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Sample records for age spectra show

  1. Seasonal Variations of Stratospheric Age Spectra in GEOSCCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Waugh, Darryn; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Pawson, Steven; Stolarski, Richard S.; Strahan, Susan E.; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2011-01-01

    There are many pathways for an air parcel to travel from the troposphere to the stratosphere, each of which takes different time. The distribution of all the possible transient times, i.e. the stratospheric age spectrum, contains important information on transport characteristics. However, it is computationally very expensive to compute seasonally varying age spectra, and previous studies have focused mainly on the annual mean properties of the age spectra. To date our knowledge of the seasonality of the stratospheric age spectra is very limited. In this study we investigate the seasonal variations of the stratospheric age spectra in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM). We introduce a method to significantly reduce the computational cost for calculating seasonally dependent age spectra. Our simulations show that stratospheric age spectra in GEOSCCM have strong seasonal cycles and the seasonal cycles change with latitude and height. In the lower stratosphere extratropics, the average transit times and the most probable transit times in the winter/early spring spectra are more than twice as old as those in the summer/early fall spectra. But the seasonal cycle in the subtropical lower stratosphere is nearly out of phase with that in the extratropics. In the middle and upper stratosphere, significant seasonal variations occur in the sUbtropics. The spectral shapes also show dramatic seasonal change, especially at high latitudes. These seasonal variations reflect the seasonal evolution of the slow Brewer-Dobson circulation (with timescale of years) and the fast isentropic mixing (with timescale of days to months).

  2. Stratospheric Age Spectra and Mean Ages from In Situ Observations of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Arlyn E.; Boering, Kristie A.; Daube, Bruce C., Jr.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In situ observations of CO2 obtained from 1992 through 2000 using the NASA ER-2 aircraft and high-altitude balloons show that seasonal and interannual variations in CO2 mixing ratios propagate from the troposphere into the lower stratosphere via the tropical tropopause, along with the long-term trend due to fossil fuel combustion. These signals spread laterally and vertically, providing detailed quantitative information about the transport history of sampled air. We have used these data to derive age spectra and mean ages that can be compared with results from models of the stratospheric circulation. For an air parcel at a point in the stratosphere, the age spectrum is defined as the probability distribution function for transit times from the tropical tropopause for each fluid element comprising the parcel. The mean age is the average transit time, corresponding to the first moment of the age spectrum. Age spectra have been derived for altitudes below approximately 20 km for the tropics and for northern midlatitudes where there is sufficient data and where the amplitudes of the seasonal and interannual oscillations in CO2 mixing ratios are large enough to be detected. Tropical age spectra are narrow, with seasonal variation indicating faster ascent during northern winter, consistent with a circulation driven by breaking of extratropical waves. The midlatitude CO2 data are consistent with bimodal age spectra, which could result from a subtropical "barrier" to horizontal exchange over a substantial altitude region. Seasonally resolved mean ages are available with nearly pole-to-pole coverage below 20 km and in the tropics and at middle and high northern latitudes up to the maximum altitude reached by the balloons (approximately 30 km). At ER-2 altitudes, steep meridional gradients in mean age are observed in the subtropics. Between 20 and 30 km, midlatitude air is approximately 2 years older than tropical air at the same altitude. The oldest air sampled was in the

  3. A Comparison of the Age-Spectra from Data Assimilation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Zhu, Zheng-Xin; Pawson, Steven; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We use kinematic and diabatic back trajectory calculations, driven by winds from a general circulation model (GCM) and two different data assimilation systems (DAS), to compute the age spectrum at three latitudes in the lower stratosphere. The age-spectra are compared to chemical transport model (CTM) calculations, and the mean ages from all of these studies are compared to observations. The age spectra computed using the GCM winds show a reasonably well-isolated tropics in good agreement with observations; however, the age spectra determined from the DAS differ from the GCM spectra. For the diabatic trajectory calculations, the age spectrum is too broad as a result of too much exchange between the tropics and mid-latitudes. The age spectrum determined using the kinematic trajectory calculation is less broad and lacks an age offset; both of these features are due to excessive vertical dispersion of parcels. The tropical and mid-latitude mean age difference between the diabatically and kinematically determined age-spectra is about one year, the former being older. The CTM calculation of the age spectrum using the DAS winds shows the same dispersive characteristics of the kinematic trajectory calculation. These results suggest that the current DAS products will not give realistic trace gas distributions for long integrations; they also help explain why the mean ages determined in a number of previous DAS driven CTM's are too young compared with observations. Finally, we note trajectory-generated age spectra show significant age anomalies correlated with the seasonal cycles, and these anomalies can be linked to year-to-year variations in the tropical heating rate. These anomalies are suppressed in the CTM spectra suggesting that the CTM transport is too diffusive.

  4. Female Migraineurs Show Lack of Insular Thinning with Age

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Nasim; Barmettler, Gabi; Moulton, Eric A.; Scrivani, Steven; Veggeberg, Rosanna; Spierings, Egilius L.H.; Burstein, Rami; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter loss in cortical regions is a normal ageing process for the healthy brain. There have been few studies on the process of ageing of the brain in chronic neurological disorders. In this study, we evaluated changes in the cortical thickness by age in 92 female subjects (46 migraine patients, and 46 healthy controls) using high field MRI. The results indicate that in contrast to healthy subjects migraineurs show lack of thinning in the insula by age. The functional significance of the lack of thinning is unknown, but may contribute to the overall cortical hyperexcitability of the migraine brain since the region is tightly involved in a number of majo brain networks involved in interoception, salience, nociception, and autonomic function, including the default mode network. PMID:25775358

  5. Map and table showing isotopic age data in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Shew, Nora B.; DuBois, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The source of the data reported here is a compilation of radiometric ages maintained in conjunction with the Alaska Mineral Resource Assessment Program (AMRAP) studies for Alaska. The symbol shape plotted at each location is coded for rock type, whether igneous, metamorphic, or other; the color of the symbol shows the geologic era or period for the Sample(s) at each locale. A list of references for each quadrangle is given to enable the user to find specific information including analytical data for each sample dated within a particular quadrangle. At the scale of this map, the very large number of Samples and the clustering of the samples in limited areas prevented the showing of individual sample numbers on the map.Synthesis and interpretation of any data set requires the user to evaluate the reliability or value of each component of the data set with respect to his or her intended use of the data. For geochronological data, this evaluation must be based on both analytical and geological criteria. Most age determinations are published with calculated estimates of analytical precision, Replicate analyses are infrequently performed; therefore, reported analytical precision is based on estimates of the precision of various components of the analysis and often on an intuitive factor to cover components that may have not been considered. Analytical accuracy is somewhat more difficult to determine; it is not only dependent on the actual measurement, it is also concerned with uncertainties in decay and abundance constants, uncertainties in the isotopic composition and size of the tracer for conventional K-Ar ages, and uncertainties in the Original isotopic composition of the sample, Geologic accuracy of a date is Variable; the interpretation of the meaning of an age determination, is important in the evaluation of its geologic accuracy. Potassium-argon, rubidium-strontium, and uranium-lead age determinations on a single sample can differ widely yet none or all may be

  6. A Comparison of the Lower Stratospheric Age-Spectra Derived from a General Circulation Model and Two Data Assimilation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Zhu, Zhengxin; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    We use kinematic and diabatic back trajectory calculations, driven by winds from a general circulation model (GCM) and two different data assimilation systems (DAS), to compute the age spectrum at three latitudes in the lower stratosphere. The age-spectra are compared to chemical transport model (CTM) calculations, and the mean ages from all of these studies are compared to observations. The age spectra computed using the GCM winds show a reasonably isolated tropics in good agreement with observations; however, the age spectra determined from the DAS differ from the GCM spectra. For the DAS diabatic trajectory calculations there is too much exchange between the tropics and mid-latitudes. The age spectrum is thus too broad and the tropical mean age is too old as a result of mixing older mid latitude air with tropical air. Likewise the mid latitude mean age is too young due to the in mixing of tropical air. The DAS kinematic trajectory calculations show excessive vertical dispersion of parcels in addition to excessive exchange between the tropics and mid latitudes. Because air is moved rapidly to the troposphere from the vertical dispersion, the age spectrum is shifted toward the young side. The excessive vertical and meridional dispersion compensate in the kinematic case giving a reasonable tropical mean age. The CTM calculation of the age spectrum using the DAS winds shows the same vertical and meridional dispersive characteristics of the kinematic trajectory calculation. These results suggest that the current DAS products will not give realistic trace gas distributions for long integrations; they also help explain why the extra tropical mean ages determined in a number of previous DAS driven CTM s are too young compared with observations. Finally, we note trajectory-generated age spectra . show significant age anomalies correlated with the seasonal cycles. These anomalies can be linked to year-to-year variations in the tropical heating rate. The anomalies are

  7. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of lower stratospheric age of air spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploeger, Felix; Birner, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Trace gas transport in the lower stratosphere is investigated by analysing seasonal and inter-annual variations of the age of air spectrum - the probability distribution of stratospheric transit times. Age spectra are obtained using the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) driven by ERA-Interim winds and total diabatic heating rates, and using a time-evolving boundary-impulse-response (BIER) method based on multiple tracer pulses. Seasonal age spectra show large deviations from an idealized stationary uni-modal shape. Multiple modes emerge in the spectrum throughout the stratosphere, strongest at high latitudes, caused by the interplay of seasonally varying tropical upward mass flux, stratospheric transport barriers and recirculation. Inter-annual variations in transport (e.g. quasi-biennial oscillation) cause significant modulations of the age spectrum shape. In fact, one particular QBO phase may determine the spectrum's mode during the following 2-3 years. Interpretation of the age spectrum in terms of transport contributions due to the residual circulation and mixing is generally not straightforward. It turns out that advection by the residual circulation represents the dominant pathway in the deep tropics and in the winter hemisphere extratropics above 500 K, controlling the modal age in these regions. In contrast, in the summer hemisphere, particularly in the lowermost stratosphere, mixing represents the most probable pathway controlling the modal age.

  8. Reddening and age for 13 southern Galactic open clusters determined from integrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Bica, E.; Dutra, C. M.; Torres, M. C.

    2001-10-01

    In this study we present flux-calibrated integrated spectra in the range 3800-6800 Å for 13 concentrated open clusters with Galactic longitudes between 219deg and 316deg, nine of which have not been previously studied. Using the equivalent widths of the Balmer lines and comparing the cluster spectra with template spectra of Magellanic Clouds and Galactic star clusters with known parameters, we derive both foreground interstellar reddening values and age. For nine clusters these two parameters have been determined for the first time, while for the rest of the sample the results show good agreement with previous studies. The present analysis indicates four very young (Hogg 11, NGC 5606, vdB-RN 80 and Pismis 17), seven moderately young (ESO 429-SC13, Hogg 3, Hogg 12, Haffner 7, BH 87, NGC 2368 and Bochum 12) and two intermediate-age (Berkeley 75 and NGC 2635) open clusters. The derived foreground interstellar reddening values are in the range 0.00 <= E(B-V) <= 0.38. The age and reddening distributions of the present sample of relatively faint open clusters match those of open clusters with known parameters in a 90deg sector centered at l = 270deg. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  9. Reading multifractal spectra: Aging by multifractal analysis of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowiec, D.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Gałaska, R.; Wdowczyk-Szulc, J.; Żarczyńska-Buchowiecka, M.

    2011-06-01

    The method of effective reading of multifractal properties is proposed. The method consists in the analysis of a given signal together with the analysis of an integrated signal. A practical way to separate monofractal-type signals from other signals is given. The method is applied to 24-hour ECG recordings of RR-interbeat intervals to assess the effect of aging on autonomic regulation of the heart in healthy adults. Heart rate variability is evaluated by multifractal analysis in the VLF band. A switch from mono- to multifractality is observed between diurnal and nocturnal parts of series in the group of young adults. With aging the multifractal structure of nocturnal signals declines. The observed changes can be related to the circadian alternation in the central mechanisms controlling the cardiovascular system which becomes impaired with advance in age in human. Indices for age impairment of autonomic regulation are proposed.

  10. Long-Term Changes in Stratospheric Age Spectra in the 21st Century in the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Feng; Waugh, Darryn W.; Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Strahan, Susan E.; Ma, Jun; Nielsen, J. Eric; Liang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the long-term variations in the stratospheric age spectra using simulations of the 21st century with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry- Climate Model (GEOSCCM). Our purposes are to characterize the long-term changes in the age spectra and identify processes that cause the decrease of the mean age in a warming climate. Changes in the age spectra in the 21st century simulations are characterized by decreases in the modal age, the mean age, the spectral width, and the tail decay timescale. Our analyses show that the decrease in the mean age is caused by two processes: the acceleration of the residual circulation that increases the young air masses in the stratosphere, and the weakening of the recirculation that leads to the decrease of tail of the age spectra and the decrease of the old air masses. The weakening of the stratospheric recirculation is also strongly correlated with the increase of the residual circulation. One important result of this study is that the decrease of the tail of the age spectra makes an important contribution to the decrease of the main age. Long-term changes in the stratospheric isentropic mixing are investigated. Mixing increases in the subtropical lower stratosphere, but its impact on the age spectra is outweighed by the increase of the residual circulation. The impacts of the long-term changes in the age spectra on long-lived chemical traces are also investigated. 37 2

  11. CD spectra show the relational style between Zic-, Gli-, Glis-zinc finger protein and DNA.

    PubMed

    Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Ishiguro, Akira; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Aruga, Jun; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko

    2008-01-01

    Zic family proteins have five C2H2-type zinc finger motifs. The Zic-zinc finger domains show high homology to the corresponding domains of the Gli and Glis families, which also contain five C2H2-type zinc finger motifs. The zinc finger motifs of the proteins of these three protein families form an alpha-helix conformation in solution. The addition of oligo DNA that included a Gli-binding sequence increased the alpha-helix content estimated by using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Comparison of the Zic-, Gli-, and Glis-zinc fingers indicated that the alpha-helix content after the addition of oligo DNA correlated well with the affinity of each zinc finger for the oligo DNA (correlation coefficient, 0.85). The importance of the zinc ion for protein folding was reflected in a reduction in the alpha-helix content upon removal of the zinc ion. Owing to the compact globular structure, the alpha-helix structure of the proteins of these three protein families is extremely thermally stable. These results suggest that the alpha-helix structure is important for DNA binding and profoundly related to functional and structural diversity among the three families.

  12. Interpretation of discordant 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra of mesozoic tholeiites from antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Sutter, J.F.; Elliot, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional K-Ar ages of tholeiitic basalts of the Ferrar Group in the central Transantarctic Mountains indicate significant loss of radiogenic 40Ar from this unit over much of its outcrop area. Argon loss varies inversely with amount of devitrified matrix in the basalts, which have not been thermally or tectonically disturbed since extrusion. 40Ar/19Ar age-spectra of these tholeiites are generally discordant and indicate significant inhomogeneity in the distribution of radiogenic 40Ar with respect to 39Ar, but are distinctly different from release patterns of thermally disturbed samples. Amounts of argon redistribution vary directly with amounts of devitrification and are reflected in progressive modification of the age spectra. A model of redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar by devitrification of originally glassy matrix is suggested that is consistent with disturbance of the conventional K-Ar systematics as well as the 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra. Samples with substantial redistribution but minor loss of radiogenic argon yield age spectra whose apparent ages decrease from low-temperature to high-temperature steps, similar to those reported for some lunar basalts, breccias, and soils. Modification of all the age spectra is attributed to redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar during progressive devitrification, although 39Ar-recoil effects suggested by Turner and Cadogan (1974) may be a factor in some cases. Where devitrification involves most potassium sites within the basalt, 40Ar/39Ar age-plateaux may be formed that have no geologic significance. ?? 1977.

  13. Short organic carbon turnover time and narrow 14C age spectra in early Holocene wetland paleosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Lael; Rosenheim, Brad E.; Fernandez, Alvaro; Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    2017-01-01

    Paleosols contain information about the rates of soil organic carbon turnover when the soil was actively forming. However, this temporal information is often difficult to interpret without tight stratigraphic control on the age of the paleosol. Here we apply ramped pyrolysis/oxidation (Ramped PyrOx) 14C analyses to evaluate age spectra of transgressive early Holocene paleosols from the Mississippi Delta in southeastern Louisiana, USA. We find 14C age spectra from soil organic matter (SOM) in both paleosols and overlying basal peats that represent variability in age that is close to, or only slightly greater than, analytical uncertainty of 14C measurements, despite different sources of carbon with likely disparate ages. Such age spectra have not previously been observed in the sedimentary record. Here they indicate vigorous soil carbon turnover prior to burial, which homogenized 14C ages within SOM across the entire thermochemical spectrum. The weighted bulk 14C ages from Ramped PyrOx of paleosols and overlying peats are identical within analytical and process-associated uncertainty, and corroborate 14C ages from charcoal fragments and plant macrofossils from the overlying peat. The youngest ages from Ramped PyrOx age spectra may also potentially be applied as chronometers for stratigraphic burial ages. Our results suggest rapid turnover (≪300 years) of carbon in these soils relative to input of allochthonous carbon, indicating that the 14C age of different soil components is decoupled from thermochemical stability and instead reflects vigorous turnover processes. The concurrence of paleosol and peat 14C ages also suggests that pedogenic processes were linked with the development of coastal marshes, and that the priming effect potentially masked the signal of allochthonous carbon inputs during sea level rise.

  14. Interpretation of 40Ar/39Ar Age-spectra in Low-grade Polymetamorphic Rocks: The Importance of Petrologic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunk, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar age-spectra of white micas from low-grade polymetamorphic terranes can be difficult to interpret, because these low-grade rocks frequently have multiple generations of cleavage-forming white mica that grew at temperatures below their closure for diffusion of argon (~350°C). Under such conditions, each generation of cleavage-forming white mica will retain its original growth age. In addition, rocks from metamorphic terranes can also contain populations of detrital and diagenetic white micas which also have distinct ages associated with them. A final complication, frequently found in these low-grade polymetamorphic samples is the presence of inseparable, intergrown chlorite and the problems with associated 39Ar recoil during irradiation of the samples, prior to sample analysis. The shapes of 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of white micas separated from such samples are frequently complex and are quite variable in shape. Some age spectra show a steady increase in age with increase in the temperature of release, while others have sigmoidal or saddle-shaped patterns. The age of most of the steps in such age spectra are mixtures of the various age populations of white mica in the sample, and as such are geologically meaningless. Nonetheless, useful constraints on the ages of at least some events recorded in these complex low-grade polymetamorphic rocks can be discerned with the help of petrographic observations, and by placing the results in a spatial context to test for reproducibility and/or the occurrence of meaningful patterns. If no chlorite is present and the sample contains no detrital white mica, an estimate of the maximum age of the youngest component and the minimum age of the oldest cleavage forming white mica populations can frequently be discerned. If the sample contains detrital white mica, a minimum age for its cooling or crystallization can be estimated. The presence of a small amount of intimately intergrown chlorite masks the age of the youngest white

  15. Your Age is Showing: Understanding the Spectral Features of Young Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiTomasso, Victoria; Schwab, Ellianna; Rice, Emily L.; Riedel, Adric R.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Faherty, Jackie

    2017-01-01

    Brown dwarfs are substellar objects that continuously cool, shrink, and fade over billions of years. These physical changes lead us to expect that young objects will have spectral indicators of low gravity. We selected 11 brown dwarfs ranging in spectral type from M7-L7 whose optical and/or low resolution NIR spectroscopy suggest that they are low gravity, hence young, objects. Using high-resolution (R~20,000) near-infrared data from the NIRSPEC instrument at the Keck II telescope in Hawaii, we analyzed J-band (1.1-1.4 μm) spectra of these targets. We calculated their radial velocities and combined those values with previously calculated parallax distances and proper motions to determine their likelihood of membership in nearby young moving groups, successfully placing three of them. We also compared our high-resolution spectra to observations of confirmed young (<500 Myr old) and field age (1-5 Gyr old) brown dwarfs. We examined differences in the gravity-sensitive potassium (K I) lines at 1.175 μm and 1.25 μm both qualitatively and quantitatively. By analyzing the high resolution spectroscopy of these candidate young brown dwarfs we can evaluate the consistency of spectral indicators of youth across spectral type, age, resolution, and wavelength regime.

  16. Age-related changes in long-term average spectra of children's voices.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Desmond; Welch, Graham Frederick

    2008-11-01

    This paper forms part of a larger study into the nature of singing development in children. The focus here is on an investigation of age-related changes in long-term average spectra (LTAS). Three hundred and twenty children in age groups 4-11 years learned a song. Each child was then digitally recorded singing alone. LTAS curves were calculated from the recordings of each voice and perceived age was estimated by a panel of independent judges. Progressive statistically significant changes were observed in the LTAS as a function of increasing age of the children. These took the form of increases in spectral energy in all frequencies below 5.75 kHz, with concomitant reductions of energy in frequency regions above this point. Increases with age were also found in overall intensity levels of the vocal products. Four experienced listeners audited the voice samples and made estimates of the children's ages. The level of accuracy of age-estimates was remarkably high for children in the youngest age groups, but was reduced with voice samples from older children. Maturation and developing competence of the vocal system, both in growth of lung capacity and at a laryngeal level, are implicated in the generation of age-related spectral changes. Perceived child singer age appears to be less closely related to spectral characteristics (as defined within LTAS) with increasing age of children.

  17. Influence of sex, smoking and age on human hprt mutation frequencies and spectra.

    PubMed Central

    Curry, J; Karnaoukhova, L; Guenette, G C; Glickman, B W

    1999-01-01

    Examination of the literature for hprt mutant frequencies from peripheral T cells yielded data from 1194 human subjects. Relationships between mutant frequency, age, sex, and smoking were examined, and the kinetics were described. Mutant frequency increases rapidly with age until about age 15. Afterward, the rate of increase falls such that after age 53, the hprt mutant frequency is largely stabilized. Sex had no effect on mutant frequency. Cigarette smoking increased mean mutant frequency compared to nonsmokers, but did not alter age vs. mutant frequency relationships. An hprt in vivo mutant database containing 795 human hprt mutants from 342 individuals was prepared. No difference in mutational spectra was observed comparing smokers to nonsmokers, confirming previous reports. Sex affected the frequency of deletions (>1 bp) that are recovered more than twice as frequently in females (P = 0. 008) compared to males. There is no indication of a significant shift in mutational spectra with age for individuals older than 19 yr, with the exception of A:T --> C:G transversions. These events are recovered more frequently in older individuals. PMID:10388825

  18. Ramped pyrolysis 14C age spectra of riverine particulate organic matter through a record hydrograph - the Great Atchafalaya Flood of 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenheim, B. E.; Roberts, B. J.; Williams, E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic flood events can have major effects on biogeochemistry of estuary and deltaic systems. In 2011, the Great Flood event that transpired in the Missouri-Mississippi River watershed resulted in likely the highest discharge of water and sediments at the Atchafalaya outflow in several thousand years (since the last time the mainstem discharge flowed through this area). We sampled the event hydrograph starting near the peak and measuring through the falling leg of the flood event. Here we describe particulate organic carbon (POC) age spectra from these samples referenced to selected samples from a >60 month time series of samples from several sites along the Atchafalaya outlet and building submarine delta. Similar to past work on high-water events, age spectra become older during the flood event. However, this flood event did not return ages as old as previous events analyzed, suggesting a provenance control on age spectra. Age spectra showed relatively youngest ages during the return to baseline conditions immediately following the flood hydrograph and then returned to intermediate ages afterwards. Our response to the event missed the early rising limb of the event, when sediment transport was highest, however the peak and falling limb of the Atchafalaya hydrograph were well-represented in our time series. We hypothesize that during the initial pulse of sediment, age spectra may have been older, but subsequent discharge at near bank-full and over bank flow at some river reaches carried more recent POC than initial erosion of bank deposits during the rising limb of the flood. Still, the age spectra observed in an extreme event do not approach the breadth of the spectra observed in more erosive and steep mountainous river systems.

  19. Aged mice receiving caffeine since adulthood show distinct patterns of anxiety-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Pochmann, Daniela; Rocha, Andreia S; Nunes, Fernanda; Almeida, Amanda S; Marques, Daniela M; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2017-03-01

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide. Anxiogenic effects of caffeine have been described in adult animals with controversial findings about its anxiogenic potential. Besides, the effects of caffeine on anxiety with aging are still poorly known. In this study, adult mice (6months old) started to receive caffeine (0.3 and 1.0mg/mL, drinking water) during 12-14months only in the light cycle and at weekdays. The open field (OF) and elevated plus maze (EPM) testing were used to determine the effects of caffeine on anxiety-related behavior in adult and aged mice (18-20months old). Because aging alters synaptic proteins, we also evaluated SNAP-25 (as a nerve terminals marker), GFAP (as an astrocyte marker) and adenosine A1 and A2A receptors levels in the cortex. According to the OF analysis, caffeine did not change both hypolocomotion and anxiety with aging. However, aged mice showed less anxiety behavior in the EPM, but after receiving caffeine (0.3mg/mL) during adulthood they were anxious as adult mice. While SNAP-25 and adenosine A2A receptors increased with aging, both GFAP and adenosine A1 receptors were not affected. Caffeine at moderate dose prevented the age-related increase of the SNAP-25, with no effect on adenosine A2A receptors. The absence of effect for the highest dose suggests that tolerance to caffeine may have developed over time. Aged mice showed high responsiveness to the OF, being difficult to achieve any effect of caffeine. On the other hand this substance sustained the adult anxious behavior over time in a less stressful paradigm, and this effect was coincident with changes in the SNAP-25, suggesting the involvement of this synaptic protein in the ability of caffeine to preserve changes related to emotionality with aging.

  20. Fascicles and the interfascicular matrix show decreased fatigue life with ageing in energy storing tendons.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2017-03-16

    Tendon is composed of rope-like fascicles bound together by interfascicular matrix (IFM). The IFM is critical for the function of energy storing tendons, facilitating sliding between fascicles to allow these tendons to cyclically stretch and recoil. This capacity is required to a lesser degree in positional tendons. We have previously demonstrated that both fascicles and IFM in energy storing tendons have superior fatigue resistance compared with positional tendons, but the effect of ageing on the fatigue properties of these different tendon subunits has not been determined. Energy storing tendons become more injury-prone with ageing, indicating reduced fatigue resistance, hence we tested the hypothesis that the decline in fatigue life with ageing in energy storing tendons would be more pronounced in the IFM than in fascicles. We further hypothesised that tendon subunit fatigue resistance would not alter with ageing in positional tendons. Fascicles and IFM from young and old energy storing and positional tendons were subjected to cyclic fatigue testing until failure, and mechanical properties were calculated. The results show that both IFM and fascicles from the SDFT exhibit a similar magnitude of reduced fatigue life with ageing. By contrast, the fatigue life of positional tendon subunits was unaffected by ageing. The age-related decline in fatigue life of tendon subunits in energy storing tendons is likely to contribute to the increased risk of injury in aged tendons. Full understanding of the mechanisms resulting in this reduced fatigue life will aid in the development of treatments and interventions to prevent age-related tendinopathy.

  1. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2013-06-04

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines, and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of water-soluble SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and α-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ∼100 ppb ammonia in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (∼0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for λexcitation = 420 ± 50 nm and λemission = 475 ± 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to λexcitation = 320 ± 25 nm and λemission = 425 ± 38 nm for the α-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the EEM spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles may have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  2. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  3. Like cognitive function, decision making across the life span shows profound age-related changes

    PubMed Central

    Tymula, Agnieszka; Rosenberg Belmaker, Lior A.; Ruderman, Lital; Glimcher, Paul W.; Levy, Ifat

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that human cognitive function improves through young adulthood and then declines across the later life span. Here we examined how decision-making function changes across the life span by measuring risk and ambiguity attitudes in the gain and loss domains, as well as choice consistency, in an urban cohort ranging in age from 12 to 90 y. We identified several important age-related patterns in decision making under uncertainty: First, we found that healthy elders between the ages of 65 and 90 were strikingly inconsistent in their choices compared with younger subjects. Just as elders show profound declines in cognitive function, they also show profound declines in choice rationality compared with their younger peers. Second, we found that the widely documented phenomenon of ambiguity aversion is specific to the gain domain and does not occur in the loss domain, except for a slight effect in older adults. Finally, extending an earlier report by our group, we found that risk attitudes across the life span show an inverted U-shaped function; both elders and adolescents are more risk-averse than their midlife counterparts. Taken together, these characterizations of decision-making function across the life span in this urban cohort strengthen the conclusions of previous reports suggesting a profound impact of aging on cognitive function in this domain. PMID:24082105

  4. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy shows significant differences between spectra of undifferentiated and polynucleated FLG 29.1 dried cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Salvatore; Benvenuti, Susanna; Conti, Antonio; Benedetti, Enzo; Bramanti, Emilia; Rossi, Ilaria; Benedetti, Edoardo

    1994-02-01

    In a recent study made on cultures of human leukaemic cells (FLG 29.1 cell line) we were able to detect, by IR microspectroscopy, some significant IR spectroscopic variations following differentiation of cells towards osteoclastic-like behavior. The present study was undertaken on the same cell line in order to monitor biochemical structure variations following fusion induced by polyetilenglycole (PEG), using FTIR microspectroscopy. The finger-print region of all the spectra was retained and normalized according to a new regression procedure. Eleven bands were selected and total band power and mean power per unit frequency were compared with the corresponding reference session bands by a Dunnett's T test. Significant differences were found in both the tested variables only between treated and untreated cells, in 6 bands.

  5. Sterols from Mytilidae show anti-aging and neuroprotective effects via anti-oxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujuan; Lin, Yanfei; Cao, Xueli; Xiang, Lan; Qi, Jianhua

    2014-11-25

    For screening anti-aging samples from marine natural products, K6001 yeast strain was employed as a bioassay system. The active mussel extract was separated to give an active sterol fraction (SF). SF was further purified, and four sterol compounds were obtained. Their structures were determined to be cholesterol (CHOL), brassicasterol, crinosterol, and 24-methylenecholesterol. All compounds showed similar anti-aging activity. To understand the action mechanism involved, anti-oxidative experiments, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, and malondialdehyde (MDA) tests were performed on the most abundant compound, CHOL. Results indicated that treatment with CHOL increases the survival rate of yeast under oxidative stress and decreases ROS and MDA levels. In addition, mutations of uth1, skn7, sod1, and sod2, which feature a K6001 background, were employed and the lifespans of the mutations were not affected by CHOL. These results demonstrate that CHOL exerts anti-aging effects via anti-oxidative stress. Based on the connection between neuroprotection and anti-aging, neuroprotective experiments were performed in PC12 cells. Paraquat was used to induce oxidative stress and the results showed that the CHOL and SF protect the PC12 cells from the injury induced by paraquat. In addition, these substance exhibited nerve growth factor (NGF) mimic activities again confirmed their neuroprotective function.

  6. Argon-40/Argon-39 Age Spectra of Apollo 17 Highlands Breccia Samples by Laser Step Heating and the Age of the Serenitatis Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalrymple, G. Brent; Ryder, Graham

    1996-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (21-63 steps) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra using a continuous laser system on 19 submilligram samples of melt rocks and clasts from Apollo 17 samples collected from the pre-Imbrian highlands in the easternmost part of the Serenitatis basin. The samples include poikilitic melt rocks inferred to have been formed in the Serenitatis basin-forming impact, aphanitic melt rock whose compositions vary and whose provenance is uncertain, and granulite, gabbro, and melt clasts. Three of the poikilitic melts have similar age spectrum plateau ages (72395,96, 3893 +/- 16 Ma (2sigma); 72535,7, 3887 +/- 16 Ma; 76315,150, 3900 +/- 16 Ma) with a weighted mean age of 3893 +/- 9 Ma, which we interpret as the best age for the Serenitatis basin- forming impact. Published Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum ages of Apollo 17 poikilitic melts are consistent with our new age but are much less precise. Two poikilitic melts did not give plateaus and the maxima in their age spectra indicate ages of greater than or equal to 3869 Ma (72558,7) and greater than or equal to 3743 Ma (77135,178). Plateau ages of two poikilitic melts and two gabbro clasts from 73155 range from 3854 +/- 16 Ma to 3937 +/- 16 Ma and have probably been affected by the ubiquitous (older?) clasts and by post- formation heating (impact) events. Plateau ages from two of the aphanitic melt 'blobs' and two granulites in sample 72255 fall in the narrow range of 3850 q 16 Ma to 3869 q 16 Ma with a weighted mean of 3862 +/- 8 Ma. Two of the aphanitic melt blobs from 72255 have ages of 3883 +/- 16 Ma and greater than or equal to 3894 Ma, whereas a poikilitic melt clast (of different composition from the 'Serenitatis' melts) has an age of 3835 +/- 16 Ma, which is the upper limit for the accretion of 72255. These data suggest that either the aphanitic melts vary in age, as is also suggested by their varying chemical compositions, or they formed in the 72255 accretionary event about 3.84-3.85 Ga and older relict

  7. [Research on the silk aging with x-ray diffraction spectra].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-mei; Yuan, Si-xun

    2010-01-01

    The present paper did some researches on the deterioration mechanism and the changes in crystallinity of silk fabrics by means of the X-ray diffraction analysis. The samples artificially aged and excavated from Hubei, Innermongolia, Shaanxi and Qinghai provinces were analyzed. The artificial aging was done by simulating three main natural aging factors: light, heat and hydrolysis. The analytical results show that X-ray diffraction analysis could reveal the aging process and characteristic of silk, as well as the changes in crystallinity during silk aging. The X-ray diffraction analysis is of practical value for the conservation state and aging mechanism studies of ancient silk. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis could also provide important information on ancient technology of textile and apparel.

  8. Growth impairment shows an age-dependent pattern in boys with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zivicnjak, Miroslav; Franke, Doris; Filler, Guido; Haffner, Dieter; Froede, Kerstin; Nissel, Richard; Haase, Sanny; Offner, Gisela; Ehrich, Jochen H H; Querfeld, Uwe

    2007-03-01

    The impact of chronological age on longitudinal body growth from early childhood through adolescence using detailed anthropometric methods has not yet been studied in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We have evaluated growth failure by measuring four components of linear growth: body height (HT), sitting height (SHT), arm length (AL) and leg length (LL). Data were prospectively collected for up to 7 years on 190 boys (3-21 years old) with congenital or hereditary CKD (all had developed at least stage 2 CKD by the age of 10 years). Patients showed the most severe growth failure in early childhood, followed by an acceleration in growth in pre-puberty, a slowing-down of growth at puberty, as expected, and thereafter a late speeding-up of growth until early adulthood. This pattern was observed irrespective of the degree of CKD and different treatment modalities, such as conservative treatment, recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy or transplantation. LL showed the most dynamic growth changes of all the parameters evaluated and emerged as the best indicator of statural growth in children with CKD. A specific age-dependent pattern of physical growth was identified in pediatric male CKD patients. This growth pattern should be considered in the evaluation of individual growth and the assessment of treatment efficacy such as rhGH therapy.

  9. Age of the Harrison Street Beast: Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra from tooth enamel

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, R.A.; Elam, J.M.; Davenport, C.; Bogard, J.S.

    1998-04-01

    Workers doing road reconstruction in 1993 in Fort Wayne, Indiana, uncovered remains of a large skeleton and contacted archaeologists for assessment prior to continuing work. The archaeologists excavated the remains which were located in a 19-cm thick layer of blue glay, a pedological deposit which forms from wet, anaerobic environments associated with bogs. This glay layer was located some 2 meters below the current ground level (Davenport 1996). In this paper, the authors present the results of an EPR analysis of tooth enamel (biogenic hydroxyapatite) from the Harrison Street Beast. The objectives of this study are: (1) determine an age for the specimen through EPR analysis of molar tooth enamel; (2) resolve and identify the radiation sensitive EPR spectral components; and (3) develop a provisional model for the creation of radiation-sensitive components in the EPR spectra.

  10. Astrocytes from adult Wistar rats aged in vitro show changes in glial functions.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Raupp, Gustavo Santos; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2015-11-01

    Astrocytes, the most versatile cells of the central nervous system, play an important role in the regulation of neurotransmitter homeostasis, energy metabolism, antioxidant defenses and the anti-inflammatory response. Recently, our group characterized cortical astrocyte cultures from adult Wistar rats. In line with that work, we studied glial function using an experimental in vitro model of aging astrocytes (30 days in vitro after reaching confluence) from newborn (NB), adult (AD) and aged (AG) Wistar rats. We evaluated metabolic parameters, such as the glucose uptake, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and glutathione (GSH) content, as well as the GFAP, GLUT-1 and xCT expression. AD and AG astrocytes take up less glucose than NB astrocytes and had decreased GLUT1 expression levels. Furthermore, AD and AG astrocytes exhibited decreased GS activity compared to NB cells. Simultaneously, AD and AG astrocytes showed an increase in GSH levels, along with an increase in xCT expression. NB, AD and AG astrocytes presented similar morphology; however, differences in GFAP levels were observed. Taken together, these results improve the knowledge of cerebral senescence and represent an innovative tool for brain studies of aging.

  11. Plasma and serum lipidomics of healthy white adults shows characteristic profiles by subjects' gender and age.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masaki; Maekawa, Keiko; Saito, Kosuke; Senoo, Yuya; Urata, Masayo; Murayama, Mayumi; Tajima, Yoko; Kumagai, Yuji; Saito, Yoshiro

    2014-01-01

    Blood is a commonly used biofluid for biomarker discovery. Although blood lipid metabolites are considered to be potential biomarker candidates, their fundamental properties are not well characterized. We aimed to (1) investigate the matrix type (serum vs. plasma) that may be preferable for lipid biomarker exploration, (2) elucidate age- and gender-associated differences in lipid metabolite levels, and (3) examine the stability of lipid metabolites in matrix samples subjected to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we performed lipidomic analyses for fasting plasma and serum samples for four groups (15 subjects/group) of young and elderly (25-34 and 55-64 years old, respectively) males and females and for an additional aliquot of samples from young males, which were subjected to repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Lysophosphatidylcholine and diacylglycerol levels were higher in serum than in plasma samples, suggesting that the clotting process influences serum lipid metabolite levels. Gender-associated differences highlighted that the levels of many sphingomyelin species were significantly higher in females than in males, irrespective of age and matrix (plasma and serum). Age-associated differences were more prominent in females than in males, and in both matrices, levels of many triacylglycerols were significantly higher in elderly females than in young females. Plasma and serum levels of most lipid metabolites were reduced by freeze-thawing. Our results indicate that plasma is an optimal matrix for exploring lipid biomarkers because it represents the original properties of an individual's blood sample. In addition, the levels of some blood lipid species of healthy adults showed gender- and age-associated differences; thus, this should be considered during biomarker exploration and its application in diagnostics. Our fundamental findings on sample selection and handling procedures for measuring blood lipid metabolites is important

  12. Streamwater ages derived from tritium show power law variation with discharge like silica concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Michael; Morgenstern, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Understanding runoff generation is important for management of freshwater systems. Determining transit time distributions of streamwaters and how they change with discharge gives information on the flowpaths and recharge sources of streams - vital information for determining the responses of streams to stressors such as pollution, landuse change, or climate change. This work takes a first look at unique information on how transit time distributions change with discharge in some New Zealand catchments. Transit time distributions of streamwaters have been determined from tritium measurements on single samples in this work. This allows changes with stream discharge to be observed, in contrast to previous isotope studies which have given averaged transit time distributions based on series of samples. In addition, tritium reveals the wide spectrum of ages present in streams whereas oxygen-18 or chloride variations only show the younger ages (Stewart et al., 2010). It was found that the mean transit time (MTT) data could be reasonably represented by straight lines in log-log plots, indicating power law relationships between MTT and discharge. Similar power law behaviour has been observed for the rock forming elements such as silica in streamwaters (Godsey et al., 2009). Case studies are presented for two New Zealand catchments, both with volcanic ash substrates. Toenepi is a dairy catchment near Hamilton, which shows well-constrained power law relationships between MTT and discharge, and between silica concentration and discharge (Morgenstern et al., 2010). Baseflow MTTs vary from 2.5 to 157 years. Tutaeuaua is a pastoral farming catchment near Taupo. Results for nested catchments along the stream also show power law relationships for both MTT and silica with discharge. Streamwater MTTs vary from 1 to 11 years. The results indicate that (1) relatively old waters dominate many streams, (2) streamwater ages vary with discharge, and (3) age, like silica, varies according to

  13. Influence of ageing on Raman spectra and the conductivity of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by heavy and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenko, A.; Zion, E.; Kaganovskii, Yu.; Wolfson, L.; Richter, V.; Sharoni, A.; Kogan, E.; Kaveh, M.; Shlimak, I.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of long-term ageing (about one year) on the Raman scattering (RS) spectra and the temperature dependence of conductivity has been studied in two series of monolayer graphene samples irradiated by different doses of C+ and Xe+ ions. It is shown that the main result of ageing consists of changes in the intensity and position of D- and G- and 2D-lines in RS spectra and in an increase of the conductivity. The observed effects are explained in terms of an increase of the radius of the "activated" area around structural defects.

  14. Reddening and age of six poorly studied star clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud derived from integrated spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minniti, J. H.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Benítez-Llambay, A.

    2014-05-01

    Aims: To increase the number of studied star clusters (SCs) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we present flux-calibrated integrated spectra in the optical range (λ = 3700-6800 Å) for six poorly studied LMC SCs of IVA type. This type corresponds to the age range between 200 and 400 Myr. We also aim at creating a new template spectrum representative of this age range at the metallicity level of the LMC. Methods: Foreground reddening E(B - V) values and ages are derived by applying the template matching method that consists of comparing the line strengths and continuum distribution of the cluster spectra with those of template cluster spectra with known properties. The equivalent width (EW) of the Balmer lines and the diagnostic diagrams involving the sum of EWs of selected spectral lines were also employed as age indicators. Results: For the first time, we provide estimates of the clusters' reddenings and ages. As expected, all the clusters appear to be of nearly the same age, their mean value being (400 ± 100) Myr, while the resulting mean E(B - V) values range between 0.00 and 0.10 mag. Conclusions: The present cluster sample complements previous ones in an effort to gather a spectral library with several clusters per age bin. By averaging the reddening-corrected integrated spectra, weighted by their signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), a new high S/N template spectrum of 400 Myr has been created. Integrated spectra for each star cluster are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/565/A49

  15. Convergence in relationships between leaf traits, spectra and age across diverse canopy environments and two contrasting tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Chavana-Bryant, Cecilia; Prohaska, Neill; Serbin, Shawn P; Guan, Kaiyu; Albert, Loren P; Yang, Xi; van Leeuwen, Willem J D; Garnello, Anthony John; Martins, Giordane; Malhi, Yadvinder; Gerard, France; Oliviera, Raimundo Cosme; Saleska, Scott R

    2017-05-01

    Leaf age structures the phenology and development of plants, as well as the evolution of leaf traits over life histories. However, a general method for efficiently estimating leaf age across forests and canopy environments is lacking. Here, we explored the potential for a statistical model, previously developed for Peruvian sunlit leaves, to consistently predict leaf ages from leaf reflectance spectra across two contrasting forests in Peru and Brazil and across diverse canopy environments. The model performed well for independent Brazilian sunlit and shade canopy leaves (R(2)  = 0.75-0.78), suggesting that canopy leaves (and their associated spectra) follow constrained developmental trajectories even in contrasting forests. The model did not perform as well for mid-canopy and understory leaves (R(2)  = 0.27-0.29), because leaves in different environments have distinct traits and trait developmental trajectories. When we accounted for distinct environment-trait linkages - either by explicitly including traits and environments in the model, or, even better, by re-parameterizing the spectra-only model to implicitly capture distinct trait-trajectories in different environments - we achieved a more general model that well-predicted leaf age across forests and environments (R(2)  = 0.79). Fundamental rules, linked to leaf environments, constrain the development of leaf traits and allow for general prediction of leaf age from spectra across species, sites and canopy environments.

  16. Brain morphometry shows effects of long-term musical practice in middle-aged keyboard players

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, H.; Minnerop, M.; Pieperhoff, P.; Schleicher, A.; Zilles, K.; Altenmüller, E.; Amunts, K.

    2013-01-01

    To what extent does musical practice change the structure of the brain? In order to understand how long-lasting musical training changes brain structure, 20 male right-handed, middle-aged professional musicians and 19 matched controls were investigated. Among the musicians, 13 were pianists or organists with intensive practice regimes. The others were either music teachers at schools or string instrumentalists, who had studied the piano at least as a subsidiary subject, and practiced less intensively. The study was based on T1-weighted MR images, which were analyzed using deformation-based morphometry. Cytoarchitectonic probabilistic maps of cortical areas and subcortical nuclei as well as myeloarchitectonic maps of fiber tracts were used as regions of interest to compare volume differences in the brains of musicians and controls. In addition, maps of voxel-wise volume differences were computed and analyzed. Musicians showed a significantly better symmetric motor performance as well as a greater capability of controlling hand independence than controls. Structural MRI-data revealed significant volumetric differences between the brains of keyboard players, who practiced intensively and controls in right sensorimotor areas and the corticospinal tract as well as in the entorhinal cortex and the left superior parietal lobule. Moreover, they showed also larger volumes in a comparable set of regions than the less intensively practicing musicians. The structural changes in the sensory and motor systems correspond well to the behavioral results, and can be interpreted in terms of plasticity as a result of intensive motor training. Areas of the superior parietal lobule and the entorhinal cortex might be enlarged in musicians due to their special skills in sight-playing and memorizing of scores. In conclusion, intensive and specific musical training seems to have an impact on brain structure, not only during the sensitive period of childhood but throughout life. PMID

  17. Chemical changes in soil charcoal of differing ages inferred from DRIFT spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, E. U.; Willgoose, G. R.; Frisia, S.; Jacobsen, G.

    2012-04-01

    Visible charcoal fragments were manually isolated from a sandy soil from the Southern Highlands of NSW, Australia, at depths of 0 - 30 cm and 30 - 60 cm. In the topsoil, the charcoal had a radiocarbon age of 85 ± 35 years BP, whereas the charcoal from the 30 - 60 cm layer was radiocarbon dated at 2540 ± 35 years BP. Diffuse reflectance FTIR (DRIFT) spectra of the charcoal reveal differences in both the number of peaks detected and their magnitudes. In the IR region 750 - 3800 cm-1, the charcoal from the lower depth had less peaks (140) than that of the topsoil (217). In the 1400 - 1600 cm-1 region, generally attributed to aromatics, the peaks were larger and more numerous (22 peaks) in the 0 - 30 cm sample than those of the 30 - 60 cm depth (14 peaks). The C-H stretch of alkenes and aromatics (3000 - 3100 cm-1) was similar at both depths, but the peak generally associated with the C-H stretch of alkanes (methyl and methylene groups) at 2850 - 3000 cm-1 was smaller in 30 - 60 cm depth than in the topsoil. In contrast to the reduction in aromatic and alkane signatures, oxidised forms were more pronounced in the older, deeper charcoal. Peaks associated with the free hydroxyl O-H stretch (alcohols and phenols) at 3640 - 3610 cm-1, carboxylic acids (910 - 950 cm-1), aliphatic O-H (alcohols) (1050 - 1150 cm-1) and cellulose-like structures (1020 cm-1), which contain a large number of uncondensed, oxidised rings, were larger in the charcoal from 30 - 60 cm than in that from the topsoil. Our results confirm that charcoal is highly persistent in soils, being retained for millennia. Aromatic structures are present in both younger and older charcoal, but decay leads to a reduction in the number and area of peaks detected at 1400 - 1600 cm-1, indicating less aromaticity. Alkane C-H also decreases with aging, probably attributable to its preferential degradation by soil microbes compared with condensed aromatic structures. Concurrent with diminished aromatic and alkane

  18. [Study on the Recognition of Liquor Age of Gujing Based on Raman Spectra and Support Vector Regression].

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-xiang; Wang, Hai-yan; Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zheng-yong; Liu, Jun

    2016-03-01

    It is an important and difficult research point to recognize the age of Chinese liquor rapidly and exactly in the field of liquor analyzing, which is also of great significance to the healthy development of the liquor industry and protection of the legitimate rights and interests of consumers. Spectroscopy together with the pattern recognition technology is a preferred method of achieving rapid identification of wine quality, in which the Raman Spectroscopy is promising because of its little affection of water and little or free of sample pretreatment. So, in this paper, Raman spectra and support vector regression (SVR) are used to recognize different ages and different storing time of the liquor of the same age. The innovation of this paper is mainly reflected in the following three aspects. First, the application of Raman in the area of liquor analysis is rarely reported till now. Second, the concentration of studying the recognition of wine age, while most studies focus on studying specific components of liquor and studies together with the pattern recognition method focus more on the identification of brands or different types of base wine. The third one is the application of regression analysis framework, which cannot be only used to identify different years of liquor, but also can be used to analyze different storing time, which has theoretical and practical significance to the research and quality control of liquor. Three kinds of experiments are conducted in this paper. Firstly, SVR is used to recognize different ages of 5, 8, 16 and 26 years of the Gujing Liquor; secondly, SVR is also used to classify the storing time of the 8-years liquor; thirdly, certain group of train data is deleted form the train set and put into the test set to simulate the actual situation of liquor age recognition. Results show that the SVR model has good train and predict performance in these experiments, and it has better performance than other non-liner regression method such

  19. Vδ2+ and α/Δ T cells show divergent trajectories during human aging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Crystal Tze Ying; Wistuba-Hamprecht, Kilian; Xu, Weili; Nyunt, Ma Schwe Zin; Vasudev, Anusha; Lee, Bernett Teck Kwong; Pawelec, Graham; Puan, Kia Joo; Rotzschke, Olaf; Ng, Tze Pin; Larbi, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Chronological aging and a variety of stressors are driving forces towards immunosenescence. While much attention was paid to the main T cell component, α/β T cells, few studies concentrate on the impact of age on γ/δ T cells' characteristics. The latter are important players of adaptive immunity but also have features associated with innate immunity. Vδ2+ are the main component of γ/δ while Vδ1+ T cells expand upon Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and with age. The Vδ2+ T cells are not influenced by persistent infections but do contribute to immunosurveillance against bacterial pathogens. Here, we focus on Vδ2+ T cells and report that their composition and functionality is not altered in older adults. We have performed a side-by-side comparison of α/β and Vδ2 cells by using two robust markers of T cell replicative history and cell differentiation (CD28 and CD27), and cytokine secretion (IFN-γ and TNF-α). Significant differences in Vδ2 versus α/β homeostasis, as well as phenotypic and functional changes emerged. However, the data strongly suggest a sustained functionality of the Vδ2 population with age, independently of the challenge. This suggests differential trajectories towards immunosenescence in α/β and Vδ2+ T cells, most likely explained by their intrinsic functions. PMID:27384987

  20. Former Very Preterm Infants Show an Unfavorable Cardiovascular Risk Profile at a Preschool Age

    PubMed Central

    Posod, Anna; Odri Komazec, Irena; Kager, Katrin; Pupp Peglow, Ulrike; Griesmaier, Elke; Schermer, Elisabeth; Würtinger, Philipp; Baumgartner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Evidence points towards an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile of former preterm infants in adolescence and adulthood. The aim of this study was to determine whether cardiovascular risk predictors are detectable in former very preterm infants at a preschool age. Five- to seven-year-old children born at <32 weeks’ gestational age were included in the study. Same-aged children born at term served as controls. Basic data of study participants were collected by means of follow-up databases and standardized questionnaires. At study visit, anthropometric data, blood pressure readings and aortic intima-media thickness were assessed. Blood samples were obtained after an overnight fast. In comparison to children born at term, former preterm infants had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] per 1-SD higher blood pressure level 3.2 [2.0–5.0], p<0.001 and 1.6 [1.1–1.2], p = 0.008), fasting glucose levels (OR [95% CI] 5.2 [2.7–10.1], p<0.001), homeostasis model assessment index (OR [95% CI] 1.6 [1.0–2.6], p = 0.036), and cholesterol levels (OR [95% CI] 2.1 [1.3–3.4], p = 0.002). Systolic prehypertension (23.7% vs. 2.2%; OR [95% CI] 13.8 [3.1–60.9], p = 0.001), elevated glucose levels (28.6% vs. 5.9%; OR [95% CI] 6.4 [1.4–28.8], p = 0.016), and hypercholesterolemia (77.4% vs. 52.9%; OR [95% CI] 3.0 [1.3–7.1], p = 0.010) were significantly more prevalent in the preterm group. As former very preterm infants display an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile already at a preschool age, implementation of routine cardiovascular follow-up programs might be warranted. PMID:27959909

  1. A model for meteoritic and lunar 40Ar/39Ar age spectra: Addressing the conundrum of multi-activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, T. Mark; Heizler, M. T.; Warren, P. H.

    2016-11-01

    Results of whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials have been used to constrain the timing of impacts in the inner solar system, solidification of the lunar magma ocean, and development of planetary magnetic fields. Despite the importance of understanding these events, the samples we have in hand are non-ideal due to mixed provenance, isotopic disturbances from potentially multiple heating episodes, and laboratory artifacts such as nuclear recoil. Although models to quantitatively assess multi-domain, diffusive 40Ar* loss have long been applied to terrestrial samples, their use on extra-terrestrial materials has been limited. Here we introduce a multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model and apply it to 40Ar/39Ar temperature-cycling, step-heating data for meteoritic and lunar samples. We show that age spectra of extra-terrestrial materials, the Jilin chondrite (K-4) and Apollo 16 lunar breccia (67514 , 43), yielding seemingly non-ideal behavior commonly interpreted as either laboratory artifacts or localized shock heating of pyroxene, are meaningful and can be understood in context of the presence of multi-diffusion domains containing multiple activation energies. Internally consistent results from both the meteoritic and lunar samples reveal high-temperature/short duration thermal episodes we interpret as due to moderate shock heating.

  2. Map showing high-purity silica sand of Middle Ordovician age in the Midwestern states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketner, Keith B.

    1979-01-01

    Certain quartz sands of Middle Ordovician age in the Midwestern States are well known for their purity and are exploited for a wide variety of industrial uses. The principal Middle Ordovician formations containing high-purity sands are the St. Peter Sandstone which crops out extensively from Minnesota to Arkansas; the Everton Formation principally of Arkansas; and the Oil Creek, McLish, and Tulip Creek Formations (all of the Simpson Group) of Oklahoma. The St. Peter and sandy beds in the other formations are commonly called "sandstones," but a more appropriate term is "sands" for in most fresh exposures they are completely uncemented or very weakly cemented. On exposure to air, uncemented sands usually become "case hardened" where evaporating ground water precipitates mineral matter at the surface; but this is a surficial effect. This report summarizes the available information on the extent of exposures, range of grain size, and chemical composition of the Middle Ordovician sands.

  3. Empirical age spectra in the lower stratosphere derived from in-situ measurements of halocarbons during TACTS/ESMVal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boenisch, Harald; Engel, Andreas; Keber, Timo

    2014-05-01

    The age spectrum is the transit time distribution of the fluid constituents in a specific stratospheric air parcel and therefore contains all the information of the air parcel's transport history. Unfortunately, it is not possible to directly measure the age spectrum of a stratospheric air parcel. Only the first moment of the distribution - the mean age of air - is directly observable from observations of passive tracers like SF6 and CO2. However, it is possible to reconstruct the age spectrum from a bunch of chemical active tracers with different stratospheric lifetimes (Schoeberl et al., 2005; Ehhalt et al., 2007) assuming to first order that the age spectrum follows the analytical solution given by Hall and Plumb (1994). Here, we will present empirical age spectra in the extratropical lower stratosphere of the northern hemisphere derived from a dataset gathered during the combined campaigns TACTS (Transport and Composition in the UT/LMS) and ESMVal (Earth System Model Validation). About 20 halocarbons have been measured with the new developed in-situ GC/MS instrument GHOST-MS. These chemical active species have different stratospheric lifetimes ranging from several days (e.g. Methylbromoform) up to several decades (e.g. CFC-12). Ehhalt, D. H., Rohrer, F., Blake, D. R., Kinnison, D. E., and Konopka, P.: On the use of nonmethane hydrocarbons for the determination of age spectra in the lower stratosphere, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D12208, 10.1029/2006jd007686, 2007. Hall, T. M., and Plumb, R. A.: Age as a Diagnostic of Stratospheric Transport, J. Geophys. Res., 99, 1059-1070, 1994. Schoeberl, M. R., Douglass, A. R., Polansky, B., Boone, C., Walker, K. A., and Bernath, P.: Estimation of stratospheric age spectrum from chemical tracers, J. Geophys. Res., 110, D21303, 10.1029/2005jd006125, 2005.

  4. Integrated J- and H-band spectra of globular clusters in the LMC: implications for stellar population models and galaxy age dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubenova, M.; Kuntschner, H.; Rejkuba, M.; Silva, D. R.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.

    2012-07-01

    Context. The rest-frame near-IR spectra of intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) stellar populations are dominated by carbon based absorption features offering a wealth of information. Yet, spectral libraries that include the near-IR wavelength range do not sample a sufficiently broad range of ages and metallicities to allow for accurate calibration of stellar population models and thus the interpretation of the observations. Aims: In this paper we investigate the integrated J- and H-band spectra of six intermediate age and old globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Methods: The observations for six clusters were obtained with the SINFONI integral field spectrograph at the ESO VLT Yepun telescope, covering the J (1.09-1.41 μm) and H-band (1.43-1.86 μm) spectral range. The spectral resolution is 6.7 Å in J and 6.6 Å in H-band (FWHM). The observations were made in natural seeing, covering the central 24″ × 24″ of each cluster and in addition sampling the brightest eight red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star candidates within the clusters' tidal radii. Targeted clusters cover the ages of ~1.3 Gyr (NGC 1806, NGC 2162), 2 Gyr (NGC 2173) and ~13 Gyr (NGC 1754, NGC 2005, NGC 2019). Results.H-band C2 and K-band 12CO (2-0) feature strengths for the LMC globular clusters are compared to the models of Maraston (2005). C2 is reasonably well reproduced by the models at all ages, while 12CO (2-0) shows good agreement for older (age ≥ 2 Gyr) populations, but the younger (1.3 Gyr) globular clusters do not follow the models. We argue that this is due to the fact that the empirical calibration of the models relies on only a few Milky Way carbon star spectra, which show different 12CO (2-0) index strengths than the LMC stars. The C2 absorption feature strength correlates strongly with age. It is present essentially only in populations that have 1-2 Gyr old stars, while its value is consistent with zero for older populations. The distinct spectral

  5. Aged PrP null mice show defective processing of neuregulins in the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed

    Benvegnù, Stefano; Gasperini, Lisa; Legname, Giuseppe

    2011-05-01

    A prion, a protease-resistant conformer of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), is the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. While this property is well established for the aberrantly folded protein, the physiological function of PrP(C) remains elusive. Among different putative functions, the non-pathogenic protein isoform PrP(C) is involved in several cellular processes. Here, we show that PrP(C) regulates the cleavage of neuregulin-1 proteins (NRG1). Neuregulins provide key axonal signals that regulate several processes, including glial cells proliferation, survival and myelination. Interestingly, mice devoid of PrP(C) (Prnp⁰/⁰) were recently shown to have a late-onset demyelinating disease in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) but not in the central nervous system (CNS). We found that NRG1 processing is developmentally regulated in the PNS and, by comparing wildtype and Prnp⁰/⁰ mice, that PrP(C) influences NRG1 processing in old, but not in young, animals. In addition, we found that also the processing of neuregulin-3, another neuregulin family member, is altered in the PNS of Prnp⁰/⁰ mice. These differences in neuregulin proteins processing are not paralleled in the CNS, thus suggesting a different cellular function for PrP(C) between the CNS and the PNS.

  6. Integrated K-band spectra of old and intermediate-age globular clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubenova, M.; Kuntschner, H.; Rejkuba, M.; Silva, D. R.; Kissler-Patig, M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Larsen, S. S.

    2010-02-01

    Current stellar population models have arguably the largest uncertainties in the near-IR wavelength range, partly due to a lack of large and well calibrated empirical spectral libraries. In this paper we present a project whose aim it is to provide the first library of luminosity weighted integrated near-IR spectra of globular clusters to be used to test the current stellar population models and serve as calibrators for future ones. Our pilot study presents spatially integrated K-band spectra of three old (≥10 Gyr) and metal poor ([Fe/H] ~ -1.4), and three intermediate age (1-2 Gyr) and more metal rich ([Fe/H] ~ - 0.4) globular clusters in the LMC. We measured the line strengths of the Na I, Ca I and 12CO (2-0) absorption features. The Na I index decreases with increasing age and decreasing metallicity of the clusters. The DCO index, used to measure the 12CO (2-0) line strength, is significantly reduced by the presence of carbon-rich TP-AGB stars in the globular clusters with age ~1 Gyr. This is in contradiction to the predictions of the stellar population models of Maraston (2005, MNRAS, 362, 799). We find that this disagreement is due to the different CO absorption strength of carbon-rich Milky Way TP-AGB stars used in the models and the LMC carbon stars in our sample. For globular clusters with age ≥ 2 Gyr we find DCO index measurements consistent with the model predictions. Based on observation collected at the ESO Paranal La Silla Observatory, Chile, Prog. ID 078.B-0205.Spectra in FITS format are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/510/A19

  7. Do Zircon age Spectra Record Magmatic Cyclicity at Soufrière (Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, A. K.; Stockli, D. F.; Lindsay, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    The Soufrière Volcanic Center (Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles) is a long-lived arc-volcanic system that evolved over the past 5 - 6 Ma. Its most recent volcanic activity between 20 and 40 ka was concentrated within the prominent Qualibou topographic depression and produced two voluminous pyroclastic deposits: Choiseul and the overlying Belfond. In addition, several dacitic lava domes exist within the Qualibou depression. Because evidence of earlier volcanic activity in long-lived magma systems is frequently obliterated by subsequent eruptive or volcano-tectonic events, high spatial resolution U-Th dating of zircon combined with (U-Th)/He dating is a powerful tool to identify magma crystallization episodes at depth and to link these to the eruptive record. U-Th model ages and disequilibrium corrected U-Pb ages for 56 individual zircons from Soufrière lavas (Morne Bonin, Belfond, Terre Blanche) and pumice (Choiseul, Belfond) were determined by secondary ionization mass spectrometry. The majority of results is on unpolished zircons where analysis pits integrate over the outermost ~10 μm of individual grains with a lateral spatial resolution of ~40 μm. Selected grains were subsequently analyzed by (U-Th)/He methods. Belfond and Terre Blanche (U-Th)/He zircon ages (~20 ka) agree with previous 14C charcoal ages, whereas Morne Bonin ages are much older (~250 ka). Overall, the U-Th zircon crystallization age spectrum reveals a remarkable range between ~20 and ~600 ka and displays multiple peaks, among which the most prominent are tentatively identified at ~40 ka, ~80 ka, ~130 ka, ~200 ka and ~500 ka. The distribution of rim ages indicates that most zircons lack overgrowth dating from just prior to the eruption, but the youngest ages for each sample overlap with the eruption ages. Soufrière zircons thus reveal magma intrusion, cooling, and crystallization cycles within the underlying plutonic system for which the volcanic stratigraphic record is sketchy.

  8. Simulated aging of lubricant oils by chemometric treatment of infrared spectra: potential antioxidant properties of sulfur structures.

    PubMed

    Amat, Sandrine; Braham, Zeineb; Le Dréau, Yveline; Kister, Jacky; Dupuy, Nathalie

    2013-03-30

    Lubricant oils are complex mixtures of base oils and additives. The evolution of their performance over time strongly depends on its resistance to thermal oxidation. Sulfur compounds revealed interesting antioxidant properties. This study presents a method to evaluate the lubricant oil oxidation. Two samples, a synthetic and a paraffinic base oils, were tested pure and supplemented with seven different sulfur compounds. An aging cell adapted to a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectrometer allows the continuous and direct analysis of the oxidative aging of base oils. Two approaches were applied to study the oxidation/anti-oxidation phenomena. The first one leads to define a new oxidative spectroscopic index based on a reduced spectral range where the modifications have been noticed (from 3050 to 2750 cm(-1)). The second method is based on chemometric treatments of whole spectra (from 4000 to 400 cm(-1)) to extract underlying information. A SIMPLe-to-use Interactive Self Modeling Analysis (SIMPLISMA) method has been used to identify more precisely the chemical species produced or degraded during the thermal treatment and to follow their evolution. Pure spectra of different species present in oil were obtained without prior information of their existence. The interest of this tool is to supply relative quantitative information reflecting evolution of the relative abundance of the different products over thermal aging. Results obtained by these two ways have been compared to estimate their concordance.

  9. Computer-aided discovery of biological activity spectra for anti-aging and anti-cancer olive oil oleuropeins.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Santangelo, Elvira; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Micol, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Ariza, Xavier; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; García, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with common conditions, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The type of multi-targeted pharmacological approach necessary to address a complex multifaceted disease such as aging might take advantage of pleiotropic natural polyphenols affecting a wide variety of biological processes. We have recently postulated that the secoiridoids oleuropein aglycone (OA) and decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone (DOA), two complex polyphenols present in health-promoting extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), might constitute a new family of plant-produced gerosuppressant agents. This paper describes an analysis of the biological activity spectra (BAS) of OA and DOA using PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software. PASS can predict thousands of biological activities, as the BAS of a compound is an intrinsic property that is largely dependent on the compound's structure and reflects pharmacological effects, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of action, and specific toxicities. Using Pharmaexpert, a tool that analyzes the PASS-predicted BAS of substances based on thousands of "mechanism-effect" and "effect-mechanism" relationships, we illuminate hypothesis-generating pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and targets that might underlie the anti-aging/anti-cancer activities of the gerosuppressant EVOO oleuropeins.

  10. Computer-aided discovery of biological activity spectra for anti-aging and anti-cancer olive oil oleuropeins

    PubMed Central

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Santangelo, Elvira; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Micol, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Ariza, Xavier; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; García, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with common conditions, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The type of multi-targeted pharmacological approach necessary to address a complex multifaceteddisease such as aging might take advantage of pleiotropic natural polyphenols affecting a wide variety of biological processes. We have recently postulated that the secoiridoids oleuropein aglycone (OA) and decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone (DOA), two complex polyphenols present in health-promoting extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), might constitute anew family of plant-produced gerosuppressant agents. This paper describes an analysis of the biological activity spectra (BAS) of OA and DOA using PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software. PASS can predict thousands of biological activities, as the BAS of a compound is an intrinsic property that is largely dependent on the compound's structure and reflects pharmacological effects, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of action, and specific toxicities. Using Pharmaexpert, a tool that analyzes the PASS-predicted BAS of substances based on thousands of “mechanism-effect” and “effect-mechanism” relationships, we illuminate hypothesis-generating pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and targets that might underlie the anti-aging/anti-cancer activities of the gerosuppressant EVOO oleuropeins. PMID:25324469

  11. The age related markers lipofuscin and apoptosis show different genetic architecture by QTL mapping in short-lived Nothobranchius fish

    PubMed Central

    Ng'oma, Enoch; Reichwald, Kathrin; Dorn, Alexander; Wittig, Michael; Balschun, Tobias; Franke, Andre; Platzer, Matthias; Cellerino, Allesandro

    2014-01-01

    Annual fish of the genus Nothobranchius show large variations in lifespan and expression of age-related phenotypes between closely related populations. We studied N. kadleci and its sister species N. furzeri GRZ strain, and found that N.kadleci is longer-lived than the N. furzeri. Lipofuscin and apoptosis measured in the liver increased with age in N. kadleci with different profiles: lipofuscin increased linearly, while apoptosis declined in the oldest animals. More lipofuscin (P < 0.001) and apoptosis (P < 0.001) was observed in N. furzeri than in N. kadleci at 16w age. Lipofuscin and apoptotic cells were then quantified in hybrids from the mating of N. furzeri to N. kadleci. F1 individuals showed heterosis for lipofuscin but additive effects for apoptosis. These two age-related phenotypes were not correlated in F2 hybrids. Quantitative trait loci analysis of 287 F2 fish using 237 markers identified two QTL accounting for 10% of lipofuscin variance (P < 0.001) with overdominance effect. Apoptotic cells revealed three significant- and two suggestive QTL explaining 19% of variance (P < 0.001), showing additive and dominance effects, and two interacting loci. Our results show that lipofuscin and apoptosis are markers of different age-dependent biological processes controlled by different genetic mechanisms. PMID:25093339

  12. Resting-state networks associated with cognitive processing show more age-related decline than those associated with emotional processing.

    PubMed

    Nashiro, Kaoru; Sakaki, Michiko; Braskie, Meredith N; Mather, Mara

    2017-03-11

    Correlations in activity across disparate brain regions during rest reveal functional networks in the brain. Although previous studies largely agree that there is an age-related decline in the "default mode network," how age affects other resting-state networks, such as emotion-related networks, is still controversial. Here we used a dual-regression approach to investigate age-related alterations in resting-state networks. The results revealed age-related disruptions in functional connectivity in all 5 identified cognitive networks, namely the default mode network, cognitive-auditory, cognitive-speech (or speech-related somatosensory), and right and left frontoparietal networks, whereas such age effects were not observed in the 3 identified emotion networks. In addition, we observed age-related decline in functional connectivity in 3 visual and 3 motor/visuospatial networks. Older adults showed greater functional connectivity in regions outside 4 out of the 5 identified cognitive networks, consistent with the dedifferentiation effect previously observed in task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. Both reduced within-network connectivity and increased out-of-network connectivity were correlated with poor cognitive performance, providing potential biomarkers for cognitive aging.

  13. Astrocytes show reduced support of motor neurons with aging that is accelerated in a rodent model of ALS.

    PubMed

    Das, Melanie M; Svendsen, Clive N

    2015-02-01

    Astrocytes play a crucial role in supporting motor neurons in health and disease. However, there have been few attempts to understand how aging may influence this effect. Here, we report that rat astrocytes show an age-dependent senescence phenotype and a significant reduction in their ability to support motor neurons. In a rodent model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) overexpressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), the rate of astrocytes acquiring a senescent phenotype is accelerated and they subsequently provide less support to motor neurons. This can be partially reversed by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Replacing aging astrocytes with young ones producing GDNF may therefore have a significant survival promoting affect on aging motor neurons and those lost through diseases such as ALS.

  14. Age-related Shifts in Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Peak-ratios and Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2>f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  15. Mössbauer Spectra of Mouse Hearts reveal age-dependent changes in mitochondrial and ferritin iron levels.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul Alan

    2017-02-15

    Cardiac function requires continuous high levels of energy, and so iron, a critical player in mitochondrial respiration, is an important component of the heart. Hearts from (57)Fe-enriched mice were evaluated by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Spectra consisted of a sextet and two quadrupole doublets. One doublet was due to residual blood while the other was due to [Fe4S4](2+) clusters and Fe(II) hemes, most of which were associated with mitochondrial respiration. The sextet was due to ferritin; there was no evidence of hemosiderin, a ferritin decomposition product. Iron from ferritin was nearly absent in young hearts, but increased steadily with age. EPR spectra exhibited signals similar to those of brain, liver, and human cells. No age-dependent EPR trends were apparent. Hearts from HFE(-/-) mice with hemochromatosis contained slightly more iron overall than controls, including more ferritin and less mitochondrial iron; these differences typify slightly older hearts, perhaps reflecting the burden due to this disease. HFE(-/-) livers were overloaded with ferritin but had low mitochondrial iron levels. IRP2(-/-) hearts contained less ferritin than controls but normal levels of mitochondrial iron. Hearts of young mice born to an iron-deficient mother contained normal levels of mitochondrial iron and no ferritin; the mothers heart contained low ferritin and normal levels of mitochondrial iron. High-spin Fe(II) ions were nearly undetectable in heart samples; these were evident in brains, livers, and human cells. Previous Mossbauer spectra of unenriched diseased human hearts lacked mitochondrial and blood doublets, and included hemosiderin features. This suggests degradation of iron-containing species during sample preparation.

  16. New insight into hydration and aging mechanisms of paper by the line shape analysis of proton NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, D.; Vasi, S.; Missori, M.; Corsaro, C.

    2016-05-01

    The action of water within biological systems is strictly linked either with their physical chemical properties and with their functions. Cellulose is one of the most studied biopolymers due to its biological importance and its wide use in manufactured products. Among them, paper is mainly constituted by an almost equimolar ratio of cellulose and water. Therefore the study of the behavior of water within pristine and aged paper samples can help to shed light on the degradation mechanisms that irremediably act over time and spoil paper. In this work we present Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on modern paper samples made of pure cellulose not aged and artificially aged as well as on ancient paper samples made in 1413 in Perpignan (France). The line shape parameters of the proton NMR spectra were studied as a function of the hydration content. Results indicate that water in aged samples is progressively involved in the hydration of the byproducts of cellulose degradation. This enhances the degradation process itself through the progressive consumption of the cellulose amorphous regions.

  17. Polysaccharides from the Medicinal Mushroom Cordyceps taii Show Antioxidant and Immunoenhancing Activities in a D-Galactose-Induced Aging Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian-Hui; Xiao, Dai-Min; Chen, Dai-Xiong; Xiao, Yu; Liang, Zong-Qi; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Cordyceps taii, an edible medicinal mushroom native to south China, is recognized as an unparalleled resource of healthy foods and drug discovery. In the present study, the antioxidant pharmacological properties of C. taii were systematically investigated. In vitro assays revealed the scavenging activities of the aqueous extract and polysaccharides of C. taii against various free radicals, that is, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and superoxide anion radical. The EC50 values for superoxide anion-free radical ranged from 2.04 mg/mL to 2.49 mg/mL, which was at least 2.6-fold stronger than that of antioxidant thiourea. The polysaccharides also significantly enhanced the antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) and markedly decreased the malondialdehyde production of lipid peroxidation in a D-galactose-induced aging mouse model. Interestingly, the immune function of the administration group was significantly boosted compared with the D-galactose-induced aging model group. Therefore, the C. taii polysaccharides possessed potent antioxidant activity closely associated with immune function enhancement and free radical scavenging. These findings suggest that the polysaccharides are a promising source of natural antioxidants and antiaging drugs. Consequently, a preliminary chemical investigation was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and revealed that the polysaccharides studied were mainly composed of glucose, mannose, and galactose. Fourier-transform infrared spectra also showed characteristic polysaccharide absorption bands. PMID:22536281

  18. IL-1 receptor-antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout mice show anxiety-like behavior by aging.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Chisato; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Odaka, Haruki; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Kiyama, Yuji; Manabe, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2015-07-10

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) plays a critical role in stress responses, and its mRNA is induced in the brain by restraint stress. Previously, we reported that IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) knockout (KO) mice, which lacked IL-1Ra molecules that antagonize the IL-1 receptor, showed anti-depression-like behavior via adrenergic modulation at the age of 8 weeks. Here, we report that IL-1Ra KO mice display an anxiety-like phenotype that is induced spontaneously by aging in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. This anxiety-like phenotype was improved by the administration of diazepam. The expression of the anxiety-related molecule glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was significantly reduced in 20-week-old but not in 11-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. The expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) was not altered between IL-1Ra KO mice and WT littermates at either 11 or 20 weeks old. Analysis of monoamine concentration in the hippocampus revealed that tryptophan, the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), and the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) were significantly increased in 20-week-old IL-1Ra KO mice compared to littermate WT mice. These findings strongly suggest that the anxiety-like behavior observed in older mice was caused by the complicated alteration of monoamine metabolism and/or GR expression in the hippocampus.

  19. Characterization of Smoc-1 uncovers two transcript variants showing differential tissue and age specific expression in Bubalus bubalis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Jyoti; Premi, Sanjay; Kumar, Sudhir; Parwez, Iqbal; Ali, Sher

    2007-01-01

    Background Secreted modular calcium binding protein-1 (Smoc-1) belongs to the BM-40 family which has been implicated with tissue remodeling, angiogenesis and bone mineralization. Besides its anticipated role in embryogenesis, Smoc-1 has been characterized only in a few mammalian species. We made use of the consensus sequence (5' CACCTCTCCACCTGCC 3') of 33.15 repeat loci to explore the buffalo transcriptome and uncovered the Smoc-1 transcript tagged with this repeat. The main objective of this study was to gain an insight into its structural and functional organization, and expressional status of Smoc-1 in water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. Results We cloned and characterized the buffalo Smoc-1, including its copy number status, in-vitro protein expression, tissue & age specific transcription/translation, chromosomal mapping and localization to the basement membrane zone. Buffalo Smoc-1 was found to encode a secreted matricellular glycoprotein containing two EF-hand calcium binding motifs homologous to that of BM-40/SPARC family. In buffalo, this single copy gene consisted of 12 exons and was mapped onto the acrocentric chromosome 11. Though this gene was found to be evolutionarily conserved, the buffalo Smoc-1 showed conspicuous nucleotide/amino acid changes altering its secondary structure compared to that in other mammals. In silico analysis of the Smoc-1 proposed its glycoprotein nature with a calcium dependent conformation. Further, we unveiled two transcript variants of this gene, varying in their 3'UTR lengths but both coding for identical protein(s). Smoc-1 evinced highest expression of both the variants in liver and modest to negligible in other tissues. The relative expression of variant-02 was markedly higher compared to that of variant-01 in all the tissues examined. Moreover, expression of Smoc-1, though modest during the early ages, was conspicuously enhanced after 1 year and remained consistently higher during the entire life span of buffalo with gradual

  20. The Deep2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Mean Ages and Metallicities ofRed Field Galaxies at Z ~; 0.9 from Stacked Keck/Deimos Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Faber, S.M.; Konidaris, Nicholas; Graves,Genevieve; Willmer, Christopher N.A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Coil, AlisonL.; Cooper, Michael C.; Davis, Marc; Harker, Justin; Koo, David C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Yan, Renbin

    2006-10-19

    As part of the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey, we analyze absorption line strengths in stacked Keck/DEIMOS spectra of red field galaxies with weak to no emission lines, at redshifts 0.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 1. Comparison with models of stellar population synthesis shows that red galaxies at z {approx} 0:9 have mean luminosity-weighted ages of the order of only 1 Gyr and at least solar metallicities. These ages cannot be reconciled with a scenario where all stars evolved passively after forming at very high z. Rather, a significant fraction of stars can be no more than 1 Gyr old, which means that some star formation in the stacked populations continued to at least z {approx} 1:2. Furthermore, a comparison of these distant galaxies with a local SDSS sample, using stellar populations synthesis models, shows that the drop in the equivalent width of H{delta} from z {approx} 0:9 to 0.1 is less than predicted by passively evolving models. This admits of two interpretations: either each individual galaxy experiences continuing low-level star formation, or the red-sequence galaxy population from z {approx} 0:9 to 0.1 is continually being added to by new galaxies with younger stars.

  1. Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra of Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step-heating and their bearing on the history of lunar basin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalrymple, G. B.; Ryder, G.

    1993-07-01

    Results are reported on 26 high-resolution (16-51 steps) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra obtained on 12 Apollo-15 melt rocks of different composition using a continuous laser system on submg fragments of recrystallized melt and single-crystal plagioclase clasts from impact melt rocks collected at the Apennine Front where the Imbrium and Serenitatis basins intersect. A table is presented with the summary of the Ar-40/Ar-39 spectrum data, which represent 891 individual temperature step analyses. Also presented are 20 of the 26 age spectra along with their respective K/Ca plots. Melt rock fragments and plagioclase clasts from seven of the 12 samples analyzed yielded reproducible, intermediate-T Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateaus, which were interpreted as crystallization ages that represent the times of impact of bolides onto the lunar surface.

  2. Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra of Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step-heating and their bearing on the history of lunar basin formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalrymple, G. B.; Ryder, Graham

    1993-01-01

    Results are reported on 26 high-resolution (16-51 steps) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra obtained on 12 Apollo-15 melt rocks of different composition using a continuous laser system on submg fragments of recrystallized melt and single-crystal plagioclase clasts from impact melt rocks collected at the Apennine Front where the Imbrium and Serenitatis basins intersect. A table is presented with the summary of the Ar-40/Ar-39 spectrum data, which represent 891 individual temperature step analyses. Also presented are 20 of the 26 age spectra along with their respective K/Ca plots. Melt rock fragments and plagioclase clasts from seven of the 12 samples analyzed yielded reproducible, intermediate-T Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectrum plateaus, which were interpreted as crystallization ages that represent the times of impact of bolides onto the lunar surface.

  3. Time-slice maps showing age, distribution, and style of deformation in Alaska north of 60° N.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Thomas E.; Box, Stephen E.

    2016-08-29

    The structural architecture of Alaska is the product of a complex history of tectonism that occurred along the Cordilleran and Arctic margins of North America through interactions with ancient and modern ocean plates and with continental elements derived from Laurentia, Siberia, and Baltica. To unravel the tectonic history of Alaska, we constructed maps showing the age, distribution, structural style, and kinematics of contractional and penetrative extensional deformation in Alaska north of latitude 60° N. at a scale of 1:5,000,000. These maps use the Geologic Map of the Arctic (Harrison and others, 2011) as a base map and follow the guidelines in the Tectonic Map of the Arctic project (Petrov and others, 2013) for construction, including use of the International Commission on Stratigraphy time scale (Cohen and others, 2013) divided into 20 time intervals. We find evidence for deformation in 14 of the 20 time intervals and present maps showing the known or probable extent of deformation for each time interval. Maps and descriptions of deformational style, age constraints, kinematics, and information sources for each deformational episode are discussed in the text and are reported in tabular form. This report also contains maps showing the lithologies and structural geology of Alaska, a terrane map, and the distribution of tectonically important units including post-tectonic sedimentary basins, accretionary complexes, ophiolites, metamorphic rocks.These new maps show that most deformational belts in Alaska are relatively young features, having developed during the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The oldest episode of deformation recognized anywhere in Alaska is found in the basement of the Farewell terrane (~1.75 Ga). Paleozoic and early Mesozoic deformational events, including Devonian deformation in the Arctic Alaska terrane, Pennsylvanian deformation in the Alexander terrane, Permian deformation in the Yukon Composite (Klondike orogeny) and Farewell terranes (Browns

  4. Prematurely delivered rats show improved motor coordination during sensory-evoked motor responses compared to age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Megan E; Brumley, Michele R

    2014-05-10

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat.

  5. Hump-shaped 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra in K-feldspar and evidence for Cretaceous authigenesis in the Fountain Formation near Eldorado Springs, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnock, Andrew C.; van de Kamp, Peter C.

    1999-12-01

    The Fountain Formation near Eldorado Springs, CO, USA, shows evidence of alteration by hydrothermal fluids that precipitated authigenic potassium feldspar (adularia) as rims on detrital feldspars and as interstitial cement deposits. Detailed 40Ar/ 39Ar step-heating experiments of samples from the Fountain Formation reveal age spectra having a characteristic hump at laboratory temperatures between 900 and 1080°C. The humps appear to be related to the presence of adularia. Laser analyses of small grains of adularia indicate that the hump can be physically dissected, unlike age gradients found in igneous feldspars. Such behavior is consistent with the mixing of gas from two or more generations of K-feldspar, each having unique diffusion properties. The feldspars studied here indicate that two pulses of ˜150°C hydrothermal fluids migrated through the Fountain Formation at 135 and 94 Ma, prior to the main phase of Laramide tectonic activity in the region. The limited occurrence of authigenic cements suggests that reactivation of the underlying Precambrian Idaho Springs-Ralston Creek shear zone was significant enough to heat and mobilize large quantities of meteoric fluids. In addition, these data also suggest that Cretaceous movements along the Transcontinental Arch, correlated with stratigraphic events, began approximately 40 million years earlier than previously thought.

  6. Age Spectra and Transport Rates in the UTLS over the Tropics and the North American Monsoon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, J. V.; Wofsy, S. C.; Daube, B. C.; Budney, J.; Commane, R.; Lindaas, J.; McKain, K.; Samra, J.; Santoni, G.; Sargent, M. R.; Smith, J. B.; Anderson, J. G.; Gao, R. S.; Rollins, A. W.; Thornberry, T. D.; Watts, L. A.; Hintsa, E. J.; Moore, F. L.; Elkins, J. W.; Andrews, A. E.; Atlas, E. L.; Navarro, M. A.; Wang, T.; Dessler, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Upper Troposphere / Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) plays a significant role in controlling the chemical composition and the radiative property of the stratosphere. Transport and mixing processes with time scales ranging from a few hours (e.g., convection) to several months (e.g., slow ascent) have been previously observed in this region of the atmosphere. While the tropics act as the dominant gateway for air entering the stratosphere, monsoon regions have recently gained significant interest as sources of direct injection of surface air into the extratropical stratosphere, bypassing the thermal and chemical control of the tropics. In this study, we use high-altitude aircraft measurements of chemical tracers with different atmospheric lifetimes to investigate the aforementioned processes. These measurements were recently collected over the tropics during the NASA ATTREX campaign and over the North American Monsoon (NAM) region during the NASA SEAC4RS campaign. In addition, we use surface station data and trajectory analysis in order to elucidate the chemical and dynamical context of the aircraft measurements. Our goals are twofold: (i) examine the age of air and age spectra in the UTLS over the tropics and the NAM region, and (ii) examine the transport rates linking the tropics and midlatitudes at UTLS altitudes. This study is primarily based upon the analysis of greenhouse gas data, in particular CO2. This tracer has a well-defined seasonal cycle driven by biosphere-atmosphere interactions and an annual trend driven by anthropogenic activity. This 'clock-like' property makes it a useful tracer for studying transport timescales. This information is then complemented by process-specific information given by additional chemical tracers such as H2O, O3, CO, and short-lived hydrocarbons. Multi-tracer aircraft data from more than 150 vertical profiles over the tropical Pacific and over 50 vertical profiles over the NAM region between Jan 2013 and Mar 2014 provide

  7. Test of Continental Drift by Comparison of Radiometric Ages: A pre-drift reconstruction shows matching geologic age provinces in West Africa and Northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hurley, P M; Rand, J R; Pinson, W H; Fairbairn, H W; de Almeida, F F; Melcher, G C; Cordani, U G; Kawashita, K; Vandoros, P

    1967-08-04

    1) The distribution of age values obtained by potassium-argon determinations and whole-rock rubidium-strontium determinations appears to be almost identical for West African rocks of the pervasive Eburnean Orogenic Cycle and basement rocks at opposite locations in South America. 2) There is also a close correlation, with respect to potassium-argon age determinations on micas, rubidium-strontium determinations on total-rock samples, and the extent to which these two sets of values differ, between rocks of the Pan-African Orogenic Cycle and rocks of the Caririan Orogenic Cycle in Brazil, where these two groups of rocks lie opposite each other in the two continents. 3) When Africa and South America are "fitted together," the sharply defined boundary between the Eburnean and the Pan-African age provinces in West Africa strikes directly toward the corresponding age boundary in northeast Brazil. 4) The transition from the 550-million-year Pan-African age province to the 2000-million-year age province in the Congo Craton in Cameroun-Gabon is matched in the rocks near the corresponding part of the east coast of Brazil. However the geological and age data are insufficient to do more than suggest the possibility of another age-boundary correlation here. 5) The evidence reported here supports the hypothesis of continental drift.

  8. Instilling Hope: Showing Individuals with New Disabilities between the Ages of 18 and 24 That Suicide Is Not the Answer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to explore what can be done to mitigate the onset of a disability for young adults aged 18-24 in order to prevent suicidal thoughts or actions. Research suggests that many factors play into suicidal ideation for this young population, including lost hope, lack of coping mechanisms, lack of financial security and…

  9. Lectin-like, oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1-deficient mice show resistance to age-related knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Oda, Yutaka; Nakamura, Fumihisa; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Akagi, Masao

    2017-01-01

    The lectin-like, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1)/ox-LDL system contributes to atherosclerosis and may be involved in cartilage degeneration. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the LOX-1/ox-LDL system contributes to age-related osteoarthritis (OA) in vivo, using LOX-1 knockout (LOX-1 KO) mice. Knee cartilage from 6, 12, and 18-month old (n = 10/group) C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) and LOX-1 KO mice was evaluated by determining the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) score of Safranin-O stained samples. The prevalence of knee OA in both mouse strains was also investigated. Expression levels of LOX-1, ox-LDL, runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2), type-X collagen (COL X), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in the articular chondrocytes were analyzed immunohistologically. No significant difference was observed in the mean scores of WT (2.00±0.61) and LOX-1 KO mice (2.00±0.49) at 6 months of age (P=1.00, n=10). At 12 and 18 months of age, the mean scores of LOX-1 KO mice (3.75±0.93 and 5.50±0.78) were significantly lower than those of WT mice (5.25±1.14 and 9.00±1.01; P<0.001 in both cases; n=10). The prevalence of OA in LOX-1 KO mice was lower than that in WT mice at 12 and 18 months of age (40 vs 70%, 70 vs 90%, respectively; n=10). The expression levels of Runx2, COL X, and MMP-13 in articular chondrocytes significantly decreased in LOX-1 KO, mice compared with those in WT mice. The study indicated that the LOX-1/ox-LDL system in chondrocytes plays a role in the pathogenesis of age-related knee OA, which is potentially a target for preventing OA progression. PMID:28348422

  10. Inequality spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2017-03-01

    Inequality indices are widely applied in economics and in the social sciences as quantitative measures of the socioeconomic inequality of human societies. The application of inequality indices extends to size-distributions at large, where these indices can be used as general gauges of statistical heterogeneity. Moreover, as inequality indices are plentiful, arrays of such indices facilitate high-detail quantification of statistical heterogeneity. In this paper we elevate from arrays of inequality indices to inequality spectra: continuums of inequality indices that are parameterized by a single control parameter. We present a general methodology of constructing Lorenz-based inequality spectra, apply the general methodology to establish four sets of inequality spectra, investigate the properties of these sets, and show how these sets generalize known inequality gauges such as: the Gini index, the extended Gini index, the Rényi index, and hill curves.

  11. The infrared and Raman spectra of the duplex of d(GGTATACC) in the crystal show bands due to both the A-form and the B-form of DNA.

    PubMed

    Liquiers, J; Taillandier, E; Peticolas, W L; Thomas, G A

    1990-10-01

    The deoxyoligonucleotide, d(GGTATACC), forms a duplex structure that crystallizes in the DNA A form. This has been shown by both X-ray diffraction studies and Raman spectroscopy (1,2). The presence of the DNA B form has been reported using diffuse X-ray scattering from a crystal of the closely related sequence d(GGBrUABrUACC)(3). In this paper the infrared spectrum of the d(GGTATACC) crystal is presented and curve resolution of both the Raman and IR spectra have been carried out. The percentage of A and B forms have been estimated. The %B form in the crystal has been estimated from the IR spectra to be about 15% and from Raman to be about 20%. Moreover the IR spectrum of the A conformation in the crystal is slightly different from the IR spectrum of the A conformation in polynucleotide fibers in particular in the region of the phosphate stretching vibrations and of the in-plane double bond vibrations of the bases. We show that it is feasible to obtain IR as well as Raman spectra of small crystals of oligonucleotides and that this is a good method of identifying all of the different conformations that may be in the crystal.

  12. Convergence in relationships between leaf traits, spectra and age across diverse canopy environments and two contrasting tropical forests

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin; Chavana-Bryant, Cecilia; Prohaska, Neill; Serbin, Shawn P.; Guan, Kaiyu; Albert, Loren P.; Yang, Xi; van Leeuwen, Willem J. D.; Garnello, Anthony John; Martins, Giordane; Malhi, Yadvinder; Gerard, France; Oliviera, Raimundo Cosme; Saleska, Scott R.

    2016-07-06

    Leaf age structures the phenology and development of plants, as well as the evolution of leaf traits over life histories. Furthermore, a general method for efficiently estimating leaf age across forests and canopy environments is lacking.

  13. Eighteen-year study of South Australian dolphins shows variation in lung nematodes by season, year, age class, and location.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Ikuko; Kemper, Catherine M; Lavery, Trish J

    2010-04-01

    Between 1990 and 2007, carcasses of opportunistically collected short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis; n=238), Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus; n=167), and common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus; n=15) were examined for parasites and life history data. Three species of lung nematodes (Halocercus lagenorhynchi, Stenurus ovatus, Pharurus alatus) were identified in surface nodules, subsurface lesions, or airways. Nematode burdens were light to heavy and, in many cases, would have compromised the dolphins' health. The number of dolphins infected was related to species, year, season, age class, and geographic region. Nematodes were found in all three species but were more prevalent in short-beaked common dolphins (mean annual prevalence=26%) than in bottlenose dolphins (12%). There was a significant increase in prevalence of nematodes in short-beaked common dolphins in 2005-06 (63%) compared to 1990-2004 (14%), with a peak in April-June. More young short-beaked common dolphins were infected than subadults and adults and, during the unusual infection event, there were more dependent calves (<130 cm) than juveniles. There were also more infections in dependent bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops spp.) calves but no increase in overall prevalence was detected during 2005-06. Because neonates of both short-beaked common dolphins and bottlenose dolphins were infected, mother-to-calf transmission is suspected for these species in South Australia. Numbers of infections in short-beaked common dolphins were higher in Gulf St Vincent than elsewhere in South Australia, particularly in 2005-06. The cause of the unusual infection event in short-beaked common dolphins is unknown. We discuss the influence of dolphin diet, life history, and external factors.

  14. Prospective microglia and brain macrophage distribution pattern in normal rat brain shows age sensitive dispersal and stabilization with development.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payel; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Ghosh, Krishnendu; Mallick, Suvadip; Pal, Chiranjib; Laskar, Aparna; Ghosh, Anirban

    2015-09-01

    The monocytic lineage cells in brain, generally speaking brain macrophage and/or microglia show some dissimilar distribution patterns and disagreement regarding their origin and onset in brain. Here, we investigated its onset and distribution/colonization pattern in normal brain with development. Primarily, early and late embryonic stages, neonate and adult brains were sectioned for routine H/E staining; a modified silver-gold staining was used for discriminating monocytic lineage cells in brain; and TEM to deliver ultramicroscopic details of these cells in brain. Immunofluorescence study with CD11b marker revealed the distribution of active microglia/macrophage like cells. Overall, in early embryonic day 12, the band of densely stained cells are found at the margin of developing ventricles and cells sprout from there dispersed towards the outer edge. However, with development, this band shrunk and the dispersion trend decreased. The deeply stained macrophage like cell population migration from outer cortex to ventricle observed highest in late embryonic days, continued with decreased amount in neonates and settled down in adult. In adult, a few blood borne macrophage like cells were observed through the vascular margins. TEM study depicted less distinguishable features of cells in brain in early embryo, whereas from late embryo to adult different neuroglial populations and microglia/macrophages showed distinctive features and organization in brain. CD11b expression showed some similarity, though not fully, with the distribution pattern depending on the differentiation/activation status of these macrophage lineage cells. This study provides some generalized spatial and temporal pattern of macrophage/microglia distribution in rat brain, and further indicates some intrigue areas that need to be addressed.

  15. Variation of illite/muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age spectra during progressive low-grade metamorphism: an example from the US Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdel, Charles; van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Niemi, Nathan

    2012-09-01

    40Ar/39Ar step-heating data were collected from micron to submicron grain-sizes of correlative illite- and muscovite-rich Cambrian pelitic rocks from the western United States that range in metamorphic grade from the shallow diagenetic zone (zeolite facies) to the epizone (greenschist facies). With increasing metamorphic grade, maximum ages from 40Ar/39Ar release spectra decrease, as do total gas ages and retention ages. Previous studies have explained similar results as arising dominantly or entirely from the dissolution of detrital muscovite and precipitation/recrystallization of neo-formed illite. While recognizing the importance of these processes in evaluating our results, we suggest that the inverse correlation between apparent age and metamorphic grade is controlled, primarily, by thermally activated volume diffusion, analogous to the decrease in apparent ages with depth observed for many thermochronometers in borehole experiments. Our results suggest that complete resetting of the illite/muscovite Ar thermochronometer occurs between the high anchizone and epizone, or at roughly 300 °C. This empirical result is in agreement with previous calculations based on muscovite diffusion parameters, which indicate that muscovite grains with radii of 0.05-2 μm should have closure temperatures between 250 and 350 °C. At high anchizone conditions, we observe a reversal in the age/grain-size relationship (the finest grain-size produces the oldest apparent age), which may mark the stage in prograde subgreenschist facies metamorphism of pelitic rocks at which neo-formed illite/muscovite crystallites typically surpass the size of detrital muscovite grains. It is also approximately the stage at which neo-formed illite/muscovite crystallites develop sufficient Ar retentivity to produce geologically meaningful 40Ar/39Ar ages. Results from our sampling transect of Cambrian strata establish a framework for interpreting illite/muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age spectra at different

  16. Are scale detrital zircon age spectra from modern sands representative of their catchment sources? : An empirical test from the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, J.; Bande, A.; Ramirez, J. C.; Mora, A.; Horton, B. K.; Nie, J.; Saylor, J.

    2010-12-01

    Despite potential pitfalls, detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology remains a widely used method to determine provenance and age, and conduct tectonic reconstructions. Potential problems include whether the zircon populations from sandstone samples accurately capture both the presence and relative abundances of zircon populations within the catchment. Sand and sandstone samples were collected and analyzed from two rivers, the Rio Cravo Sur and Rio Cusiana, and the various Cretaceous-Cenozoic formations present in their respective catchments (areas= XX, YY km2, respectively). Using digital watershed delineation, mapped surface geology, the areal extent of each formation, and the measured detrital zircon U-Pb age spectrum for each formation, model zircon populations were generated to represent each catchment. We compared this to the measured river data using both qualitative and statistical analysis methods in order to determine whether sampled formations yield representative populations. Statistical tests including the coefficient of determination (R-squared), overlap-similarity comparison, and the Chi-square test support the conclusion that populations reflect their contributors. Modern river sediments sampled in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes reveal U-Pb age spectra that are representative of the contributing formations. Significantly, not only do river samples accurately reflect the presence of zircon populations, they also closely reflect the relative abundance of those populations. We attribute deviations between model and measured spectra to differences in zircon concentration, or erosion.

  17. Reliability and longitudinal change of detrital-zircon age spectra in the Snake River system, Idaho and Wyoming: An example of reproducing the bumpy barcode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Paul Karl; Fanning, C. Mark; Beranek, Luke P.

    2005-12-01

    Detrital-zircon age-spectra effectively define provenance in Holocene and Neogene fluvial sands from the Snake River system of the northern Rockies, U.S.A. SHRIMP U-Pb dates have been measured for forty-six samples (about 2700 zircon grains) of fluvial and aeolian sediment. The detrital-zircon age distributions are repeatable and demonstrate predictable longitudinal variation. By lumping multiple samples to attain populations of several hundred grains, we recognize distinctive, provenance-defining zircon-age distributions or "barcodes," for fluvial sedimentary systems of several scales, within the upper and middle Snake River system. Our detrital-zircon studies effectively define the geochronology of the northern Rocky Mountains. The composite detrital-zircon grain distribution of the middle Snake River consists of major populations of Neogene, Eocene, and Cretaceous magmatic grains plus intermediate and small grain populations of multiply recycled Grenville (˜950 to 1300 Ma) grains and Yavapai-Mazatzal province grains (˜1600 to 1800 Ma) recycled through the upper Belt Supergroup and Cretaceous sandstones. A wide range of older Paleoproterozoic and Archean grains are also present. The best-case scenario for using detrital-zircon populations to isolate provenance is when there is a point-source pluton with known age, that is only found in one location or drainage. We find three such zircon age-populations in fluvial sediments downstream from the point-source plutons: Ordovician in the southern Beaverhead Mountains, Jurassic in northern Nevada, and Oligocene in the Albion Mountains core complex of southern Idaho. Large detrital-zircon age-populations derived from regionally well-defined, magmatic or recycled sedimentary, sources also serve to delimit the provenance of Neogene fluvial systems. In the Snake River system, defining populations include those derived from Cretaceous Atlanta lobe of the Idaho batholith (80 to 100 Ma), Eocene Challis Volcanic Group and

  18. Transgenic mice overexpressing glia maturation factor-β, an oxidative stress inducible gene, show premature aging due to Zmpste24 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Imai, Rika; Asai, Kanae; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Takenaka, Masaru

    2015-07-01

    Glia Maturation Factor-β (GMF), a brain specific protein, is induced by proteinuria in renal tubules. Ectopic GMF overexpression causes apoptosisin vitro via cellular vulnerability to oxidative stress. In order to examine the roles of GMF in non-brain tissue, we constructed transgenic mice overexpressing GMF (GMF-TG). The GMF-TG mice exhibited appearance phenotypes associated with premature aging. The GMF-TG mice also demonstrated short lifespans and reduced hair regrowth, suggesting an accelerated aging process. The production of an abnormal lamin A, a nuclear envelope protein, plays a causal role in both normal aging and accelerated aging diseases, known as laminopathies. Importantly, we identified the abnormal lamin A (prelamin A), accompanied by a down-regulation of a lamin A processing enzyme (Zmpste24) in the kidney of the GMF-TG mice. The GMF-TG mice showed accelerated aging in the kidney, compared with wild-type mice, showing increased TGF-β1, CTGF gene and serum creatinine. The gene expression of p21/waf1 was increased at an earlier stage of life, at 10 weeks, which was in turn down-regulated at a later stage, at 60 weeks. In conclusion, we propose that GMF-TG mice might be a novel mouse model of accelerated aging, due to the abnormal lamin A.

  19. Aging is associated with an expansion of CD49fhi mammary stem cells that show a decline in function and increased transformation potential

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiaoxiang; Gao, Hui; Shi, Yuanshuo; Zhang, Fuchuang; Gu, Xiang; Wu, Anqi; Wang, Danhan; Chen, Yuanhong; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Yeh, I-Tien; Daniel, Benjamin J.; Chen, Yidong; Zou, Yi; Rebel, Vivienne L.; Walter, Christi A.; Lu, Jianxin; Huang, Changjiang; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence increases during aging, yet the mechanism of age-associated mammary tumorigenesis is unclear. Mammary stem cells are believed to play an important role in breast tumorigenesis, but how their function changes with age is unknown. We compared mammary epithelial cells isolated from young and old mammary glands of different cohorts of C57BL6/J and BALB/c mice, and our findings revealed that old mammary glands were characterized by increased basal cell pool comprised of mostly CD49fhi cells, altered luminal-to-basal cell ratio, and irregular ductal morphology. More interestingly, basal stem cells in old mice were increased in frequency, but showed a functional decline of differentiation and increased neoplastic transformation potential. Gene signature enrichment analysis revealed a significant enrichment of a luminal cell gene expression signature in the basal stem cell-enriched population from old mice, suggesting some luminal cells were expressing basal markers. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed the presence of luminal cells with high CD49f expression in hyperplastic lesions implicating these cells as undergoing luminal to basal phenotypic changes during aging. Whole transcriptome analysis showed elevated immune and inflammatory responses in old basal stem cells and stromal cells, which may be the underlying cause for increased CD49fhi basal-like cells in aged glands. PMID:27852980

  20. When Age and Culture Interact in an Easy and Yet Cognitively Demanding Task: Older Adults, But Not Younger Adults, Showed the Expected Cultural Differences

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jinkyung; Huang, Chih-Mao; Park, Denise C.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between age and culture can have various implications for cognition as age represents the effect of biological processes whereas culture represents the effect of sustaining experiences. Nevertheless, their interaction has rarely been examined. Thus, based on the fact that Asians are more intuitive in reasoning than Americans, we examined how this cultural difference might interact with age. Young and old participants from the US and Singapore performed a categorization task (living vs. non-living). To measure their reliance on intuition, we manipulated the typicality of targets (animate vs. inanimate). We showed that (1) RTs for inanimate organisms were slower than RTs for animate organisms (atypicality cost), (2) the cost was particularly large for older adults and (3) an age × culture interaction was observed such that cultural differences in the cost (Singaporeans > Americans) was found only among older participants. Further, we demonstrated that the age effect was associated with cognitive function and the culture effect among older adults was associated with cultural values. Finally, a moderated mediation analysis suggests that cognitive function and cultural values interact with each other in order to jointly influence one’s cognition.

  1. Fractional anisotropy shows differential reduction in frontal-subcortical fiber bundles—A longitudinal MRI study of 76 middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Vik, Alexandra; Hodneland, Erlend; Haász, Judit; Ystad, Martin; Lundervold, Astri J.; Lundervold, Arvid

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the frontal- and white matter (WM) retrogenesis hypotheses and the assumptions that fronto-striatal circuits are especially vulnerable in normal aging, the goal of the present study was to identify fiber bundles connecting subcortical nuclei and frontal areas and obtain site-specific information about age related fractional anisotropy (FA) changes. Multimodal magnetic resonance image acquisitions [3D T1-weighted and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI)] were obtained from healthy older adults (N = 76, range 49–80 years at inclusion) at two time points, 3 years apart. A subset of the participants (N = 24) was included at a third time-point. In addition to the frontal-subcortical fibers, the anterior callosal fiber (ACF) and the corticospinal tract (CST) was investigated by its mean FA together with tract parameterization analysis. Our results demonstrated fronto-striatal structural connectivity decline (reduced FA) in normal aging with substantial inter-individual differences. The tract parameterization analysis showed that the along tract FA profiles were characterized by piece-wise differential changes along their extension rather than being uniformly affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first longitudinal study detecting age-related changes in frontal-subcortical WM connections in normal aging. PMID:26029102

  2. Overconstrained library-based fitting method reveals age- and disease-related differences in transcutaneous Raman spectra of murine bones.

    PubMed

    Maher, Jason R; Inzana, Jason A; Awad, Hani A; Berger, Andrew J

    2013-07-01

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely on measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent on its chemical composition. Raman spectroscopy has been used extensively in ex vivo studies to measure the chemical composition of bone. Recently, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) has been utilized to measure bone transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make noninvasive, in vivo measurements of bone with SORS that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based on fitting with spectral libraries. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both bone and soft tissue. The algorithm was utilized to transcutaneously detect biochemical differences in the tibiae of wild-type mice between 1 and 7 months of age and between the tibiae of wild-type mice and a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta. These results represent the first diagnostically sensitive, transcutaneous measurements of bone using SORS.

  3. The aging brain shows less flexible reallocation of cognitive resources during dual-task walking: A mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI) study.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Brenda R; Foxe, John J; Butler, John S; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo

    2015-08-15

    Aging is associated with reduced abilities to selectively allocate attention across multiple domains. This may be particularly problematic during everyday multitasking situations when cognitively demanding tasks are performed while walking. Due to previous limitations in neuroimaging technology, much remains unknown about the cortical mechanisms underlying resource allocation during locomotion. Here, we utilized an EEG-based mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI) technique that integrates high-density event-related potential (ERP) recordings with simultaneously acquired foot-force sensor data to monitor gait patterns and brain activity concurrently. To assess effects of motor load on cognition we evaluated young (N=17; mean age=27.2) and older adults (N=16; mean age=63.9) and compared behavioral and ERP measures associated with performing a Go/No-Go response inhibition task as participants sat stationary or walked on a treadmill. Stride time and variability were also measured during task performance and compared to stride parameters obtained without task performance, thereby assessing effects of cognitive load on gait. Results showed that older, but not young adults' accuracy dropped significantly when performing the inhibitory task while walking. Young adults revealed ERP modulations at relatively early (N2 amplitude reduction) and later (earlier P3 latency) stages within the processing stream as motor load increased while walking. In contrast, older adults' ERP modulations were limited to later processing stages (increased P3 amplitude) of the inhibitory network. The relative delay and attenuation of ERP modulations accompanied by behavioral costs in older participants might indicate an age-associated loss in flexible resource allocation across multiple tasks. Better understanding of the neural underpinnings of these age-related changes may lead to improved strategies to reduce fall risk and enhance mobility in aging.

  4. Borrelia miyamotoi infections among wild rodents show age and month independence and correlation with Ixodes persulcatus larval attachment in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kyle R; Takano, Ai; Konnai, Satoru; Shimozuru, Michito; Kawabata, Hiroki; Tsubota, Toshio

    2013-02-01

    To clarify how Borrelia miyamotoi is maintained in the environment in Hokkaido, we examined Ixodes persulcatus for its prevalence among wild rodents and its tick vector by detecting a portion of the borrelial flaB gene in rodent urinary bladder and blood samples, and from whole ticks. We compared B. miyamotoi infection rates to Borrelia garinii and Borrelia afzelii, which are human Lyme disease pathogens also carried by wild rodents, and which are transmitted by the same vector tick. Whereas B. garinii and B. afzelii showed age dependence of infection rates among wild rodents (18.4% and 9.9% among adults and 6.0% and 3.4% among sub-adults, respectively) when looking at urinary bladder samples, B. miyamotoi infection rates were not age dependent for either blood (4.2% among adults, and 7.9% among sub-adults) or urinary bladder samples (1.0% among adults, and 1.7% among sub-adults). Moreover, while B. garinii and B. afzelii infection rates showed increases across months (June, July [p<0.05] and August [p<0.01] had higher rates than in May for adult rodents with B. garinii, and July and August had higher rates than in May [p<0.01] for adult rodents with B. afzelii), B. miyamotoi infection rates did not show significant month dependence. These differences in month and age dependence led us to suspect that B. miyamotoi may not develop persistent infections in wild rodents, as B. garinii and B. afzelii are thought to. Furthermore, we examined the extent of rodent exposure to I. persulcatus nymphs and larvae throughout most of the tick's active season (May through September), and determined that B. miyamotoi infection rates in sub-adult rodents were correlated with larval burden (p<0.01), suggesting that larvae may be very important in transmission of B. miyamotoi to wild rodents.

  5. CFH haplotypes and ARMS2, C2, C3, and CFB alleles show association with susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration in Mexicans

    PubMed Central

    Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez-Corona, Ulises; Falfán-Valencia, Ramcés; Sebastian, Leticia; Morales, Fabiola; Ochoa-Contreras, Daniel; Carnevale, Alessandra; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the contribution of genetic variants of complement factor H (CFH), complement component 2 and 3 (C2 and C3), complement factor B (CFB), and age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk in the Mexican Mestizo population. Methods Analysis included 282 unrelated Mexican patients with advanced AMD, 205 healthy controls, and 280 population controls. Stereoscopic fundus images were graded on the Clinical Age-Related Maculopathy System (CARMS). We designed a resequencing strategy using primers with M13 adaptor for the 23 exons of the CFH gene in a subgroup of 96 individuals clinically evaluated: 48 AMD cases and 48 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in C3 (Arg80Gly and Pro292Leu), C2 (rs547154), CFB (Leu9His), and ARMS2 (Ala69Ser) were genotyped in all patients, healthy and population controls using TaqMan assay. Results All evaluated individuals were Mexican Mestizos, and their genetic ancestry was validated using 224 ancestry informative markers and calculating Fst values. The CFH resequencing revealed 19 SNPs and a common variant in the intron 2 splice acceptor site; three CFH haplotypes inferred from individual genotypes, showed significant differences between cases and controls. The risk alleles in C3 (rs1047286, odds ratio [OR]=2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.64–3.75, p=1.59E-05; rs2230199, OR=2.15, 95% CI=1.48–3.13, p=6.28E-05) and in ARMS2 (rs10490924, OR=3.09, 95% CI=2.48–3.86, p=5.42E-23) were strongly associated with risk of AMD. The protective effect of alleles in C2 (rs547154) and CFB (rs4151667) showed a trend but was not significantly associated after correction for multiple testing. Conclusions Our results show that ARMS2 and C3 are major contributors to advanced AMD in Mexican patients, while the contributions of CFH, C2, and CFB are minor to those of other populations, reveling significant ethnic differences in minor allele

  6. Methanolic Extract of Dill Leaves Inhibits AGEs Formation and Shows Potential Hepatoprotective Effects in CCl4 Induced Liver Toxicity in Rat.

    PubMed

    Oshaghi, Ebrahim Abbasi; Khodadadi, Iraj; Mirzaei, Fatemeh; Khazaei, Mozafar; Tavilani, Heidar; Goodarzi, Mohammad Taghi

    2017-01-01

    The research was aimed at evaluating the antiglycation, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective properties of methanolic extract of Anethum graveolens (dill). The antioxidant properties, photochemical characteristics, and antiglycation effects of dill extract were measured. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxic rats were used to show the hepatoprotective activity of dill leaves. Different concentration of dill extract (0.032, 0.065, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL) showed potential antioxidant ability. The extract of dill leaves significantly reduced AGEs formation and also fructosamine and protein carbonyl levels in rats' liver. Thiol groups' oxidation, amyloid cross-β, and protein fragmentation (P < 0.001) significantly reduced in treated rats. Liver damage markers significantly reduced in dill-treated animals (P < 0.05). Dill with potential antioxidant, antiglycation, and hepatoprotective effects can be suggested for treatment of diabetes complications.

  7. Methanolic Extract of Dill Leaves Inhibits AGEs Formation and Shows Potential Hepatoprotective Effects in CCl4 Induced Liver Toxicity in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khodadadi, Iraj; Mirzaei, Fatemeh; Khazaei, Mozafar; Tavilani, Heidar

    2017-01-01

    The research was aimed at evaluating the antiglycation, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective properties of methanolic extract of Anethum graveolens (dill). The antioxidant properties, photochemical characteristics, and antiglycation effects of dill extract were measured. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxic rats were used to show the hepatoprotective activity of dill leaves. Different concentration of dill extract (0.032, 0.065, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/mL) showed potential antioxidant ability. The extract of dill leaves significantly reduced AGEs formation and also fructosamine and protein carbonyl levels in rats' liver. Thiol groups' oxidation, amyloid cross-β, and protein fragmentation (P < 0.001) significantly reduced in treated rats. Liver damage markers significantly reduced in dill-treated animals (P < 0.05). Dill with potential antioxidant, antiglycation, and hepatoprotective effects can be suggested for treatment of diabetes complications. PMID:28182107

  8. Comparison of mitochondrial mutation spectra in ageing human colonic epithelium and disease: absence of evidence for purifying selection in somatic mitochondrial DNA point mutations.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Laura C; Elson, Joanna L; Nooteboom, Marco; Grady, John P; Taylor, Geoffrey A; Taylor, Robert W; Mathers, John C; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Turnbull, Doug M

    2012-01-01

    Human ageing has been predicted to be caused by the accumulation of molecular damage in cells and tissues. Somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been documented in a number of ageing tissues and have been shown to be associated with cellular mitochondrial dysfunction. It is unknown whether there are selective constraints, which have been shown to occur in the germline, on the occurrence and expansion of these mtDNA mutations within individual somatic cells. Here we compared the pattern and spectrum of mutations observed in ageing human colon to those observed in the general population (germline variants) and those associated with primary mtDNA disease. The pathogenicity of the protein encoding mutations was predicted using a computational programme, MutPred, and the scores obtained for the three groups compared. We show that the mutations associated with ageing are randomly distributed throughout the genome, are more frequently non-synonymous or frameshift mutations than the general population, and are significantly more pathogenic than population variants. Mutations associated with primary mtDNA disease were significantly more pathogenic than ageing or population mutations. These data provide little evidence for any selective constraints on the occurrence and expansion of mtDNA mutations in somatic cells of the human colon during human ageing in contrast to germline mutations seen in the general population.

  9. Structure shows that a glycosaminoglycan and protein recognition site in factor H is perturbed by age-related macular degeneration-linked single nucleotide polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Andrew P; Deakin, Jon A; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Blaum, Bärbel S; Egan, Claire; Ferreira, Viviana P; Pangburn, Michael K; Lyon, Malcolm; Uhrín, Dusan; Barlow, Paul N

    2007-06-29

    A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the factor H gene predisposes to age-related macular degeneration. Factor H blocks the alternative pathway of complement on self-surfaces bearing specific polyanions, including the glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans. Factor H also binds C-reactive protein, potentially contributing to noninflammatory apoptotic processes. The at risk sequence contains His (rather than Tyr) at position 402 (384 in the mature protein), in the seventh of the 20 complement control protein (CCP) modules (CCP7) of factor H. We expressed both His(402) and Tyr(402) variants of CCP7, CCP7,8, and CCP6-8. We determined structures of His(402) and Tyr(402) CCP7 and showed them to be nearly identical. The side chains of His/Tyr(402) have similar, solvent-exposed orientations far from interfaces with CCP6 and -8. Tyr(402) CCP7 bound significantly more tightly than His(402) CCP7 to a heparin affinity column as well as to defined-length sulfated heparin oligosaccharides employed in gel mobility shift assays. This observation is consistent with the position of the 402 side chain on the edge of one of two glycosaminoglycan-binding surface patches on CCP7 that we inferred on the basis of chemical shift perturbation studies with a sulfated heparin tetrasaccharide. According to surface plasmon resonance measurements, Tyr(402) CCP6-8 binds significantly more tightly than His(402) CCP6-8 to immobilized C-reactive protein. The data support a causal link between H402Y and age-related macular degeneration in which variation at position 402 modulates the response of factor H to age-related changes in the glycosaminoglycan composition and apoptotic activity of the macula.

  10. Serum Folate Shows an Inverse Association with Blood Pressure in a Cohort of Chinese Women of Childbearing Age: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Minxue; Tan, Hongzhuan; Zhou, Shujin; Retnakaran, Ravi; Smith, Graeme N.; Davidge, Sandra T.; Trasler, Jacquetta; Walker, Mark C.; Wen, Shi Wu

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been reported that higher folate intake from food and supplementation is associated with decreased blood pressure (BP). The association between serum folate concentration and BP has been examined in few studies. We aim to examine the association between serum folate and BP levels in a cohort of young Chinese women. Methods We used the baseline data from a pre-conception cohort of women of childbearing age in Liuyang, China, for this study. Demographic data were collected by structured interview. Serum folate concentration was measured by immunoassay, and homocysteine, blood glucose, triglyceride and total cholesterol were measured through standardized clinical procedures. Multiple linear regression and principal component regression model were applied in the analysis. Results A total of 1,532 healthy normotensive non-pregnant women were included in the final analysis. The mean concentration of serum folate was 7.5 ± 5.4 nmol/L and 55% of the women presented with folate deficiency (< 6.8 nmol/L). Multiple linear regression and principal component regression showed that serum folate levels were inversely associated with systolic and diastolic BP, after adjusting for demographic, anthropometric, and biochemical factors. Conclusions Serum folate is inversely associated with BP in non-pregnant women of childbearing age with high prevalence of folate deficiency. PMID:27182603

  11. Senescent human fibroblasts show increased glycolysis and redox homeostasis with extracellular metabolomes that overlap with those of irreparable DNA damage, aging, and disease.

    PubMed

    James, Emma L; Michalek, Ryan D; Pitiyage, Gayani N; de Castro, Alice M; Vignola, Katie S; Jones, Janice; Mohney, Robert P; Karoly, Edward D; Prime, Stephen S; Parkinson, Eric Kenneth

    2015-04-03

    Cellular senescence can modulate various pathologies and is associated with irreparable DNA double-strand breaks (IrrDSBs). Extracellular senescence metabolomes (ESMs) were generated from fibroblasts rendered senescent by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or 20 Gy of γ rays (IrrDSBsen) and compared with those of young proliferating cells, confluent cells, quiescent cells, and cells exposed to repairable levels of DNA damage to identify novel noninvasive markers of senescent cells. ESMs of PEsen and IrrDSBsen overlapped and showed increased levels of citrate, molecules involved in oxidative stress, a sterol, monohydroxylipids, tryptophan metabolism, phospholipid, and nucleotide catabolism, as well as reduced levels of dipeptides containing branched chain amino acids. The ESM overlaps with the aging and disease body fluid metabolomes, supporting their utility in the noninvasive detection of human senescent cells in vivo and by implication the detection of a variety of human pathologies. Intracellular metabolites of senescent cells showed a relative increase in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose-phosphate pathway, and, consistent with this, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase transcripts. In contrast, tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme transcript levels were unchanged and their metabolites were depleted. These results are surprising because glycolysis antagonizes senescence entry but are consistent with established senescent cells entering a state of low oxidative stress.

  12. Development of a novel pink-eyed dilution mouse model showing progressive darkening of the eyes and coat hair with aging

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, Akira; SUGIYAMA, Makoto; HONDO, Eiichi; KINOSHITA, Keiji; YAMAGISHI, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    Oca2p-cas (oculocutaneous albinism II; pink-eyed dilution castaneus) is a coat color mutant gene on mouse chromosome 7 that arose spontaneously in wild Mus musculus castaneus mice. Mice homozygous for Oca2p-cas usually exhibit pink eyes and gray coat hair on the non-agouti genetic background, and this ordinary phenotype remains unchanged throughout life. During breeding of a mixed strain carrying this gene on the C57BL/6J background, we discovered a novel spontaneous mutation that causes darkening of the eyes and coat hair with aging. In this study, we developed a novel mouse model showing this unique phenotype. Gross observations revealed that the pink eyes and gray coat hair of the novel mutant young mice became progressively darker in color by approximately 3 months after birth. Light and transmission-electron microscopic observations revealed a marked increase in melanin pigmentation of coat hair shafts and choroid of the eye in the novel mice compared to that in the ordinary mice. Sequence analysis of Oca2p-cas revealed a 4.1-kb deletion involving exons 15 and 16 of its wild-type gene. However, there was no sequence difference between the two types of mutant mice. Mating experiments suggested that the novel mutant phenotype was not inherited in a simple fashion, due to incomplete penetrance. The novel spontaneous mutant mouse is the first example of progressive hair darkening animals and is an essential animal model for understanding of the regulation mechanisms of melanin biosynthesis with aging. PMID:25739360

  13. Development of a novel pink-eyed dilution mouse model showing progressive darkening of the eyes and coat hair with aging.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Akira; Sugiyama, Makoto; Hondo, Eiichi; Kinoshita, Keiji; Yamagishi, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    Oca2(p-cas) (oculocutaneous albinism II; pink-eyed dilution castaneus) is a coat color mutant gene on mouse chromosome 7 that arose spontaneously in wild Mus musculus castaneus mice. Mice homozygous for Oca2(p-cas) usually exhibit pink eyes and gray coat hair on the non-agouti genetic background, and this ordinary phenotype remains unchanged throughout life. During breeding of a mixed strain carrying this gene on the C57BL/6J background, we discovered a novel spontaneous mutation that causes darkening of the eyes and coat hair with aging. In this study, we developed a novel mouse model showing this unique phenotype. Gross observations revealed that the pink eyes and gray coat hair of the novel mutant young mice became progressively darker in color by approximately 3 months after birth. Light and transmission-electron microscopic observations revealed a marked increase in melanin pigmentation of coat hair shafts and choroid of the eye in the novel mice compared to that in the ordinary mice. Sequence analysis of Oca2(p-cas) revealed a 4.1-kb deletion involving exons 15 and 16 of its wild-type gene. However, there was no sequence difference between the two types of mutant mice. Mating experiments suggested that the novel mutant phenotype was not inherited in a simple fashion, due to incomplete penetrance. The novel spontaneous mutant mouse is the first example of progressive hair darkening animals and is an essential animal model for understanding of the regulation mechanisms of melanin biosynthesis with aging.

  14. Lily Pad Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the 'Lily Pad' bounce-mark area at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was acquired on the 3rd sol, or martian day, of Opportunity's mission (Jan.26, 2004). The upper left image is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera, showing regions from which spectra were extracted from the 'Lily Pad' area. As noted by the line graph on the right, the green spectra is from the undisturbed surface and the red spectra is from the airbag bounce mark.

  15. Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate Metabolites in Urine Show Age-Related Changes and Associations with Adiposity and Parameters of Insulin Sensitivity in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Smerieri, Arianna; Testa, Chiara; Lazzeroni, Pietro; Nuti, Francesca; Grossi, Enzo; Cesari, Silvia; Montanini, Luisa; Latini, Giuseppe; Bernasconi, Sergio; Papini, Anna Maria; Street, Maria E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Phthalates might be implicated with obesity and insulin sensitivity. We evaluated the levels of primary and secondary metabolites of Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in urine in obese and normal-weight subjects both before and during puberty, and investigated their relationships with auxological parameters and indexes of insulin sensitivity. Design and Methods DEHP metabolites (MEHP, 6-OH-MEHP, 5-oxo-MEHP, 5-OH-MEHP, and 5-CX-MEHP), were measured in urine by RP-HPLC-ESI-MS. Traditional statistical analysis and a data mining analysis using the Auto-CM analysis were able to offer an insight into the complex biological connections between the studied variables. Results The data showed changes in DEHP metabolites in urine related with obesity, puberty, and presence of insulin resistance. Changes in urine metabolites were related with age, height and weight, waist circumference and waist to height ratio, thus to fat distribution. In addition, clear relationships in both obese and normal-weight subjects were detected among MEHP, its products of oxidation and measurements of insulin sensitivity. Conclusion It remains to be elucidated whether exposure to phthalates per se is actually the risk factor or if the ability of the body to metabolize phthalates is actually the key point. Further studies that span from conception to elderly subjects besides further understanding of DEHP metabolism are warranted to clarify these aspects. PMID:25706863

  16. Infants with complex congenital heart diseases show poor short-term memory in the mobile paradigm at 3 months of age.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Ying; Harrison, Tondi; Heathcock, Jill

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine learning, short-term memory and general development including cognitive, motor, and language domains in infants with Complex Congenital Heart Defects (CCDH). Ten infants with CCHD (4 males, 6 females) and 14 infants with typical development (TD) were examined at 3 months of age. The mobile paradigm, where an infant's leg is tethered to an overhead mobile, was used to evaluate learning and short-term memory. The Bayley Scales of Infant Development 3rd edition (Bayley-III) was used to evaluate general development in cognitive, motor, and language domains. Infants with CCHD and infants with TD both showed learning with significant increase in kicking rate (p<0.001) across periods of the mobile paradigm, but only infants with TD demonstrated short-term memory (p=0.017) in the mobile paradigm. There were no differences on cognitive, motor, and language development between infants with CCHD and infants with TD on the Bayley-III. Early assessment is necessary to guide targeted treatment in infants with CCHD. One-time assessment may fail to detect potential cognitive impairments during early infancy in infants with CCHD. Supportive intervention programs for infants with CCHD that focuses on enhancing short-term memory are recommended.

  17. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  18. Intracranial administration of vaccinia virus complement control protein in Mo/Hu APPswe PS1dE9 transgenic mice at an early age shows enhanced performance at a later age using a cheese board maze test.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Amod P; Pillay, Nirvana S; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Kotwal, Girish J

    2008-12-01

    One of the key pro-inflammatory mediators activated by amyloid protein in neurodegenerative disorders of the brain, such as Alzheimer's disease is the complement system. Vaccinia virus complement control protein secreted by vaccinia virus, commonly known as VCP, was found to inhibit amyloid protein mediated up-regulation of complement system in vitro. In the current research investigation, VCP was administered twice (First dose at 3 weeks and the second dose at 6-7 months) intracranially into the parietal cortical area of Mo/Hu APPswe transgenic mice. At the age of 2 years or more, the same mice were subjected to cued-learning, spatial learning, probe and reverse probe trial paradigms of cheese board maze tasks for cognitive assessment. A significant difference was observed between VCP treated mice and the transgenic controls on days two and three of the cued trials and probe trials. The VCP treated group showed a similar trend as revealed during the spatial learning trial and reverse probe trial. A differential pattern of thioflavine S staining was observed in the VCP treated group. These results suggest that administration of VCP at an early age in transgenic mice may be effective in regulating the progression to the familial form of Alzheimer's disease at a later age.

  19. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These images, taken with the LEISA infrared camera on the New Horizons Ralph instrument, show fine details in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere using light that can only be seen using infrared sensors. These are 'false color' pictures made by assigning infrared wavelengths to the colors red, green and blue. LEISA (Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array) takes images across 250 IR wavelengths in the range from 1.25 to 2.5 microns, allowing scientists to obtain an infrared spectrum at every location on Jupiter. A micron is one millionth of a meter.

    These pictures were taken at 05:58 UT on February 27, 2007, from a distance of 2.9 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). They are centered at 8 degrees south, 32 degrees east in Jupiter 'System III' coordinates. The large oval-shaped feature is the well-known Great Red Spot. The resolution of each pixel in these images is about 175 kilometers (110 miles); Jupiter's diameter is approximately 145,000 kilometers (97,000 miles).

    The image on the left is an altitude map made by assigning the color red to 1.60 microns, green to 1.89 microns and blue to 2.04 microns. Because Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light strongly at 2.04 microns, only clouds at very high altitude will reflect light at this wavelength. Light at 1.89 microns can go deeper in the atmosphere and light at 1.6 microns can go deeper still. In this map, bluish colors indicate high clouds and reddish colors indicate lower clouds. This picture shows, for example, that the Great Red Spot extends far up into the atmosphere.

    In the image at right, red equals 1.28 microns, green equals 1.30 microns and blue equals 1.36 microns, a range of wavelengths that similarly probes different altitudes in the atmosphere. This choice of wavelengths highlights Jupiter's high-altitude south polar hood of haze. The edge of Jupiter's disk at the bottom of the panel appears slightly non-circular because the left-hand portion is the true edge of the disk, while the right

  20. F1 (CBA×C57) mice show superior hearing in old age relative to their parental strains: hybrid vigor or a new animal model for "golden ears"?

    PubMed

    Frisina, Robert D; Singh, Ameet; Bak, Matthew; Bozorg, Sara; Seth, Rahul; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2011-09-01

    Age-related hearing loss - presbycusis - is the most common communication problem and third most prevalent chronic medical disorder of the aged. The CBA and C57BL/6 mouse strains are useful for studying features of presbycusis. The CBA loses its hearing slowly, like most humans. Because the C57 develops a rapid, high frequency hearing loss by middle age, it has an "old" ear but a relatively young brain, a model that helps separate peripheral (cochlear) from central (brain) etiologies. This field of sensory neuroscience lacks a good mouse model for the 5-10% of aged humans with normal cochlear sensitivity, but who have trouble perceiving speech in background noise. We hypothesized that F1 (CBA×C57) hybrids would have better hearing than either parental strain. Measurements of peripheral auditory sensitivity supported this hypothesis, however, a rapid decline in the auditory efferent feedback system, did not. Therefore, F1s might be an optimal model for studying cases where the peripheral hearing is quite good in old age; thereby allowing isolation of central auditory changes due to brain neurodegeneration.

  1. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  2. Don't forget the siblings: School-aged siblings of children presenting to mental health services show at-risk patterns of attachment.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, Kasia; Elliott, Bronwen

    2017-04-01

    Family therapists understand that children presenting for treatment are often bearers of symptoms signalling relational problems within the family system. Rather than addressing the children's symptoms in isolation, family therapists typically take those relational problems as their starting point in therapy. This study used the School-aged Assessment of Attachment (SAA) to assess the self-protective (attachment) strategies of the siblings of children presenting for psychiatric evaluation and also of the siblings of control children drawn from the normative population. Siblings of children in the clinical group were much more likely than siblings of control children to use at-risk self-protective strategies and to have markers suggestive of unresolved loss or trauma. School-aged siblings were found to use a broad range of strategies, and the pattern of change from first born to later born involved either a reversal of strategy or a shift to a more complex strategy. The study highlights that siblings of children presenting to mental health services are significantly affected by family relational stress. A family systems approach to assessment, one that enquires about the wellbeing of all family members, will ensure that the emotional needs of siblings are also addressed during the therapy process.

  3. EXPLORING THE MORPHOLOGY OF RAVE STELLAR SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienayme, O.; Siebert, A.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M.; Watson, F. G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a medium-resolution (R {approx} 7500) spectroscopic survey of the Milky Way that has already obtained over half a million stellar spectra. They present a randomly selected magnitude-limited sample, so it is important to use a reliable and automated classification scheme that identifies normal single stars and discovers different types of peculiar stars. To this end, we present a morphological classification of {approx}350, 000 RAVE survey stellar spectra using locally linear embedding, a dimensionality reduction method that enables representing the complex spectral morphology in a low-dimensional projected space while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority of all spectra in the database ({approx} 90%-95%) belong to normal single stars, but there is also a significant population of several types of peculiars. Among them, the most populated groups are those of various types of spectroscopic binary and chromospherically active stars. Both of them include several thousands of spectra. Particularly the latter group offers significant further investigation opportunities since activity of stars is a known proxy of stellar ages. Applying the same classification procedure to the sample of normal single stars alone shows that the shape of the projected manifold in two-dimensional space correlates with stellar temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity.

  4. Bootstrap classification and point-based feature selection from age-staged mouse cerebellum tissues of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectra using a fuzzy rule-building expert system.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Peter B; Laurent, Claudine; Levinson, Douglas F; Levitt, Pat; Markey, Sanford P

    2007-09-19

    A bootstrap method for point-based detection of candidate biomarker peaks has been developed from pattern classifiers. Point-based detection methods are advantageous in comparison to peak-based methods. Peak determination and selection are problematic when spectral peaks are not baseline resolved or on a varying baseline. The benefit of point-based detection is that peaks can be globally determined from the characteristic features of the entire data set (i.e., subsets of candidate points) as opposed to the traditional method of selecting peaks from individual spectra and then combining the peak list into a data set. The point-based method is demonstrated to be more effective and efficient using a synthetic data set when compared to using Mahalanobis distance for feature selection. In addition, probabilities that characterize the uniqueness of the peaks are determined. This method was applied for detecting peaks that characterize age-specific patterns of protein expression of developing and adult mouse cerebella from matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) data. The mice comprised three age groups: 42 adults, 19 14-day-old pups, and 16 7-day-old pups. Three sequential spectra were obtained from each tissue section to yield 126, 57 and 48 spectra for adult, 14-day-old pup, and 7-day-old pup spectra, respectively. Each spectrum comprised 71,879 mass measurements in a range of 3.5-50 kDa. A previous study revealed that 846 unique peaks were detected that were consistent for 50% of the mice in each age group (C. Laurent, D.F. Levinson, S.A. Schwartz, P.B. Harrington, S.P. Markey, R.M. Caprioli, P. Levitt, Direct profiling of the cerebellum by MALDI MS: a methodological study in postnatal and adult mouse, J. Neurosci. Res. 81 (2005) 613-621.). A fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) was applied to investigate the correlation of age with features in the MS data. FuRES detected two outlier pup-14 spectra. Prediction was evaluated

  5. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  6. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  7. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B.; Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E.; Cid Fernandes, R. E-mail: abml@iac.es E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  8. Non-LTE Stellar Population Synthesis of Globular Clusters Using Synthetic Integrated Light Spectra. I. Constructing the IL Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Mitchell. E.; Short, C. Ian

    2017-02-01

    We present an investigation of the globular cluster population synthesis method of McWilliam & Bernstein, focusing on the impact of non-LTE (NLTE) modeling effects and color–magnitude diagram (CMD) discretization. Johnson–Cousins–Bessel U – B, B-V, V-I, and J-K colors are produced for 96 synthetic integrated light (IL) spectra with two different discretization prescriptions and three degrees of NLTE treatment. These color values are used to compare NLTE- and LTE-derived population ages. Relative contributions of different spectral types to the IL spectra for different wavebands are measured. IL NLTE spectra are shown to be more luminous in the UV and optical than LTE spectra, but show stronger absorption features in the IR. The main features showing discrepancies between NLTE and LTE IL spectra may be attributed to light metals, primarily Fe i, Ca i, and Ti i, as well as TiO molecular bands. Main-sequence stars are shown to have negligible NLTE effects at IR wavelengths compared to more evolved stars. Photometric color values are shown to vary at the millimagnitude level as a function of CMD discretization. Finer CMD sampling for the upper main sequence and turnoff, base of the red giant branch, and the horizontal branch minimizes this variation. Differences in ages derived from LTE and NLTE IL spectra are found to range from 0.55 to 2.54 Gyr, comparable to the uncertainty in GC ages derived from color indices with observational uncertainties of 0.01 mag, the limiting precision of the Harris catalog.

  9. Magic Carpet Shows Its Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The upper left image in this display is from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit, showing the 'Magic Carpet' region near the rover at Gusev Crater, Mars, on Sol 7, the seventh martian day of its journey (Jan. 10, 2004). The lower image, also from the panoramic camera, is a monochrome (single filter) image of a rock in the 'Magic Carpet' area. Note that colored portions of the rock correlate with extracted spectra shown in the plot to the side. Four different types of materials are shown: the rock itself, the soil in front of the rock, some brighter soil on top of the rock, and some dust that has collected in small recesses on the rock face ('spots'). Each color on the spectra matches a line on the graph, showing how the panoramic camera's different colored filters are used to broadly assess the varying mineral compositions of martian rocks and soils.

  10. In vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy of Drosophila melanogaster at 14.1 T shows trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to reduced insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    RIGHI, VALERIA; APIDIANAKIS, YIORGOS; MINTZOPOULOS, DIONYSSIOS; ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS; RAHME, LAURENCE G.; TZIKA, A. ARIA

    2010-01-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a non-destructive biochemical tool for investigating live organisms, has yet to be used in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a useful model organism for investigating genetics and physiology. We developed and implemented a high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS) MRS method to investigate live Drosophila at 14.1 T. We demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using HRMAS MRS for molecular characterization of Drosophila with a conventional MR spectrometer equipped with an HRMAS probe. We showed that the metabolic HRMAS MRS profiles of injured, aged wild-type (wt) flies and of immune deficient (imd) flies were more similar to chico flies mutated at the chico gene in the insulin signaling pathway, which is analogous to insulin receptor substrate 1–4 (IRS1–4) in mammals and less to those of adipokinetic hormone receptor (akhr) mutant flies, which have an obese phenotype. We thus provide evidence for the hypothesis that trauma in aging and in innate immune-deficiency is linked to insulin signaling. This link may explain the mitochondrial dysfunction that accompanies insulin resistance and muscle wasting that occurs in trauma, aging and immune system deficiencies, leading to higher susceptibility to infection. Our approach advances the development of novel in vivo non-destructive research approaches in Drosophila, suggests biomarkers for investigation of biomedical paradigms, and thus may contribute to novel therapeutic development. PMID:20596596

  11. A case of age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder metachronously showing two distinct morphologic appearances, one of a polymorphic disease resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma, and the other of a large-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tadashi; Fujita, Ayumi; Ueno, Hironori; Park, Jae-Won; Yano, Takahiro; Hoshikawa, Masahiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Kuramochi, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of age-related EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (age-related EBV+ B-cell LPD) metachronously showing two distinct morphologic appearances: one of a polymorphic disease resembling classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), and the other of a large-cell lymphoma. A 71-year-old man was admitted to the St. Marianna University Hospital because of fever and generalized lymphadenopathy. Right axillary lymph node biopsy revealed mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma (MCHL). The patient was referred to the Tokyo Medical Center, where he was treated with chemotherapy and obtained CR. One year later, the patient again developed fever and generalized lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the right cervical mass revealed a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with salvage chemotherapies and obtained the second CR. Two years later, the patient developed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Although CR was achieved with chemotherapy, AML relapsed 5 months later and proved to be refractory. Two and a half years later, the patient developed right cervical lymph node enlargement. The biopsy again revealed diagnosis of MCHL. The patient died 2 months later. On reviewing all of the biopsy specimens, including the findings of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, possibility of CHL was ruled out, because neoplastic giant cells resembling Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells were positive for both Oct2 and BOB.1, which has not been reported in CHL. Both HRS-like cells at the time of diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma and lymphoma cells at the time of diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma were positive for CD20 and EBV-encoded small RNAs. This case was finally diagnosed as having age-related EBV+ B-cell LPD. We report the case here as it underscores the difficulty in diagnosing age-related EBV+ B-cell LPDs and also suggests an important role of EBV in the pathogenesis of lymphoid neoplasms.

  12. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna C.; Vogel, Petr

    2016-10-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these spectra and their associated uncertainties is crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to date have been determined either by converting measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that make up the spectra, using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to β-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  13. Global Metabolic Profiling of Plasma Shows that Three-Year Mild-Caloric Restriction Lessens an Age-Related Increase in Sphingomyelin and Reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in Overweight and Obese Subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjoo; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-12-01

    The effect of weight loss from long-term, mild-calorie diets (MCD) on plasma metabolites is unknown. This study was to examine whether MCD-induced weight reduction caused changes in the extended plasma metabolites. Overweight and obese subjects aged 40-59 years consumed a MCD (approximately 100 kcal/day deficit, n=47) or a weight-maintenance diet (control, n=47) in a randomized, controlled design with a three-year clinical intervention period and plasma samples were analyzed by using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The three-year MCD intervention resulted in weight loss (-8.87%) and significant decreases in HOMA-IR and TG. The three-year follow-up of the MCD group showed reductions in the following 13 metabolites: L-leucine; L-phenylalanine; 9 lysoPCs; PC (18:0/20:4); and SM (d18:0/16:1). The three-year MCD group follow-up identified increases in palmitic amide, oleamide, and PC (18:2/18:2). Considering the age-related alterations in the identified metabolites, the MCD group showed a greater decrease in L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, and SM (d18:0/16:1) compared with those of the control group. Overall, the change (Δ) in BMI positively correlated with the ΔTG, ΔHOMA-IR, ΔL-leucine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The ΔHOMA-IR positively correlated with ΔTG, ΔL-leucine, ΔL-phenylalanine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The weight loss resulting from three-year mild-caloric restriction lessens the age-related increase in SM and reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in overweight and obese subjects. These changes were coupled with improved insulin resistance (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02081898).

  14. Global Metabolic Profiling of Plasma Shows that Three-Year Mild-Caloric Restriction Lessens an Age-Related Increase in Sphingomyelin and Reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in Overweight and Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjoo; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    The effect of weight loss from long-term, mild-calorie diets (MCD) on plasma metabolites is unknown. This study was to examine whether MCD-induced weight reduction caused changes in the extended plasma metabolites. Overweight and obese subjects aged 40-59 years consumed a MCD (approximately 100 kcal/day deficit, n=47) or a weight-maintenance diet (control, n=47) in a randomized, controlled design with a three-year clinical intervention period and plasma samples were analyzed by using UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The three-year MCD intervention resulted in weight loss (-8.87%) and significant decreases in HOMA-IR and TG. The three-year follow-up of the MCD group showed reductions in the following 13 metabolites: L-leucine; L-phenylalanine; 9 lysoPCs; PC (18:0/20:4); and SM (d18:0/16:1). The three-year MCD group follow-up identified increases in palmitic amide, oleamide, and PC (18:2/18:2). Considering the age-related alterations in the identified metabolites, the MCD group showed a greater decrease in L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, and SM (d18:0/16:1) compared with those of the control group. Overall, the change (Δ) in BMI positively correlated with the ΔTG, ΔHOMA-IR, ΔL-leucine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The ΔHOMA-IR positively correlated with ΔTG, ΔL-leucine, ΔL-phenylalanine, and ΔSM (d18:0/16:1). The weight loss resulting from three-year mild-caloric restriction lessens the age-related increase in SM and reduces L-leucine and L-phenylalanine in overweight and obese subjects. These changes were coupled with improved insulin resistance (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02081898). PMID:28053823

  15. Neutron and photon spectra in LINACs.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Martínez-Ovalle, S A; Lallena, A M; Mercado, G A; Benites-Rengifo, J L

    2012-12-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation, using the MCNPX code, was carried out in order to estimate the photon and neutron spectra in two locations of two linacs operating at 15 and 18 MV. Detailed models of both linac heads were used in the calculations. Spectra were estimated below the flattening filter and at the isocenter. Neutron spectra show two components due to evaporation and knock-on neutrons. Lethargy spectra under the filter were compared to the spectra calculated from the function quoted by Tosi et al. that describes reasonably well neutron spectra beyond 1 MeV, though tends to underestimate the energy region between 10(-6) and 1 MeV. Neutron and the Bremsstrahlung spectra show the same features regardless of the linac voltage.

  16. Perception of stop onset spectra in Chinese children with phonological dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenli; Yue, Guoan

    2012-11-01

    The ability to identify stop consonants from brief onset spectra was compared between a group of Chinese children with phonological dyslexia (the PD group, with a mean age of 10 years 4 months) and a group of chronological age-matched control children. The linguistic context, which included vowels and speakers, and durations of stop onset spectra were varied. Children with PD showed lower identification accuracy and exhibited a smaller vowel context effect for some stop-vowel combinations compared with the chronological age-matched control group. Further analyses revealed that the PD group had more variable response patterns, and their responses were less consistent with the acoustic characteristics of stop onset spectra. The results suggest that Chinese children with PD do not show greater sensitivity to allophonic acoustic variability compared with control children and exhibit a generally less robust response pattern to phonetic categories.

  17. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  18. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  19. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  20. Hey Teacher, Your Personality's Showing!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A study of 30 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers and 300 of their students showed that a teacher's age, sex, and years of experience did not relate to students' mathematics achievement, but that more effective teachers showed greater "freedom from defensive behavior" than did less effective teachers. (DT)

  1. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  2. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  3. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  4. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  5. Comparing Ultraviolet Spectra Against Calculations: First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ruth C.

    2003-01-01

    The five-year goal of this effort is to calculate high fidelity mid-UV spectra for individual stars and stellar systems for a wide range of ages, abundances, and abundance ratios. In this first year, the emphasis was placed on revising the list of atomic line parameters used to calculate mid-UV spectra. First, new identifications of atomic lines and measurements of their transition probabilities were obtained for lines of the first and second ionization stages of iron-peak elements. Second, observed mid-UV and optical spectra for standard stars were re-analyzed and compared to new calculations, to refine the determination of transition probabilities and to estimate the identity of lines still missing from the laboratory lists. As evidenced by the figures, a dramatic improvement has resulted in the reproduction of the spectra of standard stars by the calculations.

  6. Spectra of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.; Moskovitz, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space-weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites are long-standing problems in asteroid science. Although the visible and near-infrared spectra of S- and Q-type objects qualitatively show the same absorption features and quantitatively show evidence of the same minerals, the S types display increased spectral slopes and muted absorption features compared to the Q types. This spectral mismatch is consistent with the effects of the space weathering process. Binzel et al. provided the missing link between Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to the transition from Q- to S-type spectra. This result implied that size, and therefore age, is related to the relationship between Q- and S-type. The existence of Q-type objects in the main belt was not confirmed until Mothe-Diniz and Nesvorny (2008) found them in young S-type clusters. To investigate the trend from Q to S in the main belt, we examined space weathering within the old main-belt Koronis family using a spectrophotometric survey (Rivkin et al. 2011, Thomas et al. 2011). Rivkin et al. (2011) identified several potential Q-type objects within the Koronis family. Our Q-type candidates were identified using broad-band spectrophotometry and could not be taxonomically classified on that basis alone. We obtained follow-up visible and near-infrared spectral observations of our potential Q-type objects, (26970) Elias, (45610) 2000 DJ_{48}, and (37411) 2001 XF_{152}, using Gemini and Magellan. We will present the results of these spectral follow-up observations. Observations of (26970) Elias demonstrate that the object is more consistent with the average Q-type spectrum than the average S-type spectrum.

  7. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  8. Mid-Infrared Spectra of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, B.; Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.; Morgan, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Mid-infrared (8-13 microns) spectra of radiation emitted from the surface of solar system objects can be interpreted in terms of surface composition. However, the spectral features are weak, and require exceptionally high signal-to-noise ratio spectra to detect them. Ground-based observations of spectra in this region are plagued by strong atmospheric absorptions from water and ozone. High-altitude balloon measurements that avoid atmospheric absorptions can be affected by contamination of the optics by dust. We have developed a technique to obtain mid-infrared spectra of Mercury that minimizes these problems. The resulting spectra show evidence of transparency features that can be used to qualitatively characterize the surface composition. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Spectra of Surface Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-22

    with a wave follower during Marsen. J. Gophysical Res. 88, 9844-9849. 11. Hughes, B.A., 1978. The effects on internal waves on surface waves : 2...Spectra of Surface Waves K. Watson March 1989 JSR-88-130 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. DTIC SELECTE JUN0 11989 0 JASONE The...Arlington, VA 22209 8503Z 11. TITLE (hlde Secvfty Cof.kaftn) SPECTRA OF SURFACE WAVES (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOfRS) K. Watson 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME

  10. Reviews Book: SEP Communications: Transmitting and Receiving Signals Book: Gliding for Gold Book: Radioactivity: A History of a Mysterious Science Book: The New Quantum Age Books: The Art of Science and The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing Equipment: SEP Analogue/digital transmission unit Equipment: SEP Optical signal transmission set Book: Stars and their Spectra Book: Voicebox: The Physics and Evolution of Speech Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Transmitting and Receiving Signals SEP booklet transmits knowledge The New Quantum Age Understanding modern quantum theory The Art of Science and The Oxford Book of Modern Science Writing Anthologies bring science to life SEP Analogue/digital transmission unit Kit transmits signal between two points SEP Optical signal transmission set Optical kit shows light transmission Stars and their Spectra New book for teaching astrophysics WORTH A LOOK Gliding for Gold Take a journey through the physics of winter sports Radioactivity: A History of a Mysterious Science Book looks at history of radioactivity Voicebox: The Physics and Evolution of Speech TExploring the evolution of the voice WEB WATCH An interactive program with promise?

  11. In favour of the definition "adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis": juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis braced after ten years of age, do not show different end results. SOSORT award winner 2014

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The most important factor discriminating juvenile (JIS) from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the risk of deformity progression. Brace treatment can change natural history, even when risk of progression is high. The aim of this study was to compare the end of growth results of JIS subjects, treated after 10 years of age, with final results of AIS. Methods Design: prospective observational controlled cohort study nested in a prospective database. Setting: outpatient tertiary referral clinic specialized in conservative treatment of spinal deformities. Inclusion criteria: idiopathic scoliosis; European Risser 0–2; 25 degrees to 45 degrees Cobb; start treatment age: 10 years or more, never treated before. Exclusion criteria: secondary scoliosis, neurological etiology, prior treatment for scoliosis (brace or surgery). Groups: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria for the AJIS, (Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis treated in adolescence), demonstrated by an x-ray before 10 year of age, and treatment start after 10 years of age. AIS group included 45 adolescents with a diagnostic x-ray made after the threshold of age 10 years. Results at the end of growth were analysed; the threshold of 5 Cobb degree to define worsened, improved and stabilized curves was considered. Statistics: Mean and SD were used for descriptive statistics of clinical and radiographic changes. Relative Risk of failure (RR), Chi-square and T-test of all data was calculated to find differences among the two groups. 95% Confidence Interval (CI) , and of radiographic changes have been calculated. Results We did not find any Cobb angle significant differences among groups at baseline and at the end of treatment. The only difference was in the number of patients progressed above 45 degrees, found in the JIS group. The RR of progression of AJIS was, 1.35 (IC95% 0.57-3.17) versus AIS, and it wasn't statistically significant in the AJIS group, in respect to AIS group (p = 0.5338). Conclusion

  12. Resolution enhancement in second-derivative spectra.

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, Mirosław A

    2015-01-01

    Derivative spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the resolution enhancement in infrared, near-infrared, Raman, ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Despite its great significance in analytical chemistry, not all aspects of the applications of this method have been explored as yet. This is the first systematic study of the parameters that influence the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra. The derivative spectra were calculated with the Savitzky-Golay method with different window size (5, 15, 25) and polynomial order (2, 4). The results obtained in this work show that the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra strongly depends on the data spacing in the original spectra, window size, polynomial order, and peak profile. As shown, the resolution enhancement is related to variations in the width of the peaks upon the differentiation. The present study reveals that in order to maximize the separation of the peaks in the second derivative spectra, the original spectra should be recorded at high resolution and differentiated using a small window size and high polynomial order. However, working with the real spectra one has to compromise between the noise reduction and optimization of the resolution enhancement in the second derivative spectra.

  13. Quantum spectra and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (1) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems. This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential-energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (2) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes -- Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  14. Quantum Spectra and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, Julio Cesar

    1992-01-01

    This work focuses on time-dependent quantum theory and methods for the study of the spectra and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. Specifically, we have addressed the following two problems: (i) Development of a time-dependent spectral method for the construction of spectra of simple quantum systems--This includes the calculation of eigenenergies, the construction of bound and continuum eigenfunctions, and the calculation of photo cross-sections. Computational applications include the quadrupole photoabsorption spectra and dissociation cross-sections of molecular hydrogen from various vibrational states in its ground electronic potential -energy curve. This method is seen to provide an advantageous alternative, both from the computational and conceptual point of view, to existing standard methods. (ii) Explicit time-dependent formulation of photoabsorption processes --Analytical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation are constructed and employed for the calculation of probability densities, momentum distributions, fluxes, transition rates, expectation values and correlation functions. These quantities are seen to establish the link between the dynamics and the calculated, or measured, spectra and cross-sections, and to clarify the dynamical nature of the excitation, transition and ejection processes. Numerical calculations on atomic and molecular hydrogen corroborate and complement the previous results, allowing the identification of different regimes during the photoabsorption process.

  15. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  16. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  17. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  18. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  19. Show Me the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Matthew J.

    2005-01-01

    Because today's students have grown up steeped in video games and the Internet, most of them expect feedback, and usually gratification, very soon after they expend effort on a task. Teachers can get quick feedback to students by showing them videotapes of their learning performances. The author, a 3rd grade teacher describes how the seemingly…

  20. Chemistry Game Shows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Susan; Muzyka, Jennifer

    2002-04-01

    We present a technological improvement to the use of game shows to help students review for tests. Our approach uses HTML files interpreted with a browser on a computer attached to an LCD projector. The HTML files can be easily modified for use of the game in a variety of courses.

  1. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  2. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  3. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  4. Objective identification of informative wavelength regions in galaxy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alexander S.; Budavári, Tamás; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Mahoney, Michael W.; Csabai, István; Dobos, Laszlo E-mail: szalay@jhu.edu

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the diversity in spectra is the key to determining the physical parameters of galaxies. The optical spectra of galaxies are highly convoluted with continuum and lines that are potentially sensitive to different physical parameters. Defining the wavelength regions of interest is therefore an important question. In this work, we identify informative wavelength regions in a single-burst stellar population model using the CUR Matrix Decomposition. Simulating the Lick/IDS spectrograph configuration, we recover the widely used D {sub n}(4000), Hβ, and Hδ {sub A} to be most informative. Simulating the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrograph configuration with a wavelength range 3450-8350 Å and a model-limited spectral resolution of 3 Å, the most informative regions are: first region—the 4000 Å break and the Hδ line; second region—the Fe-like indices; third region—the Hβ line; and fourth region—the G band and the Hγ line. A principal component analysis on the first region shows that the first eigenspectrum tells primarily the stellar age, the second eigenspectrum is related to the age-metallicity degeneracy, and the third eigenspectrum shows an anti-correlation between the strengths of the Balmer and the Ca K and H absorptions. The regions can be used to determine the stellar age and metallicity in early-type galaxies that have solar abundance ratios, no dust, and a single-burst star formation history. The region identification method can be applied to any set of spectra of the user's interest, so that we eliminate the need for a common, fixed-resolution index system. We discuss future directions in extending the current analysis to late-type galaxies. ASCII formatted tables of the regional eigenspectra are available.

  5. Velocity, scalar and transfer spectra in numerical turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Robert M.

    1990-02-01

    Velocity and passive-scalar spectra for turbulent fields generated by a forced three-dimensional simulation with 128-cubed grid points and Taylor-microscale Reynolds numbers up to 83 are shown to have convective and diffusive spectral regimes. One- and three-dimensional spectra are compared with experiment and theory. If normalized by the Kolmogorov dissipation scales and scalar dissipation, velocity spectra and scalar spectra for given Prandtl numbers collapse to single curves in the dissipation regime with exponentail tails. If multiplied by k exp 5/3, the velocity spectra show an anomalously high Kolmogorov constant that is consistent with low Reynolds number experiments. When normalized by the Batchelor scales, the scalar spectra show a universal dissipation regime that is independent of Prandtl numbers from 0.1 to 1.0. The time development of velocity spectra is illustrated by energy-transfer spectra in which distinct pulses propagate to high wavenumbers.

  6. Analytical calculation of two-dimensional spectra.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joshua D; Conrad, Rebecca; Siemens, Mark E

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate an analytical calculation of two-dimensional (2D) coherent spectra of electronic or vibrational resonances. Starting with the solution to the optical Bloch equations for a two-level system in the 2D time domain, we show that a fully analytical 2D Fourier transform can be performed if the projection-slice and Fourier-shift theorems of Fourier transforms are applied. Results can be fit to experimental 2D coherent spectra of resonances with arbitrary inhomogeneity.

  7. Two slow meteors with spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubs, Martin; Sposetti, Stefano; Spinner, Roger; Booz, Beat

    2017-01-01

    On January 2, 2017 two peculiar meteors (M20170102_001216 and M20170102_015202) were observed by several stations in Switzerland. Both had a long duration, slow velocity, similar brightness and a very similar radiant. As they appeared in a time interval of 100 minutes, a satellite was suspected as a possible origin of these two observations. A closer inspection however showed that this interpretation was incorrect. The two objects were slow meteors. Spectra were taken from both objects, which were nearly identical. Together this points to a common origin of the two meteors.

  8. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show.

  9. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre.

  10. Prognostic factors for disease progression in advanced Hodgkin's disease: an analysis of patients aged under 60 years showing no progression in the first 6 months after starting primary chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. M.; Radford, J. A.; Ryder, W. D.; Collins, C. D.; Deakin, D. P.; Crowther, D.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a very high-risk group based on presenting characteristics could be identified in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease who may benefit from high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT). Between 1975 and 1992, 453 previously untreated patients aged under 60 years who did not progress in the first 6 months after the start of standard chemotherapy had their hospital notes reviewed. The outcomes analysed were early disease progression (in the 6- to 18-month window following the start of chemotherapy) and disease progression in the whole of the follow-up period. A Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the combined effects of a number of presenting characteristics on these outcomes. Despite the presence of factors with significant effects on the relative rate of progression, the absolute effects in a group identified as having the poorest prognosis were not especially poor. No group could be defined with a freedom from progression rate of less than 70% over 6-18 months, and the worst prognostic group, which included only 53 patients, had an overall freedom from progression rate of 57% at 5 years. Four other reported prognostic indices were evaluated using our data set, but none of the indices was more successful in identifying a very high-risk group. It has not been possible to define a sufficiently high-risk group of patients with Hodgkin's disease based on presenting characteristics for whom HDCT could be advised as part of primary treatment. The search for more discriminating prognostic factors identifying vulnerable patients with a high risk of relapse must continue before a role can be found for HDCT following conventional chemotherapy in patients without disease progression. PMID:9000607

  11. THE SPITZER ATLAS OF STELLAR SPECTRA (SASS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ardila, David R.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Makowiecki, Wojciech; Stauffer, John; Rho, Jeonghee; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio; Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, Stefanie; Song, Inseok

    2010-12-15

    We present the Spitzer Atlas of Stellar Spectra, which includes 159 stellar spectra (5-32 {mu}m; R {approx} 100) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. This Atlas gathers representative spectra of a broad section of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, intended to serve as a general stellar spectral reference in the mid-infrared. It includes stars from all luminosity classes, as well as Wolf-Rayet (WR) objects. Furthermore, it includes some objects of intrinsic interest, such as blue stragglers and certain pulsating variables. All of the spectra have been uniformly reduced, and all are available online. For dwarfs and giants, the spectra of early-type objects are relatively featureless, characterized by the presence of hydrogen lines in A spectral types. Besides these, the most noticeable photospheric features correspond to water vapor and silicon monoxide in late-type objects and methane and ammonia features at the latest spectral types. Most supergiant spectra in the Atlas present evidence of circumstellar gas and/or dust. The sample includes five M supergiant spectra, which show strong dust excesses and in some cases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. Sequences of WR stars present the well-known pattern of lines of He I and He II, as well as forbidden lines of ionized metals. The characteristic flat-top shape of the [Ne III] line is evident even at these low spectral resolutions. Several Luminous Blue Variables and other transition stars are present in the Atlas and show very diverse spectra, dominated by circumstellar gas and dust features. We show that the [8]-[24] Spitzer colors (IRAC and MIPS) are poor predictors of spectral type for most luminosity classes.

  12. Stellar parametrization from Gaia RVS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Allende Prieto, C.; Fustes, D.; Manteiga, M.; Arcay, B.; Bijaoui, A.; Dafonte, C.; Ordenovic, C.; Ordoñez Blanco, D.

    2016-01-01

    found for A-type stars, while the log(g) derivation is more accurate (errors of 0.07 and 0.12 dex at GRVS = 12.6 and 13.4, respectively). For the faintest stars, with GRVS≳ 13-14, a Teff input from the spectrophotometric-derived parameters will allow the final GSP-Spec parametrization to be improved. Conclusions: The reported results, while neglecting possible mismatches between synthetic and real spectra, show that the contribution of the RVS-based stellar parameters will be unique in the brighter part of the Gaia survey, which allows for crucial age estimations and accurate chemical abundances. This will constitute a unique and precious sample, providing many pieces of the Milky Way history puzzle with unprecedented precision and statistical relevance.

  13. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  14. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  15. [Spectra of dark green jade from Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Mao, Jian; Chai, Lin-Tao; Guo, Shou-Guo; Fan, Jian-Liang; Bao, Feng

    2013-05-01

    Chemical compositions and spectral characteristics of one type of dark green jades assumed from omphacite jadeite from Myanmar jadeite mining area were studied by X-ray powder diffraction(XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectra(XRF), Raman spectra(RM) and UV-Vis Spectroscopy, etc. Based on testing by XRD and XRF, it was shown that it belongs to iron-enriched plagioclase, including albite and anorthite. The compositions range is between Ab0.731 An0.264 Or0.004 and Ab0.693 An0.303 Or0.004. Raman spectra of samples, albite jade and anorthite were collected and analyzed. Additionally, the distributions of Si, Al in the crystal structure were also discussed. UV-Vis spectra showed that dark green hue of this mineral is associated with d--d electronic transition of Fe3+ and Cr3+.

  16. SPECTRA. September 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Transportation Services program with the Dragon capsule. (Credit: SpaceX /Chris Thompson) S p a c e c r a f t e n g in e e r in g spectra NRL...secondary payloads on board a Space Exploration Technologies ( SpaceX ), Inc., Falcon 9 launch vehicle. NRL’s nanosatellites are part of the CubeSat...Maryland. The primary payload launched aboard the SpaceX Falcon 9 was the Dragon capsule. Developed by SpaceX and sponsored by NASA’s Commercial Orbital

  17. Determinations of Photon Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    COVERED O14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 115. PAGE COUNT THESIS/ftFROW*W FROM TO 1989 1 54 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION A ?RQVk;U kOR 3UB LIC RELEASE...IAW AFR 190- 1 ERNEST A. HAYGOOD, 1st Lt, USAF Executive Officer, Civilian Institution ProQrams 17. COSATI CODES 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on...spectra from measurements obtained with a sodium iodide counting system. A response matrix is computed by combining photon cross sections with

  18. Control spectra for Quito

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Roberto; Rivas-Medina, Alicia; Caiza, Pablo; Quizanga, Diego

    2017-03-01

    The Metropolitan District of Quito is located on or very close to segments of reverse blind faults, Puengasí, Ilumbisí-La Bota, Carcelen-El Inca, Bellavista-Catequilla and Tangahuilla, making it one of the most seismically dangerous cities in the world. The city is divided into five areas: south, south-central, central, north-central and north. For each of the urban areas, elastic response spectra are presented in this paper, which are determined by utilizing some of the new models of the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) NGA-West2 program. These spectra are calculated considering the maximum magnitude that could be generated by the rupture of each fault segment, and taking into account the soil type that exists at different points of the city according to the Norma Ecuatoriana de la Construcción (2015). Subsequently, the recurrence period of earthquakes of high magnitude in each fault segment is determined from the physical parameters of the fault segments (size of the fault plane and slip rate) and the pattern of recurrence of type Gutenberg-Richter earthquakes with double truncation magnitude (Mmin and Mmax) is used.

  19. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  20. [Vibrational spectra of Corallium elatius].

    PubMed

    Fan, Lu-wei; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Yang

    2013-09-01

    Corallium elatius, which has unique color distribution characteristic, is the most important species of Taiwan precious corals. EPMA, XRD, FTIR and Laser Raman detective methods were used to study the chemical, mineral composition and spectra characteristics of Corallium elatius. The result of EPMA, XRD and FTIR shows the high-Mg calcite mineral componentand the stable minor chemical constituents of the samples. Meanwhile, the cell parameter indicates the lattice distortion and the preferred orientation of calcite grain caused by organic matter. The red part of the samples shows a different Raman spectrum from that of the white part, located at 1517/1128 cm(-1) and 1296/1016 cm(-1). Raman scattering measurement reveals the relationship between the organic matter and color.

  1. Continuum Fitting HST QSO Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tytler, David; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method which we are using to fit and describe QSO spectra relies upon the fact that QSO continuum are generally very smooth and simple except for emission and absorption lines. To see this we need high signal-to-noise (S/N) spectra of QSOs at low redshift which have relatively few absorption lines in the Lyman-a forest. We need a large number of such spectra to use as the basis set for the PCA analysis which will find the set of principal component spectra which describe the QSO family as a whole. We have found that too few HST spectra have the required S/N and hence we need to supplement them with ground based spectra of QSOs at higher redshift. We have many such spectra and we have been working to make them suitable for this analysis. We have concentrated on this topic since 12/15/01.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: High-resolution NIR spectra of local giants (Feuillet+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuillet, D. K.; Bovy, J.; Holtzman, J.; Girardi, L.; MacDonald, N.; Majewski, S. R.; Nidever, D. L.

    2016-04-01

    We present a sample of 705 local giant stars observed using the New Mexico State University 1m telescope with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III/Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) spectrograph, for which we estimate stellar ages and the local star formation history (SFH). The high-resolution (R~22500), near infrared (1.51-1.7μm) APOGEE spectra provide measurements of stellar atmospheric parameters (temperature, surface gravity, [M/H], and [α/M]). Due to the smaller uncertainties in surface gravity possible with high-resolution spectra and accurate Hipparcos distance measurements, we are able to calculate the stellar masses to within 30%. For giants, the relatively rapid evolution up the red giant branch allows the age to be constrained by the mass. We examine methods of estimating age using both the mass-age relation directly and a Bayesian isochrone matching of measured parameters, assuming a constant SFH. To improve the SFH prior, we use a hierarchical modeling approach to constrain the parameters of the model SFH using the age probability distribution functions of the data. The results of an α-dependent Gaussian SFH model show a clear age-[α/M] relation at all ages. Using this SFH model as the prior for an empirical Bayesian analysis, we determine ages for individual stars. The resulting age-metallicity relation is flat, with a slight decrease in [M/H] at the oldest ages and a ~0.5 dex spread in metallicity across most ages. For stars with ages <~1Gyr we find a smaller spread, consistent with radial migration having a smaller effect on these young stars than on the older stars. (1 data file).

  3. Timing, rates and spectra of human germline mutation.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, Raheleh; Wuster, Arthur; Lindsay, Sarah J; Hardwick, Robert J; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Al Turki, Saeed; Dominiczak, Anna; Morris, Andrew; Porteous, David; Smith, Blair; Stratton, Michael R; Hurles, Matthew E

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations are a driving force behind genome evolution and genetic disease. We investigated genome-wide mutation rates and spectra in multi-sibling families. The mutation rate increased with paternal age in all families, but the number of additional mutations per year differed by more than twofold between families. Meta-analysis of 6,570 mutations showed that germline methylation influences mutation rates. In contrast to somatic mutations, we found remarkable consistency in germline mutation spectra between the sexes and at different paternal ages. In parental germ line, 3.8% of mutations were mosaic, resulting in 1.3% of mutations being shared by siblings. The number of these shared mutations varied significantly between families. Our data suggest that the mutation rate per cell division is higher during both early embryogenesis and differentiation of primordial germ cells but is reduced substantially during post-pubertal spermatogenesis. These findings have important consequences for the recurrence risks of disorders caused by de novo mutations.

  4. Sequencing BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincaré polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (refined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identification of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d {N}=2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. Lastly, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  5. Sequencing BPS spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; Stošić, Marko; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explain from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.

  6. Sequencing BPS spectra

    DOE PAGES

    Gukov, Sergei; Nawata, Satoshi; Saberi, Ingmar; ...

    2016-03-02

    In this article, we provide both a detailed study of color-dependence of link homologies, as realized in physics as certain spaces of BPS states, and a broad study of the behavior of BPS states in general. We consider how the spectrum of BPS states varies as continuous parameters of a theory are perturbed. This question can be posed in a wide variety of physical contexts, and we answer it by proposing that the relationship between unperturbed and perturbed BPS spectra is described by a spectral sequence. These general considerations unify previous applications of spectral sequence techniques to physics, and explainmore » from a physical standpoint the appearance of many spectral sequences relating various link homology theories to one another. We also study structural properties of colored HOMFLY homology for links and evaluate Poincar e polynomials in numerous examples. Among these structural properties is a novel "sliding" property, which can be explained by using (re fined) modular S-matrix. This leads to the identi fication of modular transformations in Chern-Simons theory and 3d N = 2 theory via the 3d/3d correspondence. In conclusion, we introduce the notion of associated varieties as classical limits of recursion relations of colored superpolynomials of links, and study their properties.« less

  7. Laboratory simulation of dust spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory studies of the IR spectra of interstellar dust are reviewed. Studies of the absorption spectra of dense molecular clouds are discussed, including methods to produce interstellar ice analogues, simulations of astronomical spectra, and IR absorption features caused by ices. Comparisons are made between observational and experimental results of interstellar dust studies. Also, the interstellar emission features associated with dusty regions exposed to UV radiation are examined, including bands related to PAHs and PAH-related materials. It is shown that interstellar spectra are more consistant with emission from free PAHs than with emission from particles.

  8. EEG Power Spectra of Adolescent Poor Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Peggy T.; McPherson, W. Brian; Oglesby, D. Michael; Dykman, Roscoe A.

    1998-01-01

    Electroencephalographic power spectra were studied in two poor-reading adolescent groups (n=38), dysphonetic and phonetic. Significant Group x Hemisphere effects were found in the alpha and beta bands, with the phonetic group showing right greater than left asymmetry. Results suggest more circumscribed and mature processing in the phonetically…

  9. Vibrational spectra study on quinolones antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Yu, Ke; Wang, Sihuan

    2006-09-01

    In order to be able to fully understand and easily identify the quilonoles, we collected IR and Raman spectra of six quinolones, and attempted to assign the attribution of the observed frequencies and their association with specific modes of vibration. According to the structure, the compounds were divided into the groups, and the similarities and differences were further studied by comparing. The result of the study shows that the frequency and intensity are comparable to the corresponding structure. The spectra not only have the commonness but also the individualities.

  10. Gravitational effects on planetary neutron flux spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Drake, D. M.; O'dell, R. D.; Brinkley, F. W.; Anderson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the planetary neutron flux spectra for planet Mars, and the lifetime of the neutron, were investigated using a modified one-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral-particle transport code, coupled with a multigroup cross-section library tailored specifically for Mars. The results showed the presence of a qualitatively new feature in planetary neutron leakage spectra in the form of a component of returning neutrons with kinetic energies less than the gravitational binding energy (0.132 eV for Mars). The net effect is an enhancement in flux at the lowest energies that is largest at and above the outermost layer of planetary matter.

  11. Cloud supersaturations from CCN spectra Hoppel minima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, James G.; Noble, Stephen; Tabor, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectral measurements in two aircraft field projects, Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T), often showed bimodality that had previously been observed in submicrometer aerosol size distributions obtained by differential mobility analyzers. However, a great deal of spectral shape variability from very bimodal to very monomodal was observed in close proximity. Cloud supersaturation (S) estimates based on critical S, Sc, at minimal CCN concentrations between two modes (Hoppel minima) were ascertained for 63% of 325 measured spectra. These cloud S were lower than effective S (Seff) determined by comparing ambient CCN spectra with nearby cloud droplet concentrations (Nc). Averages for the polluted MASE stratus were 0.15 and 0.23% and for the cumulus clouds of ICE-T 0.44 and 1.03%. This cloud S disagreement between the two methods might in part be due to the fact that Hoppel minima include the effects of cloud processing, which push CCN spectra toward lower S. Furthermore, there is less cloud processing by the smaller cloud droplets, which might be related to smaller droplets evaporating more readily. Significantly lower concentrations within the more bimodal spectra compared with the monomodal spectra indicated active physical processes: Brownian capture of interstitial CCN and droplet coalescence. Chemical cloud processing also contributed to bimodality, especially in MASE.

  12. Red spectra from white and blue noise

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, N. J.; Provenzale, A.; Spiegel, E. A.; Martens, M.; Tresser, C.; Wu, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    The value of maps of the interval in modelling population dynamics has recently been called into question because temporal variations from such maps have blue or white power spectra, whereas many observations of real populations show time-series with red spectra. One way to deal with this discrepancy is to introduce chaotic or stochastic fluctuations in the parameters of the map. This leads to on–off intermittency and can markedly redden the spectrum produced by a model that does not by itself have a red spectrum. The parameter fluctuations need not themselves have a red spectrum in order to achieve this effect. Because the power spectrum is not invariant under a change of variable, another way to redden the spectrum is by a suitable transformation of the variables used. The question this poses is whether spectra are the best means of characterizing a fluctuating variable.

  13. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.; Choudhary, D. P.; Rezaei, R.; Louis, R. E.

    2015-01-10

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  14. Constraining Galaxy Evolution Using Observed UV-Optical Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Our understanding of galaxy evolution depends on model spectra of stellar populations, and the models are only as good as the observed spectra and stellar parameters that go into them. We are therefore evaluating modem UV-optical model spectra using Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) as the reference standard. The NGSL comprises intermediate-resolution (R is approximately 1000) STIS spectra of 378 stars having a wide range in metallicity and age. Unique features of the NGSL include its broad wavelength coverage (1,800-10,100 A) and high-S/N, absolute spectrophotometry. We will report on a systematic comparison of model and observed UV-blue spectra, describe where on the HR diagram significant differences occur, and comment on current approaches to correct the models for these differences.

  15. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  16. Projecting Spectra for Classroom Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Philip

    1991-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive spectrum projector that makes high-dispersion, high-efficiency diffraction gratings using a holographic process. Discusses classroom applications such as transmission spectra, absorption spectra, reflection characteristics of materials, color mixing, florescence and phosphorescence, and break up spectral colors. (MDH)

  17. Age Limits.

    PubMed

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  18. Infrared spectra of cesium chloride aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2000-10-01

    The aqueous solutions of CsCl were studied at room temperature by infrared (IR) spectroscopy in the entire solubility range, 0-1200 g/L, using attenuated total reflection (ATR) sampling. The influence of anomalous dispersion on the IR-ATR spectra was evaluated by calculating the imaginary refractive index, k(ν), of each sample. Factor analysis (FA) was used to determine the number and abundance of species in the solutions. FA applied to both k(ν) spectra and IR-ATR spectra produced two principal spectra with a similar abundance of species. This result indicates that, even at high salt concentration, the optical effects do not influence the chemical analysis of IR-ATR spectra. The spectral modifications related to the salt concentrations are mainly first order. Second order effects were observed, but being weak, were not investigated. The two principal spectra are related to the two species present in the solution: pure water and CsCl-solvated water. From the latter, 2.8±0.4 water molecules were calculated to be associated with each close-bound Cs+/Cl- ion pair. In the case of KCl and NaCl aqueous solutions, both of which showed the same number of species, the number of water molecules associated to an ion pair was 5.0±0.4. That the latter number is different from that of CsCl indicates that the interaction between water molecules and ion pairs is different when cation Na or K in the chloride salt is replaced by Cs.

  19. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  20. Simulation of dielectric spectra of erythrocytes with various shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji

    2009-07-01

    Dielectric spectra of erythrocyte suspensions were numerically simulated over a frequency range from 1 kHz to 100 MHz to study the effects of erythrocyte shape on the dielectric spectra. First, a biconcave-discoid model for normal erythrocytes or discocytes was compared with an equivalent oblate spheroid model. The two models showed similar dielectric spectra to each other, suggesting that the oblate spheroid model can be approximately used for discocytes. Second, dielectric spectra were simulated for discocytes deformed by osmotic cell swelling. The deformation resulted in the increase in relaxation intensity and the sharpening of spectrum shape. Finally, dielectric spectra were simulated for echinocytes, stomatocytes and sickle cells that are induced by chemical agents and diseases. The dielectric spectra of echinocytes and stomatocytes were similar to each other, being distinguishable from that of discocytes and quite different from that of sickle cells.

  1. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Construction and Application to Simulated Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Adam; Leighly, Karen; Wagner, Cassidy; Macinnis, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Quasars have complex spectra with emission lines influenced by many factors. Therefore, to fully describe the spectrum requires specification of a large number of parameters, such as line equivalent width, blueshift, and ratios. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) aims to construct eigenvectors-or principal components-from the data with the goal of finding a few key parameters that can be used to predict the rest of the spectrum fairly well. Analysis of simulated quasar spectra was used to verify and justify our modified application of PCA.We used a variant of PCA called Weighted Expectation Maximization PCA (EMPCA; Bailey 2012) along with k-means cluster analysis to analyze simulated quasar spectra. Our approach combines both analytical methods to address two known problems with classical PCA. EMPCA uses weights to account for uncertainty and missing points in the spectra. K-means groups similar spectra together to address the nonlinearity of quasar spectra, specifically variance in blueshifts and widths of the emission lines.In producing and analyzing simulations, we first tested the effects of varying equivalent widths and blueshifts on the derived principal components, and explored the differences between standard PCA and EMPCA. We also tested the effects of varying signal-to-noise ratio. Next we used the results of fits to composite quasar spectra (see accompanying poster by Wagner et al.) to construct a set of realistic simulated spectra, and subjected those spectra to the EMPCA /k-means analysis. We concluded that our approach was validated when we found that the mean spectra from our k-means clusters derived from PCA projection coefficients reproduced the trends observed in the composite spectra.Furthermore, our method needed only two eigenvectors to identify both sets of correlations used to construct the simulations, as well as indicating the linear and nonlinear segments. Comparing this to regular PCA, which can require a dozen or more components, or to

  2. Phonon spectra of alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeković, S.; Vukajlović, F.; Veljković, V.

    1982-10-01

    In this work we used a simple local model pseudopotential which includes screening for the phonon spectra calculations of alkali metals. The results obtained are in very good agreement with experimental data. In some branches of phonon spectra the differences between theoretical and experimental results are within 1-2%, while the maximum error is about 6%. The suggested form of the pseudopotential allows us to describe the phonon spectra of Na, K and Rb with only one, and, at the same time, a unique, parameter. In this case, the maximum disagreements from experiment are 9% for Na, 8% for K and 7% for Rb.

  3. [Raman spectra of YBCO superconductor with hot ultrapressing treatment].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-feng; Wei, Le-han; Cao, Xiao-wei

    2002-02-01

    Laser Raman spectra of YBCO oxide superconductor with hot ultrapressing and annealing treatment are reported. In addition to improving physical properties, the spectra data show that the processing can also perfect orthorhombie phase and enhance lattice on orientation trend as well as is good for formation of two dimension CuO2 net. The relation between structure and the superconductivity has been discussed.

  4. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    with the ubiquitous Lya forest lines, and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber and the measured S/N of the spectrum by modelling typical Ly forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the 'incompleteness and S/N corrected' redshift number densities of O VI absorbers. We can place a secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: O OV I (2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 1.9 × 10 - 8 h -1 . We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionisation fraction, [Special characters omitted.] , and adopting the Anders & Grevesse (1989) solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicty of the gas probed in our search : z(2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 3.6 × 10 -4 h , in good agreement with other studies. These results demonstrate that large spectroscopic datasets such as SDSS can play an important role in QSO absorption line studies, in spite of the relatively low resolution. Lastly, we have performed a stacking analysis whereby we shift individual spectra back to the rest-frame of the absorber candidate, and derive a mean absorption spectrum for various subsamples. Besides further validating the reality of the absorbers themselves, i.e. ruling out spurious interlopers and other misclassifications, we can use these stacked spectra for a variety of purposes. First of all, we can judge the effects of additional cut criteria like a minimal strength for associated CIV absorption, and hence produce cleaner and better defined subsamples, increasing the strength of future proposals for high-resolution studies. Secondly, the stack itself contains valuable information about the gas probed in our search. We have

  5. Spectra ID of recent SN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, Peter

    2013-12-01

    P. Challis, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), on behalf of the CfA Supernova Group, report spectra (range 320-860 nm) of various SN obtained during Dec. 24-27 UT by P. Challis, S. Gottilla (MMTO.org), and E. Marin (MMTO.org) with the MMT 6.5-m telescope (+ Blue Channel). Cross-correlation with a library of supernova spectra using the "Supernova Identification" code (SNID; Blondin and Tonry 2007, Ap.J.

  6. Velocity Spectra In The Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, A.

    In some respects the turbulence structure in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) reacts in the same way as the boundary layer over land, that is to say Monin-Obukhov similarity theory can be applied. There are, however, frequently situations when the similarity between the two breaks down. Analysis of measurements, taken at the flat, small island Oestergarnsholm in the middle of the Baltic Sea, clearly shows the influence of the sea state on MABL. The measurements comprise turbulence and mean variables taken at several heights on a 30 m tower, as well as wave parameters from a Wave Rider Buoy deployed 3 km outside the island. Model results of the wave field around the island together with foot-print analysis indicate that the wave field is almost un disturbed for low to moderate wind speeds but has to be corrected for limited water depth for the highest wind speeds. Our earlier analysis shows a strict similarity with over-land conditions for both mean and turbulence variables (mean wind gradient, fluxes, spectra etc.) for growing waves (young waves) travelling slower than the wind. But as soon as some waves become mature and get a speed faster than the wind speed, similarity breaks down. Thus the turbulence structure in the MABL needs to be described in terms of additional parameters such as wave age and maybe boundary layer height. Spectra of the velocity components in the MABL have been analyzed taking sea state into account. During neutral stability and young sea spectra follow the new similarity theory proposed by Hunt and Carlotti (2000) and Högström, Hunt and Smedman (2001). But with increasing wavelength of the surface waves spectra gradually change both shape and energy level, beginning at the low frequency end and continuing towards higher frequencies. For cp/U ~ 1 (where cp is the peak phase speed) the `breaking point' can be seen in the inertial subrange, which actually gives two frequency intervals with a ­2/3 slope but with different

  7. Temporal Evolution of Solar Energetic Particle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Donald J.; Dalla, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    During solar flares and coronal mass ejections, Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) may be released into the interplanetary medium and near-Earth locations. The energy spectra of SEP events at 1 AU are typically averaged over the entire event or studied in a few snapshots. In this article we analyze the time evolution of the energy spectra of four large selected SEP events using a large number of snapshots. We use a multi-spacecraft and multi-instrument approach for the observations, obtained over a wide SEP energy range. We find large differences in the spectra at the beginning of the events as measured by different instruments. We show that over time, a wave-like structure is observed traveling through the spectra from the highest energies to the lowest energies, creating an "arch" shape that then straightens into a power law later in the event, after times on the order of 10 hours. We discuss the processes that determine SEP intensities and their role in shaping the spectral time evolution.

  8. [Near infrared Raman spectra analysis of rhizoma dioscoreae].

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Shuo; Chen, Rong; Li, Yong-Zeng; Feng, Shang-Yuan; Huang, Zu-Fang; Xie, Bing-Xian

    2008-05-01

    A novel and compact near-infrared (NIR) Raman system was developed using 785 nm diode laser, volume-phase technology holographic system, and NIR intensified charge-coupled device (CCD). The Raman spectra and first derivative spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae were obtained. The Raman spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae showed three strong characteristic peaks at 477, 863 and 936 cm(-1), respectively. The major ingredients are protein, amino acid, starch, polysaccharides and so on, matching the known basic biochemical composition of rhizoma dioscoreae. In the first derivative spectra of rhizoma dioscoreae, the distinguishing characteristic peaks appeared at 467, 484, 870 and 943 cm(-1). Contrasted with rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra in the ranges of 600 to 800 cm(-1) and 1 000 to 1 400 cm(-1), the changes in rhizoma dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra are represented more clearly than the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra. So the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman first derivative spectra can be an accurate supplementary analysis method to the rhizoma dioscoreae Raman spectra.

  9. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  10. Reanalysis of Tyrannosaurus rex Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Bern, Marshall; Phinney, Brett S; Goldberg, David

    2009-09-01

    Asara et al. reported the detection of collagen peptides in a 68-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus rex bone by shotgun proteomics. This finding has been called into question as a possible statistical artifact. We reanalyze Asara et al.'s tandem mass spectra using a different search engine and different statistical tools. Our reanalysis shows a sample containing common laboratory contaminants, soil bacteria, and bird-like hemoglobin and collagen.

  11. Raman spectra of carotenoids in natural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withnall, Robert; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Silver, Jack; Edwards, Howell G. M.; de Oliveira, Luiz F. C.

    2003-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of naturally occurring carotenoids have been obtained from nautilus, periwinkle ( Littorina littorea) and clam shells under 514.5 nm excitation and these spectra are compared with the resonance Raman spectra obtained in situ from tomatoes, carrots, red peppers and saffron. The tomatoes, carrots and red peppers gave rise to resonance Raman spectra exhibiting a ν1 band at ca. 1520 cm -1, in keeping with its assignment to carotenoids with ca. nine conjugated carboncarbon double bonds in their main chains, whereas the resonance Raman spectrum of saffron showed a ν1 band at 1537 cm -1 which can be assigned to crocetin, having seven conjugated carboncarbon double bonds. A correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length has been used to interpret the data obtained from the shells, and the wavenumber position (1522 cm -1) of the ν1 band of the carotenoid in the orange clam shell suggests that it contains nine conjugated double bonds in the main chain. However, the black periwinkle and nautilus shells exhibit ν1 bands at 1504 and 1496 cm -1, respectively. On the basis of the correlation between ν1 wavenumber location and effective conjugated chain length, this indicates that they contain carotenoids with longer conjugated chains, the former having ca. 11 double bonds and the latter ca. 13 or even more. Raman spectra of the nautilus, periwinkle and clam shells also exhibited a strong band at 1085 cm -1 and a doublet with components at 701 and 705 cm -1, which can be assigned to biogenic calcium carbonate in the aragonite crystallographic form.

  12. An Interactive Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, K. B.; Henry, R. B. C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a website containing high-quality moderate-resolution spectra of 88 planetary nebulae (PNe) from 3600 to 9600 Å, obtained at KPNO and CTIO. Spectra are displayed in a zoomable window, and there are templates available that show wavelength and ion identifications. In addition to the spectra themselves, the website also contains a brief discussion of PNe as astronomical objects and as contributors to our understanding of stellar evolution, and a table with atlas information for each object along with a link to an image. This table can be re-ordered by object name, galactic or equatorial coordinates, distance from the sun, the galactic center, or the galactic plane. We envision that this website, which concentrates a large amount of data in one place, will be of interest to a variety of users. PN researchers might need to check the spectrum of a particular object of interest; the non-specialist astronomer might simply be interested in perusing such a collection of spectra; and finally, teachers of introductory astronomy can use this database to illustrate basic principles of atomic physics and radiation. To encourage such use, we have written two simple exercises at a basic level to introduce beginning astronomy students to the wealth of information that PN spectra contain. We are grateful to Adam Wang of the Williams College OIT and to his summer student teams who worked on various apects of the implementation of this website. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-9819123 and by Williams College and the University of Oklahoma.

  13. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail showing lower chord pin-connected to vertical member, showing floor beam riveted to extension of vertical member below pin-connection, and showing brackets supporting cantilevered sidewalk. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  14. Vibrational Spectra of Selected Monohalogenated Monocarboxylic Acids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS, INFRARED SPECTRA), (*CARBOXYLIC ACIDS, *INFRARED SPECTRA), IODINE COMPOUNDS, CHLORINE COMPOUNDS, BROMINE COMPOUNDS, ACETIC ACID , ACETATES, MOLECULAR STRUCTURE, MOLECULAR ASSOCIATION

  15. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  16. Aging fingerprints in combustion particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenay, V.; Mooser, R.; Tritscher, T.; Křepelová, A.; Heringa, M. F.; Chirico, R.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Watts, B.; Raabe, J.; Huthwelker, T.; Ammann, M.

    2011-05-01

    Soot particles can significantly influence the Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering solar radiation as well as by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. However, despite their environmental (as well as economic and political) importance, the way these properties are affected by atmospheric processing is still a subject of discussion. In this work, soot particles emitted from two different cars, a EURO 2 transporter, a EURO 3 passenger vehicle, and a wood stove were investigated on a single-particle basis. The emitted exhaust, including the particulate and the gas phase, was processed in a smog chamber with artificial solar radiation. Single particle specimens of both unprocessed and aged soot were characterized using x-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Comparison of the spectra from the unprocessed and aged soot particles revealed changes in the carbon functional group content, such as that of carboxylic carbon, which can be ascribed to both the condensation of secondary organic compounds on the soot particles and oxidation of primary soot particles upon photochemical aging. Changes in the morphology and size of the single soot particles were also observed upon aging. Furthermore, we show that the soot particles take up water in humid environments and that their water uptake capacity increases with photochemical aging.

  17. Automated analysis of slitless spectra - Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchemin, M.; Borra, E. F.; Levesque, S.

    1991-09-01

    The stellar spectral classification that can be achieved with very low-dispersion spectroscopy is examined. Several methods are applied to slitless spectra taken from the automated grens plates analysis project undertaken at Laval University. It is suggested that an accuracy in B - V of about 0.1 mag at B approximating 19 for stars bluer than B - V below 0.8 mag or better for redder stars can be obtained by probing the continuum. Results from DDO-like photometry show that grens data behave similarly to the Gunn and Stryker library of standard stars for many indices. Results of multivariate analysis are coherent with the stellar spectral classification and provide a powerful and objective means of cataloging spectra of the same spectral shape.

  18. High resolution derivative spectra in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demetriades-Shah, Tanvir H.; Steven, Michael D.; Clark, Jeremy A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of derivative spectra is an established technique in analytical chemistry for the elimination of background signals and for resolving overlapping spectral features. Application of this technique for tackling analogous problems such as interference from soil background reflectance in the remote sensing of vegetation or for resolving complex spectra of several target species within individual pixels in remote sensing is proposed. Methods for generating derivatives of high spectral resolution data are reviewed. Results of experiments to test the use of derivatives for monitoring chlorosis in vegetation show that derivative spectral indices are superior to conventional broad-band spectral indices such as the near-infrared/red reflectance ratio. Conventional broad-band indices are sensitive to both leaf cover as well as leaf color. New derivative spectral indices which were able to monitor chlorosis unambiguously were identified. Potential areas for the application of this technique in remote sensing are considered.

  19. Terahertz-sideband spectra involving Kapteyn series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Ian; Tautz, Robert C.; Citrin, D. S.

    2009-09-01

    Kapteyn series of the second kind appear in models of even- and odd-order sideband spectra in the optical regime of a quantum system modulated by a high-frequency (e.g., terahertz) electromagnetic field (Citrin D S 1999 Phys. Rev. B 60 5659) and in certain time-periodic transport problems in superlattices (Ignatov A A and Romanov Y A 1976 Phys. Status Solidi b 73 327; Feise M W and Citrin D S 1999 Appl. Phys. Lett. 75 3536). This paper shows that both the even- and the odd-order Kapteyn series that appear can be summed in closed form, thereby allowing more transparent insight into the structural dependence of the sideband spectra and also providing an analytic control for the accuracy of numerical procedures designed to evaluate the series. The general method of analysis may also be of interest for other Kapteyn series.

  20. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  1. Specific heat of multifractal energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, L. R.; Vallejos, R. O.; Tsallis, C.; Mendes, R. S.; Roux, S.

    2001-07-01

    Motivated by the self-similar character of energy spectra demonstrated for quasicrystals, we investigate the case of multifractal energy spectra, and compute the specific heat associated with simple archetypal forms of multifractal sets as generated by iterated maps. We considered the logistic map and the circle map at their threshold to chaos. Both examples show nontrivial structures associated with the scaling properties of their respective chaotic attractors. The specific heat displays generically log-periodic oscillations around a value that characterizes a single exponent, the ``fractal dimension,'' of the distribution of energy levels close to the minimum value set to 0. It is shown that when the fractal dimension and the frequency of log oscillations of the density of states are large, the amplitude of the resulting log oscillation in the specific heat becomes much smaller than the log-periodic oscillation measured on the density of states.

  2. Neutron Spectra in a 15 MV LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Chu, Wei-Han; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Lan, Jen-Hong

    2010-12-07

    Neutron spectra were calculated inside the treatment hall of a 15 MV LINAC, calculations were carried out using Monte Carlo methods. With a Bonner sphere spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminiscent dosimeters the neutron spectrum at 100 cm from the isocenter was measured and compared with the calculated spectrum. All the spectra in the treatment hall show the presence of evaporation and knock-on neutrons; also the room-return due to the hall features is shown. In the maze the large contribution are due to epithermal and thermal neutrons. A good agreement between the calculated and measured spectrum at 100 cm was noticed, from this comparison the differences are attributed to the water content in the concrete of the hall.

  3. Recovery of fluctuation spectrum evolution from tomographic shear spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometto, Silvio A.; Mezzetti, Marino E-mail: mezzetti@oats.inaf.it

    2013-05-01

    Forthcoming large angle surveys are planned to obtain high precision tomographic shear data. In principle, they will allow us to recover the spectra of matter density fluctuation, at various redshift, through the inversion of the expressions yielding shear spectra from fluctuation spectra. This was discussed in previous work, where SVD techniques for matrix inversion were also shown to be the optimal tool to this aim. Here we show the significant improvements obtainable by using a 7 bin tomography, as allowed by future Euclid data, and discuss error propagation from shear to fluctuation spectra. We find that the technique is a promising tool, namely for the analysis of baryon physics through high–l shear spectra and to test the consistency between expansion rate and fluctuation growth.

  4. The structure of BPS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Pietro

    In this thesis we develop and apply novel techniques for analyzing BPS spectra of supersymmetric quantum field theories of class S. By a combination of wall-crossing, spectral networks and quiver methods we explore the BPS spectra of higher rank four-dimensional N = 2 super Yang-Mills, uncovering surprising new phenomena. Focusing on the SU(3) case, we prove the existence of wild BPS spectra in field theory, featuring BPS states of higher spin whose degeneracies grow exponentially with the energy. The occurrence of wild BPS states is surprising because it appears to be in tension with physical expectations on the behavior of the entropy as a function of the energy scale. The solution to this puzzle comes from realizing that the size of wild BPS states grows rapidly with their mass, and carefully analyzing the volume-dependence of the entropy of BPS states. We also find some interesting structures underlying wild BPS spectra, such as a Regge-like relation between the maximal spin of a BPS multiplet and the square of its mass, and the existence of a universal asymptotic distribution of spin-j irreps within a multiplet of given charge. We also extend the spectral networks construction by introducing a refinement in the topological classification of 2d-4d BPS states, and identifying their spin with a topological invariant known as the "writhe of soliton paths". A careful analysis of the 2d-4d wall-crossing behavior of this refined data reveals that it is described by motivic Kontsevich-Soibelman transformations, controlled by the Protected Spin Character, a protected deformation of the BPS index encoding the spin of BPS states. Our construction opens the way for the systematic study of refined BPS spectra in class S theories. We apply it to several examples, including ones featuring wild BPS spectra, where we find an interesting relation between spectral networks and certain functional equations. For class S theories of A 1 type, we derive an alternative technique for

  5. Exploiting Low-Dimensional Structure in Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Freeman, Peter E.; Lee, Ann B.; Schafer, Chad M.

    2009-01-01

    Dimension-reduction techniques can greatly improve statistical inference in astronomy. A standard approach is to use Principal Components Analysis (PCA). In this work, we apply a recently developed technique, diffusion maps, to astronomical spectra for data parameterization and dimensionality reduction, and develop a robust, eigenmode-based framework for regression. We show how our framework provides a computationally efficient means by which to predict redshifts of galaxies, and thus could inform more expensive redshift estimators such as template cross-correlation. It also provides a natural means by which to identify outliers (e.g., misclassified spectra, spectra with anomalous features). We analyze 3835 Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra and show how our framework yields a more than 95% reduction in dimensionality. Finally, we show that the prediction error of the diffusion-map-based regression approach is markedly smaller than that of a similar approach based on PCA, clearly demonstrating the superiority of diffusion maps over PCA for this regression task.

  6. Infrared transmission spectra of Sea of Fertility regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhmanova, M. V.; Karyakin, A. V.; Tartasov, L. S.

    1974-01-01

    Transmission spectra in the 2-25 micrometer region were obtained for samples of lunar regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. A comparison of the Luna 16, Apollo 11, and Apollo 12 samples showed that the infrared transmission spectra of regolith samples from the mare regions are similar and characteristic of basic basaltic rocks. The absorption bands show up in the vibration region of the SiO4 groups. No water and OH groups were found in the samples based on the spectrum. Spectra of regolith samples calcined at 1000C showed changes that can be interpreted as changes in the spectra of irradiated crystals (especially distinctly for the Luna 16 samples).

  7. Computer Simulation of NMR Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a PASCAL computer program which provides interactive analysis and display of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra from spin one-half nuclei using a hard-copy or monitor. Includes general and theoretical program descriptions, program capability, and examples of its use. (Source for program/documentation is included.)…

  8. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  9. Discrimination of petroleum fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszewski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents studies of the total spectra (fluorescence-excitation matrix) of petroleum with regard to the utilization of fluorescence for determining petroleum pollutants. Thorough testing of one group, comprising almost forty lubricating oils in the form of their hexane solutions, points out their discrimination.

  10. Shape effects on asteroid spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davalos, J.; Carvano, J.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this work is to probe how the shape of a body like an asteroid could be modifying its observed spectra and the derived mineralogical interfaces based on spectral modeling. To model this effect, we construct an oblate ellipsoid with triangular facets, where each facet contributes to the overall reflectance. The synthetic spectra is generated by the isotropic multiple-scattering approximation (IMSA) reflectance model of Hapke (1993). First, we obtained optical constants by inverting the spectra of meteorites, obtained from the RELAB spectral database. These optical constants were found inverting the reflectance bidirectional equation of Hapke; this is made in two steps: (i) The first inversion is to find the single-scattering albedo π (ii) in the model of Hapke, this albedo is found under the regime of the geometric optics, where the particle size is much larger than the wavelength of the incident radiation. Here we assumed a constant value for the real part of the optical constant n=1.5. With these optical constants, we can construct synthetic spectra for any particle size. The phase function used is the double Henyey-Greenstein phase function and an accurate expression for the H-functions. We started with the ellipsoidal shape a=1.0, b=c=0.5 for two particle size 50 and 250 μ m, in this part, we found good differences in the BAR parameter between the two geometric models, this was done for 100 Eucrite meteorites spectra. In this first study, we found that the BAR parameter between the two models is bigger when the particle size increases. In the second part, we started with different ellipsoidal shapes and produced synthetic spectra for material with eucrite and diogenite composition with a phase angle of 20 degrees, incidence and emission angles of 10 degrees, and particle size at 250 μ m. All spectra was generated for four parameters of phase angle b=[0.2,0.4,0.6,0.8] taking the empirical relation between the phase constants of Hapke (2012

  11. Planning a Successful Tech Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikirk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tech shows are a great way to introduce prospective students, parents, and local business and industry to a technology and engineering or career and technical education program. In addition to showcasing instructional programs, a tech show allows students to demonstrate their professionalism and skills, practice public presentations, and interact…

  12. [Neuronal ageing].

    PubMed

    Piechota, Małgorzata; Sunderland, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Ageing leads to irreversible alterations in the nervous system, which to various extent impair its functions such as capacity to learn and memory. In old neurons and brain, similarly to what may take place in other cells, there is increased oxidative stress, disturbed energetic homeostasis and metabolism, accumulation of damage in proteins and nucleic acids. Characteristic of old neurons are alterations in plasticity, synaptic transmission, sensitivity to neurotrophic factors and cytoskeletal changes. Some markers of senescence, whose one of them is SA-beta-galactosidase were used to show the process of neuronal ageing both in vitro, and in vivo. Some research suggest that, despite the fact that neurons are postmitotic cells, it is cell cycle proteins which play a certain role in their biology, e.g. differentiation. However, their role in neuronal ageing is not known or explained. Ageing is the serious factor of development of neurodegenerative diseases among others Alzheimer disease.

  13. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  14. EFFECTS OF FORSTERITE GRAIN SHAPE ON INFRARED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, C.; Imai, Y.; Chihara, H.; Murata, K.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Suto, H.; Tachibana, S.; Ohara, S.

    2010-02-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) detected several sharp infrared features around young stars, comets, and evolved stars. These sharp features were identified as Mg-rich crystalline silicates of forsterite and enstatite by comparison with spectra from laboratory data. However, certain infrared emission bands in the observed spectra cannot be identified because they appear at slightly shorter wavelengths than the peaks in forsterite laboratory spectra, where the shapes of forsterite particles are irregular. To solve this problem, we measured infrared spectra of forsterite grains of various shapes (irregular, plate-like with no sharp edges, elliptical, cauliflower, and spherical) in the infrared spectral region between 5 and 100 mum. The spectra depend on particle shape. The spectra of the 11, 19, 23, and 33 mum bands, in particular, are extremely sensitive to particle shape, whereas some peaks such as the 11.9, 49, and 69 mum bands remained almost unchanged despite different particle shapes. This becomes most evident from the spectra of near-spherical particles produced by annealing an originally amorphous silicate sample at temperature from 600 to 1150 deg. C. The spectra of these samples differ strongly from those of other ones, showing peaks at much shorter wavelengths. At a higher annealing temperature of 1200 deg. C, the particle shapes changed drastically from spherical to irregular and the spectra became similar to those of forsterite particles with irregular shapes. Based on ISO data and other observational data, the spectra of outflow sources and disk sources may correspond to differences in forsterite shape, and further some unidentified peaks, such as those at 32.8 or 32.5 mum, may be due to spherical or spherical-like forsterite.

  15. The analysis of spectra of novae taken near maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stryker, L. L.; Hestand, J.; Starrfield, S.; Wehrse, R.; Hauschildt, P.; Spies, W.; Baschek, B.; Shaviv, G.

    1988-01-01

    A project to analyze ultraviolet spectra of novae obtained at or near maximum optical light is presented. These spectra are characterized by a relatively cool continuum with superimposed permitted emission lines from ions such as Fe II, Mg II, and Si II. Spectra obtained late in the outburst show only emission lines from highly ionized species and in many cases these are forbidden lines. The ultraviolet data will be used with calculations of spherical, expanding, stellar atmospheres for novae to determine elemental abundances by spectral line synthesis. This method is extremely sensitive to the abundances and completely independent of the nebular analyses usually used to obtain novae abundances.

  16. Anomalous Raman spectra from La2CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Gerald; Dacol, F. H.

    1990-03-01

    We show that some published Raman spectra from the superconductors (La2-xSrx)CuO4 and La2NiO4 are incorrect. We believe that these spectra were obtained when the samples were ``burnt'' by the focused laser beam and were actually due to La2O3. Similar anomalous results can be obtained when starting with Nd2CuO4 where the spectra come from Nd2O3. A spectrum distinctly different from those of La2O3 or Nd2O3 is obtained from Y2O3.

  17. Satellite Animation Shows California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows a series of moisture-laden storms affecting California from Jan. 6 through Jan. 9, 2017. TRT: 00:36 Credit: NASA...

  18. Satellite Movie Shows Erika Dissipate

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Aug. 27 to 29 shows Tropical Storm Erika move through the Eastern Caribbean Sea and dissipate near eastern Cuba. ...

  19. Phobos surface spectra mineralogical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajola, M.; Lazzarin, M.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Roush, T. L.; Pendleton, Y.; Bertini, I.; Magrin, S.; Carli, C.; La Forgia, F.; Barbieri, C.

    2014-04-01

    A mineralogical model composed of a mixture of Tagish Lake meteorite (TL) and Pyroxene Glass (PM80) was presented in [1] to explain the surface reflectance of Phobos from 0.25 to 4.0 μm. The positive results we obtained, when comparing the OSIRIS data [2] extended in wavelength to include the [3,4] spectra, forced us to perform a wider comparison between our TL-PM80 model and the CRISM and OMEGA Phobos spectra presented in [5]. Such spectra cover three different regions of interest (ROIs) situated in the Phobos sub-Mars hemisphere: the interior of the Stickney crater, its eastern rim, and its proximity terrain southeast of the Reldresal crater. We decided to vary the percentage mixture of the components of our model (80% TL, 20% PM80), between pure TL and pure PM80, by means of the radiative transfer code based on the [6] formulation of the slab approximation. Once this spectral range was derived, see Fig. 1, we attempted to compare it with the [5] spectra between 0.4 and 2.6 μm, i.e. below the thermal emitted radiation, to see if any spectral match was possible. We observed that CRISM scaled spectra above 1.10 μm fall within pure Tagish Lake composition and the [1] model. The CRISM data below 1.10 μm present more discrepancies with our models, in particular for the Stickney's rim spectrum. Nevertheless the TL and PM80 components seem to be good mineralogical candidates on Phobos. We performed the same analysis with the OMEGA data and, again, we found out that the Stickney's rim spectrum lies out of our model range, while the two remaining spectra still lie between pure TL and 80% TL - 20% PM80, but indicating that a different, more complicated mixture is expected in order to explain properly both the spectral trend and the possible absorption bands located above 2.0 μm. Within this analysis, we point out that a big fraction of TL material (modeled pure or present with a minimum percentage of 80% mixed together with 20% PM80) seems to explain Phobos spectral

  20. Polarization effects in cutaneous autofluorescent spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Jeliazkova, Al.; Genova, Ts.; Pavlova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2014-05-01

    Used polarized light for fluorescence excitation one could obtain response related to the anisotropy features of extracellular matrix. The fluorophore anisotropy is attenuated during lesions' growth and level of such decrease could be correlated with the stage of tumor development. Our preliminary investigations are based on in vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from healthy volunteers skin on different ages and from different anatomical places using linear polarizer and analyzer for excitation and emission light detected. Measurements were made using spectrofluorimeter FluoroLog 3 (HORIBA Jobin Yvon, France) with fiber-optic probe in steady-state regime using excitation in the region of 280-440 nm. Three different situations were evaluated and corresponding excitation-emission matrices were developed - with parallel and perpendicular positions for linear polarizer and analyzer, and without polarization of excitation and fluorescence light detected from a forearm skin surface. The fluorescence spectra obtained reveal differences in spectral intensity, related to general attenuation, due to filtering effects of used polarizer/analyzer couple. Significant spectral shape changes were observed for the complex autofluorescence signal detected, which correlated with collagen and protein cross-links fluorescence, that could be addressed to the tissue extracellular matrix and general condition of the skin investigated, due to morphological destruction during lesions' growth. A correlation between volunteers' age and the fluorescence spectra detected was observed during our measurements. Our next step is to increase developed initial database and to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescent polarization effects and found if they are significantly altered from normal skin to cancerous state of the tissue, this way to develop a non-invasive diagnostic tool for dermatological practice.

  1. National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Jimenez Sheri Raborn, CPA; Tom Baker

    2008-03-31

    National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration created a 400KW Photovoltaic self-generation plant at the National Orange Show Events Center (NOS). The NOS owns a 120-acre state fairground where it operates an events center and produces an annual citrus fair known as the Orange Show. The NOS governing board wanted to employ cost-saving programs for annual energy expenses. It is hoped the Photovoltaic program will result in overall savings for the NOS, help reduce the State's energy demands as relating to electrical power consumption, improve quality of life within the affected grid area as well as increase the energy efficiency of buildings at our venue. In addition, the potential to reduce operational expenses would have a tremendous effect on the ability of the NOS to service its community.

  2. Age determination of 15 old to intermediate-age small Magellanic cloud star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Piatti, A. E.; Geisler, D.; Leiton, R.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.; Grocholski, A. J.; Sarajedini, A. E-mail: claria@oac.uncor.edu E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl E-mail: gcarraro@eso.org E-mail: grocholski@phys.lsu.edu

    2014-04-01

    We present color-magnitude diagrams in the V and I bands for 15 star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on data taken with the Very Large Telescope (VLT, Chile). We selected these clusters from our previous work, wherein we derived cluster radial velocities and metallicities from calcium II infrared triplet (CaT) spectra also taken with the VLT. We discovered that the ages of six of our clusters have been appreciably underestimated by previous studies, which used comparatively small telescopes, graphically illustrating the need for large apertures to obtain reliable ages of old and intermediate-age SMC star clusters. In particular, three of these clusters, L4, L6, and L110, turn out to be among the oldest SMC clusters known, with ages of 7.9 ± 1.1, 8.7 ± 1.2, and 7.6 ± 1.0 Gyr, respectively, helping to fill a possible 'SMC cluster age gap'. Using the current ages and metallicities from Parisi et al., we analyze the age distribution, age gradient, and age-metallicity relation (AMR) of a sample of SMC clusters measured homogeneously. There is a suggestion of bimodality in the age distribution but it does not show a constant slope for the first 4 Gyr, and we find no evidence for an age gradient. Due to the improved ages of our cluster sample, we find that our AMR is now better represented in the intermediate/old period than we had derived in Parisi et al., where we simply took ages available in the literature. Additionally, clusters younger than ∼4 Gyr now show better agreement with the bursting model of Pagel and Tautvaišienė, but we confirm that this model is not a good representation of the AMR during the intermediate/old period. A more complicated model is needed to explain the SMC chemical evolution in that period.

  3. Leaf aging of Amazonian canopy trees as revealed by spectral and physiochemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavana-Bryant, Cecilia; Malhi, Yadvinder; Wu, Jin; Asner, Gregory P.; Anastasiou, Athanasios; Enquist, Brian J.; Cosio Caravasi, Eric G.; Doughty, Christopher E.; Saleska, Scott R.; Martin, Roberta E.; Gerard, France F.

    2016-04-01

    Leaf aging is a fundamental driver of changes in leaf traits, thereby, regulating ecosystem processes and remotely-sensed canopy dynamics. We explore leaf reflectance as a tool to monitor leaf age and develop a spectra-based partial least squares regression (PLSR) model to predict age using data from a phenological study of 1,099 leaves from 12 lowland Amazonian canopy trees in southern Peru. Results demonstrated monotonic decreases in leaf water (LWC) and phosphorous content (Pmass) and increase in leaf mass per area (LMA) with age across trees; leaf nitrogen (Nmass) and carbon content (Cmass) showed monotonic but tree-specific age responses. We observed large age-related variation in leaf spectra across trees. A spectra-based model was more accurate in predicting leaf age (R2= 0.86 and percent root mean square error %RMSE= 33) compared to trait-based models using single (R2=0.07 to 0.73; %RMSE=7 to 38) and multiple predictors (R2=0.76; %RMSE=28). Spectra and trait-based models established a physiochemical basis for the spectral age model. Vegetation indices (VIs) including the normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI2), normalised difference water index (NDWI) and photosynthetic reflectance index (PRI) were all age-dependent. This study highlights the importance of leaf age as a mediator of leaf traits, provides evidence of age-related leaf reflectance changes that have important impacts on VIs used to monitor canopy dynamics and productivity and proposes a new approach to predicting and monitoring leaf age with important implications for remote sensing.

  4. Leaf aging of Amazonian canopy trees as revealed by spectral and physiochemical measurements.

    PubMed

    Chavana-Bryant, Cecilia; Malhi, Yadvinder; Wu, Jin; Asner, Gregory P; Anastasiou, Athanasios; Enquist, Brian J; Cosio Caravasi, Eric G; Doughty, Christopher E; Saleska, Scott R; Martin, Roberta E; Gerard, France F

    2017-05-01

    Leaf aging is a fundamental driver of changes in leaf traits, thereby regulating ecosystem processes and remotely sensed canopy dynamics. We explore leaf reflectance as a tool to monitor leaf age and develop a spectra-based partial least squares regression (PLSR) model to predict age using data from a phenological study of 1099 leaves from 12 lowland Amazonian canopy trees in southern Peru. Results demonstrated monotonic decreases in leaf water (LWC) and phosphorus (Pmass ) contents and an increase in leaf mass per unit area (LMA) with age across trees; leaf nitrogen (Nmass ) and carbon (Cmass ) contents showed monotonic but tree-specific age responses. We observed large age-related variation in leaf spectra across trees. A spectra-based model was more accurate in predicting leaf age (R(2)  = 0.86; percent root mean square error (%RMSE) = 33) compared with trait-based models using single (R(2)  = 0.07-0.73; %RMSE = 7-38) and multiple (R(2)  = 0.76; %RMSE = 28) predictors. Spectra- and trait-based models established a physiochemical basis for the spectral age model. Vegetation indices (VIs) including the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index 2 (EVI2), normalized difference water index (NDWI) and photosynthetic reflectance index (PRI) were all age-dependent. This study highlights the importance of leaf age as a mediator of leaf traits, provides evidence of age-related leaf reflectance changes that have important impacts on VIs used to monitor canopy dynamics and productivity and proposes a new approach to predicting and monitoring leaf age with important implications for remote sensing.

  5. Hierarchical analysis of molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    A novel representation of molecular spectra in terms of hierarchical trees has proven to be an important aid for the study of many significant problems in gas-phase chemical dynamics. Trees are generated from molecular spectra by monitoring the changes that occur in a spectrum as resolution is changed in a continuous manner. A tree defines a genealogy among all lines of a spectrum. This allows for a detailed understanding of the assignment of features of a spectrum that may be difficult to obtain any other way as well as an understanding of intramolecular energy transfer time scales, mechanisms, and pathways. The methodology has been applied to several problems: transition state spectroscopy, intramolecular energy transfer in highly excited molecules, high-resolution overtone spectroscopy, and the nature of the classical-quantum correspondence when there is classical chaos (``quantum chaos``).

  6. Eigenvectors of optimal color spectra.

    PubMed

    Flinkman, Mika; Laamanen, Hannu; Tuomela, Jukka; Vahimaa, Pasi; Hauta-Kasari, Markku

    2013-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and weighted PCA were applied to spectra of optimal colors belonging to the outer surface of the object-color solid or to so-called MacAdam limits. The correlation matrix formed from this data is a circulant matrix whose biggest eigenvalue is simple and the corresponding eigenvector is constant. All other eigenvalues are double, and the eigenvectors can be expressed with trigonometric functions. Found trigonometric functions can be used as a general basis to reconstruct all possible smooth reflectance spectra. When the spectral data are weighted with an appropriate weight function, the essential part of the color information is compressed to the first three components and the shapes of the first three eigenvectors correspond to one achromatic response function and to two chromatic response functions, the latter corresponding approximately to Munsell opponent-hue directions 9YR-9B and 2BG-2R.

  7. Formation of cyclotron lines in gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S. G.; Meszaros, P.

    1989-01-01

    A transmission model of gamma-ray burst sources is studied using the relativistic QED magnetic-resonant opacities including multiple photon scattering, incorporated into a discrete-ordinate radiative-transport scheme. The physics of the cyclotron line-producing region is discussed in general, and the expected line profiles, relative harmonic strengths, and polarizations are indicated under various conditions. The calculated spectra for these models show good agreement with the spectra reported from Ginga for GB 880205 and GB 870303.

  8. Accelerated Fitting of Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Yuan-Sen; Conroy, Charlie; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2016-07-01

    Stellar spectra are often modeled and fitted by interpolating within a rectilinear grid of synthetic spectra to derive the stars’ labels: stellar parameters and elemental abundances. However, the number of synthetic spectra needed for a rectilinear grid grows exponentially with the label space dimensions, precluding the simultaneous and self-consistent fitting of more than a few elemental abundances. Shortcuts such as fitting subsets of labels separately can introduce unknown systematics and do not produce correct error covariances in the derived labels. In this paper we present a new approach—Convex Hull Adaptive Tessellation (chat)—which includes several new ideas for inexpensively generating a sufficient stellar synthetic library, using linear algebra and the concept of an adaptive, data-driven grid. A convex hull approximates the region where the data lie in the label space. A variety of tests with mock data sets demonstrate that chat can reduce the number of required synthetic model calculations by three orders of magnitude in an eight-dimensional label space. The reduction will be even larger for higher dimensional label spaces. In chat the computational effort increases only linearly with the number of labels that are fit simultaneously. Around each of these grid points in the label space an approximate synthetic spectrum can be generated through linear expansion using a set of “gradient spectra” that represent flux derivatives at every wavelength point with respect to all labels. These techniques provide new opportunities to fit the full stellar spectra from large surveys with 15-30 labels simultaneously.

  9. Ultraviolet Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, Ted

    1996-07-01

    The ultraviolet reflectance spectra of the icy satellites ofUranus are largely unknown. We propose to use the HubbleSpace Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph in order to obtainthe first high S/N UV spectra of Ariel, Titania, and Oberon.Because of our innovative targeting approach, we have alsobeen able to include Umbriel in our observational plans.These satellites sample almost the full range of UV albedosand UV/VIS colors exhibited by the large Uranian satellites.The spectral resolution and range will overlap with earth-based telescopic and spacecraft observations of these objectsallowing for comparisons of the UV data with existing visualand near-infrared spectra of these objects. These comparisonswill ultimately provide greater constraints on the relativelylow albedo spectrally neutral non-ice component on the Uraniansatellites. The existance of UV spectral features due tospecies such as O_3, H_2O_2 or carbon-rich macromolecules(e.g. polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) can provide evidencefor modification of the surfaces via plasma or meteoriticbombardment, alteration by high-energy ultraviolet radiation,or accretion of particles from nearby sources such asplanetary rings or dust bands.

  10. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth.

    PubMed

    Makidono, Akari; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Mori, Miki; Yagata, Hiroshi; Onoda, Yui; Kikuchi, Mari; Nozaki, Taiki; Saida, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Seigo; Suzuki, Koyu

    2013-07-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare fibroepithelial lesion and particularly uncommon in adolescent girls. It is thought to arise from the periductal rather than intralobular stroma. Usually, it is seen as a well-defined mass. Phyllodes tumor showing intraductal growth is extremely rare. Here we report a girl who has a phyllodes tumor with intraductal growth.

  11. Maturation of EEG Power Spectra in Early Adolescence: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cragg, Lucy; Kovacevic, Natasa; McIntosh, Anthony Randal; Poulsen, Catherine; Martinu, Kristina; Leonard, Gabriel; Paus, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the fine-grained development of the EEG power spectra in early adolescence, and the extent to which it is reflected in changes in peak frequency. It also sought to determine whether sex differences in the EEG power spectra reflect differential patterns of maturation. A group of 56 adolescents were tested at age 10 years and…

  12. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  13. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field.

  14. LET spectra measurements on LDEF: variations with shielding and location.

    PubMed

    Benton, E V; Frank, A L; Csige, I; Frigo, L A; Benton, E R

    1996-11-01

    LET spectra measurements made with passive plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were found to depend on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. LET spectra were measured at several locations on LDEF as part of the P0006 LETSME experiment (Benton and Parnell, 1984), the P0004 Seeds in Space experiment (Parks and Alston, 1984), the A00l5 Free Flyer Biostacks and the M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link experiment (Taylor, 1984). Locations included the east, west and Earth sides of the LDEF satellite. The LET spectra measured with PNTDs deviated significantly from calculations, especially for high LET particles (LET infinity H2O > or = 100 keV/micrometer). At high LETs, short-range inelastic secondary particles produced by trapped proton interactions with the nuclei of the detector were found to be the principal contributor to LET spectra. At lower LETs, the spectra appeared to be due to short-range, inelastic and stopping primary protons, with primary GCR particles making a smaller contribution. The dependence of LET spectra on detector orientation and shielding was studied using the four orthogonal stacks in the P0006 experiment. Both measurements of total track density and LET spectra showed a greater number of particles arriving from the direction of space than from Earth. Measurements of LET spectra in CR-39 PNTD on the east (leading) and west (trailing) sides of LDEF showed a higher rate of production at the west side. This was caused by a larger flux of trapped protons on the west side as predicted by the east/west trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Track density measured in CR-39 PNTDs increased as a function of shielding depth in the detector stack. A similar measurement made in a thick stack of CR-39 interspersed with layers of Al and exposed to 154 MeV protons at a ground-based accelerator showed a similar result, indicating that a significant fraction of the particle events counted were from secondaries and that the

  15. LET spectra measurements on LDEF: variations with shielding and location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.; Benton, E. R.

    1996-01-01

    LET spectra measurements made with passive plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were found to depend on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. LET spectra were measured at several locations on LDEF as part of the P0006 LETSME experiment (Benton and Parnell, 1984), the P0004 Seeds in Space experiment (Parks and Alston, 1984), the A00l5 Free Flyer Biostacks and the M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link experiment (Taylor, 1984). Locations included the east, west and Earth sides of the LDEF satellite. The LET spectra measured with PNTDs deviated significantly from calculations, especially for high LET particles (LET infinity H2O > or = 100 keV/micrometer). At high LETs, short-range inelastic secondary particles produced by trapped proton interactions with the nuclei of the detector were found to be the principal contributor to LET spectra. At lower LETs, the spectra appeared to be due to short-range, inelastic and stopping primary protons, with primary GCR particles making a smaller contribution. The dependence of LET spectra on detector orientation and shielding was studied using the four orthogonal stacks in the P0006 experiment. Both measurements of total track density and LET spectra showed a greater number of particles arriving from the direction of space than from Earth. Measurements of LET spectra in CR-39 PNTD on the east (leading) and west (trailing) sides of LDEF showed a higher rate of production at the west side. This was caused by a larger flux of trapped protons on the west side as predicted by the east/west trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Track density measured in CR-39 PNTDs increased as a function of shielding depth in the detector stack. A similar measurement made in a thick stack of CR-39 interspersed with layers of Al and exposed to 154 MeV protons at a ground-based accelerator showed a similar result, indicating that a significant fraction of the particle events counted were from secondaries and that the

  16. Gestational age

    MedlinePlus

    Fetal age - gestational age; Gestation; Neonatal gestational age; Newborn gestational age ... Gestational age can be determined before or after birth. Before birth, your health care provider will use ultrasound to ...

  17. Aging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... email address Submit Home > Healthy Aging > Wellness Healthy Aging Aging skin More information on aging skin When it ... treated early. Return to top More information on Aging skin Read more from womenshealth.gov Varicose Veins ...

  18. [Nutrition, aging, old age].

    PubMed

    Iván, L

    1998-12-06

    In humans there is evidence that the restriction of total caloric intake appears to be more important than the restriction of any particular macronutrient. Today the mechanism of the effect of caloric restriction is unknown. With advancing age and the occurrence of concomitant illness there is an increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies. Altered nutritional status is associated with the pathogenesis of a number of common diseases of the elderly, thus it would appear that nutritional modulation and manipulation represents one possible approach to successful aging and a healthy longevity. The conceptual framework of the paper suggests the need of a newer light of the aging processes namely by a holistic human-gero-ecological model and a personality oriented geriatry. There are accentuated the role of the nutrients and vitamins, the food intake and drug-nutrients interactions and the meanings of the differences between the normal and pathological aging.

  19. "Medicine show." Alice in Doctorland.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    This is an excerpt from the script of a 1939 play provided to the Institute of Social Medicine and Community Health by the Library of Congress Federal Theater Project Collection at George Mason University Library, Fairfax, Virginia, pages 2-1-8 thru 2-1-14. The Federal Theatre Project (FTP) was part of the New Deal program for the arts 1935-1939. Funded by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) its goal was to employ theater professionals from the relief rolls. A number of FTP plays deal with aspects of medicine and public health. Pageants, puppet shows and documentary plays celebrated progress in medical science while examining social controversies in medical services and the public health movement. "Medicine Show" sharply contrasts technological wonders with social backwardness. The play was rehearsed by the FTP but never opened because funding ended. A revised version ran on Broadway in 1940. The preceding comments are adapted from an excellent, well-illustrated review of five of these plays by Barabara Melosh: "The New Deal's Federal Theatre Project," Medical Heritage, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Jan/Feb 1986), pp. 36-47.

  20. Turn-over in pulsar spectra: From young pulsars to millisecond ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.; Serylak, M.

    2008-02-01

    The evidence for turn-over in young pulsar radio spectra at high frequencies is presented. The frequency at which a spectrum shows the maximum flux density is called the peak frequency. This peak frequency appears to depend on pulsar age and dispersion measure. A possible relation with pulsar age is interesting. Millisecond pulsars, which are very old objects, may show no evidence for spectral turn-over down to 100 MHz. Some studied pulsars with turn-over at high frequencies have been shown to have very interesting interstellar environments. This could suggest that the turn-over phenomenon is associated with the enviromental conditions around the neutron stars, rahter than being related intrinsically with the radio emission mechanism. Although there are no earlier reports of such a connection, a more detailed study on larger sample of pulsars is needed to address this idea more quantitatively. In this context, future observations below 200 MHz using LOFAR will allow us to investigate turn-over in radio pulsar spectra.

  1. CLASSIFICATION OF STELLAR SPECTRA WITH LOCAL LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Connolly, Andrew; Vanderplas, Jake; Schneider, Jeff; Xiong Liang

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the use of dimensionality reduction techniques for the classification of stellar spectra selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using local linear embedding (LLE), a technique that preserves the local (and possibly nonlinear) structure within high-dimensional data sets, we show that the majority of stellar spectra can be represented as a one-dimensional sequence within a three-dimensional space. The position along this sequence is highly correlated with spectral temperature. Deviations from this 'stellar locus' are indicative of spectra with strong emission lines (including misclassified galaxies) or broad absorption lines (e.g., carbon stars). Based on this analysis, we propose a hierarchical classification scheme using LLE that progressively identifies and classifies stellar spectra in a manner that requires no feature extraction and that can reproduce the classic MK classifications to an accuracy of one type.

  2. Predicting Infrared Spectra of Nerve Agents Using Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.-P.; Wang, H.-T.; Zheng, W.-P.; Sun, C.; Bai, Y.; Guo, X.-D.; Sun, H.

    2016-09-01

    Vibration frequencies of four nerve agents and two simulators are calculated using B3LYP coupled with ten basis sets. To evaluate the accuracy of calculated spectra, root mean square error (RMSE) and weighted cross-correlation average (WCCA) are considered. The evaluation shows that B3LYP/6-311+g(d,p) performs best in predicting infrared spectra, and polarization functions are found to be more important than diffusion functions in spectra simulation. Moreover, B3LYP calculation underestimates frequencies related to the P atom. The WCCA metric derives 1.008 as a unique scaling factor for calculated frequencies. The results indicate that the WCCA metric can identify six agents based on calculated spectra.

  3. Power spectra at radio frequency of lightning return stroke waveforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Thomson, D. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Rinnert, K.; Krider, E. P.

    1989-01-01

    The power spectra of the wideband (10 Hz to 100 kHz) magnetic field signals in a number of lightning return strokes (primarily first return strokes) measured during a lightning storm which occurred in Lindau, West Germany in August, 1984 have been calculated. The RF magnetic field data were obtained with the engineering unit of the Galileo Jupiter Probe lightning experiment. The spectra of the magnetic field data definitely show fine structure, with two or three distinct peaks appearing in the spectra of many of the waveforms. An enhancement of power at frequencies of about 60-70 kHz is often seen in the spectra of the waveform time segments preceding and following the rise-to-peak amplitude of the return stroke.

  4. Mammography X-Ray Spectra Simulated with Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Gonzalez, J. Ramirez; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Hernandez-Davila, V. M.; Villasana, R. Hernandez; Mercado, G. A.

    2008-08-11

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to obtain the x-ray spectra of various target-filter combinations for a mammography unit. Mammography is widely used to diagnose breast cancer. Further to Mo target with Mo filter combination, Rh/Rh, Mo/Rh, Mo/Al, Rh/Al, and W/Rh are also utilized. In this work Monte Carlo calculations, using MCNP 4C code, were carried out to estimate the x-ray spectra produced when a beam of 28 keV electrons did collide with Mo, Rh and W targets. Resulting x-ray spectra show characteristic x-rays and continuous bremsstrahlung. Spectra were also calculated including filters.

  5. [Study on THz spectra of nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Huang, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-yan; Zhao, Guo-zhong

    2009-09-01

    The terahertz (THz) spectra of nicotinic acid, nicotinamide and nicotine were studied at room temperature. The time-domain THz spectra were measured. The frequency-domain spectra were obtained by fast Fourier transform (FFT). The spectral response and the dispersive relationship of refractive index in THz spectral range were obtained. The results show that the samples have obvious spectral response in THz spectral range except nicotine. The corresponding stimulated spectra were given by using density functional theory (DFT) method for both nicotinamide and nicotinic acid. The origin of the absorption peaks of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide was explored. It is thought that the absorption peak of nicotinic acid is caused by the torsion and wagging of the molecule, but the absorption peaks of nicotinamide (except 1.93 THz) are caused by intermolecular or phonon mode. It was shown that the molecule structure and vibrational modes of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide can be analyzed by the combination of simulation and experimental results.

  6. The absorption spectra of carbonates and their precursors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.

    The carbonates calcite and dolomite have been discovered in the dust shells of evolved stars (Kemper et al. 2002) and young proto stars (Ceccarelli et al. 2002). The mechanism for carbonate formation with a aqueous or non-aqueous process were discussed in their papers. These processes have not yet been reproduced in a laboratory experiment. First of all, we measured the mass absorption spectra of varous carbonates were measured in the mid- and far-infrared region. These spectra show very strong and broad peaks in the far-infrared region. The calcite and dolomite have peaks at about 92 microns and 63 microns, respectively. The alternative process of carbonates has not yet been clear. We investigate the alternative process measuring the spectra of the precursors of carbonates. We will report the preliminary results and discuss about the alternative process comparing the measured spectra of the precursors with the observation.

  7. "Show me" bioethics and politics.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Myra J

    2007-10-01

    Missouri, the "Show Me State," has become the epicenter of several important national public policy debates, including abortion rights, the right to choose and refuse medical treatment, and, most recently, early stem cell research. In this environment, the Center for Practical Bioethics (formerly, Midwest Bioethics Center) emerged and grew. The Center's role in these "cultural wars" is not to advocate for a particular position but to provide well researched and objective information, perspective, and advocacy for the ethical justification of policy positions; and to serve as a neutral convener and provider of a public forum for discussion. In this article, the Center's work on early stem cell research is a case study through which to argue that not only the Center, but also the field of bioethics has a critical role in the politics of public health policy.

  8. Phoenix Scoop Inverted Showing Rasp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows the silver colored rasp protruding from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm scoop. The scoop is inverted and the rasp is pointing up.

    Shown with its forks pointing toward the ground is the thermal and electrical conductivity probe, at the lower right. The Robotic Arm Camera is pointed toward the ground.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. ShowMe3D

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Michael B

    2012-01-05

    ShowMe3D is a data visualization graphical user interface specifically designed for use with hyperspectral image obtained from the Hyperspectral Confocal Microscope. The program allows the user to select and display any single image from a three dimensional hyperspectral image stack. By moving a slider control, the user can easily move between images of the stack. The user can zoom into any region of the image. The user can select any pixel or region from the displayed image and display the fluorescence spectrum associated with that pixel or region. The user can define up to 3 spectral filters to apply to the hyperspectral image and view the image as it would appear from a filter-based confocal microscope. The user can also obtain statistics such as intensity average and variance from selected regions.

  10. Determining Ages of APOGEE Giants with Known Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuillet, Diane K.; Bovy, Jo; Holtzman, Jon; Girardi, Léo; MacDonald, Nick; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.

    2016-01-01

    We present a sample of 705 local giant stars observed using the New Mexico State University 1 m telescope with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III/Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) spectrograph, for which we estimate stellar ages and the local star formation history (SFH). The high-resolution (R ˜ 22,500), near infrared (1.51-1.7 μm) APOGEE spectra provide measurements of stellar atmospheric parameters (temperature, surface gravity, [M/H], and [α/M]). Due to the smaller uncertainties in surface gravity possible with high-resolution spectra and accurate Hipparcos distance measurements, we are able to calculate the stellar masses to within 30%. For giants, the relatively rapid evolution up the red giant branch allows the age to be constrained by the mass. We examine methods of estimating age using both the mass-age relation directly and a Bayesian isochrone matching of measured parameters, assuming a constant SFH. To improve the SFH prior, we use a hierarchical modeling approach to constrain the parameters of the model SFH using the age probability distribution functions of the data. The results of an α-dependent Gaussian SFH model show a clear age-[α/M] relation at all ages. Using this SFH model as the prior for an empirical Bayesian analysis, we determine ages for individual stars. The resulting age-metallicity relation is flat, with a slight decrease in [M/H] at the oldest ages and a ˜0.5 dex spread in metallicity across most ages. For stars with ages ≲1 Gyr we find a smaller spread, consistent with radial migration having a smaller effect on these young stars than on the older stars.

  11. Age Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    The ages of rocks from the lunar highlands vary widely, even for a single rock sample. This makes it difficult to quantitatively test ideas for early lunar differentiation and formation of the crust. Lars Borg and Amy Gaffney (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory), and Charles Shearer (University of New Mexico) have devised a set of guidelines to apply to geochronological data that leads to a relative ranking of the reliability of the age determined for a sample. Applying their guidelines to existing data for lunar highland rocks shows an upper limit on rock ages between 4340 and 4370 million years. This is essentially the same as the so-called model ages of the formation of KREEP (a chemical component enriched in potassium, rare earth elements, and phosphorous) and of the formation of the deep source regions that melted to produce mare basalts. The numerous ages close to 4370 million years suggests a complicated and protracted cooling of the primordial lunar magma ocean or a widespread vigorous period of magmatic activity in the Moon.

  12. Action spectra for photosynthetic inhibition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, M. M.; Flint, S.; Camp, L. B.

    1981-01-01

    The ultraviolet action spectrum for photosynthesis inhibition was determined to fall between that of the general DNA action spectrum and the generalized plant action spectrum. The characteristics of this action spectrum suggest that a combination of pronounced increase in effectiveness with decreasing wavelength, substantial specificity for the UV-B waveband, and very diminished response in the UV-A waveband result in large radiation amplification factors when the action spectra are used as weighting functions. Attempted determination of dose/response relationships for leaf disc inhibition provided inconclusive data from which to deconvolute an action spectrum.

  13. The Optical Spectra of Aerosols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    espressione dell’ampiezza di diffusione in * avanti vengono fattorizzati. In questo modo la somma delle am- piezze di diftusione di "cluster" con...F1D-Ali35 687 THE OPTICAL SPECTRA OF REROSOLSOU) MESSINA UNIV (ITALY) i/i 1ST DI STRIJTTURA DELLA IIATERIA F BORIIHESE OCT 83 UNCLASSIFIED DRR78--85F...ELEMENT PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS * Istituto di Struttura della Materia 61102A-1T161102-BH57-01 Un iversita di Messina V~nina. Ttalv St

  14. Front-surface absorbance spectra of wheat flour: determination of carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Zandomeneghi, M; Festa, C; Carbonaro, L; Galleschi, L; Lenzi, A; Calucci, L

    2000-06-01

    Front-surface absorbance spectra of wheat flours in the 250-650 nm region can be obtained by measuring reflectance spectra with a conventional spectrofluorometer suitably set to detect light scattered from powder samples. The spectra recorded on flour samples, obtained from seeds of four bread and five durum wheats, show high-intensity absorption bands due to aromatic amino acids of wheat proteins and low-intensity bands due to chromophores bound to low-molecular-weight compounds. The intensity of these last bands is proportional to the concentration of the corresponding chromophores present in the flour; thus, it can be used to measure the content of the compounds containing the chromophore(s). In particular, a quantitative determination of the carotenoids actually present in the flours is made, obtaining information on the original content of the seeds. This determination is important, as, for example, xanthophylls are well-known antioxidants and free-radical scavengers involved in aging processes of seeds. Reflectance measurements on powder samples are far more economic in terms of time and materials consumption than methods such as extraction and HPLC analysis of extracts and, in addition, give an evaluation of the overall content of carotenoids with absorption bands in the spectral range 450-500 nm. Application of the technique to other food powders with low-intensity absorption bands in the near-UV and vis region is possible.

  15. Method of processing positron lifetime spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Valuev, N.P.; Klimov, A.B.; Zhikharev, A.N.

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes a method for the processing of spectra of positron annihilation which permits a much more relaible determination of the lifetime during numerical processing of spectra by computer.

  16. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  17. Casimir experiments showing saturation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sernelius, Bo E.

    2009-10-15

    We address several different Casimir experiments where theory and experiment disagree. First out is the classical Casimir force measurement between two metal half spaces; here both in the form of the torsion pendulum experiment by Lamoreaux and in the form of the Casimir pressure measurement between a gold sphere and a gold plate as performed by Decca et al.; theory predicts a large negative thermal correction, absent in the high precision experiments. The third experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between a metal plate and a laser irradiated semiconductor membrane as performed by Chen et al.; the change in force with laser intensity is larger than predicted by theory. The fourth experiment is the measurement of the Casimir force between an atom and a wall in the form of the measurement by Obrecht et al. of the change in oscillation frequency of a {sup 87}Rb Bose-Einstein condensate trapped to a fused silica wall; the change is smaller than predicted by theory. We show that saturation effects can explain the discrepancies between theory and experiment observed in all these cases.

  18. Effect of Temperature on Jet Velocity Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Statistical jet noise prediction codes that accurately predict spectral directivity for both cold and hot jets are highly sought both in industry and academia. Their formulation, whether based upon manipulations of the Navier-Stokes equations or upon heuristic arguments, require substantial experimental observation of jet turbulence statistics. Unfortunately, the statistics of most interest involve the space-time correlation of flow quantities, especially velocity. Until the last 10 years, all turbulence statistics were made with single-point probes, such as hotwires or laser Doppler anemometry. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) brought many new insights with its ability to measure velocity fields over large regions of jets simultaneously; however, it could not measure velocity at rates higher than a few fields per second, making it unsuitable for obtaining temporal spectra and correlations. The development of time-resolved PIV, herein called TR-PIV, has removed this limitation, enabling measurement of velocity fields at high resolution in both space and time. In this paper, ground-breaking results from the application of TR-PIV to single-flow hot jets are used to explore the impact of heat on turbulent statistics of interest to jet noise models. First, a brief summary of validation studies is reported, undertaken to show that the new technique produces the same trusted results as hotwire at cold, low-speed jets. Second, velocity spectra from cold and hot jets are compared to see the effect of heat on the spectra. It is seen that heated jets possess 10 percent more turbulence intensity compared to the unheated jets with the same velocity. The spectral shapes, when normalized using Strouhal scaling, are insensitive to temperature if the stream-wise location is normalized relative to the potential core length. Similarly, second order velocity correlations, of interest in modeling of jet noise sources, are also insensitive to temperature as well.

  19. Visible Spectra of Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Nagarajan, R.; Maier, J. P.; Zhuang, X.; Le, A.; Steimle, T. C.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO) has been extensively studied spectroscopically due to its astrophysical relevance. TiO is the main opacity source in the atmospheres of cool M-type stars in the visible and near infrared. In view of the high cosmic abundance of Ti and O, titanium dioxide (TiO2) is believed to play an important role in dust formation processes from the gas-phase in circumstellar shells of oxygen-rich stars. The electronic spectra of a cold molecular beam of TiO2 have been investigated using mass-resolved resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. TiO2 was produced by laser ablation of a pure titanium rod in the presence of a supersonic expanding mixture of approximately 5% O2 in either helium or argon. The spectra were recorded in the region 17500 cm-1 to 22500 cm-1 and the bands assigned to the A1B2 ← X1A1 transition. The origin and harmonic vibrational constants for the A1B2 state were determined to be: T000 = 17593(5) cm-1, ω1 = 876(3) cm-1, ω2 = 184(1) cm-1, and ω3 = 316(2) cm-1. Further, the dispersed fluorescence of a few bands were recorded to obtain vibrational parameters for the X1A1 state.

  20. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  1. First dynamic spectra of stellar microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastian, T. S.; Bookbinder, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The VLA has been used in the spectral-line mode at 1.4 GHz to obtain the first dynamic spectra of stellar sources other than the sun. Two very intense, highly circularly polarized, microwave outbursts were observed on the dMe flare star UV Cet, in addition to a slowly varying, unpolarized component. One outburst was purely left circularly polarized and showed no variations as a function of frequency across the 41 MHz band, whereas the other was as much as 70 percent right-circularly polarized and showed distinct variations with frequency. Although the slowly varying emission is probably due to incoherent gyrosynchrotron emission, the two flaring events are the result of coherent mechanisms. The coherent emission is interpreted in terms of plasma radiation and the cyclotron maser instability.

  2. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  3. LSD-based analysis of high-resolution stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsymbal, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Van, Reeth T.

    2014-11-01

    We present a generalization of the method of least-squares deconvolution (LSD), a powerful tool for extracting high S/N average line profiles from stellar spectra. The generalization of the method is effected by extending it towards the multiprofile LSD and by introducing the possibility to correct the line strengths from the initial mask. We illustrate the new approach by two examples: (a) the detection of astroseismic signatures from low S/N spectra of single stars, and (b) disentangling spectra of multiple stellar objects. The analysis is applied to spectra obtained with 2-m class telescopes in the course of spectroscopic ground-based support for space missions such as CoRoT and Kepler. Usually, rather high S/N is required, so smaller telescopes can only compete successfully with more advanced ones when one can apply a technique that enables a remarkable increase in the S/N of the spectra which they observe. Since the LSD profiles have a potential for reconstruction what is common in all the spectral profiles, it should have a particular practical application to faint stars observed with 2-m class telescopes and whose spectra show remarkable LPVs.

  4. Ages of LMC star clusters using ASAD2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asa'd, Randa S.; Vazdekis, Alexandre; Zeinelabdin, Sami

    2016-04-01

    We use ASAD2, the new version of ASAD (Analyzer of Spectra for Age Determination), to obtain the age and reddening of 27 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) clusters from full fitting of integrated spectra using different statistical methods [χ2 and Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test] and a set of stellar population models including GALAXEV and MILES. We show that our results are in good agreement with the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) ages for both models, and that metallicity does not affect the age determination for the full spectrum fitting method regardless of the model used for ages with log (age/year) < 9. We discuss the results obtained by the two statistical results for both GALAXEV and MILES versus three factors: age, signal-to-noise ratio and resolution (full width at half maximum). The predicted reddening values when using the χ2 minimization method are within the range found in the literature for resolved clusters (i.e. <0.35); however the KS test can predict E(B - V) higher values. The sharp spectrum transition originated at ages around the supergiants contribution, at either side of the AGB peak around log (age/year) 9.0 and log (age/year) 7.8 are limiting our ability to provide values in agreement with the CMD estimates and as a result the reddening determination is not accurate. We provide the detailed results of four clusters spanning a wide range of ages. ASAD2 is a user-friendly program available for download on the Web and can be immediately used at http://randaasad.wordpress.com/asad-package/.

  5. Human platelet sulfotransferase shows seasonal rhythms.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, D; Palego, L; Mazzanti, C; Silvestri, S; Cassano, G B

    1995-04-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the possible presence of seasonal changes in platelet phenolsulfotransferase (ST) in a group of 20 healthy, drug-free subjects of both sexes between 24 and 37 years of age. Blood samples were taken four times a year in the period immediately following the equinoxes and the solstices. The results showed that both Sts underwent seasonal changes: the lowest values were found in autumn and in winter, and the highest in the summer. A positive correlation between the two STs and the length of the photoperiod was observed in winter whereas in the spring we detected a negative correlation between the TL ST and the photoperiod length. Future studies should clarify whether platelet ST of patients with mood disorders shows a similar seasonality.

  6. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  7. Reflectance Spectra of Space Debris in GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schildknecht, T.; Vannanti, A.; Krag, H.; Erd, C.

    The space debris environment in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) region is mostly investigated by means of optical surveys. Such surveys revealed a considerable amount of debris in the size range of 10 centimeter to one meter. Some of these debris exhibit particularly high area-to-mass ratios as derived from the evolution of their orbits. In order to understand the nature and eventually the origin of these objects, observations allowing to derive physical characteristics like size, shape and material are required. Information on the shape and the attitude motion of a debris piece may be obtained by photometric light curves. The most promising technique to investigate the surface material properties is reflectance spectroscopy. This paper discusses preliminary results obtained from spectrometric observations of space debris in GEO. The observations were acquired at the 1-meter ESA Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) on Tenerife with a low-resolution spectrograph in the wavelength range of 450-960 nm. The target objects were space debris of different types with brightness as small as magnitude 15. Some simple-shaped, intact "calibration objects" with known surface materials like the MSG-2 satellites were also observed. The spectra show shape variations expected to be caused by the different physical properties of the objects. The determination of the possible materials is still in a preliminary phase. Limitations of the acquisition process of the spectra and the subsequent analysis are discussed. Future steps planned for a better characterization of the debris from the observed data are briefly outlined.

  8. Equilibria and absorption spectra of tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Metzler, C M; Viswanath, R; Metzler, D E

    1991-05-25

    Tryptophanase (tryptophan: indole-lyase) from Escherichia coli has been isolated in the holoenzyme form and its absorption spectra and acid-base chemistry have been reevaluated. Apoenzyme has been prepared by dialysis against sodium phosphate and L-alanine and molar absorptivities of the coenzyme bands have been estimated by readdition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The spectrophotometric titration curve, whose midpoint is at pH 7.6 in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffers, indicates some degree of cooperativity in dissociation of a pair of protons. Resolution of the computed spectra of individual ionic forms of the enzyme with lognormal distribution curves shows that band shapes are similar to those of model Schiff bases and of aspartate aminotransferase. Using molar areas from the latter we estimated amounts of individual tautomeric species. In addition to ketoenamine and enolimine or covalent adduct the high pH form also appears to contain approximately 18% of a species with a dipolar ionic ring (protonated on the ring nitrogen and with phenolate -O-). We suggest that this may be the catalytically active form of the coenzyme in tryptophanase. The equilibrium between tryptophanase and L-alanine has also been reevaluated.

  9. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  10. Serial FBG sensor network allowing overlapping spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbenseth, S.; Lochmann, S.; Ahrens, A.; Rehm, B.

    2016-05-01

    For structure or material monitoring low impact serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) networks have attracted increasing research interest. Common sensor networks using wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) for FBG interrogation are limited in their efficiency by the spectral width of their light source, the FBG tuning range and the spectral guard bands. Overlapping spectra are strictly forbidden in this case. Applying time division multiplexing (TDM) or active resonator schemes may overcome these restrictions. However, they introduce other substantial disadvantages like signal roundtrip dependency or sophisticated control of active resonating structures. Code division multiplexing (CDM) as a means of FBG interrogation by simple autocorrelation of appropriate codes has been shown to be superior in this respect. However, it came at the cost of a second spectrometer introducing additional equalization efforts. We demonstrate a new serial FBG sensor network utilizing CDM signal processing for efficient sensor interrogation without the need of a second spectrometer and additional state of polarization (SOP) controlling components. It allows overlapping spectra even when all sensing FBGs are positioned at the same centre wavelength and it shows a high degree of insensitivity to SOP. Sequence inversed keyed (SIK) serial signal processing utilizing quasi-orthogonal balanced codes ensures simple and quick sensor interrogation with high signal-to-interference/noise ratio.

  11. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  12. Spectra from pair-equilibrium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model of relativistic nonmagnetized plasma with uniform temperature and electron density distributions is considered, and spectra from plasma in pair equilibrium are studied. A range of dimensionless temperature (T) greater than about 0.2 is considered. The spectra from low pair density plasmas in pair equilibrium vary from un-Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra at Thomson cross section tau(N) much less than one to Comptonized bremsstrahlung spectra with tau(N) over one. For high pair density plasmas the spectra are flat for T greater than about one, and have broad intensity peaks at energy roughly equal to 3T for T less than one. In the latter region the total luminosity is approximately twice the annihilation luminosity. All spectra are flat in the X-ray region, in contradiction to observed AGN spectra. For dimensionless luminosity greater than about 100, the cooling time becomes shorter than the Thomson time.

  13. Power spectra of solar convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, D.-Y.; Labonte, B. J.; Braun, D. C.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of convective motions on the sun are studied using Kitt Peak Doppler images and power spectra of convection. The power peaks at a scale of about 29,000 km and drops off smoothly with wavenumber. There is no evidence of apparent energy excess at the scale of the mesogranulation proposed by other authors. The vertical and horizontal power for each wavenumber are obtained and used to calculate the vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation. The amplitude of vertical and horizontal velocities of the supergranulation are 0.034 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.38 (+ or - 0.01) km/s, respectively. The corresponding rms values are 0.024 (+ or - 0.002) km/s and 0.27 (+ or - 0.01) km/s.

  14. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  15. Pressure spectra and cross spectra at an area contraction in a ducted combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Raftopoulos, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    Pressure spectra and cross-spectra at an area contraction in a liquid fuel, ducted, combustion noise test facility are analyzed. Measurements made over a range of air and fuel flows are discussed. Measured spectra are compared with spectra calculated using a simple analytical model.

  16. Submillimeter Spectra of Low Temperature Gases and Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wishnow, E H; Gush, H P; Halpern M; Ozier, I

    2002-09-19

    Submillimeter absorption spectra of nitrogen, nitrogen-argon mixtures, and methane have been measured using temperatures and pressures near to those found in the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. The experiments show the spectral signature of dimers which will likely appear in far-infrared spectra of Titan that will be obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The recent CIRS spectrum of Jupiter shows far-infrared spectral lines of methane and the corresponding lines are observed in the laboratory. We are extending this work to lower frequencies using a new differential Michelson interferometer that operates over the frequency region 3-30 cm{sup -1}.

  17. Submillimeter Spectra of Low Temperature Gases and Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wishnow, E. H.; Gush, H. P.; Halpern, M.; Ozier, I.

    2002-01-01

    Submillimeter absorption spectra of nitrogen, nitrogen-argon mixtures, and methane have been measured using temperatures and pressures near to those found in the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn. The experiments show the spectral signature of dimers which will likely appear in far-infrared spectra of Titan that will be obtained by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The recent CIRS spectrum of Jupiter shows far-infrared spectral lines of methane and the corresponding lines are observed in the laboratory. We are extending this work to lower frequencies using a new differential Michelson interferometer that operates over the frequency region 3-30 1/cm..

  18. Line Coupling in Atmospheric Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipping, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical modeling of atmospheric spectra is important for a number of different applications: for instance, in the determination of minor atmospheric constituents such as ozone, carbon dioxide, CFC's etc.; in monitoring the temperature profile for climate studies; and in measuring the incoming and outgoing radiation to input into global climate models. In order to accomplish the above mentioned goal, one needs to know the spectral parameters characterizing the individual spectral lines (frequency, width, strength, and shape) as well as the physical parameters of the atmosphere (temperature, abundances, and pressure). When all these parameters are known, it is usually assumed that the resultant spectra and concomitant absorption coefficient can then be calculated by a superposition of individual profiles of appropriate frequency, strength and shape. However, this is not true if the lines are 'coupled'. Line coupling is a subtle effect that takes place when lines of a particular molecule overlap in frequency. In this case when the initial states and the final states of two transitions are connected by collisions, there is a quantum interference resulting in perturbed shapes. In general, this results in the narrowing of Q-branches (those in which the rotational quantum number does not change), and vibration-rotational R- and P branches (those in which the rotational quantum number changes by +/- 1), and in the spectral region beyond band heads (regions where the spectral lines pile up due to centrifugal distortion). Because these features and spectral regions are often those of interest in the determination of the abundances and pressure-temperature profiles, one must take this effect into account in atmospheric models.

  19. Ultraviolet Spectra of Two Magnetic White Dwarfs and Ultraviolet Spectra of Subluminous Objects Found in the Kiso Schmidt Survey and Ultraviolet Absorptions in the Spectra of DA White Dwarfds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Research under NASA Grant NAG5-287 has carried out a number of projects in conjunction with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. These include: (1) studies of the UV spectra of DA white dwarfs which show quasi-molecular bands of H2 and H2(+); (2) the peculiar star HR6560; (3) the UV spectra of two magnetic white dwarfs that also show the quasi-molecular features; (4) investigations of the UV spectra of subluminous stars, primarily identified from visual wavelength spectroscopy in the Kiso survey of UV excess stars, some of which show interesting metal lines in their UV spectra; and (5) completion of studies of UV spectra of DB stars. The main result of this research has been to further knowledge of the structure and compositions of subluminous stars which helps cast light on their formation and evolution.

  20. 5 - 14 μm Spitzer spectra of the Themis and Veritas asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Zoe A.; Licandro, Javier; Campins, Humberto; Ziffer, Julie; de Prá, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic studies of primitive asteroid families provide constraints on the composition of the solar nebula and the distribution of volatiles in the asteroid belt. Results from visible and near-infrared spectroscopy show diversity between primitive families. We aim to better constrain the composition of two primitive families with very different ages: Themis (~2.5 Gyr) and Veritas (~8 Myr). We analyzed 5 - 14 μm Spitzer Space Telescope spectra of 11 Themis asteroids and nine Veritas asteroids, for a total of 20 asteroids. We report the presence of a broad 10-μm emission feature, attributed to a layer of fine-grained silicates, in the spectra of all 11 Themis asteroids and six of nine Veritas asteroids in our sample. Spectral contrast in statistically significant detections of the 10-μm feature ranges from 1% ± 0.1% to 8.5% ± 0.9%. Comparison with the spectra of primitive meteorites (McAdam et al. 2015, Icarus, 245, 320) suggests asteroids in both families are similar to meteorites with lower abundances of phyllosilicates. We used the Near-Earth Asteroid Thermal Model to derive diameters, beaming parameters and albedos for our sample. Asteroids in both families have beaming parameters near unity and low to moderate albedos. We find that contrast of the silicate emission feature is not correlated with asteroid diameter; however, higher 10-μm contrast may be associated with flatter spectral slopes in the near-infrared. The spectra of both families are consistent with icy bodies with some amount of fine-grained silicates, but with coarser grains or denser surface structure than Trojan asteroids and comets. The range of spectral contrast of the 10-μm emission feature within each family suggests diversity in regolith porosity and/or grain size.

  1. Cassini UVIS Observations Show Active Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L.; Colwell, J. E.; UVIS Team

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) is part of the remote sensing payload of the NASA/ESA Cassini spacecraft. This spectrograph includes channels for extreme UV and far UV spectroscopic imaging, high speed photometry of stellar occultations, solar EUV occultation, and a hydrogen/deuterium absorption cell. We report our initial results from UVIS observations of Saturn's rings. Dynamic interactions between neutrals, ions, rings, moons and meteoroids produce a highly structured and time variable Saturn system Oxygen in the Saturn system dominates the magnetosphere. Observed fluctuations indicate close interactions with plasma sources. Stochastic events in the E ring may be the ultimate source. The spectral signature of water ice is seen on Phoebe and in Saturn's rings. Water ice is mixed non-uniformly with darker constituents. The high structure of the UV ring reflectance argues that collisional transport dominates ballistic transport in darkening the rings. Our preliminary results support the idea that rings are recycled fragments of moons: the current processes are more important than history and initial conditions. The spectra along the UVIS SOI radial scan indicate varying amounts of water ice. In the A ring, the ice fraction increases outward to a maximum at the outer edge. This large-scale variation is consistent with initially pure ice that has suffered meteoritic bombardment over the age of the Solar system (Cuzzi and Estrada 1998). We also see variations over scales of 1000 - 3000 km, which cannot be explained by this mechanism. Ballistic transport of spectrally neutral extrinsic pollutants from meteoroids striking the rings has a typical throw distance of 6000 km (Durisen et al 1989), too long to explain this finer structure. We propose a class of smaller renewal events, in which a small moon residing within the rings is shattered by an external impactor (Colwell and Esposito 1993, Barbara and Esposito 2002, Esposito and Colwell 2003). The

  2. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  3. Vibrationally high-resolved electronic spectra of MCl2 (M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and photoelectron spectra of MCl2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Yibin; Pang, Min; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing

    2016-10-01

    We systematically studied the vibrational-resolved electronic spectra of group IV dichlorides using the Franck-Condon approximation combined with the Duschinsky and Herzberg-Teller effects in harmonic and anharmonic frameworks (only the simulation of absorption spectra includes the anharmonicity). Calculated results showed that the band shapes of simulated spectra are in accordance with those of the corresponding experimental or theoretical ones. We found that the symmetric bend mode in progression of absorption is the most active one, whereas the main contributor in photoelectron spectra is the symmetric stretching mode. Moreover, the Duschinsky and anharmonic effects exert weak influence on the absorption spectra, except for PbCl2 molecule. The theoretical insights presented in this work are significant in understanding the photophysical properties of MCl2 (M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and studying the Herzberg-Teller and the anharmonic effects on the absorption spectra of new dichlorides of this main group.

  4. General computational spectroscopic framework applied to Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum K-shell argon spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M L; Sinars, D B; Scott, H A

    2005-01-10

    We describe a general computational spectroscopic framework for interpreting observed spectra. The framework compares synthetic spectra with measured spectra, then optimizes the agreement using the Dakota toolkit to minimize a merit function that incorporates established spectroscopic techniques. We generate synthetic spectra using the self-consistent nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium atomic kinetics and radiative transfer code Cretin, relativistic atomic structure and cross section data from Hullac, and detailed spectral line shapes from Totalb. We test the capabilities of both our synthetic spectra model and general spectroscopic framework by analyzing a K-shell argon spectrum from a Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion experiment. The framework obtains close agreement between an experimental spectrum measured by a time integrated focusing spectrometer and the optimal synthetic spectrum. The synthetic spectra show that considering the spatial extent of the capsule and including the effects of optically thick resonance lines significantly affects the interpretation of measured spectra.

  5. Use of thin ionization calorimeters for measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Ormes, J. S.; Schmidt, W. K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of performing measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra with a thin ionization calorimeter was investigated. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine whether energy response fluctuations would cause measured spectra to be different from the primary spectra. First, Gaussian distributions were assumed for the calorimeter energy resolutions. The second method employed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of cascades from an isotropic flux of protons. The results show that as long as the energy resolution does not change significantly with energy, the spectral indices can be reliably determined even for sigma sub e/e = 50%. However, if the energy resolution is strongly energy dependent, the measured spectra do not reproduce the true spectra. Energy resolutions greatly improving with energy result in measured spectra that are too steep, while resolutions getting much worse with energy cause the measured spectra to be too flat.

  6. The mid-infrared transmission spectra of Antarctic ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-IR (4000-450/cm; 2.5-22.2 microns) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000/cm (10 microns) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-IR ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites.

  7. Phonon spectra of plutonium at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado, Boris; Bottin, François; Bouchet, Johann

    2017-03-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are used to investigate the vibrational properties of the high-temperature δ and ɛ phases of plutonium. We combine the local-density approximation (LDA)+U for strong electron correlations and the temperature-dependent effective potential method in order to calculate the phonon spectra of the two phases, as well as their dependence on temperature. Our results show that the ɛ phase can only be stabilized when temperature and correlations are simultaneously accounted for. We are also able to quantify the degree of anharmonicity of the two phases. While the δ phase is fairly harmonic up to 1000 K, we find that the ɛ phase is strongly anharmonic, which explains why this structure dominates the phase diagram at high temperature.

  8. Optical absorption spectra of dications of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, J.A.; Wei, C.C.; Jeevarajan, A.S.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-04-04

    Quantitative optical absorption spectra of the cation radicals and the dications of canthaxanthin (I), {beta}carotene (II), 7`-cyano-7`-ethoxycarbonyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (III), and 7`,7`-dimethyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (IV) in dichloromethane solution are reported. Exclusive formation of dications occurs when the carotenoids are oxidized with ferric chloride. Addition of neutral carotenoid to the dications results in equilibrium formation of cation radicals. Oxidation with iodine in dichloromethane affords only cation radicals; electrochemical oxidation under suitable conditions yields both dications and cation radicals. Values of the optical parameters depend on the nature of the oxidative medium. The oscillator strengths calculated for gas phase cation radicals and dications of I-IV using the INDO/S method show the same trend as the experimental values. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  10. DETERMINING AGES OF APOGEE GIANTS WITH KNOWN DISTANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Feuillet, Diane K.; Holtzman, Jon; Bovy, Jo; Girardi, Léo; MacDonald, Nick; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.

    2016-01-20

    We present a sample of 705 local giant stars observed using the New Mexico State University 1 m telescope with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III/Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) spectrograph, for which we estimate stellar ages and the local star formation history (SFH). The high-resolution (R ∼ 22,500), near infrared (1.51–1.7 μm) APOGEE spectra provide measurements of stellar atmospheric parameters (temperature, surface gravity, [M/H], and [α/M]). Due to the smaller uncertainties in surface gravity possible with high-resolution spectra and accurate Hipparcos distance measurements, we are able to calculate the stellar masses to within 30%. For giants, the relatively rapid evolution up the red giant branch allows the age to be constrained by the mass. We examine methods of estimating age using both the mass–age relation directly and a Bayesian isochrone matching of measured parameters, assuming a constant SFH. To improve the SFH prior, we use a hierarchical modeling approach to constrain the parameters of the model SFH using the age probability distribution functions of the data. The results of an α-dependent Gaussian SFH model show a clear age–[α/M] relation at all ages. Using this SFH model as the prior for an empirical Bayesian analysis, we determine ages for individual stars. The resulting age–metallicity relation is flat, with a slight decrease in [M/H] at the oldest ages and a ∼0.5 dex spread in metallicity across most ages. For stars with ages ≲1 Gyr we find a smaller spread, consistent with radial migration having a smaller effect on these young stars than on the older stars.

  11. Interpretation of Anomalous Ultraviolet Transitions of Fe II Observed in Laboratory Fourier Transform Spectra and Stellar HST and IUE Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Sveneric; Brage, Tomas; Leckrone, David S.; Nave, Gillian; Wahlgren, Glenn M.

    1995-06-01

    We discuss LS-forbidden ΔS = 2 transitions of Fe II that appear as strong lines in ultraviolet stellar and laboratory spectra. The lines occur because of indirect level mixing-two close energy levels, W2P3/2 and x6P3/2, are mixed through a third level acting as a catalyst. In transition multiplets, that involve either the w2P3/2 or the x6P3/2 level, the normal component is accompanied by a close, parasite component. These components are well resolved in laboratory Fourier transform spectra, from which accurate intensity ratios can be measured. Spectra of the HgMn star χ Lupi recorded with the Hubble Space Telescope, show the normal and the parasite components resolved for the first time in stellar spectra. These have been used together with laboratory spectra to derive oscillator strengths for four multiplets and the mixing coefficients for the two interacting energy levels. We also provide improved spectroscopic data for all Fe ii multiplets that include the w2P3/2 and x6P3/2 levels. The level mixing involves the UV 191 multiplet of Fe II around 1780 Å, which is shown to have one parasite component. This multiplet is known to be a prominent emission feature in spectra of various objects, e.g., cool star chromospheres and symbiotic stars. As an example, we show IUE spectra of the eclipsing binary 32 Cyg, which provides perfect conditions for fluorescence experiments, and discuss possible excitation mechanisms of UV 191. Based on second-order perturbation theory and multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, an atomic three-level model is constructed. This model explains the contradiction found when applying first-order perturbation theory, viz., two close energy levels perturbing each other without causing a repulsion.

  12. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo P.; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of atomic, ionic and molecular species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic both in measuring the spectra and in their interpretation, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, and for this reason, it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS in spectroscopy (Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013

  13. The far-ultraviolet spectra of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burstein, David; Bertola, F.; Buson, L. M.; Faber, S. M.; Lauer, Tod R.

    1988-01-01

    New and revised ultraviolet energy distributions ar presented based on 97 IUE spectra of 31 early-type galaxies and the bulge of M31. Based on optical spectra and morphology, the sample galaxies are divided into star-forming galaxies, active galaxies, and quiescent galaxies. A well-defined nonlinear relationship between (1550-V) color and Mg2 for the 24 quiescent galaxies is obtained. The ultraviolet spectra of these galaxies can be modeled as a sum of two components: a normal, cool stellar population of main-sequence and giant branch stars that is redder at high Mg2, plus a very blue population having a steeply rising UV flux below 2000 A that increases in strength with metallicity. The UV spectra of star-forming galaxies are significantly flatter than the very blue component of quiescent galxies and are consistent with aging bursts of star formation. Two sample population models are explored for the blue stellar component of quiescent galaxies: postasymptotic giant branch stars and young stars from continuing star formation.

  14. Interpretation of Nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran Vibrational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Lyubimov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The structures of four possible stereoisomers of the closed form of photochromic nitroindolinospirobenzothiopyran (NISTP) {1',3'-dihydro-1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1-benzothiopyran-2,2'-(2H)-indoline]} were determined by the DFT method. The geometry of the most stable isomer was defined. Nitro-substitution changes mainly the lengths of bonds formed by S and N with spiro-atom Cs. According to the calculations, the CsS bond changes most and lengthens by 0.019 Å. It is shown that the S atom has large displacement amplitudes in normal modes assigned to Raman lines at 230, 285, 360, and 575 cm-1 and weak IR bands at 467 and 577 cm-1. Oscillations involving the nitro group are very active in Raman and IR spectra. Their frequencies are slightly lower than similar frequencies of nitrobenzene and nitroindolinospirobenzopyran, indicating a higher degree of vibrational coupling of the NO2 group with the NISTP molecular skeleton.

  15. Reflectance spectra of subarctic lichens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petzold, Donald E.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1988-01-01

    Lichens constitute a major portion of the ground cover of high latitude environments, but little has been reported concerning their in situ solar spectral reflectance properties. Knowledge of these properties is important for the interpretation of remotely sensed observations from high latitude regions, as well as in studies of high latitude ecology and energy balance climatology. The spectral reflectance of common boreal vascular plants is similar to that of vascular plants of the midlatitudes. The dominant lichens, in contrast, display variable reflectance patterns in visible wavelengths. The relative reflectance peak at 0.55 microns, common to green vegetation, is absent or indistinct in spectra of pervasive boreal forest and tundra lichens, despite the presence of chlorophyll in the inner algal cells. Lichens of the dominant genus, Cladina, display strong absorption of ultraviolet energy and short-wavelength blue light relative to their absorption in other visible wavelengths. Since the Cladinae dominate both the surface vegetation in open woodlands of the boreal forest and the low arctic tundra, their unusual spectral reflectance patterns will enable accurate monitoring of the boreal forest-tundra ecotone and detection of its vigor and movement in the future.

  16. Educational Outreach: The Space Science Road Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.

    2002-01-01

    The poster presented will give an overview of a study towards a "Space Road Show". The topic of this show is space science. The target group is adolescents, aged 12 to 15, at Dutch high schools. The show and its accompanying experiments would be supported with suitable educational material. Science teachers at schools can decide for themselves if they want to use this material in advance, afterwards or not at all. The aims of this outreach effort are: to motivate students for space science and engineering, to help them understand the importance of (space) research, to give them a positive feeling about the possibilities offered by space and in the process give them useful knowledge on space basics. The show revolves around three main themes: applications, science and society. First the students will get some historical background on the importance of space/astronomy to civilization. Secondly they will learn more about novel uses of space. On the one hand they will learn of "Views on Earth" involving technologies like Remote Sensing (or Spying), Communication, Broadcasting, GPS and Telemedicine. On the other hand they will experience "Views on Space" illustrated by past, present and future space research missions, like the space exploration missions (Cassini/Huygens, Mars Express and Rosetta) and the astronomy missions (Soho and XMM). Meanwhile, the students will learn more about the technology of launchers and satellites needed to accomplish these space missions. Throughout the show and especially towards the end attention will be paid to the third theme "Why go to space"? Other reasons for people to get into space will be explored. An important question in this is the commercial (manned) exploration of space. Thus, the questions of benefit of space to society are integrated in the entire show. It raises some fundamental questions about the effects of space travel on our environment, poverty and other moral issues. The show attempts to connect scientific with

  17. Perception of Stop Onset Spectra in Chinese Children with Phonological Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Wenli; Yue, Guoan

    2012-01-01

    The ability to identify stop consonants from brief onset spectra was compared between a group of Chinese children with phonological dyslexia (the PD group, with a mean age of 10 years 4 months) and a group of chronological age-matched control children. The linguistic context, which included vowels and speakers, and durations of stop onset spectra…

  18. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  19. Non-linear power spectra in the synchronous gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim; Jeong, Donghui; Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Biern, Sang Gyu E-mail: hr@kasi.re.kr E-mail: jinn-ouk.gong@apctp.org

    2015-05-01

    We study the non-linear corrections to the matter and velocity power spectra in the synchronous gauge (SG). For the leading correction to the non-linear power spectra, we consider the perturbations up to third order in a zero-pressure fluid in a flat cosmological background. Although the equations in the SG happen to coincide with those in the comoving gauge (CG) to linear order, they differ from second order. In particular, the second order hydrodynamic equations in the SG are apparently in the Lagrangian form, whereas those in the CG are in the Eulerian form. The non-linear power spectra naively presented in the original SG show rather pathological behavior quite different from the result of the Newtonian theory even on sub-horizon scales. We show that the pathology in the nonlinear power spectra is due to the absence of the convective terms in, thus the Lagrangian nature of, the SG. We show that there are many different ways of introducing the corrective convective terms in the SG equations. However, the convective terms (Eulerian modification) can be introduced only through gauge transformations to other gauges which should be the same as the CG to the second order. In our previous works we have shown that the density and velocity perturbation equations in the CG exactly coincide with the Newtonian equations to the second order, and the pure general relativistic correction terms starting to appear from the third order are substantially suppressed compared with the relativistic/Newtonian terms in the power spectra. As a result, we conclude that the SG per se is an inappropriate coordinate choice in handling the non-linear matter and velocity power spectra of the large-scale structure where observations meet with theories.

  20. ALIEN: A nebular spectra analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, R.; Vazquez, R.

    2000-11-01

    A new C-coded software, designed to analyze nebular spectra, is presented. T his software is able to read the fluxes of the most important ions directly from IRAF's output file (splot.log). Spectra can be dereddened using the Balmer lines ratio and the Seaton's extinction law. Electron temperature and density, as well as ionic abundances by number are estimated by means of numeric calculations based on the five-level atom model. The dereddened spectra and the table containing the ionic abundances can be saved in a LaTex formatted file. This software has been initially designed to work with a low dispersion spectra.

  1. Near-Infrared Spectra of Uranian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, C. C.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Mazuk, S.; Puetter, R. C.

    2001-05-01

    We present 0.8 to 2.5 micron spectra taken on June 21 & 22, 1998 UT of the Uranian satellites Miranda, Titania, Ariel, Oberon, and Umbriel. The spectra were taken using The Aerospace Corporation's Near-Infrared Imaging Spectragraph (NIRIS) on the University of California's Lick Observatory 3 meter Shane telescope. These spectra will be compared with previous work including Brown, R.H. and Cruikshank, D.P. (1983) as well as more recent spectra and analysis by Grundy, W. et al. (1999). Support for this research was provided by The Aerospace Corporation's Independent Research and Development Program.

  2. [Describing language of spectra and rough set].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Hu, Zhan-yi; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2002-06-01

    It is the traditional way to analyze spectra by experiences in astronomical field. And until now there has never been a suitable theoretical frame to describe spectra, which is may be owing to small spectra datasets that astronomers can get by low-level instruments. With the high-speed development of telescopes, especially on behalf of LAMOST, a large telescope which can collect more than 20,000 spectra in an observing night, spectra datasets are becoming larger and larger very fast. Facing these voluminous datasets, the traditional spectra-processing way simply depending on experiences becomes unfit. In this paper, we develop a brand-new language--describing language of spectra (DLS) to describe spectra of celestial bodies by defining BE (Basic element). And based on DLS, we introduce the method of RSDA (Rough set and data analysis), which is a technique of data mining. By RSDA we extract some rules of stellar spectra, and this experiment can be regarded as an application of DLS.

  3. Laser Spectra and efficiencies of pyrazolo derivatives of coumarins

    SciTech Connect

    Padhye, M.R.; Varadarajan, T.S.; Deshpande, A.V.

    1985-09-01

    Of the new laser dyes of coumarin series reported earlier, pyrazolo derivatives have been further studied. The paper reports their laser spectra and efficiencies in various solvents compared to a standard coumarin laser dye C/sub 515/. One of the derivatives shows comparable output under optimum concentration conditions as compared to the standard.

  4. Healthy Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Contact Us Text size | Print | Healthy Aging This information in Spanish ( en español ) A healthy ... Aging email updates. Enter email address Submit Healthy Aging news Accessibility | Privacy policy | Disclaimers | FOIA | Link to ...

  5. Consistent cosmic microwave background spectra from quantum depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Casadio, Roberto; Orlandi, Alessio; Kühnel, Florian E-mail: florian.kuhnel@fysik.su.se

    2015-09-01

    Following a new quantum cosmological model proposed by Dvali and Gomez, we quantitatively investigate possible modifications to the Hubble parameter and following corrections to the cosmic microwave background spectrum. In this model, scalar and tensor perturbations are generated by the quantum depletion of the background inflaton and graviton condensate respectively. We show how the inflaton mass affects the power spectra and the tensor-to-scalar ratio. Masses approaching the Planck scale would lead to strong deviations, while standard spectra are recovered for an inflaton mass much smaller than the Planck mass.

  6. Atomic transition probabilities of Ce I from Fourier transform spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitz, D. E.; Lawler, J. E.; Chisholm, J.; Wood, M. P.; Sobeck, J.; den Hartog, E. A.

    2010-03-01

    We report transition probabilities for 2874 lines of CeI in the wavelength range 360 -- 1500 nm. These are derived from new branching fraction measurements on Fourier transform spectra normalized with recently-reported radiative lifetimes (Den Hartog et al., J. Phys. B 42, 085006 (2009)). We have analyzed the decay branches for 153 upper levels in 14 different spectra recorded under a variety of discharge lamp conditions. Comparison of results with previous less extensive investigations shows good agreement for lines studied in common. Accurate Ce I transition probabilities are needed for applications in astrophysics and in lighting research, particularly for the development of improved metal halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  7. Partitioning Ocean Wave Spectra Obtained from Radar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaye, Lauriane; Vergely, Jean-Luc; Hauser, Daniele; Guitton, Gilles; Mouche, Alexis; Tison, Celine

    2016-08-01

    2D wave spectra of ocean waves can be partitioned into several wave components to better characterize the scene. We present here two methods of component detection: one based on watershed algorithm and the other based on a Bayesian approach. We tested both methods on a set of simulated SWIM data, the Ku-band real aperture radar embarked on the CFOSAT (China- France Oceanography Satellite) mission which launch is planned mid-2018. We present the results and the limits of both approaches and show that Bayesian method can also be applied to other kind of wave spectra observations as those obtained with the radar KuROS, an airborne radar wave spectrometer.

  8. Star Shows It Has The Right Stuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an observation by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to make the best case yet that a star can be engulfed by its companion star and survive. This discovery will help astronomers better understand how closely coupled stars, and perhaps even stars and planets, evolve when one of the stars expands enormously in its red giant phase. The binary star system known as V471 Tauri comprises a white dwarf star (the primary) in a close orbit -- one thirtieth of the distance between Mercury and the Sun -- with a normal Sun-like star (the secondary). Chandra's data showed that the hot upper atmosphere of the secondary star has a deficit of carbon atoms relative to nitrogen atoms. "This deficit of carbon atoms is the first clear observational evidence that the normal star was engulfed by its companion in the past," according to Jeremy Drake of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, MA, who coauthored an article on V471 in The Astrophysical Journal Letters with Marek Sarna of the N. Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland. The white dwarf star was once a star several times as massive as the Sun. Nuclear fusion reactions in the core of such a star convert carbon into nitrogen over a period of about a billion years. When the fuel in the core of the star is exhausted, the core collapses, triggering more energetic nuclear reactions that cause the star to expand and transform into a red giant before eventually collapsing to become a white dwarf. The carbon-poor material in the core of the red giant is mixed with outer part of the star, so its atmosphere shows a deficit of carbon, as compared with Sun-like stars. The X-ray spectra of a red giant star (top panel) and a Sun-like star (bottom panel) show the large difference in the peaks due to carbon atoms in the two stars. Theoretical calculations indicate that a red giant in a binary system can completely envelop its companion star and dramatically affect its evolution. During this common envelope

  9. Comparative Modelling of the Spectra of Cool Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebzelter, T.; Heiter, U.; Abia, C.; Eriksson, K.; Ireland, M.; Neilson, H.; Nowotny, W; Maldonado, J; Merle, T.; Peterson, R.; Plez, B.; Short, C. I.; Wahlgren, G. M.; Worley, C.; Aringer, B.; Bladh, S.; de Laverny, P.; Goswami, A.; Mora, A.; Norris, R. P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Scholz, M.; Thevenin, F.; Tsuji, T.; Kordopatis, G.

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to extract information from the spectra of stars depends on reliable models of stellar atmospheres and appropriate techniques for spectral synthesis. Various model codes and strategies for the analysis of stellar spectra are available today. Aims. We aim to compare the results of deriving stellar parameters using different atmosphere models and different analysis strategies. The focus is set on high-resolution spectroscopy of cool giant stars. Methods. Spectra representing four cool giant stars were made available to various groups and individuals working in the area of spectral synthesis, asking them to derive stellar parameters from the data provided. The results were discussed at a workshop in Vienna in 2010. Most of the major codes currently used in the astronomical community for analyses of stellar spectra were included in this experiment. Results. We present the results from the different groups, as well as an additional experiment comparing the synthetic spectra produced by various codes for a given set of stellar parameters. Similarities and differences of the results are discussed. Conclusions. Several valid approaches to analyze a given spectrum of a star result in quite a wide range of solutions. The main causes for the differences in parameters derived by different groups seem to lie in the physical input data and in the details of the analysis method. This clearly shows how far from a definitive abundance analysis we still are.

  10. Spectral classification with the International Ultraviolet Explorer: An atlas of B-type spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rountree, Janet; Sonneborn, George

    1993-01-01

    New criteria for the spectral classification of B stars in the ultraviolet show that photospheric absorption lines in the 1200-1900A wavelength region can be used to classify the spectra of B-type dwarfs, subgiants, and giants on a 2-D system consistent with the optical MK system. This atlas illustrates a large number of such spectra at the scale used for classification. These spectra provide a dense matrix of standard stars, and also show the effects of rapid stellar rotation and stellar winds on the spectra and their classification. The observational material consists of high-dispersion spectra from the International Ultraviolet Explorer archives, resampled to a resolution of 0.25 A, uniformly normalized, and plotted at 10 A/cm. The atlas should be useful for the classification of other IUE high-dispersion spectra, especially for stars that have not been observed in the optical.

  11. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  12. Universality of vibrational spectra of globular proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    It is shown that the density of modes of the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal, i.e. regardless of the protein in question, it closely follows one universal curve. The present study, including 135 proteins analyzed with a full atomic empirical potential (CHARMM22) and using the full complement of all atoms Cartesian degrees of freedom, goes far beyond previous claims of universality, confirming that universality holds even in the frequency range that is well above 100 cm-1 (300-4000 cm-1), where peaks and turns in the density of states are faithfully reproduced from one protein to the next. We also characterize fluctuations of the spectral density from the average, paving the way to a meaningful discussion of rare, unusual spectra and the structural reasons for the deviations in such ‘outlier’ proteins. Since the method used for the derivation of the vibrational modes (potential energy formulation, set of degrees of freedom employed, etc) has a dramatic effect on the spectral density, another significant implication of our findings is that the universality can provide an exquisite tool for assessing and improving the quality of potential functions and the quality of various models used for NMA computations. Finally, we show that the input configuration also affects the density of modes, thus emphasizing the importance of simplified potential energy formulations that are minimized at the outset. In summary, our findings call for a serious two-way dialogue between theory and experiment: experimental spectra of proteins could now guide the fine tuning of theoretical empirical potentials, and the various features and peaks observed in theoretical studies—being universal, and hence now rising in importance—would hopefully spur experimental confirmation.

  13. Prediction of electroencephalographic spectra from neurophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Rennie, C. J.; Wright, J. J.; Bahramali, H.; Gordon, E.; Rowe, D. L.

    2001-02-01

    A recent neurophysical model of propagation of electrical waves in the cortex is extended to include a physiologically motivated subcortical feedback loop via the thalamus. The electroencephalographic spectrum when the system is driven by white noise is then calculated analytically in terms of physiological parameters, including the effects of filtering of signals by the cerebrospinal fluid, skull, and scalp. The spectral power at low frequencies is found to vary as f-1 when awake and f-3 when asleep, with a breakpoint to a steeper power-law tail at frequencies above about 20 Hz in both cases; the f-1 range concurs with recent magnetoencephalographic observations of such a regime. Parameter sensitivities are explored, enabling a model with fewer free parameters to be proposed, and showing that spectra predicted for physiologically reasonable parameter values strongly resemble those observed in the laboratory. Alpha and beta peaks seen near 10 Hz and twice that frequency, respectively, in the relaxed wakeful state are generated via subcortical feedback in this model, thereby leading to predictions of their frequencies in terms of physiological parameters, and of correlations in their occurrence. Subcortical feedback is also predicted to be responsible for production of anticorrelated peaks in deep sleep states that correspond to the occurrence of theta rhythm at around half the alpha frequency and sleep spindles at 3/2 times the alpha frequency. An additional positively correlated waking peak near three times the alpha frequency is also predicted and tentatively observed, as are two new types of sleep spindle near 5/2 and 7/2 times the alpha frequency, and anticorrelated with alpha. These results provide a theoretical basis for the conventional division of EEG spectra into frequency bands, but imply that the exact bounds of these bands depend on the individual. Three types of potential instability are found: one at zero frequency, another in the theta band at around

  14. An analysis of scattered light in low dispersion IUE spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basri, G.; Clarke, J. T.; Haisch, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed numerical simulation of light scattering from the low-resolution grating in the short wavelength spectrograph of the IUE Observatory was developed, in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of scattering on both continuum and line emission spectra. It is found that: (1) the redistribution of light by grating scattering did not appreciably alter either the shape or the absolute flux level of continuum spectra for A-F stars; (2) late-type stellar continua showed a tendency to flatten when observed in scattered light toward the shorter wavelengths; and (3) the effect of grating scattering on emission lines is to decrease measured line intensities by an increasing percentage toward the shorter wavelengths. The spectra obtained from scattering experiments for solar-type and late type stars are reproduced in graphic form.

  15. Properties of artificial networks evolved to contend with natural spectra.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Yaniv; Rostami, Mohammad; Purves, Dale

    2014-07-22

    Understanding why spectra that are physically the same appear different in different contexts (color contrast), whereas spectra that are physically different appear similar (color constancy) presents a major challenge in vision research. Here, we show that the responses of biologically inspired neural networks evolved on the basis of accumulated experience with spectral stimuli automatically generate contrast and constancy. The results imply that these phenomena are signatures of a strategy that biological vision uses to circumvent the inverse optics problem as it pertains to light spectra, and that double-opponent neurons in early-level vision evolve to serve this purpose. This strategy provides a way of understanding the peculiar relationship between the objective world and subjective color experience, as well as rationalizing the relevant visual circuitry without invoking feature detection or image representation.

  16. Properties of artificial networks evolved to contend with natural spectra

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Yaniv; Rostami, Mohammad; Purves, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Understanding why spectra that are physically the same appear different in different contexts (color contrast), whereas spectra that are physically different appear similar (color constancy) presents a major challenge in vision research. Here, we show that the responses of biologically inspired neural networks evolved on the basis of accumulated experience with spectral stimuli automatically generate contrast and constancy. The results imply that these phenomena are signatures of a strategy that biological vision uses to circumvent the inverse optics problem as it pertains to light spectra, and that double-opponent neurons in early-level vision evolve to serve this purpose. This strategy provides a way of understanding the peculiar relationship between the objective world and subjective color experience, as well as rationalizing the relevant visual circuitry without invoking feature detection or image representation. PMID:25024184

  17. Spectra modulation of terahertz radiation from air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Wenfeng; Zhang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz spectra modulation can be potentially used in the remote sensing. The spectra modulation of terahertz radiation from two plasmas is demonstrated experimentally. With the comparison of the spectra of terahertz radiated from single and two plasmas, the output spectrum of terahertz wave has been proved to be of interference superposition of the two separate terahertz waves. With measurement and analysis of the polarization states of the output terahertz wave, it is fund that the two orthogonal components of THz electric fields have effects on the components involved in the interference of two terahertz waves. The output terahertz radiation from two plasmas is simulated, and the result shows that the distance between two plasmas contributes greatly to the spectrum modulation of terahertz radiation.

  18. Candidates for Pulsars with Gigahertz-Peaked Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarczewski, L.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    Kijak et al. (2011) provided a definite evidence for a new type of pulsar radio spectra. These spectra show the maximum flux above 1 GHz and their energy decreases below 1 GHz, producing a positive spectral index at lower frequencies. They called these objects the gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. We study a spectrum of radio pulsars and try to find pulsars with the turn-over effect at high frequencies. We created a database of candidates for pulsars with GPS effect using Maron et al. (2000) and ATNF database (Manchester et al. 2005), and also using recent papers where flux measurements were published (for example Bates et al. 2011). As a result a set of 22 candidates for pulsars with GPS was found.

  19. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  20. An atlas of ultraviolet spectra of star-forming galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, A. L.; Bohlin, R. C.; Calzetti, D.; Panagia, N.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1993-01-01

    A systematic study is presented of the UV spectra of star-forming galaxies of different morphological type and activity class using a sample drawn from a uniformly reduced IUE data set. The spectra for a wide variety of galaxies, including normal spiral, LINER, starburst, blue compact, blue compact dwarf, and Seyfert 2 galaxies, are presented in the form of spectral energy distributions to demonstrate the overall characteristics according to morphology and activity class and in the form of absolute flux distributions to better show the absorption and emission features of individual objects. The data support the picture based on UV spectra of the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory and of the Astronautical Netherlands Satellite that spiral galaxies of later Hubble class have more flux at the shortest UV wavelengths than do spiral galaxies of earlier Hubble class.

  1. Optical transmission spectra in quasiperiodic multilayered photonic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medeiros, F. F.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.

    2006-10-01

    Optical transmission spectra in quasiperiodic multilayered photonic structures, composed of both positive (SiO2) and negative refractive index materials, are calculated by using a theoretical model based on the transfer matrix approach for normal incidence geometry. The quasiperiodic structures are substitutional sequences, characterized by the nature of their Fourier spectrum, which can be dense pure point (e.g. Fibonacci sequence) or singular continuous (e.g. Thue-Morse and double-period sequences). The transmission spectra for the case where both refractive indices can be approximated by a different constant show a unique mirror symmetrical profile, with no counterpart for the positive refractive index case, as well as a striking self-similar behaviour related to the Fibonacci sequence. For a more realistic frequency-dependent refractive index, the transmission spectra are characterized by a rich transmission profile of Bragg peaks with no more self-similarity or mirror symmetry.

  2. [The analysis and identification of fritillaria cirrhosa by Raman spectra].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Na; Chen, Di-Ling; Zhu, Mei-Fang; Zhang, He-Ming

    2013-08-01

    Laser Raman spectrum technology was used to distinguish fritillaria cirrhosa from its adulterants rapidly and accurately. The study is based on that different traditional Chinese medicine contains different chemical compositions, and the differences could be displayed in Raman spectra. The Raman spectra of fritillaria cirrhosas shows that several characteristic strong peaks could be found at 442, 480, 863, 941, 1 083, 1 129, 1 342, 1 463 and 2 910 cm(-1), and a few obvious peaks appear at 111, 302, 360, 409, 527, 579, 618, 718, 767, 1 052, 1 083, 1 207 and 1 261 cm(-1). According to the Raman spectra, a Raman fingerprint of fritillaria cirrhosa was set up, which could be used to distinguish its adulterants. This analysis could be used in identifying fritillaria cirrhosa rapidly, accurately and nondestructively.

  3. Characteristics of the Brillouin spectra in Erbium-Ytterbium fibers.

    PubMed

    Canat, G; Durécu, A; Lesueur, G; Lombard, L; Bourdon, P; Jolivet, V; Jaouën, Y

    2008-03-03

    This paper reports the main characteristics of the Stokes spectra for typical pumped and unpumped Erbium-Ytterbium doped fibers. Doped fibers show shorter Brillouin shifts and their spectra are up to 1.6 times broader than undoped fibers. Those spectra are composed of several peaks originating from several longitudinal acoustic modes. The effective Brillouin gain of the secondary modes can be as large as 20% of the main peak gain. They can merge into a more complex structure for the largest cores. Simulations allow to relate these characteristics to the influence of codoping and index profile inhomogeneity. An additional broadening of the Stokes spectrum in pumped fibers is reported and attributed to thermal effects.

  4. Testing Dissipative Magnetosphere Model Light Curves and Spectra with Fermi Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brambilla, Gabriele; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Harding, Alice K.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2015-01-01

    We explore the emission properties of a dissipative pulsar magnetosphere model introduced by Kalapotharakos et al. comparing its high-energy light curves and spectra, due to curvature radiation, with data collected by the Fermi LAT. The magnetosphere structure is assumed to be near the force-free solution. The accelerating electric field, inside the light cylinder (LC), is assumed to be negligible, while outside the LC it rescales with a finite conductivity (sigma). In our approach we calculate the corresponding high-energy emission by integrating the trajectories of test particles that originate from the stellar surface, taking into account both the accelerating electric field components and the radiation reaction forces. First, we explore the parameter space assuming different value sets for the stellar magnetic field, stellar period, and conductivity. We show that the general properties of the model are in a good agreement with observed emission characteristics of young gamma-ray pulsars, including features of the phase-resolved spectra. Second, we find model parameters that fit each pulsar belonging to a group of eight bright pulsars that have a published phase-resolved spectrum. The sigma values that best describe each of the pulsars in this group show an increase with the spin-down rate (E? ) and a decrease with the pulsar age, expected if pair cascades are providing the magnetospheric conductivity. Finally, we explore the limits of our analysis and suggest future directions for improving such models.

  5. Effectiveness of Spectral Similarity Measures to Develop Precise Crop Spectra for Hyperspectral Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, H.; Krishna Mohan, B.

    2014-11-01

    The present study was undertaken with the objective to check effectiveness of spectral similarity measures to develop precise crop spectra from the collected hyperspectral field spectra. In Multispectral and Hyperspectral remote sensing, classification of pixels is obtained by statistical comparison (by means of spectral similarity) of known field or library spectra to unknown image spectra. Though these algorithms are readily used, little emphasis has been placed on use of various spectral similarity measures to select precise crop spectra from the set of field spectra. Conventionally crop spectra are developed after rejecting outliers based only on broad-spectrum analysis. Here a successful attempt has been made to develop precise crop spectra based on spectral similarity. As unevaluated data usage leads to uncertainty in the image classification, it is very crucial to evaluate the data. Hence, notwithstanding the conventional method, the data precision has been performed effectively to serve the purpose of the present research work. The effectiveness of developed precise field spectra was evaluated by spectral discrimination measures and found higher discrimination values compared to spectra developed conventionally. Overall classification accuracy for the image classified by field spectra selected conventionally is 51.89% and 75.47% for the image classified by field spectra selected precisely based on spectral similarity. KHAT values are 0.37, 0.62 and Z values are 2.77, 9.59 for image classified using conventional and precise field spectra respectively. Reasonable higher classification accuracy, KHAT and Z values shows the possibility of a new approach for field spectra selection based on spectral similarity measure.

  6. The Extragalactic Background Light and Absorption in Gamma Ray Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Rudy C.

    2008-03-01

    Recent state-of-the-art semi-analytic models (SAMs) can now accurately model the history of galaxy formation and evolution. These SAMs utilize a 'forward evolution' approach and include all of the important processes for determining photon emission from galaxies, such as cooling and shock heating of gas, galaxy mergers, star formation and aging, supernova and AGN feedback, and the reprocessing of light by dust. I will be presenting our group's latest prediction of the extra-galactic background light based on this work and will discuss the implications for the attenuation of VHE gamma rays from distant sources due to pair-production. These results will be compared to recent limits placed on the EBL by observations of GeV and TeV blazar spectra by experiments such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. The implications for reconstructing the intrinsic spectra of distant blazars will be addressed.

  7. Spectra Handling from AIRS and IRIS for Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Lau, M.; Aumann, H. H.; Yung, Y. L.

    2010-12-01

    model shows consistent spectra for both clear sky and low cloud with both AIRS and IRIS by introducing water vapor in the model. The model results indicate the CO2 and CH4 increase which is consistent with the IPCC report. Due to the broad emission range of the water vapor in the troposphere, it plays a significant role in the model simulations.

  8. Spectra of the Jovian ring and Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, G.; Becklin, E. E.; Jewitt, D. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Terrile, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements made between 0.887 and 2.4 microns demonstrate that the Jovian ring and Amalthea have similar reflection spectra. The spectra, in particular the ratio of the 0.9- to 2.2-micron reflectivities, are inconsistent with those expected from water, ammonia, or methane frosts, but are consistent with reflection from large rock bodies.

  9. Blind extraction of exoplanetary spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Waldmann, Ingo; Damiano, Mario; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2016-10-01

    In the last decade, remote sensing spectroscopy enabled characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. Transmission and emission spectra of tens of transiting exoplanets have been measured with multiple instruments aboard Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescopes as well as ground-based facilities, revealing the presence of chemical species in their atmospheres, and constraining their temperature and pressure profiles.Early analyses were somehow heuristic, leading to some controversies in the literature.A photometric precision of 0.01% is necessary to detect the atmospheric spectral modulations. Current observatories, except Kepler, were not designed to achieve this precision. Data reduction is necessary to minimize the effect of instrument systematics in order to achieve the target precision. In the past, parametric models have extensively been used by most teams to remove correlated noise with the aid of auxiliary information of the instrument, the so-called optical state vectors (OSVs). Such OSVs can include inter- and intra-pixel position of the star or its spectrum, instrument temperatures and inclinations, and/or other parameters. In some cases, different parameterizations led to discrepant results.We recommend the use of blind non-parametric data detrending techniques to overcome those issues. In particular, we adopt Independent Component Analysis (ICA), i.e. a powerful blind source separation (BSS) technique to disentangle the multiple instrument systematics and astrophysical signals in transit/eclipse light curves. ICA does not require a model for the systematics, thence it can be applied to any instrument with little changes, if any. ICA-based algorithms have been applied to Spitzer/IRAC and synthetic observations in photometry (Morello et al. 2014, 2015, 2016; Morello 2015) and to Hubble/WFC3, Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRS and Hubble/WFC3 in spectroscopy (Damiano, Morello et al., in prep., Waldmann 2012, 2014, Waldmann et al. 2013) with excellent

  10. Isotope shifts in spectra of molecular liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskaya, E. V.; Kolomiitsova, T. D.; Shurukhina, A. V.; Shchepkin, D. N.

    2016-02-01

    In the IR absorption spectra of low-temperature molecular liquids, we have observed anomalously large isotope shifts of frequencies of vibrational bands that are strong in the dipole absorption. The same effect has also been observed in their Raman spectra. At the same time, in the spectra of cryosolutions, the isotope shifts of the same bands coincide with a high accuracy (±(0.1-0.5) cm-1) with the shifts that are observed in the spectra of the gas phase. The difference between the spectra of examined low-temperature systems is caused by the occurrence of resonant dipole-dipole interactions between spectrally active identical molecules. The calculation of the band contour in the spectrum of liquid freon that we have performed in this work taking into account the resonant interaction between states of simultaneous transitions in isotopically substituted molecules can explain this effect.

  11. PCA: Principal Component Analysis for spectra modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Peter D.; Oliver, Seb; Farrah, Duncan; Wang, Lingyu; Efstathiou, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    The mid-infrared spectra of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) contain a variety of spectral features that can be used as diagnostics to characterize the spectra. However, such diagnostics are biased by our prior prejudices on the origin of the features. Moreover, by using only part of the spectrum they do not utilize the full information content of the spectra. Blind statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) consider the whole spectrum, find correlated features and separate them out into distinct components. This code, written in IDL, classifies principal components of IRS spectra to define a new classification scheme using 5D Gaussian mixtures modelling. The five PCs and average spectra for the four classifications to classify objects are made available with the code.

  12. Doppler-shifting effects on frequency spectra of gravity waves observed near the summer mesopause at high latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of radar observations of horizontal and vertical velocities near the summer mesopause at Poker Flat (Alaska), showing that the observed vertical velocity spectra were influenced strongly by Doppler-shifting effects. The horizontal velocity spectra, however, were relatively insensitive to horizontal wind speed. The observed spectra are compared with predicted spectra for various models of the intrinsic motion spectrum and degrees of Doppler shifting.

  13. Thermal aging effect of vanadyl acetylacetonate precursor for deposition of VO{sub 2} thin films with thermochromic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jung-Hoon; Nam, Sang-Hun; Kim, Donguk; Kim, Minha; Seo, Hyeon Jin; Ro, Yu Hyeon; Joo, Yong Tae; Lee, Jaehyeong; Boo, Jin-Hyo

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • 7 day aged VO(acac){sub 2} sol shows enhanced adhesivity on the SiO{sub 2} compared with non-aged sol. • The aging process has significantly affected the morphologies of VO{sub 2} films. • From the FT-IR spectra, thermal aging process provides the deformation of precursor. • The metal insulator transition (MIT) efficiency (ΔT{sub at2000} {sub nm}) reached a maximum value of 51% at 7 day aging. • Thermal aging process could shorten the aging time of sol solution. - Abstract: Thermochromic properties of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) have been studied extensively due to their IR reflection applications in energy smart windows. In this paper, we studied the optical switching property of VO{sub 2} thin film, depending on the thermal aging time of the vanadyl acetylacetonate (VO(acac){sub 2}) precursor. We found the alteration of the IR spectra of the precursor by tuning the aging time as well as heat treatments of the precursor. An aging effect of vanadium precursor directly affects the morphologies, optical switching property and crystallinity of VO{sub 2} films. The optimum condition was achieved at the 7 day aging time with metal insulator transition (MIT) efficiency of 50%.

  14. Determining Ages of APOGEE Giants with Known Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuillet, Diane; Bovy, Jo; Holtzman, Jon A.; Girardi, Leo; APOGEE Team

    2016-01-01

    We present a sample of 705 local (d <400 pc) red giant stars observed using the New Mexico State University 1m telescope with the SDSS-III APOGEE spectrograph, for which we estimate stellar ages and the age distribution from the high-resolution spectroscopic stellar parameters and accurate distance measurements from Hipparcos. The high-resolution (R ~ 23,000), near infrared (H-band, 1.5-1.7 μm) APOGEE spectra provide measurements of the stellar atmospheric parameters (temperature, surface gravity, [M/H], and [α/M]). Due to the smaller uncertainties in surface gravity possible with high-resolution spectra and accurate Hipparcos distance measurements, we are able to calculate the stellar masses to within 40 %. For red giants, the relatively rapid evolution of stars up the red giant branch allows the age to be constrained based on the mass. We examine methods of estimating age using both the mass-age relation directly and a Bayesian isochrone matching of measured parameters, assuming a constant SFH. To improve the prior on the SFH, we use a hierarchical modeling approach to constrain the parameters of a model SFH from the age probability distribution functions of the data. The results of an α-dependent Gaussian SFH model shows a clear relation between age and [α/M] at all ages. Using this SFH model as the prior for an empirical Bayesian analysis, we construct a full age probability distribution function and determine ages for individual stars. The age-metallicity relation is flat, with a slight decrease in [M/H] at the oldest ages and a ~ 0.5 dex spread in metallicity. For stars with ages > 1 Gyr we find a smaller spread, consistent with radial migration having a smaller effect on these young stars than on the older stars. This method of estimating ages of red giants is developed with the intent of estimating ages for the much larger sample of APOGEE survey giants that will have parallax measurements from Gaia.

  15. [Raman spectra and its application of graphite enclaves in nephrite-jades in Xiuyan, Liaoning].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhi-li; Jiang, Qi-yun; Luo, Han; Qin, She-cai; Li, Liu-fen

    2010-11-01

    Xiuyan, Liaoning was an important locality of jade material of the Red Mountain Culture in the Neolithic Age in Chinese history where there are two types of raw material of nephrite jades, namely gravel nephrite jade (Hemo Yu in Chinese) and old nephrite jade (Lao Yu in Chinese). In the present paper, Laser Raman spectrum technique was applied to analyze the graphite enclaves in the nephrite jades of the two types of materials. The results show that the graphite enclaves in the two types of jades have different characteristics of Raman spectra, indicating that they probably were formed under different geological conditions, or originated from different ore-forming periods or were exploited from different section of ore body. Hence, laser Raman spectrum technique could be used as a supplementary measure for nondestructive detection to determine the occurrence of jades.

  16. Biological spectra analysis: Linking biological activity profiles to molecular structure

    PubMed Central

    Fliri, Anton F.; Loging, William T.; Thadeio, Peter F.; Volkmann, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Establishing quantitative relationships between molecular structure and broad biological effects has been a longstanding challenge in science. Currently, no method exists for forecasting broad biological activity profiles of medicinal agents even within narrow boundaries of structurally similar molecules. Starting from the premise that biological activity results from the capacity of small organic molecules to modulate the activity of the proteome, we set out to investigate whether descriptor sets could be developed for measuring and quantifying this molecular property. Using a 1,567-compound database, we show that percent inhibition values, determined at single high drug concentration in a battery of in vitro assays representing a cross section of the proteome, provide precise molecular property descriptors that identify the structure of molecules. When broad biological activity of molecules is represented in spectra form, organic molecules can be sorted by quantifying differences between biological spectra. Unlike traditional structure–activity relationship methods, sorting of molecules by using biospectra comparisons does not require knowledge of a molecule's putative drug targets. To illustrate this finding, we selected as starting point the biological activity spectra of clotrimazole and tioconazole because their putative target, lanosterol demethylase (CYP51), was not included in the bioassay array. Spectra similarity obtained through profile similarity measurements and hierarchical clustering provided an unbiased means for establishing quantitative relationships between chemical structures and biological activity spectra. This methodology, which we have termed biological spectra analysis, provides the capability not only of sorting molecules on the basis of biospectra similarity but also of predicting simultaneous interactions of new molecules with multiple proteins. PMID:15625110

  17. Magnetoabsorption spectra of bilayer graphene ribbons with Bernal stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. C.; Chang, C. P.; Lin, M. F.

    2008-09-01

    Magnetoabsorption spectra of bilayer graphene ribbons with Bernal stacking are studied by the Peierls-coupling tight-binding method. When the magnetic confinement prevails over the quantum confinement, low-energy spectra chiefly exhibit many Landau peaks, which are strongly modified by the inter-ribbon interactions and the magnetic-field magnitude (B) . The spectra show denser Landau peaks in bilayer graphene ribbon than in a monolayer ribbon with the same ribbon width. The absorption frequencies of Landau peaks of a wide monolayer ribbon show the B dependence, while those of a bilayer ribbon exhibit a varying B -field dependence. In the spectra region ω≤100meV , the absorption frequencies of Landau peaks are linearly dependent on the magnetic-field magnitude. At ω≥100meV , they evolve from the B dependence to the B dependence with the increase in the field strength. The absorption frequencies of Landau peaks exhibit B dependence at B≥20T . The relationship between the magneto-optical properties and electronic structures (the state energies and wave functions) are explored. The Landau wave functions are illustrated and used to identify the optical selection rule.

  18. IUE spectra of F and late A stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Marstad, N. C.

    1981-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of alpha CMi (F5 IV-V), beta Cas (F2 IV), alpha Car (F0 Ib), and gamma Boo (A7 III) in the context of the question as to whether chromospheres disappear in the early F late A portions of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Both alpha CMi (Procyon) and beta Cas show bright emission line spectra indicative of chromospheres and transition regions, but neither alpha Car (Canopus) nor gamma Boo show any evidence of emission in their SWP spectra or at the Mg II lines, despite very deep exposures. Alpha CMi has emission line fluxes roughly 6 times those of the quiet Sun, but the rapidly rotating delta Scuti type variable beta Cas has surface fluxes 10 to 50 times those of the quiet Sun. Upper limits on emission line fluxes for alpha Car are 4 to 20 and for gamma Boo 15 to 80 times the quiet Sun. It is concluded that the apparent absence of emission lines in the spectra of alpha Car and gamma Boo should not be interpreted as due to the absence of nonradiatively heated outer atmospheres in stars hotter than spectral type F0, but rather to the inability to see emission lines with IUE against a background of scattered light and a bright photospheric absorption line spectrum either in low or high dispersion.

  19. Ancient bacteria show evidence of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Hebsgaard, Martin B.; Christensen, Torben R.; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Nielsen, Rasmus; Munch, Kasper; Brand, Tina; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Zuber, Maria T.; Bunce, Michael; Rønn, Regin; Gilichinsky, David; Froese, Duane; Willerslev, Eske

    2007-01-01

    Recent claims of cultivable ancient bacteria within sealed environments highlight our limited understanding of the mechanisms behind long-term cell survival. It remains unclear how dormancy, a favored explanation for extended cellular persistence, can cope with spontaneous genomic decay over geological timescales. There has been no direct evidence in ancient microbes for the most likely mechanism, active DNA repair, or for the metabolic activity necessary to sustain it. In this paper, we couple PCR and enzymatic treatment of DNA with direct respiration measurements to investigate long-term survival of bacteria sealed in frozen conditions for up to one million years. Our results show evidence of bacterial survival in samples up to half a million years in age, making this the oldest independently authenticated DNA to date obtained from viable cells. Additionally, we find strong evidence that this long-term survival is closely tied to cellular metabolic activity and DNA repair that over time proves to be superior to dormancy as a mechanism in sustaining bacteria viability. PMID:17728401

  20. Multibubble Sonoluminescence Spectra of Water which Resemble Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, Y. T.; Gordeychuk, T. V.

    2000-06-01

    Multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) spectra of water from cavitation clouds were collected in the presence of different noble gases and at different acoustic intensities. Results show that at high acoustic intensity and with xenon as a dissolved gas the emission of the OH* radical becomes indiscernible from the continuum. These spectra resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectra. It is concluded that the source of emission in MBSL and SBSL can be the same, the difference in spectra is due to the higher temperature inside the bubble during SBSL.

  1. Multibubble sonoluminescence spectra of water which resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence

    PubMed

    Didenko; Gordeychuk

    2000-06-12

    Multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL) spectra of water from cavitation clouds were collected in the presence of different noble gases and at different acoustic intensities. Results show that at high acoustic intensity and with xenon as a dissolved gas the emission of the OH* radical becomes indiscernible from the continuum. These spectra resemble single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) spectra. It is concluded that the source of emission in MBSL and SBSL can be the same, the difference in spectra is due to the higher temperature inside the bubble during SBSL.

  2. Study of N2 CARS spectra of a coal-fired flow facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagdish P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    1993-07-01

    A comparative study of N2 CARS spectra was performed at a coal-fired flow facility diffuser and aerodynamic duct. Spectra recorded at the diffuser have atypical feature near V = 1-2 N2 CARS vibrational transition. Atypical feature intensity decreases in the aerodynamic duct spectra. N2 CARS spectra at the aerodynamic duct show the laser-produced C2 absorption around the fundamental band. The CARS inferred temperature at the diffuser is estimated to be +/- 100 K where as at the aerodynamic duct it is +/- 250 K. The error in the inferred temperature with different interference in the CARS spectrum was also studied.

  3. Development of site-specific earthquake response spectra for eastern US sites

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Shaffer, K.E.

    1993-08-01

    Site-specific earthquake, uniform-hazard response spectra have been defined for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites for use in evaluating existing facilities and designing new facilities. The site-specific response spectra were defined from probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard studies following the requirements in DOE-STD-1024-92, ``Guidelines for Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Curves at DOE Sites.` For these two sites, the results show that site-specific uniform-hazard response spectra are slightly higher in the high-frequency range and considerably lower in the low-frequency range compared with response spectra defined for these sites in the past.

  4. [Study on temperature correction of near-infrared spectra of solution].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Shi, Zhen-Zhi; Xu, Ke-Xin; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2009-11-01

    The near-infrared spectrum of some common solvents, such as water, has very high sensitivity to temperature. So, the effect of temperature can not be ignored in NIRS. When temperature changes, the transmission spectra of the solution will also change. The influence of the temperature was deduced theoretically based on the Lambert-Beer's law in the present paper. And a method for temperature correction of sample's spectra was proposed. By using the change in pure solvent's absorbency with temperature disturbance, the method is used to correct the spectra of prediction samples. The spectra of glucose aqueous solution and albumin aqueous solution were measured at different temperatures. The calibration models of glucose and albumin concentration prediction were built respectively by using the calibration sample's spectra at 30 degrees C. The absorbency of pure water has different value at different temperature, and this difference was used to correct the spectra of sample which was measured at temperatures other than 30 degrees C. The experiment results showed that the curves of absorbancy difference of prediction samples, which were measured at different temperatures, show good superposition after spectra correction. And the root mean square error (RMSEP) of prediction was reduced obviously. It also means that the influence of temperature on the spectra can be eliminated effectively after spectra correction by using the method proposed in this paper.

  5. Handbook of Monochromatic XPS Spectra, Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, B. Vincent

    2000-10-01

    This handbook is one of three containing an invaluable collection of research grade XPS Spectra. Each handbook concentrates on a specific family of materials (the elements and their native oxides, semiconductors and polymers) and is entirely self-contained. The introductory section to each handbook includes comprehensive information about the XPS instrument used, the materials and the advanced methods used to collect the spectra. Energy resolution settings, instrument characteristics, energy referencing methods, traceability, energy scale calibration details and transmission function are all reported. Among the many valuable features included in each of these handbooks are: ? All spectra were measured by using AlK monochromatic X-rays ? All spectra were collected in a self-consistent manner to maximise data reliability and quality ? All peaks in the wide spectra are fully annotated and accompanied by detailed atom % tables that report BEs for each of the labelled peaks ? Each high-energy resolution spectrum is peak-fitted and accompanied by detailed tables containing binding energies, FWHMs and relative percentages. In this volume 'Semiconductors' are contained XPS Spectra from a wide range of semiconductive materials and related materials, a rare tool for scientists and analysts in this area. Exclusive features of this volume include: ? Binding energies are accurate to +/- 0.08eV ? Charge compensation was done with a flood-gun mesh-screen system ? Valence band spectra document the occupied density of states (DOS) and the fundamental electronic nature of the semi-conductive materials analysed ? Analyses were done: "as received", "freshly fractured in air", "ion etched" and "chemically treated" ? Alphabetically organised by chemical abbreviations for ease of locating each material This handbook is an invaluable reference for materials scientists and electrical engineers in industry, academia and government laboratories interested in the analysis of semiconductors

  6. Methane on Triton and Pluto - New CCD spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apt, J.; Carleton, N. P.; Mackay, C. D.

    1983-07-01

    Spectra of Triton and of Pluto from 4553-9558 A at 25 A resolution are presented. Both spectra show the methane absorption near 8900 A; its equivalent width was 16 times greater on Pluto than on Triton at the time of the observations. This is the first published observation of the 8900 A feature in Triton's spectrum. The previously reported 27 m-amagat abundance of the Pluto atmosphere ignored contributions due to methane ice and should therefore be regarded as an upper limit. The observations of the Pluto spectrum discussed here show sharp structure in the 8900 and 8600 A bands; the case for an atmosphere on Pluto may turn on whether new laboratory measurements show that such structure is present in methane ice.

  7. Aberrant EEG functional connectivity and EEG power spectra in resting state post-traumatic stress disorder: a sLORETA study.

    PubMed

    Imperatori, Claudio; Farina, Benedetto; Quintiliani, Maria Isabella; Onofri, Antonio; Castelli Gattinara, Paola; Lepore, Marta; Gnoni, Valentina; Mazzucchi, Edoardo; Contardi, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the modifications of EEG power spectra and EEG connectivity of resting state (RS) condition in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Seventeen patients and seventeen healthy subjects matched for age and gender were enrolled. EEG was recorded during 5min of RS. EEG analysis was conducted by means of the standardized Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (sLORETA). In power spectra analysis PTSD patients showed a widespread increase of theta activity (4.5-7.5Hz) in parietal lobes (Brodmann Area, BA 7, 4, 5, 40) and in frontal lobes (BA 6). In the connectivity analysis PTSD patients also showed increase of alpha connectivity (8-12.5Hz) between the cortical areas explored by Pz-P4 electrode. Our results could reflect the alteration of memory systems and emotional processing consistently altered in PTSD patients.

  8. Age Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    12 June 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a group of impact craters in Aonia Planum, Mars. Remarkably, two of the craters are approximately equal in size, however, they clearly differ in age. The left (west) crater has a well-defined rim and its ejecta blanket overlies part of the less pronounced crater to its immediate east. The one with the ejecta blanket is younger. Other circular depressions in this bouldery scene are also old, eroded impact craters.

    Location near: 59.5oS, 78.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  9. Computer processing of tunable diode laser spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Randy D.

    1989-01-01

    A computer-controlled tunable diode laser spectrometer and spectral analysis software are described. The three-channel system records simultaneously the transmission of a subject gas, a temperature-stabilized etalon, and a calibration gas. The software routines are applied to diode laser spectra of HNO3 and NO2 to illustrate the procedures adopted for conversion of raw spectral data to useful transmission and harmonic spectra. Extraction of line positions, absorption intensities, collisional broadening coefficients, and gas concentrations from recorded spectra is also described.

  10. Analysis of atmospheric spectra for trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Seals, Robert K., Jr.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Goldman, Aaron; Murcray, David G.; Murcray, Frank J.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the comprehensive analysis of high resolution atmospheric spectra recorded in the middle-infrared region to obtain simultaneous measurements of coupled parameters (gas concentrations of key trace constituents, total column amounts, pressure, and temperature) in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.002 and 0.02 cm exp -1 resolutions with the University of Denver group's balloon-borne, aircraft borne, and ground-based interferometers and 0.005 to 0.01 cm exp -1 resolution solar spectra from Kitt Peak are used in the analyses.

  11. Vibrational spectra and structure of isopropylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, A. I.; Noskov, A. I.; Remizov, A. B.; Chachkov, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Infrared spectra (4000-400 cm -1) and Raman spectra (1700-40 cm -1) of the liquid and two crystalline solids of isopropylbenzene (cumene) and isopropylbenzene-d 12 have been recorded. The spectra indicate that in the liquid and crystalline solids isopropylbenzene exists in planar conformation only (C sbnd H bond is in the plane of the benzene ring). An assignment of the observed band wave numbers both isopropylbenzene and isopropylbenzene-d 12 is discussed by comparison with normal mode wave numbers and IR intensities calculated from ab initio 6-31G (d) force fields.

  12. Tetrahdroxysqualene from Rhus taitensis Shows Antimycobacterial Activity Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Noro, Jeffrey C.; Barrows, Louis R.; Gideon, Osia G.; Ireland, Chris M.; Koch, Michael; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Piskaut, Pius; Pond, Christopher D.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis has become a major health problem, in particular with the emergence of extremely drug resistant tuberculosis (XDRTB). In our search for new therapeutic leads against TB, we isolated a new triterpene (1) from the plant Rhus taitensis collected in Papua New Guinea. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was isolated using bioassay-guided fractionation of the methanolic extract of R. taitensis leaves and twigs. The structure of tetrahydroxysqualene (1) was elucidated on the basis of HRESIMS and 1D and 2D NMR spectra. Tetrahydroxysqualene (1) exhibited anti–tuberculosis activity with an MIC of 10.0 μg/mL while showing only modest cytotoxicity. PMID:18710283

  13. DFT studies of the vibrational spectra of salicylic acid and related compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compounds that exhibit intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds can have infrared and Raman spectra that show evidences of these hydrogen bonds. In modeling the vibrational spectra of such compounds, the addition of explicit hydrogen bonding species (e.g. solvent molecules) can often improve agreeme...

  14. Simple stellar population modelling of low S/N galaxy spectra and quasar host galaxy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, G.; Tremonti, C. A.; Hooper, E. J.; Wolf, M. J.; Sheinis, A. I.; Richards, J. W.

    2015-02-01

    To study the effect of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) on their host galaxies it is important to study the hosts when the SMBH is near its peak activity. A method to investigate the host galaxies of high luminosity quasars is to obtain optical spectra at positions offset from the nucleus where the relative contribution of the quasar and host is comparable. However, at these extended radii the galaxy surface brightness is often low (20-22 mag arcsec-2) and the resulting spectrum might have such low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) that it hinders analysis with standard stellar population modelling techniques. To address this problem, we have developed a method that can recover galaxy star formation histories (SFHs) from rest-frame optical spectra with S/N ˜ 5 Å-1. This method uses the statistical technique diffusion k-means to tailor the stellar population modelling basis set. Our diffusion k-means minimal basis set, composed of four broad age bins, is successful in recovering a range of galaxy SFHs. Additionally, using an analytic prescription for seeing conditions, we are able to simultaneously model scattered quasar light and the SFH of quasar host galaxies (QHGs). We use synthetic data to compare results of our novel method with previous techniques. We also present the modelling results on a previously published QHG and show that galaxy properties recovered from a diffusion k-means basis set are less sensitive to noise added to this QHG spectrum. Our new method has a clear advantage in recovering information from QHGs and could also be applied to the analysis of other low S/N galaxy spectra such as those typically obtained for high redshift objects or integral field spectroscopic surveys.

  15. Electronic spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the bulk exciton show substantial quantum confinement effects. Recent experiments including Stark effect, resonance Raman, valence band photoemission, and near edge X-ray adsorption will be used to put together a picture of the nanocrystal electronic states.

  16. Characterizing mechanical effects of aging damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, T.D.; Chen, S.P.; Schoonover, J.R.; Trent, B.C.; Howe, P.M.; Hjelm, R.P.; Browning, R.V.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal was to develop and apply several different experimental and theoretical/computational tools to better understand physical and chemical aging phenomena in plastic-bonded high explosives, and to develop a methodology for predicting the likely effects of aging on the mechanical properties of the composite based on input from these fundamental studies. Initial comparisons were done for spectra of fresh and aged Esane, as well as PBX-9501, and the authors found differences in the carbonyl region of the spectrum, which possibly reflect differences in hydrogen bonding due to aging phenomena. The micromechanical model of composites was extended to study various volume fractions of HMX with binders. The results showed that, as the binder fraction increases, there is a decrease in the maximum stress that can be supported but an increase in the percent strain at final fracture. A more realistic microstructural model was obtained through the use of a phase field model. Using this model, the authors have studied the microstructural evolution as a function of the grain boundary energy vs. misorientation relationship. The initial results indicate that there are some changes in the grain growth rate when the grain-boundary energy dependence on the angle is not constant. They also find that solute tends to segregate at the grain boundary and slows the grain growth kinetics.

  17. Shape of the A=14 {beta} spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A.; Brown, B.A.

    1995-10-01

    The shape of allowed {Beta} spectra have a small contribution from the interference of the vector, weak-magnetism and axial GT matrix elements. According to CVC plus charge-symmetry of nuclear interactions, in a 0{sup +}{r_arrow} 1{sup +} transition like the {Beta} and {gamma} decays of the A=14 system, the weak-magnetism and electro-magnetic-Ml matrix elements should be equal. A measurement of the shape of the {sup 14}O spectrum, however, disagrees, by a factor of two with naive calculation described above. It has been speculated that because of the high supression of GT matrix element in the A=14 system, one could understand this discrepancy based on small charge-symmetry-effects. We have used shell-model wave functions adjusted to fit {sup 14}N(e,e{sup {prime}}) inelastic scattering, the width of the M1-{gamma} transition, and the {Beta} log f t`s, and show that reasonable assumptions lead to estimates that are very close to the naive CVC estimation. We propose that the {sup 14}O discrepancy is important and that new experiments should be done to measure the shape of the spectrum.

  18. Conformal symmetry and light flavor baryon spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchbach, M.; Compean, C. B.

    2010-08-01

    The degeneracy among parity pairs systematically observed in the N and Δ spectra is interpreted to hint on a possible conformal symmetry realization in the light flavor baryon sector in line with AdS5/CFT4. The case is made by showing that all the observed N and Δ resonances with masses below 2500 MeV distribute fairly well each over the first levels of a unitary representation of the conformal group, a representation that covers the spectrum of a quark-diquark system, placed directly on a conformally compactified Minkowski spacetime, R1⊗S3, as approached from the AdS5 cone. The free geodesic motion on the S3 manifold is described by means of the scalar conformal equation there, which is of the Klein-Gordon-type. The equation is then gauged by the curved Coulomb potential that has the form of a cotangent function. Conformal symmetry is not exact, this because the gauge potential slightly modifies the conformal centrifugal barrier of the free geodesic motion. Thanks to this, the degeneracy between P11-S11 pairs from same level is relaxed, while the remaining states belonging to same level remain practically degenerate. The model describes the correct mass ordering in the P11-S11 pairs through the spectra as a combined effect of the above conformal symmetry breaking, on the one side, and a parity change of the diquark from a scalar at low masses, to a pseudoscalar at higher masses, on the other. The quality of the wave functions is illustrated by calculations of realistic mean square charge radii and electric charge form factors on the examples of the proton, and the protonic P11(1440), and S11(1535) resonances. The scheme also allows for a prediction of the dressing function of an effective instantaneous gluon propagator from the Fourier transform of the gauge potential. We find a dressing function that is finite in the infrared and tends to zero at infinity.

  19. The Mid-Infrared Transmission Spectra of Antarctic Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.

    1993-01-01

    The mid-infrared (4000-450 1/cm; 2.5-22.2 micron) transmission spectra of seven Antarctic ureilites and 10 Antarctic H-5 ordinary chondrites are presented. The ureilite spectra show a number of absorption bands, the strongest of which is a wide, complex feature centered near 1000 1/cm (10 micron) due to Si-O stretching vibrations in silicates. The profiles and positions of the substructure in this feature indicate that Mg-rich olivines and pyroxenes are the main silicates responsible. The relative abundances of these two minerals, as inferred from the spectra, show substantial variation from meteorite to meteorite, but generally indicate olivine is the most abundant (olivine:pyroxene = 60:40 to 95:5). Both the predominance of olivine and the variable olivine-to-pyroxene ratio are consistent with the known composition and heterogeneity of ureilites. The H-5 ordinary chondrites spanned a range of weathering classes and were used to provide a means of addressing the extent to which the ureilite spectra may have been altered by weathering processes. It was found that, while weathering of these meteorites produces some weak bands due to the formation of small amounts of carbonates and hydrates, the profile of the main silicate feature has been little affected by Antarctic exposure in the meteorites studied here. The mid-infrared ureilite spectra provide an additional means of testing potential asteroidal parent bodies for the ureilites. At present, the best candidates include the subset of S-type asteroids having low albedos and weak absorption features in the near infrared.

  20. Spectra: Time series power spectrum calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Tabaré

    2017-01-01

    Spectra calculates the power spectrum of a time series equally spaced or not based on the Spectral Correlation Coefficient (Ferraz-Mello 1981, Astron. Journal 86 (4), 619). It is very efficient for detection of low frequencies.

  1. Spatial evolution of ocean wave spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spatially evolving deep water synthetic aperture radar (SAR) directional spectra of a mixed ocean wave system are compared with a comprehensive set of surface and aircraft measurements. The evolution of the SAR spectra, at least for ocean wavelengths greater than 80 m, is seen as generally consistent with the auxiliary data set in both time and space. From the spatial evolution of the angular component of the spectra, it is possible to project back to an apparent remote storm source that is also consistent with the storm location via GOES satellite imagery. The data provide compelling evidence that the spatial evolution of SAR ocean wave spectra can be a useful tool in global ocean wave monitoring and forecasting.

  2. Synthesis and Spectra of Vanadium Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.; Stupgia, Sean

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates simple synthetic techniques, redox principles in synthesis reactions, interpretation of visible spectra using Orgel diagrams, and the spectrochemical series. The experiment is suitable for the advanced undergraduate inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  3. An analysis of middle ultraviolet dayglow spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, Billie S.

    1991-12-01

    Middle ultraviolet spectra from 1800 to 3400A are analyzed. These spectra were obtained from the March 1990 rocket flight of the NPS MUSTANG instrument over the altitudes 105km to 315km. The data were compared with computer generated synthetic spectra. A least squares fitting procedure was developed for this purpose. Each data point was weighted using the standard deviation of the means. Synthetic spectra were generated for the following emissions: N2 Vegard-Kaphan; N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield; NO gamma, delta, and epsilon; OI 2972A, OII 2470A; and NII 2143A. Altitude profiles for the emissions were obtained. Tentative identification was made of the OIII 2853A emission. A comparison of VK and LBH profiles demonstrates the process of N2 A-state quenching by atomic oxygen.

  4. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  5. Frequency Spectra of Magnetoacoustic Emission in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanchenko, S. V.; Grokhovsky, V. I.; Kolchanov, N. N.

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the magnetoacoustic emission spectra of iron meteorites and their industrial analogs. The revealed differences in signal amplitude, position and width of the peaks are associated with the features of structure and the magnetic texture.

  6. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  7. Skin Aging

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin changes as you age. You might notice wrinkles, age spots and dryness. Your skin also becomes thinner and loses fat, making it ... heal, too. Sunlight is a major cause of skin aging. You can protect yourself by staying out ...

  8. POLLUX: a database of synthetic stellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, A.; Gebran, M.; Josselin, E.; Martins, F.; Plez, B.; Belmas, M.; Lèbre, A.

    2010-06-01

    Aims: Synthetic spectra are needed to determine fundamental stellar and wind parameters of all types of stars. They are also used for the construction of theoretical spectral libraries helpful for stellar population synthesis. Therefore, a database of theoretical spectra is required to allow rapid and quantitative comparisons to spectroscopic data. We provide such a database offering an unprecedented coverage of the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Methods: We present the POLLUX database of synthetic stellar spectra. For objects with Teff ≤ 6000 K, MARCS atmosphere models are computed and the program TURBOSPECTRUM provides the synthetic spectra. ATLAS12 models are computed for stars with 7000 K ≤ Teff ≤ 15 000 K. SYNSPEC gives the corresponding spectra. Finally, the code CMFGEN provides atmosphere models for the hottest stars (Teff > 25 000 K). Their spectra are computed with CMF_FLUX. Both high resolution (R > 150 000) optical spectra in the range 3000 to 12 000 Å and spectral energy distributions extending from the UV to near-IR ranges are presented. These spectra cover the HR diagram at solar metallicity. Results: We propose a wide variety of synthetic spectra for various types of stars in a format that is compliant with the Virtual Observatory standards. A user-friendly web interface allows an easy selection of spectra and data retrieval. Upcoming developments will include an extension to a large range of metallicities and to the near-IR high resolution spectra, as well as a better coverage of the HR diagram, with the inclusion of models for Wolf-Rayet stars and large datasets for cool stars. The POLLUX database is accessible at http://pollux.graal.univ-montp2.fr/ and through the Virtual Observatory. Copy of database is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb

  9. Diffuse emission and pathological Seyfert spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Jules P.

    1995-01-01

    In this annual ROSAT status report, the diffuse emission and spectra from Seyfert galaxies are examined. Three papers are presented and their contents include the soft x-ray properties and spectra of a binary millisecond pulsar, the PSPC and HRI observations of a Starburst/Seyfert 2 Galaxy, and an analysis of the possibility of x-ray luminous starbursts in the Einstein Medium Sensitivity Survey.

  10. On the Photoelectron Spectra of Li4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The most stable structure for Li4(-) is found to be the rhombus. Electron detachment from this structure does not seem able to fully explain the photoelectron spectra. The computed results are consistent with those Rao, Jena, and Ray who have proposed that the experimental spectra consists of a superposition of detachment from the Li4(-) rhombus and tetrahedron, forming the singlet and triplet states of Li4, respectively.

  11. New atlas of IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Vanallen, J. W.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Murcray, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Over 4500 absorption lines have been marked on the spectra and the corresponding line positions tabulated. The associated absorbing telluric or solar species for more than 90% of these lines have been identified and only a fraction of the unidentified lines have peak absorptions greater than a few percent. The high resolution and the low Sun spectra greatly enhance the sensitivity limits for identification of trace constituents.

  12. Trigonometric Polynomials For Estimation Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    Orthogonal sets of trigonometric polynomials used as suboptimal substitutes for discrete prolate-spheroidal "windows" of Thomson method of estimation of spectra. As used here, "windows" denotes weighting functions used in sampling time series to obtain their power spectra within specified frequency bands. Simplified windows designed to require less computation than do discrete prolate-spheroidal windows, albeit at price of some loss of accuracy.

  13. Overlapping spectra resolution using non-negative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-Tao; Li, Tong-Hua; Chen, Kai; Li, Wei-Guang; Bi, Xian

    2005-03-31

    Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF), with the constraints of non-negativity, has been recently proposed for multi-variate data analysis. Because it allows only additive, not subtractive, combinations of the original data, NMF is capable of producing region or parts-based representation of objects. It has been used for image analysis and text processing. Unlike PCA, the resolutions of NMF are non-negative and can be easily interpreted and understood directly. Due to multiple solutions, the original algorithm of NMF [D.D. Lee, H.S. Seung, Nature 401 (1999) 788] is not suitable for resolving chemical mixed signals. In reality, NMF has never been applied to resolving chemical mixed signals. It must be modified according to the characteristics of the chemical signals, such as smoothness of spectra, unimodality of chromatograms, sparseness of mass spectra, etc. We have used the modified NMF algorithm to narrow the feasible solution region for resolving chemical signals, and found that it could produce reasonable and acceptable results for certain experimental errors, especially for overlapping chromatograms and sparse mass spectra. Simulated two-dimensional (2-D) data and real GUJINGGONG alcohol liquor GC-MS data have been resolved soundly by NMF technique. Butyl caproate and its isomeric compound (butyric acid, hexyl ester) have been identified from the overlapping spectra. The result of NMF is preferable to that of Heuristic evolving latent projections (HELP). It shows that NMF is a promising chemometric resolution method for complex samples.

  14. Independent component analysis classification of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Gasnault, Olivier; Wiens, Roger C.; Cousin, Agnès; Clegg, Samuel M.; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Lasue, Jérémie

    2013-08-01

    The ChemCam instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover uses the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique to remotely analyze Martian rocks. It retrieves spectra up to a distance of seven meters to quantify and to quantitatively analyze the sampled rocks. Like any field application, on-site measurements by LIBS are altered by diverse matrix effects which induce signal variations that are specific to the nature of the sample. Qualitative aspects remain to be studied, particularly LIBS sample identification to determine which samples are of interest for further analysis by ChemCam and other rover instruments. This can be performed with the help of different chemometric methods that model the spectra variance in order to identify a the rock from its spectrum. In this paper we test independent components analysis (ICA) rock classification by remote LIBS. We show that using measures of distance in ICA space, namely the Manhattan and the Mahalanobis distance, we can efficiently classify spectra of an unknown rock. The Mahalanobis distance gives overall better performances and is easier to manage than the Manhattan distance for which the determination of the cut-off distance is not easy. However these two techniques are complementary and their analytical performances will improve with time during MSL operations as the quantity of available Martian spectra will grow. The analysis accuracy and performances will benefit from a combination of the two approaches.

  15. Theoretical calculation of spectra of dibutyl phthalate and dioctyl phthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jian-Bin; Tang, Yan-Lin; Long, Zheng-Wen; Hu, Shuang-Hui; Li, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Dibutyl phthalate DBP and dioctyl phthalate DOP are the main components of the plasticizers. In order to investigate their molecular structure, chemical bond and spectrum, the geometrical parameters of the ground state and infrared (IR) spectrum are calculated using the density functional theory B3LYP method at the level of 6-311++G( d, p). On this basis, the first twenty-six excited states and the UV-Vis absorption spectra of DBP and DOP are studied using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in the same fundamental group and compared with the ultraviolet absorption peak of the molecules measured with UNICO UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The two kinds of molecular spectra are then classified and compared with that in reference. The results show that the strong absorption of IR spectra of DOP and DBP are produced by C-H bending in-plane vibration and C=O telescopic vibration producing. The most absorption of UV-Vis absorption spectra appears in the end absorption belt from n to σ* transition, and the stronger absorption in the E belt of benzene electronic transition from π to π*. There are blue shift for DOP end absorption belt from n to σ* transition and red shift for DOP E absorption belt from π to π* transition relative to that of DBP. This calculation results are better in accord with the spectral data measured by UNICO ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometer.

  16. Tunneling spectra for electrons in the lowest Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnell, F. J.; Simon, Steven H.

    2010-03-01

    The recently developed experimental technique of time dependent capacitance spectroscopy [1] allows for measurements of high-resolution tunneling spectra of 2DEGs in the quantum Hall regime, giving a detailed probe of the single particle spectral function (electron addition and subtraction spectra). These experiments show a number of interesting features including Landau level structure, exchange enhanced Zeeman energy, Coulomb gap physics, effects of fractional quantization, as well as several key features that remain to be explained. While there has been some prior theoretical work[2] towards explaining low energy Coulomb gap features of tunneling spectra found in much earlier tunneling experiments [3], the new experiments[1] have uncovered physics outside of the prior theoretical explanations. Building on a number of these prior theoretical works, we investigate theoretically the expected tunneling spectra for electrons in low Landau levels, including the effects of electron spin and coupling to collective modes. [1] O. E. Dial, R.C. Ashoori, L.N. Pfeiffer, and K.W. West, Nature 448, 176-179 (2007) ; O. E. Dial et al, unpublished. [2] I. Aleiner et al, Phys. Rev. Lett 74 3435; (1994) S. R. E. Yang and A. MacDonald PRL 70 4110 (1993); S. He, P.M. Platzman, and B. I. Halperin, PRL 71 777 (1993). [3] J. P. Eisenstein et al, Phy. Rev. Lett. 69, 3804 (1992).

  17. Theoretical study on absorption and emission spectra of adenine analogues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongxia; Song, Qixia; Yang, Yan; Li, Yan; Wang, Haijun

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescent nucleoside analogues have attracted much attention in studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids in recent years. In the present work, we use theoretical calculations to investigate the structural and optical properties of four adenine analogues (termed as A1, A2, A3, and A4), and also consider the effects of aqueous solution and base pairing. The results show that the fluorescent adenine analogues can pair with thymine to form stable H-bonded WC base pairs. The excited geometries of both adenine analogues and WC base pairs are similar to the ground geometries. The absorption and emission maxima of adenine analogues are greatly red shifted compared with nature adenine, the oscillator strengths of A1 and A2 are stronger than A3 and A4 in both absorption and emission spectra. The calculated low-energy peaks in the absorption spectra are in good agreement with the experimental data. In general, the aqueous solution and base pairing can slightly red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima, and can increase the oscillator strengths of absorption spectra, but significantly decrease the oscillator strengths of A3 in emission spectra.

  18. Standardization of near infrared spectra measured on multi-instrument.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2014-07-11

    Calibration model transfer is essential for practical applications of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy because the measurements of the spectra may be performed on different instruments and the difference between the instruments must be corrected. An approach for calibration transfer based on alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) algorithm is proposed in this work. From the three-way spectral matrix measured on different instruments, the relative intensity of concentration, spectrum and instrument is obtained using trilinear decomposition. Because the relative intensity of instrument is a reflection of the spectral difference between instruments, the spectra measured on different instruments can be standardized by a correction of the coefficients in the relative intensity. Two NIR datasets of corn and tobacco leaf samples measured with three instruments are used to test the performance of the method. The results show that, for both the datasets, the spectra measured on one instrument can be correctly predicted using the partial least squares (PLS) models built with the spectra measured on the other instruments.

  19. Spectra of Baroclinic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1996-01-01

    Baroclinic inertia-gravity (IG) waves form a persistent background of thermocline depth and sea surface height oscillations. They also contribute to the kinetic energy of horizontal motions in the subsurface layer. Measured by the ratio of water particle velocity to wave phase speed, the wave nonlinearity may be rather high. Given a continuous supply of energy from external sources, nonlinear wave-wave interactions among IG waves would result in inertial cascades of energy, momentum, and wave action. Based on a recently developed theory of wave turbulence in scale-dependent systems, these cascades are investigated and IG wave spectra are derived for an arbitrary degree of wave nonlinearity. Comparisons with satellite-altimetry-based spectra of surface height variations and with energy spectra of horizontal velocity fluctuations show good agreement. The well-known spectral peak at the inertial frequency is thus explained as a result of the inverse cascade. Finally, we discuss a possibility of inferring the internal Rossby radius of deformation and other dynamical properties of the upper thermocline from the spectra of SSH (sea surface height) variations based on altimeter measurements.

  20. Quantitative Comparison of Tandem Mass Spectra Obtained on Various Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazsó, Fanni Laura; Ozohanics, Oliver; Schlosser, Gitta; Ludányi, Krisztina; Vékey, Károly; Drahos, László

    2016-08-01

    The similarity between two tandem mass spectra, which were measured on different instruments, was compared quantitatively using the similarity index (SI), defined as the dot product of the square root of peak intensities in the respective spectra. This function was found to be useful for comparing energy-dependent tandem mass spectra obtained on various instruments. Spectral comparisons show the similarity index in a 2D "heat map", indicating which collision energy combinations result in similar spectra, and how good this agreement is. The results and methodology can be used in the pharma industry to design experiments and equipment well suited for good reproducibility. We suggest that to get good long-term reproducibility, it is best to adjust the collision energy to yield a spectrum very similar to a reference spectrum. It is likely to yield better results than using the same tuning file, which, for example, does not take into account that contamination of the ion source due to extended use may influence instrument tuning. The methodology may be used to characterize energy dependence on various instrument types, to optimize instrumentation, and to study the influence or correlation between various experimental parameters.

  1. Properties of Martian Hematite at Meridiani Planum by Simultaneous Fitting of Mars Mossbauer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, D. G.; Fleischer, I.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    temperature dependence of certain parameters. By examining different fitting models, we demonstrate an improved fit for martian hematite modeled with two sextets rather than as a single sextet, and show that outcrop and spherule hematite are distinct. For outcrop, the weaker sextet indicates a Morin transition typical of well-crystallized and chemically pure hematite, while most of the outcrop hematite remains in a weakly ferromagnetic state at all temperatures. For spherule spectra, both sextets are consistent with weakly ferromagnetic hematite with no Morin transition. For both hematites, there is evidence for a range of particle sizes.

  2. On optimization of absorption-dispersion spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawranek, J. P.; Grabska, J.; Beć, K. B.

    2016-12-01

    A modified approach to the analysis of spectra of the complex electric permittivity of liquids in the Infrared region is presented. These spectra are derived from experimental spectra of the complex refractive index. Subsequently they are used to determine important secondary quantities, e.g. spectra of complex molecular polarizabilities and an integral property - the molar vibrational polarization. The accuracy of these quantities depends essentially on the accuracy of both components of the complex electric permittivity spectrum. In the proposed procedure, the spectra of the complex electric permittivity are approximated using the Classical Damped Harmonic Oscillator (CDHO) model for the description of individual bandshapes. The CDHO model defines both the real and imaginary part of the complex permittivity. The fitting procedure includes a simultaneous optimization of both the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity spectrum. A comparison of absorption-only curve fitting and the novel absorption-dispersion double curve fitting is presented; advantages of the new approach in accuracy, reliability and convergence time are pointed out. Due to the complexity of the problem, the choice was restricted to non-gradient methods of optimization. The performance of several gradientless algorithms was tested. Among numerous procedures the Powell General Least Squares Method Without Derivatives was found to be the most efficient. The reliability of obtained results of the band separatiovn process was tested on several simulated spectra of increasing complexity. The applicability of the developed approach to the analysis of exemplary experimental data was evaluated and discussed.

  3. Eigenvalue Spectra of Modular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2013-08-01

    A large variety of dynamical processes that take place on networks can be expressed in terms of the spectral properties of some linear operator which reflects how the dynamical rules depend on the network topology. Often, such spectral features are theoretically obtained by considering only local node properties, such as degree distributions. Many networks, however, possess large-scale modular structures that can drastically influence their spectral characteristics and which are neglected in such simplified descriptions. Here, we obtain in a unified fashion the spectrum of a large family of operators, including the adjacency, Laplacian, and normalized Laplacian matrices, for networks with generic modular structure, in the limit of large degrees. We focus on the conditions necessary for the merging of the isolated eigenvalues with the continuous band of the spectrum, after which the planted modular structure can no longer be easily detected by spectral methods. This is a crucial transition point which determines when a modular structure is strong enough to affect a given dynamical process. We show that this transition happens in general at different points for the different matrices, and hence the detectability threshold can vary significantly, depending on the operator chosen. Equivalently, the sensitivity to the modular structure of the different dynamical processes associated with each matrix will be different, given the same large-scale structure present in the network. Furthermore, we show that, with the exception of the Laplacian matrix, the different transitions coalesce into the same point for the special case where the modules are homogeneous but separate otherwise.

  4. An Inverse Modeling Approach to Estimating Phytoplankton Pigment Concentrations from Phytoplankton Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moisan, John R.; Moisan, Tiffany A. H.; Linkswiler, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton absorption spectra and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigment observations from the Eastern U.S. and global observations from NASA's SeaBASS archive are used in a linear inverse calculation to extract pigment-specific absorption spectra. Using these pigment-specific absorption spectra to reconstruct the phytoplankton absorption spectra results in high correlations at all visible wavelengths (r(sup 2) from 0.83 to 0.98), and linear regressions (slopes ranging from 0.8 to 1.1). Higher correlations (r(sup 2) from 0.75 to 1.00) are obtained in the visible portion of the spectra when the total phytoplankton absorption spectra are unpackaged by multiplying the entire spectra by a factor that sets the total absorption at 675 nm to that expected from absorption spectra reconstruction using measured pigment concentrations and laboratory-derived pigment-specific absorption spectra. The derived pigment-specific absorption spectra were further used with the total phytoplankton absorption spectra in a second linear inverse calculation to estimate the various phytoplankton HPLC pigments. A comparison between the estimated and measured pigment concentrations for the 18 pigment fields showed good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.5) for 7 pigments and very good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.7) for chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin. Higher correlations result when the analysis is carried out at more local geographic scales. The ability to estimate phytoplankton pigments using pigment-specific absorption spectra is critical for using hyperspectral inverse models to retrieve phytoplankton pigment concentrations and other Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) from passive remote sensing observations.

  5. Mosaic aging

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lary C.; Herndon, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Although all multicellular organisms undergo structural and functional deterioration with age, senescence is not a uniform process. Rather, each organism experiences a constellation of changes that reflect the heterogeneous effects of age on molecules, cells, organs and systems, an idiosyncratic pattern that we refer to as mosaic aging. Varying genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors (local and extrinsic) contribute to the aging phenotype in a given individual, and these agents influence the type and rate of functional decline, as well as the likelihood of developing age-associated afflictions such as cardiovascular disease, arthritis, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders. Identifying key factors that drive aging, clarifying their activities in different systems, and in particular understanding how they interact will enhance our comprehension of the aging process, and could yield insights into the permissive role that senescence plays in the emergence of acute and chronic diseases of the elderly. PMID:20110150

  6. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1 to 100 MeV region is reported with data from the combined observations of experiments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. Most of the events studied are dominated by He, and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. An alternative interpretation is that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the spectrum.

  7. Calculation of IR-spectra of structural fragments of lignins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.; Ishankhodzhaeva, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    To study structure of softwood lignins the experimental and theoretical IR-spectra in middle IR-diapason were analyzed. To interpret these data the quantum chemical calculations of IR-spectra of general dimmer fragments of softwood lignins by method of density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set were carried out. These calculations showed that frequencies of normal vibrations of fragment with β-alkyl-aryl linkage are close to the experimental values of the IR absorption bands of lignin, and infrared spectrum of this structure is similar to the experimental spectrum of lignin. The calculations with accounting for the solvent showed a strong increase in the intensity of the majority of the bands and the solvent effect on the frequencies of vibrations.

  8. A library of near-infrared integral field spectra of young M-L dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy, M.; Chauvin, G.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Rojo, P.; Allard, F.; Pinte, C.; Dumas, C.; Homeier, D.

    2014-02-01

    Context. At young ages, low surface gravity affects the atmospheric properties of ultracool dwarfs. The impact on medium-resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectra has only been slightly investigated at the M-L transition so far. Aims: We present a library of NIR (1.1-2.45 μm) medium-resolution (R ~ 1500-2000) integral field spectra of 15 young M6-L0 dwarfs. We aim at deriving updated NIR spectral type, luminosity, and physical parameters (Teff, log g, M, L/L⊙) for each source. This work also aims at testing the latest generation of BT-SETTL atmospheric models. Methods: We estimated spectral types using spectral indices and the spectra of young objects classified in the optical. We used the 2010 and 2012 releases of the BT-SETTL synthetic spectral grid and cross-checked the results with the DRIFT-PHOENIX models to derive the atmospheric properties of the sources. Results: We do not find significant differences between the spectra of young companions and those of young isolated brown dwarfs in the same spectral type range. We derive infrared spectral types L0 ± 1, L0 ± 1, M9.5 ± 0.5, M9.5 ± 0.5, M9.25 ± 0.25, M8+0.5-0.75, and M8.5 ± 0.5 for AB Pic b, Cha J110913-773444, USco CTIO 108B, GSC 08047-00232 B, DH Tau B, CT Cha b, and HR7329B, respectively. The BT-SETTL and DRIFT-PHOENIX models yield close Teff and log g estimates for each source. The models seem to show a 600+600-300 K drop in the effective temperature at the M-L transition. Assuming the former temperatures are correct, we then derive new mass estimates that confirm that DH Tau B, USco CTIO 108B, AB Pic b, KPNO Tau 4, OTS 44, and Cha1109 lie inside or at the boundary of the planetary mass range. We combine the empirical luminosities of the M9.5-L0 sources to the Teff to derive semi-empirical radii estimates that do not match "hot-start" evolutionary models predictions at 1-3 Myr. We use complementary data to demonstrate that atmospheric models are able to reproduce the combined optical and infrared

  9. NEXAFS of ionic solids as seen through resonant electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, M.; Kikas, A.; Maiste, A.; Ruus, R.; Saar, A.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the nonradiative decay patterns of core-hole-electron bound states (core excitons) in the regions of K L 23 edge of KMnF 3 and KCl, Cl L 23 edge of NaCl, and F K edge of alkali fluorides include specific spectator structures which are clearly distinguishable from the normal Auger spectra excited in the regions of continuum transitions.

  10. Condensed-matter energetics from diatomic molecular spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, In H.; Jeanloz, Raymond; Jhung, Kyu S.

    1993-01-01

    Analyses of molecular spectra and compression data from crystals show that a single function successfully describes the dependence on interatomic separation of both the potential energy of diatomic molecules and the cohesive binding energy of condensed matter. The empirical finding that one function describes interatomic energies for such diverse forms of matter and over a wide range of conditions can be used to extend condensed-matter equations of state but warrants further theoretical study.

  11. Disks of T Tauri stars with flat infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, F.C.; Shu, F.H.; Lada, C.J.

    1988-03-01

    The energy distributions of T Tauri stars with flat infrared spectra is modeled by assuming that they have spatially thin disks with unorthodox radial gradients of temperature. Derived model parameters show that the disks associated with the flat-spectrum sources must contain intrinsic luminosity in addition to the energy intercepted and reprocessed from the central star, i.e., the disks must be active. Self-gravity may provide a possible source for this activity. 80 references.

  12. UV fingerprints predominate in the PTCH mutation spectra of basal cell carcinomas independent of clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Heitzer, Ellen; Lassacher, Anita; Quehenberger, Franz; Kerl, Helmut; Wolf, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) shows a wide interpatient variation in lesion accrual. To determine whether certain tumorigenic fingerprints and potentially predisposing patched (PTCH) tumor suppressor single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are distributed differently among sporadic BCC patients, we compared the PTCH mutation spectra in early-onset BCC (first lesion at age < 35 years), regular BCC (first lesion at age > or = 35 years and < 10 lesions), and multiple BCC (> or = 10 lesions). The PTCH gene was mutated in 29 of 60 cases (48%). Most of the PTCH mutations bore the UV fingerprint (i.e., C --> T or tandem CC --> TT transitions at dipyrimidine sites). However, neither the proportion nor the spectra of exonic PTCH mutations differed significantly among the three groups. A large number of SNPs (IVS10+99C/T, IVS11-51G/C, 1665T/C, 1686C/T, IVS15+9G/C, IVS16-80G/C, IVS17+21G/A, and 3944C/T or its combinations) were also detected, but again their incidence did not differ significantly among the groups. Interestingly, expression of the IVS16-80G/C and the IVS17+21G/A genotype did not achieve the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in patients with regular and/or early-onset BCC. These data suggest that a (UV-) mutated PTCH gene is important for sporadic BCC formation independent of clinical phenotype and that the IVS16-80G/C and/or IVS17+21G/A SNP site might be important for tumorigenesis in certain BCC patients.

  13. DFT simulations and vibrational analysis of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of 2-amino-4-methyl benzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Dheivamalar, S; Silambarasan, V

    2012-10-01

    This work deals with the vibrational spectroscopy of 2-amino-4-methyl benzonitrile (AMB) by means of quantum chemical calculations. The mid and far FTIR and FT-Raman spectra were measured in the condensed state. Hartree-Fock (HF/6-31G(*)) and density functional theory (DFT, B3LYP/6-31G(*)) ab initio methods have been performed to interpret the observed vibrational spectra. The vibrational spectra were interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis based on scaled density functional force field. The results of the calculations were applied to simulated infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound, which showed excellent agreement with the observed spectra.

  14. Age and injury severity.

    PubMed

    Brorsson, B

    1989-01-01

    This study aims at showing if and to what extent injury severity in frontal car crashes increases with the age of front seat occupants. Data on 2658 belted drivers and front seat passengers in Volvo private car series 140, 240 and 740/760, involved in frontal crashes were extracted from the Volvo Car Crash Register. The results show that the risk of injury resulting in "medical observation" does not increase systematically with age. However, the risk of fracture with any localization is more than three times higher among those aged 65-74 than in those aged 18-24, and the risk of fracture in the rib cage is nearly eleven times higher among the older than in the younger age group. It can be concluded that the incidence of specific types of injuries - as exemplified with fractures of any localization and fractures in the rib cage - increases with advancing age.

  15. Gravitational spectra from direct measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Colombo, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    A simple rapid method is described for determining the spectrum of a surface field from harmonic analysis of direct measurements along great circle arcs. The method is shown to give excellent overall trends to very high degree from even a few short arcs of satellite data. Three examples are taken with perfect measurements of satellite tracking over a planet made up of hundreds of point-masses using (1) altimetric heights from a low orbiting spacecraft, (2) velocity residuals between a low and a high satellite in circular orbits, and (3) range-rate data between a station at infinity and a satellite in highly eccentric orbit. In particular, the smoothed spectrum of the Earth's gravitational field is determined to about degree 400(50 km half wavelength) from 1 D x 1 D gravimetry and the equivalent of 11 revolutions of Geos 3 and Skylab altimetry. This measurement shows there is about 46 cm of geoid height remaining in the field beyond degree 180.

  16. Infrared spectra of silica polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, C.; Noguchi, R.; Chihara, H.; Suto, H.; Ohtaka, O.; Imai, Y.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.

    The existence of silica within several debris disks has been suggested. We investigate the annealing conditions of α-cristobalite, and further prepare various types of silica, including α-cristobalite, α-quartz, coesite, stishovite, and fused quartz, which are natural, synthetic or commercial samples. We compare the results to previous studies and find that α-cristobalite synthesized at higher temperature than annealed silica. The interesting result of features similar to those of forsterite should be highlighted, where αcristobalite and coesite showed similar peaks at 16, 33, and 69 μm as forsterite. The 69 μm band for αcristobalite is especially very broad and strong, and shifts largely to a shorter wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The band for coesite, however, is very sharp, and shifts only a small amount to longer wavelengths under cooling to low temperatures. The peak positions of 16 and 69-μm band due to α-cristobalite can become index for temperature of silica dust. We discuss the possibility of silica detection around debris disks.

  17. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  18. Parameterizing Stellar Spectra Using Deep Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Pan, Ru-Yang; Duan, Fu-Qing

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale sky surveys are observing massive amounts of stellar spectra. The large number of stellar spectra makes it necessary to automatically parameterize spectral data, which in turn helps in statistically exploring properties related to the atmospheric parameters. This work focuses on designing an automatic scheme to estimate effective temperature ({T}{eff}), surface gravity ({log}g) and metallicity [Fe/H] from stellar spectra. A scheme based on three deep neural networks (DNNs) is proposed. This scheme consists of the following three procedures: first, the configuration of a DNN is initialized using a series of autoencoder neural networks; second, the DNN is fine-tuned using a gradient descent scheme; third, three atmospheric parameters {T}{eff}, {log}g and [Fe/H] are estimated using the computed DNNs. The constructed DNN is a neural network with six layers (one input layer, one output layer and four hidden layers), for which the number of nodes in the six layers are 3821, 1000, 500, 100, 30 and 1, respectively. This proposed scheme was tested on both real spectra and theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models. Test errors are measured with mean absolute errors (MAEs). The errors on real spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are 0.1477, 0.0048 and 0.1129 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (64.85 K for {T}{eff}), respectively. Regarding theoretical spectra from Kurucz’s new opacity distribution function models, the MAE of the test errors are 0.0182, 0.0011 and 0.0112 dex for {log}g, {log}{T}{eff} and [Fe/H] (14.90 K for {T}{eff}), respectively.

  19. Can We Infer Ocean Dynamics from Altimeter Wavenumber Spectra?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richman, James; Shriver, Jay; Arbic, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The wavenumber spectra of sea surface height (SSH) and kinetic energy (KE) have been used to infer the dynamics of the ocean. When quasi-geostrophic dynamics (QG) or surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) turbulence dominate and an inertial subrange exists, a steep SSH wavenumber spectrum is expected with k-5 for QG turbulence and a flatter k-11/3 for SQG turbulence. However, inspection of the spectral slopes in the mesoscale band of 70 to 250 km shows that the altimeter wavenumber slopes typically are much flatter than the QG or SQG predictions over most of the ocean. Comparison of the altimeter wavenumber spectra with the spectra estimated from the output of an eddy resolving global ocean circulation model (the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM, at 1/25 resolution), which is forced by high frequency winds and includes the astronomical forcing of the sun and the moon, suggests that the flatter slopes of the altimeter may arise from three possible sources, the presence of internal waves, the lack of an inertial subrange in the 70 to 250 km band and noise or submesoscales at small scales. When the wavenumber spectra of SSH and KE are estimated near the internal tide generating regions, the resulting spectra are much flatter than the expectations of QG or SQG theory. If the height and velocity variability are separated into low frequency (periods greater than 2 days) and high frequency (periods less than a day), then a different pattern emerges with a relatively flat wavenumber spectrum at high frequency and a steeper wavenumber spectrum at low frequency. The stationary internal tides can be removed from the altimeter spectrum, which steepens the spectral slopes in the energetic internal wave regions. Away from generating regions where the internal waves

  20. Transit Spectra of a Hazy World Revealed by Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Hazes dramatically influence exoplanet observations by obscuring deeper atmospheric layers. This effect is especially pronounced in transit spectroscopy, which probes large pathlengths through an exoplanet atmosphere as it crosses the disk of its host star. While hazes are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra, it is difficult to make inferences from the observations because of the need to disentangle effects of noise, gas absorption, and haze extinction. Here, we turn to Titan, an extremely well studied world with a hazy atmosphere, to better understand how high altitude hazes can impact exoplanet transit observations. We use solar occultation observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. The data, which span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases, including acetylene and carbon monoxide. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is not flat, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum, and demonstrate how high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding our observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Overall, these new data challenge our understanding of how hazes influence exoplanet transit observations, and provide a means of testing proposed approaches for exoplanet characterization. Additionally, our findings will

  1. Titan Reveals Transit Spectra of a Definitively Hazy World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Maltagliati, Luca; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-11-01

    Hazes dramatically influence exoplanet observations by obscuring deeper atmospheric layers. This effect is especially pronounced in transit spectroscopy, which probes large pathlengths through an exoplanet atmosphere as it crosses the disk of its host star. While hazes are proposed to explain observed featureless transit spectra, it is difficult to make inferences from the observations because of the need to disentangle effects of noise, gas absorption, and haze extinction. Here, we turn to Titan, an extremely well studied world with a hazy atmosphere, to better understand how high altitude hazes can impact exoplanet transit observations. We use solar occultation observations from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft to generate transit spectra. Our approach exploits symmetry between occultations and transits, producing transit radius spectra that inherently include the effects of haze multiple scattering, refraction, and gas absorption. The data, which span 0.88-5 microns at a resolution of 12-18 nm, show strong methane absorption features, and weaker features due to other gases, including acetylene and carbon monoxide. Unlike the usual assumption made when modeling and interpreting transit observations of potentially hazy worlds, the slope set by haze in our spectra is neither flat nor has a pure Rayleigh slope, and creates a variation in transit height whose magnitude is comparable to those from the strongest gaseous absorption features. We use a simple model of haze extinction to explore how Titan's haze affects its transit spectrum, and demonstrate how high altitude hazes can severely limit the atmospheric depths probed by transit spectra, bounding our observations to pressures smaller than 0.1-10 mbar, depending on wavelength. Overall, these new data challenge our understanding of how hazes influence exoplanet transit observations, and provide a means of testing proposed approaches for exoplanet characterization

  2. DETERMINING REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF SURFACES AND CLOUDS ON EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Strait, Talia E.

    2013-03-01

    Planned missions will spatially resolve temperate terrestrial planets from their host star. Although reflected light from such a planet encodes information about its surface, it has not been shown how to establish surface characteristics of a planet without assuming known surfaces to begin with. We present a reanalysis of disk-integrated, time-resolved, multiband photometry of Earth obtained by the Deep Impact spacecraft as part of the EPOXI Mission of Opportunity. We extract reflectance spectra of clouds, ocean, and land without a priori knowledge of the numbers or colors of these surfaces. We show that the inverse problem of extracting surface spectra from such data is a novel and extreme instance of spectral unmixing, a well-studied problem in remote sensing. Principal component analysis is used to determine an appropriate number of model surfaces with which to interpret the data. Shrink-wrapping a simplex to the color excursions of the planet yields a conservative estimate of the planet's endmember spectra. The resulting surface maps are unphysical, however, requiring negative or larger-than-unity surface coverage at certain locations. Our ''rotational unmixing'' supersedes the endmember analysis by simultaneously solving for the surface spectra and their geographical distributions on the planet, under the assumption of diffuse reflection and known viewing geometry. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo to determine best-fit parameters and their uncertainties. The resulting albedo spectra are similar to clouds, ocean, and land seen through a Rayleigh-scattering atmosphere. This study suggests that future direct-imaging efforts could identify and map unknown surfaces and clouds on exoplanets.

  3. Theoretical spectra of floppy molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua

    2000-09-01

    Detailed studies of the vibrational dynamics of floppy molecules are presented. Six-D bound-state calculations of the vibrations of rigid water dimer based on several anisotropic site potentials (ASP) are presented. A new sequential diagonalization truncation approach was used to diagonalize the angular part of the Hamiltonian. Symmetrized angular basis and a potential optimized discrete variable representation for intermonomer distance coordinate were used in the calculations. The converged results differ significantly from the results presented by Leforestier et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 106 , 8527 (1997)]. It was demonstrated that ASP-S potential yields more accurate tunneling splittings than other ASP potentials used. Fully coupled 4D quantum mechanical calculations were performed for carbon dioxide dimer using the potential energy surface given by Bukowski et al [J. Chem. Phys., 110, 3785 (1999)]. The intermolecular vibrational frequencies and symmetry adapted force constants were estimated and compared with experiments. The inter-conversion tunneling dynamics was studied using the calculated virtual tunneling splittings. Symmetrized Radau coordinates and the sequential diagonalization truncation approach were formulated for acetylene. A 6D calculation was performed with 5 DVR points for each stretch coordinate, and an angular basis that is capable of converging the angular part of the Hamiltonian to 30 cm-1 for internal energies up to 14000 cm-1. The probability at vinylidene configuration were evaluated. It was found that the eigenstates begin to extend to vinylidene configuration from about 10000 cm-1, and the ra, coordinate is closely related to the vibrational dynamics at high energy. Finally, a direct product DVR was defined for coupled angular momentum operators, and the SDT approach were formulated. They were applied in solving the angular part of the Hamiltonian for carbon dioxide dimer problem. The results show the method is capable of giving very accurate

  4. Disk-Averaged Synthetic Spectra of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong ,William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  5. H. N. Russell and Atomic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, David

    2001-04-01

    “I would rather analyze spectra than do cross-word puzzles or do almost anything else” Henry Norris Russell wrote to William F. Meggers in 1927. Meggers, chief of the spectroscopy division at the NBS, had been surprised that an astrophysicist could be so keen about the analysis of complex spectra. But Russell was a new type of astrophysicist, one who made physics the core of his research. Spectra, for Russell, held the "master key" to knowledge about the universe, and of the atom. He was first attracted by the challenge of detecting and explaining anomalies, which he hoped would lead to new knowledge about the structure of matter. Then, influenced by physicists such as Meggers, he devoted himself to filling in the picture of the structure of atoms from their characteristic spectra as completely as possible. In this talk I will review how Russell worked with Meggers and became the nucleus of an ever-widening circle of spectroscopists devoted to the analysis of complex spectra.

  6. Improving Algorithm for Automatic Spectra Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackovic, K.; Nikolic, S.; Kotrc, P.

    2009-09-01

    Testing and improving of the computer program for automatic processing (flat-fielding) of a great number of solar spectra obtained with the horizontal heliospectrograph HSFA2 has been done. This program was developed in the Astronomical Institute of Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic in Ondřejov. An irregularity in its work has been discovered, i.e. the program didn't work for some of the spectra. To discover a cause of this error an algorithm has been developed, and a program for examination of the parallelism of reference hairs crossing the spectral slit on records of solar spectra has been made. The standard methods for data processing have been applied-calculating and analyzing higher-order moments of distribution of radiation intensity. The spectra with the disturbed parallelism of the reference hairs have been eliminated from further processing. In order to improve this algorithm of smoothing of spectra, isolation and removal of the harmonic made by a sunspot with multiple elementary transformations of ordinates (Labrouste's transformations) are planned. This project was accomplished at the first summer astronomy practice of students of the Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Serbia in 2007 in Ondřejov.

  7. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  8. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars.

    PubMed

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2005-08-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and European Space Agency's Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earthsized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of a Mars-like planet to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra. We explore the detectability as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPFC) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model. This model uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions and viewing geometries. The model was validated against spectra recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor-Thermal Emission Spectrometer and the Mariner 9-Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer. Results presented here include disk-averaged synthetic spectra, light curves, and the spectral variability at visible and mid-infrared wavelengths for Mars as a function of viewing angle, illumination, and season. We also considered the differences in the spectral appearance of an increasingly ice-covered Mars, as a function of spectral resolution, signal-to-noise and integration time for both TPF-C and TPFI/ Darwin.

  9. Cleaning HI Spectra Contaminated by GPS RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Kamin; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NUDET systems aboard GPS satellites utilize radio waves to communicate information regarding surface nuclear events. The system tests appear in spectra as RFI (radio frequency interference) at 1381MHz, which contaminates observations of extragalactic HI (atomic hydrogen) signals at 50-150 Mpc. Test durations last roughly 20-120 seconds and can occur upwards of 30 times during a single night of observing. The disruption essentially renders the corresponding HI spectra useless.We present a method that automatically removes RFI in HI spectra caused by these tests. By capitalizing on the GPS system's short test durations and predictable frequency appearance we are able to devise a method of identifying times containing compromised data records. By reevaluating the remaining data, we are able to recover clean spectra while sacrificing little in terms of sensitivity to extragalactic signals. This method has been tested on 500+ spectra taken by the Undergraduate ALFALFA Team (UAT), in which it successfully identified and removed all sources of GPS RFI. It will also be used to eliminate RFI in the upcoming Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS).This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1211005.

  10. Background noise spectra of global seismic stations

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.M.; Claassen, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Over an extended period of time station noise spectra were collected from various sources for use in estimating the detection and location performance of global networks of seismic stations. As the database of noise spectra enlarged and duplicate entries became available, an effort was mounted to more carefully select station noise spectra while discarding others. This report discusses the methodology and criteria by which the noise spectra were selected. It also identifies and illustrates the station noise spectra which survived the selection process and which currently contribute to the modeling efforts. The resulting catalog of noise statistics not only benefits those who model network performance but also those who wish to select stations on the basis of their noise level as may occur in designing networks or in selecting seismological data for analysis on the basis of station noise level. In view of the various ways by which station noise were estimated by the different contributors, it is advisable that future efforts which predict network performance have available station noise data and spectral estimation methods which are compatible with the statistics underlying seismic noise. This appropriately requires (1) averaging noise over seasonal and/or diurnal cycles, (2) averaging noise over time intervals comparable to those employed by actual detectors, and (3) using logarithmic measures of the noise.

  11. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  12. Population aging.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of population aging in China, the most densely populated country in the world. Statistics indicate that by the end of 1998, 83.75 million out of the 1.248 billion Chinese people will be over 65 years old. According to the UN standards, China will soon become an aging society. The aging population poses several challenges to the country with the greatest challenge being the increasing social responsibility to care for the aged. With the undeveloped legislative framework to protect the interests of the aged and the serious drawbacks in the pension system to cater only to the income part and not the service part of the aged, China is not yet ready for the advent of aging. Violation of the rights of senior citizens is still very rampant despite enactment of the law on Protection of the Rights of the Elderly in 1996. Moreover, China is not economically ready to become an aging society. China faces this challenge by adopting a three-pronged approach to solve the problem namely: family support, establishment of nursing homes, and creating a social security framework that addresses the needs of the society suited to the Chinese condition. It is believed that with the growing economy of the country and the rising income of its people, a comprehensive social security net will be created to take care of the aged.

  13. Aging gauge

    DOEpatents

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  14. Age-related disappearance of Mayer-like heart rate waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarisch, W. R.; Ferguson, J. J.; Shannon, R. P.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of age on the principal spectral components of heart rate obtained immediately after passive upright tilt was investigated in human subjects who underwent a 60-deg tilt over 9 sec. Two groups were examined, the first of which consisting of healthy male subjects aged 22-26 years, while the second was comprised of subjects aged 65-84 years on no medication; radiograms were recorded continuously beginning just prior to tilt until 3 min posttilt. The results of spectral analysis showed that elderly subjects did not exhibit the Mayer-like heart rate waves (the 0.07-0.09 Hz oscillations) that were present in the spectra of young subjects immediately after passive upright tilt. The findings are consistent with the concept of a 'dysautonomia of aging'. It is suggested that postural stress testing with spectral analysis of heart rate fluctuations may provide a useful way of assessing physiologic vs chronologic age.

  15. Quantum confinement in metal nanofilms: Optical spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-05-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra of Au, Fe, Co and Ni polycrystalline nanofilms in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement. The film thickness ranged from 1.1 to 15.6 nm, depending on the material. The films were deposited on fused silica substrates by sputtering/thermo-evaporation, with Fe, Co and Ni protected by a SiO2 film deposited on top. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with the box width equal to the mass thickness of the nanofilm. The transverse-quantized energy levels and transition energies scale as the inverse square of the film thickness. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are 0.93 (Au), 0.027 (Fe), 0.21 (Co) and 0.16 (Ni), in units of mo - the mass of the free electron, being independent on the film thickness. The uncertainties in the effective mass values are ca. 2.5%, determined by the film thickness calibration. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO, was thickness-independent in Au (5.00) and Fe (6.00), and increased with the film thickness in Co (from 7 to 9) and Ni (from 7 to 11). The transitions observed in the absorbance all start at the level n and correspond to Δn=+1, +2, +3, etc. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with the increased excitation energy. The photoluminescence quantum yields grow linearly with the excitation energy, showing evidence of multiple exciton generation. A prototype Fe-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated at least 90% quantum yield of photoelectrons at 77 K.

  16. AGNs with composite spectra. II. Additional data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, A. C.; Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.

    1999-03-01

    In a previous paper \\cite[(Véron et al. 1997)]{ver97} we presented medium resolution (3.4 Angstroms FWHM) spectroscopic observations of 15 ``transition objects'', selected for having an ambiguous location in the \\cite[Veilleux & Osterbrock (1987)]{vei87} diagnostic diagrams, and showed that most of them were in fact ``composite'', this being due to the simultaneous presence on the slit of both a Seyfert or Liner nucleus and a H Ii region. Here, we report new spectroscopic observations of 53 emission-line galaxies with a ``transition'' spectrum, bringing up to 61 the total number of observed objects in an unbiased sample of 88 ``transition objects''. Almost all of the observed galaxies have a ``composite" nature, confirming the finding that true ``transition'' spectra may not exist at all. By eliminating ``composite objects'' from the diagnostic diagrams, a clear separation between the different classes of nuclear emission-line regions (Seyfert 2s, Liners and H Ii regions) becomes apparent; by restricting the volume occupied by the different line-emitting regions in the 3-dimensional diagnostic diagrams, we are also restricting the range of possible physical parameters in these regions. There seems to be no continuity between Seyfert 2s and Liners, the two classes occupying distinct volumes in the 3-dimensional space defined by lambda 6300/Hα ii, lambda 6583/Hα , and lambda 6300/Hα . Based on observations collected at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained from the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF) archive. Tables 5 and 6 are also available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  17. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  18. Electronic and Vibrational Spectra of InP Quantum Dots Formed by Sequential Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. S.; Ueda, A.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.

    1997-01-01

    We have performed sequential ion implantation of indium and phosphorus into silica combined with controlled thermal annealing to fabricate InP quantum dots in a dielectric host. Electronic and vibrational spectra were measured for the as-implanted and annealed samples. The annealed samples show a peak in the infrared spectra near 320/cm which is attributed to a surface phonon mode and is in good agreement with the value calculated from Frolich's theory of surface phonon polaritons. The electronic spectra show the development of a band near 390 nm that is attributed to quantum confined InP.

  19. Recent pollen spectra and zonal vegetation in the western USSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, G. M.

    The relationship of modern pollen spectra to present-day vegetation is critical to the reconstruction of vegetation and climate from fossil pollen spectra. This study uses isopoll maps to illustrate the pollen-vegetation relationships in the Soviet Union west of 100°E and presents descriptive statistics for 544 modern samples of arboreal pollen and for 370 samples of herb pollen obtained from the Soviet palynological literature. Data are assembled from this large geographic region and presented in a standardized form on a scale which can be used to relate quantitative pollen data to zonal vegetation and climatic variables and to make comparisons with other regions. In order to show the relationship between pollen types and major ecotones in forested and non-forested areas, the pollen data are presented as percentages of a sum including both arboreal and non-arboreal pollen. Major pollen types which attain values of 10% or more in at least one vegetation zone include Betula (birch), Cyperaceae (sedges), Picea (spruce), Pinus (total pine), Pinus sibirica, Ericaceae (heath family), Gramineae (grasses), Artemisia (sage), and Chenopodiaceae (i.e., saltbush, Russian thistle, pigweed family). Samples from the tundra and forest-tundra have high values of Ericaceae (heath family), birch, alder, and sedge pollen. In the boreal forest, pine, spruce, and birch pollen predominate. In the mixed and deciduous forests, Tilia (linden), Quercus (oak), Ulmus (elm), and Corylus (hazel) pollen attain maximum values. In the forest-steppe and steppe zones, arboreal pollen decreases in importance and is replaced by non-arboreal pollen types. Pollen of Artemisia and Chenopodiaceae predominates in the semi-desert zones. In spite of variation in the pollen spectra arising from the use of different sediment types (soil, peat, and river sediments), and human disturbance of vegetation, the pollen spectra are clearly related to zonal vegetation. Pollen spectra from the western USSR show

  20. Crystal field spectra of lunar pyroxenes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; Abu-Eid, R. M.; Huggins, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    Absorption spectra in the visible and near infrared regions have been obtained for pyroxene single crystals in rocks from the Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 missions. The polarized spectra are compared with those obtained from terrestrial calcic clinopyroxenes, subcalcic augites, pigeonites, and orthopyroxenes. The lunar pyroxenes contain several broad, intense absorption bands in the near infrared, the positions of which are related to bulk composition, Fe(2+) site occupancy and structure type of the pyroxene. The visible spectra contain several sharp, weak peaks mainly due to spin-forbidden transitions in Fe(2+). Additional weak bands in this region in Apollo 11 pyroxenes are attributed to Ti(3+) ions. Spectral features from Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Cr(3+), and Cr(2+) were not observed.

  1. Vibrational spectra of molecular fluids in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakcheev, V. G.; Morozov, V. B.

    2012-12-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is applied for quantitative analysis of carbon dioxide phase composition in pores of nanoporous glass samples at nearcritical temperatures. Measurements of the 1388 1/cm Q-branch were made in a wide pressure range corresponding to coexistence of gas (gas-like), adsorbed and condensed phases within pores. At temperatures several degrees below the critical value, CARS spectra behavior is easy to interpret in terms of thermodynamic model of surface adsorption and capillary condensation. It allows estimating mass fractions of different phase components. Moreover, spectra measured at near critical temperatures 30.5 and 33°C have pronounced inhomogeneous shapes and indicate the presence of condensed phase in the volume of pores. The effect obviously reflects the fluid behaviour near the critical point in nanopores. Pores with smaller radii are filled with condensed phase at lower pressures. The analysis of the CARS spectra is informative for quantitative evaluation of phase composition in nanopores.

  2. Janus Spectra in Two-Dimensional Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Cerbus, Rory T.; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-09-01

    In large-scale atmospheric flows, soap-film flows, and other two-dimensional flows, the exponent of the turbulent energy spectra, α , may theoretically take either of two distinct values, 3 or 5 /3 , but measurements downstream of obstacles have invariably revealed α =3 . Here we report experiments on soap-film flows where downstream of obstacles there exists a sizable interval in which α transitions from 3 to 5 /3 for the streamwise fluctuations but remains equal to 3 for the transverse fluctuations, as if two mutually independent turbulent fields of disparate dynamics were concurrently active within the flow. This species of turbulent energy spectra, which we term the Janus spectra, has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our results may open up new vistas in the study of turbulence and geophysical flows.

  3. Children Show Selective Trust in Technological Informants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danovitch, Judith H.; Alzahabi, Reem

    2013-01-01

    Although children are often exposed to technological devices early in life, little is known about how they evaluate these novel sources of information. In two experiments, children aged 3, 4, and 5 years old ("n" = 92) were presented with accurate and inaccurate computer informants, and they subsequently relied on information provided by…

  4. You Show, I Grow! Project Enlightenment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burroughs, Sara Chalmers

    This book is designed to help teachers, assistants, and volunteers who work in day care centers, preschools, and kindergartens teach basic skills to young children (ages 3-6) when they are ready to acquire the skill. Separate sections are provided for each of 11 skill areas: (1) listening; (2) memory; (3) colors; (4) counting; (5) geometric…

  5. Optical Spectroscopic Monitoring of Parachute Yarn Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Garcia, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Behr, V.L.; Whinery, L.D.; Peng, L.W.

    1999-04-01

    Optical spectroscopic techniques were evaluated as nondestructive monitors of the aging of parachutes in nuclear weapons. We analyzed thermally aged samples of nylon and Kevlar webbing by photoluminescence spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy. Infrared analysis was also performed to help understand the degradation mechanisms of the polymer materials in the webbing. The photoluminescence and reflection spectra were analyzed by chemometric data treatment techniques to see if aged-induced changes in the spectra correlated to changes in measured tensile strength. A correlation was found between the shapes of the photoluminescent bands and the measured tensile strengths. Photoluminescent spectra can be used to predict the tensile strengths of nylon and Kevlar webbing with sufficient accuracy to categorize the webbing sample as above rated tensile strength, marginal or below rated tensile strength. The instrumentation required to perform the optical spectroscopic measurement can be made rugged, compact and portable. Thus, optical spectroscopic techniques offer a means for nondestructive field monitoring of parachutes in the enduring stockpile/

  6. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1-100 MeV region is reported. Most of the events studied are dominated by He and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. Spectra of H, He-3, O, and Fe have spectral indices that are consistent with a value of about 3.5 above about 2 MeV/amu. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. Alternative interpretations are that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the resulting ion spectrum or that low-energy particles encounter significant additional scattering during transport from the flare.

  7. Automatic classification of spectra from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John; Self, Matthew; Taylor, William; Goebel, John; Volk, Kevin; Walker, Helen

    1989-01-01

    A new classification of Infrared spectra collected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) is presented. The spectral classes were discovered automatically by a program called Auto Class 2. This program is a method for discovering (inducing) classes from a data base, utilizing a Bayesian probability approach. These classes can be used to give insight into the patterns that occur in the particular domain, in this case, infrared astronomical spectroscopy. The classified spectra are the entire Low Resolution Spectra (LRS) Atlas of 5,425 sources. There are seventy-seven classes in this classification and these in turn were meta-classified to produce nine meta-classes. The classification is presented as spectral plots, IRAS color-color plots, galactic distribution plots and class commentaries. Cross-reference tables, listing the sources by IRAS name and by Auto Class class, are also given. These classes show some of the well known classes, such as the black-body class, and silicate emission classes, but many other classes were unsuspected, while others show important subtle differences within the well known classes.

  8. Effect of solvents on the fluorescence spectra of bacterial luciferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukovataya, Irina E.; Tyulkova, Natalya A.; Kaykova, Elisaveta V.

    2006-08-01

    Bacteria luciferases catalyze the oxidation reaction of the long-chain aliphatic aldehyde and reduced flavinmononucleotide involving molecular oxygen to a respective fatty acid emitting light quanta in the visible spectrum. Fluorescence emission of luciferases from Photobacterium leiognathi dissolved in organic solvent-water mixtures was investigated. Methanol, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide were used as organic solvents. As the methanol and acetone concentration is increased the emission maximum peak is decrease. In contrast, with dimethyl sulfoxide and formamide addition induced a increasing of the emission maximum intensity. The values of wavelength maximum (λ max) at the addition of this solvent can shows the spectra shifted to the red by about 12 nm. These increasing in the fluorescence intensity and in the λ max may be due to luciferase denaturation, resulting from the more intensive contact of chromospheres of luciferase with the solvent. At all used concentrations of methanol, acetone and formamide the shape of the fluorescence spectra was not changed. These studies demonstrate that the luciferase tryptophan fluorescence is sensitive to changes of physical-chemical property of enzyme environment. A comparison of activation/inactivation and fluorescence spectra of luciferase in methanol or acetone solutions shows that the extent of inactivation is larger than the extent of fluorescence changes at the same methanol or acetone concentration.

  9. MEASUREMENTS OF STELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS USING AUTOCORRELATION OF SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.; Deschatelets, D.

    2015-11-15

    We present a novel technique that uses the autocorrelation of the spectrum of a star to measure the line broadening caused by the modulus of its average surface magnetic field. The advantage of the autocorrelation comes from the fact that it can detect very small spectral line broadening effects because it averages over many spectral lines and therefore gives an average with a very high signal-to-noise ratio. We validate the technique with the spectra of known magnetic stars and obtain autocorrelation curves that are in full agreement with published magnetic curves obtained with Zeeman splitting. The autocorrelation also gives less noisy curves so that it can be used to obtain very accurate curves. We degrade the resolution of the spectra of these magnetic stars to lower spectral resolutions where the Zeeman splitting is undetectable. At these resolutions, the autocorrelation still gives good quality curves, thereby showing that it can be used to measure magnetic fields in spectra where the Zeeman splitting is significantly smaller than the width of the spectral line. This would therefore allow observing magnetic fields in very faint Ap stars with low-resolution spectrographs, thereby greatly increasing the number of known magnetic stars. It also demonstrates that the autocorrelation can measure magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars as well as weak magnetic fields that give a Zeeman splitting smaller than the intrinsic width of the spectral lines. Finally, it shows that the autocorrelation can be used to find unknown magnetic stars in low-resolution spectroscopic surveys.

  10. Molecular dynamics and spectra. II. Diatomic Raman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berens, Peter H.; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1981-07-01

    This paper and paper I in this series [P.H. Berens and K.R. Wilison, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 4872 (1981)] indicate that infrared and Raman rotational and fundamental vibrational-rotational spectra of dense systems (high pressure gases, liquids, and solids) are essentially classical, in that they can be computed and understood from a basically classical mechanical viewpoint, with some caveats for features in which anharmonicity is important, such as the detailed shape of Q branches. It is demonstrated here, using the diatomic case as an example, that ordinary, i.e., nonresonant, Raman band contours can be computed from classical mechanics plus simple quantum corrections. Classical versions of molecular dynamics, linear response theory, and ensemble averaging, followed by straightforward quantum corrections, are used to compute the pure rotational and fundamental vibration-rotational Raman band contours of N2 for the gas phase and for solutions of N2 in different densities of gas phase Ar and in liquid Ar. The evolution is seen from multiple peaked line shapes characteristic of free rotation in the gas phase to single peaks characteristic of hindered rotation in the liquid phase. Comparison is made with quantum and correspondence principle classical gas phase spectral calculations and with experimental measurements for pure N2 and N2 in liquid Ar. Three advantages are pointed out for a classical approach to infrared and Raman spectra. First, a classical approach can be used to compute the spectra of complex molecular systems, e.g., of large molecules, clusters, liquids, solutions, and solids. Second, this classical approach can be extended to compute the spectra of nonequilibrium and time-dependent systems, e.g., infrared and Raman spectra during the course of chemical reactions. Third, a classical viewpoint allows experimental infrared and Raman spectra to be understood and interpreted in terms of atomic motions with the considerable aid of classical models and of our

  11. BET, thermal degradation, and FTIR spectras of triazine polyamine polymers.

    PubMed

    Can, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    Here we show effect of the polyamine polymer chain length to BET isotherms. According to IUPAC classification [1], all three polymers are fitting type 1 physical adsorption isotherm with H3 hysteresis (except for EDA having H2 hysteresis). Moreover, TG and TGA analysis of polymers triazine-ethylenediamine (EDA) and triazine-triethylenetetramine (TETA) are provided. Due to the similarities of the structure, main decomposition temperatures are close to each other (between 593 K and 873 K). In order to understand change of FTIR spectra with adsorption and stripping Au(III), fresh, Au(III) adsorbed and recycled spectras of polymers measured. For further discussions about the effect of chain length to adsorption of Au(III) onto triazine polyamine polymer particles "Au (III) Uptake by Triazine Polyamine Polymers: Mechanism, Kinetic and Equilibrium Studies" Can et al. [2] (article in press).

  12. Nonexistence results for relaxation spectra with compact support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Whittle Gruffudd, H. R.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of recovering the (transformed) relaxation spectrum h from the (transformed) loss modulus g by inverting the integral equation g={{sech}}\\ast h, where \\ast denotes convolution, using Fourier transforms. We are particularly interested in establishing properties of h, having assumed that the Fourier transform of g has entire extension to the complex plane. In the setting of square integrable functions, we demonstrate that the Paley-Wiener theorem cannot be used to show the existence of non-trivial relaxation spectra with compact support. We prove a stronger result for tempered distributions: there are no non-trivial relaxation spectra with compact support. Finally we establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the relaxation spectrum h to be strictly positive definite.

  13. Detectability of minerals on desert alluvial fans using reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Hugh; Adams, John B.

    1987-01-01

    The visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra of soil samples collected from desert alluvial and colluvial surfaces in the Cuprite mining district, Nevada, were analyzed. These surfaces are downslope from hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks that contain spectrally characteristic minerals such as alunite and kaolinite. Coarse fractions of the soils on the alluvial fans are mineralogically variable and express the upslope lithologies; fine fractions are remarkably similar mineralogically and spectrally in all samples because of dilution of local mineral components by regionally derived windblown dust. Theoretical models for spectral mixing and for particle-size effects were used to model the observed spectral variations. Diagnostic mineral absorption bands in the spectra of fan materials were enhanced by computationally removing the spectrum of the homogeneous fine-soil component. Results show that spectral mixing models are useful for analyzing data with high spectral resolution obtained by field and aircraft spectrometers.

  14. [Singularity spectra analysis of the ST segments of 12-lead electrocardiogram].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Ning, Xinbao; Xu, Yinlin; Ma, Qianli; Chen, Ying; Li, Dehua

    2007-12-01

    By analysing the f(a) singularity spectra of the ST segments of the synchronous 12-lead ECG, we have found that the singularity spectrum is close to monofractality and its area is only half the area of the synchronous 12-lead ECG f(alpha) singularity spectrum. The ST segments of the synchronous 12-lead ECG signal also has f(alpha) singularity spectra distribution and it also has a reasonable varying scope. We have also found that the lead number of the ST segment f (alpha) singularity spectra for adults having coronary heart disease overstep the reasonable scope tends to increase over that of the ECG f(alpha) singularity spectra. These findings show that using the ST segments f(alpha) singularity spectra distribution of the synchronous 12-lead ECG is more effective than using the synchronous 12-lead ECG on the clinical analysis.

  15. On the possibility to diagnose a kappa-distribution from EVE flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzifcakova, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2015-08-01

    X-ray flare emission is strongly affected by the non-thermal part of the electron distribution. RHESSI observations and also recent theoretical derivations showed that the electron distribution function in coronal X-ray sources could be a kappa-distribution. An effect of kappa-distribution on the relative intensities of spectral lines of Fe XVIII - Fe XXIV observed in SDO/EVE flare spectra was calculated using KAPPA package based on the CHIANTI. Together with CHIANTI, this allows us to estimate the influence of the kappa-distributions on the diagnostics of electron density and temperature from the flare spectra. The possibility to diagnose parameters of the kappa-distribution from EVE flare spectra is discussed. The synthetic spectra for the kappa-distribution are compared with the observed flare spectra.

  16. Raman and infrared spectra and theoretical calculations of dipicolinic acid, dinicotinic acid, and their dianions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Kathleen; Laane, Jaan

    2008-11-01

    The Raman and infrared spectra of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and dinicotinic acid (DNic) and their salts (CaDPA, Na 2DPA, and CaDNic) have been recorded and the spectra have been assigned. Ab initio and DFT calculations were carried out to predict the structures and vibrational spectra and were compared to the experimental results. Because of extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the crystals of these molecules, the calculated structures and spectra for the individual molecules agree only moderately well with the experimental values. Theoretical calculations were also carried out for DPA dimers and DPA·2H 2O to better understand the intermolecular interactions. The spectra do show that DPA and its calcium salt, which are present in anthrax spores, can be distinguished from the very similar DNic and CaDNic.

  17. Tentative identification of urea and formamide in ISO-SWS infrared spectra of interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raunier, S.; Chiavassa, T.; Duvernay, F.; Borget, F.; Aycard, J. P.; Dartois, E.; d'Hendecourt, L.

    2004-03-01

    Laboratory experiments involving vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation of solid isocyanic acid (HNCO) at 10 K, followed by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), are used to interpret the complex spectra associated with Interstellar Medium (ISM) dust grains, particularly the spectra associated with the icy phase observed toward dense molecular clouds. The comparison of the infrared spectra of the photolysis products with spectra recorded from the protostellar source NGC 7538 IRS9 shows that the ``unexplained" 1700 cm-1 feature can be attributed to the contribution of several species H2CO (formaldehyde), HCONH2 (formamide) and H2NCONH2 (urea) mixed with H2O as the main contributor. Urea, formaldehyde and NH4+OCN- (ammonium cyanate) may also contribute to a band at 1470 cm-1, widely observed in many protostellar infrared sources and which remains up to now poorly explained in numerous ISO-SWS spectra. Isocyanic acid could be a precursor of formamide and urea in interstellar ices.

  18. Consistency analysis of plastic samples based on similarity calculation from limited range of the Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, B. W.; Wu, Z. X.; Dong, X. P.; Lu, D.; Tao, S. C.

    2016-07-01

    We proposed a novel method to calculate the similarity between samples with only small differences at unknown and specific positions in their Raman spectra, using a moving interval window scanning across the whole Raman spectra. Two ABS plastic samples, one with and the other without flame retardant, were tested in the experiment. Unlike the traditional method in which the similarity is calculated based on the whole spectrum, we do the calculation by using a window to cut out a certain segment from Raman spectra, each at a time as the window moves across the entire spectrum range. By our method, a curve of similarity versus wave number is obtained. And the curve shows a large change where the partial spectra of the two samples is different. Thus, the new similarity calculation method identifies samples with tiny difference in their Raman spectra better.

  19. Observed and theoretical spectra in the 10-100 A interval. [of solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.

    1988-01-01

    The soft X-ray spectra recorded in two sounding-rocket flights in 1982 and 1985 are compared with predicted spectra. The processed densitometer trace of the full spectrum is presented, together with the new spectrum from the 1985 experiment. The intensities of the lines are then compared with predictions.

  20. Experimental Constraints on Neutrino Spectra Following Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Jim; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We discuss new initiatives to constrain predictions of fission neutrino spectra from nuclear reactors. These predictions are germane to the understanding of reactor flux anomalies; are needed to reduce systematic uncertainty in neutrino oscillation spectra; and inform searches for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. The initiatives include a search for very high- Q beta decay components to the neutrino spectrum from the Daya Bay power plant; plans for a measurement of the β- spectrum from 252Cf fission products; and precision measurements of the 235U fission neutrino spectrum from PROSPECT and other very short baseline reactor experiments.

  1. A data base of geologic field spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.; Goetz, A. F. H.; Paley, H. N.; Alley, R. E.; Abbott, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that field samples measured in the laboratory do not always present an accurate picture of the ground surface sensed by airborne or spaceborne instruments because of the heterogeneous nature of most surfaces and because samples are disturbed and surface characteristics changed by collection and handling. The development of new remote sensing instruments relies on the analysis of surface materials in their natural state. The existence of thousands of Portable Field Reflectance Spectrometer (PFRS) spectra has necessitated a single, all-inclusive data base that permits greatly simplified searching and sorting procedures and facilitates further statistical analyses. The data base developed at JPL for cataloging geologic field spectra is discussed.

  2. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  3. Hadron rapidity spectra within a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostukhin, A. S.; Toneev, V. D.

    2017-01-01

    A 2-stage hybrid model is proposed that joins the fast initial state of interaction, described by the hadron string dynamics (HSD) model, to subsequent evolution of the expanding system at the second stage, treated within ideal hydrodynamics. The developed hybrid model is assigned to describe heavy-ion collisions in the energy range of the NICA collider under construction in Dubna. Generally, the model is in reasonable agreement with the available data on proton rapidity spectra. However, reproducing proton rapidity spectra, our hybrid model cannot describe the rapidity distributions of pions. The model should be improved by taking into consideration viscosity effects at the hydrodynamical stage of system evolution.

  4. Four years of meteor spectra patrol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of the NASA-Langley Research Center meteor spectra patrol is described in general terms. The recording of very faint meteors was made possible by three great strides in optical and photographic technology in the 1960's: (1) the availability of optical-grade fused silica at modest cost, (2) the development of large transmission gratings with high blaze efficiency, and (3) the development of a method for avoiding plate fogging due to background skylight, which consisted of using a photoelectric meteor detector which actuates the spectrograph shutter when a meteor occurs in the field. The classification scheme for meteor spectra developed by Peter M. Millman is described.

  5. Micro-Raman spectra of ugrandite garnet.

    PubMed

    Moroz, T; Ragozin, A; Salikhov, D; Belikova, G; Puchkov, V; Kagi, H

    2009-08-01

    The natural garnets from chromite ores associated with pegmatoid pyroxenites of Sangalyk area (Uchaly ore district, southern Urals, Russia) were studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of these garnets were close to ugrandite, an isomorphous intermediate group of uvarovite-grossularite-andradite, X(3)Y(2)(SiO(4))(3), X = Ca(2+), Y = Al(3+), Fe(3+), Cr(3+), according to Raman spectra and X-ray microprobe analyses. An assignment of most of the observed bands in visible and near infrared Raman spectra is reported.

  6. Micro-Raman spectra of ugrandite garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, T.; Ragozin, A.; Salikhov, D.; Belikova, G.; Puchkov, V.; Kagi, H.

    2009-08-01

    The natural garnets from chromite ores associated with pegmatoid pyroxenites of Sangalyk area (Uchaly ore district, southern Urals, Russia) were studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of these garnets were close to ugrandite, an isomorphous intermediate group of uvarovite-grossularite-andradite, X 3Y 2(SiO 4) 3, X = Ca 2+, Y = Al 3+, Fe 3+, Cr 3+, according to Raman spectra and X-ray microprobe analyses. An assignment of most of the observed bands in visible and near infrared Raman spectra is reported.

  7. Algorithms for classification of astronomical object spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Szuppe, J.; Hryniewicz, K.

    2015-09-01

    Obtaining interesting celestial objects from tens of thousands or even millions of recorded optical-ultraviolet spectra depends not only on the data quality but also on the accuracy of spectra decomposition. Additionally rapidly growing data volumes demands higher computing power and/or more efficient algorithms implementations. In this paper we speed up the process of substracting iron transitions and fitting Gaussian functions to emission peaks utilising C++ and OpenCL methods together with the NOSQL database. In this paper we implemented typical astronomical methods of detecting peaks in comparison to our previous hybrid methods implemented with CUDA.

  8. Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Alpha Spectra Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Orellana, Carlos J.; Rubio-Montero, Pilar; González-Velasco, Horacio

    2005-01-01

    We present a performance study of alpha-particle spectra fitting using parallel Genetic Algorithm (GA). The method uses a two-step approach. In the first step we run parallel GA to find an initial solution for the second step, in which we use Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method for a precise final fit. GA is a high resources-demanding method, so we use a Beowulf cluster for parallel simulation. The relationship between simulation time (and parallel efficiency) and processors number is studied using several alpha spectra, with the aim of obtaining a method to estimate the optimal processors number that must be used in a simulation.

  9. Intellectual Disabilities and Power Spectra Analysis during Sleep: A New Perspective on Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, M.; Carotenuto, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of sleep in cognitive processes has been confirmed by a growing number of reports for all ages of life. Analysing sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra may be useful to study cortical organisation in individuals with Borderline Intellectual Functioning (BIF), as seen in other disturbances even if it is not considered a…

  10. Principal component analysis of UV-VIS-NIR transmission spectra of Moldavian matured wine distillates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodasevich, Mikhail A.; Trofimova, Darya V.; Nezalzova, Elena I.

    2010-09-01

    Principal component analysis of UV-VIS-NIR transmission spectra of matured wine distillates (1-40 years aged) produced by three Moldavian manufacturers allows to characterize with sufficient certainty the eleven chemical parameters of considered alcoholic beverages: contents of acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, furfural, vanillin, syringic aldehyde and acid, etc.

  11. Principal component analysis of UV-VIS-NIR transmission spectra of Moldavian matured wine distillates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodasevich, Mikhail A.; Trofimova, Darya V.; Nezalzova, Elena I.

    2011-02-01

    Principal component analysis of UV-VIS-NIR transmission spectra of matured wine distillates (1-40 years aged) produced by three Moldavian manufacturers allows to characterize with sufficient certainty the eleven chemical parameters of considered alcoholic beverages: contents of acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, furfural, vanillin, syringic aldehyde and acid, etc.

  12. Database-Driven Analyses of Astronomical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cami, Jan

    2012-03-01

    species to the fullerene species C60 and C70 [4]. Given the large number and variety of molecules detected in space, molecular infrared spectroscopy can be used to study pretty much any astrophysical environment that is not too energetic to dissociate the molecules. At the lowest energies, it is interesting to note that molecules such as CN have been used to measure the temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background (see e.g., Ref. 15). The great diagnostic potential of infrared molecular spectroscopy comes at a price though. Extracting the physical parameters from the observations requires expertise in knowing how various physical processes and instrumental characteristics play together in producing the observed spectra. In addition to the astronomical aspects, this often includes interpreting and understanding the limitations of laboratory data and quantum-chemical calculations; the study of the interaction of matter with radiation at microscopic scales (called radiative transfer, akin to ray tracing) and the effects of observing (e.g., smoothing and resampling) on the resulting spectra and possible instrumental effects (e.g., fringes). All this is not trivial. To make matters worse, observational spectra often contain many components, and might include spectral contributions stemming from very different physical conditions. Fully analyzing such observations is thus a time-consuming task that requires mastery of several techniques. And with ever-increasing rates of observational data acquisition, it seems clear that in the near future, some form of automation is required to handle the data stream. It is thus appealing to consider what part of such analyses could be done without too much human intervention. Two different aspects can be separated: the first step involves simply identifying the molecular species present in the observations. Once the molecular inventory is known, we can try to extract the physical parameters from the observed spectral properties. For both

  13. Comparison of reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Ando, Masatoshi; Stookey, George K.

    2000-03-01

    Development of dental caries is associated with the loss of minerals and change in the enamel structure. In this study, we have measured and compared reflectance spectra of sound and carious enamel, to investigate its utility in detection and analysis of dental caries. One hundred twenty, 3-mm diameter human enamel cores, with no sign of fluorosis, tetracycline stain, hypoplasia, fracture and restorations, were prepared. The enamel surfaces then were ground and polished. Specimens were placed on a fitted holder with either black or white color for background, with no fluorescence. The baseline spectra were measured using a spectrophotometer with enclosed diffused illumination. Spectra measured from 380 to 780 nm at 5 nm intervals. All measurements were corrected to compensate for the spectrum of illumination. The specimens were divided into two groups and exposed to a demineralizing solution, for 48 and 96 hours, respectively. Reflectance spectra of specimens were measured following lesion induction. All specimens were sectioned and analyzed by transverse microradiography (TMR), where lesion depth and mineral loss ((Delta) Z) were measured. Dimensionality of multi-spectral data was reduced through its conversion to L*a*b* color coordinates and principal component analysis (PCA). Multiple linear regression analysis showed low correlation between L*a*b* and lesion depth and mineral loss. PCA analysis showed higher correlation coefficient, compared to L*a*b*. Preliminary results of this study suggest that multi-spectral measurement and analysis of the tooth surface could be useful in predicting the depth and severity of an early carious lesion.

  14. Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, V.; Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Adelsberg, M. van; Werner, K.

    2011-09-21

    The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

  15. Identifying leaf traits that signal stress in TIR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago Acevedo, Maria F.; Groen, Thomas A.; Hecker, Christoph A.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2017-03-01

    Plants under constant water and temperature stress experience a chain of reactions that in the long term alter their leaf traits (morphology, anatomy and chemistry). The use of these traits as proxies for assessing plant stress was so far mainly based on conventional laboratory methods, which are expensive and time-consuming. Remote sensing methods based on spectral changes can detect changes in pigments and productivity using the visible and near infrared. However, the use of infrared spectra, where changes in the spectra are associated with physical changes of the leaf, is still incipient. In this study plants of Rhododendron cf. catawbiense, were exposed to low temperatures and low soil water content during a six months experiment. The spectral response in the infrared region 1.4-16 μm, microstructural variables, leaf water content, leaf area and leaf molecules such as lignin and cellulose concentrations were measured in individual leaves after the period of stress. This study revealed that under cold conditions plants have most changes in leaf water content, lignin and cellulose concentrations and leaf area, while under drought conditions the most striking change is water loss. These leaf trait modifications are also correlated with changes in thermal infrared spectra, showing their potential as proxies for detecting plant stress in this species. A multinomial model allows the estimation of the stress treatments imposed on these plants from their infrared spectra. This model reveals a group of 15 bands in the SWIR and MWIR between 2.23 and 7.77 μm, which show relatively large changes, and had an overall accuracy of 87%. Finally, individual partial least squares regression models show that lignin, cellulose, leaf water content and leaf area are the leaf traits reacting significantly to long-term stress and that are also generating measurable changes in the infrared spectra. Although these models are based on laboratory data, the congruence of the identified

  16. Data from the Television Game Show "Friend or Foe?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalist, David E.

    2004-01-01

    The data discussed in this paper are from the television game show "Friend or Foe", and can be used to examine whether age, gender, race, and the amount of prize money affect contestants' strategies. The data are suitable for a variety of statistical analyses, such as descriptive statistics, testing for differences in means or proportions, and…

  17. Binary Pulsar B1259-63 Spectrum Evolution and Classification of Pulsar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembska, M.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2012-12-01

    Recently published results (Kijak et al. 2011a) indicated the evidence for a new aspect in radio pulsars spectra. We studied the radio spectrum of PSR B1259-63 in an unique binary with Be star LS 2883 and showed that this pulsar undergoes a spectrum evolution due to the orbital motion. We proposed a qualitative model which explains this evolution. We considered two mechanisms that might influence the observed radio emission: free-free absorption and cyclotron resonance. According to the published results (Kijak et al. 2011b), there were found objects with a new type of pulsar radio spectra, called gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. Most of them were found to exist in very interesting environments. Therefore, it is suggested that the turnover phenomenon is associated with the environment, rather than being related intrinsically to the radio emission mechanism. Having noticed an apparent resemblance between the B1259-63 spectrum and the GPS, we suggested that the same mechanisms should be responsible for both cases. Thus, we believe that this binary system can hold the clue to the understanding of the gigahertz-peaked spectra of isolated pulsars. Using the same database we constructed spectra for chosen observing days and obtained different types of spectra. Comparing to current classification of pulsar spectra, there occurs a suggestion that the appearance of various spectra shapes, different from a simple power law which is typical for radio pulsars, is possibly caused by environmental conditions around neutron stars.

  18. Identifying pure urban image spectra using a learning urban image spectral archive (LUISA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilge, Marianne; Heiden, Uta; Habermeyer, Martin; Mende, André; Juergens, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    In this study a learning urban image spectral archive (LUISA) has been developed, that overcomes the issue of an incomplete spectral library and can be used to derive scene-specific pure material spectra. It consists of a well described starting spectral library (LUISA-A) and a tool to derive scene-based pure surface material spectra (LUISA-T). The concept is based on a three-stage approach: (1) Comparing hyperspectral image spectra with LUISA-A spectra to identify scene-specific pure materials, (2) extracting unknown pure spectra based on spatial and spectral metrics and (3) provides the framework to implement new surface material spectra into LUISA-A. The spectral comparison is based on several similarity measures, followed by an object- and spectral-based ruleset to optimize and categorize potentially new pure spectra. The results show that the majority of pure surface materials could be identified using LUISA-A. Unknown spectra are composed of mixed pixels and real pure surface materials which could be distinguished by LUISA-T.

  19. Thermal Emission and Reflected Light Spectra of Super Earths with Flat Transmission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.; Zahnle, Kevin; Line, Michael; Kempton, Eliza; Lewis, Nikole; Cahoy, Kerri

    2015-12-01

    Planets larger than Earth and smaller than Neptune are some of the most numerous in the galaxy, but observational efforts to understand this population have proved challenging because optically thick clouds or hazes at high altitudes obscure molecular features. We present models of super Earths that include thick clouds and hazes and predict their transmission, thermal emission, and reflected light spectra. Very thick, lofted clouds of salts or sulfides in high metallicity (1000× solar) atmospheres create featureless transmission spectra in the near-infrared. Photochemical hazes with a range of particle sizes also create featureless transmission spectra at lower metallicities. Cloudy thermal emission spectra have muted features more like blackbodies, and hazy thermal emission spectra have emission features caused by an inversion layer at altitudes where the haze forms. Close analysis of reflected light from warm (˜400-800 K) planets can distinguish cloudy spectra, which have moderate albedos (0.05-0.20), from hazy models, which are very dark (0.0-0.03). Reflected light spectra of cold planets (˜200 K) accessible to a space-based visible light coronagraph will have high albedos and large molecular features that will allow them to be more easily characterized than the warmer transiting planets. We suggest a number of complementary observations to characterize this population of planets, including transmission spectra of hot (≳ 1000 K) targets, thermal emission spectra of warm targets using the James Webb Space Telescope, high spectral resolution (R ˜ 105) observations of cloudy targets, and reflected light spectral observations of directly imaged cold targets. Despite the dearth of features observed in super Earth transmission spectra to date, different observations will provide rich diagnostics of their atmospheres.

  20. Aging of clean foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Stewart, Peter S.

    2014-11-01

    Aging is an inevitable process in living systems. Here we show how clean foams age with time through sequential coalescence events: in particular, foam aging resembles biological aging. We measure population dynamics of bubbles in clean foams through numerical simulations with a bubble network model. We demonstrate that death rates of individual bubbles increase exponentially with time, independent on initial conditions, which is consistent with the Gompertz mortality law as usually found in biological aging. This consistency suggests that clean foams as far-from-equilibrium dissipative systems are useful to explore biological aging. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST.

  1. Aging hippocampus and amygdala.

    PubMed

    Malykhin, Nikolai V; Bouchard, Thomas P; Camicioli, Richard; Coupland, Nicholas J

    2008-03-26

    Earlier studies suggest that the anterior hippocampus may show resilience to age-associated volume loss. This study compared high-resolution magnetic resonance images obtained from younger (n=28; age range: 22-50 years) and older (n=39; age range: 65-84 years) healthy right-handed individuals to determine whether age-related volume changes varied between the hippocampal head, body and tail. Volumetric reductions were progressively more severe from hippocampal head to tail. Amygdala volume differences were intermediate in size. Although limited by the cross-sectional design, these data suggest that hippocampal subregions show a gradient of volume reduction in healthy aging that contrasts with the preferential reduction of anterior hippocampal volumes in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  2. New Insights from Modeling of Core-collapse Supernova Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. John; Dessart, Luc

    2013-06-01

    With the advent of modern survey telescopes, research into supernovae (SNe) is making huge advances. The surveys are discovering thousands of SNe, identifying new classes of SNe, refining the statistics of SNe occurrence as a function of class and host galaxy properties, and allowing the direct identification of SNe progenitors. With these new observations comes the need for theoretical advances in modeling SNe spectra. In this presentation we discuss recent advances in modeling and interpreting the spectra of core-collapse SNe (Types Ib, Ic, and II) and pair-instability SNe. Recent investigations have revealed the importance of mixing nickel into the helium-rich layer for the excitation of He I lines in Type Ib and Ic supernovae. In particular, we were able to generate Ib and Ic like spectra from the same progenitor model - the only distinction in the SN ejecta is the amount of mixing. There is also now a general realization that most Ib and Ic SNe arise from intermediate mass stars (M < 20 Mo) which have undergone complex mass-transfer and mass-loss processes in a binary system. While some super-luminous SNe have been associated with the pair-production instability, detailed spectroscopic modeling has revealed that the observed post-maximum spectra are too blue, and this raises serious doubts as to their origin. With the advent of the mesa star, a publicly available stellar evolution code, we can now create our own SN progenitors with physically consistent structures. Importantly, we can alter the inputs to mesa star to check the influence of different evolutionary parameters on the structure of the pre-SN star, and its subsequent influence on the SN light curve and spectra. We have used mesa star to generate RSG progenitors for a star with an initial mass of 15 Mo, and have examined the influence of the assumed mixing length, metallicity, rotation, and mass-loss rate. All show measurable effects on the pre-SN progenitor, and on the resulting SN light curves and

  3. Neurodegeneration in accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Moren

    2016-11-01

    The growing proportion of elderly people represents an increasing economic burden, not least because of age-associated diseases that pose a significant cost to the health service. Finding possible interventions to age-associated disorders therefore have wide ranging implications. A number of genetically defined accelerated aging diseases have been characterized that can aid in our understanding of aging. Interestingly, all these diseases are associated with defects in the maintenance of our genome. A subset of these disorders, Cockayne syndrome, Xeroderma pigmentosum group A and ataxia-telangiectasia, show neurological involvement reminiscent of what is seen in primary human mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cells converting energy stored in oxygen, sugar, fat, and protein into ATP, the energetic currency of our body. Emerging evidence has linked this organelle to aging and finding mitochondrial dysfunction in accelerated aging disorders thereby strengthens the mitochondrial theory of aging. This theory states that an accumulation of damage to the mitochondria may underlie the process of aging. Indeed, it appears that some accelerated aging disorders that show neurodegeneration also have mitochondrial dysfunction. The mitochondrial alterations may be secondary to defects in nuclear DNA repair. Indeed, nuclear DNA damage may lead to increased energy consumption, alterations in mitochondrial ATP production and defects in mitochondrial recycling, a term called mitophagy. These changes may be caused by activation of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase 1 (PARP1), an enzyme that responds to DNA damage. Upon activation PARP1 utilizes key metabolites that attenuate pathways that are normally protective for the cell. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 or reconstitution of the metabolites rescues the changes caused by PARP1 hyperactivation and in many cases reverse the phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. This implies that modulation

  4. Fourier smoothing of digital photographic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupama, G. C.

    1990-03-01

    Fourier methods of smoothing one-dimensional data are discussed with particular reference to digital photographic spectra. Data smoothed using lowpass filters with different cut-off frequencies are intercompared. A method to scale densities in order to remove the dependence of grain noise on density is described. Optimal filtering technique which models signal and noise in Fourier domain is also explained.

  5. Rotational and Vibrational Spectra of Molecular Clusters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-30

    3 I D ’- 2095 205 209 2105 i k (c),,.-..0 WavenumbersHCN/Av ixture .Pekarlbld asM -mnmr dmr 6 9014 CARS spectra ofthe v, region of HCN in...shown above, the bond stretching constants below the structure. Values shown in parentheses were held fixed. %% -.. .4 .. 0 Table 8 Sumawy of norma

  6. Laboratory millimeter and submillimeter spectra of CO/+/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, K. V. L. N.; Helminger, P.; Herbst, E.; De Lucia, F. C.

    1981-01-01

    The strong electric dipole-allowed transitions of the molecular ion CO(+) in the region 235-470 GHz have been measured in the laboratory. The laboratory spectra at 235 GHz appear to confirm the claim by Erickson et al. (1981) to have observed CO(+) in OMC-1.

  7. Principal component analysis of phenolic acid spectra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic acids are common plant metabolites that exhibit bioactive properties and have applications in functional food and animal feed formulations. The ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of four closely related phenolic acid structures were evaluated by principal component analysis (PCA) to...

  8. Variations on supersymmetry breaking and neutrino spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Borzumati, F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Nomura, Y.; Yanagida, T.

    2000-12-11

    The problem of generating light neutrinos within supersymmetric models is discussed. It is shown that the hierarchy of scales induced by supersymmetry breaking can give rise to suppression factors of the correct order of magnitude to produce experimentally allowed neutrino spectra.

  9. Chaotic spectra: How to extract dynamic information

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, H.S.; Gomez Llorente, J.M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Kulander, K.C.

    1988-10-01

    Nonlinear dynamics is applied to chaotic unassignable atomic and molecular spectra with the aim of extracting detailed information about regular dynamic motions that exist over short intervals of time. It is shown how this motion can be extracted from high resolution spectra by doing low resolution studies or by Fourier transforming limited regions of the spectrum. These motions mimic those of periodic orbits (PO) and are inserts into the dominant chaotic motion. Considering these inserts and the PO as a dynamically decoupled region of space, resonant scattering theory and stabilization methods enable us to compute ladders of resonant states which interact with the chaotic quasi-continuum computed in principle from basis sets placed off the PO. The interaction of the resonances with the quasicontinuum explains the low resolution spectra seen in such experiments. It also allows one to associate low resolution features with a particular PO. The motion on the PO thereby supplies the molecular movements whose quantization causes the low resolution spectra. Characteristic properties of the periodic orbit based resonances are discussed. The method is illustrated on the photoabsorption spectrum of the hydrogen atom in a strong magnetic field and on the photodissociation spectrum of H/sub 3//sup +/. Other molecular systems which are currently under investigation using this formalism are also mentioned. 53 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Correlation Functions Aid Analyses Of Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Norton, Robert H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    New uses found for correlation functions in analyses of spectra. In approach combining elements of both pattern-recognition and traditional spectral-analysis techniques, spectral lines identified in data appear useless at first glance because they are dominated by noise. New approach particularly useful in measurement of concentrations of rare species of molecules in atmosphere.

  11. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  12. Prompt fission neutron spectra of actinides

    DOE PAGES

    Capote, R.; Chen, Y. -J.; Hambsch, F. -J.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Here, the energy spectrum of prompt neutrons emitted in fission (PFNS) plays a very important role in nuclear science and technology. A Coordinated Research Project (CRP) "Evaluation of Prompt Fission Neutron Spectra of Actinides" was established by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2009, with the major goal to produce new PFNS evaluations with uncertainties for actinide nuclei.

  13. Spectra of Angrites and Possible Parent Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; McCoy, T. J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2001-01-01

    One meteorite class where very little progress has been made in identifying possible parent bodies is the angrites. We have obtained spectra of two new angrites (D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Calculated late time spectra of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Axelrod, T.S.

    1987-10-30

    We consider here the nebular phase spectra of supernovae whose late time luminosity is provided by the radioactive decay of /sup 56/Ni and /sup 56/Co synthesized in the explosion. A broad variety of supernovae are known or suspected to fall in this category. This includes all SNIa and SNIb, and at least some SNII, in particular SN1987a. At sufficiently late times the expanding supernova becomes basically nebular in character due to its decreasing optical depth. The spectra produced during this stage contain information on the density and abundance structure of the entire supernova, as opposed to spectra near maximum light which are affected only by the outermost layers. A numerical model for nebular spectrum formation is therefore potentially very valuable for answering currently outstanding questions about the post-explosion supernova structure. As an example, we can hope to determine the degree of mixing which occurs between the layers of the ''onion-skin'' abundance structure predicted by current one dimensional explosion calculations. In the sections which follow, such a numerical model is briefly described and then applied to SN1972e, a typical SNIa, SN1985f, an SNIb, and finally to SN1987a. In the case of SN1987a predicted spectra are presented for the wavelength range from 1 to 100 microns at a time 300 days after explosion. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Astronomy Spectra Experiment for Nonscience Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental technique to develop inferential thinking in less scientifically-oriented community college students is described. Students activate unlabeled gas discharge tubes and identify the gases by comparing color photographs with spectrometer observations. Includes methods for taking color photographs of spectra. (SK)

  16. Students' Mental Models of Atomic Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Körhasan, Nilüfer Didis; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Mental modeling, which is a theory about knowledge organization, has been recently studied by science educators to examine students' understanding of scientific concepts. This qualitative study investigates undergraduate students' mental models of atomic spectra. Nine second-year physics students, who have already taken the basic chemistry and…

  17. Automatic Spike Removal Algorithm for Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yao; Burch, Kenneth S

    2016-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique, widely used in both academia and industry. In part, the technique's extensive use stems from its ability to uniquely identify and image various material parameters: composition, strain, temperature, lattice/excitation symmetry, and magnetism in bulk, nano, solid, and organic materials. However, in nanomaterials and samples with low thermal conductivity, these measurements require long acquisition times. On the other hand, charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors used in Raman microscopes are vulnerable to cosmic rays. As a result, many spurious spikes occur in the measured spectra, which can distort the result or require the spectra to be ignored. In this paper, we outline a new method that significantly improves upon existing algorithms for removing these spikes. Specifically, we employ wavelet transform and data clustering in a new spike-removal algorithm. This algorithm results in spike-free spectra with negligible spectral distortion. The reduced dependence on the selection of wavelets and intuitive wavelet coefficient adjustment strategy enables non-experts to employ these powerful spectra-filtering techniques.

  18. Solar Energetic Particle Spectra Measured with PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James; Bruno, Alessandro; Boezio, Mirko; Bravar, Ulisse; Christian, Eric; Georgia, De Nolfo; Martucci, Matteo; Merge, Matteo; Munini, Riccardo; Sparvoli, Roberta; Stochaj, Steven; Pamela Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the event integrated spectra from several SEP events from 2006 to 2014 in the energy range starting at 80 MeV and extending well above the neutron monitor threshold. The PAMELA instrument is in a high inclination, low Earth orbit and has access to SEPs when at high geographic latitudes. This means that the spectra have been assembled from regularly spaced measurements with gaps during the course of the event. Furthermore, the field of view of PAMELA is small and during the high latitude passes it scans a wide range of asymptotic directions as the spacecraft moves. Correcting for data gaps and solid angle effects, we have compiled event-integrated intensity spectra that typically exhibit power law shapes in energy with an exponential roll over. The events analyzed include two, maybe three, GLEs. In those cases the roll over energy lies above the neutron monitor threshold (1 GV) while the others are lower. We see no qualitative difference between the spectra of GLE vs. non-GLE events. National Science Foundation, NASA, Italian Space Agency, Russian Space Agency.

  19. Mid-infrared spectra of comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Reach, William T.; Harker, David E.

    2017-03-01

    Comet nuclei and D-type asteroids have several similarities at optical and near-IR wavelengths, including near-featureless red reflectance spectra, and low albedos. Mineral identifications based on these characteristics are fraught with degeneracies, although some general trends can be identified. In contrast, spectral emissivity features in the mid-infrared provide important compositional information that might not otherwise be achievable. Jovian Trojan D-type asteroids have emissivity features strikingly similar to comet comae, suggesting that they have the same compositions and that the surfaces of the Trojans are highly porous. However, a direct comparison between a comet and asteroid surface has not been possible due to the paucity of spectra of comet nuclei at mid-infrared wavelengths. We present 5-35 μm thermal emission spectra of comets 10P/Tempel 2, and 49P/Arend-Rigaux observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our analysis reveals no evidence for a coma or tail at the time of observation, suggesting the spectra are dominated by the comet nucleus. We fit each spectrum with the near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) and find sizes in agreement with previous values. However, the NEATM beaming parameters of the nuclei, 0.74-0.83, are systematically lower than the Jupiter-family comet population mean of 1.03 ± 0.11, derived from 16- and 22-μm photometry. We suggest this may be either an artifact of the spectral reduction, or the consequence of an emissivity low near 16 μm. When the spectra are normalized by the NEATM model, a weak 10-μm silicate plateau is evident, with a shape similar to those seen in mid-infrared spectra of D-type asteroids. A silicate plateau is also evident in previously published Spitzer spectra of the nucleus of comet 9P/Tempel 1. We compare, in detail, these comet nucleus emission features to those seen in spectra of the Jovian Trojan D-types (624) Hektor, (911) Agamemnon, and (1172) Aneas, as well

  20. Ageing doctors.

    PubMed

    Lillis, Steven; Milligan, Eleanor

    2017-03-01

    Doctors are neither more nor less susceptible than the general population to the effects of ageing. The relevance of deterioration with age depends on the nature of the work undertaken. Reduced muscle strength and visual and auditory deterioration can compromise clinical ability. Accumulation of chronic disease further reduces capacity. Cognitive decline is of particular importance, as good medical care requires considerable cognitive function. Patient safety is paramount, yet older doctors are an important part of the medical workforce and their value should be recognised. Changes in patient case mix, work place support systems and individual adjustments can assist safe practice. Deterioration in health should be acknowledged and requires proactive management. Current methods of ensuring competence are inadequate for supporting ageing doctors. A new initiative is recommended comprising collaboration between regulators, colleges and employing institutions to support the ageing doctor in providing safe and effective practice.

  1. Immunological Aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Immunosenescence is associated with an increased incidence and severity of infections with common pathogens, neoplastic disease and autoimmunity. In general, aging is associated with a decline in function at the cellular level, rather than cell loss, although thymic atrophy and ...

  2. Spectra of delay-coupled heterogeneous noisy nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vüllings, Andrea; Schöll, Eckehard; Lindner, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear oscillators that are subject to noise and delayed interaction have been used to describe a number of dynamical phenomena in Physics and beyond. Here we study the spectral statistics (power and cross-spectral densities) of a small number of noisy nonlinear oscillators and derive analytical approximations for these spectra. In our paper, individual oscillators are described by the normal form of a supercritical or subcritical Hopf bifurcation supplemented by Gaussian white noise. Oscillators can be distinguished from each other by their frequency, bifurcation parameter, and noise intensity. Extending previous results from the literature, we first calculate in linear response theory the power spectral density and response function of the single oscillator in both super- and subcritical parameter regime and test them against numerical simulations. For small heterogeneous groups of oscillators (N = 2 or 3), which are coupled by a delayed linear term, we use a linear response ansatz to derive approximations for the power and cross-spectral densities of the oscillators within this small network. These approximations are confirmed by comparison with extensive numerical simulations. Using the theory we relate the peaks in the spectra of the homogeneous system (identical oscillators) to periodic solutions of the deterministic (noiseless) system. For two delay-coupled subcritical Hopf oscillators, we show that the coupling can enhance the coherence resonance effect, which is known to occur for the single subcritical oscillator. In the case of heterogeneous oscillators, we find that the delay-induced characteristic profile of the spectra is conserved for moderate frequency detuning.

  3. Parameterization of directional spectra, part 2, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juszko, Barbara-Ann

    1989-12-01

    The description of complex directional wave spectra using a limited number of parameters would reduce data storage requirements and facilitate the theoretical and practical use of spectral characteristics. The present work assessed the ability of a 10 parameter model developed in the WAVEC study and the existing OGDP hindcast model to represent hindcast directional wave spectra observed at a single location near Hibernia. The parametric model acceptably reproduced the hindcast spectra over 90 percent of the time. There was little loss of information as indicated by the behavior of the spectral statistics. A significant correlation was observed between energy levels, peak wave direction and vector mean direction between hindcast and observed behavior. No definite conclusions could be formed on specific frequency direction features due to intrinsic limitations in directional spectral techniques. A coherence analysis between hindcast and measured winds indicated that the man machine mix of hindcast input wind did provide an improvement over a purely geostrophic estimate. The coherence squared dropped below acceptable levels at frequencies above 0.75 cycles per day (cpd). This behavior was reflected in the coherence of the vector mean wave field. Limiting the analysis to selected wave frequency bands, indicated that the hindcast model did not reproduce the observed swell signature with any statistical confidence while the set showed acceptable coherence to frequencies between 0.75 and 1.0 cpd.

  4. IR and Raman spectra of liquid water: theory and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Auer, B M; Skinner, J L

    2008-06-14

    IR and Raman (parallel- and perpendicular-polarized) spectra in the OH stretch region for liquid water were measured some years ago, but their interpretation is still controversial. In part, this is because theoretical calculation of such spectra for a neat liquid presents a formidable challenge due to the coupling between vibrational chromophores and the effects of motional narrowing. Recently we proposed an electronic structure/molecular dynamics method for calculating spectra of dilute HOD in liquid D(2)O, which relied on ab initio calculations on clusters to provide a map from nuclear coordinates of the molecules in the liquid to OH stretch frequencies, transition dipoles, and polarizabilities. Here we extend this approach to the calculation of couplings between chromophores. From the trajectories of the fluctuating local-mode frequencies, transition moments, and couplings, we use our recently developed time-averaging approximation to calculate the line shapes. Our results are in good agreement with experiment for the IR and Raman line shapes, and capture the significant differences among them. Our analysis shows that while the coupling between chromophores is relatively modest, it nevertheless produces delocalization of the vibrational eigenstates over up to 12 chromophores, which has a profound effect on the spectroscopy. In particular, our results demonstrate that the peak in the parallel-polarized Raman spectrum at about 3250 wavenumbers is collective in nature.

  5. Hydration of amino acids: FTIR spectra and molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Panuszko, Aneta; Adamczak, Beata; Czub, Jacek; Gojło, Emilia; Stangret, Janusz

    2015-11-01

    The hydration of selected amino acids, alanine, glycine, proline, valine, isoleucine and phenylalanine, has been studied in aqueous solutions by means of FTIR spectra of HDO isotopically diluted in H2O. The difference spectra procedure and the chemometric method have been applied to remove the contribution of bulk water and thus to separate the spectra of solute-affected HDO. To support interpretation of obtained spectral results, molecular dynamics simulations of amino acids were performed. The structural-energetic characteristic of these solute-affected water molecules shows that, on average, water affected by amino acids forms stronger and shorter H-bonds than those in pure water. Differences in the influence of amino acids on water structure have been noticed. The effect of the hydrophobic side chain of an amino acid on the solvent interactions seems to be enhanced because of the specific cooperative coupling of water strong H-bond chain, connecting the carboxyl and amino groups, with the clathrate-like H-bond network surrounding the hydrocarbon side chain. The parameter derived from the spectral data, which corresponds to the contributions of the population of weak hydrogen bonds of water molecules which have been substituted by the stronger ones in the hydration sphere of amino acids, correlated well with the amino acid hydrophobicity indexes.

  6. [Feasibility of monitoring karst standing conditions with vegetation spectra].

    PubMed

    Yue, Yue-Min; Wang, Ke-Lin; Xiong, Ying

    2012-07-01

    Karst regions are typically ecological fragile zones constrained by geological setting, which resulted in high heterogeneity of vegetation standing conditions. The karst vegetation was featured with stone, dry and high calcium carbonate content growth conditions. Based on vegetation spectral analysis and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), the present study aimed to examine the feasibility of using vegetation spectra to monitor the heterogeneous karst standing conditions. The results showed that there were significant differences between karst vegetation and non-karst vegetation within the spectral range of 1 300-2 500 nm reflectance and 400 - 680 nm first-derivative spectra. It was found that soil moisture and calcium carbonate contents had the most significant effects on vegetation spectral features in karst regions. Ordination diagrams of CCA could distinguish the differences of karst vegetation and non-karst vegetation. Our study demonstrates that vegetation spectra are highly related to karst standing conditions and it is feasible to monitor karst standing conditions with vegetation spectral features.

  7. COMPOSITE SPECTRA IN MERGING U/LIRGs CAUSED BY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, J. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Dopita, M. A.

    2014-01-20

    We present a key result from our optical integral field spectroscopic survey of 27 nearby ultraluminous and luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs) from the Great Observatory All-Sky LIRG Survey. Using spatially resolved multi-component emission line fitting to trace the emission line ratios and velocity dispersion of the ionized gas, we quantify for the first time the widespread shock ionization in gas-rich merging U/LIRGs. Our results show a fractional contribution to the total observed Hα flux from radiative shocks increasing from a few percent during early merger stages to upward of 60% of the observed optical emission line flux in late-stage mergers. We compare our resolved spectroscopy to nuclear spectra and find that 3/4 of the galaxies in our sample that would be classified as ''composite'' based on optical spectroscopy are primarily characterized by a combination of star formation and merger-driven shocks. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of ''composite'' rest-frame optical spectra of U/LIRGs as starburst+active galactic nucleus (AGN), as the shock emission combined with star formation can mimic ''composite'' optical spectra in the absence of any contribution from an AGN.

  8. Age matters.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, James Edgar; Marinelli, Michela

    2009-03-01

    The age of an experimental animal can be a critical variable, yet age matters are often overlooked within neuroscience. Many studies make use of young animals, without considering possible differences between immature and mature subjects. This is especially problematic when attempting to model traits or diseases that do not emerge until adulthood. In this commentary we discuss the reasons for this apparent bias in age of experimental animals, and illustrate the problem with a systematic review of published articles on long-term potentiation. Additionally, we review the developmental stages of a rat and discuss the difficulty of using the weight of an animal as a predictor of its age. Finally, we provide original data from our laboratory and review published data to emphasize that development is an ongoing process that does not end with puberty. Developmental changes can be quantitative in nature, involving gradual changes, rapid switches, or inverted U-shaped curves. Changes can also be qualitative. Thus, phenomena that appear to be unitary may be governed by different mechanisms at different ages. We conclude that selection of the age of the animals may be critically important in the design and interpretation of neurobiological studies.

  9. Understanding aging.

    PubMed

    Strehler, B L

    2000-01-01

    Enormous advances in our understanding of human aging have occurred during the last 50 yr. From the late 19th to the mid-20th centuries only four comprehensive and important sources of information were available: 1. August Weismann's book entitled Essays on Heredity and Kindred Biological Problems (the first of these essays dealt with The Duration of Life; 1). Weissmann states (p. 10) "In the first place in regulating the length of life, the advantage to the species, and not to the individual, is alone of any importance. This must be obvious to any one who has once thoroughly thought out the process of natural selection_". 2. A highly systematized second early source of information on aging was the collection of essays edited by Cowdry and published in 1938. This 900+ page volume contains 34 chapters and was appropriately called Problems of Aging. 3. At about the same time Raymond Pearl published his book on aging (2). Pearl believed that aging was the indirect result of cell specialization and that only the germ line was resistant to aging. Unfortunately Pearl died in the late 1930s and is largely remembered now for having been the founding editor of Quarterly Review of Biology while he was at the Johns Hopkins University, this author's alma mater. 4. Alexis Carrel wrote a monumental scientific and philosophical book, Man, the Unknown (3). Carrel believed that he had demonstrated that vertebrate cells could be kept in culture and live indefinitely, a conclusion challenged by others (more on this later).

  10. ELM: AN ALGORITHM TO ESTIMATE THE ALPHA ABUNDANCE FROM LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Yude; Zhao, Gang; Kumar, Yerra Bharat; Pan, Jingchang E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn

    2016-01-20

    We have investigated a novel methodology using the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm to determine the α abundance of stars. Applying two methods based on the ELM algorithm—ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices—to the stellar spectra from the ELODIE database, we measured the α abundance with a precision better than 0.065 dex. By applying these two methods to the spectra with different signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) and different resolutions, we found that ELM+spectra is more robust against degraded resolution and ELM+Lick indices is more robust against variation in S/N. To further validate the performance of ELM, we applied ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices to SDSS spectra and estimated α abundances with a precision around 0.10 dex, which is comparable to the results given by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. We further applied ELM to the spectra of stars in Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, NGC 6791), and results show good agreement with previous studies (within 1σ). A comparison of the ELM with other widely used methods including support vector machine, Gaussian process regression, artificial neural networks, and linear least-squares regression shows that ELM is efficient with computational resources and more accurate than other methods.

  11. Prompt fission neutron spectra of n+235U above the (n,nf) fission threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Neng-Chuan; Jia, Min; Chen, Yong-Jing; Liu, Ting-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Calculations of prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) from the 235U(n, f) reaction were performed with a semi-empirical method for En = 7.0 and 14.7 MeV neutron energies. The total PFNS were obtained as a superposition of (n,xnf) pre-fission neutron spectra and post-fission spectra of neutrons which were evaporated from fission fragments, and these two kinds of spectra were taken as an expression of the evaporation spectrum. The contributions of (n,xnf) fission neutron spectra on the calculated PFNS were discussed. The results show that emission of one or two neutrons in the (n,nf) or (n,2nf) reactions influences the PFNS shape, and the neutron spectra of the (n,xnf) fission-channel are soft compared with the neutron spectra of the (n,f) fission channel. In addition, analysis of the multiple-chance fission component showed that second-chance fission dominates the PFNS with an incident neutron energy of 14.7 MeV whereas first-chance fission dominates the 7 MeV case. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205246, 91126010, U1230127, 91226102), IAEA CRP (15905), and Defense Industrial Technology Development Program (B0120110034)

  12. On the difference between SERS spectra of cell growth media and whole bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Premasiri, W. Ranjith; Gebregziabher, Yoseph; Ziegler, Lawrence D.

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently suggested [N. E. Marotta and L. A. Bottomley, Appl. Spectrosc. 64, 2010, 601-06] that previously reported SERS spectra of vegetative bacterial cells are due to residual cell growth media that were not properly removed from samples of the lab cultured microorganism suspensions. SERS spectra of several commonly used cell growth media are similar to those of bacterial cells as shown here and reported elsewhere. However, a multivariate data analysis approach shows that SERS spectra of different bacterial species grown in the same growth media exhibit different characteristic vibrational spectra, SERS spectra of the same organism grown in different media display the same SERS spectrum, and SERS spectra of growth media do not cluster near the SERS spectra of washed bacteria. Furthermore, a bacterial SERS spectrum grown in a minimal medium, which uses inorganics for a nitrogen source and displays virtually no SERS features, exhibits a characteristic bacterial SERS spectrum. We use multivariate analysis to show how successive water washing and centrifugation cycles remove cell growth media and result in a robust bacterial SERS spectrum in contrast to the previous study attributing bacterial SERS signals to growth media. PMID:21513591

  13. ELM: an Algorithm to Estimate the Alpha Abundance from Low-resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yude; Zhao, Gang; Pan, Jingchang; Bharat Kumar, Yerra

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated a novel methodology using the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm to determine the α abundance of stars. Applying two methods based on the ELM algorithm—ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices—to the stellar spectra from the ELODIE database, we measured the α abundance with a precision better than 0.065 dex. By applying these two methods to the spectra with different signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) and different resolutions, we found that ELM+spectra is more robust against degraded resolution and ELM+Lick indices is more robust against variation in S/N. To further validate the performance of ELM, we applied ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices to SDSS spectra and estimated α abundances with a precision around 0.10 dex, which is comparable to the results given by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. We further applied ELM to the spectra of stars in Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, NGC 6791), and results show good agreement with previous studies (within 1σ). A comparison of the ELM with other widely used methods including support vector machine, Gaussian process regression, artificial neural networks, and linear least-squares regression shows that ELM is efficient with computational resources and more accurate than other methods.

  14. Default Mode Network alterations in alexithymia: an EEG power spectra and connectivity study

    PubMed Central

    Imperatori, Claudio; Della Marca, Giacomo; Brunetti, Riccardo; Carbone, Giuseppe Alessio; Massullo, Chiara; Valenti, Enrico Maria; Amoroso, Noemi; Maestoso, Giulia; Contardi, Anna; Farina, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that alexithymia is characterized by functional alterations in different brain areas [e.g., posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)], during emotional/social tasks. However, only few data are available about alexithymic cortical networking features during resting state (RS). We have investigated the modifications of electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectra and EEG functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) in subjects with alexithymia. Eighteen subjects with alexithymia and eighteen subjects without alexithymia matched for age and gender were enrolled. EEG was recorded during 5 min of RS. EEG analyses were conducted by means of the exact Low Resolution Electric Tomography software (eLORETA). Compared to controls, alexithymic subjects showed a decrease of alpha power in the right PCC. In the connectivity analysis, compared to controls, alexithymic subjects showed a decrease of alpha connectivity between: (i) right anterior cingulate cortex and right PCC, (ii) right frontal lobe and right PCC, and (iii) right parietal lobe and right temporal lobe. Finally, mediation models showed that the association between alexithymia and EEG connectivity values was directed and was not mediated by psychopathology severity. Taken together, our results could reflect the neurophysiological substrate of some core features of alexithymia, such as the impairment in emotional awareness. PMID:27845326

  15. Role of non-Condon vibronic coupling and conformation change on two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yuejie; Tian, Guangjun; Luo, Yi

    2013-07-01

    Two-photon absorption spectra of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) often show a blue-shift band compared to their conventional one-photon absorption spectra, which is an intriguing feature that has not been well understood. We present here a systematic study on one- and two-photon spectra of GFP chromophore by means of the density functional response theory and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods. It shows that the popular density functional fails to provide correct vibrational progression for the spectra. The non-Condon vibronic coupling, through the localised intrinsic vibrational modes of the chromophore, is responsible for the blue-shift in the TPA spectra. The cis to trans isomerisation can be identified in high-resolution TPA spectra. Our calculations demonstrate that the high level ab initio multiconfigurational CASSCF method, rather than the conventional density functional theory is required for investigating the essential excited-state properties of the GFP chromophore.

  16. The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-13

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  17. Vibrational spectra of 3,5-dimethylpyrazole and deuterated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Orza, J M; García, M V; Alkorta, I; Elguero, J

    2000-07-01

    The infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of 3,5-dimethylpyrazole have been recorded in the vapor, liquid (melt and solution) and solid states. Two deuterated derivatives, C5H7N-ND and C5D7N-NH, were also studied in solid state and in solutions. Instrumental resolution was relatively low, 2.0 cm(-1) in the IR and approximately 2.7 cm(-1) in the Raman spectra. The solids are made of cyclic hydrogen-bonded trimers. These trimers, present also in chloroform and acetone solutions, give rise to characteristic high absorption IR spectra in the 3200-2500 cm(-1) region, related to Fermi resonance involving nu(NH) vibrations. Bands from trimers are not present in water solutions but these solutions show spectral features similar in several ways to those of the trimer, attributable to solvent-bonded complexes. Evidence of H-bonding interactions with the other solvents is also visible in the high-frequency region. The two very intense bands in the Raman spectra of the solids appearing at 115 and 82 cm(-1) in the parent compound are also connected with a trimer formation. To interpret the experimental data, ab initio computations of the harmonic vibrational frequencies and IR and Raman intensities were carried out using the Gaussian 94 program package after full optimization at the RHF/6-31G* level for the three monomeric compounds as well as for three models of the trimer, with C3h, C3 and C1 symmetry. The combined use of experiments and computations allow a firm assignment of most of the observed bands for all the systems. In general, the agreement between theory and experiment is very good, with the exception of the IR and Raman intensities of some transitions. Particularly noticeable is the failure of the theoretical calculation in accounting for the high intensity of the Raman bands of the solid about 115 and 82 cm(-1).

  18. RESEARCH PAPER: Automated estimation of stellar fundamental parameters from low resolution spectra: the PLS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2009-06-01

    PLS (Partial Least Squares regression) is introduced into an automatic estimation of fundamental stellar spectral parameters. It extracts the most correlative spectral component to the parameters (Teff, log g and [Fe/H]), and sets up a linear regression function from spectra to the corresponding parameters. Considering the properties of stellar spectra and the PLS algorithm, we present a piecewise PLS regression method for estimation of stellar parameters, which is composed of one PLS model for Teff, and seven PLS models for log g and [Fe/H] estimation. Its performance is investigated by large experiments on flux calibrated spectra and continuum normalized spectra at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and resolutions. The results show that the piecewise PLS method is robust for spectra at the medium resolution of 0.23 nm. For low resolution 0.5 nm and 1 nm spectra, it achieves competitive results at higher SNR. Experiments using ELODIE spectra of 0.23 nm resolution illustrate that our piecewise PLS models trained with MILES spectra are efficient for O ~ G stars: for flux calibrated spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.14 dex, and -0.09 dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.44 dex and 0.38 dex, respectively; for continuum normalized spectra, the systematic offsets are 3.8%, 0.12dex, and -0.13dex for Teff, log g and [Fe/H], with error scatters of 5.2%, 0.49 dex and 0.41 dex, respectively. The PLS method is rapid, easy to use and does not rely as strongly on the tightness of a parameter grid of templates to reach high precision as Artificial Neural Networks or minimum distance methods do.

  19. Aging of SRC liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, T.; Jones, L.; Tewari, K. C.; Li, N. C.

    1981-02-01

    The viscosity of SRC-LL liquid increases when subjected to accelerated aging by bubbling oxygen in the presence of copper strip at 62°C. Precipitates are formed and can be separated from the aged liquid by Soxhlet extraction with pentane. A 30-70 blend of SRC-I with SRC-LL was subjected to oxygen aging in the absence of copper, and the viscosity increased dramatically after 6 days at 62°. The content of preasphaltene and its molecular size increase with time of aging, accompanied by decrease of asphaltene and pentane-soluble contents. For the preasphaltene fraction on aging, gel permeation chromatography shows formation of larger particles. ESR experiments show that with oxygen aging, spin concentration in the preasphaltene fraction decreases. Perhaps some semiquinone, together with di- and tri-substituted phenoxy radicals, generated by oxygen aging of the coal liquid, interact with the free radicals already present in coal to yield larger particles and reduce free radical concentration. We are currently using the very high-field (600-MHz) NMR spectrometer at Mellon Institute to determine changes in structural parameters before and after aging of SRC-II and its chromatographically separated fractions.

  20. CARBON STARS WITH INFRARED SPECTRA IN GROUP P OF THE IRAS/LRS DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P. S.

    2012-10-01

    Sources with infrared spectra in Group P of the IRAS/LRS database all show polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features. They are often planetary nebulae, H II regions, reflection/dark nebulae, Wolf-Rayet stars, or external galaxies. However, we noted that some carbon stars are also included in this group. We searched for and investigated all infrared spectra in Group P of the IRAS/LRS database. Finally, we found 11 previously known carbon stars and identified 8 new candidate carbon stars in Group P. Infrared spectra of these stars may present the 11.2 {mu}m SiC emission features indicative of their carbon-rich properties.