning and measurement of skin color and “race” as social variables in health research. PMID:16257938

  17. Reconstructing Carotenoid-Based and Structural Coloration in Fossil Skin.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Maria E; Orr, Patrick J; Kearns, Stuart L; Alcalá, Luis; Anadón, Pere; Peñalver, Enrique

    2016-04-25

    Evidence of original coloration in fossils provides insights into the visual communication strategies used by ancient animals and the functional evolution of coloration over time [1-7]. Hitherto, all reconstructions of the colors of reptile integument and the plumage of fossil birds and feathered dinosaurs have been of melanin-based coloration [1-6]. Extant animals also use other mechanisms for producing color [8], but these have not been identified in fossils. Here we report the first examples of carotenoid-based coloration in the fossil record, and of structural coloration in fossil integument. The fossil skin, from a 10 million-year-old colubrid snake from the Late Miocene Libros Lagerstätte (Teruel, Spain) [9, 10], preserves dermal pigment cells (chromatophores)-xanthophores, iridophores, and melanophores-in calcium phosphate. Comparison with chromatophore abundance and position in extant reptiles [11-15] indicates that the fossil snake was pale-colored in ventral regions; dorsal and lateral regions were green with brown-black and yellow-green transverse blotches. Such coloration most likely functioned in substrate matching and intraspecific signaling. Skin replicated in authigenic minerals is not uncommon in exceptionally preserved fossils [16, 17], and dermal pigment cells generate coloration in numerous reptile, amphibian, and fish taxa today [18]. Our discovery thus represents a new means by which to reconstruct the original coloration of exceptionally preserved fossil vertebrates.

  18. Daily Consumption of a Fruit and Vegetable Smoothie Alters Facial Skin Color

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kok Wei; Graf, Brigitte A.; Mitra, Soma R.; Stephen, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of dietary carotenoids or carotenoid supplements can alter the color (yellowness) of human skin through increased carotenoid deposition in the skin. As fruit and vegetables are the main dietary sources of carotenoids, skin yellowness may be a function of regular fruit and vegetable consumption. However, most previous studies have used tablets or capsules to supplement carotenoid intake, and less is known of the impact of increased fruit and vegetable consumption on skin color. Here, we examined skin color changes in an Asian population (Malaysian Chinese ethnicity) over a six week dietary intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie. Eighty one university students (34 males, 47 females; mean age 20.48) were assigned randomly to consuming either a fruit smoothie (intervention group) or mineral water (control group) daily for six weeks. Participants’ skin yellowness (CIELab b*), redness (a*) and luminance (L*) were measured at baseline, twice during the intervention period and at a two-week follow-up, using a handheld reflectance spectrophotometer. Results showed a large increment in skin yellowness (p<0.001) and slight increment in skin redness (p<0.001) after 4 weeks of intervention for participants in the intervention group. Skin yellowness and skin redness remained elevated at the two week follow up measurement. In conclusion, intervention with a carotenoid-rich fruit smoothie is associated with increased skin redness and yellowness in an Asian population. Changes in the reflectance spectrum of the skin suggest that this color change was caused by carotenoid deposition in the skin. PMID:26186449

  19. Making Sense of Skin Color in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Janine S.; Budescu, Mia; Sommers, Marilyn S.

    2012-01-01

    The background of this article is that assessment and quantification of skin color is important to health care; color is one indicator of overall health and is linked to oxygenation, tissue perfusion, nutritional status, and injury. The purpose is to describe how skin color varies across racial/ethnic groups so that the information can be applied to clinical practice. The method used is cross-sectional, descriptive design (n = 257). We recorded self-defined race/ethnicity and used a spectrophotometer to measure skin color at two anatomic sites. Skin color variables included L* (light/dark), a* (red/green), and b* (yellow/blue). As regards results, we found significant differences in L*, a*, and b* values by site and race/ethnicity in White, Asian, and Biracial participants. L*: F(3, 233) = 139.04, p < .01 and F(3, 233) = 118.47, p < .01. Black participants had significantly lower mean L* values and wider ranges of L*, a*, and b* as compared with other groups. In regard to application, these findings suggest that clinicians and researchers should plan and provide care based on skin color, rather than race/ethnicity. PMID:22645403

  20. [Physiological features of skin ageing in human].

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, I V; Tankanag, A V; Chemeris, N K

    2013-01-01

    The issue deals with the actual problem of gerontology, notably physiological features of human skin ageing. In the present review the authors have considered the kinds of ageing, central factors, affected on the ageing process (ultraviolet radiation and oxidation stress), as well as the research guidelines of the ageing changes in the skin structure and fuctions: study of mechanical properties, microcirculation, pH and skin thickness. The special attention has been payed to the methods of assessment of skin blood flow, and to results of investigations of age features of peripheral microhemodynamics. The laser Doppler flowmetry technique - one of the modern, noninvasive and extensively used methods for the assessmant of skin blood flow microcirculation system has been expanded in the review. The main results of the study of the ageing changes of skin blood perfusion using this method has been also presented.

  1. Sun exposure, skin color and vitamin D status in Arab children and adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Al-Saleh, Yousef; Khan, Nasiruddin; Sabico, Shaun; Aljohani, Naji; Alfawaz, Hanan; Alsulaimani, Maha; Al-Othman, Abdulaziz M; Alokail, Majed S

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests an increased prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the Middle East and North African countries. Sunlight has long been recognized as a major provider of vitamin D and lighter skin color has been associated with better vitamin D status. In this context, we aimed to determine whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D[25-(OH)D] concentrations are related to skin color, sun exposure and gender among healthy Saudi children and adults. A total of 808 Saudi children (age=14.6±0.04years) and 561 (age=31.4±0.3years) adults of both genders were included in this study. Levels of sun exposure and skin color were determined using a standard questionnaire. Anthropometry and plasma 25-(OH)D concentrations were analyzed. On the basis of duration of sun exposure (<20min vs. >20min), a significantly lower concentration of 25-(OH)D (40.9±1.2 vs. 35.5±1.8nmol/l; p<0.019) was demonstrated in dark-skinned boys with exposure time less than 20min than those exposed longer than 20min. We were unable to show an effect of sunlight exposure or skin color on vitamin D status of children or adults, except in dark-skinned boys who had lower 25(OH)D concentrations associated with limited sun exposure.

  2. Color enhancement in multispectral image of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Masanori; Murakami, Yuri; Obi, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    2003-07-01

    Multispectral imaging is receiving attention in medical color imaging, as high-fidelity color information can be acquired by the multispectral image capturing. On the other hand, as color enhancement in medical color image is effective for distinguishing lesion from normal part, we apply a new technique for color enhancement using multispectral image to enhance the features contained in a certain spectral band, without changing the average color distribution of original image. In this method, to keep the average color distribution, KL transform is applied to spectral data, and only high-order KL coefficients are amplified in the enhancement. Multispectral images of human skin of bruised arm are captured by 16-band multispectral camera, and the proposed color enhancement is applied. The resultant images are compared with the color images reproduced assuming CIE D65 illuminant (obtained by natural color reproduction technique). As a result, the proposed technique successfully visualizes unclear bruised lesions, which are almost invisible in natural color images. The proposed technique will provide support tool for the diagnosis in dermatology, visual examination in internal medicine, nursing care for preventing bedsore, and so on.

  3. Airborne particle exposure and extrinsic skin aging.

    PubMed

    Vierkötter, Andrea; Schikowski, Tamara; Ranft, Ulrich; Sugiri, Dorothea; Matsui, Mary; Krämer, Ursula; Krutmann, Jean

    2010-12-01

    For decades, extrinsic skin aging has been known to result from chronic exposure to solar radiation and, more recently, to tobacco smoke. In this study, we have assessed the influence of air pollution on skin aging in 400 Caucasian women aged 70-80 years. Skin aging was clinically assessed by means of SCINEXA (score of intrinsic and extrinsic skin aging), a validated skin aging score. Traffic-related exposure at the place of residence was determined by traffic particle emissions and by estimation of soot in fine dust. Exposure to background particle concentration was determined by measurements of ambient particles at fixed monitoring sites. The impact of air pollution on skin aging was analyzed by linear and logistic regression and adjusted for potential confounding variables. Air pollution exposure was significantly correlated to extrinsic skin aging signs, in particular to pigment spots and less pronounced to wrinkles. An increase in soot (per 0.5 × 10(-5) per m) and particles from traffic (per 475  kg per year and square km) was associated with 20% more pigment spots on forehead and cheeks. Background particle pollution, which was measured in low residential areas of the cities without busy traffic and therefore is not directly attributable to traffic but rather to other sources of particles, was also positively correlated to pigment spots on face. These results indicate that particle pollution might influence skin aging as well.

  4. Skin Color Variation in Orang Asli Tribes of Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Khai C.; Ngu, Mee S.; Reid, Katherine P.; Teh, Mei S.; Aida, Zamzuraida S.; Koh, Danny XR.; Berg, Arthur; Oppenheimer, Stephen; Salleh, Hood; Clyde, Mahani M.; Md-Zain, Badrul M.; Canfield, Victor A.; Cheng, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    Pigmentation is a readily scorable and quantitative human phenotype, making it an excellent model for studying multifactorial traits and diseases. Convergent human evolution from the ancestral state, darker skin, towards lighter skin colors involved divergent genetic mechanisms in people of European vs. East Asian ancestry. It is striking that the European mechanisms result in a 10–20-fold increase in skin cancer susceptibility while the East Asian mechanisms do not. Towards the mapping of genes that contribute to East Asian pigmentation there is need for one or more populations that are admixed for ancestral and East Asian ancestry, but with minimal European contribution. This requirement is fulfilled by the Senoi, one of three indigenous tribes of Peninsular Malaysia collectively known as the Orang Asli. The Senoi are thought to be an admixture of the Negrito, an ancestral dark-skinned population representing the second of three Orang Asli tribes, and regional Mongoloid populations of Indo-China such as the Proto-Malay, the third Orang Asli tribe. We have calculated skin reflectance-based melanin indices in 492 Orang Asli, which ranged from 28 (lightest) to 75 (darkest); both extremes were represented in the Senoi. Population averages were 56 for Negrito, 42 for Proto-Malay, and 46 for Senoi. The derived allele frequencies for SLC24A5 and SLC45A2 in the Senoi were 0.04 and 0.02, respectively, consistent with greater South Asian than European admixture. Females and individuals with the A111T mutation had significantly lighter skin (p = 0.001 and 0.0039, respectively). Individuals with these derived alleles were found across the spectrum of skin color, indicating an overriding effect of strong skin lightening alleles of East Asian origin. These results suggest that the Senoi are suitable for mapping East Asian skin color genes. PMID:22912732

  5. [Normal and abnormal human skin color: from research to esthetics].

    PubMed

    Ortonne, J-P

    2009-10-01

    Skin color is controlled by pigmentary genes that regulate constitutive skin pigmentation and by environmental factors, the most obvious of them being solar U.V. At this time, more than 130 distinct pigmentary genes are known. They affect embryogenesis and survival of the melanocyte system, mélanosome biogenesis, melanogenesis, mélanosome transport and transfer, eumelanins/pheomelanins ratio and epidermal mélanosome turn-over and elimination. The pigmentary disorders of the skin are common and represent an important part of dermatologist activity. They concern at the same time the general dermatology and the aesthetic dermatology.

  6. National Differences in Intelligence, Crime, Income, and Skin Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, J. Philippe; Templer, Donald I.

    2009-01-01

    National differences in murder, rape, and serious assault were examined in 113 countries in relation to national IQ, income, skin color, birth rate, life expectancy, infant mortality, and HIV/AIDS. Data were collated from the 1993-1996 International Crime Statistics published by INTERPOL. Violent crime was found to be lower in countries with…

  7. The Skin Color Paradox and the American Racial Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochschild, Jennifer L.; Weaver, Vesla

    2007-01-01

    Dark-skinned blacks in the United States have lower socioeconomic status, more punitive relationships with the criminal justice system, diminished prestige, and less likelihood of holding elective office compared with their lighter counterparts. This phenomenon of "colorism" both occurs within the African American community and is…

  8. Skin aging: are adipocytes the next target?

    PubMed Central

    Kruglikov, Ilja L.; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2016-01-01

    Dermal white adipose tissue (dWAT) is increasingly appreciated as a special fat depot. The adipocytes in this depot exert a variety of unique effects on their surrounding cells and can undergo massive phenotypic changes. Significant modulation of dWAT content can be observed both in intrinsically and extrinsically aged skin. Specifically, skin that has been chronically photo-damaged displays a reduction of the dWAT volume, caused by the replacement of adipocytes by fibrotic structures. This is likely to be caused by the recently uncovered process described as “adipocyte-myofibroblast transition” (AMT). In addition, contributions of dermal adipocytes to the skin aging processes are also indirectly supported by spatial correlations between the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring and the appearance of signs of skin aging in different ethnic groups. These observations could elevate dermal adipocytes to prime targets in strategies aimed at counteracting skin aging. PMID:27434510

  9. Effects of intrinsic aging and photodamage on skin dyspigmentation: an explorative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, Gabor; Trojahn, Carina; D'Alessandro, Brian; Patwardhan, Sachin; Canfield, Douglas; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Photoaging is associated with increasing pigmentary heterogeneity and darkening of skin color. However, little is known about age-related changes in skin pigmentation on sun-protected areas. The aim of this explorative study was to measure skin color and dyspigmentation using image processing and to evaluate the reliability of these parameters. Twenty-four volunteers of three age-groups were included in this explorative study. Measurements were conducted at sun-exposed and sun-protected areas. Overall skin-color estimates were similar among age groups. The hyper- and hypopigmentation indices differed significantly by age groups and their correlations with age ranged between 0.61 and 0.74. Dorsal forearm skin differed from the other investigational areas (p<0.001). We observed an increase in dyspigmentation at all skin areas, including sun-protected skin areas, already in young adulthood. Associations between age and dyspigmentation estimates were higher compared to color parameters. All color and dyspigmentation estimates showed high reliability. Dyspigmentation parameters seem to be better biomarkers for UV damage than the overall color measurements.

  10. Association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3)levels in adult New Zealanders with ethnicity, skin color and self-reported skin sensitivity to sun exposure.

    PubMed

    Nessvi, Sofia; Johansson, Lisa; Jopson, Jan; Stewart, Alistair; Reeder, Anthony; McKenzie, Richard; Scragg, Robert K

    2011-01-01

    The study aim was to determine the contribution of ethnicity, objectively measured skin color and skin reaction-to-sun exposure to variations in 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) [25(OH)D(3) ]. A multiethnic sample (European, Maori, Pacific and Asian) of 503 adult volunteers aged 18-85 years, recruited from Auckland and Dunedin in New Zealand, answered a questionnaire on sun exposure and self-defined ethnicity. Skin color was measured using a spectrophotometer and the Individual Typology Angle (ITA) calculated. A blood sample was collected 4 weeks later to measure 25(OH)D(3). 25(OH)D(3) was associated with ethnicity, but not self-reported skin reaction-to-sun exposure. Amongst the ethnic groups, Asians had the lowest mean 25(OH)D level (37.0 nmol L(-1)) and Europeans with lighter colored skin had the highest (57.9 nmol L(-1)). An association also was seen between 25(OH)D(3) and skin color, with an increase of 2-3 nmol L(-1) per 10° increase in ITA value, indicating higher 25(OH)D(3) with lighter skin color; but much of this association disappeared after adjusting for ethnicity. In contrast, ethnicity remained associated with 25(OH)D(3) after adjusting for ITA skin color and skin reaction-to-sun exposure. These results indicate that self-defined ethnicity was a major determinant of variations in serum 25(OH)D(3), while objective measures of skin color explained relatively little additional variation.

  11. Age, colors and ISO standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2010-01-01

    Age influences all bodily functions, also vision. Therefore, the effects of age on vision should be mirrored in ergonomic requirements laid down in display standards such as ISO 9241-300/307, 'Electronic visual display requirements'. However, this is only true to a limited extent - just as is the case with other standards dealing with ergonomic requirements, because developers of such standards do not possess the necessary specific knowledge. It therefore was an important step by ISO and IEC to publish in 2001 ISO/IEC Guide 71: 'Guidelines for standard developers to address the needs of older persons and persons with disabilities'. This guide was followed by a more specific and detailed Technical Report from ISO, ISO/TR 22411, as well as by 'Guidelines on Accessibility' from CIE. These three guidelines are reviewed. The paper concludes with developments around ISO 9241-300/307 in general, especially future additions on autostereoscopic displays and electronic paper. As to the former, the visual fatigue often accompanying viewing 3D displays needs methods for characterizing and validating such displays, to reduce visual fatigue as much as possible. Standardizing certain properties of electronic paper is an example of the present pro-active way of working of ISO/TC159/SC4/WG2, 'Visual Display Requirements', that developed ISO 9241-300/307.

  12. Skin Color in the Development of Identity: A Biopsychosocial Model

    PubMed Central

    Fullilove, Mindy Thompson; Reynolds, Tyrone

    1984-01-01

    The role of skin color in the development of identity has been studied by a variety of paradigms. This paper applies the biopsychosocial model to this problem, with the hope that systems hierarchies offer a way to understand how many variables have an impact on a single point. This model postulates that complex social interactions are the life setting for the individual whose development also reflects biological endowment, including the contributions of heredity and nurturance. The final personal integration of an adult understanding of skin color requires an active assertion by the individual. This model is explored through the writings of Jessie Fauset, a leading participant in the literary movement known as the Harlem Renaissance. PMID:6748102

  13. Factors of skin ageing share common mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Giacomoni, P U; Rein, G

    2001-01-01

    Ageing has been defined as the accumulation of molecular modifications which manifest as macroscopic clinical changes. Human skin, unique among mammalians insofar as it is deprived of fur, is particularly sensitive to environmental stress. Major environmental factors have been recognized to induce modifications of the morphological and biophysical properties of the skin. Metabolites from ingested or inhaled substances do affect skin, which is also sensitive to endogenous hormone levels. Factors as diverse as ultraviolet radiation, atmospheric pollution, wounds, infections, traumatisms, anoxya, cigarette smoke, and hormonal status have a role in increasing the rate of accumulation of molecular modifications and have thus been termed 'factors of ageing'. All these factors share as a common feature, the capability to directly or indirectly induce one of the steps of the micro-inflammatory cycle, which includes the expression of ICAM-1 in endothelial cells. This triggers a process leading to the accumulation of damages in the skin resulting in skin ageing since ICAM-1 expression provokes recruitment and diapedesis of circulating immune cells, which digest the extracellular matrix (ECM) by secreting collagenases, myeloperoxidases and reactive oxygen species. The activation of these lytic processes provokes random damage to resident cells, which in turn secrete prostaglandines and leukotrienes. These signaling molecules induce the degranulation of resident mast cells which release the autacoid histamine and the cytokine TNF-alpha thus activating endothelial cells lining adjacent capillaries which release P-selectin and synthesize ICAM-1. This closes a self-maintained micro-inflammatory cycle, which results in the accumulation of ECM damage, i.e. skin aging. In this paper we review the evidence that two factors able to induce macroscopical and molecular modifications in the skin, protein glycation and stretch, activate the micro-inflammatory cycle. We further present

  14. Technical note: comparing von Luschan skin color tiles and modern spectrophotometry for measuring human skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Swiatoniowski, Anna K; Quillen, Ellen E; Shriver, Mark D; Jablonski, Nina G

    2013-06-01

    Prior to the introduction of reflectance spectrophotometry into anthropological field research during the 1950s, human skin color was most commonly classified by visual skin color matching using the von Luschan tiles, a set of 36 standardized, opaque glass tiles arranged in a chromatic scale. Our goal was to establish a conversion formula between the tile-based color matching method and modern reflectance spectrophotometry to make historical and contemporary data comparable. Skin pigmentation measurements were taken on the forehead, inner upper arms, and backs of the hands using both the tiles and a spectrophotometer on 246 participants showing a broad range of skin pigmentation. From these data, a second-order polynomial conversion formula was derived by jackknife analysis to estimate melanin index (M-index) based on tile values. This conversion formula provides a means for comparing modern data to von Luschan tile measurements recorded in historical reports. This is particularly important for populations now extinct, extirpated, or admixed for which tile-based measures of skin pigmentation are the only data available.

  15. Nutrition and aging skin: sugar and glycation.

    PubMed

    Danby, F William

    2010-01-01

    The effect of sugars on aging skin is governed by the simple act of covalently cross-linking two collagen fibers, which renders both of them incapable of easy repair. Glucose and fructose link the amino acids present in the collagen and elastin that support the dermis, producing advanced glycation end products or "AGEs." This process is accelerated in all body tissues when sugar is elevated and is further stimulated by ultraviolet light in the skin. The effect on vascular, renal, retinal, coronary, and cutaneous tissues is being defined, as are methods of reducing the glycation load through careful diet and use of supplements.

  16. A source of healthcare disparity: race, skin color, and injuries after rape among adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Baker, Rachel B; Fargo, Jamison D; Shambley-Ebron, Donna; Sommers, Marilyn S

    2010-01-01

    Differences in anogenital injury resulting from rape may occur because of racial or skin color differences in adult women. It is critical to determine if these differences also are associated with differences in injury prevalence and frequency in adolescents and young adults. In a retrospective review of medical records, we examined whether Black adolescent/young adult females had different anogenital injuries as compared to White females following rape. Next, we examined whether skin color differences explained a significant amount of the racial difference in injuries. We reviewed charts of 234 female victims of rape ages 14 to 29. Overall injury prevalence was 62.8%. Race was significantly associated with frequency of injuries in several anatomical locations, with White victims having a higher frequency of injuries than Black victims. Skin color was significantly associated with injury frequency in many anatomical locations, with victims with light skin sustaining more injuries than victims with dark skin. Even when skin color was included in the relationship, race remained a statistically significant factor, suggesting that the relationship between race and injuries may be more complicated than merely a skin color difference that has been mislabeled a racial difference.

  17. Ebony and Ivory: Relationship between African American Young Women's Skin Color and Ratings of Self and Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia; McFall-Roberts, Ebuni; Flowers, Claudia; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Many individuals face discrimination because of their skin color; however, skin color of African American young adults has not been studied in detail. This study examines relationships between skin color and perceptions among African American college women. The study yielded a positive correlation between personal values and self-rated skin color

  18. The Differential Effect of Skin Color on Attractiveness, Personality Evaluations, and Perceived Life Success of African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, T. Joel; Bielitz, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Skin color in relation to perceived attractiveness, personality ratings, and perceived life success of African Americans was investigated in a 2 (sex of participant) 2 (skin color of stimulus person) 2 (sex of stimulus person) design. Based on prior research, Skin Color Sex of Stimulus Person and Sex of Participant Skin Color interactions were…

  19. Skin Ageing: Natural Weapons and Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Binic, Ivana; Lazarevic, Viktor; Ljubenovic, Milanka; Mojsa, Jelena; Sokolovic, Dusan

    2013-01-01

    The fact that the skin is the most visible organ makes us aware of the ageing process every minute. The use of plant extracts and herbs has its origins in ancient times. Chronological and photo-ageing can be easily distinguished clinically, but they share important molecular features. We tried to gather the most interesting evidence based on facts about plants and plant extracts used in antiaging products. Our main idea was to emphasize action mechanisms of these plant/herbal products, that is, their “strategies” in fighting skin ageing. Some of the plant extracts have the ability to scavenge free radicals, to protect the skin matrix through the inhibition of enzymatic degradation, or to promote collagen synthesis in the skin. There are some plants that can affect skin elasticity and tightness. Certainly, there is a place for herbal principles in antiaging cosmetics. On the other hand, there is a constant need for more evaluation and more clinical studies in vivo with emphasis on the ingredient concentration of the plant/herbal products, its formulation, safety, and duration of the antiaging effect. PMID:23431351

  20. Not by the Color of Their Skin; The Impact of Racial Differences on the Child's Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Marjorie

    Contents of this book include: Part I: "The Nursery School and Its Racial Integration"--introduction, establishing physical and psychological integration; staff meetings; observing and working through; Part II: "Theory and Practice"--skin color anxiety: the skin and its importance in personality development; skin color anxiety, the visual impact,…

  1. Age-related crosslink in skin collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, M.; Mechanic, G.

    1986-05-01

    A stable crosslinking amino acid was isolated from mature bovine skin collagen and its structure was identified as histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL) using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry and /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C-NMR. This newly identified crosslink has a linkage between C-2 histidine and C-6 of lysine in the latter's portion of hydroxylysinonorleucine. Quantitative studies using various aged samples of cow and human skin collagen indicated that this acid-heat stable nonreducible compound was the major age-related crosslink. In case of cow skin collagen, for example, during early embryonic development (3 and 5 month old embryos) the content of HHL stayed less than 0.01 residue/mole of collagen, however from the middle of gestation period (7 month old embryo) through the maturation stage it showed rapid increase with age and reached approximately 0.5 residues/mole of collagen in the 3 year old animal. Small increments (up to 0.65 res/mole of collagen) were observed in the 9 year old cow. The amounts of the crosslink unlike pyridinoline do not decrease with aging. Similar patterns were observed in human skin collagen.

  2. The Development of White-Asian Categorization: Contributions from Skin Color and Other Physiognomic Cues

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Yarrow; Dotsch, Ron; Clark, Amelia R.; Stepanova, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European–East Asian (“White–Asian”) categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial physiognomy, allowing the contribution of each to be assessed independently and in interaction with each other. Results demonstrated substantial development across this age range in children’s ability to draw on both sorts of cue, with over twice as much variance explained by stimulus variation in adults than children. Nonetheless, children were clearly sensitive to both skin color and other aspects of facial physiognomy, suggesting that understanding of the White-Asian category boundary develops in a somewhat different way than understanding of the White-Black category boundary, in which attention to features other than skin color appear only somewhat later. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for theories of social categorization. PMID:27355683

  3. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bischof, Johannes; Streubel, Maria Karolin; Trost, Andrea; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis. PMID:25906193

  4. Implications of the Admixture Process in Skin Color Molecular Assessment

    PubMed Central

    de Cerqueira, Caio Cesar Silva; Hünemeier, Tábita; Gomez-Valdés, Jorge; Ramallo, Virgínia; Volasko-Krause, Carla Daiana; Barbosa, Ana Angélica Leal; Vargas-Pinilla, Pedro; Dornelles, Rodrigo Ciconet; Longo, Danaê; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; González-José, Rolando; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Callegari-Jacques, Sídia Maria; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Cátira Bortolini, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the complex genotype-phenotype architecture of human pigmentation has clear implications for the evolutionary history of humans, as well as for medical and forensic practices. Although dozens of genes have previously been associated with human skin color, knowledge about this trait remains incomplete. In particular, studies focusing on populations outside the European-North American axis are rare, and, until now, admixed populations have seldom been considered. The present study was designed to help fill this gap. Our objective was to evaluate possible associations of 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), located within nine genes, and one pseudogene with the Melanin Index (MI) in two admixed Brazilian populations (Gaucho, N = 352; Baiano, N = 148) with different histories of geographic and ethnic colonization. Of the total sample, four markers were found to be significantly associated with skin color, but only two (SLC24A5 rs1426654, and SLC45A2 rs16891982) were consistently associated with MI in both samples (Gaucho and Baiano). Therefore, only these 2 SNPs should be preliminarily considered to have forensic significance because they consistently showed the association independently of the admixture level of the populations studied. We do not discard that the other two markers (HERC2 rs1129038 and TYR rs1126809) might be also relevant to admixed samples, but additional studies are necessary to confirm the real importance of these markers for skin pigmentation. Finally, our study shows associations of some SNPs with MI in a modern Brazilian admixed sample, with possible applications in forensic genetics. Some classical genetic markers in Euro-North American populations are not associated with MI in our sample. Our results point out the relevance of considering population differences in selecting an appropriate set of SNPs as phenotype predictors in forensic practice. PMID:24809478

  5. Implications of the admixture process in skin color molecular assessment.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Caio Cesar Silva de; Hünemeier, Tábita; Gomez-Valdés, Jorge; Ramallo, Virgínia; Volasko-Krause, Carla Daiana; Barbosa, Ana Angélica Leal; Vargas-Pinilla, Pedro; Dornelles, Rodrigo Ciconet; Longo, Danaê; Rothhammer, Francisco; Bedoya, Gabriel; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; González-José, Rolando; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Callegari-Jacques, Sídia Maria; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Cátira Bortolini, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the complex genotype-phenotype architecture of human pigmentation has clear implications for the evolutionary history of humans, as well as for medical and forensic practices. Although dozens of genes have previously been associated with human skin color, knowledge about this trait remains incomplete. In particular, studies focusing on populations outside the European-North American axis are rare, and, until now, admixed populations have seldom been considered. The present study was designed to help fill this gap. Our objective was to evaluate possible associations of 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), located within nine genes, and one pseudogene with the Melanin Index (MI) in two admixed Brazilian populations (Gaucho, N = 352; Baiano, N = 148) with different histories of geographic and ethnic colonization. Of the total sample, four markers were found to be significantly associated with skin color, but only two (SLC24A5 rs1426654, and SLC45A2 rs16891982) were consistently associated with MI in both samples (Gaucho and Baiano). Therefore, only these 2 SNPs should be preliminarily considered to have forensic significance because they consistently showed the association independently of the admixture level of the populations studied. We do not discard that the other two markers (HERC2 rs1129038 and TYR rs1126809) might be also relevant to admixed samples, but additional studies are necessary to confirm the real importance of these markers for skin pigmentation. Finally, our study shows associations of some SNPs with MI in a modern Brazilian admixed sample, with possible applications in forensic genetics. Some classical genetic markers in Euro-North American populations are not associated with MI in our sample. Our results point out the relevance of considering population differences in selecting an appropriate set of SNPs as phenotype predictors in forensic practice.

  6. "Shades of beauty": examining the relationship of skin color to perceptions of physical attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Frisby, Cynthia M

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this research project was to investigate the relationship between skin color and level of perceived physical attractiveness. Previous research suggested that skin color plays an important role in how we perceive an individual's physical attractiveness. The current study was conducted to determine how influential the role of race is on perceptions of physical attractiveness. In this study, 79 subjects were asked to evaluate images of potential endorsers to be used in an upcoming advertising campaign. The images were those of females of varying skin tones. Data were then collected and analyzed to determine whether skin tone and level of skin color can in fact influence the physical attractiveness stereotype.

  7. Role of antioxidants in the skin: anti-aging effects.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Intracellular and extracellular oxidative stress initiated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) advance skin aging, which is characterized by wrinkles and atypical pigmentation. Because UV enhances ROS generation in cells, skin aging is usually discussed in relation to UV exposure. The use of antioxidants is an effective approach to prevent symptoms related to photo-induced aging of the skin. In this review, the mechanisms of ROS generation and ROS elimination in the body are summarized. The effects of ROS generated in the skin and the roles of ROS in altering the skin are also discussed. In addition, the effects of representative antioxidants on the skin are summarized with a focus on skin aging.

  8. Daytime Changes of Skin Biophysical Characteristics: A Study of Hydration, Transepidermal Water Loss, pH, Sebum, Elasticity, Erythema, and Color Index on Middle Eastern Skin

    PubMed Central

    Firooz, Alireza; Zartab, Hamed; Sadr, Bardia; Bagherpour, Leili Naraghi; Masoudi, Aidin; Fanian, Ferial; Dowlati, Yahya; Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Samadi, Aniseh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The exposure of skin to ultraviolet radiation and temperature differs significantly during the day. It is reasonable that biophysical parameters of human skin have periodic daily fluctuation. The objective of this study was to study the fluctuations of various biophysical characteristics of Middle Eastern skin in standardized experimental conditions. Materials and Methods: Seven biophysical parameters of skin including stratum corneum hydration, transepidermal water loss, pH, sebum, elasticity, skin color, and erythema index were measured at three time points (8 a.m., 12 p.m. and 4 p.m.) on the forearm of 12 healthy participants (mean age of 28.4 years) without any ongoing skin disease using the CK MPA 580 device in standard temperature and humidity conditions. Results: A significant difference was observed between means of skin color index at 8 a.m. (175.42 ± 13.92) and 4 p.m. (164.44 ± 13.72, P = 0.025), between the pH at 8 a.m. (5.72 ± 0.48) and 4 p.m. (5.33 ± 0.55, P = 0.001) and pH at 12 p.m. (5.60 ± 0.48) and 4 p.m. (5.33 ± 0.55, P = 0.001). Other comparisons between the means of these parameters at different time points resulted in nonsignificant P values. Conclusion: There are daytime changes in skin color index and pH. Skin color index might be higher and cutaneous pH more basic in the early morning compared to later of the day. PMID:27904203

  9. What Color is My Arm? Changes in Skin Color of an Embodied Virtual Arm Modulates Pain Threshold.

    PubMed

    Martini, Matteo; Perez-Marcos, D; Sanchez-Vives, M V

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that visual inputs can modulate pain. However, the influence of skin color on pain perception is unknown. Red skin is associated to inflamed, hot and more sensitive skin, while blue is associated to cyanotic, cold skin. We aimed to test whether the color of the skin would alter the heat pain threshold. To this end, we used an immersive virtual environment where we induced embodiment of a virtual arm that was co-located with the real one and seen from a first-person perspective. Virtual reality allowed us to dynamically modify the color of the skin of the virtual arm. In order to test pain threshold, increasing ramps of heat stimulation applied on the participants' arm were delivered concomitantly with the gradual intensification of different colors on the embodied avatar's arm. We found that a reddened arm significantly decreased the pain threshold compared with normal and bluish skin. This effect was specific when red was seen on the arm, while seeing red in a spot outside the arm did not decrease pain threshold. These results demonstrate an influence of skin color on pain perception. This top-down modulation of pain through visual input suggests a potential use of embodied virtual bodies for pain therapy.

  10. What Color is My Arm? Changes in Skin Color of an Embodied Virtual Arm Modulates Pain Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Matteo; Perez-Marcos, D.; Sanchez-Vives, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that visual inputs can modulate pain. However, the influence of skin color on pain perception is unknown. Red skin is associated to inflamed, hot and more sensitive skin, while blue is associated to cyanotic, cold skin. We aimed to test whether the color of the skin would alter the heat pain threshold. To this end, we used an immersive virtual environment where we induced embodiment of a virtual arm that was co-located with the real one and seen from a first-person perspective. Virtual reality allowed us to dynamically modify the color of the skin of the virtual arm. In order to test pain threshold, increasing ramps of heat stimulation applied on the participants’ arm were delivered concomitantly with the gradual intensification of different colors on the embodied avatar’s arm. We found that a reddened arm significantly decreased the pain threshold compared with normal and bluish skin. This effect was specific when red was seen on the arm, while seeing red in a spot outside the arm did not decrease pain threshold. These results demonstrate an influence of skin color on pain perception. This top-down modulation of pain through visual input suggests a potential use of embodied virtual bodies for pain therapy. PMID:23914172

  11. Race and Skin Color in Latino Health: An Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Beverly Araujo; Williams, David R.

    2016-01-01

    We examined 22 articles to compare Black Latinos/as’ with White Latinos/as’ health and highlight findings and limitations in the literature. We searched 1153 abstracts, from the earliest on record to those available in 2016. We organized the articles into domains grounded on a framework that incorporates the effects of race on Latinos/as’ health and well-being: health and well-being, immigration, psychosocial factors, and contextual factors. Most studies in this area are limited by self-reported measures of health status, inconsistent use of race and skin color measures, and omission of a wider range of immigration-related and contextual factors. We give recommendations for future research to explain the complexity in the Latino/a population regarding race, and we provide insight into Black Latinos/as experiences. PMID:27736206

  12. Changes of color coordinates of biological tissue with superficial skin damage due to mechanical trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pteruk, Vail; Mokanyuk, Olexander; Kvaternuk, Olena; Yakenina, Lesya; Kotyra, Andrzej; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Dussembayeva, Shynar

    2015-12-01

    Change of color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues is based on calculated spectral diffuse reflection. The proposed color coordinates of normal and pathological biological tissues of skin provided using standard light sources, allowing accurately diagnose skin damage due to mechanical trauma with a blunt object for forensic problems.

  13. The Genetics and Evolution of Human Skin Color: The Case of Desiree's Baby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This case explores the genetics and evolution of skin color, using a short story by Kate Chopin called "Desiree's Baby" as a starting point. Students read the story and discuss a series of questions probing the genetics of the family in the tale. Students then read an article about the evolution of skin color and write an essay analyzing the…

  14. Attractive skin coloration: harnessing sexual selection to improve diet and health.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Ross D; Ozakinci, Gözde; Perrett, David I

    2012-12-20

    In this paper we review the mechanisms through which carotenoid coloration could provide a sexually selected cue to condition in species with elaborate color vision. Skin carotenoid pigmentation induced by fruit and vegetable consumption may provide a similar cue to health in humans (particularly light-skinned Asians and Caucasians). Evidence demonstrates that carotenoid-based skin coloration enhances apparent health, and that dietary change can perceptibly impact skin color within weeks. We find that the skin coloration associated with increased fruit and vegetable consumption benefits apparent health to a greater extent than melanin pigmentation. We argue that the benefits to appearance may motivate individuals to improve their diet and that this line of appearance research reveals a potentially powerful strategy for motivating a healthy lifestyle.

  15. Brain-Skin Connection: Stress, Inflammation and Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Lyga, John

    2014-01-01

    The intricate relationship between stress and skin conditions has been documented since ancient times. Recent clinical observations also link psychological stress to the onset or aggravation of multiple skin diseases. However, the exact underlying mechanisms have only been studied and partially revealed in the past 20 years or so. In this review, the authors will discuss the recent discoveries in the field of “Brain-Skin Connection”, summarizing findings from the overlapping fields of psychology, endocrinology, skin neurobiology, skin inflammation, immunology, and pharmacology. PMID:24853682

  16. Combinatorial Color Space Models for Skin Detection in Sub-continental Human Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, Shah Mostafa; Saiful Islam, Md.; Rabbani, Md. Golam; Tabassum, Mirza Rehenuma; Gias, Alim Ul; Kamal, Md. Mostafa; Muctadir, Hossain Muhammad; Shakir, Asif Khan; Imran, Asif; Islam, Saiful

    Among different color models HSV, HLS, YIQ, YCbCr, YUV, etc. have been most popular for skin detection. Most of the research done in the field of skin detection has been trained and tested on human images of African, Mongolian and Anglo-Saxon ethnic origins, skin colors of Indian sub-continentals have not been focused separately. Combinatorial algorithms, without affecting asymptotic complexity can be developed using the skin detection concepts of these color models for boosting detection performance. In this paper a comparative study of different combinatorial skin detection algorithms have been made. For training and testing 200 images (skin and non skin) containing pictures of sub-continental male and females have been used to measure the performance of the combinatorial approaches, and considerable development in success rate with True Positive of 99.5% and True Negative of 93.3% have been observed.

  17. Colorism in the Classroom: How Skin Tone Stratifies African American and Latina/o Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Although racial inequality is frequently studied in education, skin tone stratification has received less attention from educational researchers. Inequality by skin tone, also known as "colorism", contributes to larger patterns of racial inequality for African Americans and Latina/os. Discrimination by skin tone affects many dimensions…

  18. Association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D with race/ethnicity and constitutive skin color in urban schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Au, Lauren E; Harris, Susan S; Dwyer, Johanna T; Jacques, Paul F; Sacheck, Jennifer M

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which constitutive skin color explains racial/ethnic differences in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations in urban schoolchildren. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to determine associations of 25OHD with parent-reported race/ethnicity and constitutive skin color as measured by reflectance colorimeter [individual typology angle (ITA°; higher value corresponds to lighter skin)] in 307 Greater Boston schoolchildren aged 9-15 during October-December 2011. Nearly 60% of all children were inadequate in 25OHD (<20 ng/mL). Prevalence of inadequate 25OHD differed by race/ethnicity (p<0.001): white (46.6%), black (74.5%), Hispanic (64.7%), Asian (88.9%), and multi-racial/other (52.7%). Serum 25OHD increased 0.6 ng/mL per 10° increase in ITA° value (p<0.001). The prediction of 25OHD by race/ethnicity was slightly stronger than the prediction by skin color in separate models (R2=0.19, R2=0.16, respectively). Most of the variability in 25OHD in race/ethnicity was due to constitutive skin color in this group of racially diverse US children.

  19. Noninvasive determination of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: standardization for variation in skin color.

    PubMed

    Linder, N; Regev, A; Gazit, G; Carplus, M; Mandelberg, A; Tamir, I; Reichman, B

    1994-05-01

    The estimation of plasma bilirubin concentration in neonates, using a transcutaneous, noninvasive jaundice meter, is significantly affected by many factors, such as gestational age, birthweight, phototherapy, and skin pigmentation. In an attempt to minimize the influence of skin color and hence circumvent the need for standardization curves for different ethnic populations, we obtained noninvasive jaundice meter readings from the infant's midsternum within 4 hours of birth and subtracted this measurement from subsequent reading in infants with hyperbilirubinemia. These results were correlated with simultaneous plasma bilirubin determinations. By this method, a single standardization curve and improved sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values for the noninvasive determination of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in a population of mixed ethnic origin was obtained.

  20. Natural and sun-induced aging of human skin.

    PubMed

    Rittié, Laure; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-05

    With worldwide expansion of the aging population, research on age-related pathologies is receiving growing interest. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the decline of skin structure and function induced by the passage of time (chronological aging) and chronic exposure to solar UV irradiation (photoaging). Nearly every aspect of skin biology is affected by aging. The self-renewing capability of the epidermis, which provides vital barrier function, is diminished with age. Vital thermoregulation function of eccrine sweat glands is also altered with age. The dermal collagenous extracellular matrix, which comprises the bulk of skin and confers strength and resiliency, undergoes gradual fragmentation, which deleteriously impacts skin mechanical properties and dermal cell functions. Aging also affects wound repair, pigmentation, innervation, immunity, vasculature, and subcutaneous fat homeostasis. Altogether, age-related alterations of skin lead to age-related skin fragility and diseases.

  1. Natural and Sun-Induced Aging of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rittié, Laure; Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    With worldwide expansion of the aging population, research on age-related pathologies is receiving growing interest. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the decline of skin structure and function induced by the passage of time (chronological aging) and chronic exposure to solar UV irradiation (photoaging). Nearly every aspect of skin biology is affected by aging. The self-renewing capability of the epidermis, which provides vital barrier function, is diminished with age. Vital thermoregulation function of eccrine sweat glands is also altered with age. The dermal collagenous extracellular matrix, which comprises the bulk of skin and confers strength and resiliency, undergoes gradual fragmentation, which deleteriously impacts skin mechanical properties and dermal cell functions. Aging also affects wound repair, pigmentation, innervation, immunity, vasculature, and subcutaneous fat homeostasis. Altogether, age-related alterations of skin lead to age-related skin fragility and diseases. PMID:25561721

  2. Effect of Colorspace Transformation, the Illuminance Component, and Color Modeling on Skin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, S; Schmugge, S; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-03-22

    Skin detection is an important preliminary process in human motion analysis. It is commonly performed in three steps: transforming the pixel color to a non-RGB colorspace, dropping the illumination component of skin color, and classifying by modeling the skin color distribution. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of these three steps on the skin detection performance. The importance of this study is a new comprehensive colorspace and color modeling testing methodology that would allow for making the best choices for skin detection. Combinations of nine colorspaces, the presence of the absence of the illuminance component, and the two color modeling approaches are compared. The performance is measured by using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve on a large dataset of 805 images with manual ground truth. The results reveal that (1) the absence of the illuminance component decreases performance, (2) skin color modeling has a greater impact than colorspace transformation, and (3) colorspace transformations can improve performance in certain instances. We found that the best performance was obtained by transforming the pixel color to the SCT, HSI, or CIELAB colorspaces, keeping the illuminance component, and modeling the color with the histogram approach.

  3. Robust skin color-based moving object detection for video surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliraj, Kalirajan; Manimaran, Sudha

    2016-07-01

    Robust skin color-based moving object detection for video surveillance is proposed. The objective of the proposed algorithm is to detect and track the target under complex situations. The proposed framework comprises four stages, which include preprocessing, skin color-based feature detection, feature classification, and target localization and tracking. In the preprocessing stage, the input image frame is smoothed using averaging filter and transformed into YCrCb color space. In skin color detection, skin color regions are detected using Otsu's method of global thresholding. In the feature classification, histograms of both skin and nonskin regions are constructed and the features are classified into foregrounds and backgrounds based on Bayesian skin color classifier. The foreground skin regions are localized by a connected component labeling process. Finally, the localized foreground skin regions are confirmed as a target by verifying the region properties, and nontarget regions are rejected using the Euler method. At last, the target is tracked by enclosing the bounding box around the target region in all video frames. The experiment was conducted on various publicly available data sets and the performance was evaluated with baseline methods. It evidently shows that the proposed algorithm works well against slowly varying illumination, target rotations, scaling, fast, and abrupt motion changes.

  4. How to Select Anti-Aging Skin Care Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin care products Dermatologists share their insider tips Shopping for an anti-aging skin care product can ... every day can make a noticeable difference. When shopping for sunscreen, select one that offers all of ...

  5. Controlling reactive oxygen species in skin at their source to reduce skin aging.

    PubMed

    Kern, Dale G; Draelos, Zoe D; Meadows, Christiaan; James Morré, D; Morré, Dorothy M

    2010-01-01

    Activity of an age-related, superoxide-forming, cell-surface oxidase (arNOX) comparing dermis, epidermis, serum, and saliva from female and male subjects ages 28-72 years measured spectrophotometrically using reduction of ferricytochrome c correlated with oxidative skin damage as estimated from autofluoresence of skin using an Advanced Glycation End products Reader (AGE-Reader; DiagnOptics B.V., Netherlands). By reducing arNOX activity in skin with arNOX-inhibitory ingredients (NuSkin's ageLOC technology), skin appearance was improved through decreased protein cross-linking and an accelerated increase in collagen.

  6. Quantitative skin color measurements in acanthosis nigricans patients: colorimetry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pattamadilok, Bensachee; Devpura, Suneetha; Syed, Zain U; Agbai, Oma N; Vemulapalli, Pranita; Henderson, Marsha; Rehse, Steven J; Mahmoud, Bassel H; Lim, Henry W; Naik, Ratna; Hamzavi, Iltefat H

    2012-08-01

    Tristimulus colorimetry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) are white-light skin reflectance techniques used to measure the intensity of skin pigmentation. The tristimulus colorimeter is an instrument that measures a perceived color and the DRS instrument measures biological chromophores of the skin, including oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, melanin and scattering. Data gathered from these tools can be used to understand morphological changes induced in skin chromophores due to conditions of the skin or their treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of these two instruments in color measurements of acanthosis nigricans (AN) lesions. Eight patients with hyperinsulinemia and clinically diagnosable AN were seen monthly. Skin pigmentation was measured at three sites: the inner forearm, the medial aspect of the posterior neck, and anterior neck unaffected by AN. Of the three, measured tristimulus L*a*b* color parameters, the luminosity parameter L* was found to most reliably distinguish lesion from normally pigmented skin. The DRS instrument was able to characterize a lesion on the basis of the calculated melanin concentration, though melanin is a weak indicator of skin change and not a reliable measure to be used independently. Calculated oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were not found to be reliable indicators of AN. Tristimulus colorimetry may provide reliable methods for respectively quantifying and characterizing the objective color change in AN, while DRS may be useful in characterizing changes in skin melanin content associated with this skin condition.

  7. Skin response to cobalt 60 irradiation and the consequences for matching the color of facial prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    van Oort, R.P.; Vermey, J.; Ten Bosch, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    A radiotherapy treatment (/sup 60/Co) of cancer in the head and neck region causes side effects in the skin that postpone the facial prosthetic treatment. The increasing and fading erythema and pigmentation of the skin was investigated with the use of a subtractive colorimeter. This method was verified with photographs scored according to the Oxford scoring system. Fourteen patients were investigated during a period of 24 weeks. The mean colorimetric skin response showed a peak 6 weeks after the onset of irradiation. Six to 7 weeks later, there was no significant difference between the skin color before and after irradiation. At this time the dry desquamation of the skin is healed. From this viewpoint, the color matching procedure for a facial prosthesis may start not earlier than 15 weeks from the onset of irradiation. If a nonirradiated control field in the facial region is present, a color match for the facial prosthesis can be started just after the irradiation period.

  8. Skin Color-Based Video Segmentation under Time-Varying Illumination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-25

    Face and Gesture Recognition , pp. 379–384, 1996. [15] R. Kjeldsen and J. Kender. Finding skin in color images. Proc. International Conf. on Automatic...Face and Gesture Recognition , pp. 312–317, 1996. [16] M. Storring, H.J. Andersen, and E. Granum. Skin colour detection under changing lighting...Object oriented face detection using range and color information. Proc. International Conf. on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition , pp. 76–81, 1998

  9. Skin color and makeup strategies of women from different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Caisey, L; Grangeat, F; Lemasson, A; Talabot, J; Voirin, A

    2006-12-01

    The development of a world-wide makeup foundation range requires a thorough understanding of skin color features of women around the world. To understand the cosmetic needs of women from different ethnic groups, we measured skin color in five different groups (French and American Caucasian, Japanese, African-American, and Hispanic-American) and compared the data obtained with women's self-perception of skin color, before or after applying their usual foundation product. Skin color was measured using a spectro-radiometer and a spheric lighting device with CCD camera ensuring a highly reliable imaging and data acquisition. The diversity of skin types involved in the study lead to define a large, continuous color space where color spectra from various ethnic groups overlap. Three types of complexion - dark, medium, or light - were distinguished in each group. Only Japanese women did not identify with this lightness scale and considered it makes more sense to classify their skin according to a pink-ocher-beige color scale. The approach however revealed the great variety of skin colors within each ethnic group and the extent of unevenness. A fairly good agreement appeared between women's self-perception and data from color measurements but in Hispanic-American group. Data recorded, after foundation was applied, showed overall consistency with makeup strategy as described by volunteers except for the latter group whose approach looked more uncertain and variable. The findings of the study demonstrate the advantage of combining qualitative and quantitative approach for assessing the cosmetic needs and expectations of women from different ethnic origin and cultural background.

  10. Discovering the link between nutrition and skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Schagen, Silke K.; Zampeli, Vasiliki A.; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Zouboulis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    Skin has been reported to reflect the general inner-health status and aging. Nutrition and its reflection on skin has always been an interesting topic for scientists and physicians throughout the centuries worldwide. Vitamins, carotenoids, tocopherols, flavonoids and a variety of plant extracts have been reported to possess potent anti-oxidant properties and have been widely used in the skin care industry either as topically applied agents or oral supplements in an attempt to prolong youthful skin appearance. This review will provide an overview of the current literature “linking” nutrition with skin aging. PMID:23467449

  11. Skin color, sex, and educational attainment in the post-civil rights era.

    PubMed

    Branigan, Amelia R; Freese, Jeremy; Patir, Assaf; McDade, Thomas W; Liu, Kiang; Kiefe, Catarina I

    2013-11-01

    We assess the relationship between skin color and educational attainment for native-born non-Hispanic Black and White men and women, using data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. CARDIA is a medical cohort study with twenty years of social background data and a continuous measure of skin color, recorded as the percent of light reflected off skin. For Black men and women, we find a one-standard-deviation increase in skin lightness to be associated with a quarter-year increase in educational attainment. For White women, we find an association approximately equal in magnitude to that found for Black respondents, and the pattern of significance across educational transitions suggests that skin color for White women is not simply a proxy for family background. For White men, any relationship between skin color and attainment is not robust and, analyses suggest, might primarily reflect differences in family background. Findings suggest that discrimination on the basis of skin color may be less specific to race than previously thought.

  12. Bioactive compounds from natural resources against skin aging.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Maity, Niladri; Nema, Neelesh K; Sarkar, Birendra K

    2011-12-15

    Skin aging involves degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in both the epidermal and dermal layers, it leaves visible signs on the surface of skin and the physical properties of the skin are modified. Chronological aging is due to passage of time, whereas premature aging occurred due to some environmental factors on skin produces visible signs such as irregular dryness, dark/light pigmentation, sallowness, severe atrophy, telangiectases, premalignant lesions, laxity, leathery appearance and deep wrinkling. There are several synthetic skincare cosmetics existing in the market to treat premature aging and the most common adverse reactions of those include allergic contact dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, phototoxic and photo-allergic reactions. Recent trends in anti-aging research projected the use of natural products derived from ancient era after scientific validation. Ample varieties of phytomolecules such as aloin, ginsenoside, curcumin, epicatechin, asiaticoside, ziyuglycoside I, magnolol, gallic acid, hydroxychavicol, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, etc. scavenges free radicals from skin cells, prevent trans-epidermal water loss, include a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher contribute to protect skin from wrinkles, leading to glowing and healthy younger skin. Present era of treating aging skin has become technologically more invasive; but herbal products including botanicals are still relevant and combining them with molecular techniques outlined throughout this review will help to maximize the results and maintain the desired anti-skin aging benefits.

  13. Auto white balance method using a pigmentation separation technique for human skin color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satomi; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Kamijo, Naohiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2017-02-01

    The human visual system maintains the perception of colors of an object across various light sources. Similarly, current digital cameras feature an auto white balance function, which estimates the illuminant color and corrects the color of a photograph as if the photograph was taken under a certain light source. The main subject in a photograph is often a person's face, which could be used to estimate the illuminant color. However, such estimation is adversely affected by differences in facial colors among individuals. The present paper proposes an auto white balance algorithm based on a pigmentation separation method that separates the human skin color image into the components of melanin, hemoglobin and shading. Pigment densities have a uniform property within the same race that can be calculated from the components of melanin and hemoglobin in the face. We, thus, propose a method that uses the subject's facial color in an image and is unaffected by individual differences in facial color among Japanese people.

  14. Auto white balance method using a pigmentation separation technique for human skin color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Satomi; Kakinuma, Akihiro; Kamijo, Naohiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsumura, Norimichi

    2016-11-01

    The human visual system maintains the perception of colors of an object across various light sources. Similarly, current digital cameras feature an auto white balance function, which estimates the illuminant color and corrects the color of a photograph as if the photograph was taken under a certain light source. The main subject in a photograph is often a person's face, which could be used to estimate the illuminant color. However, such estimation is adversely affected by differences in facial colors among individuals. The present paper proposes an auto white balance algorithm based on a pigmentation separation method that separates the human skin color image into the components of melanin, hemoglobin and shading. Pigment densities have a uniform property within the same race that can be calculated from the components of melanin and hemoglobin in the face. We, thus, propose a method that uses the subject's facial color in an image and is unaffected by individual differences in facial color among Japanese people.

  15. Photoaging and chronological aging profile: Understanding oxidation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Peres, P S; Terra, V A; Guarnier, F A; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2011-05-03

    The impact of chronological aging and photoaging on the skin is particularly concerning, especially when oxidative stress is involved. This article provides evidence of quantitative and qualitative differences in the oxidative stress generated by chronological aging and photoaging of the skin in HRS/J hairless mice. Analysis of the results revealed an increase in lipid peroxides as the skin gets older and in photoaged skin (10.086 ± 0.70 η MDA/mg and 14.303 ± 1.81 η MDA/mg protein, respectively), although protein oxidation was only verified in chronological aged skin (15.449 ± 0.99 η protein/mg protein). The difference between both skin types is the decay in the capacity of lipid membrane turnover revealed by the dislocation of older skin to the left in the chemiluminescence curve. Imbalance between antioxidant and oxidation processes was verified by the decrease in total antioxidant capacity of chronological and photoaged skins. Although superoxide dismutase remained unchanged, catalase increased in the 18 and 48-week-old skin groups and decreased in irradiated mice, demonstrating that neither enzyme is a good parameter to determine oxidative stress. The differences observed between chronological and photoaging skin represent a potential new approach to understanding the phenomenon of skin aging and a new target for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency and Its Associations with Skin Color in Pregnant Women in the First Trimester in a Sample from Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Richard, Aline; Rohrmann, Sabine; Quack Lötscher, Katharina C

    2017-03-10

    Vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy has negative clinical consequences, such as associations with glucose intolerance, and has been shown to be distributed differently in certain ethnic groups. In some countries, a difference in the rate of vitamin D deficiency was detected in pregnant women depending on their skin color. We examined the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) in women in early pregnancy in Switzerland and evaluated the association of skin color with vitamin D deficiency. In a single-center cohort study, the validated Fitzpatrick scale and objective melanin index were used to determine skin color. Of the 204 pregnant women included, 63% were vitamin D deficient. The mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was 26.1 ng/mL (95% confidence interval (CI) 24.8-27.4) in vitamin D-sufficient women and 10.5 ng/mL (95% CI 9.7-11.5) in women with deficiency. In the most parsimonious model, women with dark skin color were statistically significantly more often vitamin D deficient compared to women with light skin color (OR 2.60; 95% CI 1.08-6.22; adjusted for age, season, vitamin D supplement use, body mass index, smoking, parity). This calls for more intense counseling as one policy option to improve vitamin D status during pregnancy, i.e., use of vitamin D supplements during pregnancy, in particular for women with darker skin color.

  17. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency and Its Associations with Skin Color in Pregnant Women in the First Trimester in a Sample from Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Aline; Rohrmann, Sabine; Quack Lötscher, Katharina C.

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency in pregnancy has negative clinical consequences, such as associations with glucose intolerance, and has been shown to be distributed differently in certain ethnic groups. In some countries, a difference in the rate of vitamin D deficiency was detected in pregnant women depending on their skin color. We examined the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) in women in early pregnancy in Switzerland and evaluated the association of skin color with vitamin D deficiency. In a single-center cohort study, the validated Fitzpatrick scale and objective melanin index were used to determine skin color. Of the 204 pregnant women included, 63% were vitamin D deficient. The mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was 26.1 ng/mL (95% confidence interval (CI) 24.8–27.4) in vitamin D–sufficient women and 10.5 ng/mL (95% CI 9.7–11.5) in women with deficiency. In the most parsimonious model, women with dark skin color were statistically significantly more often vitamin D deficient compared to women with light skin color (OR 2.60; 95% CI 1.08–6.22; adjusted for age, season, vitamin D supplement use, body mass index, smoking, parity). This calls for more intense counseling as one policy option to improve vitamin D status during pregnancy, i.e., use of vitamin D supplements during pregnancy, in particular for women with darker skin color. PMID:28287422

  18. Objective measurement of shade color in age estimation

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Sharad; Ahuja, Nitin; Bajaj, Puneet; Kapoor, Charu; Sabarwal, Robin; Rajpal, Karan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Age estimation is an important subspecialty of forensic medicine. Dental hard tissues are highly resistant to degradation and putrefaction. Enamel is translucent and varies in color from light yellow to grey white. The color of the teeth has been reported to be affected by chronological age. Enamel color may also depend on environmental factors viz. diet, occupational habits, vitamin deficiencies, fluoride level in drinking water etc., It has been found that color changes in dentin vary from white to yellow. Studies have been done to measure the dentin color for age estimation. Aim: To find a correlation between the enamel color and chronological age and secondly to estimate the age of an individual from enamel color. Material and Methods: A total of 300 patients visiting the outpatient department of oral medicine and radiology were selected. Out of those, 150 were men and 150 women. The patients were divided into V groups based on the age. A thorough case history was taken for all the patients. Maxillary Central and Lateral incisor was used for the estimation of shade. The enamel color was evaluated using a VITA classical shade guide. Statistical Analysis: Data were exported to an Excel spread sheet and statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS. Linear regression analysis was used to find correlations between age and enamel shade. Results: In the group 1 and 2 i.e. from 15 to 36 years, the shades A 2 and B 2 (reddish hue) was found to be most common. While in the group 3 and 4, shades ranged from A 3 to B 3 (brownish to yellowish hue). In the patients above 59 years i.e. group 5 the enamel shade with greyish hue was found to be most common. Conclusion: Age determination using enamel color can be tried in forensic cases in the identification of individuals with no birth records. PMID:26816455

  19. Maintaining skin integrity in the aged: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kottner, J; Lichterfeld, A; Blume-Peytavi, U

    2013-09-01

    Ageing is associated with structural and functional changes of the skin that result in increased vulnerability. The aim of this systematic review is to synthesize empirical evidence about the efficacy and effectiveness of basic skin care interventions for maintaining skin integrity in the aged. The databases Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL (1990-2012), Scopus, SCI (February 2013) and reference lists were searched. Inclusion criteria were primary intervention studies using skin care products in physiologically aged skin (lower age limit 50 years). Study and sample characteristics, interventions and outcomes were extracted. The methodological quality was assessed and a level of evidence was assigned. From 1535 screened articles 188 were read in full text. From these, 33 articles were included reporting results on treating dry skin conditions, and preventing incontinence-associated dermatitis and superficial ulcerations. Most studies had lower levels of evidence of 3 or 4. Skin-cleansing products containing syndets or amphoteric surfactants compared with standard soap and water washing improved skin dryness and demonstrated skin-protecting effects. Moisturizers containing humectants consistently showed statistically significant improvements in skin dryness. Skin barrier products containing occlusives reduced the occurrence of skin injuries compared with standard or no treatment. Owing to methodological limitations the current evidence base for basic skin care in the aged is weak. Using low-irritating cleansing products and humectant- or occlusive-containing moisturizers seems to be the best strategy for maintaining the skin barrier function and integrity. We know little about the effects of cleansing regimens and about the benefits of moisturizers when compared with each other.

  20. Clinical skin imaging using color spatial frequency domain imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Moy, Austin J.; Reichenberg, Jason; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-02-01

    Skin diseases are typically associated with underlying biochemical and structural changes compared with normal tissues, which alter the optical properties of the skin lesions, such as tissue absorption and scattering. Although widely used in dermatology clinics, conventional dermatoscopes don't have the ability to selectively image tissue absorption and scattering, which may limit its diagnostic power. Here we report a novel clinical skin imaging technique called color spatial frequency domain imaging (cSFDI) which enhances contrast by rendering color spatial frequency domain (SFD) image at high spatial frequency. Moreover, by tuning spatial frequency, we can obtain both absorption weighted and scattering weighted images. We developed a handheld imaging system specifically for clinical skin imaging. The flexible configuration of the system allows for better access to skin lesions in hard-to-reach regions. A total of 48 lesions from 31 patients were imaged under 470nm, 530nm and 655nm illumination at a spatial frequency of 0.6mm^(-1). The SFD reflectance images at 470nm, 530nm and 655nm were assigned to blue (B), green (G) and red (R) channels to render a color SFD image. Our results indicated that color SFD images at f=0.6mm-1 revealed properties that were not seen in standard color images. Structural features were enhanced and absorption features were reduced, which helped to identify the sources of the contrast. This imaging technique provides additional insights into skin lesions and may better assist clinical diagnosis.

  1. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of digital image analysis for skin color measurement

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Marilyn; Beacham, Barbara; Baker, Rachel; Fargo, Jamison

    2013-01-01

    Background We determined the intra- and inter-rater reliability of data from digital image color analysis between an expert and novice analyst. Methods Following training, the expert and novice independently analyzed 210 randomly ordered images. Both analysts used Adobe® Photoshop lasso or color sampler tools based on the type of image file. After color correction with Pictocolor® in camera software, they recorded L*a*b* (L*=light/dark; a*=red/green; b*=yellow/blue) color values for all skin sites. We computed intra-rater and inter-rater agreement within anatomical region, color value (L*, a*, b*), and technique (lasso, color sampler) using a series of one-way intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). Results Results of ICCs for intra-rater agreement showed high levels of internal consistency reliability within each rater for the lasso technique (ICC ≥ 0.99) and somewhat lower, yet acceptable, level of agreement for the color sampler technique (ICC = 0.91 for expert, ICC = 0.81 for novice). Skin L*, skin b*, and labia L* values reached the highest level of agreement (ICC ≥ 0.92) and skin a*, labia b*, and vaginal wall b* were the lowest (ICC ≥ 0.64). Conclusion Data from novice analysts can achieve high levels of agreement with data from expert analysts with training and the use of a detailed, standard protocol. PMID:23551208

  2. A genome-wide association study identifies novel alleles associated with hair color and skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiali; Kraft, Peter; Nan, Hongmei; Guo, Qun; Chen, Constance; Qureshi, Abrar; Hankinson, Susan E; Hu, Frank B; Duffy, David L; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Hayward, Nicholas K; Thomas, Gilles; Hoover, Robert N; Chanock, Stephen; Hunter, David J

    2008-05-16

    We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of natural hair color in more than 10,000 men and women of European ancestry from the United States and Australia. An initial analysis of 528,173 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped on 2,287 women identified IRF4 and SLC24A4 as loci highly associated with hair color, along with three other regions encompassing known pigmentation genes. We confirmed these associations in 7,028 individuals from three additional studies. Across these four studies, SLC24A4 rs12896399 and IRF4 rs12203592 showed strong associations with hair color, with p = 6.0x10(-62) and p = 7.46x10(-127), respectively. The IRF4 SNP was also associated with skin color (p = 6.2x10(-14)), eye color (p = 6.1x10(-13)), and skin tanning response to sunlight (p = 3.9x10(-89)). A multivariable analysis pooling data from the initial GWAS and an additional 1,440 individuals suggested that the association between rs12203592 and hair color was independent of rs1540771, a SNP between the IRF4 and EXOC2 genes previously found to be associated with hair color. After adjustment for rs12203592, the association between rs1540771 and hair color was not significant (p = 0.52). One variant in the MATP gene was associated with hair color. A variant in the HERC2 gene upstream of the OCA2 gene showed the strongest and independent association with hair color compared with other SNPs in this region, including three previously reported SNPs. The signals detected in a region around the MC1R gene were explained by MC1R red hair color alleles. Our results suggest that the IRF4 and SLC24A4 loci are associated with human hair color and skin pigmentation.

  3. IRF4, MC1R and TYR genes are risk factors for actinic keratosis independent of skin color.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Leonie C; Liu, Fan; Pardo, Luba M; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Kayser, Manfred; Nijsten, Tamar

    2015-06-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a pre-malignant skin disease, highly prevalent in elderly Europeans. This study investigates genetic susceptibility to AK with a genome-wide association study (GWAS). A full body skin examination was performed in 3194 elderly individuals from the Rotterdam Study (RS) of exclusive north-western European origin (aged 51-99 years, 45% male). Physicians graded the number of AK into four severity levels: none (76%), 1-3 (14%), 4-9 (6%) and ≥10 (5%), and skin color was quantified using a spectrophotometer on sun-unexposed skin. A GWAS for AK severity was conducted, where promising signals at IRF4 and MC1R (P < 4.2 × 10(-7)) were successfully replicated in an additional cohort of 623 RS individuals (IRF4, rs12203592, Pcombined = 6.5 × 10(-13) and MC1R, rs139810560, Pcombined = 4.1 × 10(-9)). Further, in an analysis of ten additional well-known human pigmentation genes, TYR also showed significant association with AK (rs1393350, P = 5.3 × 10(-4)) after correction for multiple testing. Interestingly, the strength and significance of above-mentioned associations retained largely the same level after skin color adjustment. Overall, our data strongly suggest that IRF4, MC1R and TYR genes likely have pleiotropic effects, a combination of pigmentation and oncogenic functions, resulting in an increased risk of AK.

  4. Mechanisms Regulating Skin Pigmentation: The Rise and Fall of Complexion Coloration

    PubMed Central

    Ebanks, Jody P.; Wickett, R. Randall; Boissy, Raymond E.

    2009-01-01

    Skin pigmentary abnormalities are seen as aesthetically unfavorable and have led to the development of cosmetic and therapeutic treatment modalities of varying efficacy. Hence, several putative depigmenting agents aimed at modulating skin pigmentation are currently being researched or sold in commercially available products. In this review we will discuss the regulation of processes that control skin complexion coloration. This includes direct inhibition of tyrosinase and related melanogenic enzymes, regulation of melanocyte homeostasis, alteration of constitutive and facultative pigmentation and down-regulation of melanosome transfer to the keratinocytes. These various processes, in the complex mechanism of skin pigmentation, can be regulated individually or concomitantly to alter complexion coloration and thus ameliorate skin complexion diseases. PMID:19865532

  5. Estimating the color of maxillary central incisors based on age and gender

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo-Diaz, David; Johnston, William M.; Wee, Alvin G.

    2008-01-01

    Statement of problem There is no scientific information regarding the selection of the color of teeth for edentulous patients. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate linear regression models that may be used to predict color parameters for central incisors of edentulous patients based on some characteristics of dentate subjects. Material and methods A spectroradiometer and an external light source were set in a noncontacting 45/0 degree (45-degree illumination and 0-degree observer) optical configuration to measure the color of subjects’ vital craniofacial structures (maxillary central incisor, attached gingiva, and facial skin). The subjects (n=120) were stratified into 5 age groups with 4 racial groups and balanced for gender. Linear first-order regression was used to determine the significant factors (α=.05) in the prediction model for each color direction of the color of the maxillary central incisor. Age, gender, and color of the other craniofacial structures were studied as potential predictors. Final predictions in each color direction were based only on the statistically significant factors, and then the color differences between observed and predicted CIELAB values for the central incisors were calculated and summarized. Results The statistically significant predictors of age and gender accounted for 36% of the total variability in L*. The statistically significant predictor of age accounted for 16% of the total variability in a*. The statistically significant predictors of age and gender accounted for 21% of the variability in b*. The mean ΔE (SD) between predicted and observed CIELAB values for the central incisor was 5.8 (3.2). Conclusions Age and gender were found to be statistically significant determinants in predicting the natural color of central incisors. Although the precision of these predictions was less than the median color difference found for all pairs of teeth studied, and may be considered an acceptable precision, further

  6. A Hybrid Color Space for Skin Detection Using Genetic Algorithm Heuristic Search and Principal Component Analysis Technique

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Color is one of the most prominent features of an image and used in many skin and face detection applications. Color space transformation is widely used by researchers to improve face and skin detection performance. Despite the substantial research efforts in this area, choosing a proper color space in terms of skin and face classification performance which can address issues like illumination variations, various camera characteristics and diversity in skin color tones has remained an open issue. This research proposes a new three-dimensional hybrid color space termed SKN by employing the Genetic Algorithm heuristic and Principal Component Analysis to find the optimal representation of human skin color in over seventeen existing color spaces. Genetic Algorithm heuristic is used to find the optimal color component combination setup in terms of skin detection accuracy while the Principal Component Analysis projects the optimal Genetic Algorithm solution to a less complex dimension. Pixel wise skin detection was used to evaluate the performance of the proposed color space. We have employed four classifiers including Random Forest, Naïve Bayes, Support Vector Machine and Multilayer Perceptron in order to generate the human skin color predictive model. The proposed color space was compared to some existing color spaces and shows superior results in terms of pixel-wise skin detection accuracy. Experimental results show that by using Random Forest classifier, the proposed SKN color space obtained an average F-score and True Positive Rate of 0.953 and False Positive Rate of 0.0482 which outperformed the existing color spaces in terms of pixel wise skin detection accuracy. The results also indicate that among the classifiers used in this study, Random Forest is the most suitable classifier for pixel wise skin detection applications. PMID:26267377

  7. [Skin aging and evidence-based topical strategies].

    PubMed

    Bayerl, C

    2016-02-01

    Anti-aging in dermatology primarily focuses on the prevention of skin aging with UV protection (clothing and sunsceens), free radical scavengers (synthetic or botanic), and cell-protecting agents such as vitamin B3. For the correction of signs of early skin aging, retinoic acid derivatives in dermatological prescriptions are the best studied substances. Topical hormonal prescriptions are also an option if UV damage has not been the leading culprit for aging. Chemical peeling leads to a marked increase in collagen formation, the deaper the better. Ingredients in cream preparations can reduce superficial skin folds (polyphenols, amino acid peptides). Modulators of regular pigmentation are important for anti-aging preparations. Growth factors (plant extracts, recombinant growth factors) are not thoroughly studied regarding the cost-benefit and risk ratio. Complex precedures such as photodynamic therapy have an impact on the appearance of aged skin.

  8. THE AGE OF ELLIPTICALS AND THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Schombert, James; Rakos, Karl E-mail: karl.rakos@chello.at

    2009-07-10

    Using new narrowband color observations of early-type galaxies in clusters, we reconstruct the color-magnitude relation (CMR) with a higher degree of accuracy than previous work. We then use the spectroscopically determined ages and metallicities from three samples, combined with multimetallicity spectral energy distribution models, to compare predicted colors for galaxies with young ages (less than 8 Gyr) with the known CMR. We find that the CMR cannot by reproduced by the spectroscopically determined ages and metallicities in any of the samples despite the high internal accuracies to the spectroscopic indices. In contrast, using only the (Fe) index to determine [Fe/H], and assuming a mean age of 12 Gyr for a galaxy's stellar population, we derive colors that exactly match not only the color zero point of the CMR but also its slope. We consider the source of young age estimates, the H{beta} index, and examine the conflict between red continuum colors and large H{beta} values in galaxy spectra. We conclude that our current understanding of stellar populations is insufficient to correctly interpret H{beta} values.

  9. Latitudinal Clines of the Human Vitamin D Receptor and Skin Color Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tiosano, Dov; Audi, Laura; Climer, Sharlee; Zhang, Weixiong; Templeton, Alan R.; Fernández-Cancio, Monica; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Sánchez-Muro, José Miguel; El Kholy, Mohamed; Hochberg, Zèev

    2016-01-01

    The well-documented latitudinal clines of genes affecting human skin color presumably arise from the need for protection from intense ultraviolet radiation (UVR) vs. the need to use UVR for vitamin D synthesis. Sampling 751 subjects from a broad range of latitudes and skin colors, we investigated possible multilocus correlated adaptation of skin color genes with the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR), using a vector correlation metric and network method called BlocBuster. We discovered two multilocus networks involving VDR promoter and skin color genes that display strong latitudinal clines as multilocus networks, even though many of their single gene components do not. Considered one by one, the VDR components of these networks show diverse patterns: no cline, a weak declining latitudinal cline outside of Africa, and a strong in- vs. out-of-Africa frequency pattern. We confirmed these results with independent data from HapMap. Standard linkage disequilibrium analyses did not detect these networks. We applied BlocBuster across the entire genome, showing that our networks are significant outliers for interchromosomal disequilibrium that overlap with environmental variation relevant to the genes’ functions. These results suggest that these multilocus correlations most likely arose from a combination of parallel selective responses to a common environmental variable and coadaptation, given the known Mendelian epistasis among VDR and the skin color genes. PMID:26921301

  10. Light reflection from crystal platelets in iridophores determines green or brown skin coloration in Takydromus lizards.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Takeo; Esashi, Jyunko; Hasegawa, Masami

    2016-11-21

    Brown and green are the most commonly imitated colors in prey animals because both colors occur in a range of habitats. Many researchers have evaluated survival with respect to background color matching, but the pigment cell mechanisms underlying such coloration are not known. Dorsal coloration of East Asian Takydromus lizards has shifted from green to brown or from brown to green on multiple occasions during the diversification of the genus, thus giving us an opportunity to examine the cellular mechanisms of background color matching. Brown and green skin were found to differ with respect to the morphological characteristics of iridophores, with different thicknesses of the reflecting platelets and the cytoplasmic spacing between platelets, despite a shared vertical arrangement of pigment cells, i.e., xanthophores in the upper layer, iridophores in the middle layer, and melanophores at the bottom of the dermal layer, among the different Takydromus lizards. Iridophores of brown skin reflected longer wavelengths of light than those of green skin, which may be attributed to the thicker platelets and longer distances between platelets in brown skin. We discuss the potential role of genetic and intracellular mechanisms explaining the thickness and orientation of the light-reflecting platelets of iridophores in Takydromus lizards.

  11. Potential role of natural compounds against skin aging.

    PubMed

    Tundis, R; Loizzo, M R; Bonesi, M; Menichini, F

    2015-01-01

    Skin aging is an inevitable biological phenomenon of human life. Advancing age brings changes to all components of the integumentary system with consequent signs on the skin. Skin aging is mainly due to intrinsic (chronologic) and extrinsic aging (photo-aging). Photo-aging is a consequence of exposure to ultraviolet radiations. Despite variable economic conditions, the skin care market based on natural products continues to see strong growth. In this context, the research of naturally occurring anti-aging agents is greatly expanding and in recent years numerous plant-derived products have been investigated. This review article focuses on highlighting recent advances in current knowledge on anti-aging natural products grouped and presented according to their family origin. Plants from 35 families were reviewed. A variety of phytomolecules, derived in particular from polyphenols, triterpenes and sterols classes, demonstrated a promising activity. Among them carnosic acid, curculigoside, curcumin, glycyrrhizic acid, mangiferin, mirkoin, asiaticoside, rosmarinic acid, tectorigenin, tyrosol etc., able to inhibit tyrosinase, hyaluronidase, elastase, and collagenase, to scavenge free radicals from skin cells, to prevent trans-epidermal water loss, and to contribute to protect skin from wrinkles, were largely investigated and herein discussed. Extracts and pure compounds from Fabaceae, Asperaceae and Zingiberaceae families have shown particular interest and appear most promising in the development of anti-aging products.

  12. MASSCLEANage—Stellar Cluster Ages from Integrated Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Bogdan; Hanson, M. M.

    2010-11-01

    We present the recently updated and expanded MASSCLEANcolors, a database of 70 million Monte Carlo models selected to match the properties (metallicity, ages, and masses) of stellar clusters found in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This database shows the rather extreme and non-Gaussian distribution of integrated colors and magnitudes expected with different cluster age and mass and the enormous age degeneracy of integrated colors when mass is unknown. This degeneracy could lead to catastrophic failures in estimating age with standard simple stellar population models, particularly if most of the clusters are of intermediate or low mass, like in the LMC. Utilizing the MASSCLEANcolors database, we have developed MASSCLEANage, a statistical inference package which assigns the most likely age and mass (solved simultaneously) to a cluster based only on its integrated broadband photometric properties. Finally, we use MASSCLEANage to derive the age and mass of LMC clusters based on integrated photometry alone. First, we compare our cluster ages against those obtained for the same seven clusters using more accurate integrated spectroscopy. We find improved agreement with the integrated spectroscopy ages over the original photometric ages. A close examination of our results demonstrates the necessity of solving simultaneously for mass and age to reduce degeneracies in the cluster ages derived via integrated colors. We then selected an additional subset of 30 photometric clusters with previously well-constrained ages and independently derive their age using the MASSCLEANage with the same photometry with very good agreement. The MASSCLEANage program is freely available under GNU General Public License.

  13. Coloration reflects skin pterin concentration in a red-tailed lizard.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, José J; Belliure, Josabel; Negro, Juan J

    2016-03-01

    When integumentary tissue pigments are contained in chromatophores, tissue color might not depend exclusively on the amount of pigment. Whether coloration does or does not reflect pigment concentration may be very significant for intraspecific communication, for example when pigment concentration provides fitness-related information. We studied the pigment responsible for the orange/red ventral tail coloring in a lacertid lizard species (Acanthodactylus erythrurus), and whether the color was related to skin pigment concentration. The pigment was identified as a pterin, a higher concentration of which resulted in darker, more red-saturated, redder (less orange) ventral tail skin color. The dorsal tail integument, even though it appears mostly gray to the naked eye, also contained pterins, and furthermore, the dorsal and ventral pterin concentrations were positively correlated. A possible explanation for these results is that pterins accumulate in the skin of the whole tail, even if only needed in the ventral part, but are concealed in the dorsal part. In this way, ventral orange/red coloration would accurately reflect pterin concentration, which provides the basis for a signaling function, while dorsal coloration would become less conspicuous as an anti-predatory mechanism.

  14. Trihydroxybenzoic acid glucoside as a global skin color modulator and photo-protectant

    PubMed Central

    Chajra, Hanane; Redziniak, Gérard; Auriol, Daniel; Schweikert, Kuno; Lefevre, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Background 3,4,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid glucoside (THBG), a molecule produced by an original biocatalysis-based technology, was assessed in this study with respect to its skin photoprotective capacity and its skin color control property on Asian-type skin at a clinical level and on skin explant culture models. Methods The double-blinded clinical study was done in comparison to a vehicle by the determination of objective color parameters thanks to recognized quantitative and qualitative analysis tools, including Chroma-Meter, VISIA-CR™, and SIAscope™. Determination of L* (brightness), a* and b* (green–red and blue–yellow chromaticity coordinates), individual typology angle, and C* (chroma) and h* (hue angle) parameters using a Chroma-Meter demonstrated that THBG is able to modify skin color while quantification of ultraviolet (UV) spots by VISIA-CR™ confirmed its photoprotective effect. The mechanism of action of THBG molecule was determined using explant skin culture model coupled to histological analysis (epidermis melanin content staining). Results We have demonstrated that THBG was able to modulate significantly several critical parameters involved in skin color control such as L* (brightness), a* (redness), individual typology angle (pigmentation), and hue angle (yellowness in this study), whereas no modification occurs on b* and C* parameters. We have demonstrated using histological staining that THBG decrease epidermis melanin content under unirradiated and irradiated condition. We also confirmed that THBG molecule is not a sunscreen agent. Conclusion This study demonstrated that THBG controls skin tone via the inhibition of melanin synthesis as well as the modulation of skin brightness, yellowness, and redness. PMID:26648748

  15. Simulated color: a diagnostic tool for skin lesions like port-wine stain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2001-05-01

    A device independent method for skin color visualization has been developed. Colors reconstructed from a reflectance spectrum are presented on a computer screen by sRGB (standard Red Green Blue) color coordinates. The colors are presented as adjacent patches surrounded by a medium grey border. CIELAB color coordinates and CIE (International Commission on Illumination) color difference (Delta) E are computed. The change in skin color due to a change in average blood content or scattering properties in dermis is investigated. This is done by analytical simulations based on the diffusion approximation. It is found that an 11% change in average blood content and a 15% change in scattering properties will give a visible color change. A supposed visibility limit for (Delta) E is given. This value is based on experimental testing and the known properties of the human visual system. This limit value can be used as a tool to determine when to terminate laser treatment of port- wine stain due to low treatment response, i.e. low (Delta) E between treatments. The visualization method presented seems promising for medical applications as port-wine stain diagnostics. The method gives good possibilities for electronic transfer of data between clinics because it is device independent.

  16. A long-standing hyperglycaemic condition impairs skin barrier by accelerating skin ageing process.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwa-Young; Kim, Jae-Hong; Jung, Minyoung; Chung, Choon Hee; Hasham, Rosnani; Park, Chang Seo; Choi, Eung Ho

    2011-12-01

    Uncontrolled chronic hyperglycaemia including type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) induces many skin problems related to chronic impaired skin barrier state. However, little is known about the skin barrier state of chronic hyperglycaemia patients, the dysfunction of which may be a major cause of their skin problems. In this study, we investigated whether a long-standing hyperglycaemic condition including type 2 DM impairs skin barrier homoeostasis in proportion to the duration and its pathomechanism. We utilized the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats as an animal model of long-standing hyperglycaemia and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats as a control strain. We confirmed that a long-standing hyperglycaemia delayed skin barrier homoeostasis, which correlated with haemoglobin A1c levels. OLETF rats as a long-standing hyperglycaemia model exhibited decreased epidermal lipid synthesis and antimicrobial peptide expression with increasing age. Decreased epidermal lipid synthesis accounted for decreased lamellar body production. In addition, OLETF rats had significantly higher serum levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and elevated levels of the receptor for AGE in the epidermis. A long-standing hyperglycaemic condition impairs skin barrier function including permeability and antimicrobial barriers by accelerating skin ageing process in proportion to the duration of hyperglycaemia, which could be a major pathophysiology underlying cutaneous complications of DM.

  17. It is all in the face: carotenoid skin coloration loses attractiveness outside the face.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, C E; Ewbank, M P; Calder, A J; von dem Hagen, E; Perrett, D I

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the importance of skin colour for facial attractiveness has been recognized. In particular, dietary carotenoid-induced skin colour has been proposed as a signal of health and therefore attractiveness. While perceptual results are highly consistent, it is currently not clear whether carotenoid skin colour is preferred because it poses a cue to current health condition in humans or whether it is simply seen as a more aesthetically pleasing colour, independently of skin-specific signalling properties. Here, we tested this question by comparing attractiveness ratings of faces to corresponding ratings of meaningless scrambled face images matching the colours and contrasts found in the face. We produced sets of face and non-face stimuli with either healthy (high-carotenoid coloration) or unhealthy (low-carotenoid coloration) colour and asked participants for attractiveness ratings. Results showed that, while for faces increased carotenoid coloration significantly improved attractiveness, there was no equivalent effect on perception of scrambled images. These findings are consistent with a specific signalling system of current condition through skin coloration in humans and indicate that preferences are not caused by sensory biases in observers.

  18. Genetic architecture of skin and eye color in an African-European admixed population.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Sandra; Johnson, Nicholas A; Candille, Sophie I; Absher, Devin M; Coram, Marc A; Lopes, Jailson; Campos, Joana; Araújo, Isabel Inês; Anderson, Tovi M; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Nordborg, Magnus; Correia E Silva, António; Shriver, Mark D; Rocha, Jorge; Barsh, Gregory S; Tang, Hua

    2013-03-01

    Variation in human skin and eye color is substantial and especially apparent in admixed populations, yet the underlying genetic architecture is poorly understood because most genome-wide studies are based on individuals of European ancestry. We study pigmentary variation in 699 individuals from Cape Verde, where extensive West African/European admixture has given rise to a broad range in trait values and genomic ancestry proportions. We develop and apply a new approach for measuring eye color, and identify two major loci (HERC2[OCA2] P = 2.3 × 10(-62), SLC24A5 P = 9.6 × 10(-9)) that account for both blue versus brown eye color and varying intensities of brown eye color. We identify four major loci (SLC24A5 P = 5.4 × 10(-27), TYR P = 1.1 × 10(-9), APBA2[OCA2] P = 1.5 × 10(-8), SLC45A2 P = 6 × 10(-9)) for skin color that together account for 35% of the total variance, but the genetic component with the largest effect (~44%) is average genomic ancestry. Our results suggest that adjacent cis-acting regulatory loci for OCA2 explain the relationship between skin and eye color, and point to an underlying genetic architecture in which several genes of moderate effect act together with many genes of small effect to explain ~70% of the estimated heritability.

  19. MC1R gene polymorphism affects skin color and phenotypic features related to sun sensitivity in a population of French adult women.

    PubMed

    Latreille, Julie; Ezzedine, Khaled; Elfakir, Anissa; Ambroisine, Laurence; Gardinier, Sophie; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Gruber, Florian; Rees, Jonathan; Tschachler, Erwin; Guinot, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    The melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene is known to play a major role in skin and hair pigmentation and to be highly polymorphic in Caucasians. This study was performed to investigate the relationships between MC1R gene polymorphisms and skin color in a large sample of French middle-aged Caucasian women. The codons 60 to 265 and the codon 294 of the MC1R gene were sequenced in 488 women. The skin color was measured on the inner side of the forearm using a spectrophotometric instrument. Fifteen variants were identified: Arg151Cys, Arg160Trp, Arg142His, Asp294His, Ile155Thr, Asp84Glu, Val60Leu, Val92Met, Arg163Gln, Ser83Pro, Thr95Met, Pro256Ser, Val265Ile, Ala166Ala and Gln233Gln. Women carrying Arg151Cys, Asp294His, Arg160Trp and Asp84Glu variants had a significantly higher reflectance in the red region, which indicates a lower level of functional melanin. This association was the most pronounced for women carrying Asp84Glu. In contrast, no significant difference was observed for other variants. Moreover, associations between MC1R polymorphisms and the risks of experiencing sunburn and of having freckles were found independently of skin color. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC1R polymorphisms do not necessarily alter the skin color but should sensitize the skin to UV-induced DNA damage.

  20. Trends in aging and skin care: Ayurvedic concepts

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Paramesh, Rangesh

    2010-01-01

    The association between Ayurveda, anti-aging and cosmeceuticals is gaining importance in the beauty, health and wellness sector. Ayurvedic cosmeceuticals date back to the Indus Valley Civilization. Modern research trends mainly revolve around principles of anti-aging activity described in Ayurveda: Vayasthapana (age defying), Varnya (brighten skin-glow), Sandhaniya (cell regeneration), Vranaropana (healing), Tvachya (nurturing), Shothahara (anti-inflammatory), Tvachagnivardhani (strengthening skin metabolism) and Tvagrasayana (retarding aging). Many rasayana plants such as Emblica officinalis (Amla) and Centella asiatica (Gotukola) are extensively used. PMID:21836797

  1. CCN1 contributes to skin connective tissue aging by inducing age-associated secretory phenotype in human skin dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2011-08-01

    Dermal connective tissue collagen is the major structural protein in skin. Fibroblasts within the dermis are largely responsible for collagen production and turnover. We have previously reported that dermal fibroblasts, in aged human skin in vivo, express elevated levels of CCN1, and that CCN1 negatively regulates collagen homeostasis by suppressing collagen synthesis and increasing collagen degradation (Quan et al. Am J Pathol 169:482-90, 2006, J Invest Dermatol 130:1697-706, 2010). In further investigations of CCN1 actions, we find that CCN1 alters collagen homeostasis by promoting expression of specific secreted proteins, which include matrix metalloproteinases and proinflammatory cytokines. We also find that CCN1-induced secretory proteins are elevated in aged human skin in vivo. We propose that CCN1 induces an "Age-Associated Secretory Phenotype", in dermal fibroblasts, which mediates collagen reduction and fragmentation in aged human skin.

  2. The analysis of aging skin based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoman; Li, Zhifang; Xu, Shufei

    2010-11-01

    Aging is a very important issue not only in dermatology, but also in cosmetic science. Cutaneous aging involves both chronological and photoaging aging process. The chronological aging is induced with the passage of time. And the photoaging skin is the extrinsic aging caused by sun exposure. The aim of this study is to use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) in vivo to assess intrinsic-age-related and photo-age-related difference. The changes of dermal collagen are measured in quantitively. The algorithm that we used automatically produced the transversal dermal map from MPM. Others, the texture of dermis are analyzed by Fourier transform and Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix. And the object extraction in textured images is proposed based on the method in object edge extraction, and the aim of it is to detect the object hidden in the skin texture in difference aging skin. The result demonstrates that the approach is effective in detecting the object in epidermis and dermis textured image in different aging skin. It could help to further understand the aging mechanism.

  3. Functional and physiological characteristics of the aging skin.

    PubMed

    Farage, Miranda A; Miller, Kenneth W; Elsner, Peter; Maibach, Howard I

    2008-06-01

    As life expectancy in the U.S. increases - and with it the proportion of the aged in the population - appropriate care of elderly skin becomes a medical concern of increasing importance. As skin ages, the intrinsic structural changes that are a natural consequence of passing time are inevitably followed by subsequent physiological changes that affect the skin's ability to function as the interface between internal and external environments. The pH of the skin surface increases with age, increasing its susceptibility to infection. Neurosensory perception of superficial pain is diminished both in intensity and speed of perception (increasing the risk of thermal injury); deep tissue pain, however, may be enhanced. A decline in lipid content as the skin ages inhibits the permeability of nonlipophilic compounds, reducing the efficacy of some topical medications. Allergic and irritant reactions are blunted, as is the inflammatory response, compromising the ability of the aged skin to affect wound repair. These functional impairments (although a predictable consequence of intrinsic structural changes) have the potential to cause significant morbidity in the elderly patient and may, as well, be greatly exacerbated by extrinsic factors like photodamage. As numbers of the elderly increase, medical as well as cosmetic dermatological interventions will be necessary to optimize the quality of life for this segment of the population.

  4. Skin aging: molecular pathology, dermal remodelling and the imaging revolution.

    PubMed

    Newton, V L; Mcconnell, J C; Hibbert, S A; Graham, H K; Watson, R E

    2015-12-01

    Skin is a multifunctional organ but, alongside every other organ system, is subject to both intrinsic (chronological) and extrinsic (environmental) aging, resulting in a loss of functional capacity. Cutaneous aging manifests as an observable change in the external appearance of the skin, the major accelerator of the aging process being our interactions with our environment, such as chronic exposure to solar irradiation (UV, IR or visible wavelengths of light). The aim of this contribution, therefore, was to provide a review of the pathological mechanisms which may play roles in the development of extrinsic, mainly photo-, aging and to review how these molecular changes impact on the structure of the organ as a whole, resulting in loss of function. Finally, we will describe the advances which are occurring in imaging techniques which may allow further characterisation of aged skin.

  5. Spectral estimation of human skin color using the Kubelka-Munk theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Motonori; Tominaga, Shoji

    2003-01-01

    The present paper describes a method for modeling human skin coloring and estimating the surface-spectral reflectance by using the Kubelka-Munk theory. First, human skin is modeled as two layers of turbid materials. Second, we describe the reflectance estimation problem as the Kubelka-Munk equations with unknown six parameters. These parameters are the regular reflectance at skin surface and the five weights for spectral absorption of such different pigments as melanin, carotene, oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, and bilirubin. Moreover, the optical coefficients of spectral absorption and scattering for the two skin layers and the thickness values of these layers are used for the solution. Finally, experiments are done for estimating the skin surface-spectral reflectance on some body parts, such as the cheeks of human face, the palm, the backs of hand, the inside of arm, and the outside of arm. It is confirmed that the proposed method is more reliable in all cases.

  6. The characteristics of three-dimensional skin imaging system by full-colored optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Chan, Li-Ming; Wang, Kai-Cheng

    2009-05-01

    In the present cosmetic market, the skin image obtained from a hand-held camera is two-dimensional (2-D). Due to insufficient penetration, only the skin surface can be detected, and thus phenomena in the dermis cannot be observed. To take the place of the conventional 2D camera, a new hand-held imaging system is proposed for three-dimensional (3-D) skin imaging. Featuring non-invasiveness, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become one of the popular medical imaging techniques. The dermal images shown in OCT-related reports were mainly single-colored because of the use of a monotonic light source. With three original-colored beams applied in OCT, a full-colored image can be derived for dermatology. The penetration depth of the system ranges from 0.43 to 0.78 mm, sufficient for imaging of main tissues in the dermis. Colorful and non-invasive perspectives of deep dermal structure help to advance skin science, dermatology and cosmetology.

  7. IQ, Skin Color, Crime, HIV/AIDS, and Income in 50 U.S. States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templer, Donald I.; Rushton, J. Philippe

    2011-01-01

    In 50 U.S. states, we found a positive manifold across 11 measures including IQ, skin color, birth rate, infant mortality, life expectancy, HIV/AIDS, violent crime, and state income with the first principal component accounting for 33% of the variance (median factor loading = 0.34). The correlation with a composite of total violent crime was…

  8. The Role of Skin Color on Hispanic Women's Perceptions of Attractiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Dionne P.; Fernandez, Paula

    2012-01-01

    This study relies on qualitative methods to investigate Hispanic women's skin color perceptions. The primary goal is to identify the relevance of these perceptions on their beliefs about their own physical attractiveness. Thirty-four self-identified White-Hispanic women attending a large Hispanic Serving Institution in the southeastern United…

  9. Comments on Correlations of IQ with Skin Color and Geographic-Demographic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Arthur R.

    2006-01-01

    A large number of national and geographic population samples were used to test the hypothesis that the variation in mean values of skin color in the diverse populations are consistently correlated with the mean measured or estimated IQs of the various groups, as are some other physical variables, known as an ecological correlation. Straightforward…

  10. Association of skin color, race/ethnicity, and hearing loss among adults in the USA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Frank R; Maas, Paige; Chien, Wade; Carey, John P; Ferrucci, Luigi; Thorpe, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies of hearing loss in adults have demonstrated that the odds of hearing loss are substantially lower in black than in white individuals. The basis of this association is unknown. We hypothesized that skin pigmentation as a marker of melanocytic functioning mediates this observed association and that skin pigmentation is associated with hearing loss independent of race/ethnicity. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 1,258 adults (20-59 years) in the 2003-2004 cycle of the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey who had assessment of Fitzpatrick skin type and pure-tone audiometric testing. Audiometric thresholds in the worse hearing ear were used to calculate speech- (0.5-4 kHz) and high-frequency (3-8 kHz) pure-tone averages (PTA). Regression models were stratified by Fitzpatrick skin type or race/ethnicity to examine the association of each factor with hearing loss independent of the other. Models were adjusted for potential confounders (demographic, medical, and noise exposure covariates). Among all participants, race/ethnicity was associated with hearing thresholds (black participants with the best hearing followed by Hispanics and then white individuals), but these associations were not significant in analyses stratified by skin color. In contrast, in race-stratified analyses, darker-skinned Hispanics had better hearing than lighter-skinned Hispanics by an average of -2.5 dB hearing level (HL; 95% CI, -4.8 to -0.2) and -3.1 dB HL (95% CI, -5.3 to -0.8) for speech and high-frequency PTA, respectively. Associations between skin color and hearing loss were not significant in white and black participants. Our results demonstrate that skin pigmentation is independently associated with hearing loss in Hispanics and suggest that skin pigmentation as a marker of melanocytic functioning may mediate the strong association observed between race/ethnicity and hearing loss.

  11. On-chip skin color detection using a triple-well CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaid, Farid; Chai, Douglas; Bouzerdoum, Abdesselam

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, a current-mode VLSI architecture enabling on read-out skin detection without the need for any on-chip memory elements is proposed. An important feature of the proposed architecture is that it removes the need for demosaicing. Color separation is achieved using the strong wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficient in silicon. This wavelength dependence causes a very shallow absorption of blue light and enables red light to penetrate deeply in silicon. A triple-well process, allowing a P-well to be placed inside an N-well, is chosen to fabricate three vertically integrated photodiodes acting as the RGB color detector for each pixel. Pixels of an input RGB image are classified as skin or non-skin pixels using a statistical skin color model, chosen to offer an acceptable trade-off between skin detection performance and implementation complexity. A single processing unit is used to classify all pixels of the input RGB image. This results in reduced mismatch and also in an increased pixel fill-factor. Furthermore, the proposed current-mode architecture is programmable, allowing external control of all classifier parameters to compensate for mismatch and changing lighting conditions.

  12. Reduced dermis thickness and AGE accumulation in diabetic abdominal skin.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yiwen; Cao, Xiaozan; Song, Fei; Xie, Ting; Ji, Xiaoyun; Miao, Mingyuan; Dong, Jiaoyun; Tian, Ming; Lin, Yuan; Lu, Shuliang

    2012-09-01

    Dermatological problems in diabetes might play an important role in the spontaneous ulcers and impaired wound healing that are seen in diabetic patients. Investigation of the cause of diabetic skin disorders is critical for identifying effective treatment. The abdominal full-thickness skin tissues of 33 patients (14 nondiabetic and 19 diabetic) were analyzed. The cell viability and malondialdehyde (MDA) production of fibroblasts were measured after advanced glycosylation end product (AGE)-bovine serum albumin (BSA) exposure. Cutaneous histological observation showed reduced thickness of the diabetic abdominal dermis with morphological characteristics of obscured multilayer epithelium and shortened, thinned, and disorganized collagen fibrils with focal chronic inflammatory cell infiltration when compared with controls of the same age. Accumulation of AGEs in diabetic skin was prominent. Less hydroxyproline, higher myeloperoxidase activity, and increased MDA content were detected in diabetic skin. In vitro, the time- and dose-dependent inhibitory effects of AGE-BSA on fibroblast viability as well as the fact that AGE-BSA could promote MDA production of fibroblasts were shown. It is shown that the accumulation of AGEs in diabetic skin tissue induces an oxidative damage of fibroblasts and acts as an important contributor to the thinner diabetic abdominal dermis. The authors believe that diabetic cutaneous properties at baseline may increase the susceptibility to injury, and diabetic wounds possess atypical origin in the repair process.

  13. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as delayed wound healing and skin cancer development. This review describes cellular mechanisms that give rise to self-perpetuating, collagen fibril fragmentation that creates an age-associated dermal microenvironment (AADM), which contributes to decline of human skin function. PMID:25660807

  14. A Major Locus for Quantitatively Measured Shank Skin Color Traits in Korean Native Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Jin, S.; Lee, J. H.; Seo, D. W.; Cahyadi, M.; Choi, N. R.; Heo, K. N.; Jo, C.; Park, H. B.

    2016-01-01

    Shank skin color of Korean native chicken (KNC) shows large color variations. It varies from white, yellow, green, bluish or grey to black, whilst in the majority of European breeds the shanks are typically yellow-colored. Three shank skin color-related traits (i.e., lightness [L*], redness [a*], and yellowness [b*]) were measured by a spectrophotometer in 585 progeny from 68 nuclear families in the KNC resource population. We performed genome scan linkage analysis to identify loci that affect quantitatively measured shank skin color traits in KNC. All these birds were genotyped with 167 DNA markers located throughout the 26 autosomes. The SOLAR program was used to conduct multipoint variance-component quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses. We detected a major QTL that affects b* value (logarithm of odds [LOD] = 47.5, p = 1.60×10−49) on GGA24 (GGA for Gallus gallus). At the same location, we also detected a QTL that influences a* value (LOD = 14.2, p = 6.14×10−16). Additionally, beta-carotene dioxygenase 2 (BCDO2), the obvious positional candidate gene under the linkage peaks on GGA24, was investigated by the two association tests: i.e., measured genotype association (MGA) and quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT). Significant associations were detected between BCDO2 g.9367 A>C and a* (PMGA = 1.69×10−28; PQTDT = 2.40×10−25). The strongest associations were between BCDO2 g.9367 A>C and b* (PMGA = 3.56×10−66; PQTDT = 1.68×10−65). However, linkage analyses conditional on the single nucleotide polymorphism indicated that other functional variants should exist. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time the linkage and association between the BCDO2 locus on GGA24 and quantitatively measured shank skin color traits in KNC. PMID:27383802

  15. Skin aging and oxidative stress: Equol's anti-aging effects via biochemical and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lephart, Edwin D

    2016-11-01

    Oxygen in biology is essential for life. It comes at a cost during normal cellular function, where reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by oxidative metabolism. Human skin exposed to solar ultra-violet radiation (UVR) dramatically increases ROS production/oxidative stress. It is important to understand the characteristics of human skin and how chronological (intrinsic) aging and photo-aging (extrinsic aging) occur via the impact of ROS production by cascade signaling pathways. The goal is to oppose or neutralize ROS insults to maintain good dermal health. Botanicals, as active ingredients, represent one of the largest categories used in dermatology and cosmeceuticals to combat skin aging. An emerging botanical is equol, a polyphenolic/isoflavonoid molecule found in plants and food products and via gastrointestinal metabolism from precursor compounds. Introductory sections cover oxygen, free radicals (ROS), oxidative stress, antioxidants, human skin aging, cellular/molecular ROS events in skin, steroid enzymes/receptors/hormonal actions and genetic factors in aging skin. The main focus of this review covers the characteristics of equol (phytoestrogenic, antioxidant and enhancement of extracellular matrix properties) to reduce skin aging along with its anti-aging skin influences via reducing oxidative stress cascade events by a variety of biochemical/molecular actions and mechanisms to enhance human dermal health.

  16. Color diffusion model for active contours - an application to skin lesion segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ivanovici, Mihai; Stoica, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Most of the existing diffusion models are defined for gray-scale images. We propose a diffusion model for color images to be used as external energy for active contours. Our diffusion model is based on the first-order moment of the correlation integral expressed using ΔE distances in the CIE Lab color space. We use a multi-scale approach for active contours, the diffusion being independently computed at various scales. We validate the model on synthetic images, including multi-fractal color textures, as well as medical images representing melanoma. We conclude that the proposed diffusion model is valid for use in skin lesion segmentation in color images using active contours.

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Skin Color Differentiation in Red Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenbin; Wang, Lanmei; Dong, Zaijie; Chen, Xingting; Song, Feibiao; Liu, Nian; Yang, Hui; Fu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Red tilapia is becoming more popular for aquaculture production in China in recent years. However, the pigmentation differentiation in genetic breeding is the main problem limiting its development of commercial red tilapia culture and the genetic basis of skin color variation is still unknown. In this study, we conducted Illumina sequencing of transcriptome on three color variety red tilapia. A total of 224,895,758 reads were generated, resulting in 160,762 assembled contigs that were used as reference contigs. The contigs of red tilapia transcriptome had hits in the range of 53.4% to 86.7% of the unique proteins of zebrafish, fugu, medaka, three-spined stickleback and tilapia. And 44,723 contigs containing 77,423 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, with 16,646 contigs containing more than one SSR. Three skin transcriptomes were compared pairwise and the results revealed that there were 148 common significantly differentially expressed unigenes and several key genes related to pigment synthesis, i.e. tyr, tyrp1, silv, sox10, slc24a5, cbs and slc7a11, were included. The results will facilitate understanding the molecular mechanisms of skin pigmentation differentiation in red tilapia and accelerate the molecular selection of the specific strain with consistent skin colors. PMID:27511178

  18. Regression-based model of skin diffuse reflectance for skin color analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Norimichi; Kawazoe, Daisuke; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Miyake, Yoichi

    2008-11-01

    A simple regression-based model of skin diffuse reflectance is developed based on reflectance samples calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of light transport in a two-layered skin model. This reflectance model includes the values of spectral reflectance in the visible spectra for Japanese women. The modified Lambert Beer law holds in the proposed model with a modified mean free path length in non-linear density space. The averaged RMS and maximum errors of the proposed model were 1.1 and 3.1%, respectively, in the above range.

  19. Key Regulatory Role of Dermal Fibroblasts in Pigmentation as Demonstrated Using a Reconstructed Skin Model: Impact of Photo-Aging

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Christine; Cohen, Catherine; Chagnoleau, Corinne; Flouret, Virginie; Bourreau, Emilie; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    To study cutaneous pigmentation in a physiological context, we have previously developed a functional pigmented reconstructed skin model composed of a melanocyte-containing epidermis grown on a dermal equivalent comprising living fibroblasts. The present studies, using the same model, aimed to demonstrate that dermal fibroblasts influence skin pigmentation up to the macroscopic level. The proof of principle was performed with pigmented skins differing only in the fibroblast component. First, the in vitro system was reconstructed with or without fibroblasts in order to test the global influence of the presence of this cell type. We then assessed the impact of the origin of the fibroblast strain on the degree of pigmentation using fetal versus adult fibroblasts. In both experiments, impressive variation in skin pigmentation at the macroscopic level was observed and confirmed by quantitative parameters related to skin color, melanin content and melanocyte numbers. These data confirmed the responsiveness of the model and demonstrated that dermal fibroblasts do indeed impact the degree of skin pigmentation. We then hypothesized that a physiological state associated with pigmentary alterations such as photo-aging could be linked to dermal fibroblasts modifications that accumulate over time. Pigmentation of skin reconstructed using young unexposed fibroblasts (n = 3) was compared to that of tissues containing natural photo-aged fibroblasts (n = 3) which express a senescent phenotype. A stimulation of pigmentation in the presence of the natural photo-aged fibroblasts was revealed by a significant increase in the skin color (decrease in Luminance) and an increase in both epidermal melanin content and melanogenic gene expression, thus confirming our hypothesis. Altogether, these data demonstrate that the level of pigmentation of the skin model is influenced by dermal fibroblasts and that natural photo-aged fibroblasts can contribute to the hyperpigmentation that is

  20. Identification of Vitis vinifera L. grape berry skin color mutants and polyphenolic profile.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vanessa; Fernandes, Fátima; Pinto-Carnide, Olinda; Valentão, Patrícia; Falco, Virgílio; Martín, Juan Pedro; Ortiz, Jesús María; Arroyo-García, Rosa; Andrade, Paula B; Castro, Isaura

    2016-03-01

    A germplasm set of twenty-five grapevine accessions, forming eleven groups of possible berry skin color mutants, were genotyped with twelve microsatellite loci, being eleven of them identified as true color mutants. The polyphenolic profiling of the confirmed mutant cultivars revealed a total of twenty-four polyphenols, comprising non-colored compounds (phenolic acids, flavan-3-ols, flavonols and a stilbene) and anthocyanins. Results showed differences in the contribution of malvidin-3-O-glucoside to the characteristic Pinot Noir anthocyanins profile. Regarding the two Pique-Poul colored variants, the lighter variant was richer than the darker one in all classes of compounds, excepting anthocyanins. In Moscatel Galego Roxo the F3'H pathway seems to be more active than F3'5'H, resulting in higher amounts of cyanidin, precursor of the cyanidin derivatives. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that a relationship between the content of polyphenolic compounds is established in groups of grape berry skin color mutant cultivars.

  1. Health disparities in the forensic sexual assault examination related to skin color

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Marilyn S.; Fargo, Jamison D.; Baker, Rachel B.; Fisher, Bonnie S.; Buschur, Carol; Zink, Therese M.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of skin color in the forensic sexual assault examination. The purpose of this study was to determine whether anogenital injury prevalence and frequency vary by skin color in women after consensual sexual intercourse. The sample consisted of 120 healthy (63 Black, 57 White) women who underwent a forensic sexual assault examination following consensual sexual intercourse. Experienced sexual assault forensic examiners using visual inspection, colposcopy technique with digital imaging, and toluidine blue application documented the number, type, and location of anogenital injuries. Although 55% of the total sample was observed to have at least one anogenital injury of any type following consensual intercourse, the percentages significantly differed for White (68%) and Black (43%) participants (p 0.02). When the presence of anogenital injury was analyzed by specific anatomical region, a significant difference between White and Black participants was only evident for the external genitalia (White = 56%, Black = 24%, p = .003), but not for the internal genitalia (White = 28%, Black = 19%, p = .20) or anus (White = 9%, Black = 10%, p = 0.99). A one standard deviation-unit increase in L* values (lightness) was related to a 150% to 250% increase in the odds of external genitalia injury prevalence (p < 0.001). While Black and White participants had a significantly different genital injury prevalence, dark skin color rather than race was a strong predictor for decreased injury prevalence. Sexual assault forensic examiners, therefore, may not be able to detect injury in women with dark skin as readily as women with light skin, leading to health disparities for women with dark skin. PMID:19947958

  2. The Taylor Hyperpigmentation Scale: a new visual assessment tool for the evaluation of skin color and pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Susan C; Arsonnaud, Stéphanie; Czernielewski, Janusz

    2005-10-01

    The Taylor Hyperpigmentation Scale is a new visual scale developed to provide an inexpensive and convenient method to assess skin color and monitor the improvement of hyperpigmentation following therapy. The tool consists of 15 uniquely colored plastic cards spanning the full range of skin hues and is applicable to individuals with Fitzpatrick skin types I to VI. Each card contains 10 bands of increasingly darker gradations of skin hue that represent progressive levels of hyperpigmentation. This article describes the ongoing development of the Taylor Hyperpigmentation Scale and reports the results of a recent validation study of the use of this newly developed chart in individuals with skin of color. In the study, skin color and an area of hyperpigmentation in 30 subjects of white, African American, Asian, or Hispanic ancestry (approximately 5 from each of the 6 skin types) were evaluated by 10 investigators. The results of the study revealed significant variation among intraindividual and interindividual ratings by investigators of skin hue (P < .0001) and hyperpigmentation (P = .0008); however, most investigators rated the scale as useful and easy to use, and 60% stated they would use it in clinical practice to document the response of hyperpigmentation to therapeutic agents. A heuristic evaluation of the results of this study provided insight into essential considerations for the continued effort to develop a useful and simple scale for assessing skin color and pigmentation.

  3. Skin as a living coloring book: how epithelial cells create patterns of pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Lorin; Fu, Wenyu; Chirico, William J; Brissette, Janice L

    2014-11-01

    The pigmentation of mammalian skin and hair develops through the interaction of two basic cell types - pigment donors and recipients. The pigment donors are melanocytes, which produce and distribute melanin through specialized structures. The pigment recipients are epithelial cells, which acquire melanin and put it to use, collectively yielding the pigmentation visible to the eye. This review will focus on the pigment recipients, the historically less understood cell type. These end-users of pigment are now known to exert a specialized control over the patterning of pigmentation, as they identify themselves as melanocyte targets, recruit pigment donors, and stimulate the transfer of melanin. As such, this review will discuss the evidence that the skin is like a coloring book: the pigment recipients create a 'picture,' a blueprint for pigmentation, which is colorless initially but outlines where pigment should be placed. Melanocytes then melanize the recipients and 'color in' the picture.

  4. Fruit, Vegetable and Dietary Carotenoid Intakes Explain Variation in Skin-Color in Young Caucasian Women: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Pezdirc, Kristine; Hutchesson, Melinda J; Whitehead, Ross; Ozakinci, Gozde; Perrett, David; Collins, Clare E

    2015-07-15

    Fruit and vegetables contain carotenoid pigments, which accumulate in human skin, contributing to its yellowness. This effect has a beneficial impact on appearance. The aim was to evaluate associations between diet (fruit, vegetable and dietary carotenoid intakes) and skin color in young women. Ninety-one Caucasian women (Median and Interquartile Range (IQR) age 22.1 (18.1-29.1) years, BMI 22.9 (18.5-31.9) kg/m2) were recruited from the Hunter region (Australia). Fruit, vegetable and dietary carotenoid intakes were estimated by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Skin color was measured at nine body locations (sun exposed and unexposed sites) using spectrophotometry. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the relationship between fruit and vegetable intakes and skin yellowness adjusting for known confounders. Higher combined fruit and vegetable intakes (β = 0.8, p = 0.017) were associated with higher overall skin yellowness values. Higher fruit combined fruit and vegetable intakes (β = 1.0, p = 0.004) were associated with increased unexposed skin yellowness. Combined fruit and vegetables plus dietary carotenoid intakes contribute to skin yellowness in young Caucasian women. Evaluation of interventions using improvements in appearance as an incentive for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in young women is warranted.

  5. Fruit, Vegetable and Dietary Carotenoid Intakes Explain Variation in Skin-Color in Young Caucasian Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Pezdirc, Kristine; Hutchesson, Melinda J.; Whitehead, Ross; Ozakinci, Gozde; Perrett, David; Collins, Clare E.

    2015-01-01

    Fruit and vegetables contain carotenoid pigments, which accumulate in human skin, contributing to its yellowness. This effect has a beneficial impact on appearance. The aim was to evaluate associations between diet (fruit, vegetable and dietary carotenoid intakes) and skin color in young women. Ninety-one Caucasian women (Median and Interquartile Range (IQR) age 22.1 (18.1–29.1) years, BMI 22.9 (18.5–31.9) kg/m2) were recruited from the Hunter region (Australia). Fruit, vegetable and dietary carotenoid intakes were estimated by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Skin color was measured at nine body locations (sun exposed and unexposed sites) using spectrophotometry. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the relationship between fruit and vegetable intakes and skin yellowness adjusting for known confounders. Higher combined fruit and vegetable intakes (β = 0.8, p = 0.017) were associated with higher overall skin yellowness values. Higher fruit combined fruit and vegetable intakes (β = 1.0, p = 0.004) were associated with increased unexposed skin yellowness. Combined fruit and vegetables plus dietary carotenoid intakes contribute to skin yellowness in young Caucasian women. Evaluation of interventions using improvements in appearance as an incentive for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in young women is warranted. PMID:26184306

  6. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-21

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  7. Skin age testing criteria: characterization of human skin structures by 500 MHz MRI multiple contrast and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    Ex vivo magnetic resonance microimaging (MRM) image characteristics are reported in human skin samples in different age groups. Human excised skin samples were imaged using a custom coil placed inside a 500 MHz NMR imager for high-resolution microimaging. Skin MRI images were processed for characterization of different skin structures. Contiguous cross-sectional T1-weighted 3D spin echo MRI, T2-weighted 3D spin echo MRI and proton density images were compared with skin histopathology and NMR peaks. In all skin specimens, epidermis and dermis thickening and hair follicle size were measured using MRM. Optimized parameters TE and TR and multicontrast enhancement generated better MRI visibility of different skin components. Within high MR signal regions near to the custom coil, MRI images with short echo time were comparable with digitized histological sections for skin structures of the epidermis, dermis and hair follicles in 6 (67%) of the nine specimens. Skin % tissue composition, measurement of the epidermis, dermis, sebaceous gland and hair follicle size, and skin NMR peaks were signatures of skin type. The image processing determined the dimensionality of skin tissue components and skin typing. The ex vivo MRI images and histopathology of the skin may be used to measure the skin structure and skin NMR peaks with image processing may be a tool for determining skin typing and skin composition.

  8. Skin color has no impact on motor resonance: evidence from mu rhythm suppression and imitation.

    PubMed

    Désy, Marie-Christine; Lepage, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that physical similarity with an observed model facilitates action-perception and understanding. Indeed, a number of studies have shown that observing actors of one's own race facilitate motor, sensory and pain resonance, possibly mediated by the human mirror-neuron system (hMNS). However, most of these studies have used stimuli that included emotional or cultural components, hence obscuring the precise contribution of physical similarity to resonance phenomena per se. The goal of the present study was to assess the effect of physical similarity (skin color) on motor resonance using stimuli that have no emotional and cultural components. We used both behavioral (imitation) and electrophysiological measures (mu-rhythm) to assess the effects of skin color on the hMNS during the observation of simple finger movements. Our results show that, in line with previous results, observation of biological movements resulted in faster reaction times and greater mu-rhythm suppression compared to non-biological movements. However, physical similarity did not affect imitation speed or mu-rhythm desynchronization. These results suggest that physical similarity with an observed action in terms of skin color does not modulate hMNS activity, and that the enhanced resonance effects reported in the previous studies are likely attributable to cultural and emotional aspects.

  9. Attenuated noradrenergic sensitivity during local cooling in aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Caitlin S; Holowatz, Lacy A; Kenney, W. Larry

    2005-01-01

    Reflex-mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction (VC) is impaired in older humans; however, it is unclear whether this blunted VC also occurs during local cooling, which mediates VC through different mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that the sensitization of cutaneous vessels to noradrenaline (NA) during direct skin cooling seen in young skin is blunted in aged skin. In 11 young (18–30 years) and 11 older (62–76 years) men and women, skin blood flow was monitored at two forearm sites with laser Doppler (LD) flowmetry while local skin temperature was cooled and clamped at 24°C. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; LD flux/mean arterial pressure) was expressed as percentage change from baseline (%ΔCVCbase). At one site, five doses of NA (10−10–10−2m) were sequentially infused via intradermal microdialysis during cooling while the other 24°C site served as control (Ringer solution + cooling). At control sites, VC due to cooling alone was similar in young versus older (−54 ± 5 versus −56 ± 3%ΔCVCbase, P= 0.46). In young, NA infusions induced additional dose-dependent VC (10−8, 10−6, 10−4 and 10−2m: −70 ± 2, −72 ± 3, −78 ± 3 and −79 ± 4%ΔCVCbase; P < 0.05 versus control). In older subjects, further VC did not occur until the highest infused dose of NA (10−2m: −70 ± 5%ΔCVCbase; P < 0.05 versus control). When cutaneous arterioles are sensitized to NA by direct cooling, young skin exhibits the capacity to further constrict to NA in a dose-dependent manner. However, older skin does not display enhanced VC capacity until treated with saturating doses of NA, possibly due to age-associated decrements in Ca2+ availability or α2C-adrenoceptor function. PMID:15705648

  10. Does maternal exposure to artificial food coloring additives increase oxidative stress in the skin of rats?

    PubMed

    Başak, K; Başak, P Y; Doğuç, D K; Aylak, F; Oğuztüzün, S; Bozer, B M; Gültekin, F

    2016-11-16

    Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome P450 family 1 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1) metabolize and detoxify carcinogens, drugs, environmental pollutants, and reactive oxygen species. Changes of GST expression in tissues and gene mutations have been reported in association with many neoplastic skin diseases and dermatoses. Widely used artificial food coloring additives (AFCAs) also reported to effect primarily behavioral and cognitive function and cause neoplastic diseases and several inflammatory skin diseases. We aimed to identify the changes in expression of GSTs, CYP1A1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat skin which were maternally exposed AFCAs. A rat model was designed to evaluate the effects of maternal exposure of AFCAs on skin in rats. "No observable adverse effect levels" of commonly used AFCAs as a mixture were given to female rats before and during gestation. Immunohistochemical expression of GSTs, CYP1A1, and VEGF was evaluated in their offspring. CYP1A1, glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP), glutathione S-transferase alpha (GSTA), glutathione S-transferase mu (GSTM), glutathione S-transferase theta (GSTT), and VEGF were expressed by epidermal keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, sebaceous glands, hair follicle, and subcutaneous striated muscle in the normal skin. CYP1A1, GSTA, and GSTT were expressed at all microanatomical sites of skin in varying degrees. The expressions of CYP1A1, GSTA, GSTT, and VEGF were decreased significantly, while GSTM expression on sebaceous gland and hair follicle was increased. Maternal exposure of AFCAs apparently effects expression of the CYP1A1, GSTs, and VEGF in the skin. This prominent change of expressions might play role in neoplastic and nonneoplastic skin diseases.

  11. 18 CFR 1300.106 - Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of race, color, religion, age, or disability. 1300.106 Section 1300.106 Conservation of Power and... AUTHORITY § 1300.106 Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability. It is TVA policy... basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability. Accordingly, all employees must avoid any action...

  12. Size and Age Dependence of Koronis Family Colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L. A.

    2011-10-01

    The ancient and massive Koronis family now has four identified subfamilies (asteroid families made by the breakup of fragments of the ancient collision), with ages running from 5.7 to 290 My. This presents unique opportunities to explore space weathering processes, along with dynamical processes such as collisions and binary formation and destruction. Analysis of family members with accurate SDSS measurements shows a correlation of average subfamily color with age that for the first time is highly statistically significant. Yet Thomas et al. (2011) report a size dependence of the colors of the ancient family that demands caution when comparing subfamilies with differing size distributions. Reanalyis of the Thomas et al. data show the reported break near asteroid diameter 5 km is not significant. However, analysis of the much more extensive SDSS data set show a significant break past diameter 2.5 km, with smaller objects systematically bluer. The break is not present in the Karin subfamily (the youngest at 5.7 My), but is already fully developed in the Eriphyla subfamily (only 220 My). The reddening trend with age remains even when comparing only asteroids of similar size, confirming the presence of space weathering phenomena. The meaning of the trend with size is not immediately clear. We consider briefly the strengths and weaknesses of several interpretations of the bluer colors for small objects: 1) those objects receive more jolts from random collisions capable of shaking the regolith and exposing fresh material beneath; 2) those objects receive more jolts from the cycle of fission and recombination driven by YORP; and 3) the lower gravity on those objects retains regolith less well.

  13. The effect of skin aging on the percutaneous penetration of chemicals through human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Roskos, K.V.

    1989-01-01

    Despite much research into the mechanisms of cutaneous aging and the identification of significant age-associated biological and biophysical changes within the skin, the question how does aging affect percutaneous absorption (PA) in vivo remains unanswered. The author has made in vivo measurements of PA in young (18-40 years) and old (> 65 years) subjects. Standard radiotracer methodology was employed and PA was quantified from the urinary excretion profiles of {sup 14}C radiolabel (corrected for incomplete renal elimination). Testosterone (TST), estradiol (EST), hydrocortisone (HC), benzoic acid (BA), acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and caffeine (CAFF) have been studied. Penetration of HC, BA, ASA, and CAFF were significantly lower in aged subjects whereas TST and EST absorption were not distinguishable from the young controls. Thus it appears that aging can affect PA in vivo and that relatively hydrophilic compounds may be most sensitive. Work was done to elucidate whether the observations were related to documented skin aging changes. Cutaneous microcirculation efficiency suspected to decline with increasing age, could not be correlated with the observed penetration changes. However, in vivo infrared spectroscopic studies of aged stratum corneum (SC) reveal a decreased amount of epidermal lipid. The diminished lipid content implies a diminished dissolution medium for compounds administered to the skin surface. They hypothesize that the compounds most affected by a loss of SC lipids would be those compounds whose overall solubility is lowest (compounds with lower octanol-water partition coefficients, eg., HC, BA, ASA and CAFF). Conversely, a diminished lipid content may not affect dissolution into the SC of highly lipophilic compounds (e.g., TST and EST).

  14. Skin intervention of fullerene-integrated nanoemulsion in structural and collagen regeneration against skin aging.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Cheng Loong; Basri, Mahiran; Tripathy, Minaketan; Abedi Karjiban, Roghayeh; Abdul-Malek, Emilia

    2015-04-05

    Despite the fact that intrinsic oxidative stress is inevitable, the extrinsic factor such as ultraviolet radiation enhances reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation resulting in premature skin aging. Nanoemulsion was loaded with fullerene, a strong free radical scavenger, and its efficacy to provide protection and regenerative effect against ROS-induced collagen breakdown in human skin was studied. Stable fullerene nanoemulsions were formulated using high shear homogenization and ultrasonic dispersion technique. An open trial was conducted using fullerene nanoemulsion on skin twice a day for 28 days. The mean collagen score significantly increased (P<0.05) from 36.53±4.39 to 48.69±5.46 with 33.29% increment at the end of the treatment. Biophysical characteristics of skin revealed that skin hydration was increased significantly (P<0.05) from 40.91±7.01 to 58.55±6.08 corneometric units (43.12% increment) and the water was able to contain within the stratum corneum without any increased in transepidermal water loss. In the in vitro safety evaluation, fullerene nanoemulsion showed no acute toxicity on 3T3 fibroblast cell line for 48h and no indication of potential dermal irritation. Hence, the fullerene nanoemulsion may assist in protecting collagen from breakdown with cosmeceutical benefit.

  15. Skin Color in Fish and Humans: Impacts on Science and Society

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Abstract As genetic model systems, fish have played a key role in our understanding of a wide range of biological processes, including vertebrate pigmentation. In this review, we focus on one aspect of pigmentation, skin pigmentation, which has been of momentous importance in human history. Two fish models, medaka and zebrafish, played important roles in demystifying skin color and, by extension, the concept of “race.” Related thinking has the potential to make two additional contributions to human welfare. Fish can be used to validate gene candidates from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in what has been called “Systems Genetics.” Because fish are familiar vertebrates, and share genetic mechanisms of skin color with humans, they also have outstanding potential as an educational tool—to “demystify” race, to increase public understanding of the role of model systems and evolution in science, and to enhance appreciation of both genetic and environmental factors that impact human health and society. PMID:19133821

  16. Skin aging in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Aquino Favarato, Grace Kelly Naves; da Silva, Aline Cristina Souza; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; da Fonseca Ferraz, Mara Lúcia; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the histomorphometric skin changes over aging patients with autopsied acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In 29 skin fragments of autopsied elderly (older than 50 years) and nonelderly patients with AIDS, epidermal thickness, the number of layers, the diameter of cells, the percentage of collagen and elastic fibers in the dermis, and the number and morphology of Langerhans cells were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed by SigmaStat 2.03 program. The thickness of the epidermis (92.55 × 158.94 μm), the number of layers (7 × 9 layers), and the diameter of the cells (13.27 × 17.6 μm) were statistically lower among the elderly. The quantity of collagen fibers (9.68 × 14.11%) and elastic fibers (11.89 × 15.31%) was also significantly lower in the elderly. There was a decrease in total (10.61 × 12.38 cel/mm(2)) and an increase in immature Langerhans cells (6.31 × 4.98 cel/mm(2)) in elderly patients with AIDS. The aging of the skin of patients with AIDS is amended in different histomorphometric aspects, the epidermis constituents suffer less pronounced changes in normal aging, and the dermis has more intense changes in elastic fibers and collagen.

  17. The aging face in patients of color: minimally invasive surgical facial rejuvenation-a targeted approach.

    PubMed

    Harris, Monte O

    2004-01-01

    We are in the midst of exciting times from a demographic standpoint as the population of darker-skinned people grows exponentially in the United States. Although there is a growing demand for facial cosmetic procedures amongst people of color, the total number of individuals undergoing surgical facial rejuvenation is dwarfed by the current Caucasian market. In order to provide optimal options for facial rejuvenation, cosmetic surgeons must have an underlying appreciation for the dynamic interplay among ethnicity, facial morphology, and the progression of aging. The purpose of the present article is to outline the minimally invasive surgical options for facial rejuvenation best suited for the patient of color. Although the population of individuals with darker-pigmented skin is quite vast, the present paper will focus on individuals of African descent, with whom the author has the most experience. Preferred surgical techniques include blepharoplasty, autologous facial fat transplantation, percutaneous cheek lift, and submental liposuction. Cutaneous surgeons familiar with soft-tissue surgery and facial anatomy should feel comfortable performing these techniques.

  18. [Expression levels of Slc7a11 in the skin of Kazakh sheep with different coat colors].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Tao; He, Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Zhao, Song-Hua; Zhang, Wen-Xiang; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Zong-Sheng; Jia, Bin

    2012-10-01

    Slc7a11 belongs to solute transporter gene family, encoding cystine/glutamate transporter xCT. It regulates switching between eumelanin and pheomelanin synthesis. In the present study, Real-time PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of Slc7a11 in the skin of Kazakh lambs with different coat colors (black, brown and white), and then the prokaryotic expression plasmid PET-32a-sxCT was constructed to induce the expression of fusion protein. The target pro-tein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatographic separation, and then was used to immunize rabbit in order to produce rabbit anti-sxCT polyclonal antibody. Finally, the expression levels of sxCT were detected in the skin of Kazakh lambs with different hair colors by Western blotting analysis. Results showed that the mRNA expression levels of Slc7a11 differed significantly in the skin of Kazakh lambs with different coat colors, with the highest level in brown coat color, followed by the black, and then the white. The sxCT protein was also detected in the skin of different coat colors by polyclonal antibody, with the highest level in brown coat color, followed by the black, and then the white. It is, therefore, concluded that slc7a11 gene might be associated with the phenotype of coat color in Kazakh sheep.

  19. In vivo multiphoton tomography in skin aging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Köhler, Johannes; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspect has been performed on hundreds of patients and volunteers in Australia, Asia, and Europe. The system enables the in vivo detection of the elastin and the collagen network as well as the imaging of melanin clusters in aging spots. The epidermis-dermis junction can be detected with submicron resolution. One major applications of this novel HighTech imaging tool is the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In particular, the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen can be investigated over long periods of time. The system with its sub-500 nm lateral resolution is able to image age-related modifications of the extracellular matrix on the level of a single elastin fiber.

  20. Sclera color changes with age and is a cue for perceiving age, health, and beauty.

    PubMed

    Russell, Richard; Sweda, Jennifer R; Porcheron, Aurélie; Mauger, Emmanuelle

    2014-09-01

    Redness or yellowness of the sclera (the light part of the eye) are known signs of illness, as is looking older than one's actual age. Here we report that the color of the sclera is related to age in a large sample of adult Caucasian females. Specifically, older faces have sclera that are more dark, red, and yellow than younger faces. A subset of these faces were manipulated to increase or decrease the darkness, redness, or yellowness of the sclera. Faces with decreased sclera darkness, redness, or yellowness were perceived to be younger than faces with increased sclera darkness, redness, or yellowness. Further, these manipulations also caused the faces to be perceived as more or less healthy, and more or less attractive. These findings show that sclera coloration is a cue for the perception of age, health, and attractiveness that is rooted in the physical changes that occur with age.

  1. Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Skin Aging: The Role of DNA Damage and Oxidative Stress in Epidermal Stem Cell Damage Mediated Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Panich, Uraiwan; Sittithumcharee, Gunya; Rathviboon, Natwarath

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the largest human organ. Skin continually reconstructs itself to ensure its viability, integrity, and ability to provide protection for the body. Some areas of skin are continuously exposed to a variety of environmental stressors that can inflict direct and indirect damage to skin cell DNA. Skin homeostasis is maintained by mesenchymal stem cells in inner layer dermis and epidermal stem cells (ESCs) in the outer layer epidermis. Reduction of skin stem cell number and function has been linked to impaired skin homeostasis (e.g., skin premature aging and skin cancers). Skin stem cells, with self-renewal capability and multipotency, are frequently affected by environment. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a major cause of stem cell DNA damage, can contribute to depletion of stem cells (ESCs and mesenchymal stem cells) and damage of stem cell niche, eventually leading to photoinduced skin aging. In this review, we discuss the role of UV-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in the skin stem cell aging in order to gain insights into the pathogenesis and develop a way to reduce photoaging of skin cells. PMID:27148370

  2. Reactive molecule species and antioxidative mechanisms in normal skin and skin aging.

    PubMed

    Wölfle, Ute; Seelinger, Günter; Bauer, Georg; Meinke, Martina C; Lademann, Jürgen; Schempp, Christoph M

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) which may exist as radicals or nonradicals, as well as reactive sulfur species and reactive carbon species, play a major role in aging processes and in carcinogenesis. These reactive molecule species (RMS), often referred to as 'free radicals' or oxidants, are partly by-products of the physiological metabolism. When RMS concentrations exceed a certain threshold, cell compartments and cells are injured and destroyed. Endogenous physiological mechanisms are able to neutralize RMS to some extent, thereby limiting damage. In the skin, however, pollutants and particularly UV irradiation are able to produce additional oxidants which overload the endogenous protection system and cause early aging, debilitation of immune functions, and skin cancer. The application of antioxidants from various sources in skin care products and food supplements is therefore widespread, with increasingly effective formulations being introduced. The harmful effects of RMS (aside from impaired structure and function of DNA, proteins, and lipids) are: interference with specific regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathways in cell metabolism, resulting in chronic inflammation, weakening of immune functions, and degradation of tissue. Important control mechanisms are: MAP-kinases, the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), the antagonistic transcription factors nuclear factor-κB and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2), and, especially important, the induction of matrix metalloproteinases which degrade dermal connective tissue. Recent research, however, has revealed that RMS and in particular ROS/RNS are apparently also produced by specific enzyme reactions in an evolutionarily adapted manner. They may fulfill important physiologic functions such as the activation of specific signaling chains in the cell metabolism, defense against infectious pathogens, and regulation of the immune system. Normal physiological conditions are characterized by

  3. New look at the role of progerin in skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Budzisz, Elżbieta; Dana, Agnieszka; Rotsztejn, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Current literature data indicate that progerin, which is a mutant of lamin A, may be one of several previously known physiological biomarkers of the aging process which begins at the age of 30. Lamins belong to the family of intermediate filaments type V and are an important component of the nuclear envelope (NE). The physiological processes of an alternative splicing of LMNA (lamin A/C) gene and posttranslational processing result in the formation of different variants of this gene. Prelamin A is generated in cytosol and modified by respective enzymes. In the final step, 15-aa peptide is released at the C-terminus, resulting in mature lamin A. Point mutation of cytosine to thymine at position 1824 in exon 11 of LMNA gene causes a truncated form of lamin A, which is defined as progerin. In the course of time, progerin is mainly found in skin fibroblasts and reticular layers of terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Changes take place in the nucleus and they are similar to those observed in patients with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and refer mainly to an increase in the amount of reactive oxygen species which reduce the level of antioxidant enzymes, DNA damage and histone modification. There are still pending studies on working out new anti-aging strategies and the skin is the main area of research. Biomimetic peptides (analogues of elafin) are used in cosmetics to reduce the formation of progerin. PMID:26327889

  4. Evaluation and recognition of skin images with aging by support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Liangjun; Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Aging is a very important issue not only in dermatology, but also cosmetic science. Cutaneous aging involves both chronological and photoaging aging process. The evaluation and classification of aging is an important issue with the medical cosmetology workers nowadays. The purpose of this study is to assess chronological-age-related and photo-age-related of human skin. The texture features of skin surface skin, such as coarseness, contrast were analyzed by Fourier transform and Tamura. And the aim of it is to detect the object hidden in the skin texture in difference aging skin. Then, Support vector machine was applied to train the texture feature. The different age's states were distinguished by the support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The results help us to further understand the mechanism of different aging skin from texture feature and help us to distinguish the different aging states.

  5. Dorsal skin color patterns among southern right whales (Eubalaena australis): genetic basis and evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Schaeff, C M; Best, P B; Rowntree, V J; Payne, R; Jarvis, C; Portway, V A

    1999-01-01

    Distribution and inheritance of dorsal skin color markings among two populations of southern right whales (Eubalaena australis) suggest that two genes influence dorsal skin color. The grey-morph and partial-grey-morph phenotypes (previously known as partial albino and grey-blaze, respectively) appear to be controlled by an X-linked gene, whereas the white blaze appears controlled by an autosomal gene (recessive phenotype). Calving intervals, calf size, and length of sighting history data suggest that partial-grey-morph, white-blaze, and black cows experience similar levels of reproductive success. Grey-morph cows (XgXg) are rare or absent in the two populations, but this was not unexpected given observed population frequencies of grey-morph males (XgY) and partial-grey-morph females (XGXg). The proportion of partial-grey-morph calves produced by black cows (XGXG) suggests that the reproductive success of grey-morph males was equal to that of black males, however, larger sample sizes are required to determine whether grey-morph males tend to have shorter sighting histories. The reproductive success of white-blaze males appeared similar to that of black males among whales off Argentina. There were significantly fewer white-blaze calves than expected off South Africa, which could be due to white-blaze males experiencing reduced reproductive success or to sighting blases that result in white-marked calves being misidentified as black calves. The relative frequencies of both types of dorsal color markings varied between the South African and Argentinian right whale populations, suggesting limited nuclear gene flow between these populations; analyses using other nuclear markers are under way to confirm the extent of gene flow.

  6. Stem cells and aberrant signaling of molecular systems in skin aging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Xuan, Min; Leung, Victor Y L; Cheng, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the body's largest organ and it is able to self-repair throughout an individual's life. With advanced age, skin is prone to degenerate in response to damage. Although cosmetic surgery has been widely adopted to rejuvinate skin, we are far from a clear understanding of the mechanisms responsible for skin aging. Recently, adult skin-resident stem/progenitor cells, growth arrest, senescence or apoptotic death and dysfunction caused by alterations in key signaling genes, such as Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK, PI3K/Akt-kinases, Wnt, p21 and p53, have been shown to play a vital role in skin regeneration. Simultaneously, enhanced telomere attrition, hormone exhaustion, oxidative stress, genetic events and ultraviolet radiation exposure that result in severe DNA damage, genomic instability and epigenetic mutations also contribute to skin aging. Therefore, cell replacement and targeting of the molecular systems found in skin hold great promise for controlling or even curing skin aging.

  7. Assessment of IrisPlex-based multiplex for eye and skin color prediction with application to a Portuguese population.

    PubMed

    Dario, Paulo; Mouriño, Helena; Oliveira, Ana Rita; Lucas, Isabel; Ribeiro, Teresa; Porto, Maria João; Costa Santos, Jorge; Dias, Deodália; Corte Real, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    DNA phenotyping research is one of the most emergent areas of forensic genetics. Predictions of externally visible characteristics are possible through analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms. These tools can provide police with "intelligence" in cases where there are no obvious suspects and unknown biological samples found at the crime scene do not result in any criminal DNA database hits. IrisPlex, an eye color prediction assay, revealed high prediction rates for blue and brown eye color in European populations. However, this is less predictive in some non-European populations, probably due to admixing. When compared to other European countries, Portugal has a relatively admixed population, resulting from a genetic influx derived from its proximity to and historical relations with numerous African territories. The aim of this work was to evaluate the utility of IrisPlex in the Portuguese population. Furthermore, the possibility of supplementing this multiplex with additional markers to also achieve skin color prediction within this population was evaluated. For that, IrisPlex was augmented with additional SNP loci. Eye and skin color prediction was estimated using the multinomial logistic regression and binomial logistic regression models, respectively. The results demonstrated eye color prediction accuracies of the IrisPlex system of 90 and 60% for brown and blue eye color, respectively, and 77% for intermediate eye color, after allele frequency adjustment. With regard to skin color, it was possible to achieve a prediction accuracy of 93%. In the future, phenotypic determination multiplexes must include additional loci to permit skin color prediction as presented in this study as this can be an advantageous tool for forensic investigation.

  8. Carotenoids from new apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) varieties and their relationship with flesh and skin color.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, David; Egea, José; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Gil, María I

    2005-08-10

    Thirty-seven apricot varieties, including four new releases (Rojo Pasión, Murciana, Selene, and Dorada) obtained from different crosses between apricot varieties and three traditional Spanish cultivars (Currot, Mauricio, and Búlida), were separated according to flesh color into four groups. The L*, a*, b*, hue angle, and chroma color measurements on the skin and flesh as well as other quality indices including flesh firmness, soluble solids, titratable acidity, and pH were plotted against the total carotenoid content measured by HPLC. Among the 37 apricot varieties, the total carotenoid content ranged from 1,512 to 16,500 microg 100 g(-1) of edible portion, with beta-carotene as the main pigment followed by beta-cryptoxanthin and gamma-carotene. The wide range of variability in the provitamin A content in the apricot varieties encouraged these studies in order to select the breeding types with enhanced carotenoid levels as the varieties with a higher potential health benefit. The carotenoid content was correlated with the color measurements, and the hue angle in both flesh and peel was the parameter with the best correlation (R = 0.92 and 0.84, respectively). An estimation of the carotenoid content in apricots could be achieved by using a portable colorimeter, as a simple and easy method for field usage applications.

  9. Spatially resolved two-color diffusion measurements in human skin applied to transdermal liposome penetration.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-05-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy imaging, the acquired diffusion information was processed to construct spatially resolved diffusion maps at different depths of the stratum corneum (SC). Experiments using amphiphilic and hydrophilic fluorescently labeled molecules show that their diffusion in SC is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes--containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer and a hydrophilic fluorophore encapsulated in the liposome lumen--was measured using cross-correlation RICS. This type of experiment allows discrimination between separate (uncorrelated) and joint (correlated) diffusion of the two different fluorescent probes, giving information about liposome integrity. Independent of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier.

  10. Skin color correction for tissue spectroscopy: demonstration of a novel approach with tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Soyemi, Olusola O; Landry, Michelle R; Yang, Ye; Idwasi, Patrick O; Soller, Babs R

    2005-02-01

    The application of partial least squares (PLS) regression to visible-near-infrared (VIS-NIR) spectroscopy for modeling important blood and tissue parameters is generally complicated by the variation in skin pigmentation (melanin) across the human population. An orthogonal correction method for removing the influence of skin pigmentation has been demonstrated in diffuse reflectance spectra from two-layer tissue-mimicking phantoms. The absorption properties of the phantoms were defined by lyophilized human hemoglobin (bottom layer) and synthetic melanin (top layer). Tissue-like scattering was simulated in both layers with intralipid. The approach uses principal components analysis (PCA) loading vectors from a separate set of phantom spectra that encode the unwanted melanin variation to remove the effect of melanin from the test phantoms. The preprocessing of phantom spectra using this orthogonal correction method resulted in PLS models with reduced complexity and enhanced prediction performance. Preliminary results from a separate study that evaluates the feasibility of defining skin color variation in an experiment with a single human subject are also presented.

  11. The role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-coactivator-1 gene in skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Shahrzad; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Aghaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is a continuous process that exhibits fine and deep wrinkles, thin and transparent skin, loss of underlying fat, dry skin and itch, following decreased collagen and elastin synthesis. Both extrinsic and intrinsic agents are considered in the pathogenesis on skin aging. Extrinsic factors such as sun exposure, windy and dry weather, nutrition, and lifestyle may induce premature aging, toxic-free radicals, and reactive oxygen species due to decreasing normal function of mitochondria which play the major intrinsic factors in premature skin aging. One of the major genetic factors in mitochondrial function is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-coactivator-1 (PGC-1) gene. This factor could delay skin aging by increasing the mitochondrial biogenesis and replication and oxidative phosphorylation and so may induce free radical scavenging. This review is focused on intrinsic skin aging and the role of PGC-1 protein in decreasing effect of aging causes. PMID:27904582

  12. The moderating effects of skin color and ethnic identity affirmation on suicide risk among low-SES African American women

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Brea L.; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Oser, Carrie B.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of concurrent racism and sexism experiences (i.e. gendered racism) on African American women’s suicidal ideation and behavior in the context of disadvantaged socioeconomic status. Drawing on a stress process framework, the moderating effects of ethnic identity and skin color were explored using multiple regression analyses. Data were from 204 low-income African American women in the B-WISE (Black Women in a Study of Epidemics) project. Findings suggested that experiencing gendered racism significantly increased these women’s risk for suicidal ideation or behavior, though only among women with medium or dark skin color. Also, having strong ethnic identity buffered the harmful effects of gendered racism. The moderating properties of skin color and ethnic identity affirmation likely operate through psychosocial pathways, blocking internalization of negative stereotypes and reducing the level of distress experienced in response to gendered racism. PMID:23459264

  13. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  14. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies the Skin Color Genes IRF4, MC1R, ASIP, and BNC2 Influencing Facial Pigmented Spots.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Leonie C; Hamer, Merel A; Gunn, David A; Deelen, Joris; Lall, Jaspal S; van Heemst, Diana; Uh, Hae-Won; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Beekman, Marian; Slagboom, P Eline; Kayser, Manfred; Liu, Fan; Nijsten, Tamar

    2015-07-01

    Facial pigmented spots are a common skin aging feature, but genetic predisposition has yet to be thoroughly investigated. We conducted a genome-wide association study for pigmented spots in 2,844 Dutch Europeans from the Rotterdam Study (mean age: 66.9±8.0 years; 47% male). Using semi-automated image analysis of high-resolution digital facial photographs, facial pigmented spots were quantified as the percentage of affected skin area (mean women: 2.0% ±0.9, men: 0.9% ±0.6). We identified genome-wide significant association with pigmented spots at three genetic loci: IRF4 (rs12203592, P=1.8 × 10(-27)), MC1R (compound heterozygosity score, P=2.3 × 10(-24)), and RALY/ASIP (rs6059655, P=1.9 × 10(-9)). In addition, after adjustment for the other three top-associated loci the BNC2 locus demonstrated significant association (rs62543565, P=2.3 × 10(-8)). The association signals observed at all four loci were successfully replicated (P<0.05) in an independent Dutch cohort (Leiden Longevity Study n=599). Although the four genes have previously been associated with skin color variation and skin cancer risk, all association signals remained highly significant (P<2 × 10(-8)) when conditioning the association analyses on skin color. We conclude that genetic variations in IRF4, MC1R, RALY/ASIP, and BNC2 contribute to the acquired amount of facial pigmented spots during aging, through pathways independent of the basal melanin production.

  15. A Victorian Age Proof of the Four Color Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahit, I.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper we have given an algorithmic proof of the four color theorem which is based only on the coloring faces (regions) of a cubic planar maps. Our algorithmic proof has been given in three steps. The first two steps are the maximal mono-chromatic and then maximal dichromatic coloring of the faces in such a way that the resulting uncolored (white) regions of the incomplete two-colored map induce no odd-cycles so that in the (final) third step four coloring of the map has been obtained almost trivially.

  16. Aging-like skin changes induced by ultraviolet irradiation in an animal model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akase, Tomoko; Nagase, Takashi; Huang, Lijuan; Ibuki, Ai; Minematsu, Takeo; Nakagami, Gojiro; Ohta, Yasunori; Shimada, Tsutomu; Aburada, Masaki; Sugama, Junko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2012-04-01

    Both physiological skin aging and pathologic photo-aging caused by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are mediated by latent inflammation and oxidative stress. Although numerous animal skin-aging models have used UV irradiation, most require massive doses or long-term irradiation. To establish a more refined skin-aging model, we focused on an animal model of metabolic syndrome (MS) because MS involves damage to various organs via oxidative stress or inflammation, similar to the changes associated with aging. We hypothesized that MS skin might exhibit more aging-like changes after milder, shorter-term UV irradiation than would normal animal skin under similar conditions, thus providing a useful model for skin aging. The authors therefore examined the skin from Tsumura Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice (MS model) and control Tsumura Suzuki non-obese (TSNO) mice before and after UV irradiation. Skin from TSOD mice had a thinner epidermis and dermis, a thicker fatty layer, reduced density and convolution of the fragmented collagen fibers, and upregulated expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a dual marker for inflammation and aging, compared to the skin from TSNO mice. UV irradiation affected TSOD skin more severely than TSNO skin, resulting in various changes resembling those in aged human skin, including damage to the dermis and subcutaneous fatty tissue, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and further upregulation of TNF-α expression. These results suggest that UV-irradiated TSOD mice may provide a new model of skin aging and imply that skin from humans with MS is more susceptible to UV- or aging-related damage than normal human skin.

  17. Is Music "Colorful"? A Study of the Effects of Age and Musical Literacy on Children's Notational Color Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkoshi, Rivka

    2004-01-01

    This eight-year study represents a pioneering effort to investigate color expression in children's graphic notations at two stages of development: "Pre-literate" (age: 7.0-8.5), before students received school music instruction, and "Post-literate" (age: 14.0-15.5), three years after students acquired Standard Notation in…

  18. Skin cancer and photoprotection in people of color: a review and recommendations for physicians and the public.

    PubMed

    Agbai, Oma N; Buster, Kesha; Sanchez, Miguel; Hernandez, Claudia; Kundu, Roopal V; Chiu, Melvin; Roberts, Wendy E; Draelos, Zoe D; Bhushan, Reva; Taylor, Susan C; Lim, Henry W

    2014-04-01

    Skin cancer is less prevalent in people of color than in the white population. However, when skin cancer occurs in non-whites, it often presents at a more advanced stage, and thus the prognosis is worse compared with white patients. The increased morbidity and mortality associated with skin cancer in patients of color compared with white patients may be because of the lack of awareness, diagnoses at a more advanced stage, and socioeconomic factors such as access to care barriers. Physician promotion of skin cancer prevention strategies for all patients, regardless of ethnic background and socioeconomic status, can lead to timely diagnosis and treatment. Public education campaigns should be expanded to target communities of color to promote self-skin examination and stress importance of photoprotection, avoidance of tanning bed use, and early skin cancer detection and treatment. These measures should result in reduction or earlier detection of cutaneous malignancies in all communities. Furthermore, promotion of photoprotection practices may reduce other adverse effects of ultraviolet exposure including photoaging and ultraviolet-related disorders of pigmentation.

  19. Aging of human skin: review of a mechanistic model and first experimental data.

    PubMed

    Giacomoni, P U; Declercq, L; Hellemans, L; Maes, D

    2000-04-01

    The physical, chemical, and biochemical factors that accelerate skin aging have been proposed to activate a self-maintained microinflammatory process, one of the expected end results of which is an imbalance in the turnover of macromolecules in the dermis. Surface peroxides are recognized as controllable factors of skin aging, and their accumulation is attributed to environmentally induced impairment of defense enzymes. Topical application of antioxidants decreases the rate at which skin elasticity and skin thickness are modified.

  20. Skin wound healing in different aged Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Evelina; Malagoli, Davide; Franchini, Antonella

    2013-08-01

    Xenopus froglets can perfectly heal skin wounds without scarring. To explore whether this capacity is maintained as development proceeds, we examined the cellular responses during the repair of skin injury in 8- and 15-month-old Xenopus laevis. The morphology and sequence of healing phases (i.e., inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling) were independent of age, while the timing was delayed in older frogs. At the beginning of postinjury, wound re-epithelialization occurred in form of a thin epithelium followed by a multilayered epidermis containing cells with apoptotic patterns and keratinocytes stained by anti-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) antibody. The inflammatory response, early activated by recruitment of blood cells immunoreactive to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, iNOS, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, persisted over time. The dermis repaired by a granulation tissue with extensive angiogenesis, inflammatory cells, fibroblasts, and anti-α-SMA positive myofibroblasts. As the healing progressed, wounded areas displayed vascular regression, decrease in cellularity, and rearrangement of provisional matrix. The epidermis restored to a prewound morphology while granulation tissue was replaced by a fibrous tissue in a scar-like pattern. The quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated an up-regulated expression of Xenopus suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (XSOCS-3) and Xenopus transforming growth factor-β2 (XTGF-β2) soon after wounding and peak levels were detected when granulation tissue was well developed with a large number of inflammatory cells. The findings indicate that X. laevis skin wound healing occurred by a combination of regeneration (in epidermis) and repair (in dermis) and, in contrast to froglet scarless wound healing, the growth to a more mature adult stage is associated with a decrease in regenerative capacity with scar-like tissue formation.

  1. Quantitative analysis on collagen morphology in aging skin based on multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Xiaoman; Li, Zhifang; Xu, Shufei

    2011-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was employed for monitoring the structure changes of mouse dermis collagen in the intrinsic- or the extrinsic-age-related processes in vivo. The characteristics of textures in different aging skins were uncovered by fast Fourier transform in which the orientation index and bundle packing of collagen were quantitatively analyzed. Some significant differences in collagen-related changes are found in different aging skins, which can be good indicators for the statuses of aging skins. The results are valuable to the study of aging skin and also of interest to biomedical photonics.

  2. Evaluation of an Audiovisual-FM System: Investigating the Interaction between Illumination Level and a Talker's Skin Color on Speech-Reading Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagne, Jean-Pierre; Laplante-Levesque, Ariane; Labelle, Maude; Doucet, Katrine; Potvin, Marie-Christine

    2006-01-01

    A program designed to evaluate the benefits of an audiovisual-frequency modulated (FM) system led to some questions concerning the effects of illumination level and a talker's skin color on speech-reading performance. To address those issues, the speech of a Caucasian female was videotaped under 2 conditions: a light skin color condition and a…

  3. Skin Color and Self-Perceptions of Immigrant and U.S.-Born Latinas: The Moderating Role of Racial Socialization and Ethnic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telzer, Eva H.; Vazquez Garcia, Heidie A.

    2009-01-01

    Research has increasingly identified race as a salient characteristic that affects one's life experiences and psychological well-being. However, little is known about how skin color affects the emotional health of Latinos. The present study examined how skin color relates to the self-perceptions of immigrant (N = 26) and U.S.-born (N = 55) Latina…

  4. Forensic sexual assault examination and genital injury: is skin color a source of health disparity?⋆

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Marilyn S.; Zink, Therese M.; Fargo, Jamison D.; Baker, Rachel B.; Buschur, Carol; Shambley-Ebron, Donna Z.; Fisher, Bonnie S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The study objectives were to (1) estimate the frequency, prevalence, type, and location of anogenital injury in black and white women after consensual sex and (2) investigate the role of skin color in the detection of injury during the forensic sexual assault examination. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive design was used with 120 healthy volunteers who underwent a well-controlled forensic examination after consensual sexual intercourse. Results Fifty-five percent of the sample had at least 1 anogenital injury after consensual intercourse; percentages significantly differed between white (68%) and black (43%) participants (P = .02). Race/ethnicity was a significant predictor of injury prevalence and frequency in the external genitalia but not in the internal genitalia or anus. However, skin color variables—lightness/darkness–, redness/greenness–, and yellowness/blueness–confounded the original relationship between race/ethnicity and injury occurrence and frequency in the external genitalia, and 1 skin color variable—redness/greenness —was significantly associated with injury occurrence and frequency in the internal genitalia. Conclusions Although differences exist in anogenital injury frequency and prevalence between black and white women, such differences can be more fully explained by variations in skin color rather than race/ethnicity. Clinical recommendations and criminal justice implications are discussed. PMID:18926341

  5. Age of Onset of Blindness and the Development of the Semantics of Color Names.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmor, Gloria Strauss

    The relationship between age of onset of blindness and development of knowledge of color relations was examined with 16 college students who had been born totally blind, 16 who had been blinded totally at approximately 15 years of age, and 16 who had normal vision. Ss were asked to judge the similarities between color names, and judgments were…

  6. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as delayed wound healing and skin cancer development. This mini-review describes cellular mechanisms that give rise to self-perpetuating, collagen fibril fragmentation that creates an age-associated dermal microenvironment, which contributes to decline of human skin function.

  7. Changes in Women’s Facial Skin Color over the Ovulatory Cycle are Not Detectable by the Human Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Burriss, Robert P.; Troscianko, Jolyon; Lovell, P. George; Fulford, Anthony J. C.; Stevens, Martin; Quigley, Rachael; Payne, Jenny; Saxton, Tamsin K.; Rowland, Hannah M.

    2015-01-01

    Human ovulation is not advertised, as it is in several primate species, by conspicuous sexual swellings. However, there is increasing evidence that the attractiveness of women’s body odor, voice, and facial appearance peak during the fertile phase of their ovulatory cycle. Cycle effects on facial attractiveness may be underpinned by changes in facial skin color, but it is not clear if skin color varies cyclically in humans or if any changes are detectable. To test these questions we photographed women daily for at least one cycle. Changes in facial skin redness and luminance were then quantified by mapping the digital images to human long, medium, and shortwave visual receptors. We find cyclic variation in skin redness, but not luminance. Redness decreases rapidly after menstrual onset, increases in the days before ovulation, and remains high through the luteal phase. However, we also show that this variation is unlikely to be detectable by the human visual system. We conclude that changes in skin color are not responsible for the effects of the ovulatory cycle on women’s attractiveness. PMID:26134671

  8. Visible skin colouration predicts perception of male facial age, health and attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Fink, B; Bunse, L; Matts, P J; D'Emiliano, D

    2012-08-01

    Although there is evidence that perception of facial age, health and attractiveness is informed by shape characteristics as well as by visible skin condition, studies on the latter have focused almost exclusively on female skin. Recent research, however, suggests that a decrease in skin colour homogeneity leads to older, less healthy and less attractive ratings of facial skin in both women and men. Here, we elaborate on the significance of the homogeneity of visible skin colouration in men by testing the hypothesis that perception of age, health and attractiveness of (non-contextual) digitally isolated fields of cheek skin only can predict that of whole facial images. Facial digital images of 160 British men (all Caucasian) aged between 10 and 70 were blind-rated for age, health and attractiveness by a total of 147 men and 154 women (mean age = 22.95, SD = 4.26), and these ratings were related to those of corresponding images of cheek skin reported by Fink et al. (J. Eur. Acad. Dermatol. Venereol. in press). Linear regression analysis showed that age, health and attractiveness perception of men's faces could be predicted by the ratings of cheek skin only, such that older men were viewed as older, less healthy and less attractive. This result underlines once again the potent signalling role of skin in its own right, independent of shape or other factors and suggests strongly that visible skin condition, and skin colour homogeneity in particular, plays a significant role in the perception of men's faces.

  9. An Analysis of Human Dorsal Hand Skin Texture Using Hyperspectral Imaging Technique for Assessing the Skin Aging Process.

    PubMed

    Calin, Mihaela Antonina; Parasca, Sorin Viorel; Calin, Marian Romeo; Petrescu, Emil

    2016-11-21

    Skin texture has become an important issue in recent research with applications in the cosmetic industry and medicine. In this paper, we analyzed the dependence of skin texture features on wavelength as well as on different parameters (age and gender) of human participants using grey-level co-occurrence matrix and hyperspectral imaging technique for a more accurate quantitative assessment of the aging process. A total of 42 healthy participants (men and women; age range, 20-70 years) was enrolled in this study. A region of interest was selected from the hyperspectral images. The results were analyzed in terms of texture using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix which generated four features (homogeneity, contrast, entropy, and correlation). The results showed that most of these features displayed variations with wavelength (the exception was entropy), with higher variations in women. Only correlation in both sexes and contrast in men proved to vary statistically significant with age, making them the targeted variables in future attempts to characterize aging skin using the complex method of hyperspectral imaging. In conclusion, by using hyperspectral imaging some measure of the degree of damage or the aging process of the hand skin can be obtained, mainly in terms of correlation values. At the present time, reasonable explanations that can link the process of skin aging and the above mentioned features could not be found, but deeper investigations are on the way.

  10. Characterizing facial skin ageing in humans: disentangling extrinsic from intrinsic biological phenomena.

    PubMed

    Trojahn, Carina; Dobos, Gabor; Lichterfeld, Andrea; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Facial skin ageing is caused by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Intrinsic ageing is highly related to chronological age. Age related skin changes can be measured using clinical and biophysical methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether and how clinical characteristics and biophysical parameters are associated with each other with and without adjustment for chronological age. Twenty-four female subjects of three age groups were enrolled. Clinical assessments (global facial skin ageing, wrinkling, and sagging), and biophysical measurements (roughness, colour, skin elasticity, and barrier function) were conducted at both upper cheeks. Pearson's correlations and linear regression models adjusted for age were calculated. Most of the measured parameters were correlated with chronological age (e.g., association with wrinkle score, r = 0.901) and with each other (e.g., residual skin deformation and wrinkle score, r = 0.606). After statistical adjustment for age, only few associations remained (e.g., mean roughness (R z ) and luminance (L (*)),  β = -0.507, R (2) = 0.377). Chronological age as surrogate marker for intrinsic ageing has the most important influence on most facial skin ageing signs. Changes in skin elasticity, wrinkling, sagging, and yellowness seem to be caused by additional extrinsic ageing.

  11. 'Skin Trade': Genealogy of Anti-ageing 'Whiteness Therapy' in Colonial Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mire, Amina

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the extent to which the emerging trend of do-it-yourself anti-ageing skin-whitening products represents a re-articulation of Western colonial concerns with environmental pollution and racial degeneracy into concern with gendered vulnerability. This emerging market is a multibillion dollar industry anchored in the USA, but expanding globally. Do-it-yourself anti-ageing skin-whitening products purport to address the needs of those looking to fight the visible signs of ageing, often promising to remove hyper-pigmented age spots from women's skin, and replace it with ageless skin, free from pigmentation. In order to contextualize the investigation of do-it-yourself anti-ageing skin-whitening practice and discourse, this article draws from the literature in colonial commodity culture, colonial tropical medicine, the contemporary anti-ageing discourse, and advertisements for anti-ageing skin-whitening products. First, it argues that the framing of the biomedicalization of ageing as a pigmentation problem caused by deteriorating environmental conditions and unhealthy lifestyle draws tacitly from European colonial concerns with the European body's susceptibility to tropical diseases, pigmentation disorders, and racial degeneration. Second, the article argues that the rise of do-it-yourself anti-ageing skin-whitening commodities that promise to whiten, brighten, and purify the ageing skin of women and frames the visible signs of ageing in terms of pigmentation pathology.

  12. Gadd45b deficiency promotes premature senescence and skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Magimaidas, Andrew; Madireddi, Priyanka; Maifrede, Silvia; Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A.

    2016-01-01

    The GADD45 family of proteins functions as stress sensors in response to various physiological and environmental stressors. Here we show that primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from Gadd45b null mice proliferate slowly, accumulate increased levels of DNA damage, and senesce prematurely. The impaired proliferation and increased senescence in Gadd45b null MEFs is partially reversed by culturing at physiological oxygen levels, indicating that Gadd45b deficiency leads to decreased ability to cope with oxidative stress. Interestingly, Gadd45b null MEFs arrest at the G2/M phase of cell cycle, in contrast to other senescent MEFs, which arrest at G1. FACS analysis of phospho-histone H3 staining showed that Gadd45b null MEFs are arrested in G2 phase rather than M phase. H2O2 and UV irradiation, known to increase oxidative stress, also triggered increased senescence in Gadd45b null MEFs compared to wild type MEFs. In vivo evidence for increased senescence in Gadd45b null mice includes the observation that embryos from Gadd45b null mice exhibit increased senescence staining compared to wild type embryos. Furthermore, it is shown that Gadd45b deficiency promotes senescence and aging phenotypes in mouse skin. Together, these results highlight a novel role for Gadd45b in stress-induced senescence and in tissue aging. PMID:27105496

  13. Gadd45b deficiency promotes premature senescence and skin aging.

    PubMed

    Magimaidas, Andrew; Madireddi, Priyanka; Maifrede, Silvia; Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2016-05-10

    The GADD45 family of proteins functions as stress sensors in response to various physiological and environmental stressors. Here we show that primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from Gadd45b null mice proliferate slowly, accumulate increased levels of DNA damage, and senesce prematurely. The impaired proliferation and increased senescence in Gadd45b null MEFs is partially reversed by culturing at physiological oxygen levels, indicating that Gadd45b deficiency leads to decreased ability to cope with oxidative stress. Interestingly, Gadd45b null MEFs arrest at the G2/M phase of cell cycle, in contrast to other senescent MEFs, which arrest at G1. FACS analysis of phospho-histone H3 staining showed that Gadd45b null MEFs are arrested in G2 phase rather than M phase. H2O2 and UV irradiation, known to increase oxidative stress, also triggered increased senescence in Gadd45b null MEFs compared to wild type MEFs. In vivo evidence for increased senescence in Gadd45b null mice includes the observation that embryos from Gadd45b null mice exhibit increased senescence staining compared to wild type embryos. Furthermore, it is shown that Gadd45b deficiency promotes senescence and aging phenotypes in mouse skin. Together, these results highlight a novel role for Gadd45b in stress-induced senescence and in tissue aging.

  14. [The usefulness of protective creams on fragile and aged skin].

    PubMed

    Rueda López, Justo; Guerrero Palmero, Alberto; Muñoz Bueno, Ana Maria; Esquius i Carbonell, Jacint; Rosell Moreno, Carmen

    2005-06-01

    The ADDERMIS protective cream has these properties: it prevents skin maceration, exercises a regenerative effect, has bacteriostatic and bactericide activity, possesses a noted anti-inflammatory effect and reduces the risk of mycotic infections. Its application is indicated for use in cases of: skin lesions, such as bed sores or leg ulcers, which require the use of a barrier product; dermatitis lesions in zones of skin folds or due to diaper use; to prevent friction zones; fragile skin; peeling, zones where cracks in the skin appear...and to use for cases of incontinence when diapers are required.

  15. Occupational exposure to natural UV radiation and premature skin ageing.

    PubMed

    Lastowiecka-Moras, Elżbieta; Bugajska, Joanna; Młynarczyk, Beata

    2014-01-01

    The skin is the part of the human body most vulnerable to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The spectrum of the negative effects of UV radiation on the skin ranges from acute erythema to carcinogenesis. Between these extreme conditions, there are other common skin lesions, e.g., photoageing. The aim of this study was to assess the skin for signs of photoageing in a group of 52 men occupationally exposed to natural UV radiation. There were 2 types of examinations: an examination of skin condition (moisture, elasticity, sebum, porosity, smoothness, discolourations and wrinkles) with a device for diagnosing the skin, and a dermatological examination. The results of both examinations revealed a higher percentage of skin characteristics typical for photoageing in outdoor workers compared to the general population.

  16. Multiple Skin Colored Nodules on both Legs in Patient with Positive QuantiFERON®-TB Gold Test

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mi Soo; Hong, Seung Phil; Park, Byung Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Nodular tuberculid (NT) was originally described by Jordaan et al. in 2000 in 4 patients from South Africa. It appeared as nodules on the legs; the pathologic changes were situated in the deep dermis and adjacent subcutaneous fat. A 34-year-old woman visited our hospital with subcutaneous skin-colored or slightly erythematous round to oval nodules. Skin biopsies revealed granulomatous inflammation at the dermo-subcutaneous junction with vasculitis. Chest X-ray, tuberculosus (TB)-polymerase chain reaction and TB culture of the skin specimen were normal. A QuantiFERON®-TB Gold test (QUIAGEN, Germany) was positive, which suggested a diagnosis of latent TB infection. The patient was treated with anti-TB medication and her condition has not recurred. Herein, we report a case of a patient with latent TB diagnosed by a positive QuantiFERON®-TB Gold test whose skin lesions had the clinical and histopathologic features of NT. PMID:28223755

  17. Retinoids suppress cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), a negative regulator of collagen homeostasis, in skin equivalent cultures and aged human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Shao, Yuan; Xu, Yiru; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2011-07-01

    Alterations in connective tissue collagen are prominent features of both chronologically aged and photoaged (ageing because of sun exposure) human skin. These age-related abnormalities are mediated in part by cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1). CCN1 is elevated in the dermis of both chronologically aged and photoaged human skin in vivo and promotes aberrant collagen homeostasis by down-regulating type I collagen, the major structural protein in skin, and promoting collagen degradation. Vitamin A and its metabolites have been shown to improve chronologically aged and photoaged skin by promoting deposition of new collagen and preventing its degradation. Here, we investigated regulation of CCN1 expression by retinoids in skin equivalent cultures and chronologically aged and photoaged human skin in vivo. In skin equivalent cultures, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive form of vitamin A in skin, significantly increased type I procollagen and reduced collagenase (matrix metalloproteinases-1, MMP-1). Addition of recombinant human CCN1 to skin equivalent cultures significantly reduced type I procollagen and increased MMP-1. Importantly, RA significantly reduced CCN1 expression in skin equivalent cultures. Topical treatment with retinol (vitamin A, 0.4%) for 7days significantly reduced CCN1 mRNA and protein expression in both chronologically aged (80+years) and photoaged human skin in vivo, compared to vehicle-treated skin. These data indicate that the mechanism by which retinoids improve aged skin, through increased collagen production, involves down-regulation of CCN1.

  18. Rejuvenation of Gene Expression Pattern of Aged Human Skin by Broadband Light Treatment: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Anne Lynn S; Bitter, Patrick H; Qu, Kun; Lin, Meihong; Rapicavoli, Nicole A; Chang, Howard Y

    2013-01-01

    Studies in model organisms suggest that aged cells can be functionally rejuvenated, but whether this concept applies to human skin is unclear. Here we apply 3′-end sequencing for expression quantification (“3-seq”) to discover the gene expression program associated with human photoaging and intrinsic skin aging (collectively termed “skin aging”), and the impact of broadband light (BBL) treatment. We find that skin aging was associated with a significantly altered expression level of 2,265 coding and noncoding RNAs, of which 1,293 became “rejuvenated” after BBL treatment; i.e., they became more similar to their expression level in youthful skin. Rejuvenated genes (RGs) included several known key regulators of organismal longevity and their proximal long noncoding RNAs. Skin aging is not associated with systematic changes in 3′-end mRNA processing. Hence, BBL treatment can restore gene expression pattern of photoaged and intrinsically aged human skin to resemble young skin. In addition, our data reveal, to our knowledge, a previously unreported set of targets that may lead to new insights into the human skin aging process. PMID:22931923

  19. Polysaccharide Extracted from Laminaria japonica Delays Intrinsic Skin Aging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Longyuan; Tan, Jia; Yang, Xiaomei; Tan, Haitao; Xu, Xiaozhen; You, Manhang; Qin, Wu; Huang, Liangzhao; Li, Siqi; Mo, Manqiu; Wei, Huifen; Li, Jing; Tan, Jiyong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of topically applied Laminaria polysaccharide (LP) on skin aging. We applied ointment containing LP (10, 25, and 50 μg/g) or vitamin E (10 μg/g) to the dorsal skin of aging mice for 12 months and young control mice for 4 weeks. Electron microscopy analysis of skin samples revealed that LP increased dermal thickness and skin collagen content. Tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease- (TIMP-) 1 expression was upregulated while that of matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP-) 1 was downregulated in skin tissue of LP-treated as compared to untreated aging mice. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 was higher in aging skin than in young skin, while LP treatment suppressed phospho-JNK expression. LP application also enhanced the expression of antioxidative enzymes in skin tissue, causing a decrease in malondialdehyde levels and increases in superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase levels relative to those in untreated aging mice. These results indicate that LP inhibits MMP-1 expression by preventing oxidative stress and JNK phosphorylation, thereby delaying skin collagen breakdown during aging. PMID:27143987

  20. The effect of mother-infant skin-to-skin contact on infants' response to the Still Face Task from newborn to three months of age.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Ann E; Power, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    The effect of mother-infant skin-to-skin contact on infants' developing social expectations for maternal behavior was investigated longitudinally over infants' first 3 months. Infants with and without skin-to-skin contact engaged with their mothers in the Still Face Task at ages 1 week, 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months. Infants with skin-to-skin contact began responding to changes in their mothers' behavior with their affect at 1 month; infants without skin-to-skin contact did so at 2 months. At 3 months, infants with skin-to-skin contact increased their non-distress vocalizations during the still face phase, suggesting social bidding to their mothers. Skin-to-skin contact accelerated infants' social expectations for their mothers' behavior and enhanced infants' awareness of themselves as active agents in social interactions.

  1. A sensory origin for color-word Stroop effects in aging: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Boaz M; Schneider, Bruce A

    2009-09-01

    An increase in Stroop effects with age is often interpreted as reflecting reductions in selective attention, or alternatively, cognitive slowing with age. In a cross-lab and a cross-sectional analysis, we linked sensory losses to Stroop declines. Specifically, we found that the latency difference, or dimensional imbalance, between reading and naming the font color of color-neutral words increased with age. A cross-sectional analysis revealed that this dimensional imbalance can both mediate the effects of age on Stroop effects, and contribute to Stroop after controlling for age effects. We conclude that age-related changes in color perception contribute to and may mediate age-related changes in Stroop.

  2. Skin Delivery of Kojic Acid-Loaded Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for the Treatment of Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalez, M. L.; Corrêa, M. A.; Chorilli, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aging process causes a number of changes in the skin, including oxidative stress and dyschromia. The kojic acid (KA) is iron chelator employed in treatment of skin aging, and inhibits tyrosinase, promotes depigmentation. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems, such as liquid crystalline systems (LCSs), can modulate drug permeation through the skin and improve the drug activity. This study is aimed at structurally developing and characterizing a kojic acid-loaded LCS, consists of water (W), cetostearyl isononanoate (oil—O) and PPG-5-CETETH-20 (surfactant-S) and evaluating its in vitro skin permeation and retention. Three regions of the diagram were selected for characterization: A (35% O, 50% S, 15% W), B (30% O, 50% S, 20% W) and C (20% O, 50% S, 30% W), to which 2% KA was added. The formulations were subjected to polarized light microscopy, which indicated the presence of a hexagonal mesophase. Texture and bioadhesion assay showed that formulation B is suitable for topical application. According to the results from the in vitro permeation and retention of KA, the formulations developed can modulate the permeation of KA in the skin. The in vitro cytotoxic assays showed that KA-unloaded LCS and KA-loaded LCS didn't present cytotoxicity. PPG-5-CETETH-20-based systems may be a promising platform for KA skin delivery. PMID:24369010

  3. Exercise-stimulated interleukin-15 is controlled by AMPK and regulates skin metabolism and aging.

    PubMed

    Crane, Justin D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Lally, James S; Ford, Rebecca J; Bujak, Adam L; Brar, Ikdip K; Kemp, Bruce E; Raha, Sandeep; Steinberg, Gregory R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a structural deterioration of skin that compromises its barrier function, healing, and susceptibility to disease. Several lines of evidence show that these changes are driven largely by impaired tissue mitochondrial metabolism. While exercise is associated with numerous health benefits, there is no evidence that it affects skin tissue or that endocrine muscle-to-skin signaling occurs. We demonstrate that endurance exercise attenuates age-associated changes to skin in humans and mice and identify exercise-induced IL-15 as a novel regulator of mitochondrial function in aging skin. We show that exercise controls IL-15 expression in part through skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of metabolism, and that the elimination of muscle AMPK causes a deterioration of skin structure. Finally, we establish that daily IL-15 therapy mimics some of the anti-aging effects of exercise on muscle and skin in mice. Thus, we elucidate a mechanism by which exercise confers health benefits to skin and suggest that low-dose IL-15 therapy may prove to be a beneficial strategy to attenuate skin aging.

  4. Exercise-stimulated interleukin-15 is controlled by AMPK and regulates skin metabolism and aging

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Justin D; MacNeil, Lauren G; Lally, James S; Ford, Rebecca J; Bujak, Adam L; Brar, Ikdip K; Kemp, Bruce E; Raha, Sandeep; Steinberg, Gregory R; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Aging is commonly associated with a structural deterioration of skin that compromises its barrier function, healing, and susceptibility to disease. Several lines of evidence show that these changes are driven largely by impaired tissue mitochondrial metabolism. While exercise is associated with numerous health benefits, there is no evidence that it affects skin tissue or that endocrine muscle-to-skin signaling occurs. We demonstrate that endurance exercise attenuates age-associated changes to skin in humans and mice and identify exercise-induced IL-15 as a novel regulator of mitochondrial function in aging skin. We show that exercise controls IL-15 expression in part through skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a central regulator of metabolism, and that the elimination of muscle AMPK causes a deterioration of skin structure. Finally, we establish that daily IL-15 therapy mimics some of the anti-aging effects of exercise on muscle and skin in mice. Thus, we elucidate a mechanism by which exercise confers health benefits to skin and suggest that low-dose IL-15 therapy may prove to be a beneficial strategy to attenuate skin aging. PMID:25902870

  5. Influence of colorant and film thickness on thermal aging characteristics of oxo-biodegradable plastic bags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuterio, Giselle Lou D.; Pajarito, Bryan B.; Domingo, Carla Marie C.; Lim, Anna Patricia G.

    2016-05-01

    Functional, lightweight, strong and cheap plastic bags incorporated with pro-oxidants undergo accelerated degradation under exposure to heat and oxygen. This work investigated the effect of colorant and film thickness on thermal aging characteristics of commercial oxo-biodegradable plastic bag films at 70 °C. Degradation is monitored through changes in infrared absorption, weight, and tensile properties of thermally aged films. The presence of carbonyl band in infrared spectrum after 672 h of thermal aging supports the degradation behavior of exposed films. Results show that incorporation of colorant and increasing thickness exhibit low maximum weight uptake. Titanium dioxide as white colorant in films lowers the susceptibility of films to oxygen uptake but enhances physical degradation. Higher amount of pro-oxidant loading also contributes to faster degradation. Opaque films are characterized by low tensile strength and high elastic modulus. Decreasing the thickness contributes to lower tensile strength of films. Thermally aged films with colorant and low thickness promote enhanced degradation.

  6. Measuring skin aging using optical coherence tomography in vivo: a validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojahn, Carina; Dobos, Gabor; Richter, Claudia; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Dermal and epidermal structures in human skin change during intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Epidermal thickness is one of the most often reported parameters for the assessment of skin aging in cross-sectional images captured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We aimed to identify further parameters for the noninvasive measurement of skin aging of sun-exposed and sun-protected areas utilizing OCT. Based on a literature review, seven parameters were inductively developed. Three independent raters assessed these parameters using four-point scales on images of female subjects of two age groups. All items could be detected and quantified in our sample. Interrater agreement ranged between 25.0% and 83.3%. The item scores "stratum corneum reflectivity," "upper dermal reflectivity," and "dermoepidermal contrast" showed significant differences between age groups on the volar and dorsal forearm indicating that they were best able to measure changes during skin aging. "Surface unevenness" was associated with the skin roughness parameters, Rz and Rmax, on the inner upper arm and volar forearm supporting the criterion validity of this parameter on sun-protected skin areas. Based on the interrater agreement and the ability to differentiate between age groups, these four parameters are being considered as the best candidates for measuring skin aging in OCT images.

  7. The interrealtionship between locally applied heat, ageing and skin blood flow on heat transfer into and from the skin.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Alshahmmari, Faris; Yim, Jong Eun; Hamdan, Adel; Lee, Haneul; Neupane, Sushma; Shetye, Gauri; Moniz, Harold; Chen, Wei-Ti; Cho, Sungkwan; Pathak, Kunal; Malthane, Swapnil; Shenoy, Samruddha; Somanaboina, Karunakar; Alshaharani, Mastour; Nevgi, Bhakti; Dave, Bhargav; Desai, Rajavi

    2011-07-01

    In response to a thermal stress, skin blood flow (BF) increases to protect the skin from damage. When a very warm, noxious, heat source (44 °C) is applied to the skin, the BF increases disproportionately faster than the heat stress that was applied, creating a safety mechanism for protecting the skin. In the present investigation, the rate of rise of BF in response to applied heat at temperatures between 32 °C and 40 °C was examined as well as the thermal transfer to and from the skin with and without BF in younger and older subjects to see how the skin responds to a non-noxious heat source. Twenty male and female subjects (10 - 20-35 years, 10 - 40-70 years) were examined. The arms of the subjects were passively heated for 6 min with and without vascular occlusion by a thermode at temperatures of 32, 36, 38 or 40 °C. When occlusion was not used during the 6 min exposure to heat, there was an exponential rise in skin temperature and BF in both groups of subjects over the 6-min period. However, the older subjects achieved similar skin temperatures but with the expenditure of fewer calories from the thermode than was seen for the younger subjects (p<0.05). BF was significantly less in the older group than the younger group at rest and after exposure to each of the three warmest thermode temperatures (p<0.05). As was seen for noxious temperatures, after a delay, the rate of rise of BF at the three warmest thermode temperatures was faster than the rise in skin temperature in the younger group but less in the older group of subjects. Thus, a consequence of ageing is reduced excess BF in response to thermal stress increasing susceptibility to thermal damage. This must be considered in modelling of BF.

  8. Opinions regarding skin ageing in the elderly inhabitants of Bialystok, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska-Kulak, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Skin diseases constitute an essential health and aesthetic problem in the elderly. The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge of the elderly residents of public nursing homes and participants of the University of the Third Age in Bialystok, Poland surrounding the factors influencing skin ageing, the awareness of skin conditions in agening skin, and the impact of skin ageing on the volunteers. The study was performed from April to June 2015 in Bialystok, in two groups: among 100 public nursing home residents (PNH) and 100 members of University of the Third Age (U3A), (all over 60 years old). The study made use of a diagnostic survey conducted via a questionnaire prepared by the authors. Nearly half of those surveyed (42.5%; n = 85) sunbathed in the past, while 28.0% (n = 56) of those surveyed now take part in this type of leisure activity. More than half of respondents (53.0%; n = 106) protected their skin using special protective preparations. A majority of Bialystok inhabitants surveyed (80.5%; n = 161) noticed the features of skin ageing. They reported birthmarks, fungal infections and bedsores as the main skin problems of the old age. Nearly half (40%) of respondents assessed their knowledge as average and 26.0% as poor. The study showed some statistical differences in the knowledge and awareness between the residents of public nursing homes and the students of the University of the Third Age, e.g., the use of the Internet by the U3A group for finding out information. There is a desire to receive education in the field of the agening skin conditions/diseases among the elderly because their level of knowledge is relatively poor. Education of seniors in this area can increase their awareness of the basic principles of skin care and prevention marking of skin ageing. The benefits of greater knowledge of seniors about the conditions of agening skin can help reduce the medical burden and reduce the incidence on certain skin diseases. Furthermore, there is a

  9. Fibroblast-mediated contraction in actinically exposed and actinically protected aging skin

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.W.; Morykwas, M.J.; Wheatley, M.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The changes in skin morphology over time are a consequence of both chronologic aging and the accumulation of environmental exposure. Through observation, we know that actinic radiation intensifies the apparent aging of skin. We have investigated the effects of aging and actinic radiation on the ability of fibroblasts to contract collagen-fibroblast lattices. Preauricular and postauricular skin samples were obtained from eight patients aged 49 to 74 undergoing rhytidectomy. The samples were kept separate, and the fibroblasts were grown in culture. Lattices constructed with preauricular fibroblasts consistently contracted more than lattices containing postauricular fibroblasts. The difference in amount of contraction in 7 days between sites was greatest for the younger patients and decreased linearly as donor age increased (r = -0.96). This difference may be due to preauricular fibroblasts losing their ability to contract a lattice as aging skin is exposed to more actinic radiation.

  10. High-definition optical coherence tomography intrinsic skin ageing assessment in women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Boone, M A L M; Suppa, M; Marneffe, A; Miyamoto, M; Jemec, G B E; Del Marmol, V

    2015-10-01

    Several non-invasive two-dimensional techniques with different lateral resolution and measurable depth range have proved to be useful in assessing and quantifying morphological changes in skin ageing. Among these, only in vivo microscopy techniques permit histometric measurements in vivo. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of chronological (intrinsic) age-related (IAR) morphological changes of epidermis, dermo-epidermal junction (DEJ), papillary dermis (PD), papillary-reticular dermis junction and reticular dermis (RD) have been performed by high-definition optical coherence tomography in real time 3-D. HD-OCT images were taken at the internal site of the right upper arm. Qualitative HD-OCT IAR descriptors were reported at skin surface, at epidermal layer, DEJ, PD and upper RD. Quantitative evaluation of age-related compaction and backscattered intensity or brightness of different skin layers was performed by using the plugin plot z-axis profile of ImageJ(®) software permitting intensity assessment of HD-OCT (DICOM) images (3-D images). Analysis was in blind from all clinical information. Sixty, fair-skinned (Fitzpatrick types I-III) healthy females were analysed retrospectively in this study. The subjects belonged to three age groups: twenty in group I aged 20-39, twenty in group II aged 40-59 and twenty in group III aged 60-79. Only intrinsic ageing in women has been studied. Significant age-related qualitative and quantitative differences could be noticed. IAR changes in dermal matrix fibers morphology/organisation and in microvasculature were observed. The brightness and compaction of the different skin layers increased significantly with intrinsic skin ageing. The depth of visibility of fibers in RD increased significantly in the older age group. In conclusion, HD-OCT allows 3-D in vivo and real time qualitative and quantitative assessment of chronological (intrinsic) age-related morphological skin changes at high resolution from skin surface to a depth

  11. Color vision deficiency in a middle-aged population: the Shahroud Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadehpur, Ebrahim; Hashemi, Hassan; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Khabazkhoob, Mehdi; Mehravaran, Shiva; Shariati, Mohammad; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of color vision defects in the middle-age population of Shahroud, Iran. We selected 6,311 people from the 40- to 64-year-old population through random cluster sampling. Color vision testing was performed with the Farnsworth D-15. Cases with similar and symmetric results in both eyes were classified as hereditary, and those with asymmetric results were considered acquired. Cases that did not conform to standard patterns were classified as unknown category. Of 5,190 respondents (response rate 82.2 %), 5,102 participants underwent the color vision test. Of these, 14.7 % (95 % confidence interval 13.7-15.6) had some type of color vision deficiency. Of the 2,157 male participants, 6.2 % were hereditary and 10.2 % were acquired and of the 2,945 female participants, 3.1 % were hereditary and 10 % were acquired. Hereditary color deficiencies were mostly of the deutan form (63.8 %), and acquired deficiencies were mostly tritan (66.1 %). The prevalence of hereditary and acquired color vision deficiency, as well as different types of red-green and blue-yellow color vision defects significantly increased with age (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the pattern of color vision defects among the middle-aged population of Shahroud was significantly different from that seen in the younger population. This could be due to changes associated with age, gender, medical and ocular conditions, and differences in race and environment. Thus, results of previous examinations and the overall health status should be considered before making any judgment about the status of color vision in middle-aged people.

  12. Damage from periorbital ageing to the multilayered structures and resilience of the skin in Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chuh-Kai; Tsai, Feng-Chou; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Hu, Chien-Ming; Wei, Po-Li; Su, Ching-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Ageing dynamically disrupts the multilayered supporting components of the skin that are held together by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Skin specimens from 33 female Chinese patients undergoing lower blepharoplasty were divided into three age groups and examined by haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Elastica-van Gieson (EVG) stains, western blotting, surface electron microscopy (SEM) and biomechanical tension analysis. The SEM density (skin surface topology) showed a negative linear relationship with age. The triangular pattern of the skin surface in the younger group gradually broke down into quadrangular and irregular patterns in the older group. Collagens and elastic fibres in the dermis showed anisotropy and decreased density in the older groups compared with the younger group, especially in the papillary dermis. Anisotropy means that physical properties differ according to the direction of measurement. E-cadherin and integrin αv (whose functions are to bind epidermal and dermal elements respectively) increased and decreased, respectively, in the oldest group. Skin resilience decreased significantly in this group under repetitive stress. In conclusion, a loss of skin surface textures, integrin αv expressions, epidermal-dermal connections and dermal compactness led to the multilayered structure of the skin becoming separated. This in turn decreased resilience during ageing. These findings may therefore explain why aged skins cannot tolerate repetitive facial expressions, and why this action produces further dynamic wrinkles. PMID:23441675

  13. Influence of age and sun exposure on the biophysical properties of the human skin: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Adhoute, H; de Rigal, J; Marchand, J P; Privat, Y; Leveque, J L

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of the skin were measured by using noninvasive methods on 72 people displaying various levels of solar elastosis on the neck. The physical parameters measured were the skin extensibility, the elastic recovery, the skin colour, the skin thickness and the electrical conductance. The correlation between the above parameters, the clinical grades of elastosis and the chronological age of each subject were studied using two different statistical approaches. They both showed that elastotic skin is less elastic, dryer, darker, more erythematous and less yellowish than the nonexposed skin. The similarities and differences between the properties of elastotic skin and purely chronologically aged skin are discussed.

  14. Ontogeny and aging of the distal skin temperature rhythm in humans.

    PubMed

    Batinga, H; Martinez-Nicolas, A; Zornoza-Moreno, M; Sánchez-Solis, M; Larqué, E; Mondéjar, M T; Moreno-Casbas, M; García, F J; Campos, M; Rol, M A; Madrid, J A

    2015-01-01

    In circadian terms, human ontogeny is characterized by the emergence of a daily pattern, from a previous ultradian pattern, for most variables during the first 6 months of life. Circadian aging in humans is characterized by a phase advance, accompanied by rhythm fragmentation and flattening. Despite an expanding body of literature focused on distal skin temperature, little information is available about the ontogeny and practically nothing about age-related changes in this rhythm. Thus, the aim was to evaluate the degree of maturation and aging of the circadian pattern of distal skin temperature to identify those parameters that are modified throughout life and could be used to differentiate subjects according to their age. For this, distal skin temperature was measured in 197 volunteers (55 % women), including babies aged 15 days (30 subjects), 1 month (28 subjects), 3 months (31 subjects), and 6 months (10 subjects); young adults aged 19 years (37 subjects); middle-aged persons aged 46 years (27 subjects); older people aged 72 (34 subjects). Circadian system maturation was associated with an increase in amplitude and a reduction in skin temperature during sleep. During adulthood, women showed a more robust pattern (lower fragmentation, and higher night-time temperature, amplitude, circadian function index, and first harmonic relative power); however, these differences were lost with aging, a period of life that was consistently associated with a phase advance of the rhythm. In summary, distal skin temperature pattern can be used as a robust variable to discern between different ages throughout the life.

  15. Collagen Fragmentation Promotes Oxidative Stress and Elevates Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in Fibroblasts in Aged Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Gary J.; Quan, Taihao; Purohit, Trupta; Shao, Yuan; Cho, Moon Kyun; He, Tianyuan; Varani, James; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Aged human skin is fragile because of fragmentation and loss of type I collagen fibrils, which confer strength and resiliency. We report here that dermal fibroblasts express increased levels of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1) in aged (>80 years old) compared with young (21 to 30 years old) human skin in vivo. Transcription factor AP-1 and α2β1 integrin, which are key regulators of MMP-1 expression, are also elevated in fibroblasts in aged human skin in vivo. MMP-1 treatment of young skin in organ culture causes fragmentation of collagen fibrils and reduces fibroblast stretch, consistent with reduced mechanical tension, as observed in aged human skin. Limited fragmentation of three-dimensional collagen lattices with exogenous MMP-1 also reduces fibroblast stretch and mechanical tension. Furthermore, fibroblasts cultured in fragmented collagen lattices express elevated levels of MMP-1, AP-1, and α2β1 integrin. Importantly, culture in fragmented collagen raises intracellular oxidant levels and treatment with antioxidant MitoQ10 significantly reduces MMP-1 expression. These data identify positive feedback regulation that couples age-dependent MMP-1-catalyzed collagen fragmentation and oxidative stress. We propose that this self perpetuating cycle promotes human skin aging. These data extend the current understanding of the oxidative theory of aging beyond a cellular-centric view to include extracellular matrix and the critical role that connective tissue microenvironment plays in the biology of aging. PMID:19116368

  16. [Molecular Mechanisms of Functional Activity Decreasing of the Skin Cells With Its Aging].

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Linkova, N S; Kukanova, E O; Orlova, O A

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the pool of signaling molecules that regulate the functional activity of the skin cells. Molecules of apoptosis and cells skin aging are p53, p21, p15, Cdk 4/6 and Bcl-2. Inflammation in skin fibroblasts are realized through the cytokines TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-1, ICAM-1, matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1,2,3,9, transcription factor NF-κB and activator protein AP-1. An important role in the aging of skin cells play neuroimmunoendocrine signaling molecules--melatonin, serotonin, skin fibroblast proliferation marker chromogranin A and CD98hc. Age-related changes in the activity of immune cells of the skin is associated with impaired expression of cluster of differentiation of T-lymphocytes (CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD11) and dendritic cells (CD83⁺). These signaling molecules produced by the fibroblasts of the skin, regulate the activity of immune cells involved in the cascade of reactions associated with inflammatory responses, proliferation, apoptosis and cell regeneration. Based on these data nowadays new highly selective approaches to the diagnosis of the skin and the creation of cosmetic agents for the prevention of aging are developed.

  17. AGE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS INDUCED BY MMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Age-Related Gene Expression Changes In Human Skin Fibroblasts Induced By methyl methanesulfonate. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan H. Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Prote...

  18. Color Vision Deficiencies in Youths 12-17 Years of Age United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaby, David; Roberts, Jean

    The prevalence of color vision deficiencies among youths 12 to 17 years of age in the United States was evaluated during a 1966-1970 survey of 6,768 youths selected as representative of noninstitutionalized adolescents with respect to age, sex, race, geographic region, income, population size of place of residence, and rate of population change in…

  19. Detection of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. A.; Pereira, L.; Ali, S. M.; Pizzol, C. D.; Tellez, C. A.; Favero, P. P.; Santos, L.; da Silva, V. V.; Praes, C. E. O.

    2016-03-01

    The aging process involves the reduction in the production of the major components of skin tissue. During intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, in dermis of human skin, fibroblasts become senescent and have decreased activity, which produce low levels of collagen. Moreover, there is accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs have incidence in the progression of age-related diseases, principally in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's diseases. AGEs causes intracellular damage and/or apoptosis leading to an increase of the free radicals, generating a crosslink with skin proteins and oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to detect AGEs markers on human skin by in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained by using a Rivers Diagnostic System, 785 nm laser excitation and a CCD detector from the skin surface down to 120 μm depth. We analyzed the confocal Raman spectra of the skin dermis of 30 women volunteers divided into 3 groups: 10 volunteers with diabetes mellitus type II, 65-80 years old (DEW); 10 young healthy women, 20-33 years old (HYW); and 10 elderly healthy women, 65-80 years old (HEW). Pentosidine and glucosepane were the principally identified AGEs in the hydroxyproline and proline Raman spectral region (1000-800 cm-1), in the 1.260-1.320 cm-1 region assignable to alpha-helical amide III modes, and in the Amide I region. Pentosidine and glucosepane calculated vibrational spectra were performed through Density Functional Theory using the B3LYP functional with 3-21G basis set. Difference between the Raman spectra of diabetic elderly women and healthy young women, and between healthy elderly women and healthy young women were also obtained with the purpose of identifying AGEs Raman bands markers. AGEs peaks and collagen changes have been identified and used to quantify the glycation process in human skin.

  20. Statistic analyses of the color experience according to the age of the observer.

    PubMed

    Hunjet, Anica; Parac-Osterman, Durdica; Vucaj, Edita

    2013-04-01

    Psychological experience of color is a real state of the communication between the environment and color, and it will depend on the source of the light, angle of the view, and particular on the observer and his health condition. Hering's theory or a theory of the opponent processes supposes that cones, which are situated in the retina of the eye, are not sensible on the three chromatic domains (areas, fields, zones) (red, green and purple-blue), but they produce a signal based on the principle of the opposed pairs of colors. A reason of this theory depends on the fact that certain disorders of the color eyesight, which include blindness to certain colors, cause blindness to pairs of opponent colors. This paper presents a demonstration of the experience of blue and yellow tone according to the age of the observer. For the testing of the statistically significant differences in the omission in the color experience according to the color of the background we use following statistical tests: Mann-Whitnney U Test, Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Median test. It was proven that the differences are statistically significant in the elderly persons (older than 35 years).

  1. Ultrastructural age-related changes in the sensory corpuscles of the human genital skin.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, A; Parisella, F R; Cavallotti, C; Persechino, S; Cavallotti, C

    2013-01-01

    In human genital skin the majority of superficial sensory corpuscles is represented by glomerular corpuscles. These corpuscles show an own morphology. Our aim is to compare the ultra-structure of superficial sensory corpuscles in the penis skin of younger and older subjects. In this report the ultra-structure of the sensitive corpuscle in the penis skin of the younger and older subjects was compared, showing that the genital skin of the older humans contains more simple complexes than the younger ones. Our findings support the view that the age-related changes that can be observed in human glomerular genital corpuscles are consistent with an increase of the simple complexes and a strong decrease of the poly-lamellar one in the older people. These findings demonstrate that human genital corpuscles underwent age-related changes. Moreover our morphological findings can be correlated in relation to the clinical evolution of the sensitivity in the genital skin.

  2. The ageing of the blood supply and the lymphatic drainage of the skin.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Terence

    2004-01-01

    The anatomy and functions of the blood and lymph vessels of human skin are described. Variation in these due to site, ageing and events during life consequent to exposure to a threatening environment are emphasised. Gradual atrophy and greater heterogeneity are features of ageing. Responses to injury and repair are complex and the interaction of mechanical signals distorting skin cells with numerous chemical signals are referred to. The lymphatics are part of an immunosurveillance system to monitor skin barrier penetration. The review attempts to draw attention to key recent advances in our understanding of the cytokine and growth factor production of the skin in the context of previous mainly physiological reviews especially influenced by 50 years of clinical practice as a dermatologist with an eye on both the skin and the fields of microcirculation and lymphology.

  3. What's in a face? The role of skin tone, facial physiognomy, and color presentation mode of facial primes in affective priming effects.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Elena V; Strube, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Participants (N = 106) performed an affective priming task with facial primes that varied in their skin tone and facial physiognomy, and, which were presented either in color or in gray-scale. Participants' racial evaluations were more positive for Eurocentric than for Afrocentric physiognomy faces. Light skin tone faces were evaluated more positively than dark skin tone faces, but the magnitude of this effect depended on the mode of color presentation. The results suggest that in affective priming tasks, faces might not be processed holistically, and instead, visual features of facial priming stimuli independently affect implicit evaluations.

  4. Decline of lymphatic vessel density and function in murine skin during aging.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Sinem; Buschle, Dorina; Luciani, Paola; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Detmar, Michael; Proulx, Steven T

    2015-10-01

    Lymphatic vessels play important roles in the pathogenesis of many conditions that have an increased prevalence in the elderly population. However, the effects of the aging process on the lymphatic system are still relatively unknown. We have applied non-invasive imaging and whole-mount staining techniques to assess the lymphatic vessel function and morphology in three different age groups of mice: 2 months (young), 7 months (middle-aged), and 18 months (aged). We first developed and validated a new method to quantify lymphatic clearance from mouse ear skin, using a lymphatic-specific near-infrared tracer. Using this method, we found that there is a prominent decrease in lymphatic vessel function during aging since the lymphatic clearance was significantly delayed in aged mice. This loss of function correlated with a decreased lymphatic vessel density and a reduced lymphatic network complexity in the skin of aged mice as compared to younger controls. The blood vascular leakage in the skin was slightly increased in the aged mice, indicating that the decreased lymphatic function was not caused by a reduced capillary filtration in aged skin. The decreased function of lymphatic vessels with aging might have implications for the pathogenesis of a number of aging-related diseases.

  5. Transcriptome and ultrastructural changes in dystrophic Epidermolysis bullosa resemble skin aging.

    PubMed

    Breitenbach, Jenny S; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Trost, Andrea; Weber, Manuela; Klausegger, Alfred; Gruber, Christina; Bruckner, Daniela; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Bauer, Johann W; Breitenbach, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The aging process of skin has been investigated recently with respect to mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. We have here observed striking phenotypic and clinical similarity between skin aging and recessive dystrophic Epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), which is caused by recessive mutations in the gene coding for collagen VII,COL7A1. Ultrastructural changes, defects in wound healing, and inflammation markers are in part shared with aged skin. We have here compared the skin transcriptomes of young adults suffering from RDEB with that of sex- and age-matched healthy probands. In parallel we have compared the skin transcriptome of healthy young adults with that of elderly healthy donors. Quite surprisingly, there was a large overlap of the two gene lists that concerned a limited number of functional protein families. Most prominent among the proteins found are a number of proteins of the cornified envelope or proteins mechanistically involved in cornification and other skin proteins. Further, the overlap list contains a large number of genes with a known role in inflammation. We are documenting some of the most prominent ultrastructural and protein changes by immunofluorescence analysis of skin sections from patients, old individuals, and healthy controls.

  6. Pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta in skin of color: new observations by dermoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ankad, Balachandra S.; Beergouder, Savitha L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Pityriasis lichenoides is an uncommon skin disease that presents in three different forms: pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA), pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC) and febrile ulceronecrotic-Mucha-Habermann disease. These represent a spectrum of a disease. PLEVA presents as skin eruption of multiple, small, red papules that develop into polymorphic lesions with periods of varying remissions, as well as possible sequels of hyper/hypopigmentation and varicella-like scars. Diagnosis of this condition is mainly clinical, and sometimes clinical differentiation from other conditions may be a difficult task that often requires histological analysis. In this study, PLEVA lesions were examined by dermoscopy, and the significance of specific dermoscopic findings was investigated in order to facilitate their differentiation from other inflammatory conditions. Objectives To evaluate dermoscopic patterns in PLEVA and to correlate these patterns with histopathology. Materials and methods The study was conducted at S. Nijalingappa Medical College, Bagalkot. It was an observational case series study and patients were selected randomly. Ethical clearance and informed consent were obtained. PLEVA lesions in early and late phases were evaluated. A manual DermLite 3 (3Gen, San Juan Capistrano, CA) dermoscope attached to a Sony (Cyber Shot DSC-W800, Sony Electronics Inc., San Diego, California, USA, digital, 14 mega pixels) camera was employed. Histopathology was done to confirm the diagnosis. Data was collected and analyzed. Results were statistically described in terms of frequencies and types of dermoscopic patterns. Results There was a total of 14 patients; 8 males and 6 females. Mean age of patients was 19 years. Mean duration of disease was 7 months. Dermoscopy in early-phase lesions revealed amorphous brownish areas around the hair follicles, dotted vessels, and scaling. Dermoscopy in late-phase lesions showed whitish-structureless areas and

  7. Reliability of the Raven Colored Progressive Matrices Test: Age and Ethnic Group Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jerry S.; Jensen, C. Mark

    1981-01-01

    Reliabilities for the Raven Colored Progressive Matrices Test (CPM) are reported for three age groups (ages 5 1/2- 6 1/2, 6 1/2-7 1/2, and 7 1/2-8 1/2 years) and three ethnic groups (Anglo, Black, and Hispanic). Results indicate CPM is not equally reliable for all age groups, but appears equally reliable for the three ethnic groups. (Author)

  8. Is lack of sleep capable of inducing DNA damage in aged skin?

    PubMed

    Kahan, V; Ribeiro, D A; Egydio, F; Barros, L A; Tomimori, J; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L

    2014-01-01

    Skin naturally changes with age, becoming more fragile. Various stimuli can alter skin integrity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether sleep deprivation affects the integrity of DNA in skin and exacerbates the effects of aging. Fifteen-month old female Hairless mice underwent 72 h of paradoxical sleep deprivation or 15 days of chronic sleep restriction. Punch biopsies of the skin were taken to evaluate DNA damage by single cell gel (comet) assay. Neither paradoxical sleep deprivation nor sleep restriction increased genetic damage, measured by tail movement and tail intensity values. Taken together, the findings are consistent with the notion that aging overrides the effect of sleep loss on the genetic damage in elderly mice.

  9. Anticedants and natural prevention of environmental toxicants induced accelerated aging of skin.

    PubMed

    Tanuja Yadav; Mishra, Shivangi; Das, Shefali; Aggarwal, Shikha; Rani, Vibha

    2015-01-01

    Skin is frequently exposed to a variety of environmental and chemical agents that accelerate ageing. External stress such as UV radiations (UVR) and environmental pollutants majorly deteriorate the skin morphology, by activating certain intrinsic factors such as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) which trigger the activation of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and inflammatory responses hence damaging the extracellular matrix (ECM) components. To counter this, an exogenous supply of anti-oxidants, is required since the endogenous anti-oxidant system cannot alone suffice the need. Bio-prospecting of natural resources for anti-oxidants has hence been intensified. Immense research is being carried out to identify potential plants with potent anti-oxidant activity against skin ageing. This review summarizes the major factors responsible for premature skin ageing and the plants being targeted to lessen the impact of those.

  10. In-vivo differentiation of photo-aged epidermis skin by texture-based classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoman; Weng, Cuncheng; Yu, Biying; Li, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Two sets of in vivo female cheek skin epidermis images were analyzed through gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and fast fourier transform (FFT). One set was derived from women in their 20s and the other from women more than 60 years of age. GLCM was used to evaluate the texture features of the regions of interest within the cheek epidermis, and texture classification was subsequently performed. During texture classification, 25 images (320×240 pixels) in each age set were randomly selected. Three texture features, i.e., energy, contrast, and correlation, were obtained from the skin images and analyzed at four orientations (0°, 45°,90°, and 135°), accompanied by different distances between two pixels. The textures of the different aging skins were characterized by FFT, which provides the dermatoglyph orientation index. The differences in the textures between the young and old skin samples can be well described by the FFT dermatoglyph orientation index. The texture features varied among the different aging skins, which provide a versatile platform for differentiating the statuses of aging skins.

  11. Using FLIM in the study of permeability barrier function of aged and young skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Choi, E. H.; Man, M. Q.; Crumrine, D.; Mauro, T.; Elias, P.

    2006-02-01

    Aged skin commonly is afflicted by inflammatory skin diseases or xerosis/eczema that can be triggered or exacerbated by impaired epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. It has been previously described a permeability barrier defect in humans of advanced age (> 75 years), which in a murine analog >18 mos, could be attributed to reduced lipid synthesis synthesis. However, the functional abnormality in moderately aged mice is due not to decreased lipid synthesis, but rather to a specific defect in stratum corneum (SC) acidification causing impaired lipid processing processing. Endogenous Na +/H + antiporter (NHE1) level was found declined in moderately aged mouse epidermis. This acidification defect leads to perturbed permeability barrier homeostasis through more than one pathways, we addressed suboptimal activation of the essential, lipid-processing enzyme, β-glucocerebrosidase (BGC) is linked to elevated SC pH. Finally, the importance of the epidermis acidity is shown by the normalization of barrier function after exogenous acidification of moderately aged skin.

  12. Objective assessment of facial skin aging and the associated environmental factors in Japanese monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Ichibori, Ryoko; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanigawa, Tomoko; Kanazawa, Shigeyuki; Shingaki, Kenta; Torii, Kosuke; Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Sakai, Yasuo; Hosokawa, Ko

    2014-06-01

    Twin studies, especially those involving monozygotic (MZ) twins, facilitate the analysis of factors affecting skin aging while controlling for age, gender, and genetic susceptibility. The purpose of this study was to objectively assess various features of facial skin and analyze the effects of environmental factors on these features in MZ twins. At the Osaka Twin Research Center, 67 pairs of MZ twins underwent medical interviews and photographic assessments, using the VISIA(®) Complexion Analysis System. First, the average scores of the right and left cheek skin spots, wrinkles, pores, texture, and erythema were calculated; the differences between the scores were then compared in each pair of twins. Next, using the results of medical interviews and VISIA data, we investigated the effects of environmental factors on skin aging. The data were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficient test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The intrapair differences in facial texture scores significantly increased as the age of the twins increased (P = 0.03). Among the twin pairs who provided answers to the questions regarding history differences in medical interviews, the twins who smoked or did not use skin protection showed significantly higher facial texture or wrinkle scores compared with the twins not exposed to cigarettes or protectants (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). The study demonstrated that skin aging among Japanese MZ twins, especially in terms of facial texture, was significantly influenced by environmental factors. In addition, smoking and skin protectant use were important environmental factors influencing skin aging.

  13. Gene expression changes with age in skin, adipose tissue, blood and brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that gene expression levels change with age. These changes are hypothesized to influence the aging rate of an individual. We analyzed gene expression changes with age in abdominal skin, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines in 856 female twins in the age range of 39-85 years. Additionally, we investigated genotypic variants involved in genotype-by-age interactions to understand how the genomic regulation of gene expression alters with age. Results Using a linear mixed model, differential expression with age was identified in 1,672 genes in skin and 188 genes in adipose tissue. Only two genes expressed in lymphoblastoid cell lines showed significant changes with age. Genes significantly regulated by age were compared with expression profiles in 10 brain regions from 100 postmortem brains aged 16 to 83 years. We identified only one age-related gene common to the three tissues. There were 12 genes that showed differential expression with age in both skin and brain tissue and three common to adipose and brain tissues. Conclusions Skin showed the most age-related gene expression changes of all the tissues investigated, with many of the genes being previously implicated in fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial activity, cancer and splicing. A significant proportion of age-related changes in gene expression appear to be tissue-specific with only a few genes sharing an age effect in expression across tissues. More research is needed to improve our understanding of the genetic influences on aging and the relationship with age-related diseases. PMID:23889843

  14. Skin care in the aging female: myths and truths

    PubMed Central

    Neill, Ushma S.

    2012-01-01

    I recently had the opportunity to visit a very relaxing and beautiful day spa during the middle-of-the-day break from the sessions at a Keystone meeting. I was having a very tranquil and restorative day, when I went in for my final treatment — a facial. The very chipper and cheerful esthetician began examining my skin and applying various creams, when I then heard her say something that nearly ruined my experience: she claimed that the topical treatment she was about to apply would, in her words, “cleanse my liver.” PMID:22293186

  15. In vivo quantification of human dermal skin aging using SHG and autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Fischer, Frank

    2012-03-01

    There are visible changes during skin aging. In the extracellular matrix these changes referred to as intrinsic aging (skin areas not exposed to sunlight) and extrinsic aging can be measured using various methods, such as subjective clinical evaluation, histology and molecular analysis. In this study we developed a new parameter for the non-invasive quantitative determination of dermal skin aging utilizing a five-dimensional intravital tomography (5D-IVT). This device, also known as 5D - multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, is a powerful tool to investigate (photo)aging-associated alterations in vivo. Structural alterations in the dermis of extrinsically aged (chronically sun-exposed) and intrinsically aged (sun-protected) human skin were recorded utilizing the collagen-specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal and the elastin-specific autofluorescence (AF) signal. Recording took place in young and elderly volunteers. The resulting images were processed in order to gain the elastin percentage and the collagen percentage per image. Then, the elastin - to - collagen ratio (ELCOR) was calculated. With respect to volar forearm skin, the ELCOR significantly increased with age. In elderly volunteers, the ELCOR value calculated for the chronically sun-exposed temple area was significantly augmented compared with the sun-protected upper arm area. Based on 5D-IVT we introduce the ELCOR as a new means to quantify age-associated alterations in the extracellular matrix of in vivo human skin. This novel parameter is compared to the currently used "SHG to AF aging index" of the dermis (SAAID).

  16. Differences in visual perception of age and attractiveness of female facial and body skin.

    PubMed

    Fink, B; Matts, P J; Röder, S; Johnson, R; Burquest, M

    2011-04-01

    Perception of age and health is critical in the judgement of attractiveness. The few studies conducted on the significance of apparent skin condition on human physical appearance have studied faces alone or isolated fields of images facial skin. Little is known about whether perception of the face matches that of other body parts or if body skin affects overall age and attractiveness perception when presented in combination with facial skin. We hypothesized that independent presentation of female faces, chests and arms (including hands) - cropped from a full face and upper body image - would result in significant differences in perception of age and attractiveness compared to the corresponding composite. Furthermore, we sought to investigate whether relatively young and attractive looking skin on selected, individual parts of the body affects overall perception. Digital photographs of 52 women aged 45-65 years were collected and processed to yield four derivative sets of images: One set showed the composite of all features, i.e. the face, the chest and the arms, whereas the other three were cropped carefully to show each part of the upper body described above independently. A total of 240 participants judged these faces for perceived age and attractiveness. Our results showed significant differences in perception with the chest and the arms being judged significantly younger than the face or composite image of the same women. Moreover, arms and chest images were perceived as more attractive than face and composite images. Finally, regression analysis indicated that differences between the perceived and chronological values of overall age perception could be predicted by age perception of the face and arms. These results continue to support the significance of facial age perception in assessment of a woman's age, but highlight that body skin also plays a role in overall age impression.

  17. In vitro model adapted to the study of skin ageing induced by air pollution.

    PubMed

    Lecas, Sarah; Boursier, Elsa; Fitoussi, Richard; Vié, Katell; Momas, Isabelle; Seta, Nathalie; Achard, Sophie

    2016-09-30

    More than a barrier against environmental agents, skin reflects individual health and is a visible sign of ageing with the progressive loss of skin integrity. In order to evaluate the consequences of an environmental complex mixture, with tobacco smoke (TS) as model, on cellular and morphological changes, a 3D skin model was used. Morphologically, tissue integrity was intact after one TS-exposure while the superficial layers were drastically reduced after two TS-exposures. However, TS modified epidermal organisation at the molecular level after just one exposure. A decrease in loricrin protein staining was showed in the epidermis, while production of inflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1α, IL-18) and metalloproteinase (MMP-1, MMP-3) were stimulated. Oxidative stress was also illustrated with an increase in 4-HNE protein staining. Moreover, terminal differentiation, cell-cell junction and anchorage gene expression was down-regulated in our model after one TS-exposure. In conclusion, tobacco smoke impacted the fundamental functions of skin, namely tissue anchorage, cornification and skin desquamation. Oxidative stress resulted in skin ageing. The tissue was even reactive with the inflammatory pathways, after one TS-exposure. The 3D-RHE model is appropriate for evaluating the impact of environmental pollutants on skin ageing.

  18. Transcriptome and ultrastructural changes in dystrophic Epidermolysis bullosa resemble skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Andrea; Weber, Manuela; Klausegger, Alfred; Gruber, Christina; Bruckner, Daniela; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Bauer, Johann W.; Breitenbach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The aging process of skin has been investigated recently with respect to mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. We have here observed striking phenotypic and clinical similarity between skin aging and recessive dystrophic Epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), which is caused by recessive mutations in the gene coding for collagen VII, COL7A1. Ultrastructural changes, defects in wound healing, and inflammation markers are in part shared with aged skin. We have here compared the skin transcriptomes of young adults suffering from RDEB with that of sex‐ and age‐matched healthy probands. In parallel we have compared the skin transcriptome of healthy young adults with that of elderly healthy donors. Quite surprisingly, there was a large overlap of the two gene lists that concerned a limited number of functional protein families. Most prominent among the proteins found are a number of proteins of the cornified envelope or proteins mechanistically involved in cornification and other skin proteins. Further, the overlap list contains a large number of genes with a known role in inflammation. We are documenting some of the most prominent ultrastructural and protein changes by immunofluorescence analysis of skin sections from patients, old individuals, and healthy controls. PMID:26143532

  19. Variation of Biophysical Parameters of the Skin with Age, Gender, and Body Region

    PubMed Central

    Firooz, Alireza; Sadr, Bardia; Babakoohi, Shahab; Sarraf-Yazdy, Maryam; Fanian, Ferial; Kazerouni-Timsar, Ali; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Dowlati, Yahya

    2012-01-01

    Background. Understanding the physiological, chemical, and biophysical characteristics of the skin helps us to arrange a proper approach to the management of skin diseases. Objective. The aim of this study was to measure 6 biophysical characteristics of normal skin (sebum content, hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity) in a normal population and assess the effect of sex, age, and body location on them. Methods. Fifty healthy volunteers in 5 age groups (5 males and females in each) were enrolled in this study. A multifunctional skin physiology monitor (Courage & Khazaka electronic GmbH, Germany) was used to measure skin sebum content, hydration, TEWL, erythema index, melanin index, and elasticity in 8 different locations of the body. Results. There were significant differences between the hydration, melanin index, and elasticity of different age groups. Regarding the locations, forehead had the highest melanin index, where as palm had the lowest value. The mean values of erythema index and melanin index and TEWL were significantly higher in males and anatomic location was a significant independent factor for all of 6 measured parameters. Conclusion. Several biophysical properties of the skin vary among different gender, age groups, and body locations. PMID:22536139

  20. Crime and Punishment: the Impact of Skin Color and Socioeconomic Status of Defendants and Victims in Jury Trials in Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rogério Ferreira; Oliveira Lima, Marcus Eugênio

    2016-11-14

    Social judgments are often influenced by racism. Voluntary crimes against life, and in particular the crime of homicide, may be the most critical situations of the impact of racism in social judgments. We analyzed 114 homicide trials conducted by the 1st Jury Court, in a Brazilian judicial capital, concluded between 2003 and 2007, for the purpose of investigating the effects of skin color and the socioeconomic status of the defendant and the victim of homicides in the jury trial court's decision. The results indicate that the social and economic profile of defendants and victims of homicide is identical. They are almost all poor (more than 70%), with low education (more than 73%) and frequently non-Whites (more than 88%). We found that judges assign longer sentences to black (β = .34, p = .01) and poor defendants (β = .23, p < .05). We even verified that the poorer the defendant, the higher was the corresponding conviction rate (Wald's Test = 5.90, p < .05). The results are discussed based on theories of social psychology and criminological sociology, which consider the relationship between skin color and socioeconomic status in social judgments and in discrimination.

  1. Role of topical peptides in preventing or treating aged skin.

    PubMed

    Gorouhi, F; Maibach, H I

    2009-10-01

    Ageing, a basic biological process seen in all living creatures, is not preventable. Surgical and topical modalities have been invented and substances were applied topically to alter the ageing process. Peptides and proteins, frequently used for this purpose, were categorized into four groups: signal peptides, enzyme-inhibitor peptides, neurotransmitter-inhibitor peptides and carrier peptides. We comprehensively review eligible studies -including controlled ex vivo or in vivo efficacy studies on any topical peptide or protein that has been administered to treat signs and symptoms of ageing.

  2. Peripheral mechanisms of thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow in aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry

    2010-01-01

    Human skin blood flow is controlled via dual innervation from the sympathetic nervous system. Reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction and vasodilation are both impaired with primary aging, rendering the aged more vulnerable to hypothermia and cardiovascular complications from heat-related illness. Age-related alterations in the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow occur at multiple points along the efferent arm of the reflex, including 1) diminished sympathetic outflow, 2) altered presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis, 3) reduced vascular responsiveness, and 4) impairments in downstream (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle) second-messenger signaling. This mechanistic review highlights some of the recent findings in the area of aging and the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow. PMID:20413421

  3. Nested PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of human skin microbial diversity with age.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Han, Lei; Yu, Pengbo; Ma, Chaofeng; Wu, Xiaokang; Xu, Jiru

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether the composition and structure of skin microbiota differ with age, cutaneous bacteria were isolated from the axillary fossa of 37 healthy human adults in two age groups (old people and young adults). Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted and characterized by nested PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) with primers specifically targeting V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. The excised gel bands were sequenced to identify bacterial categories. The total bacteria, Staphylococcus spp., Staphylococcus epidermidis and Corynebacterium spp. were further enumerated by quantitative PCR. There were no significant differences in the species diversity profiles between age groups. The similarity index was lower across age groups than that it was intra-group. This indicates that the composition of skin flora is more similar to others of the same age than across age groups. While Staphylococcus spp. and Corynebacterium spp. were the dominant bacteria in both groups, sequencing and quantitative PCR revealed that skin bacterial composition differed by age. The copy number of total bacteria and Corynebacterium spp. were significantly lower in younger subjects, whereas there were no statistical differences in the quantity of Staphylococcus spp. and Staphylococcus epidermidis. These results suggest that the skin flora undergo both quantitative and qualitative changes related to aging.

  4. Differential expression of cathepsins K, S and V between young and aged Caucasian women skin epidermis.

    PubMed

    Sage, Juliette; De Quéral, Delphine; Leblanc-Noblesse, Emmanuelle; Kurfurst, Robin; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Perrier, Eric; Nizard, Carine; Lalmanach, Gilles; Lecaille, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous aging translates drastic structural and functional alterations in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Multiple mechanisms are involved, including changes in protease levels. We investigated the age-related protein expression and activity of cysteine cathepsins and the expression of two endogenous protein inhibitors in young and aged Caucasian women skin epidermis. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that the expression of cathepsins K, S and V, as well as cystatins A and M/E within keratinocytes is reduced in photoprotected skin of aged women. Furthermore, the overall endopeptidase activity of cysteine cathepsins in epidermis lysates decreased with age. Albeit dermal elastic fiber and laminin expression is reduced in aged skin, staining of nidogen-1, a key protein in BM assembly that is sensitive to proteolysis by cysteine, metallo- and serine proteases, has a similar pattern in both young and aged skin. Since cathepsins contribute to the hydrolysis and turnover of ECM/basement membrane components, the abnormal protein degradation and deposition during aging process may be related in part to a decline of lysosomal/endosomal cathepsin K, S and V activity.

  5. Effects of subprimal type, quality grade, and aging time on display color of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Garner, C M; Unruh, J A; Hunt, M C; Boyle, E A E; Houser, T A

    2014-10-01

    A factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of two subprimal types (chuck roll and knuckle), two quality grades (Premium Choice and Select), and three vacuum-storage aging times before processing (7, 21, and 42d) ground beef patty display color attributes. Patties from chuck roll and Premium Choice subprimals had brighter red visual color scores, less discoloration, and higher L*, a*, b*, and chroma values than those from knuckle and Select subprimals, respectively. With an increased display time, patties became darker red, more discolored, and had decreased L*, a*, b*, and chroma values. Therefore, aging Premium Choice chuck rolls for less time (fewer than 21d) could maximize display color life.

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging of Normal, Chronologically Aged, Photoaged and Photodamaged Skin: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mamalis, Andrew; Ho, Derek; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of providing a non-invasive real-time cross-sectional image of the skin through the use of light-based interferometry– a method sometimes described as a “light-based ultrasound.” One key application of OCT in dermatology is the visualization of dermal collagen during processes such as chronological aging, photoaging, or photodamage. These skin conditions are typically managed by the practitioner’s subjective assessment of severity and response to therapy. METHODS & MATERIALS We searched Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Cochrane databases for published literature on the imaging of skin collagen by OCT using the following search terms: “optical coherence tomography,” “OCT,” “skin,” “collagen,” “photoaging,” “wrinkles,” and “photodamage.” RESULTS Our search resulted in 23 articles investigating OCT skin collagen imaging meeting our search criteria. CONCLUSION We anticipate tremendous growth in the field of OCT skin imaging that will parallel the development ultrasound technology has experienced over the past 30 years. We foresee that OCT imaging to evaluate skin aging will not only help identify pathological changes earlier, but will also assist evaluation of response-to-therapy longitudinally without biopsy. PMID:26322560

  7. Ameliorating Effect of Akebia quinata Fruit Extracts on Skin Aging Induced by Advanced Glycation End Products.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seoungwoo; Son, Dahee; Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Seungjun; Roh, Kyung-Baeg; Ryu, Dehun; Lee, Jongsung; Jung, Eunsun; Park, Deokhoon

    2015-11-12

    The accumulation of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the skin plays a very important role in skin aging. Both are known to interact with each other. Therefore, natural compounds or extracts that possess both antioxidant and antiglycation activities might have great antiageing potential. Akebia quinata fruit extract (AQFE) has been used to treat urinary tract inflammatory disease in traditional Korean and Chinese medicines. In the present study, AQFE was demonstrated to possess antioxidant and antiglycation activity. AQFE protects human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) from oxidative stress and inhibits cellular senescence induced by oxidative stress. We also found that AQFE inhibits glycation reaction between BSA and glucose. The antiglycation activity of AQFE was dose-dependent. In addition, the antiglycation activity of AQFE was confirmed in a human skin explant model. AQFE reduced CML expression and stimulated fibrillin-1 expression in comparison to the methyglyoxal treatment. In addition, the possibility of the extract as an anti-skin aging agent has also been clinically validated. Our analysis of the crow's feet wrinkle showed that there was a decrease in the depth of deep furrows in RI treated with AQFE cream over an eight-week period. The overall results suggest that AQFE may work as an anti-skin aging agent by preventing oxidative stress and other complications associated with AGEs formation.

  8. Effect of postmortem aging on marination performance of broiler breast pectoralis major categorized by color lightness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of postmortem aging on marinade uptake and retention by early-deboned chicken breast fillets with different color lightness. Effects of marination on product yield and muscle shear force were also determined. Early deboned (2 h postmortem) broiler butterflies...

  9. 18 CFR 1300.106 - Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability. 1300.106 Section 1300.106 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1300.106 Harassment on the basis of...

  10. 18 CFR 1300.106 - Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability. 1300.106 Section 1300.106 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1300.106 Harassment on the basis of...

  11. 18 CFR 1300.106 - Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability. 1300.106 Section 1300.106 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1300.106 Harassment on the basis of...

  12. 18 CFR 1300.106 - Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, age, or disability. 1300.106 Section 1300.106 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY § 1300.106 Harassment on the basis of...

  13. Color stability of maxillofacial silicone with nanoparticle pigment and opacifier submitted to disinfection and artificial aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filié Haddad, Marcela; Coelho Goiato, Marcelo; Micheline Dos Santos, Daniela; Moreno, Amália; Filipe D'Almeida, Nuno; Alves Pesqueira, Aldiéris

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color stability of a maxillofacial elastomer with the addition of a nanoparticle pigment and/or an opacifier submitted to chemical disinfection and artificial aging. Specimens were divided into four groups (n = 30): group I: silicone without pigment or opacifier, group II: ceramic powder pigment, group III: Barium sulfate (BaSO4) opacifier, and group IV: ceramic powder and BaSO4 opacifier. Specimens of each group (n = 10) were disinfected with effervescent tablets, neutral soap, or 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. Disinfection was done three times a week during two months. Afterward, specimens were submitted to different periods of artificial aging. Color evaluation was initially done, after 60 days (disinfection period) and after 252, 504, and 1008 h of artificial aging with aid of a reflection spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05). The isolated factor disinfection did not statistically influence the values of color stability among groups. The association between pigment and BaSO4 opacifier (GIV) was more stable in relationship to color change (▵E). All values of ▵E obtained, independent of the disinfectant and the period of artificial aging, were considered acceptable in agreement with the norms presented in literature.

  14. Color stability of maxillofacial silicone with nanoparticle pigment and opacifier submitted to disinfection and artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Filié Haddad, Marcela; Coelho Goiato, Marcelo; Micheline Dos Santos, Daniela; Moreno, Amália; Filipe D'almeida, Nuno; Alves Pesqueira, Aldiéris

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the color stability of a maxillofacial elastomer with the addition of a nanoparticle pigment and∕or an opacifier submitted to chemical disinfection and artificial aging. Specimens were divided into four groups (n = 30): group I: silicone without pigment or opacifier, group II: ceramic powder pigment, group III: Barium sulfate (BaSO(4)) opacifier, and group IV: ceramic powder and BaSO(4) opacifier. Specimens of each group (n = 10) were disinfected with effervescent tablets, neutral soap, or 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. Disinfection was done three times a week during two months. Afterward, specimens were submitted to different periods of artificial aging. Color evaluation was initially done, after 60 days (disinfection period) and after 252, 504, and 1008 h of artificial aging with aid of a reflection spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05). The isolated factor disinfection did not statistically influence the values of color stability among groups. The association between pigment and BaSO(4) opacifier (GIV) was more stable in relationship to color change (△E). All values of △E obtained, independent of the disinfectant and the period of artificial aging, were considered acceptable in agreement with the norms presented in literature.

  15. Relationship between skin color and some fruit quality characteristics of 'Hass' avocado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mexico is the main ‘Hass’ avocado exporter in the world. More than 100,000 ton are exported every year being the USA, Japan, the European Union, and Canada the main importer countries. Recently, ‘Hass’ avocado shipments to Canada containing fruit with skin blackening have been rejected since this ch...

  16. Relationship between skin color and some quality characteristics of exportable 'Hass' avocado fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mexico is the main ‘Hass’ avocado exporter in the world. More than 100,000 tons are exported every year being the U.S., Japan, the European Union, and Canada the main importer countries. Shipments to Canada containing fruits with blackening skin have been rejected since this characteristic is associ...

  17. Disruptive coloration in cuttlefish: a visual perception mechanism that regulates ontogenetic adjustment of skin patterning.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Alexandra; Mäthger, Lydia M; Chubb, Charles; Florio, Christopher; Chiao, Chuan-Chin; Hanlon, Roger T

    2007-04-01

    Among the changeable camouflage patterns of cuttlefish, disruptive patterning is shown in response to certain features of light objects in the visual background. However, whether animals show disruptive patterns is dependent not only on object size but also on their body size. Here, we tested whether cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) are able to match their disruptive body patterning with increasing size of background objects as they grow from hatchling to adult size (0.7 to 19.6 cm mantle length; factor of 28). Specifically, do cuttlefish have a single ;visual sampling rule' that scales accurately during ontogeny? For each of seven size classes of cuttlefish, we created black and white checkerboards whose check sizes corresponded to 4, 12, 40, 120, 400 and 1200% of the area of the cuttlefish's White square, which is a neurophysiologically controlled component of the skin. Disruptive body patterns were evoked when, regardless of animal size, the check size measured either 40 or 120% of the area of the cuttlefish's White square, thus demonstrating a remarkable ontogenetic conformity to a single visual sampling rule. Cuttlefish have no known visual feedback loop with which to adjust their skin patterns. Since the area of a cuttlefish's White square skin component is a function of body size, our results indicate that cuttlefish are solving a visual scaling problem of camouflage presumably without visual confirmation of the size of their own skin component.

  18. From Dark to Light: Skin Color and Wages among African-Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Arthur H.; Hamilton, Darrick; Darity, William, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops and tests a theory, referred to as "preference for whiteness," which predicts that the interracial (white-black) and intraracial wage gap widens as the skin shade of the black worker darkens. Using data drawn from the Multi City Study of Urban Inequality and the National Survey of Black Americans, we report evidence…

  19. Age-related changes in expression and function of Toll-like receptors in human skin.

    PubMed

    Iram, Nousheen; Mildner, Michael; Prior, Marion; Petzelbauer, Peter; Fiala, Christian; Hacker, Stefan; Schöppl, Alice; Tschachler, Erwin; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2012-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) initiate innate immune responses and direct subsequent adaptive immunity. They play a major role in cutaneous host defense against micro-organisms and in the pathophysiology of several inflammatory skin diseases. To understand the role of TLRs in the acquisition of immunological competence, we conducted a comprehensive study to evaluate TLR expression and function in the developing human skin before and after birth and compared it with adults. We found that prenatal skin already expresses the same spectrum of TLRs as adult skin. Strikingly, many TLRs were significantly higher expressed in prenatal (TLRs 1-5) and infant and child (TLRs 1 and 3) skin than in adult skin. Surprisingly, neither dendritic cell precursors in prenatal skin nor epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells in adult skin expressed TLRs 3 and 6, whereas the staining pattern and intensity of both TLRs in fetal basal keratinocytes was almost comparable to those of adults. Stimulation of primary human keratinocytes from fetal, neonatal and adult donors with selected TLR agonists revealed that the synthetic TLR3 ligand poly (I:C) specifically, mimicking viral double-stranded RNA, induced a significantly enhanced secretion of CXCL8/IL8, CXCL10/IP-10 and TNFα in fetal and neonatal keratinocytes compared with adult keratinocytes. This study demonstrates quantitative age-specific modifications in TLR expression and innate skin immune reactivity in response to TLR activation. Thus, antiviral innate immunity already in prenatal skin may contribute to protect the developing human body from viral infections in utero in a scenario where the adaptive immune system is not yet fully functional.

  20. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity

    PubMed Central

    Plikus, Maksim V.; Van Spyk, Elyse Noelani; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-01-01

    Historically work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as liver, fat and muscle. In recent years, skin is emerging as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging and carcinogenesis. Morphologically skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration -- the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell-type specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of the skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar UV radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. The skin also provides opportunities to interrogate clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model for investigating the

  1. The circadian clock in skin: implications for adult stem cells, tissue regeneration, cancer, aging, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Plikus, Maksim V; Van Spyk, Elyse N; Pham, Kim; Geyfman, Mikhail; Kumar, Vivek; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2015-06-01

    Historically, work on peripheral circadian clocks has been focused on organs and tissues that have prominent metabolic functions, such as the liver, fat, and muscle. In recent years, skin has emerged as a model for studying circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, stem cell functions, tissue regeneration, aging, and carcinogenesis. Morphologically, skin is complex, containing multiple cell types and structures, and there is evidence for a functional circadian clock in most, if not all, of its cell types. Despite the complexity, skin stem cell populations are well defined, experimentally tractable, and exhibit prominent daily cell proliferation cycles. Hair follicle stem cells also participate in recurrent, long-lasting cycles of regeneration: the hair growth cycles. Among other advantages of skin is a broad repertoire of available genetic tools enabling the creation of cell type-specific circadian mutants. Also, due to the accessibility of skin, in vivo imaging techniques can be readily applied to study the circadian clock and its outputs in real time, even at the single-cell level. Skin provides the first line of defense against many environmental and stress factors that exhibit dramatic diurnal variations such as solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and temperature. Studies have already linked the circadian clock to the control of UVB-induced DNA damage and skin cancers. Due to the important role that skin plays in the defense against microorganisms, it also represents a promising model system to further explore the role of the clock in the regulation of the body's immune functions. To that end, recent studies have already linked the circadian clock to psoriasis, one of the most common immune-mediated skin disorders. Skin also provides opportunities to interrogate the clock regulation of tissue metabolism in the context of stem cells and regeneration. Furthermore, many animal species feature prominent seasonal hair molt cycles, offering an attractive model

  2. Raman spectroscopy of human skin: looking for a quantitative algorithm to reliably estimate human age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Boffelli, Marco; Miyamori, Daisuke; Uemura, Takeshi; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Zhu, Wenliang; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of examining soft tissues by Raman spectroscopy is challenged in an attempt to probe human age for the changes in biochemical composition of skin that accompany aging. We present a proof-of-concept report for explicating the biophysical links between vibrational characteristics and the specific compositional and chemical changes associated with aging. The actual existence of such links is then phenomenologically proved. In an attempt to foster the basics for a quantitative use of Raman spectroscopy in assessing aging from human skin samples, a precise spectral deconvolution is performed as a function of donors' ages on five cadaveric samples, which emphasizes the physical significance and the morphological modifications of the Raman bands. The outputs suggest the presence of spectral markers for age identification from skin samples. Some of them appeared as authentic "biological clocks" for the apparent exactness with which they are related to age. Our spectroscopic approach yields clear compositional information of protein folding and crystallization of lipid structures, which can lead to a precise identification of age from infants to adults. Once statistically validated, these parameters might be used to link vibrational aspects at the molecular scale for practical forensic purposes.

  3. Effect of postpolymerization method on the color stability of composite resins submitted to ultraviolet aging.

    PubMed

    Santos, Paulo Henrique dos; Souza, Fernando Isquierdo de; Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Pavan, Sabrina

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of postpolymerization method on the color stability of resin-based composites. Samples of direct and indirect restorative materials were polymerized with two photo-curing units (Visio photo-curing oven system and LED Elipar Freelight 2). All samples were submitted to an initial chromatic analysis using a spectrometer and submitted to ultraviolet-accelerated artificial aging. The direct material showed less color change than the indirect material, independent of the photo-activation method used. Samples photo cured with the LED system showed less change than those photo cured with the Visio system. The postpolymerization oven did not improve the color stability of direct and indirect resin-based composites.

  4. The Development of Skin Conductance Fear Conditioning in Children from Ages 3 to 8 Years

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Venables, Peter H.; Dawson, Michael E.; Mednick, Sarnoff A.

    2009-01-01

    Although fear conditioning is an important psychological construct implicated in behavioral and emotional problems little is known about how it develops in early childhood. Using a differential, partial reinforcement conditioning paradigm, this longitudinal study assessed skin conductance conditioned responses in 200 children at ages 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8 years. Results demonstrated that in both boys and girls: (1) fear conditioning increased across age, particularly from ages 5 to 6 years, (2) the three components of skin conductance fear conditioning that reflect different degrees of automatic and controlled cognitive processes exhibited different developmental profiles, and (3) individual differences in arousal, orienting, and the unconditioned response were associated with individual differences in conditioning, with the influence of orienting increasing at later ages. This first longitudinal study of the development of skin conductance fear conditioning in children both demonstrates that children as young as age 3 years evidence fear conditioning in a difficult acquisition paradigm, and that different sub-components of skin conductance conditioning have different developmental trajectories. PMID:20121876

  5. Instrumental evaluation of anti-aging effects of cosmetic formulations containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Jung, Ho Jung; Schrammek-Drusios, Med Christine; Lee, Sung Nae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Seung Bin; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-01-01

    Anti-aging cosmetics are widely used for improving signs of aged skin such as skin wrinkles, decreased elasticity, low dermal density and yellow skin tone. The present study evaluated the effects of cosmetic formulations, eye cream and facial cream, containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum (S. marianum) seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone after 4 weeks period of application on aged human skin. Healthy volunteers (n=20) with aged skin were recruited to apply the test materials facially twice per day for 4 weeks. Skin wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone were measured instrumentally for assessing the improvement of skin aging. All the measurements were conducted prior to the application of test materials and at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Crow's feet wrinkles were decreased 5.97% after 2 weeks of test material application and 14.07% after 4 weeks of application in comparison of pre-application. Skin elasticity was increased 6.81% after 2 weeks and 8.79% after 4 weeks. Dermal density was increased 16.74% after 2 weeks and 27.63% after 4 weeks. With the L* value indicating skin brightness and the a* value indicating erythema (redness), the results showed that brightness was increased 1.70% after 2 weeks and 2.14% after 4 weeks, and erythema was decreased 10.45% after 2 weeks and 22.39% after 4 weeks. Hence, the test materials appear to exert some degree of anti-aging effects on aged human skin. There were no abnormal skin responses from the participants during the trial period. We conclude that the facial and eye cream containing palmitoyl peptides and S. marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other ingredients have effects on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone. PMID:27446338

  6. Instrumental evaluation of anti-aging effects of cosmetic formulations containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Jung, Ho Jung; Schrammek-Drusios, Med Christine; Lee, Sung Nae; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kwon, Seung Bin; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-08-01

    Anti-aging cosmetics are widely used for improving signs of aged skin such as skin wrinkles, decreased elasticity, low dermal density and yellow skin tone. The present study evaluated the effects of cosmetic formulations, eye cream and facial cream, containing palmitoyl peptides, Silybum marianum (S. marianum) seed oil, vitamin E and other functional ingredients on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone after 4 weeks period of application on aged human skin. Healthy volunteers (n=20) with aged skin were recruited to apply the test materials facially twice per day for 4 weeks. Skin wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone were measured instrumentally for assessing the improvement of skin aging. All the measurements were conducted prior to the application of test materials and at 2 and 4 weeks of treatment. Crow's feet wrinkles were decreased 5.97% after 2 weeks of test material application and 14.07% after 4 weeks of application in comparison of pre-application. Skin elasticity was increased 6.81% after 2 weeks and 8.79% after 4 weeks. Dermal density was increased 16.74% after 2 weeks and 27.63% after 4 weeks. With the L* value indicating skin brightness and the a* value indicating erythema (redness), the results showed that brightness was increased 1.70% after 2 weeks and 2.14% after 4 weeks, and erythema was decreased 10.45% after 2 weeks and 22.39% after 4 weeks. Hence, the test materials appear to exert some degree of anti-aging effects on aged human skin. There were no abnormal skin responses from the participants during the trial period. We conclude that the facial and eye cream containing palmitoyl peptides and S. marianum seed oil, vitamin E and other ingredients have effects on the improvement of facial wrinkles, elasticity, dermal density and skin tone.

  7. The process of ageing reflected by histological changes in the skin.

    PubMed

    Bonta, Marinela; Daina, Lucia; Muţiu, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Structural and functional alterations, as well as changes occurring in the aspect of the skin during the ageing process, are due to some complex mechanisms, determined by intrinsic and extrinsic factors, which act synergistically. This study aims to analyze the histological changes of collagen and elastic fibers and of skin vasculature that occur in time, during the process of ageing. Fragments of skin have been collected from subjects of both sexes and of different ages, totaling 121 samples from different body regions. The following stains were used: Modified Goldner's Masson trichrome, Ferric Orcein-Hematoxylin and the combined stains Orcein-Goldner's trichrome. As the process of ageing advances, collagen fibers become thinner and change their aspect; at advanced age, the lysis of collagen fibers and their thickening in the deep dermis is present, as they become more fibrous. Elastic fibers show the tendency of fragmentation at more advanced age, gradually change their tinctorial affinity and reduce in amount; in the deep dermis, they tend to thicken progressively, in the presence of discrete elastolysis processes that evolve steadily and irreversibly. Thus, processes of elastic fibers degeneration and lysis run faster by comparison with those of collagen fibers degeneration. With ageing, a progressive reduction of dermis vasculature is present, due to a reduction in the number and size of vascular vessels, which is in its turn associated with the progressive alterations of vascular walls components, changes that advance until the function of the vessel ceases.

  8. Age-associated increase of skin fibroblast-derived prostaglandin E2 contributes to reduced collagen levels in elderly human skin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Lei, Dan; Swindell, William R; Xia, Wei; Weng, Shinuo; Fu, Jianping; Worthen, Christal A; Okubo, Toru; Johnston, Andrew; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Production of type I collagen declines during aging, leading to skin thinning and impaired function. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a pleiotropic lipid mediator that is synthesized from arachidonic acid by the sequential actions of cyclooxygenases (COX) and PGE synthases (PTGES). PGE2 inhibits collagen production by fibroblasts in vitro. We report that PTGES1 and COX2 progressively increase with aging in sun-protected human skin. PTGES1 and COX2 mRNA was increased 3.4-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively, in the dermis of elderly (>80 years) versus young (21-30 years) individuals. Fibroblasts were the major cell source of both enzymes. PGE2 levels were increased 70% in elderly skin. Fibroblasts in aged skin display reduced spreading due to collagen fibril fragmentation. To investigate the relationship between spreading and PGE2 synthesis, fibroblasts were cultured on micropost arrays or hydrogels of varying mechanical compliance. Reduced spreading/mechanical force resulted in increased expression of both PTGES1 and COX2 and elevated levels of PGE2. Inhibition of PGE2 synthesis by diclofenac enhanced collagen production in skin organ cultures. These data suggest that reduced spreading/mechanical force of fibroblasts in aged skin elevates PGE2 production, contributing to reduced collagen production. Inhibition of PGE2 production may be therapeutically beneficial for combating age-associated collagen deficit in human skin. PMID:25905589

  9. Combined Spline and B-spline for an improved automatic skin lesion segmentation in dermoscopic images using optimal color channel.

    PubMed

    Abbas, A A; Guo, X; Tan, W H; Jalab, H A

    2014-08-01

    In a computerized image analysis environment, the irregularity of a lesion border has been used to differentiate between malignant melanoma and other pigmented skin lesions. The accuracy of the automated lesion border detection is a significant step towards accurate classification at a later stage. In this paper, we propose the use of a combined Spline and B-spline in order to enhance the quality of dermoscopic images before segmentation. In this paper, morphological operations and median filter were used first to remove noise from the original image during pre-processing. Then we proceeded to adjust image RGB values to the optimal color channel (green channel). The combined Spline and B-spline method was subsequently adopted to enhance the image before segmentation. The lesion segmentation was completed based on threshold value empirically obtained using the optimal color channel. Finally, morphological operations were utilized to merge the smaller regions with the main lesion region. Improvement on the average segmentation accuracy was observed in the experimental results conducted on 70 dermoscopic images. The average accuracy of segmentation achieved in this paper was 97.21 % (where, the average sensitivity and specificity were 94 % and 98.05 % respectively).

  10. The Development of Skin Conductance Fear Conditioning in Children from Ages 3 to 8 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Venables, Peter H.; Dawson, Michael E.; Mednick, Sarnoff A.

    2010-01-01

    Although fear conditioning is an important psychological construct implicated in behavioral and emotional problems, little is known about how it develops in early childhood. Using a differential, partial reinforcement conditioning paradigm, this longitudinal study assessed skin conductance conditioned responses in 200 children at ages 3, 4, 5, 6,…

  11. Collagen cross-linking in sun-exposed and unexposed sites of aged human skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Prisayanh, P.; Haque, Z.; Woodley, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    A recently described nonreducible, acid-heat stable compound, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine (HHL), is a collagen cross-link isolated from mature skin tissue. Its abundance is related to chronologic aging of skin. The present communication describes the quantity of HHL from aged human skin of the same individuals in sun-exposed (wrist) and unexposed (buttock) sites. Punch biopsies were obtained from these sites from nine people of age 60 or older. HHL contents (moles/mole of collagen) at these sites were for wrist 0.13 +/- 0.07 and for buttock 0.69 +/- 0.17 (mean +/- SD, p less than 0.001). In addition, it was found that acute irradiation of the cross-linked peptides with UVA (up to 250 J/cm2) and UVB (up to 1 J/cm2) had no effect on HHL structure. The same treatment significantly degraded another nonreducible, stable collagen cross-link, pyridinoline. The results suggest that chronic sunlight exposure may be associated with an impediment to normal maturation of human dermal collagen resulting in tenuous amount of HHL. Thus, the process of photoaging in dermal collagen is different from that of chronologic aging in human skin.

  12. The genetics of skin, hair, and eye color variation and its relevance to forensic pigmentation predictive tests.

    PubMed

    Maroñas, O; Söchtig, J; Ruiz, Y; Phillips, C; Carracedo, Á; Lareu, M V

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the potential application of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based predictive tests for skin, hair, and eye color to forensic analysis in support of police investigations lacking DNA database matches or eyewitness testimony. Brief descriptions of the biology of melanogenesis and the main genes involved are presented in order to understand the basis of common pigmentation variation in humans. We outline the most recently developed forensically sensitive multiplex tests that can be applied to investigative analyses. The review also describes the biology of the SNPs with the closest associations to, and therefore the best predictors for, common variation in eye, hair, and skin pigmentation. Because pigmentation pathways are complex in their patterns, many of the better-studied human albinism traits provide insight into how pigmentation SNPs interact, control, or modify gene expression and show varying degrees of association with the key genes identified to date. These aspects of SNP action are discussed in an overview of each of the functional groups of pigmentation genes.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation, aging and the skin: prevention of damage by topical cAMP manipulation.

    PubMed

    Amaro-Ortiz, Alexandra; Yan, Betty; D'Orazio, John A

    2014-05-15

    Being the largest and most visible organ of the body and heavily influenced by environmental factors, skin is ideal to study the long-term effects of aging. Throughout our lifetime, we accumulate damage generated by UV radiation. UV causes inflammation, immune changes, physical changes, impaired wound healing and DNA damage that promotes cellular senescence and carcinogenesis. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and among the malignancies of highest increasing incidence over the last several decades. Melanoma incidence is directly related to age, with highest rates in individuals over the age of 55 years, making it a clear age-related disease. In this review, we will focus on UV-induced carcinogenesis and photo aging along with natural protective mechanisms that reduce amount of "realized" solar radiation dose and UV-induced injury. We will focus on the theoretical use of forskolin, a plant-derived pharmacologically active compound to protect the skin against UV injury and prevent aging symptoms by up-regulating melanin production. We will discuss its use as a topically-applied root-derived formulation of the Plectranthus barbatus (Coleus forskolii) plant that grows naturally in Asia and that has long been used in various Aryuvedic teas and therapeutic preparations.

  14. Ultraviolet radiation, aging and the skin: prevention of damage by topical cAMP manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Amaro-Ortiz, Alexandra; Yan, Betty; D’Orazio, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Being the largest and most visible organ of the body and heavily influenced by environmental factors, skin is ideal to study long-term effects of aging. Throughout our lifetime, we accumulate damage generated by UV radiation. UV causes inflammation, immune changes, physical changes, impaired wound healing and DNA damage that promotes cellular senescence and carcinogenesis. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and among the malignancies of highest increasing incidence over the last several decades. Melanoma incidence is directly related to age, with highest rates in individuals over the age of 55 years, making it a clear age-related disease. In this review, we will focus on UV-induced carcinogenesis and photo aging along with natural protective mechanisms that reduce amount of “realized” solar radiation dose and UV-induced injury. We will focus on the theoretical use of forskolin, a plant-derived pharmacologically active compound to protect the skin against UV injury and prevent aging symptoms by up-regulating melanin production. We will discuss its use as a topically-applied root-derived formulation of the Plectranthus barbatus (Coleus forskolii) plant that grows naturally in Asia and that has long been used in various Aryuvedic teas and therapeutic preparations. PMID:24838074

  15. Skin Color and Latinos: The Origins and Contemporary Patterns of Ethnoracial Ambiguity among Mexican Americans and Puerto Ricans. Report Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montalvo, Frank F.

    Failure to understand the role of skin color in the development of ethnoracial identity among Hispanic Americans has led to continued psychic and educational problems for them, hidden the cause of real and potential divisiveness in the community, and prevented the development of effective strategies for overcoming ethnic prejudice. The ethnic…

  16. Elderly and sun-affected skin. Distinguishing between changes caused by aging and changes caused by habitual exposure to sun.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review and distinguish between skin changes produced by aging and changes produced by habitual exposure to sun. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The literature was searched from 1969 to 1999 for articles on dermatoheliosis and sun-damaged skin. Surprisingly few were found comparing the difference between elderly skin and sun-damaged skin. A few articles focused on certain small aspects of sun-damaged skin. Many excellent articles described particular changes (e.g., actinic keratosis), but few covered all the changes due to aging and to sun. MAIN MESSAGE: Skin changes due to aging can be distinguished from those due to sun damage. All changes due to sun exposure can be grouped under the term dermatoheliosis; five parts of the skin are involved: epidermis (actinic keratosis), dermis (solar elastosis), blood vessels (telangiectasia), sebaceous glands (solar comedones), and melanocytes (diffuse or mottled brown patches). Habitual exposure to sun and a white skin are prerequisites for developing these changes. Knowing the difference between changes caused by sun and by aging can help physicians predict which patients are most likely to get skin cancers. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of these common skin changes will help physicians diagnose and manage the skin abnormalities of elderly people and of people with dermatoheliosis. PMID:11421052

  17. Stressed out mitochondria: the role of mitochondria in ageing and cancer focussing on strategies and opportunities in human skin.

    PubMed

    Tulah, Asif S; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2013-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA damage has been used as a successful and unique biomarker of tissue stress. A valuable example of this is sun damage in human skin which leads to ageing and skin cancer. The skin is constantly exposed to the harmful effects of sunlight, such as ultraviolet radiation, which causes it to age with observable characteristic features as well as clinical precancerous lesions and skin cancer. Formation of free radicals by the sun's harmful rays which contribute to oxidative stress has been linked to the induction of deletions and mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. These markers of mitochondrial DNA damage have been proposed to contribute to the mechanisms of ageing in many tissues including skin and are associated with many diseases including cancer. In this article we highlight the role of this important organelle in ageing and cancer with particular emphasis on experimental strategies in the skin.

  18. Constraining Globular Cluster Age Uncertainties using the IR Color-Magnitude Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correnti, Matteo; Gennaro, Mario; Kalirai, Jason S.; Brown, Thomas M.; Calamida, Annalisa

    2016-05-01

    Globular Clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way are the primary laboratories for establishing the ages of the oldest stellar populations and for measuring the color-magnitude relation of stars. In infrared (IR) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the stellar main sequence (MS) exhibits a “kink” due to opacity effects in M dwarfs such that lower mass and cooler dwarfs become bluer in the IR color baseline. This diagnostic offers a new opportunity to model GC CMDs and to reduce uncertainties on cluster properties (e.g., their derived ages). In this context, we analyzed Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 IR archival observations of four GCs—47 Tuc, M4, NGC 2808, and NGC 6752—for which the data are deep enough to fully sample the low-mass MS, reaching at least ≃2 mag below the “kink.” We derived the fiducial lines for each cluster and compared them with a grid of isochrones over a large range of parameter space, allowing age, metallicity, distance, and reddening to vary within reasonable selected ranges. The derived ages for the four clusters are, respectively, 11.6, 11.5, 11.2, and 12.1 Gyr and their random uncertainties are σ ˜ 0.7-1.1 Gyr. Our results suggest that the near-IR MS “kink,” combined with the MS turn-off, provides a valuable tool to measure GC ages and offers a promising opportunity to push the absolute age of GCs to sub-Gyr accuracy with the next generation IR telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating an Oral Anti-aging Skin Care Supplement for Treating Photodamaged Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sigler, Monya L.; Hino, Peter D.; Moigne, Anne Le; Dispensa, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate an anti-aging skin care supplement on the appearance of photodamaged skin. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Following a one-month washout period, subjects received two anti-aging skin care formula tablets (total daily dose: marine complex 210mg, vitamin C 54mg, zinc 4mg) or placebo daily for 16 weeks. Subjects were restricted from products/procedures that may affect the condition/appearance of skin, including direct facial sun or tanning bed exposure. Participants utilized a standardized facial cleanser and SPF15 moisturizer. Setting: Single study center (Texas, United States; June-November 2007). Participants: Healthy women aged 35 to 60 years (mean, 50 years), Fitzpatrick skin type I-IV, modified Glogau type II—III. Measurements: Subjects were assessed at Weeks 6, 12, and 16 on clinical grading (0-10 VAS), bioinstrumentation, digital photography, and self-assessments. Analysis of variance with treatment in the model was used for between-group comparisons (alpha P≤0.05). Results: Eighty-two anti-aging skin care formula subjects and 70 placebo subjects completed the study. Significant differences in change from baseline to Week 16 scores were observed for clinical grading of overall facial appearance (0.26; P<0.0001), radiant complexion (0.59; P<0.0001), periocular wrinkles (0.08; P<0.05), visual (0.56; P<0.0001) and tactile (0.48; P<0.0001) roughness, and mottled hyperpigmentation (0.15; P<0.001) favoring the subjects in the anti-aging skin care supplement group. Ultrasound skin density (Week 16) was significantly reduced for placebo versus anti-aging skin care supplement group (-1.4% vs. 0%; P<0.01). Other outcomes were not significant. Mild gastrointestinal symptoms possibly related to the anti-aging skin care supplement (n=1) and placebo (n=2) were observed. Conclusion: Women with photodamaged skin receiving anti-aging skin care supplement showed significant improvements in the appearance of facial

  20. Skin pentosidine and telomere length do not covary with age in a long-lived seabird.

    PubMed

    Rattiste, Kalev; Klandorf, Hillar; Urvik, Janek; Sepp, Tuul; Asghar, Muhammad; Hasselquist, Dennis; Cooey, Crissa; Hõrak, Peeter

    2015-08-01

    The questions about why and how senescence occurs in the wild are among the most pertinent ones in evolutionary ecology. Telomere length is a commonly used marker for aging, while other biomarkers of aging have received considerably less attention. Here we studied how another potent indicator of aging-skin pentosidine concentration-relates to age and blood telomere length in a long-lived seabird with well-documented reproductive senescence. We found no associations between telomere length, skin pentosidine and chronological age in male common gulls (Larus canus), aging from 2 to 30 years. However, the variance in telomere length was 4.6 times higher among the birds older than 13 years, which hints at relaxed selection on telomere length among the birds that have passed their prime age of reproduction. These results suggest that physiological and chronological ages may be largely uncoupled in our study system. Furthermore, our findings do not support a hypothesis about the presence of a common physiological factor (e.g., such as oxidative stress) that would cause covariation between two independent markers of aging.

  1. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  2. Transcriptome profiling reveals differential gene expression in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis associated with red/green skin color mutant of pear (Pyrus communis L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanan; Yao, Gaifang; Yue, Wenquan; Zhang, Shaoling; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanin concentration is the key determinant for red skin color in pear fruit. However, the molecular basis for development of red skin is complicated and has not been well-understood thus far. “Starkrimson” (Pyrus communis L.), an introduced red pear cultivated in the north of China and its green mutant provides a desirable red/green pair for identification of candidate genes involved in color variation. Here, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome for the red/green color mutant at three stages of development using Illumina RNA-seq technology. The total number of mapped reads ranged from 26 to 46 million in six libraries. About 70.11–71.95% of clean reads could be mapped to the reference genome. Compared with green colored fruit, a total of 2230 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in red fruit. Gene Ontology (GO) terms were defined for 4886 differential transcripts involved in 15 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Three DEGs were identified as candidate genes in the flavonoid pathway, LAR, ANR, and C3H. Tellingly, higher expression was found for genes encoding ANR and LAR in the green color mutant, promoting the proanthocyanidin (PA) pathway and leading to lower anthocyanin. MYB-binding cis-motifs were identified in the promoter region of LAR and ANR. Based on these findings, we speculate that the regulation of PA biosynthesis might be a key factor for this red/green color mutant. Besides the known MYB and MADS transcription families, two new families, AP2 and WRKY, were identified as having high correlation with anthocyanin biosynthesis in red skinned pear. In addition, qRT-PCR was used to confirm the transcriptome results for 17 DEGs, high correlation of gene expression, further proved that AP2 and WARK regulated the anthocyanin biosynthesis in red skinned “Starkrimson,” and ANR and LAR promote PA biosynthesis and contribute to the green skinned variant. This study can serve as a valuable new resource

  3. Transcriptome profiling reveals differential gene expression in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis associated with red/green skin color mutant of pear (Pyrus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanan; Yao, Gaifang; Yue, Wenquan; Zhang, Shaoling; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanin concentration is the key determinant for red skin color in pear fruit. However, the molecular basis for development of red skin is complicated and has not been well-understood thus far. "Starkrimson" (Pyrus communis L.), an introduced red pear cultivated in the north of China and its green mutant provides a desirable red/green pair for identification of candidate genes involved in color variation. Here, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome for the red/green color mutant at three stages of development using Illumina RNA-seq technology. The total number of mapped reads ranged from 26 to 46 million in six libraries. About 70.11-71.95% of clean reads could be mapped to the reference genome. Compared with green colored fruit, a total of 2230 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in red fruit. Gene Ontology (GO) terms were defined for 4886 differential transcripts involved in 15 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Three DEGs were identified as candidate genes in the flavonoid pathway, LAR, ANR, and C3H. Tellingly, higher expression was found for genes encoding ANR and LAR in the green color mutant, promoting the proanthocyanidin (PA) pathway and leading to lower anthocyanin. MYB-binding cis-motifs were identified in the promoter region of LAR and ANR. Based on these findings, we speculate that the regulation of PA biosynthesis might be a key factor for this red/green color mutant. Besides the known MYB and MADS transcription families, two new families, AP2 and WRKY, were identified as having high correlation with anthocyanin biosynthesis in red skinned pear. In addition, qRT-PCR was used to confirm the transcriptome results for 17 DEGs, high correlation of gene expression, further proved that AP2 and WARK regulated the anthocyanin biosynthesis in red skinned "Starkrimson," and ANR and LAR promote PA biosynthesis and contribute to the green skinned variant. This study can serve as a valuable new resource laying a

  4. The evolving role of the NAD+/nicotinamide metabolome in skin homeostasis, cellular bioenergetics, and aging.

    PubMed

    Oblong, John E

    2014-11-01

    Human skin is exposed to daily environmental insults, particularly solar radiation, that triggers a range of molecular responses. These perturbations to the normal homeostatic state can lead to cellular dysfunction and, ultimately, impacts tissue integrity and accelerates skin aging (photoaging). One of the responses is increased oxidative stress which has been shown to disrupt cellular bioenergetics. This can be detected by depletion of the nucleotide energy metabolites NAD+ and ATP as both an acute transient decrease and, over time, a more permanent chronic reduction due in part to cumulative damage of mitochondria. NAD+ and its primary precursor nicotinamide have been known for some time to impact skin homeostasis based on linkages to dietary requirements, treatment of various inflammatory conditions, photoaging, and prevention of cancer. Cellular NAD+ pools are known to be lower in aged skin and treatment with nicotinamide is hypothesized to restore these levels, thereby mitigating cellular bioenergetics dysfunction. In dermal fibroblasts, nicotinamide is able to protect against oxidative stress to glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation as well as increase mitochondrial efficiency via sirtuin-dependent selective mitophagy. Recent research has found that NAD+ cellular pools are more dynamic than previously thought, oscillating in tandem with free nicotinamide, and serves as a regulatory point and feedback loop in cellular metabolism regulation, maintenance of mitochondrial efficiency, and circadian rhythmicity. Since UV-induced oxidative stress in skin can disrupt these processes, continued molecular understanding of the role of NAD+ and nicotinamide in skin biology is important to identify interventions that would help maintain its normal homeostatic functions and efficient cellular bioenergetics.

  5. Five-year incidence of age-related maculopathy in relation to iris, skin or hair colour, and skin sun sensitivity: the Blue Mountains Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie Jin; Jakobsen, Kirsten; Smith, Wayne; Mitchell, Paul

    2003-08-01

    This study aimed to assess longitudinal associations between iris,hair and skin colour, plus skin sensitivity to sun and the 5-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM). Of 3654 baseline Blue Mountains Eye Study participants (aged 49+ years), 2335 survivors (75.1%) were re-examined after 5 years. Retinal photographs were graded using the Wisconsin ARM Grading System and incident ARM lesions confirmed using side-by-side grading.Iris/skin/hair colour was assessed and skin sensitivity questions were asked at baseline. After adjusting for age, sex and smoking, no significant associations were found between iris or hair colour and incident late or early ARM. Compared to persons with fair skin, those with very fair skin had an increased risk of developing geographical atrophy (odds ratio [OR] 3.5,95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-10.4).However, persons with sun-related skin damage were less likely than those without to develop indistinct soft drusen (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9). Longitudinal data provide no support for the previously reported cross-sectional association between iris colour and ARM.

  6. Sympathetic modulation of sensory nerve activity with age: human and rodent skin models.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Z; LeVasseur, S; Merhi, M; Helme, R D

    1997-11-01

    1. Sensory nerves serve an afferent role and mediate neurogenic components of inflammation and tissue repair via an axon reflex release of sensory peptides at sites of injury. Dysfunction of these nerves with age could contribute to delayed tissue healing. 2. Complementary animal and human skin models were used in the present studies to investigate changes in the modulation of sensory nerve function by sympathetic efferents during ageing. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to monitor neurogenic skin vascular responses. 3. The animal model used skin of the hind footpad of anaesthetized rats combined with electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve, while the human model comprised capsaicin electrophoresis to the volar surface of the forearm. Sympathetic modulation was effected by systemic phentolamine pretreatment in animals and local application in the human model. 4. The results obtained from the human model confirmed the reported decline in sensory nerve function and showed no change in sympathetic modulation with age. The results from the animal model confirm and expand results obtained from the human model. 5. The use of low (5 Hz) and high (15 Hz) frequency electrical stimulation (20 V, 2 ms for 1 min) revealed a preferential response of aged sensory nerves to low-frequency electrical stimulation parameters with differential sympathetic modulation that is dependent on the frequency of stimulation.

  7. Palladium and Platinum Nanoparticles Attenuate Aging-Like Skin Atrophy via Antioxidant Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Shuichi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Izuo, Naotaka; Toda, Toshihiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) loss causes a redox imbalance as it leads to excess superoxide generation, which results in the appearance of various aging-related phenotypes, including skin atrophy. Noble metal nanoparticles, such as palladium (Pd) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles, are considered to function as antioxidants due to their strong catalytic activity. In Japan, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles called PAPLAL has been used to treat chronic diseases over the past 60 years. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of PAPLAL against aging-related skin pathologies in mice. Transdermal PAPLAL treatment reversed skin thinning associated with increased lipid peroxidation in Sod1−/− mice. Furthermore, PAPLAL normalized the gene expression levels of Col1a1, Mmp2, Has2, Tnf-α, Il-6, and p53 in the skin of the Sod1−/− mice. Pt nanoparticles exhibited marked SOD and catalase activity, while Pd nanoparticles only displayed weak SOD and catalase activity in vitro. Although the SOD and catalase activity of the Pt nanoparticles significantly declined after they had been oxidized in air, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation. Importantly, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles with a molar ratio of 3 or 4 to 1 continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation, indicating that Pd nanoparticles prevent the oxidative deterioration of Pt nanoparticles. These findings indicate that PAPLAL stably suppresses intrinsic superoxide generation both in vivo and in vitro via SOD and catalase activity. PAPLAL is a potentially powerful tool for the treatment of aging-related skin diseases caused by oxidative damage. PMID:25333617

  8. Palladium and platinum nanoparticles attenuate aging-like skin atrophy via antioxidant activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Shuichi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Izuo, Naotaka; Toda, Toshihiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) loss causes a redox imbalance as it leads to excess superoxide generation, which results in the appearance of various aging-related phenotypes, including skin atrophy. Noble metal nanoparticles, such as palladium (Pd) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles, are considered to function as antioxidants due to their strong catalytic activity. In Japan, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles called PAPLAL has been used to treat chronic diseases over the past 60 years. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of PAPLAL against aging-related skin pathologies in mice. Transdermal PAPLAL treatment reversed skin thinning associated with increased lipid peroxidation in Sod1-/- mice. Furthermore, PAPLAL normalized the gene expression levels of Col1a1, Mmp2, Has2, Tnf-α, Il-6, and p53 in the skin of the Sod1-/- mice. Pt nanoparticles exhibited marked SOD and catalase activity, while Pd nanoparticles only displayed weak SOD and catalase activity in vitro. Although the SOD and catalase activity of the Pt nanoparticles significantly declined after they had been oxidized in air, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation. Importantly, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles with a molar ratio of 3 or 4 to 1 continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation, indicating that Pd nanoparticles prevent the oxidative deterioration of Pt nanoparticles. These findings indicate that PAPLAL stably suppresses intrinsic superoxide generation both in vivo and in vitro via SOD and catalase activity. PAPLAL is a potentially powerful tool for the treatment of aging-related skin diseases caused by oxidative damage.

  9. Consistency of the Proteome in Primary Human Keratinocytes With Respect to Gender, Age, and Skin Localization*

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Adrian; Weber, Sebastian; Zarai, Mostafa; Engelke, Rudolf; Nascimento, Juliana M.; Gretzmeier, Christine; Hilpert, Martin; Boerries, Melanie; Has, Cristina; Busch, Hauke; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Dengjel, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    Keratinocytes account for 95% of all cells of the epidermis, the stratified squamous epithelium forming the outer layer of the skin, in which a significant number of skin diseases takes root. Immortalized keratinocyte cell lines are often used as research model systems providing standardized, reproducible, and homogenous biological material. Apart from that, primary human keratinocytes are frequently used for medical studies because the skin provides an important route for drug administration and is readily accessible for biopsies. However, comparability of these cell systems is not known. Cell lines may undergo phenotypic shifts and may differ from the in vivo situation in important aspects. Primary cells, on the other hand, may vary in biological functions depending on gender and age of the donor and localization of the biopsy specimen. Here we employed metabolic labeling in combination with quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to assess A431 and HaCaT cell lines for their suitability as model systems. Compared with cell lines, comprehensive profiling of the primary human keratinocyte proteome with respect to gender, age, and skin localization identified an unexpected high proteomic consistency. The data were analyzed by an improved ontology enrichment analysis workflow designed for the study of global proteomics experiments. It enables a quick, comprehensive and unbiased overview of altered biological phenomena and links experimental data to literature. We guide through our workflow, point out its advantages compared with other methods and apply it to visualize differences of cell lines compared with primary human keratinocytes. PMID:23722187

  10. Investigation of age-related decline of microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 in human skin through immunohistochemistry study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qian; Chen, Siming; Chen, Ying; Lyga, John; Wyborski, Russell; Santhanam, Uma

    2013-01-01

    During aging, the reduction of elastic and collagen fibers in dermis can lead to skin atrophy, fragility, and aged appearance, such as increased facial wrinkling and sagging. Microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 (MAGP-1) is an extracellular matrix protein critical for elastic fiber assembly. It integrates and stabilizes the microfibril and elastin matrix network that helps the skin to endure mechanical stretch and recoil. However, the observation of MAGP-1 during skin aging and its function in the dermis has not been established. To better understand age-related changes in the dermis, we investigated MAGP-1 during skin aging and photoaging, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies. Gene expression by microarray was performed using human skin biopsies from young and aged female donors. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis on the MAGP-1 protein was performed in dermal fibroblast cultures and in human skin biopsies. Specific antibodies against MAGP-1 and fibrillin-1 were used to examine protein expression and extracellular matrix structure in the dermis via biopsies from donors of multiple age groups. A reduction of the MAGP-1 gene and protein levels were observed in human skin with increasing age and photoexposure, indicating a loss of the functional MAGP-1 fiber network and a lack of structural support in the dermis. Loss of MAGP-1 around the hair follicle/pore areas was also observed, suggesting a possible correlation between MAGP-1 loss and enlarged pores in aged skin. Our findings demonstrate that a critical "pre-elasticity" component, MAGP-1, declines with aging and photoaging. Such changes may contribute to age-related loss of dermal integrity and perifollicular structural support, which may lead to skin fragility, sagging, and enlarged pores.

  11. A and MdMYB1 allele-specific markers controlling apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) skin color and suitability for marker-assisted selection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X J; Wang, L X; Chen, X X; Liu, Y L; Meng, R; Wang, Y J; Zhao, Z Y

    2014-10-31

    Pre-selection for fruit skin color at the seedling stage would be highly advantageous, with marker-assisted selection offering a potential method for apple pre-selection. A and MdMYB1 alleles are allele-specific DNA markers that are potentially associated with apple skin color, and co-segregate with the Rf and Rni loci, respectively. Here, we assessed the potential application of these 2 alleles for marker-assisted breeding across 30 diverse cultivars and 2 apple seedling progenies. The red skin color phenotype was usually associated with the MdMYB1-1 allele and A(1) allele, respectively, while the 2 molecular markers provided approximately 91% predictability in the 'Fuji' x 'Cripps Pink' and 'Fuji' x 'Gala' progenies. The results obtained from the 30 cultivars and 2 progenies were consistent for the 2 molecular markers. Hence, the results supported that Rf and Rni could be located in a gene cluster, or even correspond to alleles of the same gene. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that red/yellow dimorphism is controlled by a monogenic system, with the presence of the red anthocyanin pigmentation being dominant. In addition, our results supported that the practical utilization of the 2 function markers to efficiently and accurately select red-skinned apple cultivars in apple scion breeding programs.

  12. Optical characters and texture maps of skin and the aging mechanism by use of multiphoton microscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiaoman; Huang, Yudian; Xu, Xiaohui

    2012-03-01

    Cutaneous aging is a complicated biological process affecting different constituents of skin, which can be divided into two types: the chronological aging and the photo-aging. The two cutaneous aging processes often co-exist accompanying with each other. The effects are often overlapped including changes in epithelium and dermis. The degeneration of collagen is a major factor in dermal alteration with aging. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) with its high resolution imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) with its depth resolved imaging were used to study the anti-aging dermatology in vivo. It was attempted to make the optical parameter and texture feature to evaluate the process of aging skin using mathematical image processing. The links among optical parameter, spectrum and texture feature in collagen with aging process were established to uncover mechanism of aging skin.

  13. Multiple skin neoplasms in subjects under 40 years of age in Goiania, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Samir; Curado, Maria Paula; Ribeiro, Ana Maria Quinteiro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the trend for malignant skin neoplasms in subjects under 40 years of age in a region with high ultraviolet radiation indices.METHODS A descriptive epidemiological study on melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers that was conducted in Goiania, Midwest Brazil, with 1,688 people under 40 years of age, between 1988 and 2009. Cases were obtained fromRegistro de Câncer de Base Populacional de Goiânia(Goiania's Population-Based Cancer File). Frequency, trends, and incidence of cases with single and multiple lesions were analyzed; transplants and genetic skin diseases were found in cases with multiple lesions.RESULTS Over the period, 1,995 skin cancer cases were observed to found, of which 1,524 (90.3%) cases had single lesions and 164 (9.7%) had multiple lesions. Regarding single lesions, incidence on men was observed to have risen from 2.4 to 3.1/100,000 inhabitants; it differed significantly for women, shifting from 2.3 to 5.3/100,000 (Annual percentage change - [APC] 3.0%, p = 0.006). Regarding multiple lesions, incidence on men was observed to have risen from 0.30 to 0.98/100,000 inhabitants; for women, it rose from 0.43 to 1.16/100,000 (APC 8.6%, p = 0.003). Genetic skin diseases or transplants were found to have been correlated with 10.0% of cases with multiple lesions - an average of 5.1 lesions per patient. The average was 2.5 in cases without that correlation.CONCLUSIONS Skin cancer on women under 40 years of age has been observed to be increasing for both cases with single and multiple lesions. It is not unusual to find multiple tumors in young people - in most cases, they are not associated with genetic skin diseases or transplants. It is necessary to avoid excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation from childhood.

  14. Multiple skin neoplasms in subjects under 40 years of age in Goiania, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Samir; Curado, Maria Paula; Ribeiro, Ana Maria Quinteiro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the trend for malignant skin neoplasms in subjects under 40 years of age in a region with high ultraviolet radiation indices. METHODS A descriptive epidemiological study on melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers that was conducted in Goiania, Midwest Brazil, with 1,688 people under 40 years of age, between 1988 and 2009. Cases were obtained from Registro de Câncer de Base Populacional de Goiânia (Goiania’s Population-Based Cancer File). Frequency, trends, and incidence of cases with single and multiple lesions were analyzed; transplants and genetic skin diseases were found in cases with multiple lesions. RESULTS Over the period, 1,995 skin cancer cases were observed to found, of which 1,524 (90.3%) cases had single lesions and 164 (9.7%) had multiple lesions. Regarding single lesions, incidence on men was observed to have risen from 2.4 to 3.1/100,000 inhabitants; it differed significantly for women, shifting from 2.3 to 5.3/100,000 (Annual percentage change – [APC] 3.0%, p = 0.006). Regarding multiple lesions, incidence on men was observed to have risen from 0.30 to 0.98/100,000 inhabitants; for women, it rose from 0.43 to 1.16/100,000 (APC 8.6%, p = 0.003). Genetic skin diseases or transplants were found to have been correlated with 10.0% of cases with multiple lesions – an average of 5.1 lesions per patient. The average was 2.5 in cases without that correlation. CONCLUSIONS Skin cancer on women under 40 years of age has been observed to be increasing for both cases with single and multiple lesions. It is not unusual to find multiple tumors in young people – in most cases, they are not associated with genetic skin diseases or transplants. It is necessary to avoid excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation from childhood. PMID:26465667

  15. Quantitative analysis of intrinsic skin aging in dermal papillae by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Chou, Sin-Yo; Tsai, Cheng-Shiun; Lin, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Shih, Yuan-Ta; Lee, Gwo-Giun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Chronological skin aging is associated with flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), but to date no quantitative analysis focusing on the aging changes in the dermal papillae (DP) has been performed. The aim of the study is to determine the architectural changes and the collagen density related to chronological aging in the dermal papilla zone (DPZ) by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) with a sub-femtoliter spatial resolution. We recruited 48 Asian subjects and obtained in vivo images on the sun-protected volar forearm. Six parameters were defined to quantify 3D morphological changes of the DPZ, which we analyzed both manually and computationally to study their correlation with age. The depth of DPZ, the average height of isolated DP, and the 3D interdigitation index decreased with age, while DP number density, DP volume, and the collagen density in DP remained constant over time. In vivo high-resolution HGM technology has uncovered chronological aging-related variations in DP, and sheds light on real-time quantitative skin fragility assessment and disease diagnostics based on collagen density and morphology. PMID:25401037

  16. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity.

    PubMed

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khan, Abida Kalsoom; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed.

  17. Anti-Aging Potential of Phytoextract Loaded-Pharmaceutical Creams for Human Skin Cell Longetivity

    PubMed Central

    Jadoon, Saima; Karim, Sabiha; Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan Bin; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Kalsoom Khan, Abida; Malik, Arif; Chen, Chunye; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    The exposure to ultraviolet radiations (UVR) is the key source of skin sunburn; it may produce harmful entities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to aging. The skin can be treated and protected from the injurious effects of ROS by using various pharmaceutical formulations, such as cream. Cream can be loaded with antioxidants to quench ROS leading to photo-protective effects. Moreover, modern medicines depend on ethnobotanicals for protection or treatment of human diseases. This review article summarizes various in vivo antioxidant studies on herbal creams loaded with phyto-extracts. These formulations may serve as cosmeceuticals to protect skin against injurious effects of UVR. The botanicals studied for dermatologic use in cream form include Acacia nilotica, Benincasa hispida, Calendula officinalis, Camellia sinensis, Camellia sinensis, Nelumbo nucifera, Capparis decidua, Castanea sativa, Coffea arabica, Crocus sativus, Emblica officinalis Gaertn, Foeniculum vulgare, Hippophae rhamnoides, Lithospermum erythrorhizon, Malus domestica, Matricaria chamomilla L., Moringa oleifera, Morus alba, Ocimum basilicum, Oryza sativa, Polygonum minus, Punica granatum, Silybum marianum, Tagetes erecta Linn., Terminalia chebula, Trigonella foenum-graecum, and Vitis vinifera. The observed anti-aging effects of cream formulations could be an outcome of a coordinating action of multiple constituents. Of numerous botanicals, the phenolic acids and flavonoids appear effective against UVR-induced damage; however the evidence-based studies for their anti-aging effects are still needed. PMID:26448818

  18. Oral sapropterin augments reflex vasoconstriction in aged human skin through noradrenergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2013-10-01

    Reflex vasoconstriction is attenuated in aged skin due to a functional loss of adrenergic vasoconstriction. Bioavailability of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor for catecholamine synthesis, is reduced with aging. Locally administered BH4 increases vasoconstriction through adrenergic mechanisms in aged human skin. We hypothesized that oral sapropterin (Kuvan, a pharmaceutical BH4) would augment vasoconstriction elicited by whole-body cooling and tyramine perfusion in aged skin. Ten healthy subjects (age 75 ± 2 yr) ingested sapropterin (10 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 3 h following ingestion. Three intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of 1) lactated Ringer, 2) 5 mM BH4, and 3) 5 mM yohimbine + 1 mM propranolol (Y+P; to inhibit adrenergic vasoconstriction). Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasoconstriction was induced by lowering and then clamping whole-body skin temperature (Tsk) using a water-perfused suit. Following whole-body cooling, subjects were rewarmed and 1 mM tyramine was perfused at each site to elicit endogenous norepinephrine release from the perivascular nerve terminal. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated as CVC = LDF/mean arterial pressure and expressed as change from baseline (ΔCVC). Plasma BH4 was elevated 3 h after ingestion of sapropterin (43.8 ± 3 vs. 19.1 ± 2 pmol/ml; P < 0.001). Sapropterin increased reflex vasoconstriction at the Ringer site at Tsk ≤ 32.5°C (P < 0.05). Local BH4 perfusion augmented reflex vasoconstriction at Tsk ≤ 31.5°C with placebo treatment only (P < 0.05). There was no treatment effect on reflex vasoconstriction at the BH4-perfused or Y+P-perfused sites. Sapropterin increased pharmacologically induced vasoconstriction at the Ringer site (-0.19 ± 0.03 vs. -0.08 ± 0.02 ΔCVC; P = 0.01). There was no

  19. Effect of Accelerated Aging on Color Change of Direct and Indirect Fiber-Reinforced Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Masoumeh Hasani; Farahat, Farnaz; Ahmadi, Elham; Hassani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of artificial accelerated aging (AAA) on color change of direct and indirect fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) restorations. Materials and Methods: Direct (Z250) and indirect (Gradia) composite resins were reinforced with glass (GF) and polyethylene fibers (PF) based on the manufacturers’ instructions. Forty samples were fabricated and divided into eight groups (n=5). Four groups served as experimental groups and the remaining four served as controls. Color change (ΔE) and color parameters (ΔL*, Δa*, Δb*) were read at baseline and after AAA based on the CIELAB system. Three-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Significant differences were found in ΔE, ΔL*, Δa* and Δb* among the groups after AAA (P<0.05). Most of the studied samples demonstrated an increase in lightness and a red-yellow shift after AAA. Conclusions: The obtained ΔE values were unacceptable after AAA (ΔE≥ 3.3). All indirect samples showed a green-blue shift with a reduction in lightness except for Gradia/PF+ NuliteF. PMID:28392813

  20. Oral sapropterin acutely augments reflex vasodilation in aged human skin through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2013-10-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and its cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) are required for full reflex cutaneous vasodilation and are attenuated in primary aging. Acute, locally administered BH4 increases reflex vasodilation through NO-dependent mechanisms in aged skin. We hypothesized that oral sapropterin (Kuvan, shelf-stable pharmaceutical formulation of BH4) would augment reflex vasodilation in aged human skin during hyperthermia. Nine healthy human subjects (76 ± 1 yr) ingested sapropterin (10 mg/kg) or placebo in a randomized double-blind crossover design. Venous blood samples were collected prior to, and 3 h following, ingestion of sapropterin for measurement of plasma BH4. Three intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin for local delivery of 1) lactated Ringer's solution, 2) 10 mM BH4, and 3) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced using a water-perfused suit. At 1°C rise in oral temperature, mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/MAP) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVCmax 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat 43°C). Plasma concentrations of BH4 were significantly elevated 3 h after ingestion of sapropterin (0 h: 19.1 ± 2 pmol/ml vs. 3 h: 43.8 ± 3 pmol/ml; P < 0.001). Sapropterin increased NO-dependent vasodilation at control site (placebo: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. sapropterin: 25 ± 4 %CVCmax; P = 0.004). Local BH4 administration increased NO-dependent vasodilation compared with control in placebo trials only (control: 14 ± 1 %CVCmax vs. BH4-treated: 24 ± 3 %CVCmax; P = 0.02). These data suggest oral sapropterin increases bioavailable BH4 in aged skin microvasculature sufficiently to increase NO synthesis through NOS and that sapropterin may be a viable intervention to

  1. Impairments in central cardiovascular function contribute to attenuated reflex vasodilation in aged skin.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Jody L; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Proctor, David N; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2015-12-15

    During supine passive heating, increases in skin blood flow (SkBF) and cardiac output (Qc) are both blunted in older adults. The aim here was to determine the effect of acutely correcting the peripheral vasodilatory capacity of aged skin on the integrated cardiovascular responses to passive heating. A secondary aim was to examine the SkBF-Qc relation during hyperthermia in the presence (upright posture) and absence (dynamic exercise) of challenges to central venous pressure. We hypothesized that greater increases in SkBF would be accompanied by greater increases in Qc. Eleven healthy older adults (69 ± 3 yr) underwent supine passive heating (0.8°C rise in core temperature; water-perfused suit) after ingesting sapropterin (BH4, a nitric oxide synthase cofactor; 10 mg/kg) or placebo (randomized double-blind crossover design). Twelve young (24 ± 1 yr) subjects served as a comparison group. SkBF (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and Qc (open-circuit acetylene wash-in) were measured during supine heating, heating + upright posture, and heating + dynamic exercise. Throughout supine and upright heating, sapropterin fully restored the SkBF response of older adults to that of young adults but Qc remained blunted. During heat + upright posture, SkBF failed to decrease in untreated older subjects. There were no age- or treatment-related differences in SkBF-Qc during dynamic exercise. The principal finding of this study was that the blunted Qc response to passive heat stress is directly related to age as opposed to the blunted peripheral vasodilatory capacity of aged skin. Furthermore, peripheral impairments to SkBF in the aged may contribute to inapposite responses during challenges to central venous pressure during hyperthermia.

  2. Assessing human skin with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and colorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, InSeok; Liu, Yang; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2012-02-01

    Colorimetry has been used as an objective measure of perceived skin color by human eye to document and score physiological responses of the skin from external insults. CIE color space values (L*, a* and b*) are the most commonly used parameters to correlate visually perceived color attributes such as L* for pigment, a* for erythema, and b* for sallowness of the skin. In this study, we investigated the relation of Lab color scale to the amount of major skin chromophores (oxy-, deoxyhemoglobin and melanin) calculated from diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Thirty two healthy human subjects with ages from 20 to 70 years old, skin types I-VI, were recruited for the study. DRS and colorimetry measurements were taken from the left and right cheeks, and on the right upper inner arm. The melanin content calculated from 630-700 nm range of DRS measurements was shown to correlate with the lightness of skin (L*) for most skin types. For subjects with medium-to-light complexion, melanin measured at the blue part spectrum and hemoglobin interfered on the relation of lightness of the skin color to the melanin content. The sallowness of the skin that is quantified by the melanin contribution at the blue part spectrum of DRS was found to be related to b* scale. This study demonstrates the importance of documenting skin color by assessing individual skin chromophores with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, in comparison to colorimetry assessment.

  3. Triple nanoemulsion potentiates the effects of topical treatments with microencapsulated retinol and modulates biological processes related to skin aging *

    PubMed Central

    Afornali, Alessandro; de Vecchi, Rodrigo; Stuart, Rodrigo Makowiecky; Dieamant, Gustavo; de Oliveira, Luciana Lima; Brohem, Carla Abdo; Feferman, Israel Henrique Stokfisz; Fabrício, Lincoln Helder Zambaldi; Lorencini, Márcio

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The sum of environmental and genetic factors affects the appearance and function of the skin as it ages. The identification of molecular changes that take place during skin aging provides biomarkers and possible targets for therapeutic intervention. Retinoic acid in different formulations has emerged as an alternative to prevent and repair age-related skin damage. OBJECTIVES To understand the effects of different retinoid formulations on the expression of genes associated with biological processes that undergo changes during skin aging. METHODS Ex-vivo skin samples were treated topically with different retinoid formulations. The modulation of biological processes associated with skin aging was measured by Reverse Transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). RESULTS A formulation containing microencapsulated retinol and a blend of active ingredients prepared as a triple nanoemulsion provided the best results for the modulation of biological, process-related genes that are usually affected during skin aging. CONCLUSION This association proved to be therapeutically more effective than tretinoin or microencapsulated retinol used singly. PMID:24474102

  4. Dermoscopy-guided reflectance confocal microscopy of skin using high-NA objective lens with integrated wide-field color camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickensheets, David L.; Kreitinger, Seth; Peterson, Gary; Heger, Michael; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Reflectance Confocal Microscopy, or RCM, is being increasingly used to guide diagnosis of skin lesions. The combination of widefield dermoscopy (WFD) with RCM is highly sensitive (~90%) and specific (~ 90%) for noninvasively detecting melanocytic and non-melanocytic skin lesions. The combined WFD and RCM approach is being implemented on patients to triage lesions into benign (with no biopsy) versus suspicious (followed by biopsy and pathology). Currently, however, WFD and RCM imaging are performed with separate instruments, while using an adhesive ring attached to the skin to sequentially image the same region and co-register the images. The latest small handheld RCM instruments offer no provision yet for a co-registered wide-field image. This paper describes an innovative solution that integrates an ultra-miniature dermoscopy camera into the RCM objective lens, providing simultaneous wide-field color images of the skin surface and RCM images of the subsurface cellular structure. The objective lens (0.9 NA) includes a hyperhemisphere lens and an ultra-miniature CMOS color camera, commanding a 4 mm wide dermoscopy view of the skin surface. The camera obscures the central portion of the aperture of the objective lens, but the resulting annular aperture provides excellent RCM optical sectioning and resolution. Preliminary testing on healthy volunteers showed the feasibility of combined WFD and RCM imaging to concurrently show the skin surface in wide-field and the underlying microscopic cellular-level detail. The paper describes this unique integrated dermoscopic WFD/RCM lens, and shows representative images. The potential for dermoscopy-guided RCM for skin cancer diagnosis is discussed.

  5. College Students Cope With Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciara, Frank J.

    College students who were preparing for service-oriented careers as teachers, social workers, nurses, and probation officers, were studied to determine whether the students held prejudicial attitudes based on skin color. Photographs of blacks and Caucasians, matched so that paired persons were of the same racial group, sex, and age level, and…

  6. Anti-Skin-Aging Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate by Regulating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Pathway on Aging Mouse Model Induced by D-Galactose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiming; Li, Yifan; Zhu, Qiangqiang; Li, Tong; Lu, Hao; Wei, Nan; Huang, Yewei; Shi, Ruoyu; Ma, Xiao; Wang, Xuanjun; Sheng, Jun

    2017-03-23

    Epigallocatechin gallate(EGCG) is a monomer separated from tea catechins, as an well-known antioxidant, which helps fight wrinkles and rejuvenate skin cells. In this study, we investigated the anti-aging effect of EGCG, and to clarify underlying mechanism of skin aging in a D-galactose-induced aging mouse model. Forty-five male mice were divided into 5 groups and treated with different dose of EGCG, Vitamin C (VitC) to mice as a positive control. All groups except vehicle were established aging model induced by D-galactose (200mg/kg/day) that was subcutaneously injected to mice for 8 weeks. Two weeks after injection of D-galactose, EGCG and Vit C groups were simultaneously administered once a day by subcutaneously inject after 5hours for injecting D-galactose. The results show that EGCG can be absorbed by the skin. Overall, the conditions of the skin of EGCG-treatment groups were improved, the whole structure of skin were better than control groups, and the levels of oxidative stress and the expression of relate with EGFR proteins were significantly higher than control group after EGCG treatment. All these findings suggest that EGCG can resist skin senility effectively. And the EGFR with relate of downstream proteins are implicated in the skin aging.

  7. Nonuniform, age-related decrements in regional sweating and skin blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Lacy M.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2013-01-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated thermoregulatory function that varies regionally over the body. Decrements in vasodilation and sweating are well documented with age, yet limited data are available concerning the regional relation between these responses. We aimed to examine age-related alterations in the relation between regional sweating (RSR) and skin blood flow (SkBF) to thermal and pharmacological stimuli. Four microdialysis fibers were inserted in the ventral forearm, abdomen, thigh, and lower back of eight healthy aged subjects (64 ± 7 yr) and nine young (23 ± 3 yr) during 1) ACh dose response (1 × 10−7 to 0.1 M, mean skin temperature 34°C) and 2) passive whole body heating to Δ1°C rise in oral temperature (Tor). RSR and SkBF were measured over each microdialysis membrane using ventilated capsules and laser-Doppler flowmetry. Maximal SkBF was measured at the end of both protocols (50 mM SNP). Regional sweating thresholds and RSR were attenuated in aged vs. young at all sites (P < 0.0001) during whole body heating. Vasodilation thresholds were similar between groups (P > 0.05). Attenuated SkBF were observed at the arm and back in the aged, representing 56 and 82% of those in the young at these sites, respectively (0.5 ΔTor). During ACh perfusion, SkBF (P = 0.137) and RSR were similar between groups (P = 0.326). Together these findings suggest regional age-related decrements in heat-activated sweat gland function but not cholinergic sensitivity. Functional consequences of such thermoregulatory impairment include the compromised ability of older individuals to defend core temperature during heat exposure and a subsequently greater susceptibility to heat-related illness and injury. PMID:23926135

  8. Skin Anti-Aging Activities of Bacteriochlorophyll a from Photosynthetic Bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Young; Yim, Tae Bin; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the anti-aging skin effects of bacteriochlorophyll a isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides are first reported, with notably low cytotoxicity in the range of 1% to 14% in adding 0.00078 (% (w/w)) of the extracts, compared with the normal growth of both human dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte cells without any treatment as a control. The highest production of procollagen from human fibroblast cells (CCD-986sk) was observed as 221.7 ng/ml with 0.001 (% (w/w)) of bacteriochlorophyll a, whereas 150 and 200 ng/ml of procollagen production resulted from addition of 0.001 (% (w/w)) of the photosynthetic bacteria. The bacteriochlorophylla- induced TNF-α production increased to 63.8%, which was lower secretion from HaCaT cells than that from addition of 0.00005 (% (w/w)) of bacteriochlorophyll a. Additionally, bacteriochlorophyll a upregulated the expression of genes related to skin anti-aging (i.e., keratin 10, involucrin, transglutaminase-1, and MMPs), by up to 4-15 times those of the control. However, crude extracts from R. sphaeroides did not enhance the expression level of these genes. Bacteriochlorophyll a showed higher antioxidant activity of 63.8% in DPPH free radical scavenging than those of water, ethanol, and 70% ethanol extracts (14.0%, 57.2%, and 12.6%, respectively). It was also shown that the high antioxidant activity could be attributed to the skin anti-aging effect of bacteriochlorophyll a, although R. sphaeroides itself would not exhibit significant anti-aging activities.

  9. An investigation into the use of color as a device to convey memes during the Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Peter A.

    Color is used as a tool in visual communication to express ideas in a symbolic fashion. It can also be used as a guide to assist the viewer in the visual narrative. Artwork created in the period of time between 1300 to 1850 in northern and central Europe provides a comprehensive perspective in the use of color as symbol and color as an elucidative devise. This period of time is known as the Little Ice Age, the duration of which spans European history between the Medieval period and the Romantic era. The extreme climatic conditions of this era caused profound changes in society on many levels and influenced the use of color in paintings throughout this chapter in history. The new paradigm of the science of ideas, called memetics, provides a framework to analyze the expression of ideas through the use of color within this span of time.

  10. Elevated cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1) promotes skin aging via upregulation of IL-1β in chronically sun-exposed human skin.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhaoping; Okubo, Toru; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J; Quan, Taihao

    2014-02-01

    Chronic exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes premature skin aging, which is characterized by reduced type I collagen production and increased fragmentation of the dermal collagenous extracellular matrix. This imbalance of collagen homeostasis is mediated, in part, by elevated expression of the matricellular protein cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), in dermal fibroblasts, the primary collagen producing cell type in human skin. Here, we report that the actions of CCN1 are mediated by induction of interleukin 1β (IL-1β). CCN1 and IL-1β are strikingly induced by acute UV irradiation, and constitutively elevated in sun-exposed prematurely aged human skin. Elevated CCN1 rapidly induces IL-1β, inhibits type I collagen production, and upregulates matrix metalloproteinase-1, which degrades collagen fibrils. Blockade of IL-1β actions by IL-1 receptor antagonist largely prevents the deleterious effects of CCN1 on collagen homeostasis. Furthermore, knockdown of CCN1 significantly reduces induction of IL-1β by UV irradiation, and thereby partially prevents collagen loss. These data demonstrate that elevated CCN1promotes inflammaging and collagen loss via induction of IL-1β and thereby contributes to the pathophysiology of premature aging in chronically sun-exposed human skin.

  11. Effects of aging on the fundamental color chemistry of dark-cutting beef.

    PubMed

    English, A R; Wills, K M; Harsh, B N; Mafi, G G; VanOverbeke, D L; Ramanathan, R

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of aging on myoglobin chemistry of dark-cutting beef. Ten USDA Choice (mean pH = 5.6; normal pH beef) and 10 no-roll dark cutter (mean pH = 6.4) strip loins were obtained from a commercial packing plant within 3 d of harvest. Loins were cut into 4 sections, vacuum packaged, randomly assigned to 0-, 21-, 42-, and 62-d aging at 2°C in the dark. Following aging, loin sections were cut into 2.5-cm-thick steaks and were used to determine bloom development, oxygen consumption (OC), metmyoglobin reducing activity (MRA), and lipid oxidation. Surface color readings were measured using a HunterLab Miniscan XE Plus spectrophotometer. A significant muscle type × aging time interaction resulted for OC ( < 0.001). Normal pH steaks declined more ( < 0.001) in OC during aging than dark-cutting beef. On d 0, dark-cutting beef had a greater OC ( < 0.001) than normal pH beef. There was a significant muscle type × oxygenation time × aging period interaction for L* values, deoxymyoglobin (DeoxyMb), and oxymyoglobin (OxyMb). When dark-cutting sections were aged for 62 d, both 0 and 60 min bloom development L* values were greater ( < 0.0001) than 0 min dark-cutting sections aged for 21 or 42 d. At all aging periods, normal pH beef had greater OxyMb content and lower DeoxyMb ( < 0.0001) during bloom development than dark-cutting beef. An aging period × muscle type interaction was significant for % overall reflectance ( = 0.0017) and absorbance ( = 0.0038). Dark cutting and normal pH beef loin sections aged for 62 d had greater reflectance ( < 0.0001) than 21 d. On d 0, dark-cutting beef had greater ( < 0.0001) MRA than normal pH beef. There were no significant ( = 0.14) differences in MRA between 42 and 62 d between dark-cutting and normal pH beef. Dark cutting steaks had lower thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values ( < 0.0001) than normal pH steaks. The results indicate that characterizing the myoglobin chemistry

  12. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  13. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  14. The Stroop Color-Word Test: Influence of Age, Sex, and Education; and Normative Data for a Large Sample Across the Adult Age Range

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Elst, Wim; Van Boxtel, Martin P. J.; Van Breukelen, Gerard J. P.; Jolles, Jelle

    2006-01-01

    The Stroop Color-Word Test was administered to 1,856 cognitively screened, healthy Dutch-speaking participants aged 24 to 81 years. The effects of age, gender, and education on Stroop test performance were investigated to adequately stratify the normative data. The results showed that especially the speed-dependent Stroop scores (time to complete…

  15. The effect of photobleaching on bee (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) setae color and its implications for studying aging and behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of foraging ecology and plant-pollinator interactions benefit from a number of bee (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) characteristics including morphometric measurements, natural history and age. Historically, bee age has been estimated using measurements of wing wear and integument color change. Wing w...

  16. Vitamin D Levels and Related Genetic Polymorphisms, Sun Exposure, Skin Color, and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    sun exposure, and dietary calcium and vitamin D intake are ascertained. Finally, the melanin content of the skin is measured using a skin reflectance...meter called a Dermaspectrometer, to measure baseline skin melanin content, which is known to inhibit vitamin D synthesis from sunlight. This...three hospitals in Chicago, along with demographic and medical information, BMI, and skin melanin content using a portable narrow-band reflectometer

  17. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Improves Aged and UV-Irradiated Skin by Catalase Induction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Se-Rah; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose homeostasis. Its activation stimulates antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, whose expression is decreased in aged human skin. Here we investigated the expression of PPARα in aged and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin, and whether PPARα activation can modulate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and procollagen through catalase regulation. We found that PPARα mRNA level was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged and photoaged human skin as well as in UV-irradiated skin. A PPARα activator, Wy14643, inhibited UV-induced increase of MMP-1 and decrease of procollagen expression and caused marked increase in catalase expression. Furthermore, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was suppressed by Wy14643 in UV-irradiated and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the PPARα activation-induced upregulation of catalase leads to scavenging of ROS produced due to UV irradiation or aging. PPARα knockdown decreased catalase expression and abolished the beneficial effects of Wy14643. Topical application of Wy14643 on hairless mice restored catalase activity and prevented MMP-13 and inflammatory responses in skin. Our findings indicate that PPARα activation triggers catalase expression and ROS scavenging, thereby protecting skin from UV-induced damage and intrinsic aging. PMID:27611371

  18. The Significance of Color Declines: A Re-Analysis of Skin Tone Differentials in Post-Civil Rights America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullickson, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    Skin tone variation within the United States' black population has long been associated with intraracial stratification. Skin tone differentials in socioeconomic status reflect both the inherited privileges of a mulatto elite and contemporary preferences for lighter skin. Three influential studies have claimed that such differentials in…

  19. Extraction conditions of white rose petals for the inhibition of enzymes related to skin aging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Guo, Haiyu; Choi, Jae-Kwon; Jang, Su-Kil; Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Ye-Seul; Choi, Youngjin; Seo, Da-Woom; Lee, Yoon-Bok; Joo, Seong-So; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2015-09-01

    In order to assess inhibitory potentials of white rose petal extracts (WRPE) on the activities of enzymes related to dermal aging according to the extraction conditions, three extraction methods were adopted. WRPE was prepared by extracting dried white rose (Rosa hybrida) petals with 50% ethanol (WRPE-EtOH), Pectinex® SMASH XXL enzyme (WRPE-enzyme) or high temperature-high pressure (WRPE-HTHP). In the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-1, although the enzyme activity was fully inhibited by all 3 extracts at 100 µg/mL in 60 min, partial inhibition (50-70%) was achieved only by WRPE-EtOH and WRPE-enzyme at 50 µg/mL. High concentrations (≥250 µg/mL) of all 3 extracts markedly inhibited the elastase activity. However, at low concentrations (15.6-125 µg/mL), only WRPE-EtOH inhibited the enzyme activity. Notably, WRPE-EtOH was superior to WRPE-enzyme and WRPE-HTHP in the inhibition of tyrosinase. WRPE-EtOH significantly inhibited the enzyme activity from 31.2 µM, reaching 80% inhibition at 125 µM. In addition to its strong antioxidative activity, the ethanol extract of white rose petals was confirmed to be effective in inhibiting skin aging-related enzymes. Therefore, it is suggested that WRPE-EtOH could be a good candidate for the improvement of skin aging such as wrinkle formation and pigmentation.

  20. Extraction conditions of white rose petals for the inhibition of enzymes related to skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Guo, Haiyu; Choi, Jae-Kwon; Jang, Su-Kil; Shin, Kyungha; Cha, Ye-Seul; Choi, Youngjin; Seo, Da-Woom; Lee, Yoon-Bok

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess inhibitory potentials of white rose petal extracts (WRPE) on the activities of enzymes related to dermal aging according to the extraction conditions, three extraction methods were adopted. WRPE was prepared by extracting dried white rose (Rosa hybrida) petals with 50% ethanol (WRPE-EtOH), Pectinex® SMASH XXL enzyme (WRPE-enzyme) or high temperature-high pressure (WRPE-HTHP). In the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-1, although the enzyme activity was fully inhibited by all 3 extracts at 100 µg/mL in 60 min, partial inhibition (50-70%) was achieved only by WRPE-EtOH and WRPE-enzyme at 50 µg/mL. High concentrations (≥250 µg/mL) of all 3 extracts markedly inhibited the elastase activity. However, at low concentrations (15.6-125 µg/mL), only WRPE-EtOH inhibited the enzyme activity. Notably, WRPE-EtOH was superior to WRPE-enzyme and WRPE-HTHP in the inhibition of tyrosinase. WRPE-EtOH significantly inhibited the enzyme activity from 31.2 µM, reaching 80% inhibition at 125 µM. In addition to its strong antioxidative activity, the ethanol extract of white rose petals was confirmed to be effective in inhibiting skin aging-related enzymes. Therefore, it is suggested that WRPE-EtOH could be a good candidate for the improvement of skin aging such as wrinkle formation and pigmentation. PMID:26472968

  1. Skin color - patchy

    MedlinePlus

    ... melanin production: Your genes Heat Injury Exposure to radiation (such as from the sun) Exposure to heavy metals Changes in hormone levels ... or giant nevi Mongolian blue spots Pityriasis alba Radiation therapy Rashes Sensitivity to the sun due to medicine reactions or certain drugs Sunburn ...

  2. Age-dependent variation in cytokines, chemokines, and biologic analytes rinsed from the surface of healthy human skin

    PubMed Central

    Kinn, Patrick M.; Holdren, Grant O.; Westermeyer, Brittney A.; Abuissa, Mousa; Fischer, Carol L.; Fairley, Janet A.; Brogden, Kim A.; Brogden, Nicole K.

    2015-01-01

    In the skin, aging is associated with overall epidermal thinning, decreased barrier function, and gradual deterioration of the epidermal immune response. However, the presence and role of cytokines, chemokines, and biologic analytes (CCBAs) in immunosenescence are not known. Here we identified age-related changes in skin properties and CCBAs from stratum corneum of healthy human subjects, providing a means to utilize CCBAs as benchmarks for aging skin health. Transepidermal water loss and a(*) (skin redness) decreased in an age-dependent manner, and were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in Groups 2 (56.6 ± 4.6 years) and 3 (72.9 ± 3.0 years) vs. Group 1 (24.3 ± 2.8 years). In skin wash fluid, 48 CCBAs were detected; seven were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in Groups 2 and 3: EGF, FGF-2, IFNα2, IL-1RA, HSA, keratin-6, and involucrin; cortisol was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in Groups 2 and 3. Our results correspond with the pro-inflammatory shift that occurs with immunosenescence and also provides basis for understanding the inflammatory changes in normal aging skin. PMID:26035055

  3. Expression and tissue distribution of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor (c-Met) in alpacas (Vicugna pacos) skins associated with white and brown coat colors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuju; He, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Junbing; He, Junping; Fan, Ruiwen; Wang, Haidong; Geng, Jianjun; Dong, Changsheng

    2015-09-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met signaling has been considered as a key pathway in both melanocyte development and melanogenesis. To understand better the expression patterns and tissue distribution characterization of HGF and its receptor c-Met in skin of white versus brown alpaca (Vicugna pacos), we detected the tissue distribution of HGF and c-Met using immunohistochemistry and analyzed the expression patterns by using Western blot and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that HGF staining robustly increased in the dermal papilla and mesenchymal cells of white alpaca skin compared with that of brown. However, c-Met staining showed strongly positive result, particularly inhair matrix and root sheath in brown alpaca skin. Western blot and qPCR results suggested that HGF and c-Met were expressed at significantly high levels in white and brown alpaca skins, respectively, and protein and transcripts possessed the same expression pattern in white and brown alpaca skins. The results suggested that HGF/c-Met signaling functions in alpaca coat color formation offer essential theoretical basis for further exploration of the role of HGF/c-Met signaling in pigment formation.

  4. Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants are associated with an increased risk for cutaneous melanoma which is largely independent of skin type and hair color.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, C; ter Huurne, J; Berkhout, M; Gruis, N; Bastiaens, M; Bergman, W; Willemze, R; Bavinck, J N

    2001-08-01

    Individuals carrying melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants have an increased risk for the development of cutaneous melanoma. Melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants are also associated with other risk factors for melanoma such as fair skin and red hair. We evaluated the relationship of melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants, fair skin, red hair and the development of melanoma in 123 patients with cutaneous melanoma and 385 control subjects. To analyze the association between melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants and skin type or hair color we also made use of 453 patients with nonmelanoma skin cancer. We analyzed the coding sequence of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene region by single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis, followed by DNA sequence analysis. Risk of melanoma dependent on the various melanocortin 1 receptor variant alleles was estimated by exposure odds ratios. The analyses of all different melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants combined, showed that the presence of melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants amounted to a higher melanoma risk, which, in stratified analyses, was independent of skin type and hair color. The odds ratios after adjusting for skin type were 3.6 (95% CI 1.7-7.2) for two variants and 2.7 (95% CI 1.5-5.1) for one variant, respectively. Compound heterozygotes and homozygotes for the Val60Leu, Val92Met, Arg142His, Arg151Cys, Arg160Trp, Arg163Gln, and His260Pro variants had odds ratios of about 4 to develop melanoma, whereas heterozygotes for these variants had half the risk. The presence of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene variant Asp84Glu appeared to impose the highest risk for cutaneous melanoma with odds ratios of 16.1 (95% CI 2.3-139.0) and 8.1 (95% CI 1.2-55.9) in compound heterozygotes and heterozygotes, respectively. The broad confidence intervals, when the different variants were analyzed separately, however, do not allow drawing definite conclusions about the magnitude of these risks. Of the more frequently occurring

  5. Effect of a quality-controlled fermented nutraceutical on skin aging markers: An antioxidant-control, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    BERTUCCELLI, GIUSEPPE; ZERBINATI, NICOLA; MARCELLINO, MASSIMILIANO; NANDA KUMAR, NAVALPUR SHANMUGAM; HE, FANG; TSEPAKOLENKO, VLADIMIR; CERVI, JOSEPH; LORENZETTI, ALDO; MAROTTA, FRANCESCO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether oral supplementation with a fermented papaya preparation (FPP-treated group) or an antioxidant cocktail (antioxidant-control group, composed of 10 mg trans-resveratrol, 60 µg selenium, 10 mg vitamin E and 50 mg vitamin C) was able to improve the skin antioxidant capacity and the expression of key skin genes, while promoting skin antiaging effects. The study enrolled 60 healthy non-smoker males and females aged 40–65 years, all of whom showed clinical signs of skin aging. The subjects were randomly divided into two matched groups, and were administered FPP or antioxidant treatment of a 4.5 g/day sachet sublingually twice a day for 90 days in a double-blind fashion. The parameters investigated were: Skin surface, brown spots, skin evenness, skin moisturization, elasticity (face), redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) concentration, and the expression levels of key genes (outer forearm sample). As compared with the baseline (day 0) and antioxidant-control values, FPP-treated subjects showed a significant improvement in skin evenness, moisturization and elasticity. The two treatments improved the MDA and SOD skin concentrations, but only the FPP-treated group showed a higher SOD level and a significant NO increase, along with significant upregulation of acquaporin-3 and downregulation of the potentially pro-aging/carcinogenetic cyclophilin-A and CD147 genes (P<0.05). Progerin was unaffected in both treatment groups. In conclusion, these findings suggest that orally-administered FPP showed a consistent biological and gene-regulatory improvement in the skin, as was also demonstrated in previous experimental and clinical trials testing other tissues, while common oral antioxidants had only a minor effect. PMID:26998011

  6. Effects of ageing and fitness on skin-microvessel vasodilator function in humans.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Klonizakis, Markos; Saxton, John M

    2010-05-01

    The impact of cardiopulmonary fitness (VO(2max)) on the age-related decline in skin-microvessel vasodilator function has not been fully established and the inter-relationships among different measures of microvascular vasodilator function are unknown. We used laser Doppler flowmetry to assess relative changes in forearm skin blood flow to various stimuli in three groups of adults: young (n = 15; 27 +/- 2 years), older sedentary (n = 14; 65 +/- 6 years) and older fit (n = 15; 61 +/- 5 years). Local-heating induced and post-occlusive hyperaemia responses were higher in the young and older fit groups compared to the older sedentary group (P < 0.05) and were moderately correlated with VO(2max) in the pooled cohort of older adults (r = 0.49-0.58; P < 0.05). Peak hyperaemia responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were higher in young compared to older sedentary adults (P < 0.05) and were not associated with VO(2max) in older adults (P > 0.05). Associations among different measures of microvascular vasodilator function were generally moderate at best. In summary, the local heating and reactive hyperaemia data indicate that the age-related decline in skin-microvessel vasodilator function can be ameliorated through regular aerobic exercise training. As this is not supported by the iontophoresis data, we recommend that, when assessing microvascular function, the use of a single physiological or pharmacological stimulation coupled to laser Doppler flowmetry should be avoided. Finally, the moderate correlations between outcomes probably reflect the distinct mediators that are responsible for the vasodilator response to each test.

  7. Oxidative damage, skin aging, antioxidants and a novel antioxidant rating system.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Debbie M; Kitchin, Jennifer Silverman

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen and a biological system's ability to neutralize the reactive intermediates. Oxidative damage occurs because of both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Together, intrinsic and extrinsic damage are the primary causes of skin aging. The skin uses a series of intrinsic antioxidants to protect itself from free radical damage. Naturally occurring extrinsic antioxidants have also been widely shown to offset and alleviate these changes. Unlike sunscreens, which have an SPF rating system to guide consumers in their purchases, there is no widely accepted method to choose antioxidant anti-aging products. ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity) and ABEL-RAC (Analysis By Emitted Light-Relative Antioxidant Capacity), are both accepted worldwide as a standard measure of the antioxidant capacity of foods, and are rating systems that could be applied to all antioxidant skincare products. The standardization of antioxidant creams could revolutionize the cosmeceutical market and give physicians and consumers the ability to compare and choose effectively.

  8. Clinical Evidence of Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum HY7714 on Skin Aging: A Randomized, Double Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Eun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Ra, Jehyeon; Choi, Il-Dong; Jeong, Ji-Woong; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Ryu, Ja Hyun; Seo, Young Kyoung; Koh, Jae Sook; Lee, Jung-Hee; Sim, Jae-Hun; Ahn, Young-Tae

    2015-12-28

    The beneficial effects of probiotics are now widely reported, although there are only a few studies on their anti-aging effects. We have found that Lactobacillus plantarum HY7714 (HY7714) improves skin hydration and has anti-photoaging effects, and in the present study, we have further evaluated the anti-aging effect of HY7714 via a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The trial included 110 volunteers aged 41 and 59 years who have dry skin and wrinkles. Participants took 1 × 10(10) CFU/day of HY7714 (probiotic group) or a placebo (placebo group) for 12 weeks. Skin hydration, wrinkles, skin gloss, and skin elasticity were measured every 4 weeks during the study period. There were significant increases in the skin water content in the face (p < 0.01) and hands (p < 0.05) at week 12 in the probiotic group. Transepidermal water loss decreased significantly in both groups at weeks 4, 8, and 12 (p < 0.001 compared with baseline), and was suppressed to a greater extent in the face and forearm in the probiotic group at week 12. Volunteers in the probiotic group had a significant reduction in wrinkle depth at week 12, and skin gloss was also significantly improved by week 12. Finally, skin elasticity in the probiotic group improved by 13.17% (p < 0.05 vs. controls) after 4 weeks and by 21.73% (p < 0.01 vs. controls) after 12 weeks. These findings are preliminary confirmation of the anti-aging benefit to the skin of L. plantarum HY7714 as a nutricosmetic agent.

  9. In vivo study of age-related changes in the optical properties of the skin.

    PubMed

    Calin, Mihaela Antonina; Parasca, S V

    2010-03-01

    The optical properties of the skin (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, refractive index) may serve to characterize the skin and are important for correct light dosimetry in many optical diagnostic procedures and laser treatments especially photodynamic therapy and laser therapy. We determined in vivo the optical properties of tissues near the wrist, elbow and knee in subjects of different ages using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, having in view the establishment of laser system types for the laser treatment of posttraumatic lesions in subjects of different ages. Diffuse reflection of light from biological tissue is due to the variation in refractive index of tissular and cellular components and the surrounding medium and depends on the wavelength of the incident optical radiation. The diffuse reflectance spectrum of the tissues tested showed two maxima localized at lamda(M1) is approximately 610 nm and lambda(M2) is approximately 675 nm. Laser systems which emit radiation at these wavelengths are not efficient for the treatment of joints, regardless of the subject's age. The deep tissues have a strong absorption in the range 630-700 nm, which indicates that for treating posttraumatic lesions we can use laser systems such as the He-Ne laser, the GaAlAs laser, and the InGaAlAs laser. Using Kramers-Kronig analysis of the diffuse reflectance spectra, the optical parameters n(omega) and k(omega) were determined. The age-dependent changes in these optical parameters of tissue must be taken into consideration and the use of laser treatments or optical diagnosis methods must be based on a knowledge of these properties and of the optical radiation parameters.

  10. Color change of the snapper (Pagrus auratus) and Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu) skin and eyes during storage: effect of light polarization and contact with ice.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Murat O; Stewart, Kelsie; Fletcher, Graham C; Alçiçek, Zayde

    2014-12-01

    Ten gurnard and 10 snapper were stored on ice. One side always contacted the ice; the other side was always exposed to air. At different intervals for up to 12 d, the fish were placed in a light box, and the images of both sides were taken using polarized and nonpolarized illumination. Image analysis resulted in average L*, a*, and b* values of skin, and average L* values of the eyes. The skin L* value of gurnard changed significantly over time while that of snapper was substantially constant. The a* and b* values of both fish decreased over time. The L* values of eyes were significantly lower for polarized images, and significantly lower for the side of fish exposed to air only. This may be a concern in quality evaluation methods such as QIM. The difference of colors between the polarized and nonpolarized images was calculated to quantify the reflection off the surface of fish. For accurate measurement of surface color and eye color, use of polarized light is recommended.

  11. Efficacy and Tolerability of a Skin Brightening/Anti-Aging Cosmeceutical Containing Retinol 0.5%, Niacinamide, Hexylresorcinol, and Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Farris, Patricia; Zeichner, Joshua; Berson, Diane

    2016-07-01

    Consumers are increasingly interested in over-the-counter skin care products that can improve the appearance of photodamaged and aging skin. This 10-week, open-label, single- center study enrolled 25 subjects with mild to moderate hyperpigmentation and other clinical stigmata of cutaneous aging including fine lines, sallowness, lack of clarity, and wrinkling. Their mean age was 53.4±7.7 years. The test product contained retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide 4.4%, resveratrol 1%, and hexylresorcinol 1.1% in a moisturizing base. Subjects were provided a skin care regimen including a cleanser, hydrating serum, moisturizer, and an SPF 30 sunscreen for daily use. The test product was applied only at night.

    The use of this skin brightening/anti-aging cosmeceutical was found to provide statistically significant improvements in all efficacy endpoints by study end. Fine lines, radiance, and smoothness were significantly improved as early as week 2 (P<.001). By week 4, hyperpigmentation, overall skin clarity, evenness of skin tone, and wrinkles showed statistically significant improvement compared to baseline. Mild retinoid dermatitis including flaking and redness occurred early in the study as reflected by tolerability scores. By week 10, subjects reported no stinging, itching, dryness, or tingling.

    The results of this open-label clinical study suggest that a topical cream containing retinol 0.5% in combination with niacinamide, resveratrol, and hexylresorcinol is efficacious and tolerable for skin brightening/anti-aging when used with a complementary skin care regimen including SPF 30 sun protection.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(7):863-868.

  12. Collagen peptide and vitamin C additively attenuate age-related skin atrophy in Sod1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Shuichi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Toda, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Kenji; Tometsuka, Chisa; Ogura, Takayuki; Koyama, Yoh-ichi; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Age-related skin thinning is correlated with a decrease in the content of collagen in the skin. Accumulating evidence suggests that collagen peptide (CP) and vitamin C (VC) transcriptionally upregulate type I collagen in vivo. However, the additive effects of CP and VC on age-related skin changes remain unclear. We herein demonstrate that CP and a VC derivative additively corrected age-related skin thinning via reduced oxidative damage in superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1)-deficient mice. Co-treatment with these compounds significantly normalized the altered gene expression of Col1a1, Has2, and Ci1, a proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter, in Sod1(-/-) skin. The in vitro analyses further revealed that collagen oligopeptide, a digestive product of ingested CP, significantly promoted the bioactivity of the VC derivative with respect to the migration and proliferation of Sod1(-/-) fibroblasts. These findings suggest that combined treatment with CP and VC is effective in cases of age-related skin pathology.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation exposure accelerates the accumulation of the aging-dependent T414G mitochondrial DNA mutation in human skin.

    PubMed

    Birket, Matthew J; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2007-08-01

    The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations has been proposed as an underlying cause of the aging process. Such mutations are thought to be generated principally through mechanisms involving oxidative stress. Skin is frequently exposed to a potent mutagen in the form of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and mtDNA deletion mutations have previously been shown to accumulate with photoaging. Here we report that the age-related T414G point mutation originally identified in skin fibroblasts from donors over 65 years also accumulates with age in skin tissue. Moreover, there is a significantly greater incidence of this mutation in skin from sun-exposed sites (chi(2)= 6.8, P < 0.01). Identification and quantification of the T414G mutation in dermal skin tissue from 108 donors ranging from 8 to 97 years demonstrated both increased occurrence with photoaging as well as an increase in the proportion of molecules affected. In addition, we have discovered frequent genetic linkage between a common photoaging-associated mtDNA deletion and the T414G mutation. This linkage indicates that mtDNA mutations such as these are unlikely to be distributed equally across the mtDNA population within the skin tissue, increasing their likelihood of exerting focal effects at the cellular level. Taken together, these data significantly contribute to our understanding of the DNA damaging effects of UV exposure and how resultant mutations may ultimately contribute towards premature aging.

  14. Nurses' uniform color and feelings/emotions in school-aged children receiving health care.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M; Burke, Jane; Bena, James F; Morrison, Shannon M; Forney, Jennifer; Krajewski, Susan

    2013-04-01

    Children may fear nurses wearing white uniforms. When emotions and uniform color were studied in 233 children, many positive emotions were most often associated with blue, bold pink-patterned, or yellow-patterned tops (all p ≤ .002). Negative emotions were not associated with uniform top colors (all p < .001). However, after excluding "uniform color does not matter," 8 negative emotions were most often associated with white uniform color (p < .001-.04), and 2 others were most often associated with the yellow-patterned top. Bold pink-patterned and solid blue uniform tops were preferred. In conclusion, children's emotions were associated with nurse uniform color.

  15. Skin-Color Prejudice and Within-Group Racial Discrimination: Historical and Current Impact on Latino/a Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez-Dueñas, Nayeli Y.; Adames, Hector Y.; Organista, Kurt C.

    2014-01-01

    The psychological literature on colorism, a form of within-group racial discrimination, is sparse. In an effort to contribute to this understudied area and highlight its significance, a concise and selective review of the history of colorism in Latin America is provided. Specifically, three historical eras (i.e., conquest, colonization, and…

  16. Cytokinetic Failure-induced Tetraploidy Develops into Aneuploidy, Triggering Skin Aging in Phosphovimentin-deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Goto, Hidemasa; Inoko, Akihito; Makihara, Hiroyuki; Enomoto, Atsushi; Horimoto, Katsuhisa; Matsuyama, Makoto; Kurita, Kenichi; Izawa, Ichiro; Inagaki, Masaki

    2015-05-22

    Tetraploidy, a state in which cells have doubled chromosomal sets, is observed in ∼20% of solid tumors and is considered to frequently precede aneuploidy in carcinogenesis. Tetraploidy is also detected during terminal differentiation and represents a hallmark of aging. Most tetraploid cultured cells are arrested by p53 stabilization. However, the fate of tetraploid cells in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, we analyze the ability to repair wounds in the skin of phosphovimentin-deficient (VIM(SA/SA)) mice. Early into wound healing, subcutaneous fibroblasts failed to undergo cytokinesis, resulting in binucleate tetraploidy. Accordingly, the mRNA level of p21 (a p53-responsive gene) was elevated in a VIM(SA/SA)-specific manner. Disappearance of tetraploidy coincided with an increase in aneuploidy. Thereafter, senescence-related markers were significantly elevated in VIM(SA/SA) mice. Because our tetraploidy-prone mouse model also exhibited subcutaneous fat loss at the age of 14 months, another premature aging phenotype, our data suggest that following cytokinetic failure, a subset of tetraploid cells enters a new cell cycle and develops into aneuploid cells in vivo, which promote premature aging.

  17. Low-temperature atmospheric plasma increases the expression of anti-aging genes of skin cells without causing cellular damages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Hae; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Jae-Koo; Hong, Jin-woo; Kim, Gyoo-cheon

    2013-03-01

    Efforts to employ various types of plasma in the field of skin care have increased consistently because it can regulate many biochemical reactions that are normally unaffected by light-based therapy. One method for skin rejuvenation adopted a high-temperature plasma generator to remove skin epithelial cells. In this case, the catalyzing effects of the plasma were rarely used due to the high temperature. Hence, the benefits of the plasma were not magnified. Recently, many types of low-temperature plasma devices have been developed for medical applications but their detailed functions and working mechanisms are unclear. The present study examined the effect of low-temperature microwave plasma on skin cells. Treatment with low-temperature plasma increased the expression of anti-aging genes in skin cells, including collagen, fibronectin and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, the plasma treatment did not cause cell death, but only induced slight cell growth arrest at the G2 phase. Although the cells treated with low-temperature plasma showed moderate growth arrest, there were no signs of thermal or genetic damage of skin cells. Overall, this low-temperature microwave plasma device induces the expressions of some anti-aging-related genes in skin cells without causing damage.

  18. Recovery of Aging-Related Size Increase of Skin Epithelial Cells: In vivo Mouse and In vitro Human Study

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Igor; Guz, Natali V.; Iyer, Swaminathan; Hewitt, Amy; Sokolov, Nina A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Woodworth, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The size increase of skin epithelial cells during aging is well-known. Here we demonstrate that treatment of aging cells with cytochalasin B substantially decreases cell size. This decrease was demonstrated on a mouse model and on human skin cells in vitro. Six nude mice were treated by topical application of cytochalasin B on skin of the dorsal left midsection for 140 days (the right side served as control for placebo treatment). An average decrease in cell size of 56±16% resulted. A reduction of cell size was also observed on primary human skin epithelial cells of different in vitro age (passages from 1 to 8). A cell strain obtained from a pool of 6 human subjects was treated with cytochalasin B in vitro for 12 hours. We observed a decrease in cell size that became statistically significant and reached 20–40% for cells of older passage (6–8 passages) whereas no substantial change was observed for younger cells. These results may be important for understanding the aging processes, and for cosmetic treatment of aging skin. PMID:25807526

  19. ‘…Re-written in the skin’ – Clues to skin biology and aging from inherited disease

    PubMed Central

    Monnat, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    The growing diversity of heritable skin diseases, a practical challenge to clinicians and dermatonosologists alike, has nonetheless served as a rich source of insight into skin biology and disease mechanisms. I summarize below some key insights from the recent gene-driven phase of research on Werner syndrome, a heritable adult progeroid syndrome with prominent dermatologic features, constitutional genomic instability and an elevated risk of cancer. I also indicate how new insights into skin biology, disease and aging may come from unexpected sources. PMID:25810110

  20. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatments and Side Effects Managing Cancer-related Side Effects Skin Problems Pressure Sores A skin or pressure sore ... Content Usage Policy . Skin Problems Dry Skin Itching Skin Color Changes Pressure Sores Scars ... and Paying for Treatment Treatments and Side Effects Survivorship: During and After Treatment Caregivers and Family ...

  1. The clinical experience and efficacy of bipolar radiofrequency with fractional photothermolysis for aged Asian skin.

    PubMed

    Akita, Hirotaka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Negishi, Kei; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2014-10-01

    Bipolar radiofrequency (RF) technology is developed based on fractional thermolysis, and the literature concerning the efficacy of the rejuvenation and treatment of acne scars has been reported in Europe and the United States of America. Therefore, we examined bipolar RF treatment using fractional thermolysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the treatment of Asian photo-aging skin, particularly 'wrinkles' and 'sagging.' Ten Japanese women (mean age: 58.6, skin type III-IV) received three fractional bipolar RF treatments every 4-6 weeks. For the objective evaluation, we evaluated the improvement of the wrinkles on the forehead, lateral canthus (crow's feet) and lower eyelid, and the sagging of the nasolabial fold using digital photographs captured using Visia(™) . For the subjective evaluation, the participants were asked to describe the improvements observed in the wrinkles on the forehead, lateral canthus (crow's feet) and lower eyelid, and sagging nasolabial fold and to evaluate the level pain experienced using a 10-point VAS score. The objective evaluation in each category showed significant improvements in the wrinkles on the lateral canthus (crow's feet) and lower eyelid. As for the nasolabial fold, 60% of the subjects showed improvements, scoring from good to excellent (51-100% improvement), although there was a little improvement of the wrinkle on the forehead. Similar improvements were observed in the subjective evaluation. During each treatment, oedema and erythema were observed in all participants, but the oedema disappeared the following day in all cases. However, mild erythema persisted for an average of 3.1 days. Micro debris disappeared after an average of 5.2 days. The participants were satisfied, as we allowed them to apply make-up the next day. There were no other severe adverse reactions observed during the treatment. The 10-point VAS score was 3.8, and no participants dropped out due to discomfort. Little improvement was observed in

  2. Anti-Aging Effects of the Hanwoo Leg Bone, Foot and Tail Infusions (HLI, HFI and HTI) on Skin Fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ja Young; Yoon, Ji Young; Jeong, Hee Sun; Joo, Nami; Choi, Soon Young

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers revealed that collagen contribute to maintaining the skin's elasticity and inhibit wrinkling of skin. Korean native cattle (Hanwoo) bone (leg bone, foot and tail) infusion contains the various inorganic materials, collagen and chondroitin sulfate. All of this, a large quantity of collagen is included in Hanwoo infusion. Therefore, this study emphasized on the effects of collagen in the Hanwoo bone infusion. For the first time, Hanwoo bone infusions were directly added to the media of Human Dermal Fibroblast (NHDF-c) to test anti-aging effects. First, it was identified that growth rate of skin fibroblast was increased. Furthermore, the Hanwoo bone infusion increased a 50% of fibroblast collagen synthesis. Also, suppression of skin fibroblast aging was confirmed by treatment Hanwoo bone infusion. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effects of infusion made from Hanwoo leg bone, foot and tail on anti-aging, wrinkle inhibiting and skin fibroblast elasticity maintaining. Therefore, this study identified that traditional infusion has effects that are good for skin elasticity.

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis of psoriasis skin images with HOS, texture and color features: A first comparative study of its kind.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Vimal K; Londhe, Narendra D; Sonawane, Rajendra S; Suri, Jasjit S

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease with red and scaly plaques on skin and affecting about 125 million people worldwide. Currently, dermatologist use visual and haptic methods for diagnosis the disease severity. This does not help them in stratification and risk assessment of the lesion stage and grade. Further, current methods add complexity during monitoring and follow-up phase. The current diagnostic tools lead to subjectivity in decision making and are unreliable and laborious. This paper presents a first comparative performance study of its kind using principal component analysis (PCA) based CADx system for psoriasis risk stratification and image classification utilizing: (i) 11 higher order spectra (HOS) features, (ii) 60 texture features, and (iii) 86 color feature sets and their seven combinations. Aggregate 540 image samples (270 healthy and 270 diseased) from 30 psoriasis patients of Indian ethnic origin are used in our database. Machine learning using PCA is used for dominant feature selection which is then fed to support vector machine classifier (SVM) to obtain optimized performance. Three different protocols are implemented using three kinds of feature sets. Reliability index of the CADx is computed. Among all feature combinations, the CADx system shows optimal performance of 100% accuracy, 100% sensitivity and specificity, when all three sets of feature are combined. Further, our experimental result with increasing data size shows that all feature combinations yield high reliability index throughout the PCA-cutoffs except color feature set and combination of color and texture feature sets. HOS features are powerful in psoriasis disease classification and stratification. Even though, independently, all three set of features HOS, texture, and color perform competitively, but when combined, the machine learning system performs the best. The system is fully automated, reliable and accurate.

  4. Molecular cloning, mRNA expression and tissue distribution analysis of Slc7a11 gene in alpaca (Lama paco) skins associated with different coat colors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Liangyan; Song, Yunfei; Zhang, Danli; Ji, Yuankai; Li, Xuejun; Dong, Changsheng

    2015-01-25

    Slc7a11 encoding solute carrier family 7 member 11 (amionic amino acid transporter light chain, xCT), has been identified to be a critical genetic regulator of pheomelanin synthesis in hair and melanocytes. To better understand the molecular characterization of Slc7a11 and the expression patterns in skin of white versus brown alpaca (lama paco), we cloned the full length coding sequence (CDS) of alpaca Slc7a11 gene and analyzed the expression patterns using Real Time PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The full length CDS of 1512bp encodes a 503 amino acid polypeptide. Sequence analysis showed that alpaca xCT contains 12 transmembrane regions consistent with the highly conserved amino acid permease (AA_permease_2) domain similar to other vertebrates. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that alpaca xCT had the highest identity and shared the same branch with Camelus ferus. Real Time PCR and Western blotting suggested that xCT was expressed at significantly high levels in brown alpaca skin, and transcripts and protein possessed the same expression pattern in white and brown alpaca skins. Additionally, immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated that xCT staining was robustly increased in the matrix and root sheath of brown alpaca skin compared with that of white. These results suggest that Slc7a11 functions in alpaca coat color regulation and offer essential information for further exploration on the role of Slc7a11 in melanogenesis.

  5. When green is positive and red is negative: Aging and the influence of color on emotional memories.

    PubMed

    Mammarella, Nicola; Di Domenico, Alberto; Palumbo, Rocco; Fairfield, Beth

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported age-related differences in memory for emotional information. One explanation places emphasis on an emotion processing preference in older adults that reflects their socioemotional self-relevant goals. Here, we evaluate the degree to which this preference in memory may be modulated by color. In 2 experiments, younger and older adults were asked to study a series of affective words (Experiment 1) or affective pictures (Experiment 2) and then presented with an immediate yes/no memory recognition task. In particular, words and pictures were colored according to the following valence-color associations: positive-green, negative-red, and neutral-blue. Each study condition included both congruent (e.g., positive-green) and incongruent associations (e.g., positive-red). For both experiments, participants showed an advantage for congruent associations compared with other types of valence-color pairings that emphasized a robust joint effect of color and affective valence in memory. More specifically, older adults' memory was sensitive to positive-green stimuli only. We discussed results in line with mechanisms underlying positivity effects in memory and the effect of color on emotional memory encoding. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Influence of Different Types of Resin Luting Agents on Color Stability of Ceramic Laminate Veneers Subjected to Accelerated Artificial Aging.

    PubMed

    Silami, Francisca Daniele Jardilino; Tonani, Rafaella; Alandia-Román, Carla Cecilia; Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated aging (AAA) on the color stability of resin cements for bonding ceramic laminate veneers of different thicknesses. The occlusal surfaces of 80 healthy human molars were flattened. Ceramic laminate veneers (IPS e-max Ceram) of two thicknesses (0.5 and 1.0 mm) were bonded with three types of luting agents: light-cured, conventional dual and self-adhesive dual cement. Teeth without restorations and cement samples (0.5 mm) were used as control. After initial color evaluations, the samples were subjected to AAA for 580 h. After this, new color readouts were made, and the color stability (ΔE) and luminosity (ΔL) data were analyzed. The greatest color changes (p<0.05) occurred when 0.5 mm veneers were fixed with light-cured cement and the lowest when 1.0 mm veneers were fixed with conventional dual cement. There was no influence of the restoration thickness when the self-adhesive dual cement was used. When veneers were compared with the control groups, it was verified that the cement samples presented the greatest alterations (p<0.05) in comparison with both substrates and restored teeth. Therefore, it was concluded that the thickness of the restoration influences color and luminosity changes for conventional dual and light-cured cements. The changes in self-adhesive cement do not depend on restoration thickness.

  7. Analysis of gene expression dynamics revealed delayed and abnormal epidermal repair process in aged compared to young skin.

    PubMed

    Sextius, Peggy; Marionnet, Claire; Tacheau, Charlotte; Bon, François-Xavier; Bastien, Philippe; Mauviel, Alain; Bernard, Bruno A; Bernerd, Françoise; Dubertret, Louis

    2015-05-01

    With aging, epidermal homeostasis and barrier function are disrupted. In a previous study, we analyzed the transcriptomic response of young skin epidermis after stratum corneum removal, and obtained a global kinetic view of the molecular processes involved in barrier function recovery. In the present study, the same analysis was performed in aged skin in order to better understand the defects which occur with aging. Thirty healthy male volunteers (67 ± 4 years old) were involved. Tape-strippings were carried out on the inner face of one forearm, the other unstripped forearm serving as control. At 2, 6, 18, 30 and 72 h after stripping, TEWL measurements were taken, and epidermis samples were collected. Total RNA was extracted and analyzed using DermArray(®) cDNA microarrays. The results highlighted that barrier function recovery and overall kinetics of gene expression were delayed following stripping in aged skin. Indeed, the TEWL measurements showed that barrier recovery in the young group appeared to be dramatically significant during the overall kinetics, while there were no significant evolution in the aged group until 30 h. Moreover, gene expression analysis revealed that the number of modulated genes following tape stripping increased as a function of time and reached a peak at 6 h after tape stripping in young skin, while it was at 30 h in aged skin, showing that cellular activity linked to the repair process may be engaged earlier in young epidermis than in aged epidermis. A total of 370 genes were modulated in the young group. In the aged group, 382 genes were modulated, whose 184 were also modulated in the young group. Only eight genes that were modulated in both groups were significantly differently modulated. The characterization of these genes into 15 functional families helped to draw a scenario for the aging process affecting epidermal repair capacity.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Clindamycin Phosphate 1.2% and Tretinoin 0.025% Gel for the Treatment of Acne and Acne-induced Post-inflammatory Hyperpigmentation in Patients with Skin of Color

    PubMed Central

    Young, Cherie M.; Kindred, Chesahna; Taylor, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of a topical gel containing clindamycin 1.2% and tretinoin 0.025% for the treatment of acne and acne-induced postinflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) in darker skinned patients. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Setting: Two United States clinical sites. Participants: Thirty-three patients 12 years of age or older with skin types IV to VI, mild-to-moderate facial acne, and PIH were enrolled. Measurements: Patients applied clindamycin phosphate/tretinoin gel or a nonmedicated vehicle each evening and a sun protection factor 30 sunscreen daily. Changes in skin erythema and hyperpigmentation were measured using a chromameter and photographic images. Efficacy was assessed using the Evaluators Global Acne Severity Scale, lesion counts, Post-inflammatory Hyperpigmentation Severity Scales and Patient’s Global Assessment Scale. Safety and tolerability were assessed by adverse event reports and a Safety Assessment Scale. Results: The mean (SD) baseline inflammatory lesion count was 11.9 (11.1) in clindamycin/tretinoin-treated patients, decreasing by 5.5 (6.56) after 12 weeks while the mean baseline inflammatory lesion count was 13.6 (11.15) in placebo-treated patients, decreasing by 4.1 (11.36) (p=0.05 for change from baseline, clindamycin/tretinoin vs. placebo). Clindamycin/tretinoin-treated patients generally demonstrated superior efficacy versus placebo treatment. The clindamycin/tretinoin topical gel was well tolerated, causing little or no irritation, although one patient withdrew due to periorbital edema of moderate severity possibly related to clindamycin/tretinoin gel. Conclusion: Although limited by small sample size, the results of this pilot study suggest clindamycin phosphate 1.2% and tretinoin 0.025% topical gel is a safe and effective option for treating mild-to-moderate acne in patients with skin of color. PMID:22798973

  9. Skin mechanics measured in vivo using torsion: a new and accurate model more sensitive to age, sex and moisturizing treatment.

    PubMed

    Salter, D C; McArthur, H C; Crosse, J E; Dickens, A D

    1993-10-01

    Summary Measurements of skin mechanics are required to understand better cracking and flaking of the epidermis and loss of 'elasticity'with age in the dermis. Improvements in torsional testing are described here. The resulting data was fitted to algebraic models, the parameters of which can serve both as a concise description of the responses and as a means of relating them to skin structure and physiology. This investigation looks into the suitability of seven such algebraic models. Five of the models examined here appear to be new. Using the commercially available Dia-Stron DTM Torque Meter with our own software, model parameters were studied as indicators of the effects of age and sex in 41 people, and of skin moisturizing treatments in a further 10 people. The two models in the literature were both found to be substantially less accurate and sensitive representations of experimental data than one of the new models proposed here based on the Weibull distribution. This 'WB model'was consistently the one best able to distinguish differences and detect changes which were statistically significant. The WB model appears to be the most powerful and efficient available. Use of this model makes it possible to demonstrate in vivo a statistically significant mechanical difference between male and pre-menopausal female skin using only one parameter (p= 0.0163, with 18 males and 19 females) and to demonstrate a statistically significant mechanical difference between successive decades of age in female skin using only one parameter (p= 0.0124, n= 24). The two parameters of the model most sensitive to skin structure, function and treatment have been combined to form the axes of a 'Skin condition chart'. Any person can be located on this chart at a point indicating their overall skin condition in mechanical terms and any changes in that condition can be clearly demonstrated by movement across the plot.

  10. Phototherapy in anti-aging and its photobiologic basics: a new approach to skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A

    2006-03-01

    Intrinsic aging and photoaging of the face are constantly ongoing, and eventually result in the typical "aged" face, with visible lines and wrinkles at rest, a variety of dyschromia and a tired, dull and lax epidermis over poorly organized elastotic dermal architecture characterized by many interfibrillary spaces. Both ablative and nonablative resurfacing have been reported as solutions, the former providing excellent results, but a long patient downtime, and the latter giving little or no downtime, but less-than-ideal results. In ablative resurfacing, the epidermis is removed and replaced with a "new" epidermis, whereas in the nonablative approach the epidermis is spared through some form of cooling. In both approaches, however, the goal is to create controlled amounts of thermal damage in the dermis to stimulate the wound healing process, thus generating a tighter, better organized, "younger" dermal matrix. A better approach might be to apply prevention, rather than the cure, and to treat subjects in their very early 20s, before even fine lines have begun to appear. This "photoanti-aging" approach could be achieved with the use of very low incident levels of photon energy to stimulate the skin cells, both epidermal and dermal, at cell-specific wavelengths based on the photobiological findings of the literature over the past two decades or so, in order to increase their resistance to the effects of chronological and photoaging. Lasers and IPL systems could be used, but are extremely expensive and therapist-intensive. A new generation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has appeared as the result of a spin-off from the US NASA Space Medicine Program, which are much more powerful than the previous generation with quasimonochromatic outputs. These LEDs can offer target specificity to achieve photobiomodulated enhanced action potentials of the skin cells, in particular mast cells, macrophages, endotheliocytes, and fibroblasts, plus increases in local blood and lymphatic

  11. Combined effects of prefermentative skin maceration and oxygen addition of must on color-related phenolics, volatile composition, and sensory characteristics of Airén white wine.

    PubMed

    Cejudo-Bastante, María Jesús; Castro-Vázquez, Lucía; Hermosín-Gutiérrez, Isidro; Pérez-Coello, María Soledad

    2011-11-23

    The effects of the joint prefermentative maceration and hyperoxygenation of Airén white must and wine on the phenolic content, chromatic characteristics, volatile composition, and sensory characteristics, not previously described in combination, have been evaluated. A total of 20 phenolic and 149 volatile compounds have been identified and quantified for that purpose. As a consequence of the oxygen addition, the concentrations of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavan-3-ols decreased (above all t-GRP and (+)-catechin), leading to color stabilization, but also the concentrations of several volatile compounds with a great importance for quality aroma decreased. Prefermentative skin maceration, previously applied to the hyperoxygenation of Airén musts, provided the aforementioned color stabilization in the respective wine but also increased the content of short-chain fatty acid esters and terpenes and decreased the concentration of C(6) alcohols. That combination of prefermentative treatments (skin maceration followed by must hyperoxygenation) produced an improvement of the global impression of the final wine based on significantly better scores of tropical fruit, body, and herbaceous notes.

  12. The Influence of Age and Gender on Skin-Associated Microbial Communities in Urban and Rural Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Shi; Zeng, Dan-Ning; Chi, Liang; Tan, Yuan; Galzote, Carlos; Cardona, Cesar; Lax, Simon; Gilbert, Jack; Quan, Zhe-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Differences in the bacterial community structure associated with 7 skin sites in 71 healthy people over five days showed significant correlations with age, gender, physical skin parameters, and whether participants lived in urban or rural locations in the same city. While body site explained the majority of the variance in bacterial community structure, the composition of the skin-associated bacterial communities were predominantly influenced by whether the participants were living in an urban or rural environment, with a significantly greater relative abundance of Trabulsiella in urban populations. Adults maintained greater overall microbial diversity than adolescents or the elderly, while the intragroup variation among the elderly and rural populations was significantly greater. Skin-associated bacterial community structure and composition could predict whether a sample came from an urban or a rural resident ~5x greater than random. PMID:26510185

  13. The Influence of Age and Gender on Skin-Associated Microbial Communities in Urban and Rural Human Populations.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shi; Zeng, Dan-Ning; Chi, Liang; Tan, Yuan; Galzote, Carlos; Cardona, Cesar; Lax, Simon; Gilbert, Jack; Quan, Zhe-Xue

    2015-01-01

    Differences in the bacterial community structure associated with 7 skin sites in 71 healthy people over five days showed significant correlations with age, gender, physical skin parameters, and whether participants lived in urban or rural locations in the same city. While body site explained the majority of the variance in bacterial community structure, the composition of the skin-associated bacterial communities were predominantly influenced by whether the participants were living in an urban or rural environment, with a significantly greater relative abundance of Trabulsiella in urban populations. Adults maintained greater overall microbial diversity than adolescents or the elderly, while the intragroup variation among the elderly and rural populations was significantly greater. Skin-associated bacterial community structure and composition could predict whether a sample came from an urban or a rural resident ~5x greater than random.

  14. The influence of age and gender on skin-associated microbial communities in urban and rural human populations

    DOE PAGES

    Ying, Shi; Zeng, Dan -Ning; Chi, Liang; ...

    2015-10-28

    Differences in the bacterial community structure associated with 7 skin sites in 71 healthy people over five days showed significant correlations with age, gender, physical skin parameters, and whether participants lived in urban or rural locations in the same city. While body site explained the majority of the variance in bacterial community structure, the composition of the skin-associated bacterial communities were predominantly influenced by whether the participants were living in an urban or rural environment, with a significantly greater relative abundance of Trabulsiella in urban populations. Adults maintained greater overall microbial diversity than adolescents or the elderly, while the intragroupmore » variation among the elderly and rural populations was significantly greater. Lastly, skin-associated bacterial community structure and composition could predict whether a sample came from an urban or a rural resident ~ 5x greater than random.« less

  15. The influence of age and gender on skin-associated microbial communities in urban and rural human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Shi; Zeng, Dan -Ning; Chi, Liang; Tan, Yuan; Galzote, Carlos; Cardona, Cesar; Lax, Simon; Gilbert, Jack; Quan, Zhe -Xue; Badger, Jonathan H.

    2015-10-28

    Differences in the bacterial community structure associated with 7 skin sites in 71 healthy people over five days showed significant correlations with age, gender, physical skin parameters, and whether participants lived in urban or rural locations in the same city. While body site explained the majority of the variance in bacterial community structure, the composition of the skin-associated bacterial communities were predominantly influenced by whether the participants were living in an urban or rural environment, with a significantly greater relative abundance of Trabulsiella in urban populations. Adults maintained greater overall microbial diversity than adolescents or the elderly, while the intragroup variation among the elderly and rural populations was significantly greater. Lastly, skin-associated bacterial community structure and composition could predict whether a sample came from an urban or a rural resident ~ 5x greater than random.

  16. Carcinogenically relevant split dose repair increased with age in rat skin model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Fredric; Tang, Moon-Shong Eric; Wu, Feng; Uddin, Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    These experiments utilize cancer induction to evaluate cancer-relevant repair during the interval between dose fractions. Low LET electron radiation(LET ~ 0.34 keV/u) were utilized in experiments that involved exposing rat dorsal skin to 2 equal 8 Gy dose fractions separated at various intervals from 0.25 h to 24 h. Cancer onset was established for 80 weeks after the exposures and only histologically verified cancers were included in the analysis. This experiment involved a total of 540 rats and 880 induced cancers. In the youngest rats (irradiated at 28 days of age) the cancer yield declined with a halftime of approximately 3.5 hrs. In 113 day old rats the cancer yield halftime was shortened to 1.3 hrs. In the oldest rats (182 days of age), the halftime could not be established quantitatively, because it was less than the shortest interval (15 min) utilized in the protocol (best estimate ~5 min). In the oldest rats the cancer yields for all fractionated exposures dropped essentially to the expected level of 2 single fractions, below which theoretically no further reduction is possible. The follow-up times for obtaining cancer yields were the same for all exposure groups in spite of the differing ages at exposure. These results indicate that repair of carcinogenically-relevant damage accelerates with age of the rat. No information is available on the possible mechanistic basis for this finding, although the model might be useful for delineating which of the many postulated split dose repair pathways is the correct one. The finding indicates that older rats should be less susceptible to the carcinogenic action of single doses of low LET radiation in comparison to younger rats, which has been verified in separate studies.

  17. AGE-breakers cleave model compounds, but do not break Maillard crosslinks in skin and tail collagen from diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengzu; Litchfield, John E; Baynes, John W

    2003-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE), formed by nonenzymatic Maillard reactions between carbohydrate and protein, contribute to the increase in chemical modification and crosslinking of tissue proteins with age. Acceleration of AGE formation in collagen during hyperglycemia, with resultant effects on vascular elasticity and basement membrane permeability, is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. AGE-breakers, such as N-phenacylthiazolium (PTB) and N-phenacyl-4,5-dimethylthiazolium (PMT) halides, have been proposed as therapeutic agents for reversing the increase in protein crosslinking in aging and diabetes. We have confirmed that these compounds, as well as the AGE-inhibitor pyridoxamine (PM), cleave the model AGE crosslink, phenylpropanedione, and have studied the effects of these compounds in reversing the increased crosslinking of skin and tail collagen isolated from diabetic rats. Crosslinking of skin collagen, measured as the half-time for solubilization of collagen by pepsin in 0.5M acetic acid, was increased approximately 5-fold in diabetic, compared to nondiabetic rats. Crosslinking of tail tendon collagen, measured as insolubility in 0.05 N acetic acid, was increased approximately 10-fold. Collagen preparations were incubated in the presence or absence of AGE-breakers or PM in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, for 24h at 37 degrees C. These treatments did not decrease the half-time for solubilization of diabetic skin collagen by pepsin or increase the acid solubility of diabetic tail tendon collagen. We conclude that, although AGE-breakers and PM cleave model crosslinks, they do not significantly cleave AGE crosslinks formed in vivo in skin collagen of diabetic rats.

  18. Age-related changes in male forearm skin-to-fat tissue dielectric constant at 300 MHz.

    PubMed

    Mayrovitz, Harvey N; Grammenos, Alexandra; Corbitt, Kelly; Bartos, Simona

    2017-03-01

    Prior research suggests that tissue dielectric constant (TDC) values are useful to assess localized skin water in females for early diagnosing breast cancer treatment-related lymphoedema and TDC values in young adults have shown gender differences. However, no TDC data are available for older males nor have ageing effects been studied despite known shifts in water state and other skin age-related changes. Thus our goals were to (i) characterize TDC values at various skin depths in young and older males, (ii) determine the dependence of these values on body composition parameters and (iii) establish inter-arm TDC ratios for use as normal male reference values. TDC measurements were made to depths of 0·5, 1·5, 2·5 and 5·0 mm bilaterally on volar forearm skin in 60 males in three groups of 20 that had mean ages ± SD of 24·0 ± 0·9, 40·0 ± 12·9 and 71·0 ± 8·0 years. Total body fat and water percentages were determined via bioimpedance at 50 KHz. Results showed that (i) for all age groups TDC values decreased with increasing depth, (ii) TDC values were not statistically different among age groups except at a depth of 0·5 mm, (iii) TDC values were highly negatively correlated with total body fat and (iv) inter-arm ratios varied little among age groups and depths. It is concluded that (i) age-related larger TDC values at only the shallowest depth is consistent with skin water shifting state from bound to more mobile in the oldest group and (ii) inter-arm ratios at any depth provide a basis to test for unilateral oedema.

  19. Anti-Aging Effects of the Hanwoo Leg Bone, Foot and Tail Infusions (HLI, HFI and HTI) on Skin Fibroblast

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; Jeong, Hee Sun; Joo, Nami

    2016-01-01

    Many researchers revealed that collagen contribute to maintaining the skin’s elasticity and inhibit wrinkling of skin. Korean native cattle (Hanwoo) bone (leg bone, foot and tail) infusion contains the various inorganic materials, collagen and chondroitin sulfate. All of this, a large quantity of collagen is included in Hanwoo infusion. Therefore, this study emphasized on the effects of collagen in the Hanwoo bone infusion. For the first time, Hanwoo bone infusions were directly added to the media of Human Dermal Fibroblast (NHDF-c) to test anti-aging effects. First, it was identified that growth rate of skin fibroblast was increased. Furthermore, the Hanwoo bone infusion increased a 50% of fibroblast collagen synthesis. Also, suppression of skin fibroblast aging was confirmed by treatment Hanwoo bone infusion. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effects of infusion made from Hanwoo leg bone, foot and tail on anti-aging, wrinkle inhibiting and skin fibroblast elasticity maintaining. Therefore, this study identified that traditional infusion has effects that are good for skin elasticity. PMID:27194933

  20. Automated Brightness and Contrast Adjustment of Color Fundus Photographs for the Grading of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tsikata, Edem; Laíns, Inês; Gil, João; Marques, Marco; Brown, Kelsey; Mesquita, Tânia; Melo, Pedro; da Luz Cachulo, Maria; Kim, Ivana K.; Vavvas, Demetrios; Murta, Joaquim N.; Miller, John B.; Silva, Rufino; Miller, Joan W.; Chen, Teresa C.; Husain, Deeba

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm to automatically standardize the brightness, contrast, and color balance of digital color fundus photographs used to grade AMD and to validate this algorithm by determining the effects of the standardization on image quality and disease grading. Methods Seven-field color photographs of patients (>50 years) with any stage of AMD and a control group were acquired at two study sites, with either the Topcon TRC-50DX or Zeiss FF-450 Plus cameras. Field 2 photographs were analyzed. Pixel brightness values in the red, green, and blue (RGB) color channels were adjusted in custom-built software to make the mean brightness and contrast of the images equal to optimal values determined by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) 2 group. Results Color photographs of 370 eyes were analyzed. We found a wide range of brightness and contrast values in the images at baseline, even for those taken with the same camera. After processing, image brightness variability (brightest image–dimmest image in a color channel) was reduced 69-fold, 62-fold, and 96-fold for the RGB channels. Contrast variability was reduced 6-fold, 8-fold, and 13-fold, respectively, after adjustment. Of the 23% images considered nongradable before adjustment, only 5.7% remained nongradable. Conclusions This automated software enables rapid and accurate standardization of color photographs for AMD grading. Translational Relevance This work offers the potential to be the future of assessing and grading AMD from photos for clinical research and teleimaging. PMID:28316876

  1. Age-related changes in skin blood flow at four anatomic sites of the body in males studied by xenon-133

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, Y.

    1990-04-01

    The normal skin blood flow in healthy subjects consisting of 28 males whose ages ranged from 20 to 72 years was measured by the xenon-133 clearance method at four different sites of the body to determine the presence of any age-related changes. The following results were obtained: Significant age-related changes were observed in the skin blood flow of the deltoid region, anterior chest, dorsum of the hand, and dorsum of the foot. Normal skin blood flow was demonstrated to be highly dependent on age and to significantly decrease with age. Average skin blood flow at these four regions of those 70 years of age decreased by 30 to 40 percent when compared to that of those 20 years of age. The skin blood flow at the deltoid region of healthy subjects was higher by 6.3 ml/100 gm per minute than that of patients in poor condition with cancer of the head and neck.

  2. Melanin-based coloration covaries with ovary size in an age-specific manner in the barn owl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulin, Alexandre

    2009-10-01

    While the adaptive function of black eumelanin-based coloration is relatively well known, the function of reddish-brown pheomelanin-based coloration is still unclear. Only a few studies have shown or suggested that the degree of reddish-brownness is associated with predator-prey relationships, reproductive parameters, growth rate and immunity. To gain insight into the physiological correlates of melanin-based coloration, I collected barn owl ( Tyto alba) cadavers and examined the covariation between this colour trait and ovary size, an organ that increases in size before reproduction. A relationship is expected because melanin-based coloration often covaries with sexual activity. The results showed that reddish-brown juveniles had larger ovaries than whiter juveniles particularly in individuals in poor condition and outside the breeding season, while in birds older than 2 years lightly coloured females had larger ovaries than reddish-brown conspecifics. As barn owls become less reddish-brown between the first and second year of age, the present study suggests that reddish-brown pheomelanic and whitish colorations are associated with juvenile- and adult-specific adaptations, respectively.

  3. Melanin-based coloration covaries with ovary size in an age-specific manner in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Roulin, Alexandre

    2009-10-01

    While the adaptive function of black eumelanin-based coloration is relatively well known, the function of reddish-brown pheomelanin-based coloration is still unclear. Only a few studies have shown or suggested that the degree of reddish-brownness is associated with predator-prey relationships, reproductive parameters, growth rate and immunity. To gain insight into the physiological correlates of melanin-based coloration, I collected barn owl (Tyto alba) cadavers and examined the covariation between this colour trait and ovary size, an organ that increases in size before reproduction. A relationship is expected because melanin-based coloration often co-varies with sexual activity. The results showed that reddish-brown juveniles had larger ovaries than whiter juveniles particularly in individuals in poor condition and outside the breeding season, while in birds older than 2 years lightly coloured females had larger ovaries than reddish-brown conspecifics. As barn owls become less reddish-brown between the first and second year of age, the present study suggests that reddish-brown pheomelanic and whitish colorations are associated with juvenile- and adult-specific adaptations, respectively.

  4. CS 22873-139: A very metal-poor main-sequence spectroscopic binary with colors indicative of intermediate age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, George W.

    1994-12-01

    CS 22873-139, a metal-deficient ((Fe/H) = -3.1), high-velocity (Vrad = +243 km/s) star with observed UBV colors (B-V = 0.37, U-B = -0.22) that locate it near the main-sequence turnoff of an old metal-poor population (Preston et al. (1991); Beers et al. (1992)), is, in fact, a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 19.16 days, eccentricity e = 0.26, and a mass ratio of approximately 0.88. The observed colors, corrected for reddening, can be matched by those for a family of artificial binaries constructed by use of colors and luminosities taken from isochrones for ages between 3 and 13 Gy, but the strengths of metal lines in the primary and secondary spectra require that the age of the system be less than approximately 8 Gy. The inferred unreddened colors of the primary, (B-V)0,p = 0.30, (U-B)0,p = -0.19, lie blueward of any globular cluster turnoff and near the low-abundance (upper) U-B boundary of BMP stars in the UBV two-color diagram, as discussed by Preston et al. (1994). Were the primary product of binary merger in an initial triple star system, Harrington's (1977) stability criterion requires for the initial close binary a1 less than 5.2 solar radii and P less than 1.5 days. According to Vilhu (1982) such a system will merge in about 109 years, a time much shorter than the main-sequence age deduced for this system, so even if binary merger had taken place the conclusion that CS 22873-139 must be a relatively young metal-poor star is preserved.

  5. Continuous irradiation with a 633-nm light-emitting diode exerts an anti-aging effect on human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Sun; Park, Won Sang; Baek, Jong-In; Lee, Bo-Sub; Yoo, Dae Sung; Park, Si Jun

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that the light source emitted from light‑emitting diode (LED) has a potential anti-aging effect on human skin. Studies using single and interval LED irradiation have documented such effects; however, to the best of our knowledge, the anti-aging effects of continuous LED irradiation have not yet been investigated. In the present study, we demonstrated that continuous irradiation with a 633±3-nm LED exerted anti-aging effects in both in vitro and ex vivo experiments. More specifically, irradiation with a 633-nm LED for 2 days increased the synthesis of type 1 procollagen and decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)1 and MMP2 in skin fibroblasts. In addition, irradiation with a 633-nm LED decreased the expression levels of inflammatory genes, such has cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and interleukin-1-α (IL-1α) in keratinocytes. Furthermore, a 14-day LED irradiation moderately increased keratinocyte proliferation. Using human skin explants, we confirmed the safety of this 633-nm LED irradiation, which resulted in unaltered morphology and allergy-free potential in human tissue. Overall, these data provide insight into the anti-aging effects of continuous LED irradiation on human skin.

  6. Development of Decision Making in School-Aged Children and Adolescents: Evidence from Heart Rate and Skin Conductance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crone, Eveline A.; van der Molen, Maurits W.

    2007-01-01

    Age differences in decision making indicate that children fail to anticipate outcomes of their decisions. Using heart rate and skin conductance analyses, we tested whether developmental changes in decision making are associated with (a) a failure to process outcomes of decisions, or (b) a failure to anticipate future outcomes of decisions.…

  7. arNOX: generator of reactive oxygen species in the skin and sera of aging individuals subject to external modulation.

    PubMed

    Morré, Dorothy M; Meadows, Christiaan; Morré, D James

    2010-01-01

    An aging-related cell-surface oxidase (aging-related NADH oxidase, arNOX) generating superoxide and other reactive oxygen species is shed from the cell surface and is found in saliva, urine, perspiration, and interstitial fluids that surround the collagen and elastin matrix underlying dermis. arNOX activity correlates with age and reaches a maximum at about age 65 in males and 55 in females. arNOX activities are highly correlated with values of human skin where a causal relationship is indicated. Ongoing efforts focus on cloning arNOX proteins and development of antiaging formulas based on arNOX inhibition (intervention).

  8. Mechanisms of acetylcholine-mediated vasodilatation in young and aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Holowatz, Lacy A; Thompson, Caitlin S; Minson, Christopher T; Kenney, W Larry

    2005-01-01

    Thermoregulatory cutaneous vasodilatation (VD) is attenuated in aged skin. While acetylcholine (ACh) plays a role in thermally mediated VD, the precise mechanisms through which ACh-mediated VD acts and whether those downstream mechanisms change with ageing are unclear. We tested the hypotheses that both nitric oxide (NO)- and prostanoid-mediated pathways contribute to exogenous ACh-mediated VD, and that both are attenuated with advanced age. Twelve young (Y: 23 ± 1 years) and 10 older (O: 69 ± 1 years) subjects underwent infusions of 137.5 μm ACh at four intradermal microdialysis sites: control (C, Ringer solution), NO synthase inhibited (NOS-I, 10 mml-NAME), cyclooxygenase inhibited (COX-I, 10 mm ketorolac) and NOS-I + COX-I. Red blood cell flux was monitored using laser-Doppler flowmetry, and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated (laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVCmax) (28 mm sodium nitroprusside + local heating to 43°C). Baseline %CVCmax was increased in the O at COX-I sites (COX-I 16 ± 1, NOS-I + COX-I 16 ± 2 versus C 10 ± 1%CVCmax; P < 0.001) but not in the young, suggesting an age-related shift toward COX vasoconstrictors contributing to basal cutaneous vasomotor tone. There was no difference in peak %CVCmax during ACh infusion between age groups, and the response was unchanged by NOS-I (O: NOS-I 35 ± 5 versus C 38 ± 5%CVCmax; P = 0.84) (Y: NOS-I 41 ± 4 versus C 39 ± 4%CVCmax; P = 0.67). COX-I and NOS-I + COX-I attenuated the peak CVC response to ACh in both groups (COX-I O: 29 ± 3, Y: 22 ± 2%CVCmaxversus C; P < 0.001 both groups; NOS-I + COX-I O: 32 ± 3 versus Y: 29 ± 2%CVCmax; versus C; P < 0.001 both groups). ACh mediates cutaneous VD through prostanoid and non-NO-, non-prostanoid-dependent pathways. Further, older subjects have a diminished prostanoid contribution to ACh-mediated VD. PMID:15661816

  9. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates cutaneous vasodilation during local heating and is attenuated in middle-aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Bruning, Rebecca S; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Smith, Caroline J; Berkowitz, Dan E; Kenney, W Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A

    2012-06-01

    Local skin heating is used to assess microvascular function in clinical populations because NO is required for full expression of the response; however, controversy exists as to the precise NO synthase (NOS) isoform producing NO. Human aging is associated with attenuated cutaneous vasodilation but little is known about the middle aged, an age cohort used for comparison with clinical populations. We hypothesized that endothelial NOS (eNOS) is the primary isoform mediating NO production during local heating, and eNOS-dependent vasodilation would be reduced in middle-aged skin. Vasodilation was induced by local heating (42°C) and during acetylcholine dose-response (ACh-DR: 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, 100.0 mmol/l) protocols. Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the skin of 24 men and women; age cohorts were 12 middle-aged (53 ± 1 yr) and 12 young (23 ± 1 yr). Sites served as control, nonselective NOS inhibited [N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)], inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibited (1400W), and neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibited (N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine). After full expression of the local heating response, l-NAME was perfused at all sites. Cutaneous vascular conductance was measured and normalized to maximum (%CVC(max): Nitropress). l-NAME reduced %CVCmax at baseline, all phases of the local heating response, and at all ACh concentrations compared with all other sites. iNOS inhibition reduced the initial peak (53 ± 2 vs. 60 ± 2%CVC(max); P < 0.001); however, there were no other differences between control, nNOS-, and iNOS-inhibited sites during the phases of local heating or ACh-DR. When age cohorts were compared, NO-dependent vasodilation during local heating (52 ± 6 vs. 68 ± 4%CVC(max); P = 0.013) and ACh perfusion (50 mmol/l: 83 ± 3 vs. 93 ± 2%CVC(max); 100 mmol/l: 83 ± 4 vs. 92 ± 3%CVC(max); both P = 0.03) were reduced in middle-aged skin. There were no differences in NOS isoform expression obtained from skin biopsy samples between groups (all

  10. Mitochondrial oxidative stress caused by Sod2 deficiency promotes cellular senescence and aging phenotypes in the skin.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Michael C; Flynn, James M; Day, Nicholas U; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Cellular senescence arrests the proliferation of mammalian cells at risk for neoplastic transformation, and is also associated with aging. However, the factors that cause cellular senescence during aging are unclear. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to cause cellular senescence in culture, and accumulated molecular damage due to mitochondrial ROS has long been thought to drive aging phenotypesin vivo. Here, we test the hypothesis that mitochondrial oxidative stress can promote cellular senescence in vivo and contribute to aging phenotypes in vivo, specifically in the skin. We show that the number of senescent cells, as well as impaired mitochondrial (complex II) activity increase in naturally aged mouse skin. Using a mouse model of genetic Sod2 deficiency, we show that failure to express this important mitochondrial anti-oxidant enzyme also impairs mitochondrial complex II activity, causes nuclear DNA damage, and induces cellular senescence but not apoptosis in the epidermis. Sod2 deficiency also reduced the number of cells and thickness of the epidermis, while increasing terminal differentiation. Our results support the idea that mitochondrial oxidative stress and cellular senescence contribute to aging skin phenotypes in vivo.

  11. Color temperature’s impact on task performance and brainwaves of school-age children

    PubMed Central

    Park, YunHee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated color temperature’s impact on task performance. It presents a scientific analysis of brainwave and task performance time changes, and the results of a self-report type survey. [Subjects] Twenty-four elementary school fifth-grade boys and girls with no visual problems participated in the experiment. [Methods] Physiological reaction times of task performance were measured in a laboratory that could fix and maintain color temperature. Brainwave changes and the task performance times were measured, and a self-report questionnaire was conducted in order to measure of emotional reactions. [Results] Regarding the brainwave changes associated with color temperature, alpha waves were emitted in the O2 area when puzzle tasks were illuminated by orange light and low and high beta waves were emitted in the F3 area under white light. Five items (Brilliant, Soft, Lively, Relaxed, Open) were reported predominantly in responses to orange light in the self-report questionnaire. [Conclusion] The results of this study show that relaxation and stability are not assured when the color temperature is low, and that concentration and cognitive activity are not necessarily easier when the color temperature is high. The color temperature change when performing tasks promoted emotional factors more than brainwave, a biological change. PMID:26644662

  12. Reflex vasoconstriction in aged human skin increasingly relies on Rho kinase-dependent mechanisms during whole body cooling

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, John D.; Holowatz, Lacy A.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2009-01-01

    Primary human aging may be associated with augmented Rho kinase (ROCK)-mediated contraction of vascular smooth muscle and ROCK-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). We hypothesized that the contribution of ROCK to reflex vasoconstriction (VC) is greater in aged skin. Cutaneous VC was elicited by 1) whole body cooling [mean skin temperature (Tsk) = 30.5°C] and 2) local norepinephrine (NE) infusion (1 × 10−6 M). Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin of eight young (Y) and eight older (O) subjects for infusion of 1) Ringer solution (control), 2) 3 mM fasudil (ROCK inhibition), 3) 20 mM NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (NOS inhibition), and 4) both ROCK + NOS inhibitors. Red cell flux was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry over each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to baseline CVC (%ΔCVCbaseline). VC was reduced at the control site in O during cooling (Y, −34 ± 3; and O, −18 ± 3%ΔCVCbaseline; P < 0.001) and NE infusion (Y, −53 ± 4, and O, −41 ± 9%ΔCVCbaseline; P = 0.006). Fasudil attenuated VC in both age groups during mild cooling; however, this reduction remained only in O but not in Y skin during moderate cooling (Y, −30 ± 5; and O, −7 ± 1%ΔCVCbaseline; P = 0.016) and was not altered by NOS inhibition. Fasudil blunted NE-mediated VC in both age groups (Y, −23 ± 4; and O, −7 ± 3%ΔCVCbaseline; P < 0.01). Cumulatively, these data indicate that reflex VC is more reliant on ROCK in aged skin such that approximately half of the total VC response to whole body cooling is ROCK dependent. PMID:19717729

  13. Reflex vasoconstriction in aged human skin increasingly relies on Rho kinase-dependent mechanisms during whole body cooling.

    PubMed

    Lang, James A; Jennings, John D; Holowatz, Lacy A; Kenney, W Larry

    2009-11-01

    Primary human aging may be associated with augmented Rho kinase (ROCK)-mediated contraction of vascular smooth muscle and ROCK-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). We hypothesized that the contribution of ROCK to reflex vasoconstriction (VC) is greater in aged skin. Cutaneous VC was elicited by 1) whole body cooling [mean skin temperature (T(sk)) = 30.5 degrees C] and 2) local norepinephrine (NE) infusion (1 x 10(-6) M). Four microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin of eight young (Y) and eight older (O) subjects for infusion of 1) Ringer solution (control), 2) 3 mM fasudil (ROCK inhibition), 3) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (NOS inhibition), and 4) both ROCK + NOS inhibitors. Red cell flux was measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry over each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as flux/mean arterial pressure and normalized to baseline CVC (%DeltaCVC(baseline)). VC was reduced at the control site in O during cooling (Y, -34 + or - 3; and O, -18 + or - 3%DeltaCVC(baseline); P < 0.001) and NE infusion (Y, -53 + or - 4, and O, -41 + or - 9%DeltaCVC(baseline); P = 0.006). Fasudil attenuated VC in both age groups during mild cooling; however, this reduction remained only in O but not in Y skin during moderate cooling (Y, -30 + or - 5; and O, -7 + or - 1%DeltaCVC(baseline); P = 0.016) and was not altered by NOS inhibition. Fasudil blunted NE-mediated VC in both age groups (Y, -23 + or - 4; and O, -7 + or - 3%DeltaCVC(baseline); P < 0.01). Cumulatively, these data indicate that reflex VC is more reliant on ROCK in aged skin such that approximately half of the total VC response to whole body cooling is ROCK dependent.

  14. The Effects of Dietary Macronutrient Balance on Skin Structure in Aging Male and Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Aisling C.; Ruohonen, Kari; Raubenheimer, David; Ballard, J. William O.; Le Couteur, David G.; Nicholls, Caroline; Li, Zhe; Maitz, Peter K. M.; Wang, Yiwei; Simpson, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition influences skin structure; however, a systematic investigation into how energy and macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate and fat) affects the skin has yet to be conducted. We evaluated the associations between macronutrients, energy intake and skin structure in mice fed 25 experimental diets and a control diet for 15 months using the Geometric Framework, a novel method of nutritional analysis. Skin structure was associated with the ratio of dietary macronutrients eaten, not energy intake, and the nature of the effect differed between the sexes. In males, skin structure was primarily associated with protein intake, whereas in females carbohydrate intake was the primary correlate. In both sexes, the dermis and subcutaneous fat thicknesses were inversely proportional. Subcutaneous fat thickness varied positively with fat intake, due to enlarged adipocytes rather than increased adipocyte number. We therefore demonstrated clear interactions between skin structure and macronutrient intakes, with the associations being sex-specific and dependent on dietary macronutrient balance. PMID:27832138

  15. Modulating testosterone pathway: a new strategy to tackle male skin aging?

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Philippe; Scior, Thomas; Do, Quoc Tuan

    2012-01-01

    In men, the level of testosterone decreases with age. At the skin level, the result is observed as a decrease in density and in a lower elasticity. Identifying compounds that are able to increase the level of testosterone appears to be an attractive strategy to develop new antiaging bioactive ingredients for men. Reverse pharmacognosy was successfully applied to identify new natural compounds able to modulate testosterone levels. Among several in silico hits, honokiol was retained as a candidate as it has the greatest potential to become an active ingredient. This result was then validated in vitro on aromatase and 5-alpha-reductase type 1 and 2, which are two types of enzymes implicated in the degradation of free testosterone. Indeed, honokiol was identified as an inhibitor of aromatase, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of about 50 μM. In addition, honokiol was shown to be an inhibitor of 5-alpha-reductase type 1, with an IC50 of about 75 μM. Taken together, these data indicate that honokiol modulates testosterone levels, and its structure has the potential to serve as a lead for future designs of highly selective inhibitors of 5-alpha-reductase type 1. PMID:23049247

  16. Modulating testosterone pathway: a new strategy to tackle male skin aging?

    PubMed

    Bernard, Philippe; Scior, Thomas; Do, Quoc Tuan

    2012-01-01

    In men, the level of testosterone decreases with age. At the skin level, the result is observed as a decrease in density and in a lower elasticity. Identifying compounds that are able to increase the level of testosterone appears to be an attractive strategy to develop new antiaging bioactive ingredients for men. Reverse pharmacognosy was successfully applied to identify new natural compounds able to modulate testosterone levels. Among several in silico hits, honokiol was retained as a candidate as it has the greatest potential to become an active ingredient. This result was then validated in vitro on aromatase and 5-alpha-reductase type 1 and 2, which are two types of enzymes implicated in the degradation of free testosterone. Indeed, honokiol was identified as an inhibitor of aromatase, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of about 50 μM. In addition, honokiol was shown to be an inhibitor of 5-alpha-reductase type 1, with an IC(50) of about 75 μM. Taken together, these data indicate that honokiol modulates testosterone levels, and its structure has the potential to serve as a lead for future designs of highly selective inhibitors of 5-alpha-reductase type 1.

  17. Evaluation of Skin Anti-aging Potential of Citrus reticulata Blanco Peel

    PubMed Central

    Apraj, Vinita D.; Pandita, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The peel of Citrus reticulata Blanco is traditionally used as tonic, stomachic, astringent, and carminative. It is also useful in skin care. Objective: To study the anti-aging potential of alcoholic extracts of C. reticulata Blanco peel using in vitro antioxidant and anti-enzyme assays. Materials and Methods: Plant extracts were obtained by Soxhlation (CR HAE- Hot Alcoholic Extract of Citrus reticulata) and maceration method (CR CAE- Cold Alcoholic Extract of Citrus reticulata). Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis was performed. Further, in vitro antioxidant, anti-enzyme, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses were performed. Results: Total phenolic and flavonoid contents of CR HAE were found to be higher than CR CAE. EC50 value of CR HAE and CR CAE for 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, Superoxide anion, and 2, 2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) assays were 250.33 ± 40.16 μg/ml and 254.73 ± 15.78 μg/ml, 221.27 ± 11.25 μg/ml and 354.20 ± 23.79 μg/ml, and 59.16 ± 2.17 μg/ml and 59.12 ± 6.21 μg/ml, respectively. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity values for CR HAE and CR CAE were found to be 1243 and 1063 μmoles 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetra methylchromane-2-carboxylic acid equivalent/g of substance, respectively. Anti-collagenase and anti-elastase activities were evaluated for both CR HAE and CR CAE. EC50 values of CR HAE and CR CAE for anti-collagenase and anti-elastase were 329.33 ± 6.38 μg/ml, 466.93 ± 8.04 μg/ml and 3.22 ± 0.24 mg/ml, 5.09 ± 0.30 mg/ml, respectively. CR HAE exhibited stronger anti-collagenase and anti-elastase activity than CR CAE. GC-MS analysis of CR HAE was carried out because CR HAE exhibited higher antioxidant and anti-enzyme potential than CR CAE. Conclusion: C. reticulata peel can be utilized in anti-wrinkle skin care formulations. SUMMARY Skin anti-aging potential of Citrus reticulata Blanco peel was evaluated throughIn vitro antioxidant and anti-enzyme assays

  18. Perlecan expression influences the keratin 15‐positive cell population fate in the epidermis of aging skin

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Michopoulou, Anna; André‐Frei, Valérie; Boulesteix, Sophie; Guicher, Christine; Dayan, Guila; Whitelock, John; Damour, Odile; Rousselle, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The epidermis is continuously renewed by stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Basal keratinocytes append the dermal‐epidermal junction, a cell surface‐associated, extracellular matrix that provides structural support and influences their behaviour. It consists of laminins, type IV collagen, nidogens, and perlecan, which are necessary for tissue organization and structural integrity. Perlecan is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan known to be involved in keratinocyte survival and differentiation. Aging affects the dermal epidermal junction resulting in decreased contact with keratinocytes, thus impacting epidermal renewal and homeostasis. We found that perlecan expression decreased during chronological skin aging. Our in vitro studies revealed reduced perlecan transcript levels in aged keratinocytes. The production of in vitro skin models revealed that aged keratinocytes formed a thin and poorly organized epidermis. Supplementing these models with purified perlecan reversed the phenomenon allowing restoration of a well‐differentiated multi‐layered epithelium. Perlecan down‐regulation in cultured keratinocytes caused depletion of the cell population that expressed keratin 15. This phenomenon depended on the perlecan heparan sulphate moieties, which suggested the involvement of a growth factor. Finally, we found defects in keratin 15 expression in the epidermis of aging skin. This study highlighted a new role for perlecan in maintaining the self‐renewal capacity of basal keratinocytes. PMID:26996820

  19. Skin Infections in Young People (Aged 14-18 Years): An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambe, Catherine I.; Hoare, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    Skin infections are a major cause of preventable hospitalization, with young people being particularly susceptible. Community-associated methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA) infection typically presents as skin infection. CA-MRSA infection rates have increased rapidly in the past decade. Exploration of literature…

  20. [Age-dependent characteristics of the skin peripheral blood flow oscillations by nonlinear dynamics methods in humans].

    PubMed

    Tankanag, A V; Tikhonova, I V; Chemeris, N K

    2008-03-01

    Study of peripheral microhaemodynamics was carried out with laser Doppler flowmetry in healthy volunteers of different age groups. The ageing changes in the state of the skin peripheral blood flow, in the functioning of separate links and regulatory systems ofmicrovascular bed have been estimated in terms of relative entropy and fractal dimension values. The revealed significant age-dependent decrease of relative entropy values in the respiratory rhythm ranges, the neurogenic and myogenic activities yielded some evidence concerning the reduction of the microcirculation system chaotic changes within these frequency ranges during the ageing. The significant increase of fractal dimension values in the ranges of cardio-rhythm and the endothelial activity in the oldest group with the mean age of 77 years indicated that the structural complexity of the oscillations in these frequency ranges increased during ageing.

  1. Apigenin inhibits UVA-induced cytotoxicity in vitro and prevents signs of skin aging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungjin; Youn, Jeungyeun; Kim, Karam; Joo, Da Hye; Shin, Shanghun; Lee, Jeongju; Lee, Hyun Kyung; An, In-Sook; Kwon, Seungbin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, Sungkwan; Cha, Hwa Jun

    2016-08-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) is a flavone that has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic properties. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of apigenin on skin and found that, in experiments using cells, apigenin restored the viability of normal human dermal fibroblasts (nHDFs), which had been decreased by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the UVA range. Using a senescence-associated (SA)-β-gal assay, we also demonstrate that apigenin protects against the UVA-induced senescence of nHDFs. Furthermore, we found that apigenin decreased the expression of the collagenase, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, in UVA-irradiated nHDFs. UVA, which has been previously identified as a photoaging-inducing factor, has been shown to induce MMP-1 expression. The elevated expression of MMP-1 impairs the collagen matrix, leading to the loss of elasticity and skin dryness. Therefore, we examined the clinical efficacy of apigenin on aged skin, using an apigenin‑containing cream for clinical application. Specifically, we measured dermal density, skin elasticity and the length of fine wrinkles in subjects treated with apigenin cream or the control cream without apigenin. Additionally, we investigated the effects of the apigenin-containing cream on skin texture, moisture and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). From these experiments, we found that the apigenin‑containing cream increased dermal density and elasticity, and reduced fine wrinkle length. It also improved skin evenness, moisture content and TEWL. These results clearly demonstrate the biological effects of apigenin, demonstrating both its cellular and clinical efficacy, and suggest that this compound holds promise as an anti-aging cosmetic ingredient.

  2. The effect of thermal aging and color pigments on the Egyptian linen properties evaluated by physicochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gaoudy, H.; Kourkoumelis, N.; Varella, E.; Kovala-Demertzi, D.

    2011-11-01

    Archaeologists in Egypt discovered ancient colored textiles in great quantities in comparison with the analogous uncolored ones. Furthermore, the latter are far more deteriorated. Most research investigations into archaeological linen have been concerned with manufacture, restoration, and conservation but little information is available about the properties of the fibers, and particularly their chemical and physical properties after dyeing with natural dyes or painted with pigments. The aim of this study is to evaluate the physicochemical properties of Egyptian linen textiles coloring with a variety of pigments used in painting in ancient times after thermally aged to get linen samples which are similar as possible to the ancient linen textiles. The evaluations were based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and tensile strength, and elongation measurements. Results showed that beyond cosmetic reasons, colored textiles did indeed play a role as protecting agents affecting strength and reducing thermal deterioration. Specifically, in the molecular level, pigments under study seem to interact to cellulose and lignin compounds of the aged linen while in the macroscopic level tensile and elongation parameters are altered. Electron microscopy confirms that pigment particles are deposited on and between the fibers' surfaces.

  3. Conception rates in farm mink (Neovison vison) in relation to first mating date, age and color variety.

    PubMed

    Felska-Błaszczyk, Lidia; Lasota, Bogdan; Seremak, Beata

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effects of the first mating date, age and color variety on the conception rates in farm mink. We analyzed female mink reproductive performance in 492 Sapphire and 463 Standard Black females over 3 or 4 years. The analysis included the number of inefficient matings, the interval between the first inefficient mating and the efficient mating (copulation) and the conception rates. The results show a significant effect of female's age and color variety on the conception rates. The youngest, yearling females of either color needed a higher number of matings per conception, as compared to older, 2- and 3-year-old females. Black females demonstrated a higher number of inefficient matings (1.066), as compared with Sapphires (0.730). Yearling females were most often mated from 1 to 10 March, and older females from 11 to 20 March. Older females achieved better conception rates than the yearlings. Dates between 11 and 25 March proved to be the optimum for the first mating, since the highest conception rates were observed if the females had mated during this period.

  4. Latent Fingermark Aging Patterns (Part II): Color Contrast Between Ridges and Furrows as One Indicator of Degradation.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Barrot Feixat, Carme; Tasker, Jack; McGarr, Luke; Stow, Karen; Carreras-Marin, Clara; Turbany Oset, Jaume; Gené Badia, Manel

    2016-07-01

    Currently, no established methodology exists to determine degradation patterns of latent fingermarks by visual means. This article is the second in a series of reports exploring quantifiable degradation-related parameters, which focuses on color contrast changes between fingermark ridges and furrows over time. Experiment variables included type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and plastic), and exposure to natural light (dark, shade, and direct light). Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder and photographed. Image histogram profiles were evaluated and combined with statistical analysis of color data values. Results indicate that sebaceous depositions on glass were generally less degraded by the effect of environmental conditions compared with those on plastic. In addition, aging in darkness was not always the best condition for preservation, and direct exposure to light seemed to inhibit visual degradation under certain conditions. Overall, the technique provided sufficient sensitivity to discern degradation patterns of fingermarks.

  5. In Vivo Antioxidant and Anti-Skin-Aging Activities of Ethyl Acetate Extraction from Idesia polycarpa Defatted Fruit Residue in Aging Mice Induced by D-Galactose

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ran-ran; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Two different concentrations of D-galactose (D-gal) induced organism and skin aging in Kunming mice were used to examine comprehensively the antioxidant and antiaging activities of ethyl acetate extraction (EAE) from Idesia polycarpa defatted fruit residue for the first time. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of EAE was 13.09 ± 0.11 μmol Trolox equivalents (TE)/mg, which showed EAE had great in vitro free radical scavenging and antioxidant activity. Biochemical indexes and morphological analysis of all tested tissues showed that EAE could effectively improve the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) of the antioxidant defense system of the aging mice, enhance the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) of tissues and serum, increase glutathione (GSH) content and decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and maintain the skin collagen, elastin, and moisture content. Meanwhile, EAE could effectively attenuate the morphological damage in brain, liver, kidney, and skin induced by D-gal and its effect was not less than that of the well-known L-ascorbic acid (VC) and α-tocopherol (VE). Overall, EAE is a potent natural antiaging agent with great antioxidant activity, which can be developed as a new medicine and cosmetic for the treatment of age-related conditions. PMID:24971146

  6. Looking, Feeling, and Doing: Are There Age Differences in Attention, Mood and Behavioral Responses to Skin Cancer Information?

    PubMed Central

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Choi, YoonSun

    2012-01-01

    Overview Previous studies on aging and attention to emotional information found that older adults may look away from negative stimuli to regulate their moods. However, it is an open question whether older adults’ tendency to look less at negative material comes at the expense of learning when negative information is also health-relevant. This study investigated how age-related changes in attention to negative but relevant information about skin cancer risk reduction influenced both subsequent health behavior and mood regulation. Methods Younger (18-25, n = 78) and older (60-92, n = 77) adults’ fixations toward videos containing negatively-valenced content and risk-reduction information about skin cancer were recorded with eye-tracking. Self-reported mood ratings were measured throughout. Behavioral outcome measures (e.g., answering knowledge questions about skin cancer, choosing a sunscreen, completing a skin self-exam) assessed participants’ learning of key health-relevant information, their interest in seeking additional information, and their engagement in protective behaviors. Results Older adults generally looked less at the negative video content, more rapidly regulated their moods, and learned fewer facts about skin cancer; yet, they engaged in a greater number of protective behaviors than did younger adults. Conclusions Older adults may demonstrate an efficient looking strategy that extracts important information without disrupting their moods, and they may compensate for less learning by engaging in a greater number of protective behaviors. Younger adults may be distracted by disruptions to their mood, constraining their engagement in protective behaviors. PMID:22149125

  7. Effect of freezing prior to aging on myoglobin redox forms and CIE color of beef from Nellore and Aberdeen Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Aroeira, Carolina Naves; de Almeida Torres Filho, Robledo; Fontes, Paulo Rogério; de Lemos Souza Ramos, Alcinéia; de Miranda Gomide, Lúcio Alberto; Ladeira, Márcio Machado; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of freezing prior to wet aging on the color of Nellore and Aberdeen Angus cattle meat. Samples of the Longissimus thoracis muscle were subjected to two treatments: conventional aging (0, 7, 14 and 21days); and freezing (-20°C for 40days) followed by thawing and aging. Freezing promoted (P<0.05) formation of metmyoglobin during aging, especially in Nellore beef. Frozen meats showed (P<0.05) lower lightness (L*) values and higher redness (a*), chroma (C*) and hue angle (h*) values at the first day of storage, deteriorating quickly with aging time. The color of the Nellore meat was less (P<0.05) stable to freezing, being lighter, yellower and less red than Angus meat. The results suggest that color stability in vacuum-packed beef is reduced by freezing prior to aging and that reduction depends on the animal breed.

  8. Effect of aging time in vacuum on tenderness, and color and lipid stability of beef from mature cows during display in high oxygen atmosphere package.

    PubMed

    Vitale, M; Pérez-Juan, M; Lloret, E; Arnau, J; Realini, C E

    2014-01-01

    The effect of aging time in vacuum on tenderness, and lipid and color stability of modified-atmosphere packaged (MAP) beef during display was evaluated in eight Friesian mature cows. Longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) sections were vacuum packaged and aged for 0, 3, 6, 8, 14 and 21 days. After each aging time, the LTL sections were cut into steaks and packaged in high oxygen atmosphere (80% O2: 20% CO2). Meat shear force, and color and lipid stability were evaluated at 0, 3, 6, and 9 days of simulated retail display. Aging for 6 or 8 days improved beef tenderness with color stability, instrumental discoloration (R630-R580) and visual color evaluation in MAP similar to those of short-time aged (3 d) or un-aged (0 d) beef. Longer aging times (14 and 21 d) resulted in tenderness values similar to those obtained with meat aged for 8 days but affected negatively color and lipid stability and, consequently, reduced the shelf life of beef in MAP.

  9. COMBINED EFFECTS OF BINARIES AND STELLAR ROTATION ON THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS OF INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhongmu; Mao Caiyan; Chen Li; Zhang Qian

    2012-12-20

    About 70% of intermediate-age star clusters in the Large Magellanic Clouds have been confirmed to have broad main sequence, multiple or extended turnoffs, and dual red giant clumps. The observed result seems to be at odds with the classical idea that such clusters are simple stellar populations. Although many models have been used to explain the results via factors such as prolonged star formation history, metallicity spread, differential reddening, selection effect, observational uncertainty, stellar rotation, and binary interaction, the reason for the special color-magnitude diagrams is still uncertain. We revisit this question via the combination of stellar rotation and binary effects. As a result, it shows 'golf club' color-magnitude diagrams with broad or multiple turnoffs, dual red clumps, blue stragglers, red stragglers, and extended main sequences. Because both binaries and massive rotators are common, our result suggests that most color-magnitude diagrams, including extended turnoff or multiple turnoffs, can be explained using simple stellar populations including both binary and stellar rotation effects, or composite populations with two components.

  10. Combined Effects of Binaries and Stellar Rotation on the Color-Magnitude Diagrams of Intermediate-age Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmu; Mao, Caiyan; Chen, Li; Zhang, Qian

    2012-12-01

    About 70% of intermediate-age star clusters in the Large Magellanic Clouds have been confirmed to have broad main sequence, multiple or extended turnoffs, and dual red giant clumps. The observed result seems to be at odds with the classical idea that such clusters are simple stellar populations. Although many models have been used to explain the results via factors such as prolonged star formation history, metallicity spread, differential reddening, selection effect, observational uncertainty, stellar rotation, and binary interaction, the reason for the special color-magnitude diagrams is still uncertain. We revisit this question via the combination of stellar rotation and binary effects. As a result, it shows "golf club" color-magnitude diagrams with broad or multiple turnoffs, dual red clumps, blue stragglers, red stragglers, and extended main sequences. Because both binaries and massive rotators are common, our result suggests that most color-magnitude diagrams, including extended turnoff or multiple turnoffs, can be explained using simple stellar populations including both binary and stellar rotation effects, or composite populations with two components.

  11. Sun protection education for diverse audiences: need for skin cancer pictures.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Yanina; Gaber, Rikki; Clayman, Marla L; Gordon, Elisa J; Friedewald, John; Robinson, June K

    2015-03-01

    Sun protection education is needed for kidney transplant recipients, whose increased risk of skin cancer could be ameliorated with sun protection. Cognitive interviews with 24 participants equally stratified among non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, and Hispanic/Latino kidney transplant recipients were performed to evaluate a sun protection education workbook. Study participants were recruited over the phone using a registry of 700 kidney transplant recipients. Participants included 12 women and 12 men with a median age of 52. In 16 of the cognitive interviews with non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanic/Latinos, pictures of skin cancer were requested by the participants in order to see the appearance of skin cancer. Kidney transplant recipients with skin of color did not consider themselves at risk to develop skin cancer and wanted to see examples of skin cancer occurring on people with skin of color. Based on these results, the workbook was modified to include pictures of squamous cell carcinoma on varying skin tones. Then, 8 participants evaluated the revised workbook in cognitive interviews and found the photographs acceptable and necessary to demonstrate the severity of skin cancer and personalize their risk of developing skin cancer. The participants progressed from having knowledge of skin cancer to believing that they could develop skin cancer because they observed skin cancers on people with their skin tone. Using pictures of skin cancers occurring on people with similar skin tone may heighten a kidney transplant recipients' sense of vulnerability and possibly improve the use of sun protection.

  12. Skin delivery of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and hyaluronic acid loaded nano-transfersomes for antioxidant and anti-aging effects in UV radiation induced skin damage.

    PubMed

    Avadhani, Kiran S; Manikkath, Jyothsna; Tiwari, Mradul; Chandrasekhar, Misra; Godavarthi, Ashok; Vidya, Shimoga M; Hariharapura, Raghu C; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Mutalik, Srinivas

    2017-11-01

    The present work attempts to develop and statistically optimize transfersomes containing EGCG and hyaluronic acid to synergize the UV radiation-protective ability of both compounds, along with imparting antioxidant and anti-aging effects. Transfersomes were prepared by thin film hydration technique, using soy phosphatidylcholine and sodium cholate, combined with high-pressure homogenization. They were characterized with respect to size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, morphology, entrapment efficiency, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), in vitro antioxidant activity and ex vivo skin permeation studies. Cell viability, lipid peroxidation, intracellular ROS levels and expression of MMPs (2 and 9) were determined in human keratinocyte cell lines (HaCaT). The composition of the transfersomes was statistically optimized by Design of Experiments using Box-Behnken design with four factors at three levels. The optimized transfersome formulation showed vesicle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential of 101.2 ± 6.0 nm, 0.245 ± 0.069 and -44.8 ± 5.24 mV, respectively. FTIR and DSC showed no interaction between EGCG and the selected excipients. XRD results revealed no form conversion of EGCG in its transfersomal form. The optimized transfersomes were found to increase the cell viability and reduce the lipid peroxidation, intracellular ROS and expression of MMPs in HaCaT cells. The optimized transfersomal formulation of EGCG and HA exhibited considerably higher skin permeation and deposition of EGCG than that observed with plain EGCG. The results underline the potential application of the developed transfersomes in sunscreen cream/lotions for improvement of UV radiation-protection along with deriving antioxidant and anti-aging effects.

  13. The underlying mechanism of proinflammatory NF-κB activation by the mTORC2/Akt/IKKα pathway during skin aging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeon Ja; Moon, Kyoung Mi; Chung, Ki Wung; Jeong, Ji Won; Park, Daeui; Kim, Dae Hyun; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), one of two different enzymatic complexes of mTOR, regulates a diverse set of substrates including Akt. mTOR pathway is one of well-known mediators of aging process, however, its role in skin aging has not been determined. Skin aging can be induced by physical age and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation which are intrinsic and extrinsic factors, respectively. Here, we report increased mTORC2 pathway in intrinsic and photo-induced skin aging, which is implicated in the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). UVB-irradiated or aged mice skin revealed that mTORC2 activity and its component, rictor were significantly upregulated which in turn increased Akt activation and Akt-dependent IκB kinase α (IKKα) phosphorylation at Thr23 in vivo. We also confirmed that UVB induced the mTORC2/Akt/IKKα signaling pathway with HaCaT human normal keratinocytes. The increased mTORC2 signaling pathway during skin aging were associated to NF-κB activation. Suppression of mTORC2 activity by the treatment of a mTOR small inhibitor or knockdown of RICTOR partially rescued UVB-induced NF-κB activation through the downregulation of Akt/IKKα activity. Our data demonstrated the upregulation of mTORC2 pathway in intrinsic and photo-induced skin aging and its role in IKKα/NF-κB activation. These data not only expanded the functions of mTOR to skin aging but also revealed the therapeutic potential of inhibiting mTORC2 in ameliorating both intrinsic skin aging and photoaging. PMID:27486771

  14. High Prevalence of Skin Diseases and Need for Treatment in a Middle-Aged Population. A Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 Study

    PubMed Central

    Sinikumpu, Suvi-Päivikki; Huilaja, Laura; Jokelainen, Jari; Koiranen, Markku; Auvinen, Juha; Hägg, Päivi M.; Wikström, Erika; Timonen, Markku; Tasanen, Kaisa

    2014-01-01

    To determine the overall prevalence of skin diseases a whole-body skin examination was performed for 1,932 members (46-years of age) of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC 1966), which is a comprehensive longitudinal research program (N = 12,058). A high prevalence of all skin diseases needing treatment was found (N = 1,158). Half of the cases of skin findings were evaluated to be serious enough to require diagnostic evaluation, treatment or follow-up either in a general health care, occupational health care or a secondary care setting. The remaining half were thought to be slight and self-treatment was advised. Males (70%) had more skin diseases needing treatment than females (52%) (P<0.001). The most common skin finding was a benign skin tumor, which was found in every cohort member. Skin infections (44%), eczemas (27%) and sebaceous gland diseases (27%) were the most common skin diseases in the cohort. Moreover, skin infections and eczemas were more commonly seen in the group with low education compared to those with high education (P<0.005). The results strengthen the postulate that skin diseases are common in an adult population. PMID:24911008

  15. Oxygen tension changes the rate of migration of human skin keratinocytes in an age-related manner.

    PubMed

    Ross, Caitlin; Alston, Myrissa; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet

    2011-01-01

    Migration of keratinocytes to re-epithelialize wounds is a key step in dermal wound healing. In aged human skin, wound healing rates decrease and cellular damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulates. The relationship between age, ROS and human skin keratinocyte migration is not clearly understood. In this study, 4% and 21% oxygen tensions were used to modify levels of ROS produced by metabolism to model low and high oxidative stress conditions. When migration of keratinocytes from young and old primary skin was compared using an in vitro scratch assay, old keratinocytes migrated faster in high oxygen tension than did young keratinocytes, whereas young keratinocytes migrated faster in low oxygen tension. Although all young and old cells at the scratch margins showed intense increases in dihydroethidium oxidation immediately after scratching, the old keratinocytes grown at 21% oxygen demonstrated a greater decrease in the DHE oxidation following scratching and migrated the fastest. These results show that old and young keratinocytes respond to oxygen tension differently and support the hypothesis that keratinocyte migration is affected by the capacity to remove ROS.

  16. Interaction of hydration, aging, and carbon content of soil on the evaporation and skin bioavailability of munition contaminants.

    PubMed

    Reifenrath, William G; Kammen, Harold O; Reddy, Gunda; Major, Michael A; Leach, Glenn J

    2008-01-01

    Water plays a key role in enhancing the permeability of human skin to many substances. To further understand its ability to potentially increase the bioavailability of soil contaminants, artificial sweat was applied to excised pig skin prior to dosing with munition-contaminated soils. Skin was mounted in chambers to allow simultaneous measurement of evaporation and penetration and to control air flow, which changed the dwell time of skin surface water within a l-h period post application of test materials. Additional variables included type of compound, aging of spiked soil samples, and carbon content of soil. To this end, the evaporation and skin penetration of C-14 labeled hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 2,6-dinitrotoluene (26DNT), and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) were determined from two soil types, Yolo, having 1.2% carbon, and Tinker, having 9.5% carbon. RDX soil samples aged 27 mo and 62 mo were compared to freshly spiked soils samples. Similarly, 26DNT samples aged 35-36 mo and TNT samples aged 18 mo were compared to freshly spiked samples. Approximately 10 microg/cm(2) of radiolabeled compound was applied in 10 mg/cm(2) of soil. Radiolabel recovered from the dermis and tissue culture media (receptor fluid) was summed to determine percent absorption from the soils. Radiolabel recovered from vapor traps determined evaporation. Mean skin absorption of all compounds was higher for low-carbon soil, regardless of soil age and skin surface water as affected by air flow conditions. For 26DNT, a simultaneous increase in evaporation and penetration with conditions that favored enhanced soil hydration of freshly prepared samples was consistent with a mechanism that involved water displacement of 26DNT from its binding sites. A mean penetration of 17.5 +/- 3.6% was observed for 26DNT in low-carbon soil, which approached the value previously reported for acetone vehicle (24 +/- 6%). 26DNT penetration was reduced to 0.35% under dryer conditions and to 0

  17. 7 CFR 51.2276 - Color chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color chart. 51.2276 Section 51.2276 Agriculture....2276 Color chart. The color chart (USDA Walnut Color Chart) to which reference is made in §§ 51.2281 and 51.2282 illustrates the four shades of walnut skin color listed as color classifications....

  18. 7 CFR 51.2276 - Color chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color chart. 51.2276 Section 51.2276 Agriculture....2276 Color chart. The color chart (USDA Walnut Color Chart) to which reference is made in §§ 51.2281 and 51.2282 illustrates the four shades of walnut skin color listed as color classifications....

  19. Senescent Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kushniruk, William

    1974-01-01

    The cutaneous surface is continually influenced by aging and environmental factors. A longer life span is accompanied by an increase in the frequency of problems associated with aging skin. Although most of these changes and lesions are not life threatening, the premalignant lesions must be recognized and treated. The common aging and actinic skin changes are discussed and appropriate management is described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:20469067

  20. The gap in the color-magnitude diagram of NGC 2420: A test of convective overshoot and cluster age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarque, Pierre; Sarajedini, Ata; Guo, X.-J.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical isochrones have been constructed using the OPAL opacities specifically to study the color-magnitude diagram of the open star cluster NGC 2420. This cluster provides a rare test of core convection in intermediate-mass stars. At the same time, its age is of interest because of its low metallicity and relatively high Galactic latitude for an open cluster. The excellent color-magnitude diagram constructed by Anthony-Twarog et al. (1990) allows a detailed fit of the isochrones to the photometric data. We discuss the importance of convective overshoot at the convective core edge in determining the morphology of the gap located near the main-sequence turnoff. We find that given the assumptions made in the models, a modest amount of overshoot (0.23 H(sub p)) is required for the best fit. Good agreement is achieved with all features of the turnoff gap for a cluster age of 2.4 +/- 0.2 Gyr. We note that a photometrically complete luminosity function near the main-sequence turnoff and subgiant branch would also provide an important test of the overshoot models.

  1. Prediction of troponin-T degradation using color image texture features in 10d aged beef longissimus steaks.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Chen, K J; Berg, E P; Newman, D J; Schwartz, C A; Keller, W L; Maddock Carlin, K R

    2014-02-01

    The objective was to use digital color image texture features to predict troponin-T degradation in beef. Image texture features, including 88 gray level co-occurrence texture features, 81 two-dimension fast Fourier transformation texture features, and 48 Gabor wavelet filter texture features, were extracted from color images of beef strip steaks (longissimus dorsi, n = 102) aged for 10d obtained using a digital camera and additional lighting. Steaks were designated degraded or not-degraded based on troponin-T degradation determined on d 3 and d 10 postmortem by immunoblotting. Statistical analysis (STEPWISE regression model) and artificial neural network (support vector machine model, SVM) methods were designed to classify protein degradation. The d 3 and d 10 STEPWISE models were 94% and 86% accurate, respectively, while the d 3 and d 10 SVM models were 63% and 71%, respectively, in predicting protein degradation in aged meat. STEPWISE and SVM models based on image texture features show potential to predict troponin-T degradation in meat.

  2. Anti-aging properties of resveratrol: review and report of a potent new antioxidant skin care formulation.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Richard A

    2008-03-01

    Resveratrol, an antioxidant polyphenol from red wine, has been the subject of intense interest in recent years due to a range of unique anti-aging properties. These include cardiovascular benefits via increased nitric oxide production, down-regulation of vasoactive peptides, lowered levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and cyclooxygenase inhibition; possible benefits on Alzheimer's disease by breakdown of beta-amyloid and direct effects on neural tissues; phytohormonal actions; anticancer properties via modulation of signal transduction, which translates into anti-initiation, antipromotion, and antiprogression effects; antimicrobial effects; and sirtuin activation, which is believed to be involved in the caloric restriction-longevity effect. Here we report a resveratrol-based skin care formulation, with 17 times greater antioxidant activity than idebenone. The role of resveratrol in prevention of photoaging is reviewed and compared with other antioxidants used in skin care products.

  3. Skin Condition Finder

    MedlinePlus

    ... SKIN CONDITIONS HEALTH TOPICS FOR PROFESSIONALS Rash and Skin Condition Finder 1 Select Age Group Infant Child ... Toe Toe Webspace Toe Nail CLOSE About the Skin Condition Finder Have a health question or concern? ...

  4. Colors and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of skin diseases relies on several clinical signs, among which color is of paramount importance. In this review, we consider certain clinical presentations of both eczematous and noneczematous contact dermatitis in which color plays a peculiar role orientating toward the right diagnosis. The conditions that will be discussed include specific clinical-morphologic subtypes of eczematous contact dermatitis, primary melanocytic, and nonmelanocytic contact hyperchromia, black dermographism, contact chemical leukoderma, and others. Based on the physical, chemical, and biologic factors underlying a healthy skin color, the various skin shades drawing a disease picture are thoroughly debated, stressing their etiopathogenic origins and histopathologic aspects.

  5. Color matching in facial prosthetics: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ranabhatt, Rani; Singh, Kamleshwar; Siddharth, Ramashanker; Tripathi, Shuchi; Arya, Deeksha

    2017-01-01

    Color matching to the surrounding skin is extremely important in patients wearing maxillofacial prostheses. It is of utmost importance to know the different techniques of color matching and coloring in maxillofacial prostheses. The purpose of this study is to review the literature data with regard to color matching in maxillofacial prosthetics. An electronic search of peer review restricted to English language dental literature was conducted to identify the relevant scientific article on color matching and coloring in maxillofacial prostheses. The publication year was up to December 2015 so that the search could include all the articles provided in that particular database. Two independent observers independently read the abstracts and later preselected full-text articles. A full-text review was carried out only for 15 articles. Out of the 15 articles, 7 were related to coloring using tinting, spraying, milling, and use of commercial cosmetics. Three studies were related to shade matching in maxillofacial prostheses. Two studies conducted the measurement of color in maxillofacial prostheses. Only one study had explained color and its relevance in maxillofacial prosthetics. Only one study was done for reproducing silicone shade guide matching Indian skin color. In addition, a single pilot study was done to measure facial skin and lip color in a human population sample stratified by race, gender, and age. Currently, there is no evidence discussing the best technique available for perfectly matching the color for the fabrication of maxillofacial prostheses. However, the latest instruments such as spectrophotometer and colorimeters are believed to have improved efficiency in matching the color.

  6. Age transcended: a semiotic and rhetorical analysis of the discourse of agelessness in North American anti-aging skin care advertisements.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Kirsten L

    2014-04-01

    Drawing from a collection of over 160 North American print advertisements for anti-aging skin care products from January to December of 2009, this paper examines the discourse of agelessness, a vision of esthetic perfection and optimal health that is continually referred to by gerontologists, cultural theorists, and scientific researchers as a state of being to which humankind can aspire. Employing critical discourse analysis through the use of semiotics and visual rhetoric, this paper explores the means through which anti-aging skin care advertisements present to their viewers a particular object of desire, looking, more specifically, at how agelessness is presented as a way out and ultimate transcendence of age. Through the analytical tools of semiotics and visual rhetoric, four visions of agelessness are identified and explored in this paper: Agelessness as Scientific Purity, Agelessness as Genetic Impulse, Agelessness as Nature's Essence, and Agelessness as Myth. Whether found in the heights of scientific purity, the inner core of our genetic impulse, the depths of nature's essence, or whether agelessness itself has reached its own, untouchable, mythic status, the advertisements in this study represent one of the most pervasive vehicles through which our current vision(s) of ageless perfection are reflected, reinforced, and suspended in a drop of cream.

  7. Scar treatment variations by skin type.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O; Bailey, J Kevin; Hom, David B

    2014-08-01

    Patients and clinicians use skin color attributes such as color uniformity, color distribution, and texture to infer physiologic health status. Normalization of skin color, surface texture, and height are important treatment goals in the treatment of scars. Skin color, structure, and response to trauma, vary with ethnicity. The incidence of hypertrophic and keloid scar formation is influenced by these inherent skin attributes. Skin type influences the response to various modalities including laser therapy and surgical intervention, and skin differences must be considered in treatment planning to achieve optimal results.

  8. Transgenic medaka that overexpress growth hormone have a skin color that does not indicate the activation or inhibition of somatolactin-α signal.

    PubMed

    Komine, Ritsuko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Oota, Hiroki; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Homma, Noriko; Fukamachi, Shoji

    2016-06-10

    Teleosts have two paralogous growth-hormone receptors (GHRs). In vitro studies demonstrated that both receptors bind to and transmit the signal of the growth hormone (GH). However, one of the GHRs (GHR1) was shown to bind more strongly to somatolactin-α (SLα), a fish-specific peptide hormone that is closely related to GH, and is, therefore, termed somatolactin receptor (SLR). In this study, we questioned whether the dual binding of GHR1/SLR causes a crosstalk (reciprocal activation or inhibition) between GH and SLα signals in vivo. For this purpose, we newly established a transgenic medaka that overexpresses GH (Actb-GH:GFP) and assessed its phenotype. The body weight of these transgenic medaka is about twice that of wild-type fish, showing that functional GH was successfully overexpressed in Actb-GH:GFP fish. The transgenic medaka, especially female fish, showed severe infertility, which was a common side effect in GH transgenesis. The skin color, which reflects the effects of SLα most conspicuously in medaka, was similar to that of neither the SLα-overexpressing nor the SLα-deficient medaka, indicating that GH overexpression does not enhance or suppress the SLα signal. We also verified that a transgenic medaka that overexpressed SLα grew and reproduced normally. Therefore, regardless of the in vitro binding relationships, the GH and SLα signals seem not to crosstalk significantly in vivo even when these hormones are overexpressed.

  9. Evaluation of skin microtopography as a measure of ultraviolet exposure.

    PubMed

    Seddon, J M; Egan, K M; Zhang, Y; Gelles, E J; Glynn, R J; Tucker, C A; Gragoudas, E S

    1992-05-01

    A pilot study was conducted to investigate the use of skin microtopography as a semiquantitative noninvasive method for estimating cumulative sun exposure in epidemiologic studies of eye disease. The subjects received a kit through the mail containing materials needed to make a replica of the skin texture of a sun-exposed area of the hand. Each subject previously had undergone a skin biopsy around the same site to evaluate elastotic degeneration, and all were interviewed about past sun exposures. A gradable skin impression was obtained from 96 of 115 (83%) participants after two mailings. The impressions were graded according to the degree of skin texture alteration using standard photographs; interobserver reliability was 0.73 using a weighted kappa statistic. The impression score was correlated most strongly with age (r = 0.53). Independent predictors of higher impression scores (more skin texture changes) were older age, cigar or pipe smoking, less education, lighter iris color, lighter skin color, male gender, and tendency to sunburn. After adjustment for age and the other predictor variables, the biopsy score was not correlated with the impression grade (r = 0.18, P = 0.13). Behaviors indexing sun exposure were not correlated with microtopography. These results suggest that skin microtopography as done in this study reflects aging from intrinsic parameters more than from actinic damage.

  10. Immune reactivity to food coloring.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Charlene

    2015-01-01

    Artificial food dyes are made from petroleum and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the enhancement of the color of processed foods. They are widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries to increase the appeal and acceptability of their products. Synthetic food colorants can achieve hues not possible for natural colorants and are cheaper, more easily available, and last longer. However, since the use of artificial food coloring has become widespread, many allergic and other immune reactive disorders have increasingly been reported. During the past 50 y, the amount of synthetic dye used in foods has increased by 500%. Simultaneously, an alarming rise has occurred in behavioral problems in children, such as aggression, attention deficit disorder (ADD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The ingestion of food delivers the greatest foreign antigenic load that challenges the immune system. Artificial colors can also be absorbed via the skin through cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. The molecules of synthetic colorants are small, and the immune system finds it difficult to defend the body against them. They can also bond to food or body proteins and, thus, are able to act in stealth mode to circumvent and disrupt the immune system. The consumption of synthetic food colors, and their ability to bind with body proteins, can have significant immunological consequences. This consumption can activate the inflammatory cascade, can result in the induction of intestinal permeability to large antigenic molecules, and could lead to cross-reactivities, autoimmunities, and even neurobehavioral disorders. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recently found a 41% increase in diagnoses of ADHD in boys of high-school age during the past decade. More shocking is the legal amount of artificial colorants allowed by the FDA in the foods, drugs, and cosmetics that we consume and use every day. The consuming public is largely

  11. Color vision in an elderly patient with protanopic genotype and successfully treated unilateral age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kitakawa, Takaaki; Hayashi, Takaaki; Tsuzuranuki, Satoshi; Kubo, Akiko; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    We investigated differences in color discrimination between the fellow eye and the affected eye successfully treated for unilateral age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in a 69-year-old male patient with protanopia. His best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 1.2 in the right eye (RE) and 0.2 in the left eye (LE). Fundus and angiographic findings showed classic choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to AMD in the LE. BCVA of the LE improved to 0.4, and CNV resolved by 15 months after initiating combined anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and photodynamic therapies. After CNV closure, the Farnsworth dichotomous was performed, showing confusion patterns of the protan axis in either eye. The Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test showed a total error score of 520 in the LE, much higher than the score of 348 in the RE. Complete genotypes of the long-wavelength-sensitive (L-) cone and middle-wavelength-sensitive (M-) cone opsin genes were determined by polymerase chain reaction, revealing that the patient had a single 5' L-M 3' hybrid gene (encoding an M-cone opsin), with this genotype responsible for protanopia (the L-cone opsin gene was non-functional), instead of the L-cone and M-cone opsin gene arrays. Poorer color vision discrimination in the LE than the RE remained present despite closure of CNV. The presence and type of congenital color vision defect can be confirmed using molecular genetic testing even if complications of acquired retinal diseases such as AMD are identified.

  12. Gastrodia elata Blume Extract Modulates Antioxidant Activity and Ultraviolet A-Irradiated Skin Aging in Human Dermal Fibroblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eunju; Chung, Haeyon; Shim, Eugene; Jeong, Jung-Ky; Han, Bok-Kyung; Choi, Hyuk-Joon; Hwang, Jinah

    2016-11-01

    Gastrodia elata Blume (GEB), a traditional herbal medicine, has been used to treat a wide range of neurological disorders (e.g., paralysis and stroke) and skin problems (e.g., atopic dermatitis and eczema) in oriental medicine. This study was designed to investigate the antioxidant ability of GEB and its antiaging effect on human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of GEB were 21.8 and 0.43 mg/g dry weight (DW), respectively. The ergothioneine content of GEB was 0.41 mg/mL DW. The DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities of GEB at 5 and 10 mg/mL approximately ranged between 31% and 44%. The superoxide dismutase activity of GEB at 10 and 25 mg/mL was 57% and 76%, respectively. GEB increased procollagen type 1 (PC1) production and inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) production and elastase-1 activity in UVA-irradiated HDF. PC1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels decreased upon UVA irradiation, but recovered in response to high doses of GEB in HDF. On the contrary, GEB significantly decreased MMP-1 and elastase-1 mRNA levels, which were markedly induced in UVA-irradiated HDF. Collectively, these results suggest that GEB has sufficient antioxidant ability to prevent the signs of skin aging in UVA-irradiated human skin cells, suggesting its potential as a natural antiaging product.

  13. In vivo confocal Raman microspectroscopy of the human skin: highlighting of spectral markers associated to aging via a research of correlation between Raman and biometric mechanical measurements.

    PubMed

    Eklouh-Molinier, Christophe; Gaydou, Vincent; Froigneux, Emmanuel; Barlier, Pascale; Couturaud, Virginie; Manfait, Michel; Piot, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Skin plays a protective role against the loss of water and external aggression, including mechanical stresses. These crucial functions are ensured by different cutaneous layers, particularly the stratum corneum (SC). During aging, the human skin reveals some apparent modifications of functionalities such as a loss of elasticity. Our investigations aimed at demonstrating that Raman microspectroscopy, as a label-free technique with a high molecular specificity, is efficient to assess in vivo the molecular composition of the skin and the alterations underwent during aging. Our approach was based on a search for correlation between Raman data collected on healthy female volunteers of different ages (from 21 to 70 years old) by means of a remote confocal Raman and skin firmness measurements used as a reference method. Raman and biometric data were then submitted to a partial least square (PLS)-based data processing. Our experiments demonstrated the potential of Raman microspectroscopy to provide an objective in vivo assessment of the skin "biological age" that can be very different from the "chronological age" of the person. In addition, Raman features sensitive to the elasticity and the fatigability of the SC were highlighted. Thereafter, calibration transfer functions were constructed to show the possibility to compare the results obtained during two distinct measurement campaigns conducted with two Raman probes of the same conception. This approach could lead to several interesting prospects, in particular by objectifying the effects of dermocosmetic products on the superficial layers of the skin and by accessing some underlying molecular mechanisms.

  14. Expression of catalytically active Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in dermal fibroblasts induces collagen fragmentation and functional alterations that resemble aged human skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Hammerberg, Craig; Li, Yong; He, Tianyuan; Quan, Taihao; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and reduced production of type I collagen by dermal fibroblasts are prominent features of aged human skin. We have proposed that MMP-1-mediated collagen fibril fragmentation is a key driver of age-related decline of skin function. To investigate this hypothesis, we constructed, characterized, and expressed constitutively active MMP-1 mutant (MMP-1 V94G) in adult human skin in organ culture and fibroblasts in three dimensional collagen lattice cultures. Expression of MMP-1 V94G in young skin in organ culture caused fragmentation and ultrastructural alterations of collagen fibrils similar to those observed in aged human skin in vivo. Expression of MMP-1 V94G in dermal fibroblasts cultured in three-dimensional collagen lattices caused substantial collagen fragmentation, which was markedly reduced by MMP-1 siRNA-mediated knockdown or MMP inhibitor MMI270. Importantly, fibroblasts cultured in MMP-1 V94G-fragmented collagen lattices displayed many alterations observed in fibroblasts in aged human skin, including reduced cytoplasmic area, disassembled actin cytoskeleton, impaired TGF-β pathway, and reduced collagen production. These results support the concept that MMP-1-mediated fragmentation of dermal collagen fibrils alters the morphology and function of dermal fibroblasts, and provide a foundation for understanding specific mechanisms that link collagen fibril fragmentation to age-related decline of fibroblast function. PMID:23601157

  15. Evaluation of the Campbell test and the influence of age, sex, breed, and coat color on puppy behavioral responses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés; López-Rodríguez, Rocío

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Campbell test and discover if there is a link between a puppy’s scores and factors such as age, breed, sex, sex-breed interaction, size, Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) groups, and coat color. The Campbell test was performed on 342 puppies (191 males and 151 females) of different breeds. The results show that the criteria used by Campbell to classify puppies are incomplete, and that it is more appropriate to use numerical values for each type of answer. In general, the mean value obtained, regardless of sex and breed, corresponded to the Campbell’s submissive stable category. The mean value was higher in male dogs than in females. PMID:18505191

  16. Practical application of cellular bioenergetics to the care of aged skin.

    PubMed

    Osborne, R; Carver, R S; Mullins, L A; Finlay, D R

    2013-07-01

    In human skin fibroblasts in vitro, procollagen-1 and NAD(+)/NADH were reduced in three strains of adult fibroblasts compared with neonatal fibroblasts. The levels of both procollagen-1 and NAD(+)/NADH were increased in the adult fibroblasts by treatment for 24 (NAD energy) or 48 h (procollagen-1) with a complex containing niacinamide, Pal-KTTKS peptide and an olive oil fatty acid derivative (Olivem(®)), especially in combination with a natural extract from dill (Lys'lastine V(®)). In one of the adult fibroblast strains evaluated, these changes in procollagen-1 and NAD(+)/NADH in response to the complex of bioactives were in parallel with increased expression of mRNA biomarkers related primarily to dermal matrix and basement membrane structure, including COL1A1, COL3A1, COL5A1, COL14A1, ELN and LOXL2, in addition to SOD2, NAMPT and TGFBR3; MMP1 was decreased in expression. In general, these mRNA biomarker effects were maintained or boosted by the addition of Lys'lastine V, particularly at 1%, and were similar to the fold changes in mRNA expression in neonatal compared with adult fibroblasts. These results indicate that the complex of niacinamide, Pal-KTTKS and Olivem, especially with addition of Lys'lastine V, increases the NAD(+)/NADH bioenergy level of adult skin fibroblasts in parallel with increased expression of skin structure biomarkers in vitro to levels similar to those in younger fibroblasts. Thus, niacinamide, Pal-KTTKS, Olivem and Lys'lastine V are promising bioactive candidates for inclusion in cosmetic formulations.

  17. Topical retinoids in skin ageing: a focused update with reference to sun-induced epidermal vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sorg, Olivier; Saurat, Jean-Hilaire

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin A is an important constituent of the epidermis, where it plays a crucial role in epidermal turnover. A deficiency of epidermal vitamin A may be the consequence of nutritional vitamin A deficiency, exposure to sunlight or any UV source, oxidative stress or chronological ageing. As a consequence, any treatment aiming at increasing epidermal vitamin A would exert a protective effect against these deleterious conditions. Retinoids may counteract some deleterious actions of UV radiation by physical and biological mechanisms. Topical natural retinoic acid precursors such as retinaldehyde or retinol are less irritant than acidic retinoids and may prevent epidermal vitamin A deficiency due to nutritional deficiency, exposure to sunlight or any condition leading to free radical production. Retinoids may be combined with other compounds with complementary actions against ageing, nutritional deficiency and cancer, such as antioxidants, to potentiate their beneficial effects in the skin.

  18. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  19. A new dermocosmetic containing retinaldehyde, delta-tocopherol glucoside and glycylglycine oleamide for managing naturally aged skin: results from in vitro to clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Rouvrais, Céline; Bacqueville, Daniel; Bogdanowicz, Patrick; Haure, Marie-José; Duprat, Laure; Coutanceau, Christine; Castex-Rizzi, Nathalie; Duplan, Hélène; Mengeaud, Valérie; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Natural aging of skin tissues, the addition of the cumulative action of the time and radiation exposure result in skin atrophy, wrinkles and degeneration of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The aim of the study was to investigate the beneficial effect of a combination containing retinaldehyde (RAL), delta-tocopherol glucoside (delta-TC) and glycylglycine ole-amide (GGO) and of a dermocosmetic containing the combination. Materials and methods The protective effect of the combination was assessed through in vitro gene expression of ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated fibroblasts. A skin aging assay using UV light on ex vivo skin samples and a clinical study conducted in 36 women aged from 35 to 55 years with a minimum of level 4 to a maximum of level 6 on the crow’s feet photoscale assessed the antiaging effect of the dermocosmetic. Results When added to UV-irradiated fibroblasts, the combination substantially improved the ECM in activating the elastin fiber production (fibrillin 2, fibulin 1 and 5 and lysyl oxidase-like 2) as well as that of proteins involved in the cellular ECM interactions (integrin b1, paxillin and actin a2). An ex vivo photodamaged human skin model showed that the dermocosmetic formulation containing the combination of the active ingredients protected the elastic network against UV-induced alterations including both elastin and fibrillin-rich fibers in the dermis. A daily application of the dermocosmetic for 2 months on naturally aged skin resulted in a statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) of visible signs of aging comprising crow’s feet, wrinkles and periocular fine lines. Finally, the formulation was well tolerated. Conclusion The dermocosmetic containing RAL, delta-TC and GGO provides a substantial benefit in the daily care of naturally aged skin in women aged 35–55 years. PMID:28203099

  20. A color-period diagram for the open cluster M 48 (NGC 2548), and its rotational age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Sydney A.; Weingrill, Joerg; Granzer, Thomas; Spada, Federico; Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2015-11-01

    Rotation periods are increasingly being used to derive ages for cool single field stars. Such ages are based on an empirical understanding of how cool stars spin down, acquired by constructing color-period diagrams (CPDs) for a series of open clusters. Our main aims here are to construct a CPD for M 48, to compare this with other clusters of similar age to check for consistency, and to derive a rotational age for M 48 using gyrochronology. We monitored M 48 photometrically for over 2 months with AIP's STELLA I 1.2 m telescope and the WiFSIP 4K imager in Tenerife. Light curves with 3 mmag precision for bright (V ~ 14 mag) stars were produced and then analysed to provide rotation periods. A cluster CPD has then been constructed. We report 62 rotation periods for cool stars in M 48. The CPD displays a clear slow/I-sequence of rotating stars, similar to those seen in the 625 Myr-old Hyades and 590 Myr-old Praesepe clusters, and below both, confirming that M 48 is younger. A similar comparison with the 250 Myr-old M 34 cluster shows that M 48 is older and does not possess any fast/C-sequence G or early K stars like those in M 34, although relatively fast rotators do seem to be present among the late-K and M stars. A more detailed comparison of the CPD with rotational evolution models shows that the cluster stars have a mean age of 450 Myr, and its (rotating) stars can be individually dated to ± 117 Myr (26%). Much of this uncertainty stems from intrinsic astrophysical spread in initial periods, and almost all stars are consistent with a single age of 450 Myr. The gyro-age of M 48 as a whole is 450 ± 50 Myr, in agreement with the previously determined isochrone age of 400 ± 100 Myr. Based on data obtained with the STELLA robotic telescopes in Tenerife, an AIP facility jointly operated by AIP and IAC; this paper presents results for the STELLA Open Cluster Survey (SOCS).Appendices A and B are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe cluster photometry

  1. Properties of the outer regions of spiral disks: abundances, colors and ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollá, Mercedes; Díaz, Angeles I.; Gibson, Brad K.; Cavichia, Oscar; López-Sánchez, Ángel-R.

    2017-03-01

    We summarize the results obtained from our suite of chemical evolution models for spiral disks, computed for different total masses and star formation efficiencies. Once the gas, stars and star formation radial distributions are reproduced, we analyze the Oxygen abundances radial profiles for gas and stars, in addition to stellar averaged ages and global metallicity. We examine scenarios for the potential origin of the apparent flattening of abundance gradients in the outskirts of disk galaxies, in particular the role of molecular gas formation prescriptions.

  2. Comparison of age-related changes in wrinkling and sagging of the skin in Caucasian females and in Japanese females.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Kazue; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Yasuko; Kitahara, Takashi; Hotta, Mitsuyuki; Moriwaki, Shigeru; Witt, Pamela S; Simion, F Anthony; Takema, Yoshinori

    2004-01-01

    We compared age-related changes in wrinkles in eight areas of facial skin (forehead, glabella, upper eyelid, corner of the eye, lower eyelid, nasolabial groove, cheek, and corner of the mouth) and sagging in the subzygomatic area of Caucasian females and of Japanese females. The subjects studied included 85 healthy Caucasian females (ages 20-69 years) living in Cincinnati in the U.S. and 70 Japanese females (ages 20-69 years) living in Tokyo. Photos of the face in frontal and in oblique 45 degrees views were analyzed. Wrinkles in the face and sagging in the subzygomatic area were graded on Japanese photoscales, respectively, by the same experienced observer. The wrinkle score increased with age in all eight areas of the face examined in Caucasian females as well as in Japanese females. In the group aged 20-29 years, the wrinkle score in each area was significantly higher in Caucasian females than in Japanese females. The wrinkle scores in the forehead, glabella, upper eyelid, and corner of the eye were similar at advanced ages between the two groups, while the wrinkle scores in lower areas of the face (lower eyelid, nasolabial groove, cheek, and corner of the mouth) were markedly higher in Caucasian females than in Japanese females in each age group, and reached an upper limit at advanced ages in Caucasian females. The sagging score also increased with age in Caucasian females as well as in Japanese females. The sagging score was significantly higher in Caucasian females than in Japanese females in the groups aged 40 years or more. These results suggest more marked wrinkle formation in all areas of the face in younger age groups of Caucasian females living in North America than in Japanese females living in Tokyo. In particular, Caucasian females showed marked age-related wrinkle formation in the lower areas of the face, probably due to sagging in the subzygomatic area, which suggests a higher susceptibility to sagging in the subzygomatic area of Caucasian females.

  3. Local tetrahydrobiopterin administration augments reflex cutaneous vasodilation through nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms in aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Stanhewicz, Anna E; Bruning, Rebecca S; Smith, Caroline J; Kenney, W Larry; Holowatz, Lacy A

    2012-03-01

    Functional constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is required for full expression of reflex cutaneous vasodilation that is attenuated in aged skin. Both the essential cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and adequate substrate concentrations are necessary for the functional synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) through NOS, both of which are reduced in aged vasculature through increased oxidant stress and upregulated arginase, respectively. We hypothesized that acute local BH(4) administration or arginase inhibition would similarly augment reflex vasodilation in aged skin during passive whole body heat stress. Four intradermal microdialysis fibers were placed in the forearm skin of 11 young (22 ± 1 yr) and 11 older (73 ± 2 yr) men and women for local infusion of 1) lactated Ringer, 2) 10 mM BH(4), 3) 5 mM (S)-(2-boronoethyl)-l-cysteine + 5 mM N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine to inhibit arginase, and 4) 20 mM N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit NOS. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) as reflex vasodilation was induced. After a 1.0°C rise in oral temperature (T(or)), mean body temperature was clamped and 20 mM l-NAME was perfused at each site. Cutaneous vascular conductance was calculated (CVC = LDF/mean arterial pressure) and expressed as a percentage of maximum (%CVC(max); 28 mM sodium nitroprusside and local heat, 43°C). Vasodilation was attenuated at the control site of the older subjects compared with young beginning at a 0.3°C rise in T(or). BH(4) and arginase inhibition both increased vasodilation in older (BH(4): 55 ± 5%; arginase-inhibited: 47 ± 5% vs. control: 37 ± 3%, both P < 0.01) but not young subjects compared with control (BH(4): 51 ± 4%CVC(max); arginase-inhibited: 55 ± 4%CVC(max) vs. control: 56 ± 6%CVC(max), both P > 0.05) at a 1°C rise in T(or). With a 1°C rise in T(or), local BH(4) increased NO-dependent vasodilation in the older (BH(4): 31.8 ± 2.4%CVC(max) vs. control: 11.7 ± 2.0%CVC

  4. The expression of miR-124 increases in aged skin to cause cell senescence and it decreases in squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Harada, Miho; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Wang, Zhongzhi; Hirano, Ayaka; Tomizawa, Yukiko; Kira, Tomomi; Igata, Toshikatsu; Masuguchi, Shinichi; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2017-01-16

    Skin senescence is induced by various factors including intrinsic aging and extrinsic aging. The current study compared the expression of microRNAs in young facial skin and senescent facial skin, and this study identified skin aging-related microRNAs. According to the results from a microRNA PCR Array, miR-124 was the microRNA that increased the most in senescent skin compared to young skin. Real-time PCR with a greater number of samples indicated that the increase in miR-124 levels in senescent facial skin was statistically significant. In situ hybridization was performed, and results indicated that the signal for miR-124 was evident in keratinocytes of senescent skin but not in those of young skin. The morphology of cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) transfected with a miR-124 mimic changed to an enlarged and irregular shape. In addition, the number of NHEKs positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) increased significantly as a result of the overexpression of the miR-124 mimic. The expression of miR-124 increased in UVB-irradiated NHEKs compared to controls in a dose-dependent manner. Expression of miR-124 in A431, a human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line, decreased significantly compared to that in NHEKs. Forced overexpression of miR-124 as a result of the transfection of a miR-124 mimic in A431 resulted in the significant suppression of the proportion of cancer cells. The current results indicated that miR-124 increases as a result of cell senescence and that it decreases during tumorigenesis. The effect of supplementation of miR-124 in an SCC cell line suggests that senescence induction therapy with microRNA may be a new therapeutic approach for treatment of SCC.

  5. 7 CFR 51.1436 - Color classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Color classifications. 51.1436 Section 51.1436... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Color Classifications § 51.1436 Color classifications. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the color...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1436 - Color classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Color classifications. 51.1436 Section 51.1436... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Color Classifications § 51.1436 Color classifications. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the color...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1436 - Color classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Color classifications. 51.1436 Section 51.1436... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Color Classifications § 51.1436 Color classifications. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the color...

  8. Whey peptides prevent chronic ultraviolet B radiation-induced skin aging in melanin-possessing male hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins or peptides exhibit various actions, including an antioxidant action, an anticancer action, and a protective action against childhood asthma and atopic syndrome. The effects of orally administered whey peptides (WPs) on chronic ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cutaneous changes, including changes in cutaneous thickness, elasticity, wrinkle formation, etc., have not been examined. In this study, we studied the preventive effects of WPs on cutaneous aging induced by chronic UVB irradiation in melanin-possessing male hairless mice (HRM). UVB (36-180 mJ/cm(2)) was irradiated to the dorsal area for 17 wk in HRM, and the measurements of cutaneous thickness and elasticity in UVB irradiated mice were performed every week. WPs (200 and 400 mg/kg, twice daily) were administered orally for 17 wk. WPs inhibited the increase in cutaneous thickness, wrinkle formation, and melanin granules and the reduction in cutaneous elasticity associated with photoaging. Furthermore, it has been reported that UVB irradiation-induced skin aging is closely associated with the increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Ki-67-, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-positive cells. WPs also prevented increases in the expression of MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9, VEGF, and Ki-67- and 8-OHdG-positive cells induced by chronic UVB irradiation. It was found that WPs prevent type IV collagen degradation, angiogenesis, proliferation, and DNA damage caused by UVB irradiation. Overall, these results demonstrate the considerable benefit of WPs for protection against solar UV-irradiated skin aging as a supplemental nutrient.

  9. [The effect of aging on the peripheral functions in farmers and chain saw operators. Part 2. Age-related changes in skin temperature and hyperemia time after pressing the nail (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, T; Miyashita, K; Shiomi, S; Iwata, H

    1981-05-01

    Vibration hazards which arise after exposure to mechanical vibration comprise various types of disorders, the most common of which are peripheral circulatory disturbances. It is now well recognized that aging effects all organ systems of the human body. The present study was therefore performed to assess the effects of aging on finger skin temperature and on hyperemia time after pressing the nail, both of which reflect peripheral circulatory functions. The subjects were 88 farmers and 86 chain saw operators ranging in age from 30 to 69 years, and 27 healthy persons aged 21 to 37 years as controls. Data were evaluated before and after cold water immersion tests in which the hand was immersed in 10 degrees C water for 10 minutes. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Before the test, skin temperature was negatively correlated with age, and hyperemia time was positively correlated with age in both farmers and chain saw operators but not in the case of the control subjects. 2)The skin temperature became lower, and hyperemia time grew longer with advancing age in both farmers and chain saw operators before and after the immersion tests. In comparison of the average skin temperature and hyperemia time between farmers and chain saw operators classified by age, the average skin temperature in chain saw operators was significantly lower than that in farmers, and the average hyperemia time in chain saw operators was significantly longer than that in farmers of every age group after the immersion test. The results suggest that we should take age-related changes into consideration to some degree when we evaluate the finger skin temperature and hyperemia time in diagnosing peripheral circulatory disturbances.

  10. Aging and Cumulative Inequality: How Does Inequality Get Under the Skin?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraro, Kenneth F.; Shippee, Tetyana Pylypiv

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article draws from cumulative disadvantage and life course theories to develop a new theory for the social scientific study of aging. Design and Methods: Five axioms of "cumulative inequality (CI) theory" are articulated to identify how life course trajectories are influenced by early and accumulated inequalities but can be modified…

  11. Discordance between Aeroallergen Specific Serum IgE and Skin Testing in Children < 4 years of age

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Gabriele; Nazari, Ramin; Ferastraoaru, Denisa; Parikh, Purvi; Geliebter, Rebecca; Pichardo, Yikania; Wiznia, Andrew; Rosenstreich, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Atopic sensitization to aeroallergens in early life has been shown to be a strong risk factor for developing persisting asthma in young children with recurrent wheeze. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the yield of skin prick test (SPT) compared to allergen specific serum IgE testing (sIgE) at identifying aeroallergen sensitization in atopic children < 4 years of age. Methods Concordance between SPT (Greer Laboratories, ComforTen™) and allergen specific sIgE (Immulite 2000™) for 7 common aeroallergens was analyzed in forty atopic inner-city children, 18–48 months of age (mean 36 +/− 9 months) with recurrent wheezing, family history of asthma and/or eczema. Results In 80% of children one or more allergen sensitizations would have been missed if only SPT had been performed, and in 38% of children one or more sensitizations would have been missed if only serum IgE testing had been performed. Agreement and between SPT and sIgE test was fair for most allergens (kappa between −0.04 and 0.50), as was correlation between sIgE levels and SPT grade (rho between 0.21 and 0.55). Children with high total sIgE (≥300 kU/l) were more likely to have sIgE positive tests with negative corresponding skin test (p=0.025). Conclusions Our study showed significant discordance between allergen specific SPT and sIgE testing results for common aeroallergens, suggesting that both SPT and sIgE testing should be done when diagnosing allergic sensitization in young children at high risk of asthma. PMID:23706713

  12. Skin beautification with oral non-hydrolized versions of carnosine and carcinine: Effective therapeutic management and cosmetic skincare solutions against oxidative glycation and free-radical production as a causal mechanism of diabetic complications and skin aging.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Savel'yeva, Ekaterina L; Lankin, Vadim Z; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2012-10-01

    Advanced glycation Maillard reaction end products (AGEs) are causing the complications of diabetes and skin aging, primarily via adventitious and cross-linking of proteins. Long-lived proteins such as structural collagen are particularly implicated as pathogenic targets of AGE processes. The formation of α-dicarbonyl compounds represents an important step for cross-linking proteins in the glycation or Maillard reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of glycation coupled to the glycation free-radical oxidation reactions as markers of protein damage in the aging of skin tissue proteins and diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism for the cross-linking reaction, we studied the reaction between a three-carbon α-dicarbonyl compound, methylglyoxal, and amino acids using EPR spectroscopy, a spectrophotometric kinetic assay of superoxide anion production at the site of glycation and a chemiluminescence technique. The transglycating activity, inhibition of transition metal ions peroxidative catalysts, resistance to hydrolysis of carnosine mimetic peptide-based compounds with carnosinase and the protective effects of carnosine, carcinine and related compounds against the oxidative damage of proteins and lipid membranes were assessed in a number of biochemical and model systems. A 4-month randomized, double-blind, controlled study was undertaken including 42 subjects where the oral supplement of non-hydrolized carnosine (Can-C Plus® formulation) was tested against placebo for 3 months followed by a 1-month supplement-free period for both groups to assess lasting effects. Assessment of the age-related skin parameters and oral treatment efficacy measurements included objective skin surface evaluation with Visioscan® VC 98 and visual assessment of skin appearance parameters. The results together confirm that a direct one-electron transfer between a Schiff base methylglyoxal dialkylimine (or its protonated form) and methylglyoxal is responsible for

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Adipose Tissue in Clinical Applications for Dermatological Indications and Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Meenakshi; Dobke, Marek; Lunyak, Victoria V.

    2017-01-01

    Operating at multiple levels of control, mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSCs) communicate with organ systems to adjust immune response, provide signals for differentiation, migration, enzymatic reactions, and to equilibrate the regenerative demands of balanced tissue homeostasis. The identification of the mechanisms by which ADSCs accomplish these functions for dermatological rejuvenation and wound healing has great potential to identify novel targets for the treatment of disorders and combat aging. Herein, we review new insights into the role of adipose-derived stem cells in the maintenance of dermal and epidermal homeostasis, and recent advances in clinical applications of ADSCs related to dermatology. PMID:28117680

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Adipose Tissue in Clinical Applications for Dermatological Indications and Skin Aging.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Meenakshi; Dobke, Marek; Lunyak, Victoria V

    2017-01-20

    Operating at multiple levels of control, mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSCs) communicate with organ systems to adjust immune response, provide signals for differentiation, migration, enzymatic reactions, and to equilibrate the regenerative demands of balanced tissue homeostasis. The identification of the mechanisms by which ADSCs accomplish these functions for dermatological rejuvenation and wound healing has great potential to identify novel targets for the treatment of disorders and combat aging. Herein, we review new insights into the role of adipose-derived stem cells in the maintenance of dermal and epidermal homeostasis, and recent advances in clinical applications of ADSCs related to dermatology.

  15. Skin Aging-Dependent Activation of the PI3K Signaling Pathway via Downregulation of PTEN Increases Intracellular ROS in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinny; Song, Hwa-Ryung; Lee, Minok; Hong, On-Yu; Whang, Pyoung H.; Han, Myung-Kwan; Kwon, Kang-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in both chronological aging and photoaging. ROS induce skin aging through their damaging effect on cellular constituents. However, the origins of ROS have not been fully elucidated. We investigated that ROS generation of replicative senescent fibroblasts is generated by the modulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) metabolism. Reduction of the PTEN protein, which dephosphorylates PIP3, was responsible for maintaining a high level of PIP3 in replicative cells and consequently mediated the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Increased ROS production was blocked by inhibition of PI3K or protein kinase C (PKC) or by NADPH oxidase activating in replicative senescent cells. These data indicate that the signal pathway to ROS generation in replicative aged skin cells can be stimulated by reduced PTEN level. Our results provide new insights into skin aging-associated modification of the PI3K/NADPH oxidase signaling pathway and its relationship with a skin aging-dependent increase of ROS in human dermal fibroblasts. PMID:28003865

  16. Curcumin induces stress response and hormetically modulates wound healing ability of human skin fibroblasts undergoing ageing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Demirovic, Dino; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2011-10-01

    Wound healing becomes impaired in several diseases and during ageing. A commonly used model for the study of wound healing is a scratched monolayer of cells in vitro, which is convenient for the analysis of the cellular and molecular changes occurring during the two phases of wound healing, namely cell migration and cell proliferation. Cell migration, which is the primary event to occur during initial wound healing, is inversely dependent on the number of focal adhesions (FA) that attach cells to the extracellular matrix. Here we report that the number of FA, measured by determining the levels of FA-proteins paxillin and talin, increase with increasing population doubling level of the serially passaged normal adult skin fibroblasts, and that this increase may account for the age-related slowing down of wound healing in vitro. We also report that curcumin, a component of the widely used spice turmeric, modulates wound healing in vitro in a biphasic dose response manner, being stimulatory at low doses (between 1 and 5 μM), and inhibitory at higher doses. Furthermore, our results show that the hormetic effects of low levels of curcumin are achieved by virtue of it being a hormetin in terms of the induction of stress response pathways, including Nrf2 and HO-1 in human cells.

  17. Prevalence of skin disorders in primary and secondary school age children in Canakkale, Turkey: a community-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Kılıc, Sevilay Oguz; Isık, Selda; Haydar Ertekin, Yusuf; Tekin, Murat; Cevizci, Sibel; Ogretmen, Zerrin; Topaloglu, Naci; Sahin, Erkan Melih; Cıbık, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin lesions may be of dermatological importance, affect appearance, and cause problems communicating with peers and may be especially more significant in childhood. Aim Information on the prevalence of pediatric dermatoses in Western Turkey. This study was aimed to define the existing data. Material and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in Canakkale, Turkey, in September-December 2013. It involved 1,957 students from five randomly selected primary and secondary schools. Each student was interviewed for age, gender, and family history, and a dermatologic examination was performed by a dermatologist. Data were coded and analyzed. Results Of the students, 79.9% revealed at least one dermatosis. The most common disease was benign neoplasms (76%), followed by pigmentary disorders (26.8%), and xerosis (5.8%). In primary schools, the acquired melanocytic nevus, hypopigmented macule, and xerosis; in secondary school the acne was statistically significantly more common. Acne and xerosis was more common in girls, and pityriasis alba was statistically more common in boys. Students who had at least one dermatosis were positively correlated with monthly income. Conclusions In Turkish school age children, the prevalence of dermatosis is 79.9%. It may be due to not using preventive means for adequate protection from the sun and other environmental factors. Infectious dermatosis and atopic dermatitis are rare and it may depend on the adequacy of public health work. PMID:27512351

  18. Sun on Skin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Describes sessions in two schools that focused on recent work with 2,857 children in Europe researching the children's perceptions of sun on skin. Investigates children's ideas about skin on different parts of the body, which was most vulnerable to the sun, and different types and colors. (Author/CCM)

  19. DOSE-RESPONSE FOR UV-INDUCED IMMUNE SUPPRESSION IN PEOPLE OF COLOR: DIFFERENCES BASED ON ERYTHEMAL REACTIVITY RATHER THAN SKIN PIGMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is known to suppress immune responses in human subjects. The purpose of this study was to develop dose responses across a broad range of skin pigmentation in order to facilitate risk assessment. UVR was administered using FS 20 bulbs. Skin pigmentation...

  20. Transforming growth factors (TGF-alpha and TGF-beta1) in the determination of vitality and wound age: immunohistochemical study on human skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Grellner, W; Vieler, S; Madea, B

    2005-10-29

    In continuation of former investigations on proinflammatory cytokines, in the present study the relevance of the transforming growth factors TGF-alpha and TGF-beta1 was evaluated for the diagnosis of vitality and wound age. Paraffin sections from human skin wounds due to sharp force influence, which had been collected in operations and autopsies, were investigated using immunohistochemistry. The wound age varied from a few minutes to a maximum of 6 weeks with focus on the early post-traumatic interval up to 5h. Samples from uninjured skin were available as controls. TGF-alpha (n=74) was weakly expressed in normal skin and showed a marked increase in epidermal reactivity after a wound age of approximately 10 min. The maximum was between 30 and 60 min. TGF-beta1 (n=51) revealed constitutional expression only in connective tissue. An increase of immunohistochemical reaction was partially detected even in classical stab wounds (wound age of several minutes). The immunohistochemically detectable signal concerned--presumably due to an infiltration with TGF-beta-rich thrombocytes--large parts of the traumatized skin and also the epidermal layers (cellular and interstitial marking). TGF-beta1 peaked after a post-traumatic interval of 30-60 min. Both factors, especially TGF-beta1, remained detectable in elevated levels also in older wounds with an age of days to weeks (network in granulation tissue). TGF-alpha and TGF-beta1 can efficiently contribute to the estimation of vitality and wound age based on the evaluation of cytokine patterns. In particular, this applies to TGF-beta1 because of its easier evaluation and rapid up-regulation. Similar to other cytokines, the parallel investigation of control skin from the same individual must be recommended to eliminate variation in the basal expression.

  1. Effect of Normal Aging and of Mild Cognitive Impairment on Event-Related Potentials to a Stroop Color-Word Task.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Goicoa, Marta; Galdo-Álvarez, Santiago; Díaz, Fernando; Zurrón, Montserrat

    2016-04-08

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from 84 adults (51 to 87 years old) with the aim of exploring the effects of aging (middle-aged and older groups) and cognitive status (healthy or with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, aMCI) on the neural functioning associated with stimulus and response processing in a Stroop color-word task. An interference (or Stroop) effect was observed in the Reaction Time (RT), and the RT and number of errors results were consistent with the age-related decline in performance. Cognitive status did not affect the behavioral performance of the task, but age and cognitive status affected several ERP parameters. Aging was associated with a) slowing of the neural processing of the stimuli (P150, N2, and P3b latencies were longer), b) greater activation of the motor cortex for response preparation (LRP-R amplitude was larger), and c) use of more neural resources for cognitive control of stimuli (N2 amplitude was larger to the congruent and incongruent stimuli than to the colored X-strings, in the older group). Independent of age, aMCI dedicated more neural resources to processing the irrelevant dimension of the stimulus (they showed a greater difference than the control participants between the P3b amplitude to the colored X-strings and to the congruent/incongruent stimuli) and showed a deficit in the selection and preparation of the motor response (with smaller LRP-S and LRP-R amplitudes). Furthermore, the middle-aged aMCI participants evaluated and classified both congruent and incongruent stimuli more slowly (they showed longer P3b latencies) relative to middle-aged controls.

  2. Comparison of different cutaneous carotenoid sensors and influence of age, skin type, and kinetic changes subsequent to intake of a vegetable extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, Martina C.; Schanzer, Sabine; Lohan, Silke B.; Shchatsinin, Ihar; Darvin, Maxim E.; Vollert, Henning; Magnussen, Björn; Köcher, Wolfang; Helfmann, Jürgen; Lademann, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, cutaneous carotenoid measurements have become increasingly popular, as carotenoids were found to be a biomarker of nutrition rich in fruits and vegetables, permitting monitoring of the influence of various stress factors. For such measurements, in addition to the specific and selective resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS), newly developed low expensive small and mobile sensors that are based on spatially resolved reflectance spectroscopy (SRRS) are used for cutaneous carotenoid measurements. Human volunteers of different age exhibiting skin types I to III were investigated using RRS and two SRRS-based sensors to determine the influence of these parameters on the measuring results. In two studies on volunteers of either the same age or skin type, however, the respective other parameter being varied and no significant influences of age or skin type could be detected. Furthermore, the kinetic changes resulting from the intake and discontinued intake of a vegetable extract rich in carotenoids showed a good correlation among the three sensors and with the detected blood carotenoids. This illustrates that the SRRS-based sensors and RRS device provide reliable cutaneous carotenoid values independent of age and skin types I to III of the volunteers.

  3. Effect of Oak Chips on Evolution of Phenolic Compounds and Color Attributes of Bog Bilberry Syrup Wine During Bottle-Aging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuxun; Wang, Shaoyang; Yuan, Guanshen; Ouyang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yaran; Zhu, Baoqing; Zhang, Bolin

    2016-10-18

    This study investigated the evolution of phenolic compounds of bog bilberry syrup wine during a bottle-aging process, and further estimated the oak chip treatment on the wine color alteration. The wine was macerated with oak chips (2 or 5 g/L under light or medium toasting level) for 20 d and then bottle-aged for 6 mo. Results showed that the oak chip treatment significantly increased the content of phenolic compounds and enhanced the copigmented anthocyanin level before aging. It also resulted in an increase on a(*) and C(*) but a decrease on L(*) , b(*) , and H(*) of the wine. During aging process, a content decrease of total phenol and antioxidant capacity of the wine was observed. Phenolic acids, flavonol glycosides, and anthocyanins reduced the content, whereas flavonol increased the content. Free and copigmented anthocyanin levels decreased, whereas polymerized anthocyanins level increased. This process caused an increase on L(*) , b(*) , and H(*) , but a decrease on a(*) and C(*) . The oak chip treatment delayed the wine color change and its effect was mainly depended on the addition amount. Partial least square regression revealed that flavonol glycosides, phenolic acids, and anthocyanins displayed a positive correlation with L(*) , b(*) , and H(*) , but a negative correlation with a(*) and C(*) . Quercetin-3-O-glucuronide, myricetin-3-O-galactoside, chlorogenic acid, and quercetin exerted a more important effect on the color alteration in wine.

  4. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    Protect aging skin. Avoid trauma such as bumping or pulling on skin areas. For a cut or scrape, use direct pressure to stop the bleeding. If you have a drug reaction, ask your provider about stopping the drug. Otherwise, follow ...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1403 - Kernel color classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Kernel color classification. 51.1403 Section 51.1403... Color Classification § 51.1403 Kernel color classification. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the color classifications provided in this section. When the color of kernels in a...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1403 - Kernel color classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Kernel color classification. 51.1403 Section 51.1403... Color Classification § 51.1403 Kernel color classification. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms of the color classifications provided in this section. When the color of kernels in a...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1436 - Color classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Color classifications. 51.1436 Section 51.1436... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Color Classifications § 51.1436 Color classifications. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1436 - Color classifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Color classifications. 51.1436 Section 51.1436... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Shelled Pecans Color Classifications § 51.1436 Color classifications. (a) The skin color of pecan kernels may be described in terms...

  9. Skin Dictionary

    MedlinePlus

    ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ... your skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library Find a ...

  10. Topical Application of Retinyl Palmitate-Loaded Nanotechnology-Based Drug Delivery Systems for the Treatment of Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marcela B.; do Prado, Alice Haddad; Bernegossi, Jéssica; Sato, Claudia S.; Lourenço Brunetti, Iguatemy; Scarpa, Maria Virgínia; Leonardi, Gislaine Ricci; Friberg, Stig E.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a structural characterization and evaluate the in vitro safety profile and in vitro antioxidant activity of liquid crystalline systems (LCS) with and without retinyl palmitate (RP). LCS containing polyether functional siloxane (PFS) as a surfactant, silicon glycol copolymer (SGC) as oil phase, and water in the ratios 30 : 25 : 45 and 40 : 50 : 10 with (OLSv = RP-loaded opaque liquid system and TLSv = RP-loaded transparent liquid system, respectively) and without (OLS and TLS, respectively) RP were studied. Samples were characterized using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and rheology analysis. In vitro safety profile was evaluated using red cell hemolysis and in vitro cytotoxicity assays. In vitro antioxidant activity was performed by the DPPH method. PLM analysis showed the presence of lamellar LCS just to TLS. Regardless of the presence of RP, the rheological studies showed the pseudoplastic behavior of the formulations. The results showed that the incorporation of RP in LCS improved the safety profile of the drug. In vitro antioxidant activity suggests that LCS presented a higher capacity to maintain the antioxidant activity of RP. PFS-based systems may be a promising platform for RP topical application for the treatment of skin aging. PMID:24772430

  11. Nitrite-embedded packaging film effects on fresh and frozen beef color development and stability as influenced by meat age and muscle type.

    PubMed

    Claus, James R; Du, Chen

    2013-11-01

    Muscles (Longissimus lumborum, LL; Psoas major, PM, semitendinosus, ST) were aged (2, 9d postmortem), cut into steaks, anaerobically packaged (nitrite-embedded film, NEF), and displayed (fresh, 19d; frozen, 39d). Fresh NEF increased (P<0.05) in redness (first 48h). Upon opening fresh NEF (d 6) and overwrapping in PVC film, redness declined (P<0.05). NEF cooked LL had more red surface compared to non-NEF. Meat age influenced NEF color. Intact NEF maintained acceptable red color throughout display. Residual nitrite and nitrate associated with fresh NEF and nitrate in NEF cooked LL were found (P<0.05) in the outer layer. Consideration should be given to providing sufficient time for nitric oxide myoglobin development when using NEF which may be influenced by meat age and muscle differences. NEF packaging has potential to extend fresh beef color display life. NEF appears to offer the opportunity to display bright red beef in frozen display by limiting typical effects of photooxidation.

  12. Aging and facial changes--documenting clinical signs, part 1: clinical changes of the aging face.

    PubMed

    Nkengne, Alex; Bertin, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    The process of aging induces the transformation of the face with changes that are usually classified as either chronological or photo induced and that affect the shape, the texture, and the color of the face. Facial shape is mainly transformed by the evolution of bones and soft tissues (muscles, fat, and skin) in addition to noticeable effects of gravity. Skin texture is mainly determined by wrinkles, which arise from atrophy of the skin layers, elastosis, and facial expressions. Skin color is related to the distribution of skin chromophores and the structure of the dermis, which affects light scattering. All facial changes are dependant on sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle. They affect self-perception and social interactions and can sometimes be slowed down or reversed using appropriate clinical procedures (e.g., dermatological, surgical, and cosmetic interventions).

  13. Aging and facial changes--documenting clinical signs, part 1: clinical changes of the aging face.

    PubMed

    Nkengne, Alex; Bertin, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    The process of aging induces the transformation of the face with changes that are usually classified as either chronological or photo-induced and that affect the shape, the texture, and the color of the face. Facial shape is mainly transformed by the evolution of bones and soft tissues (muscles, fat, and skin) in addition to noticeable effects of gravity. Skin texture is mainly determined by wrinkles, which arise from atrophy of the skin layers, elastosis, and facial expressions. Skin color is related to the distribution of skin chromophores and the structure of the dermis, which affects light scattering. All facial changes are dependant on sex, ethnicity, and lifestyle. They affect self-perception and social interactions and can sometimes be slowed down or reversed using appropriate clinical procedures (eg, dermatological, surgical, cosmetic interventions).

  14. Color Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... rose in full bloom. If you have a color vision defect, you may see these colors differently than most people. There are three main kinds of color vision defects. Red-green color vision defects are the most ...

  15. Early onset of aging-like changes is restricted to cognitive abilities and skin structure in Cnr1⁻/⁻ mice.

    PubMed

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras; Drews, Eva; Albayram, Önder; Piyanova, Anastasia; Gaffal, Evelyn; Tueting, Thomas; Michel, Kerstin; Mauer, Daniela; Maier, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Genetic deletion of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor leads to an early onset of learning and memory impairment. In the present study we asked whether the lack of CB1 receptors accelerates aging in general or is selective for cognitive functions. We therefore compared the onset and dynamics of age-dependent changes in social memory, locomotor activity, hearing ability, and in the histopathology of peripheral organs between wild-type and Cnr1 knockout (Cnr1(-/-)) mice. We observed deficits in social memory already in 3-month-old Cnr1(-/-) mice. In contrast, wild-type animals showed such deficits at the age of 6 months. Sensory and motor functions were similar between the genotypes. Thus, hearing loss for higher frequencies and the development of hypomotility showed a similar age-dependent course. In the periphery we detected an early onset of aging-like histological changes in the skin, but not in other organs. We conclude that the lack of CB1 receptor does not induce accelerated aging in general, but induces changes in cognitive function and in skin structure that resemble those associated with aging.

  16. Skin cancer in patients with chronic radiation dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.M.; Hanke, C.W.; Zollinger, T.W.; Montebello, J.F.; Hornback, N.B.; Norins, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    The cases of 76 patients with chronic radiation dermatitis resulting from low-dose ionizing radiation for benign disease were reviewed retrospectively for risk factors leading to the development of neoplasia. The patients were studied with respect to original hair color, eye color, sun reactive skin type, benign disease treated, area treated, age at treatment, and age at development of first skin cancer. Analysis of data showed 37% of patients had sun-reactive skin type I, 27% had type II, and 36% had type III. Types IV through VI were not represented. There appeared to be an overrepresentation of types I and II. Increased melanin pigmentation may therefore be either directly or indirectly protective against the development of skin cancers in patients who have received low-dose superficial ionizing radiation for benign disease. The sun-reactive skin type of patients with chronic radiation dermatitis may be used as a predictor of skin cancer risk when the total dose of ionizing radiation is not known.

  17. Ultraviolet Light and Skin Cancer in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Shannon C.; Bergfeld, Wilma F.

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide. Ultraviolet light exposure is the most important risk factor for cutaneous melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Constitutive skin color and genetic factors, as well as immunological factors, play a role in the development of skin cancer. Ultraviolet light also causes sunburn and photoaging damage to the skin. PMID:23015891

  18. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin Health and Skin Diseases Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... acne to wrinkles Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It ...

  19. Color stability of thermochromic pigment in maxillofacial silicone

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Lippo V.J.; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Valittu, Pekka K.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Maxillofacial silicone elastomer is usually colored intrinsically with color pigments to match skin colors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the color stability of a maxillofacial silicone elastomer, colored with a thermochromic, color changing pigment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Disc-shaped maxillofacial silicone specimens were prepared and divided into 3 groups: a conventionally colored control group, one group additionally colored with 0.2 wt% thermochromic pigment , and one group with 0.6 wt% thermochromic pigment. Half of the surface of each specimen was covered with an aluminium foil. All of the specimens were exposed to UV radiation in 6 hour cycles over 46 days. In between the UV exposures, half of the specimens were stored in darkness, at room temperature, and the other half was stored in an incubator, at a humidity of 97% and a temperature of +37℃. Color measurements were made with a spectrophotometer and registered according to the CIELAB L*a*b* color model system. The changes in L*, a* and b* values during artificial aging were statistically analyzed by using paired samples t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. P-values <.05 were considered as statistically significant. RESULTS The UV exposure resulted in visually noticeable and statistically significant color changes in the L*, a* and b* values in both of the test groups containing thermochromic pigment. Storage in the incubator lead to statistically significant color changes in the a* and b* values of the specimens containing thermochromic pigment, compared to those stored at room temperature. CONCLUSION The specimens containing thermochromic pigment were very sensitive to UV radiation, and the thermochromic pigment is not suitable, as such, to be used in maxillofacial prostheses. PMID:23755330

  20. 7 CFR 51.1447 - Fairly uniform in color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fairly uniform in color. 51.1447 Section 51.1447... color. Fairly uniform in color means that 90 percent or more of the kernels in the lot have skin color within the range of one or two color classifications....

  1. 7 CFR 51.1447 - Fairly uniform in color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fairly uniform in color. 51.1447 Section 51.1447... § 51.1447 Fairly uniform in color. Fairly uniform in color means that 90 percent or more of the kernels in the lot have skin color within the range of one or two color classifications....

  2. 7 CFR 51.1447 - Fairly uniform in color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fairly uniform in color. 51.1447 Section 51.1447... § 51.1447 Fairly uniform in color. Fairly uniform in color means that 90 percent or more of the kernels in the lot have skin color within the range of one or two color classifications....

  3. 7 CFR 51.1447 - Fairly uniform in color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fairly uniform in color. 51.1447 Section 51.1447... color. Fairly uniform in color means that 90 percent or more of the kernels in the lot have skin color within the range of one or two color classifications....

  4. 7 CFR 51.1447 - Fairly uniform in color.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fairly uniform in color. 51.1447 Section 51.1447... color. Fairly uniform in color means that 90 percent or more of the kernels in the lot have skin color within the range of one or two color classifications....

  5. Age-related effects on event-related brain potentials in a congruence/incongruence judgment color-word Stroop task

    PubMed Central

    Zurrón, Montserrat; Lindín, Mónica; Galdo-Alvarez, Santiago; Díaz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We examined the event-related brain potentials elicited by color-word stimuli in a Stroop task in which healthy participants (young and old) had to judge whether the meaning and the color of the stimulus were congruent or incongruent. The Stroop effect occurred in both age groups, with longer reaction times in the older group than in the young group for both types of stimuli, but no difference in the number of errors made by either group. Although the N2 and P3b latencies were longer in the older than in the younger group, there were no differences between groups in the latencies of earlier event-related potential components, and therefore the age-related processing slowing is not generalized. The frontal P150 amplitude was larger, and the parietal P3b amplitude was smaller, in the older than in the younger group. Furthermore, the P3b amplitude was maximal at frontal locations in older participants and at parietal locations in young participants. The age-related increase in perceptual resources and the posterior-to-anterior shift in older adults support adaptive reorganization of the neural networks involved in the processing of this Stroop-type task. PMID:24987369

  6. Reduction of fibroblast size/mechanical force down-regulates TGF-β type II receptor: implications for human skin aging.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Gary J; Shao, Yuan; He, Tianyuan; Qin, Zhaoping; Perry, Daniel; Voorhees, John J; Quan, Taihao

    2016-02-01

    The structural integrity of human skin is largely dependent on the quality of the dermal extracellular matrix (ECM), which is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. Normally, fibroblasts attach to the ECM and thereby achieve stretched, elongated morphology. A prominent characteristic of dermal fibroblasts in aged skin is reduced size, with decreased elongation and a more rounded, collapsed morphology. Here, we show that reduced size of fibroblasts in mechanically unrestrained three-dimensional collagen lattices coincides with reduced mechanical force, measured by atomic force microscopy. Reduced size/mechanical force specifically down-regulates TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) and thus impairs TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Both TβRII mRNA and protein were decreased, resulting in 90% loss of TGF-β binding to fibroblasts. Down-regulation of TβRII was associated with significantly decreased phosphorylation, DNA-binding, and transcriptional activity of its key downstream effector Smad3 and reduced expression of Smad3-regulated essential ECM components type I collagen, fibronectin, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2). Restoration of TβRII significantly increased TGF-β induction of Smad3 phosphorylation and stimulated expression of ECM components. Reduced expression of TβRII and ECM components in response to reduced fibroblast size/mechanical force was fully reversed by restoring size/mechanical force. Reduced fibroblast size was associated with reduced expression of TβRII and diminished ECM production, in aged human skin. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism that provides a molecular basis for loss of dermal ECM, with concomitant increased fragility, which is a prominent feature of human skin aging.

  7. Increased expressions and activations of apoptosis-related factors in cell signaling during incised skin wound healing in mice: a preliminary study for forensic wound age estimation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui; Guan, Da-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Du, Yu; Xiong, Chang-Yan; Zhu, Bao-Li; Zhang, Jian-Jun

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that apoptosis plays a pivotal role during skin wound healing and apoptosis-related factors in cell signaling regulate a variety of cellular function. In this study, the expressions of p38MAPK, and JNK, iNOS, eNOS were detected and the activations of caspase-6, -7, -8, -9, and calpain, another signaling pathway of apoptosis, were also investigated by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting in mice. A time-dependent increase of each protein level was observed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot in mouse skin incision. p38MAPK level peaked at 12 h and 3 d, calpain level peaked at 1 d and 5 d, iNOS level peaked at 1 d and 10 d, while the peak levels of eNOS, caspase-6, -7, -8, and -9 occurred at 3 d and p-JNK at 1 d post-injury. In the early phase of wound healing, infiltrating polymorphonulcear cells were labeled with all the factors except caspase-8. Thereafter, infiltrating mononuclear cells and proliferating spindle-shaped fibroblastic cells showed positive staining for p38MAPK, JNK, calpain, caspases and NOS. The activation of caspase-8, -9, -6, and -7 as detected by Western blot indicated that caspase apoptotic pathway may take effect in cellular elimination during skin wound healing. From the viewpoint of forensic pathology, the time-dependent expressions of the factors in apoptotic pathway during skin incised wound healing may be used as potential markers for wound age estimation.

  8. An Open Label Clinical Trial of a Multi-Ingredient Anti-Aging Moisturizer Designed to Improve the Appearance of Facial Skin.

    PubMed

    Herndon, James H; Jiang, Lily; Kononov, Tatiana; Fox, Theresa

    2015-07-01

    An open label clinical trial was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer designed to improve the appearance of facial skin. Parameters studied included fine lines and wrinkles, clarity/brightness, visual roughness, tactile roughness, evenness of skin tone (redness), evenness of skin tone (hyperpigmentation) and overall appearance. Thirty-seven female subjects, ages 35-60 years completed the study. Effective ingredients incorporated into the facial anti-aging moisturizer include: Astragalus membranaceus root extract, a peptide blend including palmitoyl tripeptide-38, standardized rosemary leaf extract (ursolic acid), tetrahexyldecyl ascorbate (THD ascorbate) and ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10). Subjects were instructed to apply the moisturizer twice daily, once in the morning and once in the evening. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of product usage. Clinical evaluations were conducted at each visit. A self-assessment questionnaire was conducted at week 4, week 8, and week 12. The self-assessment questionnaire included product efficacy inquiries and product aesthetic inquiries. Digital photography was conducted at baseline, week 8, and week 12. After 8 weeks of twice daily use, clinical evaluation results show that the multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer produced a statistically significant improvement in the scores of all clinical grading parameters assessed compared to baseline. A greater statistically significant improvement was seen at 12 weeks. At week 12, there was a statistically significant percentage of favorable results versus unfavorable results in all product efficacy and product aesthetic self-assessment questionnaire results. Digital photography supported the clinical grading and self-assessment questionnaire results. Additionally, the multi-ingredient anti-aging moisturizer is judged to be mild and well tolerated. Several tolerability parameters were assessed at all time

  9. Color constancy in Japanese animation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Yasuyo G.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we measure the colors used in a Japanese Animations. The result can be seen on CIE-xy color spaces. It clearly shows that the color system is not a natural appearance system but an imagined and artistic appearance system. Color constancy of human vision can tell the difference in skin and hair colors between under moonlight and day light. Human brain generates a match to the memorized color of an object from daylight viewing conditions to the color of the object in different viewing conditions. For example, Japanese people always perceive the color of the Rising Sun in the Japanese flag as red even in a different viewing condition such as under moonlight. Color images captured by a camera cannot present those human perceptions. However, Japanese colorists in Animation succeeded in painting the effects of color constancy not only under moonlight but also added the memory matching colors. They aim to create a greater impact on viewer's perceptions by using the effect of the memory matching colors. In this paper, we propose the Imagined Japanese Animation Color System. This system in art is currently a subject of research in Japan. Its importance is that it could also provide an explanation on how human brain perceives the same color under different viewing conditions.

  10. "Skin facts" to optimize aesthetic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetic providers need to be well versed in the anatomy and intricacies of the skin. This foundational skin knowledge is critical in assessing clients' aged skin during the aesthetic consultation. A sound understanding of the skin is also a prerequisite to any facial rejuvenation procedure. This article provides the aesthetic provider with the basics of skin anatomy and how the skin changes over time.

  11. Results from in vitro and ex vivo skin aging models assessing the antiglycation and anti-elastase MMP-12 potential of glycylglycine oleamide

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanowicz, Patrick; Haure, Marie-José; Ceruti, Isabelle; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine; Castex-Rizzi, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycation is an aging reaction of naturally occurring sugars with dermal proteins. Type I collagen and elastin are most affected by glycation during intrinsic chronological aging. Aim To study the in vitro and ex vivo assays in human skin cells and explants and the antiaging effects of glycylglycine oleamide (GGO). Materials and methods The antiglycation effect of GGO was assessed in a noncellular in vitro study on collagen and, ex vivo, by immunohistochemical staining on human skin explants (elastin network glycation). The ability of GGO to contract fibroblasts was assessed in a functional assay, and its anti-elastase (MMP-12) activity was compared to that of oleic acid alone, glycylglycine (GG) alone, and oleic acid associated with GG. Results In vitro, GGO reduced the glycation of type I collagen. Ex vivo, GGO restored the expression of fibrillin-1 inhibited by glycation. Furthermore, GGO induced a tissue retraction of almost 30%. Moreover, the MMP-12 activity was inhibited by up to 60%. Conclusion Under the present in vitro and ex vivo conditions, GGO prevents glycation of the major structural proteins of the dermis, helping to reduce the risk of rigidification. By maintaining the elastic function of the skin, GGO may be a promising sparring partner for other topical antiaging agents. PMID:27382322

  12. Anti-inflammation activities of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in response to UV radiation suggest potential anti-skin aging activity.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Suk; Hwang, Jinik; Park, Mirye; Seo, Hyo Hyun; Kim, Hyoung-Shik; Lee, Jeong Hun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2014-10-14

    Certain photosynthetic marine organisms have evolved mechanisms to counteract UV-radiation by synthesizing UV-absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). In this study, MAAs were separated from the extracts of marine green alga Chlamydomonas hedleyi using HPLC and were identified as porphyra-334, shinorine, and mycosporine-glycine (mycosporine-Gly), based on their retention times and maximum absorption wavelengths. Furthermore, their structures were confirmed by triple quadrupole MS/MS. Their roles as UV-absorbing compounds were investigated in the human fibroblast cell line HaCaT by analyzing the expression levels of genes associated with antioxidant activity, inflammation, and skin aging in response to UV irradiation. The mycosporine-Gly extract, but not the other MAAs, had strong antioxidant activity in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Furthermore, treatment with mycosporine-Gly resulted in a significant decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels, which are typically increased in response to inflammation in the skin, in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, in the presence of MAAs, the UV-suppressed genes, procollagen C proteinase enhancer (PCOLCE) and elastin, which are related to skin aging, had increased expression levels equal to those in UV-mock treated cells. Interestingly, the increased expression of involucrin after UV exposure was suppressed by treatment with the MAAs mycosporine-Gly and shinorine, but not porphyra-334. This is the first report investigating the biological activities of microalgae-derived MAAs in human cells.

  13. Autophagy in human skin fibroblasts: Comparison between young and aged cells and evaluation of its cellular rhythm and response to Ultraviolet A radiation.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, Nadine; Dong, Kelly; Pelle, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Autophagic mechanisms play critical roles in cell maintenance. Damaged organelles that are not removed by autophagosomes, which act by engulfing and degrading these cellular components, have been linked to various pathologies. Recently, the progression of aging has also been correlated to a compromised autophagic response. Here, we report for the first time a significant reduction in autophagic levels in synchronized aged normal human skin fibroblasts as compared to young fibroblasts. We measured a 77.9% reduction in autophagy as determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for LC3B expression, a microtubule-associated protein correlated to late stage autophagosome formation. In addition, we visualized these same changes by immunocytofluorescence with antibodies directed against LC3B. By harvesting synchronized, as well as unsynchronized cells over time, we were also able to measure for the first time a nighttime peak in autophagy that was present in young but absent in aged fibroblasts. Finally, since human skin is constantly subjected to environmentally induced oxidative stress from sunlight, we exposed fibroblasts to 10 J/cm2 ultraviolet A and found, in good agreement with current literature, not only that irradiation could partially reactivate autophagy in the aged cells, but also that this increase was phase shifted earlier from its endogenous temporal pattern because of its loss of synchronization with circadian rhythm.

  14. Color blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... have trouble telling the difference between red and green. This is the most common type of color ... color blindness often have problems seeing reds and greens, too. The most severe form of color blindness ...

  15. A mixture of peptides and sugars derived from plant cell walls increases plant defense responses to stress and attenuates ageing-associated molecular changes in cultured skin cells.

    PubMed

    Apone, Fabio; Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Arciello, Stefania; Tortora, Assunta; Filippini, Lucio; Monoli, Irene; Cucchiara, Mirna; Gibertoni, Simone; Chrispeels, Maarten J; Colucci, Gabriella

    2010-02-15

    Small peptides and aminoacid derivatives have been extensively studied for their effect of inducing plant defense responses, and thus increasing plant tolerance to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Similarly to plants, these compounds can activate different signaling pathways in mammalian skin cells as well, leading to the up-regulation of anti-aging specific genes. This suggests the existence of analogous defense response mechanisms, well conserved both in plants and animal cells. In this article, we describe the preparation of a new mixture of peptides and sugars derived from the chemical and enzymatic digestion of plant cell wall glycoproteins. We investigate the multiple roles of this product as potential "biostimulator" to protect plants from abiotic stresses, and also as potential cosmeceutical. In particular, the molecular effects of the peptide/sugar mixture of inducing plant defense responsive genes and protecting cultured skin cells from oxidative burst damages were deeply evaluated.

  16. The effect of the color red on consuming food does not depend on achromatic (Michelson) contrast and extends to rubbing cream on the skin.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Nicola; Martani, Margherita; Corsini, Claudia; Oleari, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    Recent literature suggests that individuals may consume less food when this is served on red plates. We explored this intriguing effect in three experiments. Independent groups of participants were presented with constant amounts of popcorns, chocolate chips, or moisturizing cream, on red, blue, or white plates. They were asked to sample the foods (by tasting them) or the cream (by rubbing it on the hand and forearm) as they wished and to complete mock "sensory analysis" questionnaires. Results confirmed that red plates reduce taste-related consumption and extended this effect to the touch-related consumption of moisturizing cream. Suggesting that the effect was not due to a decrease in the consciously experienced appeal of products on red plates, overall appreciation of the foods or cream did not differ according to plate color. After careful photometric measures of the materials used for each food-plate pairing, we determined that food and cream consumption was not predicted by Michelson (achromatic) contrast. Although the origin of the intriguing effect of the color red on consumption remains unclear, our results may prove useful to future potential explanations.

  17. Protective effects of the antioxidant extract collected from Styela clava tunics on UV radiation‑induced skin aging in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Ji Eun; Go, Jun; Song, Sung Hwa; Sung, Ji Eun; Son, Hong Joo; Jung, Young Jin; Kim, Bae Hwan; Jung, Young Suk; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2016-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is considered a primary cause of skin damage, which is characterized by deep wrinkles, roughness, laxity and pigmentation through oxidative stress and oxidative photodamage. To examine the therapeutic effects of ethanol extract of Styela clava tunics (EtSCT) on UV radiation-induced skin aging in hairless mice, alterations in skin phenotype, histological structures, inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative conditions and toxicity were investigated during 13 weeks of UV irradiation and topical application of EtSCT. EtSCT showed high reducing power (3.1%), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity (92.7%) and NO scavenging activity (15.6%) due to its high total flavonoids (15.3 mg/ml) and total phenolics (36.8 mg/ml). The topical application of EtSCT suppressed photoaging of the skin of UV-irradiated mice, and this was demonstrated by the inhibition of wrinkle formation, the suppression of the erythema index as well as the prevention of transepidermal water loss. Additionally, the epidermal thickness and adipocytes number were recovered to a similar level as that in the no radiation group in the UV + EtSCT‑treated groups compared with the UV + vehicle‑treated group, and the expression of collagen I increased. The attenuation of mitogen‑activated protein kinase and ER stress signaling pathways activated by reactive oxygen species was also detected in the UV + EtSCT‑treated group. Inflammatory responses including the infiltration of mast cells, CD31 expression and interleukin-6 secretion were significantly lower in the UV + EtSCT-treated groups. Moreover, the concentration of malondialdehyde was reduced and the activity of superoxide dismutase was effectively recovered in the UV + EtSCT-treated groups compared with that in the vehicle-treated groups. Liver and kidney t