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Sample records for age systolic blood

  1. Age dependency of peripheral and central systolic blood pressures: cross-sectional and longitudinal observations in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Staessen, Jan A; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; O'Rourke, Michael; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have described the age-related changes in both peripheral and central systolic blood pressures (SBPs) in populations. We addressed this issue in 1066 women and 978 men, all untreated (mean age, 45.1 years; 27.2% hypertensive) and randomly selected from a Chinese population, of whom 369 and 330 underwent a repeat examination after 3.6 years (median). In cross-sectional analyses, central SBP increased more with age than peripheral SBP in women below age 50 (1.21 vs. 1.01 mm Hg per year; P<0.001) and in men below age 60 (0.73 vs. 0.48 mm Hg per year; P<0.001), whereas in older women (0.64 vs. 0.58 mm Hg per year; P=0.27) and older men (0.45 vs. 0.44 mm Hg per year; P=0.79), the slopes of central and peripheral SBPs on age were similar. Compared with men, women had steeper (P<0.001) age-related increases in peripheral and central SBPs. Systolic augmentation pressure increased with age, but this increase was substantially smaller (P<0.0001) for peripheral than central augmentation (women, 0.086 vs. 0.45 mm Hg per year; men, 0.083 vs. 0.39 mm Hg per year). In multivariable-adjusted regression, age contributed ≥89.7% of the explained variance in peripheral and central SBPs. In longitudinal analyses, the annual percentage increases from baseline to follow-up in peripheral and central SBP were similar (P≥0.76) in both women (2.14% vs. 2.16 % per year) and men (1.33% vs. 1.34 % per year; P-values for sex difference ≤0.044). In conclusion, in younger subjects assessed cross-sectionally, the age-related increase was larger for central than peripheral SBP, whereas the corresponding cross-sectional estimates in older subjects and the longitudinal estimates in all subjects showed similar age-related increases in central and peripheral SBP.

  2. Cumulative systolic blood pressure exposure in relation to cognitive function in middle-aged and elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Yuling; Chen, Guojuan; Liu, Xiaoxue; Wang, Zhijun; Cao, Yibin; Li, Haitao; Song, Lu; Li, Chunhui; Zhao, Hualing; Chen, Shuohua; Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Anxin; Wu, Shouling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The association between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and cognitive function is controversial in elderly adults. In addition, few studies focused on the cumulative effect of SBP. We aimed to investigate the association between cumulative SBP exposure and cognitive function among middle-aged and elderly adults. The analysis was based on the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study. The primary predictor was the cumulative SBP calculated by consecutive SBP values measured through baseline (2006–2007) up to the fourth examination (2012–2013). The cognitive function was estimated by mini-mental state examination (MMSE) in the fourth examination. Linear regression and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association between cumulative SBP and cognitive function. Among 2211 participants (41.4% female, aged 40–94 years), 167 (7.55%) were diagnosed with cognitive impairment (MMSE score < 24). Higher cumulative exposure to SBP (per SD increment) was independently associated with poor cognitive performance after controlling for multiple factors (P < 0.001). We observed nondifferential association between men and women. However, higher cumulative SBP in the adults aged ≥60 years had a stronger association with poor cognitive performance compared with that in adults aged 40 to 60 years. Greater exposure to cumulative SBP is associated with worse cognitive performance among middle-aged and elderly adults. This association is similar between men and women, but stronger in elderly adults. PMID:27902618

  3. Associations between age, cohort, and urbanization with systolic and diastolic blood pressure in China: a population-based study across 18 years

    PubMed Central

    ATTARD, Samantha M; HERRING, Amy H; ZHANG, Bing; DU, Shufa; POPKIN, Barry M; GORDON-LARSEN, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Objective Little is known about whether large-scale environmental changes, such as those seen with urbanization, are differentially associated with systolic versus diastolic blood pressure, and whether those changes vary by birth cohort. Methods We used data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey, a population-based cohort study of Chinese adults (n=18,976; ages 18–70y) seen a maximum of 7 times over 1991–2009. We used hierarchical multivariable linear models to simultaneously estimate systolic and diastolic blood pressure as correlated outcomes over time, accounting for their physiologic, time-varying correlation. Main exposure variables were urbanicity, age, and birth cohort. Over 18 years of modernization, median systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by 10 and 7 mm Hg, respectively. Results Our hierarchical model results suggest greater temporal increases in systolic and particularly diastolic blood pressure at lower versus higher urbanicity. At the same chronological age, for a 10-year difference in birth cohort (i.e., born in 1980s versus 1970s) the adjusted mean diastolic blood pressure was ~3mm Hg higher for the later birth cohort (p<0.001). Pulse pressure (calculated as model-predicted systolic minus diastolic blood pressure) was also higher at low versus high urbanicity. Conclusions These results suggest increased susceptibility of diastolic blood pressure (and thus peripheral vascular resistance) to environmental change, particularly in younger Chinese adults. Because diastolic blood pressure more strongly predicts cardiovascular disease risk in younger adulthood, hypertension-related health burden in China may increase over time. PMID:25668349

  4. Effects of overweight and the PLA2G7 V279F polymorphism on the association of age with systolic blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjoo; Kim, Minkyung; Yoo, Hye Jin; Jang, Hye Young; Lee, Sang-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to determine the effects of the persistence of overweight for three years and the PLA2G7 V279F polymorphism, as well as the interaction between these factors, on the association of age with blood pressure (BP). Healthy middle-aged subjects with normotensive BP were divided into the normal-weight and overweight groups. The PLA2G7 V279F genotype, BP, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) were determined. Lp-PLA2 activity was lower in the F allele subjects (n = 111) than in those with the VV genotype (n = 389). The overweight individuals with the F allele had lower Lp-PLA2 activity and ox-LDL at both baseline and after three years and lower systolic and diastolic BP and LDL cholesterol after three years compared with those with the VV phenotype. After three years, the overweight subjects with the VV phenotype exhibited greater increases in Lp-PLA2 activity, systolic BP, and ox-LDL than those with the F allele and normal-weight subjects with the VV phenotype. A multivariate analysis revealed that the PLA2G7 V279F genotype, baseline BMI, changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and ox-LDL remained independently and positively associated with changes in systolic BP. The simultaneous presence of the PLA2G7 279VV genotype and persistence of overweight synergistically increases the risk for hypertension, whereas lower Lp-PLA2 activity in PLA2G7 279F allele carriers might offer certain protection against hypertension, even in individuals who have been overweight for over three years. PMID:28334001

  5. Older age is associated with greater central aortic blood pressure following the exercise stress test in subjects with similar brachial systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masatake; Oshima, Kazutaka; Iwasaki, Yoichi; Kumai, Yuto; Avolio, Alberto; Yamashina, Akira; Takazawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Brachial systolic pressure (BSP) is often monitored during exercise by the stress test; however, central systolic pressure (CSP) is thought to be a more direct measure of cardiovascular events. Although some studies reported that exercise and aging may play roles in changes of both BSP and CSP, the relationship between BSP and CSP with age following the exercise stress test remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the relationship between BSP and CSP measured after exercise. Ninety-six subjects underwent the diagnostic treadmill exercise stress test, and we retrospectively divided them into the following 3 groups by age: the younger age group (43 ± 4 years), middle age group (58 ± 4 years), and older age group (70 ± 4 years). Subjects exercised according to the Bruce protocol, to achieve 85 % of their age-predicted maximum heart rate or until the appearance of exercise-associated symptoms. BSP, CSP, and pulse rate (PR) were measured using a HEM-9000AI (Omron Healthcare, Japan) at rest and after exercise. BSP, CSP, and PR at rest were not significantly different among the 3 groups (p = 0.92, 0.21, and 0.99, respectively). BSP and PR immediately after exercise were not significantly different among the groups (p = 0.70 and 0.38, respectively). However, CSP immediately after exercise was 144 ± 18 mmHg (younger age), 149 ± 17 mmHg (middle age), and 158 ± 19 mmHg (older age). CSP in the older age group was significantly higher than that in the younger age group (p < 0.01). Despite similar BSPs in all age groups after exercise, CSP was higher in the older age group. Therefore, older subjects have a higher CSP after exercise, which is not readily assessed by conventional measurements of BSP.

  6. Lower Protein-to-Carbohydrate Ratio in Maternal Diet is Associated with Higher Childhood Systolic Blood Pressure up to Age Four Years

    PubMed Central

    Blumfield, Michelle L.; Nowson, Caryl; Hure, Alexis J.; Smith, Roger; Simpson, Stephen J.; Raubenheimer, David; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; Collins, Clare E.

    2015-01-01

    The prenatal environment can influence development of offspring blood pressure (BP), which tracks into adulthood. This prospective longitudinal study investigated whether maternal pregnancy dietary intake is associated with the development of child BP up to age four years. Data are from 129 mother-child dyads enrolled in the Women and Their Children’s Health study. Maternal diet was assessed using a validated 74-item food frequency questionnaire at 18 to 24 weeks and 36 to 40 weeks, with a reference period of the previous three months. Child systolic and diastolic BP were measured at 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months, using an automated BP monitor. Using mixed-model regression analyses adjusted for childhood growth indices, pregnancy intakes of percentage of energy (E%) polyunsaturated fat (β coefficient 0.73; 95% CI 0.003, 1.45; p = 0.045), E% omega-6 fatty acids (β coefficient 0.89; 95% CI 0.09, 1.69; p = 0.03) and protein-to-carbohydrate (P:C) ratio (β coefficient −14.14; 95% CI −27.68, −0.60; p = 0.04) were associated with child systolic BP trajectory up to 4 years. Child systolic BP was greatest at low proportions of dietary protein (<16% of energy) and high carbohydrate (>40% of energy) intakes. There may be an ideal maternal macronutrient ratio associated with optimal infant BP. Maternal diet, which is potentially modifiable, may play an important role in influencing offspring risk of future hypertension. PMID:25919307

  7. Cumulative systolic blood pressure exposure in relation to cognitive function in middle-aged and elderly adults: A prospective, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Yuling; Chen, Guojuan; Liu, Xiaoxue; Wang, Zhijun; Cao, Yibin; Li, Haitao; Song, Lu; Li, Chunhui; Zhao, Hualing; Chen, Shuohua; Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Anxin; Wu, Shouling

    2016-11-01

    The association between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and cognitive function is controversial in elderly adults. In addition, few studies focused on the cumulative effect of SBP. We aimed to investigate the association between cumulative SBP exposure and cognitive function among middle-aged and elderly adults.The analysis was based on the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study. The primary predictor was the cumulative SBP calculated by consecutive SBP values measured through baseline (2006-2007) up to the fourth examination (2012-2013). The cognitive function was estimated by mini-mental state examination (MMSE) in the fourth examination. Linear regression and logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association between cumulative SBP and cognitive function.Among 2211 participants (41.4% female, aged 40-94 years), 167 (7.55%) were diagnosed with cognitive impairment (MMSE score < 24). Higher cumulative exposure to SBP (per SD increment) was independently associated with poor cognitive performance after controlling for multiple factors (P < 0.001). We observed nondifferential association between men and women. However, higher cumulative SBP in the adults aged ≥60 years had a stronger association with poor cognitive performance compared with that in adults aged 40 to 60 years.Greater exposure to cumulative SBP is associated with worse cognitive performance among middle-aged and elderly adults. This association is similar between men and women, but stronger in elderly adults.

  8. Impact of age on the importance of systolic and diastolic blood pressures for stroke risk: the MOnica, Risk, Genetics, Archiving, and Monograph (MORGAM) Project.

    PubMed

    Vishram, Julie K K; Borglykke, Anders; Andreasen, Anne H; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Ibsen, Hans; Jørgensen, Torben; Broda, Grazyna; Palmieri, Luigi; Giampaoli, Simona; Donfrancesco, Chiara; Kee, Frank; Mancia, Giuseppe; Cesana, Giancarlo; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Sans, Susana; Olsen, Michael H

    2012-11-01

    This study investigates age-related shifts in the relative importance of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressures as predictors of stroke and whether these relations are influenced by other cardiovascular risk factors. Using 34 European cohorts from the MOnica, Risk, Genetics, Archiving, and Monograph (MORGAM) Project with baseline between 1982 and 1997, 68 551 subjects aged 19 to 78 years, without cardiovascular disease and not receiving antihypertensive treatment, were included. During a mean of 13.2 years of follow-up, stroke incidence was 2.8%. Stroke risk was analyzed using hazard ratios per 10-mm Hg/5-mm Hg increase in SBP/DBP by multivariate-adjusted Cox regressions, including SBP and DBP simultaneously. Because of nonlinearity, DBP was analyzed separately for DBP ≥ 71 mm Hg and DBP <71 mm Hg. Stroke risk was associated positively with SBP and DBP ≥ 71 mm Hg (SBP/DBP ≥ 71 mm Hg; hazard ratios: 1.15/1.06 [95% CI: 1.12-1.18/1.03-1.09]) and negatively with DBP <71 mm Hg (0.88[0.79-0.98]). The hazard ratio for DBP decreased with age (P<0.001) and was not influenced by other cardiovascular risk factors. Taking into account the age × DBP interaction, both SBP and DBP ≥ 71 mm Hg were significantly associated with stroke risk until age 62 years, but in subjects older than 46 years the superiority of SBP for stroke risk exceeded that of DBP ≥ 71 mm Hg and remained significant until age 78 years. DBP <71 mm Hg became significant at age 50 years with an inverse relation to stroke risk. In Europeans, stroke risk should be assessed by both SBP and DBP until age 62 years with increased focus on SBP from age 47 years. From age 62 years, emphasis should be on SBP without neglecting the potential harm of very low DBP.

  9. Evidence that a single gene with gender- and age-dependent effects influences systolic blood pressure determination in a population-based sample.

    PubMed Central

    Pérusse, L; Moll, P P; Sing, C F

    1991-01-01

    A biometrical study was carried out to evaluate the role of genetic variation in determining interindividual differences in systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the population at large. SBP was measured in 1,266 Caucasian individuals in 278 pedigrees ascertained through children enrolled in the Rochester, MN, school system. The sample included 646 males and 620 females 550 years of age and not taking antihypertensive medication or oral contraceptives. Complex segregation analysis was first applied to these data by using a regression model for age, in which the intercept was gender and ousiotype specific but in which the slope was only gender specific. When the slope was independent of ousiotype, neither variation at a single gene combined with polygenic effects (mixed genetic model) nor variation in a single environmental factor combined with polygenetic effects (mixed environmental model) explained the distribution of SBP in this sample. However, when the regression model for age allowed both the intercept and slope to be gender and ousiotype specific, the mixed environmental model was rejected whereas the mixed genetic model was not. These results suggest that variability in SBP may be influenced by major effects of allelic variation at a single gene that are both gender and age dependent. This study (1) suggests that particular genotypes determined by a single gene are associated with a steeper increase of SBP with age among males and females 550 years of age in the general population and (2) illustrates the need to consider models that more realistically represent the relationship between genotypic variability and phenotypic variability, to understand the genetics of human quantitative traits. PMID:2063879

  10. Age and double product (systolic blood pressure x heart rate) reserve-adjusted modification of the Duke Treadmill Score nomogram in men.

    PubMed

    Sadrzadeh Rafie, Amir H; Dewey, Frederick E; Sungar, Gannon W; Ashley, Euan A; Hadley, David; Myers, Jonathan; Froelicher, Victor F

    2008-11-15

    The Duke Treadmill Score (DTS) is an established clinical tool for risk stratification. Our aim was to determine if other variables could improve the prognostic power of the DTS and if so, to modify the DTS nomogram. From a total of 1,959 patients referred for exercise testing at the Palo Alto VA Medical Center from 1997 to 2006 (a mean follow-up of 5.4 years), we studied 1,759 male veterans (age 57 +/- 12 years) free of heart failure. Double product (DP) was calculated by multiplying systolic blood pressure and heart rate; variables and their products were subtracted to obtain the differences between at rest and maximal exercise (reserve) and recovery. Of all the hemodynamic measurements, DP reserve was the strongest predictor of cardiovascular death (CVD) (Wald Z-score -3.84, p <0.001) after adjustment for potential confounders. When the components of DTS were entered in the Cox hazard model with DP reserve and age, only DP reserve and age were chosen (p <0.00001). Using the Cox coefficients, a score calculated by [age - DTS - 3 x (DP reserve/1,000)] yielded an area under the curve of 0.84 compared with 0.76 for the DTS. Using this equation, a nomogram was constructed by adding age and DP reserve to the original DTS nomogram improving estimation of annual CVD. In conclusion, we propose an age and DP reserve-adjusted DTS nomogram that improves the prognostic estimates of average annual CVD over the DTS alone.

  11. Invasively Measured Aortic Systolic Blood Pressure and Office Systolic Blood Pressure in Cardiovascular Risk Assessment: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Laugesen, Esben; Knudsen, Søren T; Hansen, Klavs W; Rossen, Niklas B; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Hansen, Michael G; Munkholm, Henrik; Thomsen, Kristian K; Søndergaard, Hanne; Bøttcher, Morten; Raungaard, Bent; Madsen, Morten; Hulman, Adam; Witte, Daniel; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Poulsen, Per L

    2016-09-01

    Aortic systolic blood pressure (BP) represents the hemodynamic cardiac and cerebral burden more directly than office systolic BP. Whether invasively measured aortic systolic BP confers additional prognostic value beyond office BP remains debated. In this study, office systolic BP and invasively measured aortic systolic BP were recorded in 21 908 patients (mean age: 63 years; 58% men; 14% with diabetes mellitus) with stable angina pectoris undergoing elective coronary angiography during January 2001 to December 2012. Multivariate Cox models were used to assess the association with incident myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. Discrimination and reclassification were assessed using Harrell's C and the Continuous Net Reclassification Index. Data were analyzed with and without stratification by diabetes mellitus status. During a median follow-up period of 3.7 years (range: 0.1-10.8 years), 422 strokes, 511 myocardial infarctions, and 1530 deaths occurred. Both office and aortic systolic BP were associated with stroke in patients with diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio per 10 mm Hg, 1.18 [95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.30] and 1.14 [95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.24], respectively) and with myocardial infarction in patients without diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio, 1.07 [95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.12] and 1.05 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.10], respectively). In models including both BP measurements, aortic BP lost statistical significance and aortic BP did not confer improvement in either C-statistics or net reclassification analysis. In conclusion, invasively measured aortic systolic BP does not add prognostic information about cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause mortality compared with office BP in patients with stable angina pectoris, either with or without diabetes mellitus.

  12. Differential control of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in blacks with essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Ayodele, Olugbenga E.; Alebiosu, C. Olutayo; Salako, Babatunde L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The risk of cardiovascular and renal diseases has been shown to be higher for systolic blood pressure than diastolic blood pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the differential control of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in Nigerians with primary hypertension. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a prospective observational study carried out at the Medical Outpatient Department of the State Hospital, Abeokuta, Nigeria. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from the ethical committee of the hospital. METHODOLOGY: The study population consisted of 185 consecutive patients (65 males, 120 females), aged 35-85 years with primary hypertension who had been on drugs one- to 25 years prior to the onset of the study. Clinic blood pressure control was assessed during a year period. Six consecutive clinic blood pressure readings were recorded for each patient and the average calculated (systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure separately). Patients were classified into subgroups based on the pattern of blood pressure control. RESULTS: Clinic systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure was controlled in 58 patients (31.4%). Systolic blood pressure control was less frequent than diastolic blood pressure control (35.7% versus 51.4%, p<0.05). Patients with uncontrolled systolic blood pressure were significantly older than patients with only uncontrolled diastolic blood pressure (66.7+/-7.4 versus 52.9+/-8.7 years, p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Systolic blood pressure is less frequently controlled than diastolic blood pressure in Nigerians treated for primary hypertension. This may increase the patient's risk of developing stroke, and cardiovascular and renal complications. PMID:15040512

  13. Automatic noninvasive measurement of systolic blood pressure using photoplethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Meir; Patron, Amikam; Glik, Zehava; Weiss, Abraham T

    2009-01-01

    Background Automatic measurement of arterial blood pressure is important, but the available commercial automatic blood pressure meters, mostly based on oscillometry, are of low accuracy. Methods In this study, we present a cuff-based technique for automatic measurement of systolic blood pressure, based on photoplethysmographic signals measured simultaneously in fingers of both hands. After inflating the pressure cuff to a level above systolic blood pressure in a relatively slow rate, it is slowly deflated. The cuff pressure for which the photoplethysmographic signal reappeared during the deflation of the pressure-cuff was taken as the systolic blood pressure. The algorithm for the detection of the photoplethysmographic signal involves: (1) determination of the time-segments in which the photoplethysmographic signal distal to the cuff is expected to appear, utilizing the photoplethysmographic signal in the free hand, and (2) discrimination between random fluctuations and photoplethysmographic pattern. The detected pulses in the time-segments were identified as photoplethysmographic pulses if they met two criteria, based on the pulse waveform and on the correlation between the signal in each segment and the signal in the two neighboring segments. Results Comparison of the photoplethysmographic-based automatic technique to sphygmomanometry, the reference standard, shows that the standard deviation of their differences was 3.7 mmHg. For subjects with systolic blood pressure above 130 mmHg the standard deviation was even lower, 2.9 mmHg. These values are much lower than the 8 mmHg value imposed by AAMI standard for automatic blood pressure meters. Conclusion The photoplethysmographic-based technique for automatic measurement of systolic blood pressure, and the algorithm which was presented in this study, seems to be accurate. PMID:19857254

  14. The design and rationale of a multi-center clinical trial comparing two strategies for control of systolic blood pressure: The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is an important public health concern because it is highly prevalent and a risk factor for adverse health outcomes, including coronary heart disease, stroke, decompensated heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and decline in cognitive function. Observational studies show a progressive increase in risk associated with blood pressure above 115/75 mm Hg. Prior research has shown that reducing elevated systolic blood pressure lowers the risk of subsequent clinical complications from cardiovascular disease. However, the optimal systolic blood pressure to reduce blood pressure-related adverse outcomes is unclear, and the benefit of treating to a level of systolic blood pressure well below 140 mm Hg has not been proven in a large, definitive clinical trial. Purpose To describe the design considerations of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) and the baseline characteristics of trial participants. Methods SPRINT is a multi-center, randomized, controlled trial that compares two strategies for treating systolic blood pressure: one targets the standard target of <140 mm Hg, and the other targets a more intensive target of <120 mm Hg. Enrollment focused on volunteers of age ≥50 years (no upper limit) with an average baseline systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg and evidence of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, 10-year Framingham cardiovascular disease risk score ≥15%, or age ≥75 years. SPRINT recruitment also targeted three pre-specified subgroups: participants with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min/1.73m2), participants with a history of cardiovascular disease, and participants 75 years of age or older. The primary outcome is first occurrence of a myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, heart failure, or cardiovascular disease death. Secondary outcomes include all-cause mortality, decline in kidney function or development of end-stage renal disease

  15. Isolated Systolic Hypertension in Young and Middle-Aged Adults.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yuichiro; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-11-01

    Young and middle-aged adults (ages ≤50 years) are increasingly prone to stroke, kidney disease, and worsening cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. An alarming increase in the prevalence of high blood pressure (BP) may underlie the adverse trend. However, there is often uncertainty in BP management for young and middle-aged adults. Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) is one such example. Whether ISH in young and middle-aged adults represents "pseudo" or "spurious" hypertension is still being debated. ISH in young and middle-aged adults is a heterogeneous entity; some individuals appear to have increased stroke volume, whereas others have stiffened aortae, or both. One size does not seem to fit all in the clinical management of ISH in young and middle-aged adults. Rather than treating ISH as a monolithic condition, detailed phenotyping of ISH based on (patho)physiology and in the context of individual global cardiovascular risks would seem to be most useful to assess an individual expected net benefit from therapy. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of ISH in young and middle-aged adults, including the prevalence, pathophysiology, and treatment.

  16. Systematic review and meta-analysis of preterm birth and later systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Femke; Monuteaux, Michael C; van Elburg, Ruurd M; Gillman, Matthew W; Belfort, Mandy B

    2012-02-01

    Lower birth weight because of fetal growth restriction is associated with higher blood pressure later in life, but the extent to which preterm birth (<37 completed weeks' gestation) or very low birth weight (<1500 g) predicts higher blood pressure is less clear. We performed a systematic review of 27 observational studies that compared the resting or ambulatory systolic blood pressure or diagnosis of hypertension among children, adolescents, and adults born preterm or very low birth weight with those born at term. We performed a meta-analysis with the subset of 10 studies that reported the resting systolic blood pressure difference in millimeters of mercury with 95% CIs or SEs. We assessed methodologic quality with a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The 10 studies were composed of 1342 preterm or very low birth weight and 1738 term participants from 8 countries. The mean gestational age at birth of the preterm participants was 30.2 weeks (range: 28.8-34.1 weeks), birth weight was 1280 g (range: 1098-1958 g), and age at systolic blood pressure measurement was 17.8 years (range: 6.3-22.4 years). Former preterm or very low birth weight infants had higher systolic blood pressure than term infants (pooled estimate: 2.5 mm Hg [95% CI: 1.7-3.3 mm Hg]). For the 5 highest quality studies, the systolic blood pressure difference was slightly greater, at 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI: 2.6-5.0 mm Hg). We conclude that infants who are born preterm or very low birth weight have modestly higher systolic blood pressure later in life and may be at increased risk for developing hypertension and its sequelae.

  17. Age-Related Differences in Memory and Executive Functions in Healthy "APOE"[epsilon]4 Carriers: The Contribution of Individual Differences in Prefrontal Volumes and Systolic Blood Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Andrew R.; Raz, Naftali

    2012-01-01

    Advanced age and vascular risk are associated with declines in the volumes of multiple brain regions, especially the prefrontal cortex, and the hippocampus. Older adults, even unencumbered by declining health, perform less well than their younger counterparts in multiple cognitive domains, such as episodic memory, executive functions, and speed of…

  18. Resting Energy Expenditure and Systolic Blood Pressure Relationships in Women Across 4.5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Neeraj; Hunter, Gary R.; Fisher, Gordon; Brock, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have reported a strong association between blood pressure (BP) and resting energy expenditure (REE). However, it is not known if this relationship persists over time. Therefore, we examined the temporal relationship between REE and systolic BP. Additionally, we examined the impact of sympathetic tone and anthropometric variables on this relationship. All testing was performed on healthy, overweight African American and European American women aged 25 – 45 years over 4.5 years in the UAB General Clinical Research Center. Repeated measures mixed-models revealed REE as a significant determinant of systolic BP (β=0.0155, P<0.0001), independent of catecholamines, leg fat, visceral fat, fat free mass, fat mass, height, RSMI, and resting heart rate. Observations that REE is predictive of systolic BP across 4.5 years support previous findings that REE may potentially mediate resting BP, independent of anthropometric variables and a marker for sympathetic tone. PMID:24548382

  19. Dairy consumption, systolic blood pressure, and risk of hypertension: Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming; Huang, Tao; Bergholdt, Helle Km; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Ellervik, Christina; Qi, Lu

    2017-03-16

    Objective To examine whether previous observed inverse associations of dairy intake with systolic blood pressure and risk of hypertension were causal.Design Mendelian randomization study using the single nucleotide polymorphism rs4988235 related to lactase persistence as an instrumental variable.Setting CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) Consortium.Participants Data from 22 studies with 171 213 participants, and an additional 10 published prospective studies with 26 119 participants included in the observational analysis.Main outcome measures The instrumental variable estimation was conducted using the ratio of coefficients approach. Using meta-analysis, an additional eight published randomized clinical trials on the association of dairy consumption with systolic blood pressure were summarized.Results Compared with the CC genotype (CC is associated with complete lactase deficiency), the CT/TT genotype (TT is associated with lactose persistence, and CT is associated with certain lactase deficiency) of LCT-13910 (lactase persistence gene) rs4988235 was associated with higher dairy consumption (0.23 (about 55 g/day), 95% confidence interval 0.17 to 0.29) serving/day; P<0.001) and was not associated with systolic blood pressure (0.31, 95% confidence interval -0.05 to 0.68 mm Hg; P=0.09) or risk of hypertension (odds ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.97 to 1.05; P=0.27). Using LCT-13910 rs4988235 as the instrumental variable, genetically determined dairy consumption was not associated with systolic blood pressure (β=1.35, 95% confidence interval -0.28 to 2.97 mm Hg for each serving/day) or risk of hypertension (odds ratio 1.04, 0.88 to 1.24). Moreover, meta-analysis of the published clinical trials showed that higher dairy intake has no significant effect on change in systolic blood pressure for interventions over one month to 12 months (intervention compared with control groups: β=-0.21, 95% confidence interval -0

  20. Systolic Blood Pressure Accuracy Enhancement in the Electronic Palpation Method Using Pulse Waveform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    1 of 4 SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE ACCURACY ENHANCEMENT IN THE ELECTRONIC PALPATION METHOD USING PULSE WAVEFORM H. S. S. Sorvoja1, R. A. Myllylä1...systolic blood pressure measurements based on pulse waveform. A set of measurement was carried out with elderly cardiac surgery patients. The experiments... blood pressure . Systolic pressure errors were defined and correlations with other specific values, like pressure rise time, pulse wave velocity

  1. Estimation of central systolic blood pressure using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Lung-Ching; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Ding, Philip Yu-An; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2010-06-01

    Current noninvasive techniques for assessing central aortic pressure require the recording of an arterial pressure wave using a high-fidelity applanation tonometer. We therefore developed and validated a novel method to estimate the central aortic systolic pressure using an oscillometric blood pressure monitor alone. Invasive high-fidelity right brachial and central aortic pressure waves, and left-brachial pulse volume plethysmography from an oscillometric blood pressure monitor, were obtained at baseline and 3 min after administration of sublingual nitroglycerin in 100 patients during cardiac catheterization. In the initial 50 patients (Generation Group), Central systolic blood pressure was predicted by a multi-variate prediction model generated from the comprehensive analysis of the invasive brachial pressure wave, including brachial late-systolic shoulder pressure value and parameters related to wave reflection and arterial compliance. Another prediction model was similarly constructed from the noninvasively calibrated pulse volume plethysmography. Both models were validated in the subsequent 50 patients (Validation Group) with results: r=0.98 (P<0.001) and mean difference=0.5+/-4.5 (95% confidence interval -8.3 to 9.3) mm Hg for the invasive model, and r=0.93 (P<0.001) and mean difference=-0.1+/-7.6 (95% confidence interval -15.0 to 14.8) mm Hg for the noninvasive model. Thus, our results indicate that central aortic systolic blood pressure could be estimated by analysis of the noninvasive brachial pressure wave alone from an oscillometric blood pressure monitor.

  2. Beetroot supplementation lowers daily systolic blood pressure in older, overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Jajja, A; Sutyarjoko, A; Lara, J; Rennie, K; Brandt, K; Qadir, O; Siervo, M

    2014-10-01

    Although inorganic nitrate and beetroot juice supplementation are associated with decreased systolic blood pressure (BP), these results have primarily been obtained from short-term trials that focused on healthy young adults. Therefore, we hypothesized that oral supplementation of beetroot juice concentrate would decrease systolic BP in overweight older participants but that the decline in BP would not be sustained after a 1-week interruption of the beetroot juice supplementation. For 3 weeks, 24 participants were randomized to either the beetroot juice concentrate or blackcurrant juice group, with a 1-week postsupplementation phase (week 4). Changes in systolic and diastolic BP were assessed during the supplementation and postsupplementation phases. Blood pressure was measured using 3 different methods: (1) resting clinic BP, (2) 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and (3) home monitoring of daily resting BP. The first 2 methods were applied at baseline and after weeks 3 and 4. Daily measurements were conducted throughout the study, with 21 subjects completing the study (beetroot/blackcurrant = 10/11; male/female = 12/9; age = 62.0 ± 1.4 years; body mass index = 30.1 ± 1.2 kg/m(2)). After 3 weeks, beetroot juice supplementation was not associated with significant changes in resting clinic BP or 24-hour ABPM. Conversely, beetroot juice concentrate reduced daily systolic BP after 3 weeks (-7.3 ± 5.9 mm Hg, P = .02); however, the effect was not maintained after the interruption of the supplementation (week 4, 2.8 ± 6.1 mm Hg, P = .09). In overweight older subjects, beetroot juice concentrate supplementation was associated with beneficial effects on daily systolic BP, although the effects were not significant when measured by 24-hour ABPM or resting clinic BP.

  3. Seven-year increase in exercise systolic blood pressure at moderate workload predicts long-term risk of coronary heart disease and mortality in healthy middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Skretteberg, Per Torger; Grundvold, Irene; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Engeseth, Kristian; Liestøl, Knut; Erikssen, Gunnar; Erikssen, Jan; Gjesdal, Knut; Bodegard, Johan

    2013-05-01

    Exercise systolic blood pressure (SBP) predicts coronary heart disease (CHD) in the general population. We tested whether changes in exercise SBP during 7 years predict CHD (including angina pectoris, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and fatal CHD) and mortality over the following 28 years. Peak SBP at 100 W workload (=5.5 METS [metabolic equivalents]; completed by all participants) was measured among 1392 apparently healthy men in 1972-75 and repeated in 1979-82. The men were divided into quartiles (Q1-Q4) of exercise SBP change. Relative risks were calculated using Cox proportional hazard regression adjusting for family history of CHD, age, smoking status, resting SBP, peak SBP at 100 W, total cholesterol at first examination (model 1), and further for physical fitness and change in physical fitness (model 2). The highest quartile, Q4, was associated with a 1.55-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.17-2.03) adjusted (model 1) risk of CHD and a 1.93-fold (1.24-3.02) risk of coronary heart death compared with the lowest, Q1. Q4 had a 1.40-fold (1.06-1.85) risk of CHD and a 1.70-fold (1.08-2.68) risk of coronary heart death using model 2. Q4 was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death and all-cause death compared with Q1 in model 1, but not in model 2. Our results indicate that an increase in exercise SBP at 100 W over 7 years is independently associated with increased long-term risk of CHD and substantiate our previous finding that high exercise SBP is an important risk factor for CHD in healthy men.

  4. Effect of hematocrit and systolic blood pressure on cerebral blood flow in newborn infants

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, D.P.; Reivich, M.; Jaggi, J.L.; Obrist, W.D.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1987-06-01

    The effects of hematocrit and systolic blood pressure on cerebral blood flow were measured in 15 stable, low birth weight babies. CBF was measured with a modification of the xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) clearance technique, which uses an intravenous bolus of /sup 133/Xe, an external chest detector to estimate arterial /sup 133/Xe concentration, eight external cranial detectors to measure cephalic /sup 133/Xe clearance curves, and a two-compartmental analysis of the cephalic /sup 133/Xe clearance curves to estimate CBF. There was a significant inverse correlation between hematocrit and CBF, presumably due to alterations in arterial oxygen content and blood viscosity. Newborn CBF varied independently of systolic blood pressure between 60 and 84 mm Hg, suggesting an intact cerebrovascular autoregulatory mechanism. These results indicate that at least two of the factors that affect newborn animal CBF are operational in human newborns and may have important clinical implications.

  5. Pre-dialysis systolic blood pressure-variability is independently associated with all-cause mortality in incident haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Viknesh; Pasea, Laura; Ojha, Sanjay; Wilkinson, Ian B; Tomlinson, Laurie A

    2014-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure variability is an independent risk factor for mortality and cardiovascular events. Standard measures of blood pressure predict outcome poorly in haemodialysis patients. We investigated whether systolic blood pressure variability was associated with mortality in incident haemodialysis patients. We performed a longitudinal observational study of patients commencing haemodialysis between 2005 and 2011 in East Anglia, UK, excluding patients with cardiovascular events within 6 months of starting haemodialysis. The main exposure was variability independent of the mean (VIM) of systolic blood pressure from short-gap, pre-dialysis blood pressure readings between 3 and 6 months after commencing haemodialysis, and the outcome was all-cause mortality. Of 203 patients, 37 (18.2%) patients died during a mean follow-up of 2.0 (SD 1.3) years. The age and sex-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.09 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.17) for a one-unit increase of VIM. This was not altered by adjustment for diabetes, prior cardiovascular disease and mean systolic blood pressure (HR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.16). Patients with VIM of systolic blood pressure above the median were 2.4 (95% CI 1.17-4.74) times more likely to die during follow-up than those below the median. Results were similar for all measures of blood pressure variability and further adjustment for type of dialysis access, use of antihypertensives and absolute or variability of fluid intake did not alter these findings. Diastolic blood pressure variability showed no association with all cause mortality. Our study shows that variability of systolic blood pressure is a strong and independent predictor of all-cause mortality in incident haemodialysis patients. Further research is needed to understand the mechanism as this may form a therapeutic target or focus for management.

  6. Clinical usefulness of the second peak of radial systolic blood pressure for estimation of aortic systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kohara, K; Tabara, Y; Tomita, H; Nagai, T; Igase, M; Miki, T

    2009-08-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (BP), obtained from radial arterial waveform using the transfer function method (TFM), has been shown to have prognostic value independently of brachial BP. In this study, the relationship between peripheral systolic BP (SBP) and aortic SBP was evaluated. We further investigated whether TFM-derived aortic SBP can be estimated by information obtained from the radial waveform. The radial waveform was analysed to obtain the first peak of radial SBP (SBP1), second peak of radial SBP (SBP2), radial augmentation index (AI) (radial (SBP2-DBP)/(SBP1-DBP) x 100 and aortic SBP and AI using TFM in 233 subjects in the supine position. Measurements were repeated after changing position to the prone position. The constructed equation was validated in 149 community residents with different backgrounds. Radial SBP2 was closer to TFM-derived aortic SBP compared with brachial SBP. TFM-derived aortic SBP was approximated by the equation: aortic SBP=18.9-radial SBP2-0.03 x HR-0.214 x radial AI (r2=0.992). The equation was also applicable to predicting aortic SBP in the prone position as well as in different populations (mean difference between predicted aortic SBP and TFM-derived aortic SBP: -0.01+/-1.34 and 1.05+/-1.47 mm Hg, respectively). Radial arterial waveform analysis can be used for estimation of TFM-derived aortic SBP.

  7. A comparison of systolic blood pressure measurement obtained using a pulse oximeter, and direct systolic pressure measurement in anesthetized sows.

    PubMed Central

    Caulkett, N A; Duke, T; Bailey, J V

    1994-01-01

    Systolic blood pressure measurement obtained with a pulse oximeter has been compared to values obtained by other indirect methods in man. Direct pressure measurement is subject to less error than indirect techniques. This study was designed to compare systolic pressure values obtained using a pulse oximeter, with values obtained by direct arterial pressure measurement. The pulse oximeter waveform was used as an indication of perfusion. A blood pressure cuff was applied proximal to the pulse oximeter probe. The cuff was inflated until the oximeter waveform disappeared, this value was recorded as the systolic pressure at the disappearance of the waveform (SPD). The cuff was inflated to a pressure > 200 mmHg, then gradually deflated until the waveform reappeared, this value was recorded as the systolic pressure at reappearance of the waveform (SPR). The average of the two values, SPD and SPR, was calculated and recorded as SPA. The study was performed in sows (n = 21) undergoing cesarean section under epidural anesthesia and IV sedation. A total of 280 measurements were made of SPD, SPR and SPA. Regression analysis of SPA and direct measurement revealed a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.81. Calculation of mean difference (bias) and standard deviation of the bias (precision) for direct pressure--SPA revealed a value of 1.3 +/- 12.1. When compared with direct measurement, the correlation of this technique was similar to that recorded for other indirect techniques used in small animals. This indicates that this technique would be useful for following systolic pressure trends.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8004540

  8. Isolated systolic hypertension in Dutch middle aged and all-cause mortality: a 25-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    van den Ban, G C; Kampman, E; Schouten, E G; Kok, F J; van der Heide, R M; van der Heide-Wessel, C

    1989-03-01

    In the early 1950s, the blood pressure of 3901 Dutch civil servants and their spouses aged 40-65 years was measured in a general health survey. Isolated systolic hypertension (systolic pressure greater than 160 mmHg, diastolic pressure less than 90 mmHg) was observed in 6.3% of the women and 3.0% of the men. The prevalence increased with age and it was more common in women in all age groups. Using logistic regression, with adjustment for potential confounders (age, smoking, serum cholesterol, Quetelet index, alcohol consumption, haemoglobin level, pulse rate and diastolic blood pressure) the association of 15- and 25-year total mortality with isolated systolic hypertension was determined. Compared to normotensive people (systolic pressure less than or equal to 135 mmHg, diastolic pressure less than 90 mmHg), the risk of death from all causes was significantly higher for men with isolated systolic hypertension after 15 and 25 years of follow-up (odds ratio OR = 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.8 and OR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-8.0). For women 15-years mortality risk was strongly associated with isolated systolic hypertension (OR = 3.7, 95% CI 1.4-9.7). The increased risk was less pronounced after 25 years of follow-up (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 0.96-3.0). Our results support those of other studies and indicate that isolated systolic hypertension is an important independent risk factor for all-cause mortality. Since isolated systolic hypertension may be an indicator for the early onset of ageing, it is important to study its determinants and to pay more attention to its diagnosis and treatment in middle-aged populations.

  9. Excess heart rate and systolic blood pressure during psychological stress in relation to metabolic demand in adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular responses during exercise are matched to the increased metabolic demand, but this may not be the case during psychological stress. No studies to date have tested this hypothesis in youth. Fifty-four youth, ages 13-16 years completed two visits. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressu...

  10. Prognostic utility of blood pressure-adjusted global and basal systolic longitudinal strain.

    PubMed

    Rhea, Isaac B; Rehman, Shuja; Jarori, Upasana; Choudhry, Muhammad W; Feigenbaum, Harvey; Sawada, Stephen G

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) and longitudinal systolic strain of the basal segments (BLS) has shown prognostic value in cardiac disorders. However, strain is reduced with increased afterload. We assessed the prognostic value of GLS and BLS adjusted for afterload. GLS and BLS were determined in 272 subjects with normal ejection fraction and no known coronary disease, or significant valve disease. Systolic blood pressure (SP) and diastolic blood pressure (DP) obtained at the time of echocardiography were used to adjust GLS and BLS as follows: strain×SP (mmHg)/120 mmHg and strain×DP (mmHg)/80 mmHg. Patients were followed for cardiac events and mortality. The mean age was 53±15 years and 53% had hypertension. There were 19 cardiac events and 70 deaths over a mean follow-up of 26±14 months. Cox analysis showed that left ventricular mass index (P=0.001), BLS (P<0.001), and DP-adjusted BLS (P<0.001) were independent predictors of cardiac events. DP-adjusted BLS added incremental value (P<0.001) to the other two predictors and had an area under the curve of 0.838 for events. DP (P=0.001), age (P=0.001), ACE inhibitor use (P=0.017), and SP-adjusted BLS (P=0.012) were independent predictors of mortality. SP-adjusted BLS added incremental value (P=0.014) to the other independent predictors. In conclusion, DP-adjusted BLS and SP-adjusted BLS were independent predictors of cardiac events and mortality, respectively. Blood pressure-adjusted strain added incremental prognostic value to other predictors of outcome.

  11. Prognostic utility of blood pressure-adjusted global and basal systolic longitudinal strain

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, Isaac B; Rehman, Shuja; Choudhry, Muhammad W; Feigenbaum, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Assessment of global longitudinal systolic strain (GLS) and longitudinal systolic strain of the basal segments (BLS) has shown prognostic value in cardiac disorders. However, strain is reduced with increased afterload. We assessed the prognostic value of GLS and BLS adjusted for afterload. GLS and BLS were determined in 272 subjects with normal ejection fraction and no known coronary disease, or significant valve disease. Systolic blood pressure (SP) and diastolic blood pressure (DP) obtained at the time of echocardiography were used to adjust GLS and BLS as follows: strain×SP (mmHg)/120 mmHg and strain×DP (mmHg)/80 mmHg. Patients were followed for cardiac events and mortality. The mean age was 53±15 years and 53% had hypertension. There were 19 cardiac events and 70 deaths over a mean follow-up of 26±14 months. Cox analysis showed that left ventricular mass index (P=0.001), BLS (P<0.001), and DP-adjusted BLS (P<0.001) were independent predictors of cardiac events. DP-adjusted BLS added incremental value (P<0.001) to the other two predictors and had an area under the curve of 0.838 for events. DP (P=0.001), age (P=0.001), ACE inhibitor use (P=0.017), and SP-adjusted BLS (P=0.012) were independent predictors of mortality. SP-adjusted BLS added incremental value (P=0.014) to the other independent predictors. In conclusion, DP-adjusted BLS and SP-adjusted BLS were independent predictors of cardiac events and mortality, respectively. Blood pressure-adjusted strain added incremental prognostic value to other predictors of outcome. PMID:27249810

  12. Comparison of the effects of antihypertensive agents on central blood pressure and arterial stiffness in isolated systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Isla S; McEniery, Carmel M; Dhakam, Zahid; Brown, Morris J; Cockcroft, John R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2009-08-01

    Isolated systolic hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and results primarily from elastic artery stiffening. Although various drug therapies are used to lower peripheral blood pressure (BP) in patients with isolated systolic hypertension, the effects of the 4 major classes of antihypertensive agents on central BP, pulse pressure (PP) amplification, and arterial stiffness in this condition are not clear. Fifty-nine patients over the age of 60 years with untreated isolated systolic hypertension (systolic BP > or =140 mm Hg and diastolic BP systolic BP and peripheral PP were reduced similarly after treatment with all 4 classes of drug. However, central PP was only reduced significantly by perindopril, lercanidipine, and bendrofluazide, whereas atenolol had no effect. Lercanidipine reduced the augmentation index, whereas atenolol increased it. Aortic pulse wave velocity was not changed by any of the drugs. In summary, despite similar reductions in peripheral systolic and PPs with the 4 classes of drug, changes in central pressure and augmentation index varied. Because central PP and increased wave reflections are considered important risk factors in patients with isolated systolic hypertension, the choice of therapy may be influenced by these findings in the future.

  13. Radial Pulse Character Relationship to Systolic Blood Pressure and Trauma Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    RADIAL PULSE CHARACTER RELATIONSHIPS TO SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE AND TRAUMA OUTCOMES John McManus, MD, MCR, Andrey L. Yershov, MD, PhD, David Ludwig...pable pulse characteristics in the radial artery would es- timate systolic blood pressure (SBP) and predict outcome in trauma patients. Methods. Data...setting is problematic. The ability to obtain a blood pressure (BP) measurement in an aus- tere environment is often limited by time constraints

  14. Audit-based education lowers systolic blood pressure in chronic kidney disease: the Quality Improvement in CKD (QICKD) trial results

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignana, Simon; Gallagher, Hugh; Jones, Simon; Chan, Tom; van Vlymen, Jeremy; Tahir, Aumran; Thomas, Nicola; Jain, Neerja; Dmitrieva, Olga; Rafi, Imran; McGovern, Andrew; Harris, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Strict control of systolic blood pressure is known to slow progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we compared audit-based education (ABE) to guidelines and prompts or usual practice in lowering systolic blood pressure in people with CKD. This 2-year cluster randomized trial included 93 volunteer general practices randomized into three arms with 30 ABE practices, 32 with guidelines and prompts, and 31 usual practices. An intervention effect on the primary outcome, systolic blood pressure, was calculated using a multilevel model to predict changes after the intervention. The prevalence of CKD was 7.29% (41,183 of 565,016 patients) with all cardiovascular comorbidities more common in those with CKD. Our models showed that the systolic blood pressure was significantly lowered by 2.41 mm Hg (CI 0.59–4.29 mm Hg), in the ABE practices with an odds ratio of achieving at least a 5 mm Hg reduction in systolic blood pressure of 1.24 (CI 1.05–1.45). Practices exposed to guidelines and prompts produced no significant change compared to usual practice. Male gender, ABE, ischemic heart disease, and congestive heart failure were independently associated with a greater lowering of systolic blood pressure but the converse applied to hypertension and age over 75 years. There were no reports of harm. Thus, individuals receiving ABE are more likely to achieve a lower blood pressure than those receiving only usual practice. The findings should be interpreted with caution due to the wide confidence intervals. PMID:23536132

  15. Baseline Characteristics of African Americans in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)

    PubMed Central

    Still, Carolyn H.; Craven, Timothy E.; Freedman, Barry I.; Van Buren, Peter; Sink, Kaycee M.; Killeen, Anthony A.; Bates, Jeffrey T.; Bee, Alberta; Contreras, Gabriel; Oparil, Suzanne; Pedley, Carolyn; Wall, Barry; White, Suzanne; Woods, Delia; Rodriguez, Carlos; Wright, Jackson T.

    2015-01-01

    The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) will compare treatment to a systolic blood pressure goal of <120 mmHg to treatment to the currently recommended goal of <140 mmHg for effects on incident cardiovascular, renal, and neurologic outcomes including cognitive decline. Objectives The objectives of this analysis are to compare baseline characteristics of African American (AA) and non-AA SPRINT participants and explore factors associated with uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) by race. Methods SPRINT enrolled 9,361 hypertensive participants over age 50. This cross-sectional analysis examines sociodemographics, baseline characteristics, and study measures among AAs compared to non-AAs. Results AAs made up 31% of participants. AAs (compared to non-AAs) were younger and less frequently male, had less education, and were more likely uninsured or covered by Medicaid. In addition, AAs scored lower on the cognitive screening test when compared to non-AAs. Multivariable logistic regression analysis found BP control rates to <140/90 mmHg were higher for AAs who were male, had higher number of chronic diseases, were on diuretic treatment, and had better medication adherence. Conclusion SPRINT is well poised to examine the effects of SBP targets on clinical outcomes as well as predictors influencing BP control in AAs. PMID:26320890

  16. Different systolic blood pressure targets for people with history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack: PAST-BP (Prevention After Stroke—Blood Pressure) randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Richard J; Roalfe, Andrea; Fletcher, Kate; Taylor, Clare J; Martin, Una; Virdee, Satnam; Greenfield, Sheila; Hobbs, F D Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether using intensive blood pressure targets leads to lower blood pressure in a community population of people with prevalent cerebrovascular disease. Design Open label randomised controlled trial. Setting 99 general practices in England, with participants recruited in 2009-11. Participants People with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack whose systolic blood pressure was 125 mm Hg or above. Interventions Intensive systolic blood pressure target (<130 mm Hg or 10 mm Hg reduction from baseline if this was <140 mm Hg) or standard target (<140 mm Hg). Apart from the different target, patients in both arms were actively managed in the same way with regular reviews by the primary care team. Main outcome measure Change in systolic blood pressure between baseline and 12 months. Results 529 patients (mean age 72) were enrolled, 266 to the intensive target arm and 263 to the standard target arm, of whom 379 were included in the primary analysis (182 (68%) intensive arm; 197 (75%) standard arm). 84 patients withdrew from the study during the follow-up period (52 intensive arm; 32 standard arm). Mean systolic blood pressure dropped by 16.1 mm Hg to 127.4 mm Hg in the intensive target arm and by 12.8 mm Hg to 129.4 mm Hg in the standard arm (difference between groups 2.9 (95% confidence interval 0.2 to 5.7) mm Hg; P=0.03). Conclusions Aiming for target below 130 mm Hg rather than 140 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure in people with cerebrovascular disease in primary care led to a small additional reduction in blood pressure. Active management of systolic blood pressure in this population using a <140 mm Hg target led to a clinically important reduction in blood pressure. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN29062286. PMID:26919870

  17. The association of night-time systolic blood pressure with ultrasound markers of subclinical cardiac and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Emily; Dolan, Eamon; Curtin, Ronan J.; Kearney, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the association of night-time systolic blood pressure (BP) with subclinical cardiac dysfunction measured by global longitudinal strain (GLS) and subclinical vascular damage measured by carotid intima–media thickness (CIMT) and carotid plaques. Methods GLS was measured by speckle-tracking analysis of echocardiogram images. CIMT was measured at the distal 1 cm of the common carotid artery. The presence of carotid plaques was recorded. Philips QLAB cardiac and vascular ultrasound quantification software was used for analysis. The association of night-time systolic BP with GLS, CIMT and carotid plaques was assessed using linear and logistic regression. Results Fifty (response rate 63%) individuals took part in this study. In univariable models, night-time systolic BP was significantly associated with GLS [β coefficient 0.85 for every 10 mmHg increase, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.3–1.4] and carotid plaques (odds ratio 1.9 for every 10 mmHg increase, 95% CI: 1.1–3.2). Univariable analysis of daytime systolic BP did not show any statistically significant associations. In age-adjusted and sex-adjusted models, the association for night-time systolic BP and GLS remained significant (β coefficient 0.68 for every 10 mmHg increase, 95% CI: 0.1–1.3). The association for carotid plaques was no longer statistically significant. In multivariable models, findings were diminished. Discussion Our results suggest a trend towards an association between night-time systolic BP and subclinical cardiac and vascular disease. When assessing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring results, the absolute night-time systolic BP seems to be a better prognostic parameter than daytime systolic BP, but ultimately a large randomised controlled trial involving chronotherapy is necessary to fully address this. PMID:27845956

  18. Systolic and diastolic changes in human coronary blood flow during Valsalva manoeuvre.

    PubMed

    Federici, A; Ciccone, M; Gattullo, D; Losano, G

    2000-01-01

    Valsalva manoeuvre is reported to be sometimes successful for the relief of angina pectoris. The present study investigated how haemodynamic changes produced by Valsalva manoeuvre can interact to improve the relationship between cardiac work and coronary blood flow. Ten male subjects aged 53 +/- 12 years (SD) were considered. Blood velocity in the internal mammary artery, previously anastomosed to the left descending coronary artery, was studied with Doppler technique. The subjects performed Valsalva manoeuvres by expiring into a tube connected to a mercury manometer, to develop a pressure of 40 mmHg. The arterial blood pressure curve was continuously monitored with a Finapres device from a finger of the left hand. During expiratory effort, an increase in heart rate and a decrease in arterial pulse pressure were followed by a more delayed and progressive increase in mean and diastolic pressures. Systolic blood velocity markedly decreased along with the reduction in pulse pressure and increase in heart rate. By contrast, diastolic and mean coronary blood velocities did not show any significant change. Since it is known that the Valsalva manoeuvre strongly reduces stroke volume and cardiac output, it is likely that a reduction in cardiac work also takes place. Since in diastole, i.e. when the myocardial wall is better perfused, coronary blood velocity did not show any significant reduction, it is likely that unchanged perfusion in the presence of reduced cardiac work is responsible for the relief from angina sometimes observed during Valsalva manoeuvre. It is also likely that the increase in heart rate prevents the diastolic and mean blood coronary velocity from decreasing during the expiratory strain, when an increased sympathetic discharge could cause vasoconstriction through the stimulation of the coronary alpha-receptors.

  19. Joint Symbolic Dynamics Analysis of Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Interactions in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- The dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) induces important changes in the autonomic control. Measures of heart rate (HR) variability and systolic...rather simple physiological interpretations and seems to be particularly suitable for risk stratification in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy ...Keywords - Symbolic dynamics, heart rate variability, blood pressure variability I. INTRODUCTION Patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy

  20. Linkage analysis of systolic blood pressure: a score statistic and computer implementation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Peng, Yingwei

    2003-01-01

    A genome-wide linkage analysis was conducted on systolic blood pressure using a score statistic. The randomly selected Replicate 34 of the simulated data was used. The score statistic was applied to the sibships derived from the general pedigrees. An add-on R program to GENEHUNTER was developed for this analysis and is freely available. PMID:14975145

  1. Age-related changes in pumping mechanical behavior of rat ventricle in terms of systolic elastance and resistance.

    PubMed

    Chang, K C; Peng, Y I; Dai, S H; Tseng, Y Z

    2000-09-01

    Both the maximal systolic elastance (Emax) and the theoretical maximal flow (Qmax) can quantify the systolic mechanical behavior of the ventricular pump. Physically, Emax can reflect the intrinsic contractility of the myocardium as an intact heart. The quantity in (Qmax is inversely related to the internal resistance of the left ventricle. How great the effects of age are on these Emax and Qmax has never been examined, however. This study was to determine the ventricular pumping mechanics in terms of the systolic elastance and resistance in male Fischer rats at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. We measured left ventricular (LV) pressure and ascending aortic flow waves using a high-fidelity pressure sensor and an electromagnetic flow probe, respectively. Those two parameters that characterize the systolic pumping mechanics of the left ventricle are obtained by making use of an elastance-resistance model. The basic hemodynamic condition in those animals with different ages is characterized by (i) no significant change in cardiac output and (ii) a decrease in basal heart rate, LV end-systolic pressure, as well as effective arterial volume elastance. Changes that take place in the left ventricle with age include a decline in Emax and an increase in Qmax especially at 24 months. These results demonstrate that the impaired intrinsic contractility of an aging heart may be compensated to some extent by the diminished ventricular internal resistance. Such compensation in aging rats may maintain normal blood flow essential for the metabolic needs of tissues and/or organs before heart dysfunction and failure occur.

  2. Association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and hypertension subtypes in untreated Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Ting-Yan; Ding, Feng-Hua; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-02-01

    The association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and ambulatory hypertension subtypes has not yet been examined in untreated Chinese patients. We measured left ventricular mass index by echocardiography (n=619), the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (n=1047), and aortic pulse wave velocity by tonometry (n=1013) in 1047 untreated subjects (mean age, 50.6 years; 48.9% women). Normotension was a 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure <130/<80 mm Hg. Hypertension subtypes were isolated diastolic hypertension and mixed systolic plus diastolic hypertension. We assessed associations of interest by multivariable-adjusted linear models. Using normotension as reference, mixed hypertension was associated with higher (P≤0.003) left ventricular mass index (+4.31 g/m(2)), urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.63 mg/mmol), and pulse wave velocity (+0.76 m/s); and isolated diastolic hypertension was associated with similar left ventricular mass index and pulse wave velocity (P≥0.39), but higher urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.24 mg/mmol; P=0.002). In younger participants (<55 years), the mutually independent effect sizes associated with 1 SD increases in 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure were +3.31/-0.36 g/m(2) (P=0.009/0.79) for left ventricular mass index, +1.15/+1.14 mg/mmol (P=0.02/0.04) for the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio, and +0.54/-0.05 m/s (P<0.001/0.54) for pulse wave velocity. In older participants, these estimates were +3.58/+0.30 g/m(2) (P=0.045/0.88), +1.23/+1.05 mg/mmol (P=0.002/0.54), and +0.76/-0.49 m/s (P<0.001/<0.001), respectively. In conclusion, 24-hour systolic blood pressure and mixed hypertension are major determinants of target organ damage irrespective of age and target organ, whereas 24-hour diastolic blood pressure and isolated diastolic hypertension only relate to the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio below middle age.

  3. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability and Lower Extremity Amputation In a Non-Elderly Population with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Budiman-Mak, Elly; Epstein, Noam; Brennan, Meghan; Stuck, Rodney; Guihan, Marylou; Huo, Zhiping; Emanuele, Nicholas; Sohn, Min-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability is emerging as a new risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, diabetic nephropathy, and other atherosclerotic conditions. Our objective is to examine whether it has any prognostic value for lower-extremity amputations. Research Design and Methods This is a nested case-control study of a cohort of patients with diabetes aged < 60 years and treated in the US Department of Veterans Healthcare system in 2003. They were followed over five years for any above-ankle (major) amputations. For each case with a major amputation (event), we randomly selected up to five matched controls based on age, sex, race/ethnicity, and calendar time. SBP variability was computed using three or more blood pressure measures taken during the one-year period before the event. Patients were classified into quartiles according to their SBP variability. Results The study sample included 1038 cases and 2932 controls. Compared to Quartile 1 (lowest variability), Quartile 2 had 1.4 times (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.00 – 2.07) and Quartiles 3 and 4 (highest) had 2.5 times (OR for Quartile 3 = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.85 – 3.72; OR for Quartile 4 = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.74 – 3.59) higher risk of major amputation (P for trend < 0.001). This gradient relationship held in both normotensive and hypertensive groups as well as for individuals without prior peripheral vascular disease. Conclusions This is the first study to show a significant graded relationship between SBP variability and risk of major amputation among non-elderly persons with diabetes. PMID:26809904

  4. Isolated Systolic Hypertension in Young and Middle-Aged Adults and 31-Year Risk for Cardiovascular Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Yuichiro; Stamler, Jeremiah; Garside, Daniel B.; Daviglus, Martha L.; Franklin, Stanley S.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Liu, Kiang; Greenland, Philip; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) <90 mm Hg, in younger and middle-aged adults is increasing in prevalence. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) with ISH in younger and middle-aged adults. METHODS CVD risks were explored in 15,868 men and 11,213 women 18 to 49 years of age (mean age 34 years) at baseline, 85% non-Hispanic white, free of coronary heart disease (CHD) and antihypertensive therapy, from the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry study. Participant classifications were as follows: 1) optimal-normal blood pressure (BP) (SBP <130 mm Hg and DBP <85 mm Hg); 2) high-normal BP (130 to 139/85 to 89 mm Hg); 3) ISH; 4) isolated diastolic hypertension (SBP <140 mm Hg and DBP ≥90 mm Hg); and 5) systolic diastolic hypertension (SBP ≥140 mm Hg and DBP ≥90 mm Hg). RESULTS During a 31-year average follow-up period (842,600 person-years), there were 1,728 deaths from CVD, 1,168 from CHD, and 223 from stroke. Cox proportional hazards models were adjusted for age, race, education, body mass index, current smoking, total cholesterol, and diabetes. In men, with optimal-normal BP as the reference stratum, hazard ratios for CVD and CHD mortality risk for those with ISH were 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03 to 1.46) and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.04 to 1.58), respectively. ISH risks were similar to those with high-normal BP and less than those associated with isolated diastolic hypertension and systolic diastolic hypertension. In women with ISH, hazard ratios for CVD and CHD mortality risk were 1.55 (95% CI: 1.18 to 2.05) and 2.12 (95% CI: 1.49 to 3.01), respectively. ISH risks were higher than in those with high-normal BP or isolated diastolic hypertension and less than those associated with systolic diastolic hypertension. CONCLUSIONS Over long-term follow-up, younger and middle-aged adults with ISH

  5. Comparison of longitudinal variance components and regression-based approaches for linkage detection on chromosome 17 for systolic blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Mariza de; Olswold, Curtis

    2003-01-01

    We compare two methods to detect genetic linkage by using serial observations of systolic blood pressure in pedigree data from the Framingham Heart Study focusing on chromosome 17. The first method is a variance components (VC) approach that incorporates longitudinal pedigree data, and the second method is a regression-based approach that summarizes all longitudinal measures in one single measure. No evidence of linkage was found either using the VC longitudinal approach or the regression-based approach, except when all time points were used from Cohorts 1 and 2 and only subjects aged 25 and 75 years were included. PMID:14975085

  6. Evaluation of Cardiovascular Control Through Analysis of Inter Beat Interval, Systolic Blood Pressure and Photoplethysmographic Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-García, N. P.; Lerma-González, C.; Infante-Vázquez, O.

    2010-12-01

    Most studies of blood pressure control consider only the relationship between blood pressure and heart rate. The aim of this work was to study the contribution of blood volume to the stability of blood pressure. Time series analysis was applied to three variables: systolic blood pressure (SBP), inter beat interval (IBI) and pulse volume (PV), in 10 healthy subjects who underwent an orthostatic challenge. During orthostatism, IBI was shortened due to decrease in vagal activity and increase in sympathetic activity to the heart. The mean SBP increased, with a trend of higher sympathetic activity to the blood vessels. However, mean PV decreased without change in the PV variability. Negative linear correlations between SBP and PV were observed in most cases. Moreover, the linear model explained better the variability of SBP in relation to PV than the relation between SBP and IBI.

  7. Azilsartan medoxomil plus chlorthalidone reduces blood pressure more effectively than olmesartan plus hydrochlorothiazide in stage 2 systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cushman, William C; Bakris, George L; White, William B; Weber, Michael A; Sica, Domenic; Roberts, Andrew; Lloyd, Eric; Kupfer, Stuart

    2012-08-01

    Azilsartan medoxomil, an effective, long-acting angiotensin II receptor blocker, is a new treatment for hypertension that is also being developed in fixed-dose combinations with chlorthalidone, a potent, long-acting thiazide-like diuretic. We compared once-daily fixed-dose combinations of azilsartan medoxomil/chlorthalidone force titrated to a high dose of either 40/25 mg or 80/25 mg with a fixed-dose combination of the angiotensin II receptor blocker olmesartan medoxomil plus the thiazide diuretic hydrochlorothiazide force titrated to 40/25 mg. The design was a randomized, 3-arm, double-blind, 12-week study of 1071 participants with baseline clinic systolic blood pressure 160 to 190 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure ≤119 mm Hg. Patients had a mean age of 57 years; 59% were men, 73% were white, and 22% were black. At baseline, mean clinic blood pressure was 165/96 mm Hg and 24-hour mean blood pressure was 150/88 mm Hg. Changes in clinic (primary end point) and ambulatory systolic blood pressures at week 12 were significantly greater in both azilsartan medoxomil/chlorthalidone arms than in the olmesartan/hydrochlorothiazide arm (P<0.001). Changes in clinic systolic blood pressure (mean±SE) were -42.5±0.8, -44.0±0.8, and -37.1±0.8 mm Hg, respectively. Changes in 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure were -33.9±0.8, -36.3±0.8, and -27.5±0.8 mm Hg, respectively. Adverse events leading to permanent drug discontinuation occurred in 7.9%, 14.5%, and 7.1% of the groups given azilsartan medoxomil/chlorthalidone 40/25 mg, azilsartan medoxomil/chlorthalidone 80/25 mg, and olmesartan/hydrochlorothiazide 40/25 mg, respectively. This large, forced-titration study has demonstrated superior antihypertensive efficacy of azilsartan medoxomil/chlorthalidone fixed-dose combinations compared with the maximum approved dose of olmesartan/hydrochlorothiazide.

  8. Reduced effect of percutaneous renal denervation on blood pressure in patients with isolated systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Sebastian; Ukena, Christian; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Cremers, Bodo; Laufs, Ulrich; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmieder, Roland E; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Renal denervation can reduce blood pressure in certain patients with resistant hypertension. The effect in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, ≥140/<90 mm Hg) is unknown. This study investigated the effects of renal denervation in 126 patients divided into 63 patients with ISH and 63 patients with combined hypertension (CH, ≥140/≥90 mm Hg) defined as baseline office systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140 mm Hg despite treatment with ≥3 antihypertensive agents. Renal denervation significantly reduced office SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at 3, 6, and 12 months by 17/18/17 and 5/4/4 mm Hg in ISH and by 28/27/30 and 13/16/18 mm Hg in CH, respectively. The reduction in SBP and DBP in ISH was lower compared with patients with CH at all observed time points (P<0.05 for SBP/DBP intergroup comparison). The nonresponder rate (change in office SBP <10 mm Hg) after 6 months was 37% in ISH and 21% in CH (P<0.001). Mean 24-hour ambulatory SBP and DBP after 3, 6, and 12 months were significantly reduced by 10/13/15 and 6/6/9 mm Hg in CH, respectively. In patients with ISH the reduction in systolic ambulatory blood pressure was 4/8/7 mm Hg (P=0.032/P<0.001/P=0.009) and 3/4/2 mm Hg (P=0.08/P<0.001/P=0.130) in diastolic ambulatory blood pressure after 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The ambulatory blood pressure reduction was significantly lower after 3 and 12 months in SBP and after 12 months in ambulatory DBP, respectively. In conclusion, renal denervation reduces office and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with ISH. However, this reduction is less pronounced compared with patients with CH.

  9. Ratio of Systolic Blood Pressure to Right Atrial Pressure, a Novel Marker to Predict Morbidity and Mortality in Acute Systolic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hesham R; Charnigo, Richard; Guglin, Maya

    2017-04-01

    Congestion is the main contributor to heart failure (HF) morbidity and mortality. We assessed the combined role of congestion and decreased forward flow in predicting morbidity and mortality in acute systolic HF. The Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness trial data set was used to determine if the ratio of simultaneously measured systolic blood pressure (SBP)/right atrial pressure (RAP) on admission predicted HF rehospitalization and 6-month mortality. One hundred ninety-five patients (mean age 56.5 years, 75% men) who received pulmonary artery catheterization were studied. The RAP, SBP, and SBP/RAP had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.593 (p = 0.0205), 0.585 (p = 0.0359), and 0.621 (p = 0.0026), respectively, in predicting HF rehospitalization. The SBP/RAP was a superior marker of HF rehospitalization compared with RAP alone (difference in AUC 0.0289, p = 0.0385). The optimal criterion of SBP/RAP <11 provided the highest combined sensitivity (77.1%) and specificity (50.9%) in predicting HF rehospitalization. The SBP/RAP had an AUC 0.622, p = 0.0108, and a cut-off value of SBP/RAP <8 had a sensitivity of 61.9% and specificity 64.1% in predicting mortality. Multivariate analysis showed that an SBP/RAP <11 independently predicted rehospitalization for HF (estimated odds ratio 3.318, 95% confidence interval 1.692 to 6.506, p = 0.0005) and an SBP/RAP <8 independently predicted mortality (estimated hazard ratio 2.025, 95% confidence interval 1.069 to 3.833, p = 0.030). In conclusion, SBP/RAP ratio is a marker that identifies a spectrum of complications after hospitalization of patients with decompensated systolic HF, starting with increased incidence of HF rehospitalization at SBP/RAP <11 to increased mortality with SBP/RAP <8.

  10. Effect of Intensive Versus Standard Clinic-Based Hypertension Management on Ambulatory Blood Pressure: Results From the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) Ambulatory Blood Pressure Study.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Bates, Jeffrey T; Bello, Natalie A; Cushman, William C; Dwyer, Jamie P; Fine, Lawrence J; Goff, David C; Haley, William E; Krousel-Wood, Marie; McWilliams, Andrew; Rifkin, Dena E; Slinin, Yelena; Taylor, Addison; Townsend, Raymond; Wall, Barry; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2017-01-01

    The effect of clinic-based intensive hypertension treatment on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) is unknown. The goal of the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) ambulatory BP ancillary study was to evaluate the effect of intensive versus standard clinic-based BP targets on ambulatory BP. Ambulatory BP was obtained within 3 weeks of the 27-month study visit in 897 SPRINT participants. Intensive treatment resulted in lower clinic systolic BP (mean difference between groups=16.0 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 14.1-17.8 mm Hg), nighttime systolic BP (mean difference=9.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 7.7-11.5 mm Hg), daytime systolic BP (mean difference=12.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 10.6-13.9 mm Hg), and 24-hour systolic BP (mean difference=11.2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 9.7-12.8 mm Hg). The night/day systolic BP ratio was similar between the intensive (0.92±0.09) and standard-treatment groups (0.91±0.09). There was considerable lack of agreement within participants between clinic systolic BP and daytime ambulatory systolic BP with wide limits of agreement on Bland-Altman plots. In conclusion, targeting a systolic BP of <120 mm Hg, when compared with <140 mm Hg, resulted in lower nighttime, daytime, and 24-hour systolic BP, but did not change the night/day systolic BP ratio. Ambulatory BP monitoring may be required to assess the effect of targeted hypertension therapy on out of office BP. Further studies are needed to assess whether targeting hypertension therapy based on ambulatory BP improves clinical outcomes.

  11. Differences in central systolic blood pressure and aortic stiffness between aerobically trained and sedentary individuals.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Pierre; Marenco, Patrice; Castagna, Olivier; Smulyan, Harold; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate central (carotid) artery blood pressure (BP) in endurance athletes. Carotid-femoral (= aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV) together with radial and carotid tonometry and pulse wave analysis were performed at rest in 30 endurance athletes and 30 sedentary controls, all males matched for age, height, brachial systolic BP (SBP), and diastolic BP. Whereas brachial BP was similar in the two groups, carotid SBP and pulse pressure (PP) were higher in endurance athletes than in controls irrespective of age (123.1 ± 2.17 vs. 110.2 ± 1.29 mm Hg, and 50.9 ± 1.95 vs. 34.1 ± 1.01 mm Hg; P < .0001 for both). PP amplification evaluated from the brachial/carotid PP ratio was lower in athletes than in controls (1.05 ± 0.04 vs. 1.40 ± 0.02; P < .0001). When compared with controls, athletes had lower PWV (7.81 ± 0.17 vs. 9.8 ± 0.23 m/second; P < .0001), higher reflected wave transit time/left ventricular ejection time ratio (P = .02), and lower heart rate (52.03 ± 1.54 vs. 68.9 ± 1.72 beats/minute; P < .0001). When matched for brachial BP, central SBP and PP were higher in endurance athletes than in sedentary controls. The possible negative pathophysiological impact of increased central BP on the overall favorable effects of training deserves further study.

  12. A quantitative trait loci-specific gene-by-sex interaction on systolic blood pressure among American Indians: the Strong Heart Family Study.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nora; MacCluer, Jean W; Göring, Harald H H; Cole, Shelley A; Rose, Kathryn M; Almasy, Laura; Diego, Vincent; Laston, Sandra; Lee, Elisa T; Howard, Barbara V; Best, Lyle G; Fabsitz, Richard R; Roman, Mary J; North, Kari E

    2006-08-01

    Age-adjusted systolic blood pressure is higher in males than females. Genetic factors may account for this sex-specific variation. To localize sex-specific quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing blood pressure, we conducted a genome scan of systolic blood pressure, in males and females, separately and combined, and tested for aggregate and QTL-specific genotype-by-sex interaction in American Indian participants of the Strong Heart Family Study. Blood pressure was measured 3 times and the average of the last 2 measures was used for analyses. Systolic blood pressure was adjusted for age and antihypertensive treatment within study center. We performed variance component linkage analysis in the full sample and stratified by sex among 1168 females and 726 males. Marker allele frequencies were derived using maximum likelihood estimates based on all individuals, and multipoint identity-by-descent sharing was estimated using Loki. We detected suggestive evidence of a QTL influencing systolic blood pressure on chromosome 17 at 129 cM between markers D17S784 and D17S928 (logarithm of odds [LOD] = 2.4). This signal substantially improved when accounting for QTL-specific genotype-by-sex interaction (P = 0.04), because we observed an LOD score of 3.3 for systolic blood pressure in women on chromosome 17 at 136 cM. The magnitude of the linkage signal on chromosome 17q25.3 was slightly attenuated when participants taking antihypertensive medications were excluded, although suggestive evidence for linkage was still identified (LOD = 2.8 in women). Accounting for interaction with sex improved our ability to detect QTLs and demonstrated the importance of considering genotype-by-sex interaction in our search for blood pressure genes.

  13. Childhood to Early-Midlife Systolic Blood Pressure Trajectories: Early-Life Predictors, Effect Modifiers, and Adult Cardiovascular Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Reremoana F; Broadbent, Jonathan; Nagin, Daniel; Ambler, Antony; Hogan, Sean; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Cutfield, Wayne; Williams, Michael J A; Harrington, HonaLee; Moffitt, Terrie E; Caspi, Avshalom; Milne, Barry; Poulton, Richie

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies examining blood pressure change over time have modeled an average population trajectory. Recent research among older adults suggests there may be subgroups with different blood pressure trajectories. Identifying subgroups at risk of developing adult hypertension early in life can inform effective risk reduction efforts. We sought to identify different systolic blood pressure trajectories from childhood, their correlated risk factors, and early-midlife cardiovascular outcomes. Blood pressure data at ages 7, 11, 18, 26, 32, and 38 years from a longitudinal, representative birth cohort study (n=975) were used to identify 4 distinct trajectory groups via group-based trajectory modeling: normal (21.8%), high-normal (43.3%), prehypertensive (31.6%), and hypertensive (4.2%). The categories refer to blood pressure beginning at the age of 7 years and most recently measured at the age of 38 years. Family history of high blood pressure (odds ratio [OR], 43.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.27-354.65), male sex (OR, 109.48; 95% CI, 26.82-446.96), being first born (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.00-8.69) and low birth weight (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.49-3.09) were associated with hypertensive group membership (compared with the normal group). Higher body mass index and cigarette smoking resulted in increasing blood pressure across trajectories, particularly for the higher blood pressure groups. Prehypertensive and hypertensive trajectory groups had worse cardiovascular outcomes by early midlife. Harmful blood pressure trajectories are identifiable in childhood, associated with both antecedent and modifiable risk factors over time, and predict adult cardiovascular disease risk. Early detection and subsequent targeted prevention and intervention may reduce the lifecourse burden associated with higher blood pressure.

  14. CHILDHOOD TO EARLY MID-LIFE SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE TRAJECTORIES: EARLY LIFE PREDICTORS, EFFECT MODIFIERS, AND ADULT CARDIOVASCULAR OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Theodore, Reremoana F; Broadbent, Jonathan; Nagin, Daniel; Ambler, Antony; Hogan, Sean; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Cutfield, Wayne; Williams, Michael J A; Harrington, HonaLee; Moffitt, Terrie E; Caspi, Avshalom; Milne, Barry; Poulton, Richie

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining blood pressure change over time have modelled an “average” population trajectory. Recent research among older adults suggests there may be subgroups with different blood pressure trajectories. Identifying subgroups at risk of developing adult hypertension early in life can inform effective risk reduction efforts. We sought to identify different systolic blood pressure trajectories from childhood, their correlated risk factors and early midlife cardiovascular outcomes. Blood pressure data at ages 7, 11, 18, 26, 32 and 38 years from a longitudinal, representative birth cohort study (n=975) were used to identify four distinct trajectory groups via group-based trajectory modeling: ‘normal’ (21.8%), ‘high-normal’ (43.3%), ‘prehypertensive’ (31.6%), and ‘hypertensive’ (4.2%). The categories refer to blood pressure beginning at age 7 and most recently measured at age 38. Family history of high blood pressure (OR=43.23, 95% CI 5.27, 354.65), male gender (OR=109.48, 95% CI=26.82, 446.96), being first born (OR=2.5 95% CI=1.00, 8.69) and low birthweight (OR=2.79, 95% CI 2.49, 3.09) were associated with hypertensive group membership (compared to the normal group). Higher body mass index and cigarette smoking resulted in increasing blood pressure across trajectories, particularly for the higher blood pressure groups. Prehypertensive and hypertensive trajectory groups had worse cardiovascular outcomes by early midlife. Harmful blood pressure trajectories are identifiable in childhood, associated with both antecedent and modifiable risk factors over time, and predict adult cardiovascular disease risk. Early detection, subsequent targeted prevention and/or intervention may reduce the lifecourse burden associated with higher blood pressure. PMID:26558818

  15. Derivation of a measure of systolic blood pressure mutability: a novel information theory-based metric from ambulatory blood pressure tests.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Danitza J; Vogel, Eugenio E; Saravia, Gonzalo; Stockins, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We provide ambulatory blood pressure (BP) exams with tools based on information theory to quantify fluctuations thus increasing the capture of dynamic test components. Data from 515 ambulatory 24-hour BP exams were considered. Average age was 54 years, 54% were women, and 53% were under BP treatment. The average systolic pressure (SP) was 127 ± 8 mm Hg. A data compressor (wlzip) designed to recognize meaningful information is invoked to measure mutability which is a form of dynamical variability. For patients with the same average SP, different mutability values are obtained which reflects the differences in dynamical variability. In unadjusted linear regression models, mutability had low association with the mean systolic BP (R(2) = 0.056; P < .000001) but larger association with the SP deviation (R(2) = 0.761; P < .001). Wlzip allows detecting levels of variability in SP that could be hazardous. This new indicator can be easily added to the 24-hour BP monitors improving information toward diagnosis.

  16. Long-term impact of systolic blood pressure and glycemia on the development of microalbuminuria in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Jose Maria; Rodilla, Enrique; Gonzalez, Carmen; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Redon, Josep

    2005-06-01

    The objective was to assess the temporal impact of factors related to the development of microalbuminuria during the follow-up of young adult normoalbuminurics with high-normal blood pressure or at stage 1 of essential hypertension. Prospective follow-up was conducted on 245 normoalbuminuric hypertensive subjects (mean age 40.9 years; 134 men; blood pressure 139.7/88.6 mm Hg; body mass index 28.5 kg/m2) never treated previously with antihypertensive drugs, with yearly urinary albumin excretion measurements, until the development of microalbuminuria. After enrollment, patients were placed on usual care including nonpharmacological treatment or with an antihypertensive drug regime to achieve a blood pressure of <135/85 mm Hg. Thirty subjects (12.2%) developed microalbuminuria after a mean follow-up of 29.9 months (range 12 to 144 months), 2.5 per 100 patients per year. Baseline urinary albumin excretion (hazard ratio, 1.07; P=0.006) and systolic blood pressure during the follow-up (hazard ratio, 1.03; P=0.008) were independent factors related to the follow-up urinary albumin excretion in a Cox proportional hazard model. A significant increase in the risk of developing microalbuminuria for urinary albumin excretion at baseline >15 mg per 24-hour systolic blood pressure >139 mm Hg and a positive trend in fasting glucose were observed in the univariate analyses. However, in the multivariate analysis, only the baseline urinary albumin excretion and the trend of fasting glucose were independently related to the risk of developing microalbuminuria. In mild hypertensives, the development of microalbuminuria was linked to insufficient blood pressure control and to a progressive increment of glucose values.

  17. Discordant effects of beta-blockade on central aortic systolic and brachial systolic blood pressure: considerations beyond the cuff.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Benjamin J; Anderson, Shawn

    2007-09-01

    The role of beta-blockers in uncomplicated hypertension has been challenged recently. Compared with other antihypertensives, beta-blockers are less effective for preventing cardiovascular events in patients with uncomplicated hypertension. Moreover, a recent meta-analysis of placebo-controlled clinical trials concluded that atenolol is not more efficacious than placebo for preventing cardiovascular events in patients with hypertension. Although these agents lower blood pressure measured conventionally over the brachial artery with a blood pressure cuff, they do not exert a commensurate effect on blood pressure in the central aorta. Central aortic blood pressure and aortic augmentation index are strong predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. Emerging data are illuminating the antihypertensive paradox whereby antihypertensive agents may elicit discordant effects on central and peripheral blood pressure and hemodynamics. Vasodilatory antihypertensives, such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors and calcium channel blockers, elicit reductions in central aortic blood pressure equal to or greater than that in the brachial artery. Conversely, beta-blockers lower central aortic blood pressure to a lesser degree even when blood pressure measured by sphygmomanometry is reduced substantially. Given the strong relationship between central aortic blood pressure and target organ damage, the effectiveness of beta-blockers may be overestimated in practice on the basis of conventional blood pressure measurements alone. Differences in central and peripheral blood pressure may account for the lack of cardiovascular protection afforded by beta-blockers in clinical trials and could account for a portion of the apparent "benefit beyond blood pressure" reduction with other classes of antihypertensive agents. Future studies should aim to better clarify the role of central aortic blood pressure in the treatment of

  18. Increased systolic blood pressure reactivity to acute stress is related with better self-reported health.

    PubMed

    Wright, Bradley J; O'Brien, Shaun; Hazi, Agnes; Kent, Stephen

    2014-11-13

    The stress reactivity hypothesis posits that the magnitude of cardiovascular reactions to acute stress tasks is related with future blood pressure status, heart hypertrophy, and atherosclerosis. We assessed the stress reactivity hypothesis and aimed to identify which physiological indices (blood pressure, heart-rate, cortisol, salivary immunoglobulin A (sIgA)) related to self-reported mental and physical health. We also assessed if physiological reactions elicited by an acute stressor were more related than basal assessments. Participants provided physiological samples, self-reported stress and health-data before and after an assessed 5-7 minute academic oral presentation. In hierarchical regression models, increased systolic and reduced sIgA reactivity was associated with better perceptions of mental health. Reactivity data were more related to self-reported data than basal data. In line with the only 2 studies to assess the reactivity hypothesis with self-perceived health, increased systolic reactivity was best associated with better perceived physical and mental health. The findings suggest that increased SBP reactivity may also be associated with positive health outcomes. Further research is required to determine if increased or decreased sIgA reactivity is most predictive of future morbidity.

  19. Continuous measurement of systolic blood pressure using the PTT and other parameters.

    PubMed

    Park, E; Cho, B; Park, S; Lee, J; Lee, J; Kim, I; Kim, Sun

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we proposed the regression model which could estimate unspecified people's systolic blood pressure (SBP) conveniently and continuously and checked its accuracy through clinical experiments. The method for estimating each individual SBP by using only pulse transit time (PTT) has been studied, but it is difficult to estimate unspecified people's SBP with the method using only PTT. Thus we researched several physical characteristic parameters which might affect blood pressure (BP) with the standard that we can measure them easily and conveniently, chose valid physical characteristic parameters through a clinical testing and correlation analysis, and made the regression model using PTT and valid physical characteristic parameters for estimating unspecified people's SBP. Comparing the result of the proposed method with American National Standards Institute of the Association of the Advancement of Medical Instrument (ANSI/AAMI), we know that the proposed regression model gives an acceptable result.

  20. Chlorthalidone Plus Amiloride Reduces the Central Systolic Blood Pressure in Stage 1 Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Leticia Aparecida Barufi; Cestario, Elizabeth do Espirito Santo; Cosenso-Martin, Luciana Neves; Vilela-Martin, Jose Fernando; Yugar-Toledo, Juan Carlos; Fuchs, Flavio Danni

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension reduction strategies use blood pressure in the brachial artery as the primary endpoint. Individuals who achieve the target blood pressure reduction with antihypertensive treatment have residual cardiovascular risk attributed to the difference in pressure between the aorta and brachial artery. Antihypertensive treatment affects the intrinsic properties of the vascular wall and arterial stiffness markers and consequently the central pressure. Recent publications stress the importance of adequate control of the central compared to peripheral blood pressure. Related clinical implications suggest that individuals with normal peripheral but high central blood pressure should not receive antihypertensive drugs that act on the central pressure. Therefore, they are at greater cardiovascular risk. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of treatment with a thiazide diuretic versus losartan on the central blood pressure in stage 1 hypertensive patients. Methods Twenty-five patients were randomized to the chlorthalidone 25 mg/amiloride 5 mg group (q.d.) and 25 patients received losartan 50 mg (b.i.d). The central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) and augmentation index (AIx 75) were assessed using applanation tonometry. The paired t-test was used to compare the systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), pulse pressure (PP), CSBP and AIx 75 between the thiazide and losartan groups at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. Results Significant reductions in CSBP (123.3 ± 14.2 vs. 113.4 ± 111.4, P = 0.0103) and AIx 75 (87.7 ± 9.6 vs. 83.8 ± 8.9, P = 0.0289) were observed after 6 months of drug treatment with chlorthalidone 25 mg/amiloride 5 mg (q.d.). The administration of losartan 50 mg (b.i.d) did not reduce the CSBP and there were insignificant changes in the AIx 75. Conclusions Six-month treatment of chlorthalidone/amiloride but not losartan reduces the CSBP and AIx 75 in adults with stage 1

  1. [Morphological and functional parameters of the left ventricle (mass, wall thickness and end-systolic stress) in school children with different levels of blood pressure, at rest and during maximal exercise].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S; Soltero, I; Onorato, E; Pietri, C; Zambrano, F

    1990-01-01

    Echocardiographically determined left ventricular mass, diastolic septal and posterior wall thickness and end-systolic wall stress, as well as electrocardiographic indexes of left ventricular enlargement (Sokolow-Lyon index and Romhilt-Estes score) and of left atrial enlargement (P terminal index) were correlated with resting and exercise systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and with several parameters of body size (weight, height, body surface area, Quetelet index), in 130 school children (61 boys, 69 girls) 6 to 15 years of age. Parameters of body size had a positive correlation both with systolic and diastolic blood pressures and with parameters of left ventricular size. Thus, the latter were adjusted for body surface area, for correlation with blood pressure. Left ventricular mass and diastolic septal and posterior wall thickness had a very poor correlation with resting and exercise diastolic blood pressures. Left ventricular mass and diastolic posterior wall thickness had a significantly higher correlation with peak exercise systolic blood pressure than with resting systolic blood pressure. End-systolic wall stress had a positive correlation with resting diastolic and systolic blood pressures. Electrocardiographic parameters of left ventricular and left atrial enlargement had a very poor correlation with resting and exercise blood pressure. Our findings suggest that early in life left ventricular mass and wall thickness are more closely related to maximal systolic blood pressure during physical exercise than to blood pressure in basal conditions. The electrocardiogram is an insensitive method to detect early modifications of left ventricular size in relation to different levels of blood pressure. The echocardiogram is the method of choice for this purpose.

  2. Blood Pressure, Left Ventricular Geometry, and Systolic Function in Children Exposed to Inorganic Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Osorio-Yáñez, Citlalli; Ayllon-Vergara, Julio C.; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Aguilar-Madrid, Guadalupe; Hernández-Castellanos, Erika; Sánchez-Peña, Luz C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a ubiquitous element present in the groundwater worldwide. Cardiovascular effects related to iAs exposure have been studied extensively in adult populations. Few epidemiological studies have been focused on iAs exposure–related cardiovascular disease in children. Objective: In this study we investigated the association between iAs exposure, blood pressure (BP), and functional and anatomical echocardiographic parameters in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 161 children between 3 and 8 years was conducted in Central Mexico. The total concentration of arsenic (As) species in urine (U-tAs) was determined by hydride generation–cryotrapping–atomic absorption spectrometry and lifetime iAs exposure was estimated by multiplying As concentrations measured in drinking water by the duration of water consumption in years (LAsE). BP was measured by standard protocols, and M-mode echocardiographic parameters were determined by ultrasonography. Results: U-tAs concentration and LAsE were significantly associated with diastolic (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in multivariable linear regression models: DBP and SBP were 0.013 (95% CI: 0.002, 0.024) and 0.021 (95% CI: 0.004, 0.037) mmHg higher in association with each 1-ng/mL increase in U-tAs (p < 0.025), respectively. Left ventricular mass (LVM) was significantly associated with LAsE [5.5 g higher (95% CI: 0.65, 10.26) in children with LAsE > 620 compared with < 382 μg/L-year; p = 0.03] in an adjusted multivariable model. The systolic function parameters left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and shortening fraction were 3.67% (95% CI: –7.14, –0.20) and 3.41% (95% CI: –6.44, –0.37) lower, respectively, in children with U-tAs > 70 ng/mL compared with < 35 ng/mL. Conclusion: Early-life exposure to iAs was significantly associated with higher BP and LVM and with lower EF in our study population of Mexican children. Citation: Osorio-Yáñez C, Ayllon-Vergara JC

  3. Impact of Antihypertensive Agents on Central Systolic Blood Pressure and Augmentation Index: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    McGaughey, Tracey J.; Fletcher, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND New evidence suggests that central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) and augmentation index (AI) are superior predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes compared to peripheral systolic BP (pSBP). We performed a meta-analysis assessing the impact of antihypertensives on cSBP and AI. METHODS PubMed, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL were searched until September 2014 to identify eligible articles. A DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model was used to calculate the weighted mean difference (WMD) and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Fifty-two and 58 studies incorporating 4,381 and 3,716 unique subjects were included for cSBP and AI analysis, respectively. RESULTS Overall, antihypertensives reduced pSBP more than cSBP (WMD 2.52mm Hg, 95% CI 1.35 to 3.69; I 2 = 21.9%). β-Blockers (BBs) posed a significantly greater reduction in pSBP as compared to cSBP (WMD 5.19mm Hg, 95% CI 3.21 to 7.18). α-Blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, renin-angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitors and nicorandil reduced cSBP and pSBP in a similar manner. The overall reduction in AI from baseline was 3.09% (95% CI 2.28 to 3.90; I 2 = 84.5%). A significant reduction in AI was seen with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, renin-angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitors, BBs, α-blockers (ABs), nicorandil, and moxonidine reduced AI nonsignificantly. CONCLUSIONS BBs are not as beneficial as the other antihypertensives in reducing cSBP and AI. PMID:26289583

  4. Evaluation of vitamin D relationship with type 2 diabetes and systolic blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Shivananda Bijoor

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether relationships exist among vitamin D, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and blood pressure in Trinidadian subjects with T2DM. Research design and methods This was a case–controlled study to determine if vitamin D levels were lower in patients with T2DM. After data analysis, an exploratory hypothesis of vitamin D relationship to systolic blood pressure (SBP) was developed. Plasma calcifediol (25(OH)D) concentrations were used as a measurement for vitamin D levels and were determined by ELISA. Cholesterol levels were measured by an automated dry chemistry analyzer and blood pressure was measured using an automatic blood pressure monitor. Results There was no significant difference (p=0.139, n=76) in 25(OH)D levels between patients with T2DM and controls. Subjects with SBP above 130 mm Hg were 8 times more likely to have a 25(OH)D plasma concentration above 25 ng/mL (OR 7.9 (2.2 to 28.7)), and were 5 times (OR 4.7 (1.7 to 15.1)) more likely to have a 25(OH)D plasma concentration above 30 ng/mL (OR 7.5 (2.3–24.2)). Vitamin D levels moderately and positively correlated with SBP (rs=0.38, p=0.001). Conclusions There was no significant difference in the 25(OH)D levels between patients with T2DM and controls (p=0.139). Patients with SBP under 130 mm Hg were 8 times more likely to have a vitamin D level above 25 ng/mL (OR 7.9 (2.2 to 28.7)). Further investigations are required to examine the relationship between vitamin D and SBP. PMID:27843555

  5. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability on Recently Diagnosed Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Michel-Chávez, Anaclara; Estañol, Bruno; Gien-López, José Antonio; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Huitrado-Duarte, María Elena; Moreno-Morales, René; Becerra-Luna, Brayans

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes affects approximately 250 million people in the world. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that leads to severe postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and increased incidence of silent myocardial infarction. Objective To determine the variability of heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in recently diagnosed diabetic patients. Methods The study included 30 patients with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes of less than 2 years and 30 healthy controls. We used a Finapres® device to measure during five minutes beat-to-beat HR and blood pressure in three experimental conditions: supine position, standing position, and rhythmic breathing at 0.1 Hz. The results were analyzed in the time and frequency domains. Results In the HR analysis, statistically significant differences were found in the time domain, specifically on short-term values such as standard deviation of NN intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), and number of pairs of successive NNs that differ by more than 50 ms (pNN50). In the BP analysis, there were no significant differences, but there was a sympathetic dominance in all three conditions. The baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) decreased in patients with early diabetes compared with healthy subjects during the standing maneuver. Conclusions There is a decrease in HR variability in patients with early type 2 diabetes. No changes were observed in the BP analysis in the supine position, but there were changes in BRS with the standing maneuver, probably due to sympathetic hyperactivity. PMID:26176187

  6. Age-Associated Increases in Pulmonary Artery Systolic Pressure in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Borlaug, Barry A.; Kane, Garvan C.; Enders, Felicity T.; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    Background In contrast to the wealth of data on isolated systolic hypertension involving the systemic circulation in the elderly, much less is known about age-related change in pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and its prognostic impact in the general population. We sought to define the relationship between PASP and age, evaluate which factors influence PASP and determine if PASP is independently predictive of mortality in the community. Methods and Results A random sample of Olmsted County, MN general population (N=2042) underwent echocardiography and spirometry and was followed for a median of 9 years. PASP was measured from the tricuspid regurgitation velocity. Left ventricular diastolic pressure was estimated using Doppler echocardiography (E/e' ratio) and arterial stiffening was assessed using the brachial artery pulse pressure. Among 1413 (69%) subjects with measurable PASP (63±11y; 43% male), PASP (median, 25th-75th percentile) was 26 (24-30) mmHg and increased with age (r=0.31; p<0.001). Independent predictors of PASP were age, pulse pressure and mitral E/e' (all p≤0.003). Increasing PASP was associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio 2.73 per 10 mmHg; p<0.001). In subjects without cardiopulmonary disease (any heart failure, coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus or chronic obstructive lung disease), the age-adjusted hazard ratio was 2.74 per 10 mmHg (p=0.016). Conclusions We provide the first population-based evidence of age-related increase in pulmonary artery pressure, its association with increasing left heart diastolic pressures and systemic vascular stiffening, as well as its negative impact on survival. Pulmonary artery pressure may serve as a novel cardiovascular risk factor and potential therapeutic target. PMID:19433755

  7. White matter disease in midlife is heritable, related to hypertension, and shares some genetic influence with systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Fennema-Notestine, Christine; McEvoy, Linda K; Notestine, Randy; Panizzon, Matthew S; Yau, Wai-Ying Wendy; Franz, Carol E; Lyons, Michael J; Eyler, Lisa T; Neale, Michael C; Xian, Hong; McKenzie, Ruth E; Kremen, William S

    2016-01-01

    White matter disease in the brain increases with age and cardiovascular disease, emerging in midlife, and these associations may be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. We examined the frequency, distribution, and heritability of abnormal white matter and its association with hypertension in 395 middle-aged male twins (61.9 ± 2.6 years) from the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging, 67% of whom were hypertensive. A multi-channel segmentation approach estimated abnormal regions within the white matter. Using multivariable regression models, we characterized the frequency distribution of abnormal white matter in midlife and investigated associations with hypertension and Apolipoprotein E-ε4 status and the impact of duration and control of hypertension. Then, using the classical twin design, we estimated abnormal white matter heritability and the extent of shared genetic overlap with blood pressure. Abnormal white matter was predominantly located in periventricular and deep parietal and frontal regions; associated with age (t = 1.9, p = 0.05) and hypertension (t = 2.9, p = 0.004), but not Apolipoprotein ε4 status; and was greater in those with uncontrolled hypertension relative to controlled (t = 3.0, p = 0.003) and normotensive (t = 4.0, p = 0.0001) groups, suggesting that abnormal white matter may reflect currently active cerebrovascular effects. Abnormal white matter was highly heritable (a(2) = 0.81) and shared some genetic influences with systolic blood pressure (rA = 0.26), although there was evidence for distinct genetic contributions and unique environmental influences. Future longitudinal research will shed light on factors impacting white matter disease presentation, progression, and potential recovery.

  8. Effects of Proximate Foreclosed Properties on Individuals' Systolic Blood Pressure in Massachusetts, 1987–2008

    PubMed Central

    Arcaya, Mariana; Glymour, M. Maria; Chakrabarti, Prabal; Christakis, Nicholas A; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S V

    2014-01-01

    Introduction No studies have examined the effects of local foreclosure activity on neighbors' blood pressure, despite the fact that spillover effects of nearby foreclosures include many known risk factors for increased blood pressure. We assessed the extent to which living near foreclosed properties is associated with subsequent systolic blood pressure (SBP). Methods and Results We used geocoded 6,590 observations collected from 1,740 participants in the Framingham Offspring Cohort across five waves (1987-2008) of the Framingham Heart Study to create a longitudinal record of exposure to nearby foreclosure activity. We distinguished between Real Estate Owned foreclosures (REOs), which typically sit vacant, and foreclosures purchased by third party buyers, which are generally put into productive use. Counts of lender-owned foreclosed properties within 100 meters of participants' homes were used to predict measured SBP and odds of being hypertensive. We assessed whether self-reported alcoholic drinks per week and measured BMI helped explain the foreclosure activity-SBP relationship. Each additional REO located within 100 meters of a participant's home was associated with an increase in SBP of 1.71 mm/hg (p=.03; 95%CI = 0.18 - 3.24) after adjusting for individual- and area-level confounders, but not with odds of hypertension. The presence of foreclosures purchased by third party buyers was not associated with SBP nor with hypertension. BMI and alcohol consumption attenuated the effect of living near REOs on SBP in fully adjusted models. Conclusion Real Estate Owned foreclosed properties may put nearby neighbors at risk for increased SBP, with higher alcohol consumption and body mass index partially mediating this relationship. PMID:24891622

  9. Fluctuation in systolic blood pressure is a major systemic risk factor for development of primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na Young; Jung, Younhea; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Chan Kee

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the risk of development of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in terms of variability in BP using a nationwide, population-based, 11-year longitudinal study using the Korean National Health Insurance Research Database. We included patients who underwent health care examinations more than twice between January 2002 and December 2006. We divided all subjects by the quartiles of variability in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and the difference between SBP and DBP. Of the total of 80,021 included subjects, 910 were diagnosed with POAG between January 2007 and December 2013. Both the Kaplan-Meier survival curves and log-rank test data indicated that patients with higher-level BP variability developed POAG significantly more frequently than did patients with lower-level variability (P < 0.001). On multivariate Cox’s regression modeling including gender, age, sex, household income, smoking status, level of alcohol intake, extent of exercise, diabetes mellitus status, dyslipidemia status, SBP, and DBP; the hazard ratios among the highest and lowest quartiles of SD SBP and CV SBP were 1.256 and 1.238, respectively. Our findings suggest that subjects in the highest quartile of SBP variability were significantly more likely to develop POAG in our population-based sample of Korean adults. PMID:28262703

  10. Impaired systolic blood pressure recovery and heart rate recovery after graded exercise in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alihanoglu, Yusuf I; Yildiz, Bekir S; Kilic, I Dogu; Uludag, Burcu; Demirci, Emre E; Zungur, Mustafa; Evrengul, Harun; Kaftan, Asuman H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare systolic blood pressure recovery and heart rate recovery (HRR) values obtained at various time intervals after maximal graded exercise treadmill testing between patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) and the controls without MS. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating systolic blood pressure recovery (SBPR) impairment and its relations to HRR and other variables in this group of patients. The study population included 110 patients with MS (67 men, 43 women; mean age: 46 ± 9 years) and 110 control subjects who did not meet the criteria for MS (58 men, 52 women; mean age: 44 ± 10 years). All patients were selected from nonobese, apparently healthy sedentary individuals who had the ability to perform maximum exercise testing. SBPR was assessed by calculating the ratio of systolic blood pressure (SBP) obtained in the third minute of the recovery period to either the peak-exercise SBP or the SBP in the first minute of the recovery period after graded exercise testing. HRR values were calculated by subtracting the HR at the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth minutes of the recovery period from the HR reached at peak exercise. There was no significant difference found between the 2 groups with respect to age and sex distribution. As expected, patients with MS had higher waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose and serum triglyceride, and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with control subjects. All HRR values calculated in the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth minutes were significantly detected lower in the MS group compared with the control group (HRR 1st: 32 ± 10 vs 36 ± 11; P = 0.009; HRR 2nd: 47 ± 10 vs 51 ± 11; P = 0.02; HRR 3rd: 53 ± 11 vs 58 ± 12; P = 0.001; HRR 4th: 57 ± 11 vs 64 ± 12; P < 0.001; HRR 5th: 60 ± 16 vs 69 ± 15; P < 0.001). In addition, calculated mean values for SBPR1 and SBPR2 were >1 in patients with MS (1.01 ± 0.2 vs 0.91 ± 0.1 and 1

  11. Does Systolic Blood Pressure Response to Lifestyle Intervention Indicate Metabolic Risk and Health-Related Quality-of-Life Improvement Over 1 Year?

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Melanie I; Gill, Dawn P; Petrella, Robert J

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether responders (minimum 4-mm Hg reduction of systolic blood pressure [BP]) at 24 weeks) to a 52-week lifestyle intervention had greater changes in metabolic risk factors and health-related quality of life than nonresponders. Participants (N=126; age, 57.4 [9.1] years) had waist circumference (WC), resting BP, glycated hemoglobin, lipids, and fitness assessed at baseline and at 12, 24, and 52 months. The 36-item short-form survey was administered to assess HRQOL. At baseline, responders had higher mental health scores (P=.04) and systolic and diastolic BPs (P<.001) than nonresponders. Across 52 weeks, responders also had greater improvements in diastolic BP (P<.001), WC (P=.01), and maximal oxygen uptake (P=.04) compared with nonresponders. Participants with clinically important changes in systolic BP at 24 weeks had greater metabolic improvements across 52 weeks, compared with those without clinically important systolic BP changes.

  12. Frequency components of systolic blood pressure variability reflect vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic functions in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takahiko; Eguchi, Kunihiro; Sakurai, Hiroki; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuyuki; Ohmichi, Mika; Morimoto, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Ushida, Takahiro; Iwase, Satoshi; Sugenoya, Junichi; Kumazawa, Takao

    2011-09-01

    In this study, after confirming the suppression of autonomic nervous function by isoflurane anesthesia using autonomic antagonists, we pharmacologically investigated the involvement of vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic functions in systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) frequency components in conscious rats at rest and during exposure to low-ambient temperature (LT-exposure, 9°C for 90 min). Under unanesthesia, phentolamine administration (α-adrenoceptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg) decreased the mid-frequency component (MF 0.33-0.73 Hz) and inversely increased the high-frequency component (HF 1.3-2.5 Hz). The increased HF was suppressed by subsequent treatment with atenolol (β-adrenoceptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg), but not with atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg). Moreover, phentolamine administration after atenolol decreased MF, but did not increase HF. LT-exposure increased MF and HF; however, phentolamine pretreatment suppressed the increased MF during LT-exposure, and atenolol pretreatment dose-dependently decreased the increased HF. These results suggest that MF and HF of SBPV may reflect α-adrenoceptor-mediated vasomotor function and β-adrenoceptor-mediated cardiac sympathetic function, respectively, in the conscious state.

  13. The effect of music therapy on postoperative pain, heart rate, systolic blood pressures and analgesic use following nasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Chan, M F; Benzie, Iris F F

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of unrelieved postoperative pain is high and may lead to adverse effects including prolonged hospitalization and delayed recovery. Distraction may be an effective pain-relieving strategy, and can be implemented by several means including affective imaging, games, and possibly music. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of music therapy on postoperative pain. Fifty-seven patients (24 females, 33 males; mean +/- SD age 39.9 +/- 14.35 years [range 15 to 69 years] were matched for age and sex and then nonselectively assigned to either an experimental (n = 27) or a control (n = 30) group. Music was played intermittently to members of the experimental group during the first 24 hour postoperative period. Pain intensity was measured using the Pain Verbal Rating Scales (VRS). Significant decreases in pain intensity over time were found in the experimental group compared to the control group (p < 0.0001). In addition, the experimental group had a lower systolic blood pressure and heart rate, and took fewer oral analgesics for pain. These findings suggest that music therapy is an effective nonpharmacologic approach for postoperative pain management.

  14. Comparison of two generalized transfer functions for measuring central systolic blood pressure by an oscillometric blood pressure monitor.

    PubMed

    Shih, Y-T; Cheng, H-M; Sung, S-H; Hu, W-C; Chen, C-H

    2013-03-01

    Central aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP-C) can be estimated from a cuff oscillometric waveform derived during the pulse volume plethysmography (PVP) by applying a device-specific aortic pressure-to-PVP waveform-generalized transfer function (A2P(GTF)). The present study compared the performance of an aortic-to-brachial pressure waveforms generalized transfer function (A2B(GTF)), which is independent of any PVP devices, with an A2P(GTF). Generalized transfer function of aortic-to-brachial (A2B(GTF)) and aortic-to-PVP (A2P(GTF)) were generated from the simultaneously obtained central aortic and brachial pressure waveforms recorded by a high-fidelity dual pressure sensor catheter, and the PVP waveform recorded by a customized noninvasive blood pressure monitor during cardiac catheterization in 40 patients, and were then applied in another 100 patients with simultaneously recorded invasive aortic pressure and noninvasively calibrated (using cuff SBP and diastolic blood pressures) PVP waveforms. The mean difference±s.d. between the noninvasively estimated and invasively recorded SBP-C was -2.1±7.7 mm Hg for A2B(GTF), which was not greater than that of -3.0±7.7 mm Hg for A2P(GTF) (P<0.01). In conclusion, SBP-C can be measured reliably using a noninvasive blood pressure monitor by applying either an A2P(GTF) or A2B(GTF) to a noninvasively calibrated PVP waveform. The performance of an A2B(GTF) is not inferior to that of an A2P(GTF).

  15. Arm-ankle systolic blood pressure difference at rest and after exercise in the assessment of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed Central

    Engvall, J.; Sonnhag, C.; Nylander, E.; Stenport, G.; Karlsson, E.; Wranne, B.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate the difference in systolic blood pressure at the arm and ankle at rest and after various exercise tests for the assessment of aortic coarctation. METHODS--22 patients (mean age 33 years, range 17-66) were investigated on the suspicion of having haemodynamically significant aortic coarctation. Eight had undergone previous coarctation surgery, of whom five had received vascular grafts and three end to end anastomoses. The patients exercised submaximally while supine, seated on a bicycle, and walking on a treadmill, as well as exercising maximally on a treadmill. Arm and ankle blood pressure were measured with a cuff at rest and 1-10 minutes after exercise. Invasive pressures and cardiac output by thermodilution were recorded during catheterisation while patients were at rest and during and after supine bicycle exercise. The degree of constriction was assessed by angiography. Twelve healthy volunteers (mean age 32 years, range 17-56) provided reference values for cuff pressures after exercise. RESULTS--All patients with a difference in cuff pressure at rest of 35 mm Hg or more had a difference in invasive pressure of 35 mm Hg or more. Increasing severity of constriction on angiography correlated with larger pressure gradients at rest and during exercise (P < 0.0001). When cuff measurements after exercise were considered singly or combined to form a predictor they did not improve the prediction of the invasive pressure gradients at rest or after maximal exercise. A pressure gradient between arm and ankle also developed in normal subjects after maximal but not after submaximal exercise. CONCLUSION--In most patients with suspected haemodynamically significant coarctation the difference in cuff pressure between arm and ankle at rest is sufficient to select patients in need of further evaluation. If exercise is performed submaximal exercise is preferable. PMID:7727189

  16. Effect of home blood pressure telemonitoring with self-care support on uncontrolled systolic hypertension in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G; Irvine, M Jane; McIsaac, Warren J; Tisler, Andras; Rossos, Peter G; Easty, Anthony; Feig, Denice S; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2012-07-01

    Lowering blood pressure reduces cardiovascular risk, yet hypertension is poorly controlled in diabetic patients. In a pilot study we demonstrated that a home blood pressure telemonitoring system, which provided self-care messages on the smartphone of hypertensive diabetic patients immediately after each reading, improved blood pressure control. Messages were based on care paths defined by running averages of transmitted readings. The present study tests the system's effectiveness in a randomized, controlled trial in diabetic patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension. Of 244 subjects screened for eligibility, 110 (45%) were randomly allocated to the intervention (n = 55) or control (n = 55) group, and 105 (95.5%) completed the 1-year outcome visit. In the intention-to-treat analysis, mean daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure, the primary end point, decreased significantly only in the intervention group by 9.1 ± 15.6 mmHg (SD; P < 0.0001), and the mean between-group difference was 7.1 ± 2.3 mmHg (SE; P < 0.005). Furthermore, 51% of intervention subjects achieved the guideline recommended target of <130/80 mmHg compared with 31% of control subjects (P < 0.05). These improvements were obtained without the use of more or different antihypertensive medications or additional clinic visits to physicians. Providing self-care support did not affect anxiety but worsened depression on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (baseline, 4.1 ± 3.76; exit, 5.2 ± 4.30; P = 0.014). This study demonstrated that home blood pressure telemonitoring combined with automated self-care support reduced the blood pressure of diabetic patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension and improved hypertension control. Home blood pressure monitoring alone had no effect on blood pressure. Promoting patient self-care may have negative psychological effects.

  17. The Correlation between Systolic Blood Pressure Measured by Return to Flow Versus Systolic Blood Pressure Measured by Arterial Catheter in the Adult Anesthetized Patient.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    a U-tube and mercury manometer for other research, he did not use it to measure arterial blood pressure (30). It was almost a century 34 N N 35 later...use of this mercury manometer decreased the size of the measuring apparatus more than 27 times (30). Carl Ludwig made an important contribution to...direct measurement of blood pressure in 1847 when he added a i graphic recording device to the mercury manometer . This eliminated observer error and

  18. Relationship between 24-h urine sodium/potassium ratio and central aortic systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Moo-Yong; Shin, Sung-Joon; Gu, Namyi; Nah, Deuk-Young; Kim, Byong-Kyu; Hong, Kyung-Soon; Cho, Eun-Joo; Sung, Ki-Chul; Lee, Sim-Yeol; Kim, Kwang-Il

    2016-11-24

    Studies evaluating the relationship between measured 24-h urine sodium (24HUNa), potassium (24HUK) and aortic blood pressure (BP) are rare, and no such study has been performed with an Asian population. We evaluated the relationship between 24HUNa, 24HUK, casual BP, 24-h ambulatory BP and aortic BP by analyzing data from 524 participants with valid 24-h urine collection, 24-h ambulatory BP and central BP measurements (mean age 48.1±9.8 years, 193 men). Hypertension was defined as a 24-h ambulatory BP ⩾130/80 mm Hg or current treatment for hypertension (n=219). The participants with hypertension and high 24HUNa (mean 210.5±52.0 mmol  per day, range 151.0-432.0) showed higher 24-h systolic (P=0.037) and diastolic BP (P=0.037) and aortic systolic BP (AoSBP, P=0.038) than the participants with hypertension and low 24HUNa (mean 115.7±25.0 mmol per day, range 45.6-150.0), adjusted for confounders. The participants with hypertension and a high ratio of 24HUNa and 24HUK (24HUNa/24HUK, mean 4.03±1.00, range 2.93-7.96) had higher AoSBP than the participants with hypertension and a low 24HUNa/24HUK ratio (mean 2.13±0.54, range 0.53-2.91), adjusted for confounders (P=0.026). The participants with hypertension demonstrated a significant linear relationship between AoSBP and 24HUNa/24HUK ratio that was independent of 24HUNa, according to the multiple regression analysis (P=0.047). In hypertensive patients, 24HUNa/24HUK was positively and more strongly related to AoSBP compared with 24HUNa alone. The result indicates that high sodium and low potassium intake may increase the subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease by elevating AoSBP.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 24 November 2016; doi:10.1038/hr.2016.161.

  19. Intracranial Aneurysm Risk Locus 5q23.2 Is Associated with Elevated Systolic Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Gaál, Emília Ilona; Rehnström, Karola; Kettunen, Johannes; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Niemelä, Mika; Jula, Antti; Raitakari, Olli T.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Johan G.; Widen, Elisabeth; Günel, Murat; Kurki, Mitja; von und zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Hernesniemi, Juha; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Pouta, Anneli; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Salomaa, Veikko; Palotie, Aarno; Perola, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of complex trait loci, the pathomechanisms of most remain elusive. Studying the genetics of risk factors predisposing to disease is an attractive approach to identify targets for functional studies. Intracranial aneurysms (IA) are rupture-prone pouches at cerebral artery branching sites. IA is a complex disease for which GWAS have identified five loci with strong association and a further 14 loci with suggestive association. To decipher potential underlying disease mechanisms, we tested whether there are IA loci that convey their effect through elevating blood pressure (BP), a strong risk factor of IA. We performed a meta-analysis of four population-based Finnish cohorts (nFIN = 11 266) not selected for IA, to assess the association of previously identified IA candidate loci (n = 19) with BP. We defined systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure as quantitative outcome variables. The most significant result was further tested for association in the ICBP-GWAS cohort of 200 000 individuals. We found that the suggestive IA locus at 5q23.2 in PRDM6 was significantly associated with SBP in individuals of European descent (pFIN = 3.01E-05, pICBP-GWAS = 0.0007, pALL = 8.13E-07). The risk allele of IA was associated with higher SBP. PRDM6 encodes a protein predominantly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. Our study connects a complex disease (IA) locus with a common risk factor for the disease (SBP). We hypothesize that common variants in PRDM6 can contribute to altered vascular wall structure, hence increasing SBP and predisposing to IA. True positive associations often fail to reach genome-wide significance in GWAS. Our findings show that analysis of traditional risk factors as intermediate phenotypes is an effective tool for deciphering hidden heritability. Further, we demonstrate that common disease loci identified in a population isolate

  20. Impact of yoga on blood pressure and quality of life in patients with hypertension – a controlled trial in primary care, matched for systolic blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical treatment of hypertension is not always sufficient to achieve blood pressure control. Despite this, previous studies on supplementary therapies, such as yoga, are relatively few. We investigated the effects of two yoga interventions on blood pressure and quality of life in patients in primary health care diagnosed with hypertension. Methods Adult patients (age 20–80 years) with diagnosed hypertension were identified by an electronic chart search at a primary health care center in southern Sweden. In total, 83 subjects with blood pressure values of 120–179/≤109 mmHg at baseline were enrolled. At baseline, the patients underwent standardized blood pressure measurement at the health care center and they completed a questionnaire on self-rated quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF). There were three groups: 1) yoga class with yoga instructor (n = 28); 2) yoga at home (n = 28); and 3) a control group (n = 27). The participants were matched at the group level for systolic blood pressure. After 12 weeks of intervention, the assessments were performed again. At baseline a majority of the patients (92%) were on antihypertensive medication, and the patients were requested not to change their medication during the study. Results The yoga class group showed no improvement in blood pressure or self-rated quality of life, while in the yoga at home group there was a decline in diastolic blood pressure of 4.4 mmHg (p < 0.05) compared to the control group. Moreover, the yoga at home group showed significant improvement in self-rated quality of life compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions A short yoga program for the patient to practice at home seems to have an antihypertensive effect, as well as a positive effect on self-rated quality of life compared to controls. This implies that simple yoga exercises may be useful as a supplementary blood pressure therapy in addition to medical treatment when prescribed by primary care

  1. Systolic blood pressure reactions to acute stress are associated with future hypertension status in the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Douglas; Ginty, Annie T; Painter, Rebecca C; Roseboom, Tessa J; Phillips, Anna C; de Rooij, Susanne R

    2012-08-01

    These analyses examined the association between blood pressure reactions to acute psychological stress and subsequent hypertension status in a substantial Dutch cohort. Blood pressure was recorded during a resting baseline and during three acute stress tasks, Stroop colour word, mirror tracing and speech. Five years later, diagnosed hypertension status was determined by questionnaire. Participants were 453 (237 women) members of the Dutch Famine Birth Cohort. In analysis adjusting for a number of potential confounders, systolic blood pressure reactivity was positively related to future hypertension. This was the case irrespective of whether reactivity was calculated as the peak or the average response to the stress tasks. The association was strongest for reactions to the speech and Stroop tasks. Diastolic blood pressure reactivity was not significantly associated with hypertension. The results provide support for the reactivity hypothesis.

  2. Nesfatin-1 and Vitamin D levels may be associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure values and hearth rate in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Figen Kir; Sahin, Serap Baydur; Ural, Ulku Mete; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Senturk, Senol; Tekin, Yesim Bayoglu; Balik, Gulsah; Cure, Erkan; Yuce, Suleyman; Kirbas, Aynur

    2015-07-09

    Obesity, insulin resistance (IR), inflammation, and hyperandrogenism may lead to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hypertension. Nesfatin-1 (N1) may be related to IR, obesity, and hypertension. Furthermore, a vitamin D (VD) deficiency is associated with hypertension and PCOS. We aimed to investigate N1 and VD levels in PCOS that have an effect on systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR).This study included 54 patients with PCOS and 48 age-body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. PCOS was diagnosed according to clinical practice guidelines. Ferriman-Gallwey scores (FGS) were calculated, while N1, VD, and other hormonal and biochemical parameters were measured for all subjects. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured as well. HR was calculated using an electrocardiogram.The levels of N1 (p < 0.001), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (p = 0.036), homeostasis model assessment as an index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p < 0.001), systolic (p < 0.001) and diastolic (p < 0.001) BP and HR (p < 0.001) in the PCOS group were significantly higher than in the control group. However, the VD levels of the PCOS group were lower than the control group (p = 0.004). N1 had a strong positive correlation with BMI, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, luteinizing hormone, systolic and diastolic BP, and HR. VD levels were negatively correlated with HOMA-IR and luteinizing hormone.Elevated N1 and decreased VD levels may be related to the presence of high-normal BP or hypertension in PCOS subjects.  N1 level may be associated with an increased BP due to its relation to inflammation and IR.

  3. Nesfatin-1 and Vitamin D levels may be associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure values and hearth rate in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Figen Kir; Sahin, Serap Baydur; Ural, Ulku Mete; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Senturk, Senol; Tekin, Yesim Bayoglu; Balik, Gulsah; Cure, Erkan; Yuce, Suleyman; Kirbas, Aynur

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance (IR), inflammation, and hyperandrogenism may lead to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and hypertension. Nesfatin-1 (N1) may be related to IR, obesity, and hypertension. Furthermore, a vitamin D (VD) deficiency is associated with hypertension and PCOS. We aimed to investigate N1 and VD levels in PCOS that have an effect on systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). This study included 54 patients with PCOS and 48 age-body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. PCOS was diagnosed according to clinical practice guidelines. Ferriman-Gallwey scores (FGS) were calculated, while N1, VD, and other hormonal and biochemical parameters were measured for all subjects. Systolic and diastolic BP was measured as well. HR was calculated using an electrocardiogram. The levels of N1 (p < 0.001), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (p = 0.036), homeostasis model assessment as an index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (p < 0.001), systolic (p < 0.001) and diastolic (p < 0.001) BP and HR (p < 0.001) in the PCOS group were significantly higher than in the control group. However, the VD levels of the PCOS group were lower than the control group (p = 0.004). N1 had a strong positive correlation with BMI, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, luteinizing hormone, systolic and diastolic BP, and HR. VD levels were negatively correlated with HOMA-IR and luteinizing hormone. Elevated N1 and decreased VD levels may be related to the presence of high-normal BP or hypertension in PCOS subjects. N1 level may be associated with an increased BP due to its relation to inflammation and IR. PMID:26295295

  4. Effect of oral nitrates on pulse pressure and arterial elasticity in patients aged over 65 years with refractory isolated systolic hypertension: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Isolated systolic hypertension is a highly prevalent disease among the elderly. The little available evidence on the efficacy of nitrates for treating the disease is based on small experimental studies. Methods/design We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, phase III, placebo-controlled trial in 154 patients aged over 65 years with refractory isolated systolic hypertension. Patients were randomized to placebo or 40 mg/day of extended-release isosorbide mononitrate added to standard therapy and titrated to 60 mg/day at week 6 if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg. The primary objective was to assess the effect on clinical pulse pressure of extended-release isosorbide mononitrate added to standard therapy in patients aged over 65 years with refractory isolated systolic hypertension after 3 months of treatment. The secondary objectives were as follows: to quantify the effect of adding the study drug on central blood pressure and vascular compliance using the augmentation index and pulse wave velocity; to evaluate the safety profile by recording adverse effects (frequency, type, severity) and the percentage of patients who had to withdraw from the trial because of adverse events; to quantify the percentage of patients who reach a clinical systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg or <130 mmHg measured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; and to quantify the change in pulse pressure measured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Discussion Few clinical trials have been carried out to test the effect of oral nitrates on isolated systolic hypertension, even though these agents seem to be effective. Treatment with extended-release isosorbide mononitrate could improve control of systolic blood pressure without severe side effects, thus helping to reduce the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Trial registration EUDRACT Number: 2012-002988-10 PMID:24228894

  5. Genome-wide linkage analysis of the tracking of systolic blood pressure using a mixed model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Zhu, Guohua; Keen, Kevin J

    2003-01-01

    Background Elevated blood pressure in middle age is a major risk factor for subsequent cardiovascular complications. An important longitudinal characteristic of blood pressure is the "tracking phenomenon". Tracking is defined as the persistence of the rank of a person's blood pressure level in a group over a long period of time. In this analysis, we used the Framingham data to investigate whether there are some genes responsible for this phenomenon. Results Both two-point and multipoint linkage analyses were applied to family members with complete data only and to all family data with missing values imputed by a Gaussian model. The results of two-point linkage analysis indicated that two loci for linkage with the intercept were on chromosomes 10 and 13, and two loci for linkage with both slope and intercept were on chromosomes 1 and 3. Multipoint linkage analysis indicated only one region, 200–240 cM on chromosome 1, to be linked with both intercept and slope. For the intercept of SBP, the highest LOD (4.43) was found at 214 cM when missing data were imputed, and the highest LOD (2.81) was at 231 cM for the complete case data. For the slope of SBP, the highest multipoint LODs were 3.63 at 227 cM and 2.02 at 234 cM for the complete case data and imputation data, respectively. Conclusion One or more genes in the range of 200–240 cM on chromosome 1 may be related to the tracking phenomenon of SBP. PMID:14975156

  6. L-NAME raises systolic blood pressure in the pithed rat by a direct adrenal epinephrine releasing action.

    PubMed

    Elayan, Hamzeh H; Kennedy, Brian P; Ziegler, Michael G

    2002-04-21

    It is generally thought that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase leads to blood pressure elevation largely through reduction in vascular levels of the vasodilator nitric oxide. However, there are several reports suggesting that NO synthase inhibitors cause adrenal epinephrine (E) release by both central and peripheral mechanisms. We investigated the role of adrenal E in the pressor effects of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME in the pithed rat to help distinguish central from peripherally mediated actions. L-NAME (10 mg/kg) raised both systolic and diastolic BP by about 30 mm Hg (P < .01) in the absence of exogenous electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerves. During stimulation at 10 V and frequencies of 1 or 2 Hz, systolic BP was about 70 mm Hg higher in L-NAME treated rats than in drug free stimulated rats. This enhancement of systolic BP by L-NAME was less pronounced at 5 or 10 Hz stimulation frequencies. Following these types of electrical stimulations of pithed rats, both plasma norepinephrine (NE) and E levels were dramatically elevated above resting plasma levels. L-NAME pretreatment of these electrically stimulated rats increased plasma E levels by an additional 60% and decreased NE by 18%. Acute adrenalectomy dramatically reduced plasma E levels and abolished the ability of L-NAME to enhance the pressor effect of sympathetic stimulation. In contrast, acute adrenalectomy of unstimulated pithed rats did not significantly reduce the pressor response to L-NAME. We conclude that adrenal E release may mediate much of the systolic pressor response of L-NAME in the stimulated pithed rat, but the magnitude of this effect varies with stimulation frequency. Since pithing disrupts central pathways, this induction of adrenal E release by L-NAME is a peripheral effect.

  7. Toe photoplethysmographic monitor, a promising noninvasive technique for tracking systolic blood pressure trends beat-to-beat.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhi Qing; Fan, Jin; Wang, Yu Tang

    2014-08-01

    The call for early detection of hypotension creates a heavy demand for new methods that can monitor trends in blood pressure (BP) levels continuously and noninvasively. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is widely used in hemodynamic analysis. We assessed the feasibility of toe PPG in tracing BP trends using BP readings obtained by standard intermittent noninvasive BP measurements from the arm of a patient with severe hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. We demonstrated that an attenuated or inversed dicrotic wave of toe PPG is predictive of BP trends, and this method could be applicable for the continuous noninvasive monitoring of systolic BP at a beat-by-beat basis.

  8. DB 01-3 TREATMENT TARGET OF SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE IN DIABETES MAY DIFFER ACCORDING TO ETHNICITY (PRO).

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi

    2016-09-01

    Asians have specific characteristics of hypertension and related cardiovascular disease. Stroke is more common than coronary artery disease in Eastern Asian countries, while the coronary artery disease is more common than stroke in Western countries. The association slope between higher blood pressure (BP) and the risk of cardiovascular events is steeper in Asians than in Caucasians. This may partly explained by the recent result demonstrating that the morning BP surge in Asians is more extended (Hoshide, Kario, Parati et al. Hypertension 2016;68:54-61). Thus, 24-hr BP control including night-time and morning periods is especially important for Asian hypertensive patients (Kario. Essential manual of 24 hour blood pressure management. Wiley, UK, pp.1-158.2016).The existing direct evidence from Asian studies are limited than the accumulated evidence from Western countries. In the ACCORD BP trial which enrolled 4733 participants with type 2 diabetes and randomized them to a target systolic BP <120mmHg (intensive BP control) or <140mmHg (standard BP control). Despite the significant difference in the achieved systolic BP, there was no significant difference in the incidence of primary cardiovascular outcomes. Based on this evidence, the target systolic BP for diabetics has been revised from 130 mmHg to 140 mmHg in the majority of Western guidelines. However, in the ACCORD study, the intensive BP control was associated with significant reduction in both total stroke and nonfatal stroke. In addition, the ONTARGET study, which showed that in diabetic patients, the risk of stroke continued to decrease down to achieved SBP <115mmHg with no evidence of J curve.The new guidelines of the Japanese Society of Hypertension regarding the management of hypertension (JSH2014) were published in 2014 (Hypertens Res 2014;37:253-390). The JSH2014 guidelines use the systolic BP value 130 mmHg, a lower target clinic BP compared to the Western guidelines (140 mmHg), for hypertensive

  9. Low-Glycemic-Index Foods Can Decrease Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure in the Short Term

    PubMed Central

    Hosseininasab, Mina; Norouzy, Abdolreza; Nematy, Mohsen; Bonakdaran, Shokoufeh

    2015-01-01

    Background. We aimed to compare the effects of low- and high-GI foods on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Methods. This longitudinal study was performed on 30 women, aged 18 to 40 years, during 24 hours. In the first leg of study all recruited subjects were assigned to LGI period for 24 hours and, after a 2-week washout period, all subjects were assigned to HGI period. BP was measured every hour during the 24-hour monitoring. Results. After the intervention, there were significant decreases in SBP and DBP in the LGI period (102.26 ± 14.18 mmHg versus 112.86 ± 9.33 mmHg for SBP and 66.96 ± 10.39 mmHg versus 74.46 ± 7.61 mmHg for DBP) (P = 0.00 and P = 0.002, resp.). However, in the HGI period, there was no significant change in SBP or DBP (110.66 ± 9.85 versus 111.80 ± 9.57 for SBP and 71.16 ± 9.16 versus 74.26 ± 10.09 for DBP) (P = 0.6 and P = 0.06, resp.). Conclusion. The results suggest that LGI foods may be beneficial in reducing 24-hour BP. PMID:26509082

  10. The association between Self-Reported Medication Adherence scores and systolic blood pressure control: a SPRINT baseline data study.

    PubMed

    Haley, William E; Gilbert, Olivia N; Riley, Robert F; Newman, Jill C; Roumie, Christianne L; Whittle, Jeffrey; Kronish, Ian M; Tamariz, Leonardo; Wiggers, Alan; Morisky, Donald E; Conroy, Molly B; Kovalik, Eugene; Kressin, Nancy R; Muntner, Paul; Goff, David C

    2016-11-01

    We examined baseline data from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to investigate whether medication adherence, measured by the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8), was associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and whether MMAS-8 score and number of antihypertensive medications interacted in influencing SBP. A total of 8435 SPRINT participants were included: 21.2% had low adherence (MMAS-8: <6); 40.0% had medium adherence (6 to <8); and 38.8% had high adherence (8). SBP was <140 mm Hg in 54.6%; 140-160 mm Hg in 36.6%; and >160 mm Hg in 8.8%. In multivariable regression, medium vs. low adherence weakly associated with lower SBP (odds ratio: 1.17; confidence interval: 1.04, 1.31). SPRINT eligibility criteria should be considered when interpreting results. Efforts to understand and enhance adherence are crucial to improve population health, and using self-report instruments might be considered for predicting treatment adherence and response in future efficacy trials and for identifying patients for adherence support in clinical practice.

  11. Resistance training reduces systolic blood pressure in metabolic syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Paulo Henrique; Linares, Stephanie Nogueira; Machado, Aryane Flauzino; Pastre, Carlos Marcelo; Netto, Jayme

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of resistance training on metabolic syndrome risk factors through comparison with a control group. Design Meta-analysis comparing resistance training interventions with control groups. Two independent reviewers selected the studies and assessed their quality and data. The pooled mean differences between resistance training and the control group were calculated using a fixed-effects model. Data sources The MEDLINE, PEDro, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus and The Cochrane Library databases were searched from their earliest records to 10 January 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials that compared the effect of resistance training on metabolic syndrome risk factors with a control group were included. All types of resistance training, irrespective of intensity, frequency or duration, were eligible. Results Only systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced, by 4.08 mm Hg (95% CI 1.33 to 6.82; p<0.01), following resistance training. The pooled effect showed a reduction of 0.04 mmol/L (95% CI −0.12, 0.21; p>0.05) for fasting plasma glucose, 0.00 (95% CI −0.05, 0.04; p>0.05) for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, 0.03 (95% CI −0.14, 0.20; p>0.05) for triglycerides, 1.39 mm Hg (95% CI −0.19, 2.98; p=0.08) for diastolic blood pressure and 1.09 cm (95% CI −0.12, 2.30; p=0.08) for waist circumference. Inconsistency (I2) for all meta-analysis was 0%. Conclusions Resistance training may help reduce systolic blood pressure levels, stroke mortality and mortality from heart disease in people with metabolic syndrome. Trial registration number CRD42015016538. PMID:26964146

  12. Prepubertal stature and blood pressure in early old age

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, S.; Berney, L.; Blane, D.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To test the hypothesis that childhood growth rate is a marker for formation of control mechanisms that influence blood pressure in early old age.
METHODS—Data are from a sample of 149 (74 male) members of Sir John Boyd Orr's survey of British families conducted between 1937 and 1939. Measured heights were collected between ages 5 and 8 years, and in early old age between 1997 and 1998. Multiple linear regression investigated the relations of blood pressure with age and sex standardised childhood height with adjustment for potential confounding factors, including adult height. Inclusion of both childhood and adult heights in the same model was used to estimate growth, as measures of childhood height are relative to adult height.
RESULTS—Mean blood pressures in early old age for those in the shortest childhood height fifth were 167.8 and 76.3 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, respectively. For the tallest fifth they were 150.8 and 63.7 mm Hg, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounding factors including adult height, the mean increase for the shortest childhood height fifth compared with the tallest was 28.5 mm Hg for systolic pressure (p = 0.015) and 22.8 mm Hg (p = 0.010) for pulse pressure. The relations of blood pressure with adult height were not statistically significant in the adjusted models.
CONCLUSION—Prepubertal growth rate is associated with the formation of mechanisms associated with the control of blood pressure in later life.

 PMID:10799423

  13. Interactive but not direct effects of perceived racism and trait anger predict resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure in black adolescents.

    PubMed

    Clark, Rodney

    2006-09-01

    This correlation study explicated the association of perceived racism and trait anger to resting blood pressure in a high school sample of 234 Blacks. Perceived racism and trait anger were assessed via self-report, and resting blood pressure was measured with a noninvasive blood pressure monitor. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that perceived racism and trait anger were not independent predictors of systolic or diastolic blood pressure. However, these analyses revealed that the interactive effects of perceived racism and trait anger were predictive of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Although perceived racism was not significantly related to blood pressure among those who were high in trait anger, perceived racism was inversely associated with blood pressure among those who were low in trait anger. The findings may have important longer term implications for future research examining the contribution of psychosocial factors to cardiac and vascular functioning in Blacks.

  14. A novel transmission-based test of association for multivariate phenotypes: an application to systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Unlike case-control studies, family-based tests for association are protected against population stratification. Complex genetic traits are often governed by quantitative precursors and it has been argued that it may be a more powerful strategy to analyze these quantitative precursors instead of the clinical end point trait. Although methods have been developed for family-based association tests for single quantitative traits, it is of interest to develop such methods for multivariate phenotypes. We propose a novel transmission-based approach based on a trio design using a simple logistic regression to test for association with a multivariate phenotype. We use our proposed method to analyze data on systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels provided in Genetic Analysis Workshop 18. However, we find that the bivariate analysis of the two phenotypes did not provide more promising results compared to univariate analyses, suggesting a possibility of a different set of major genetic variants modulating the two phenotypes. PMID:25519341

  15. Differentiation of Overweight from Normal Weight Young Adults by Postprandial Heart Rate Variability and Systolic Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Taffe, Lauren; Stancil, Kimani; Bond, Vernon; Pemminati, Sudhakar; Gorantla, Vasavi Rakesh; Kadur, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity and cardiovascular disease are inextricably linked and the health community’s response to the current epidemic of adolescent obesity may be improved by the ability to target adolescents at highest risk for developing cardiovascular disease in the future. Overweight manifests early as autonomic dysregulation and current methods do not permit differentiation of overweight adolescents or young adults at highest risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Aim This study was designed to test the hypothesis that scaling exponents motivated by nonlinear fractal analyses of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) differentiate overweight, otherwise healthy adolescent/young adult subjects at risk for developing prehypertension, the primary forerunner of cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods The subjects were 18-20year old males with Body Mass Index (BMI) 20.1-42.5kg/m2. Electrocardiographic inter-beat (RR) intervals were measured during 3h periods of bed rest after overnight fasting and ingestion of 900Cal high-carbohydrate and high-fat test beverages on separate days. Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), k-means cluster and ANOVA analyses of scaling coefficients α, α1, and α2, showed dependencies on hourly measurements of systolic blood pressure and on premeasured BMI. Results It was observed that α value increased during the caloric challenge, appears to represent metabolically-induced changes in HRV across the participants. An ancillary analysis was performed to determine the dependency on BMI without BMI as a parameter. Cluster analysis of the high-carbohydrate test beverage treatment and the high-fat treatment produced grouping with very little overlap. ANOVA on both clusters demonstrated significance at p<0.001. We were able to demonstrate increased sympathetic modulation of our study group during ingestion and metabolism of isocaloric high-carbohydrate and high-fat test beverages. Conclusion These findings demonstrate significantly different

  16. Differences in ward-to-cath lab systolic blood pressure predicts long-term adverse outcomes after drug-eluting stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Her, Ae-Young; Ann, Soe Hee; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong Min; Kim, Yong Hoon; Garg, Scot; Singh, Gillian Balbir; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2015-11-01

    We sought to investigate the effect of ward-to-cath lab blood pressure (BP) differences on long-term clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stent (DES). There are limited data available on the association between PCI with DES and BP differences on long-term clinical outcomes. This study enrolled 994 patients who underwent PCI with DES from March 2003 to August 2007. Resting BP was measured in a ward environment before transfer to the cardiac catheterization lab (cath lab), and again when the patient was laid down on the cath lab table. Patients were divided into two groups according to the difference in ward-to-cath lab systolic BP. Large difference group (n = 383) was defined as the absolute systolic difference of >20 mmHg and small difference group (n = 424) as the absolute systolic difference of ≤20 mmHg. The primary endpoints were all-cause mortality, cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke. A total of 807 patients (mean age 60 ± 10 years, 522 males) received follow-up for 5.1 ± 2.4 years. The rate of all-cause mortality was significantly higher in the large difference group compared to the small difference group (6.6 vs. 2.8 %; adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 2.43; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.22-4.83; p = 0.012). There were higher cardiac deaths seen in the large difference group compared to the small difference group (3.9 vs. 1.4 %; adjusted HR 2.84; 95 % CI 1.1-7.31; p = 0.031). Stroke (2.4 vs. 1.2 %, p = 0.125) and TVR (3.7 vs. 1.7 %, p = 0.051) had higher trends in the large difference group compared to the small difference group. The composite of primary endpoints (all-cause mortality, cardiac death, nonfatal MI and stroke) occurred more frequently in the large difference group compared to the small difference group (10.0 vs. 6.4 %; adjusted HR 1.71; 95 % CI 1.04-2.81; p = 0.033). A difference in ward-to-cath lab systolic BP of >20 mmHg may contribute to increased adverse

  17. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM,…

  18. Increased Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure Is Associated With Altered Gut Microbiota Composition and Butyrate Production in Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Arango, Luisa F; Barrett, Helen L; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K; Morrison, Mark; Dekker Nitert, Marloes

    2016-10-01

    The risk of developing pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia is higher in obese pregnant women. In obesity, the composition of the gut microbiota is altered. Obesity is also associated with low-grade inflammation. Metabolites from the gut microbiota may contribute to both hypertension and inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the composition of the gut microbiota in overweight and obese pregnant women is associated with blood pressure and levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The composition of the gut microbiota was determined with 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing in 205 women at 16 weeks gestation from the SPRING study (the Study of Probiotics in Gestational Diabetes). Expression of butyrate-producing genes in the gut microbiota was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were measured in fasting serum of a subset of 70 women. Blood pressure was slightly but significantly higher in obese compared with overweight women. The abundance of the butyrate-producing genus Odoribacter was inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure. Butyrate production capacity was decreased, but plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations increased in obese pregnant women. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were inversely correlated with expression of butyrate kinase and Odoribacter abundance. This study shows that in overweight and obese pregnant women at 16 weeks gestation, the abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria and butyrate production in the gut microbiota is significantly negatively associated with blood pressure and with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels. Increasing butyrate-producing capacity may contribute to maintenance of normal blood pressure in obese pregnant women.

  19. Systolic Blood Pressure Control Among Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes: A Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Three Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Probstfield, Jeffery; Hire, Donald; Redmon, J. Bruce; Evans, Gregory W.; Coday, Mace; Lewis, Cora E.; Johnson, Karen C.; Wilmoth, Sharon; Bahnson, Judy; Dulin, Michael F.; Green, Jennifer B.; Knowler, William C.; Kitabchi, Abbas; Murillo, Anne L.; Osei, Kwame; Rehman, Shakaib U.; Cushman, William C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The relative effectiveness of 3 approaches to blood pressure control—(i) an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) focused on weight loss, (ii) frequent goal-based monitoring of blood pressure with pharmacological management, and (iii) education and support—has not been established among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes who are appropriate for each intervention. METHODS Participants from the Action for Health in Diabetes (Look AHEAD) and the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) cohorts who met criteria for both clinical trials were identified. The proportions of these individuals with systolic blood pressure (SBP) <140mm Hg from annual standardized assessments over time were compared with generalized estimating equations. RESULTS Across 4 years among 480 Look AHEAD and 1,129 ACCORD participants with baseline SBPs between 130 and 159mm Hg, ILI (OR = 1.46; 95% CI = [1.18–1.81]) and frequent goal-based monitoring with pharmacotherapy (OR = 1.51; 95% CI = [1.16–1.97]) yielded higher rates of blood pressure control compared to education and support. The intensive behavioral-based intervention may have been more effective among individuals with body mass index >30kg/m2, while frequent goal-based monitoring with medication management may be more effective among individuals with lower body mass index (interaction P = 0.047). CONCLUSIONS Among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, both ILI and frequent goal-based monitoring with pharmacological management can be successful strategies for blood pressure control. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRY clinicaltrials.gov identifiers NCT00017953 (Look AHEAD) and NCT00000620 (ACCORD). PMID:25666468

  20. Association of genetic variation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure among African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource study.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ervin R; Young, J Hunter; Li, Yali; Dreisbach, Albert W; Keating, Brendan J; Musani, Solomon K; Liu, Kiang; Morrison, Alanna C; Ganesh, Santhi; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ramachandran, Vasan S; Polak, Josef F; Fabsitz, Richard R; Dries, Daniel L; Farlow, Deborah N; Redline, Susan; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hirschorn, Joel N; Sun, Yan V; Wyatt, Sharon B; Penman, Alan D; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I; Townsend, Raymond R; Doumatey, Ayo P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Mosley, Thomas H; Lyon, Helen N; Kang, Sun J; Rotimi, Charles N; Cooper, Richard S; Franceschini, Nora; Curb, J David; Martin, Lisa W; Eaton, Charles B; Kardia, Sharon L R; Taylor, Herman A; Caulfield, Mark J; Ehret, Georg B; Johnson, Toby; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans (AAs) is higher than in other US groups; yet, few have performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in AA. Among people of European descent, GWASs have identified genetic variants at 13 loci that are associated with blood pressure. It is unknown if these variants confer susceptibility in people of African ancestry. Here, we examined genome-wide and candidate gene associations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium consisting of 8591 AAs. Genotypes included genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data utilizing the Affymetrix 6.0 array with imputation to 2.5 million HapMap SNPs and candidate gene SNP data utilizing a 50K cardiovascular gene-centric array (ITMAT-Broad-CARe [IBC] array). For Affymetrix data, the strongest signal for DBP was rs10474346 (P= 3.6 × 10(-8)) located near GPR98 and ARRDC3. For SBP, the strongest signal was rs2258119 in C21orf91 (P= 4.7 × 10(-8)). The top IBC association for SBP was rs2012318 (P= 6.4 × 10(-6)) near SLC25A42 and for DBP was rs2523586 (P= 1.3 × 10(-6)) near HLA-B. None of the top variants replicated in additional AA (n = 11 882) or European-American (n = 69 899) cohorts. We replicated previously reported European-American blood pressure SNPs in our AA samples (SH2B3, P= 0.009; TBX3-TBX5, P= 0.03; and CSK-ULK3, P= 0.0004). These genetic loci represent the best evidence of genetic influences on SBP and DBP in AAs to date. More broadly, this work supports that notion that blood pressure among AAs is a trait with genetic underpinnings but also with significant complexity.

  1. Association of genetic variation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure among African Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource study

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ervin R.; Young, J. Hunter; Li, Yali; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Keating, Brendan J.; Musani, Solomon K.; Liu, Kiang; Morrison, Alanna C.; Ganesh, Santhi; Kutlar, Abdullah; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Polak, Josef F.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Dries, Daniel L.; Farlow, Deborah N.; Redline, Susan; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Hirschorn, Joel N.; Sun, Yan V.; Wyatt, Sharon B.; Penman, Alan D.; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Lyon, Helen N.; Kang, Sun J.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Franceschini, Nora; Curb, J. David; Martin, Lisa W.; Eaton, Charles B.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Taylor, Herman A.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ehret, Georg B.; Johnson, Toby; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Smith, Albert V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Pihur, Vasyl; Vollenweider, Peter; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Heath, Simon; Sõber, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Jackson, Anne U.; Peden, John F.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Rudan, Igor; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Chambers, John C.; Kumari, Meena; JinGo, Min; van der Harst, Pim; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjögren, Marketa; Vinay, D.G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Kuusisto, Johanna; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimäki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Charlotte Onland-Moret, N.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S.P.M.; Campbell, Harry; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N.M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Rory; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Bis, Joshua C.; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Hoffman Bolton, Judith A.; Köttgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Mooser, Vincent; Chaturvedi, Nish; Frayling, Timothy M.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grässler, Jürgen; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Scott, Laura J.; Stringham, Heather M.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; SolerArtigas, Maria; Dong, Yanbin; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K.; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; MariaCorsi, Anna; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Scott, James; Sehmi, Joban S.; Zhang, Weihua; Hedblad, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Narisu, Narisu; Stančáková, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Chris; Schwartz, Steven M.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Longstreth, Will T.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R.G.; Wain, Louise V.; Morken, Mario A.; Swift, Amy J.; Laitinen, Jaana; Prokopenko, Inga; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Radha Mani, K.; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Hofman, Albert; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G.; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kangas, Antti J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Soininen, Pasi; Tukiainen, Taru; Würz, Peter; Twee-Hee Ong, Rick; Dörr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kranthi Kumar, M.J.; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Hveem, Kristian; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Wong, Tien Y.; Shyong Tai, E.; Laakso, Markku; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Harris, Tamara B.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Salomaa, Veikko; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Farrall, Martin; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Rettig, Rainer; Uda, Manuela; Strachan, David P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Larson, Martin G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn , Cornelia M.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in African Americans (AAs) is higher than in other US groups; yet, few have performed genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in AA. Among people of European descent, GWASs have identified genetic variants at 13 loci that are associated with blood pressure. It is unknown if these variants confer susceptibility in people of African ancestry. Here, we examined genome-wide and candidate gene associations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium consisting of 8591 AAs. Genotypes included genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data utilizing the Affymetrix 6.0 array with imputation to 2.5 million HapMap SNPs and candidate gene SNP data utilizing a 50K cardiovascular gene-centric array (ITMAT-Broad-CARe [IBC] array). For Affymetrix data, the strongest signal for DBP was rs10474346 (P= 3.6 × 10−8) located near GPR98 and ARRDC3. For SBP, the strongest signal was rs2258119 in C21orf91 (P= 4.7 × 10−8). The top IBC association for SBP was rs2012318 (P= 6.4 × 10−6) near SLC25A42 and for DBP was rs2523586 (P= 1.3 × 10−6) near HLA-B. None of the top variants replicated in additional AA (n = 11 882) or European-American (n = 69 899) cohorts. We replicated previously reported European-American blood pressure SNPs in our AA samples (SH2B3, P= 0.009; TBX3-TBX5, P= 0.03; and CSK-ULK3, P= 0.0004). These genetic loci represent the best evidence of genetic influences on SBP and DBP in AAs to date. More broadly, this work supports that notion that blood pressure among AAs is a trait with genetic underpinnings but also with significant complexity. PMID:21378095

  2. Changes in Systolic Blood Pressure during Isometric Contractions of Different Size Muscle Groups.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    Using bipolar needles to determine the "...functional anatomy of the forearm muscles during thp contractions...", the prime movers were defined as th...I I :som~’ric contrac-ion of the righ* hand alone, right hip flexors 3lone, anO *he right hip flexors simultaneously a* mildntical relativ...9608A A-C coupler was used to produce the doppler blood flow signals. EMG signals were transformed using type 9852A direct-average ENG couplers. Each of

  3. Evaluation of prehospital and emergency department systolic blood pressure as a predictor of in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Lalezarzadeh, Fariborz; Wisniewski, Paul; Huynh, Katie; Loza, Maria; Gnanadev, Dev

    2009-10-01

    Hypotension is a trauma activation criterion validated by multiple studies. However, field systolic blood pressures (SBP) are still met with skepticism. How significant is the role of prehospital (PH) and emergency department (ED) SBP in the patient's overall condition? A review of the trauma registry over a 5-year period was conducted. PH SBPs were stratified into four categories: severe (SBP 80 mmHg or less), moderate (81-100 mmHg), mild hypotension (101-120 mmHg), and normotension (greater than 120 mmHg). These four groups were further subcategorized into the patients who were hypotensive, SBP 90 mmHg or less in the ED, versus those that were not (SBP greater than 90 mmHg). Data for 6964 patients were analyzed. Patients with PH SBP of 80 mmHg or less compared with patients who had PH SBP of greater than 80 mmHg had higher mortality (OR, 9; 95% CI, 6.45-12.84). Patients with both PH SBP 80 mmHg or less and ED SBP 90 mmHg or less had the highest risk of mortality (50%) and highest need for emergent operative intervention (54%). PH and ED hypotension is a strong predictor of in-hospital mortality and need for emergent surgical intervention in trauma patients. Field or ED blood pressures should serve as a significant marker of the patient's condition.

  4. Dissociation between blood pressure and heart rate response to hypoxia after bilateral carotid body removal in men with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Niewinski, Piotr; Janczak, Dariusz; Rucinski, Artur; Tubek, Stanislaw; Engelman, Zoar J; Jazwiec, Przemyslaw; Banasiak, Waldemar; Sobotka, Paul A; Hart, Emma C J; Paton, Julian F R; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2014-03-01

    While the ventilatory response to hypoxia is known to be mediated by the carotid bodies, the origin of the haemodynamic alterations evoked by hypoxia is less certain. Bilateral carotid body removal (CBR) performed to treat congestive heart failure may serve as a model to improve our understanding of haemodynamic responses to hypoxia in humans. We studied six congestive heart failure patients before and 1 month after CBR [median (interquartile range): age, 58.5 (56-61) years old; and ejection fraction, 32 (25-34)%]. Peripheral chemosensitivity (hypoxic ventilatory response) was equated to the slope relating lowest oxygen saturation to highest minute ventilation following exposures to hypoxia. Likewise, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) slopes were calculated as slopes relating the lowest oxygen saturations to the highest SBP, DBP and HR responses. We found that CBR reduces the hypoxic ventilatory response (91%, P < 0.05), SBP (71%, P < 0.05) and DBP slopes (59%, P = 0.07). In contrast, the HR slope remained unchanged. The dissociation between the blood pressure and HR responses after CBR shows involvement of a different chemoreceptive site(s) maintaining the response to acute hypoxia. We conclude that carotid bodies are responsible for ventilatory and blood pressure responses, while the HR response might be mediated by the aortic bodies. The significant reduction of the blood pressure response to hypoxia after CBR suggests a decrease in sympathetic tone, which is of particular clinical relevance in congestive heart failure.

  5. Immobilization-induced increases of systolic blood pressure and dysregulation of electrolyte balance in ethanol-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Yasmin, Farzana; Haque, Zeba; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2015-07-01

    Clinical and experimental studies revealed that alcohol drinking and life event stresses are predisposing factors to hypertension. Intra and extra cellular levels of electrolytes may play important role in the pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension. Dietary intake of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium is suggested to have a role in the regulation of blood pressure. The present study was designed to monitor the effects of acute exposure to 2h immobilization stress and ethanol administration at a dose of 2.5 g/kg body weight (i.p.) and combined effect of acute administration of ethanol and immobilization stress on systolic blood pressure (SBP), intraerythrocyte, serum and tissue electrolytes in rats. Results showed that acute exposure to 2h immobilization increased SBP, intraerythrocyte sodium and decreased intraerythrocyte potassium in water as well as in ethanol injected rats. The concentration of Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ increased while that of K⁺ and Mg²⁺ decreased in the heart and kidney tissue. Ethanol administration also increased Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ levels and decreased K⁺ and Mg²⁺ levels in the heart and kidney tissue. Restraint stress decreased serum levels of Na⁺, K⁺, Ca²⁺, P, and Cl⁻ and increased serum Mg²⁺, glucose and haematocrit. Ethanol administration also decreased serum levels of Na⁺, K⁺, Ca²⁺, P, and Cl⁻ and increased serum Mg²⁺, glucose and haematocrit. The effects of ethanol and stress on the changes of blood and tissues electrolytes were additive and may be involved in the greater occurrence of hypertension in alcoholics. Our results suggested an important role of intra and extra cellular electrolytes in both stress and ethanol-induced hypertension. The findings may help to develop strategies for the treatment of hypertension in alcoholics.

  6. Effect of angiotensin receptor blockade on central aortic systolic blood pressure in hypertensive Asians measured using radial tonometry: an open prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Teong, Hui Hwang; Chin, Adeline Mei Lin; Sule, Ashish Anil; Tay, Jam Chin

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Central aortic systolic pressure (CASP) has been shown to be a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events than brachial blood pressure (BP). Different classes of drugs have differential effects on CASP and brachial BP. This open prospective cohort study aimed to observe changes in CASP (measured using radial tonometry) among hypertensive Asians after 12 weeks of treatment with valsartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). METHODS Patients with treatment-naïve hypertension or uncontrolled hypertension who were on non-ARB therapy were eligible for inclusion. Patients with uncontrolled BP (i.e. ≥ 140/90 mmHg) received valsartan for 12 weeks. The patients’ brachial systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP), and CASP changes were monitored using the BPro® watch. RESULTS The mean age of the 44 enrolled patients was 35 years. At baseline, the mean BP and CASP were 150.2/91.4 ± 10.6/9.4 mmHg and 136.3 ± 12.2 mmHg, respectively. Valsartan reduced SBP, DBP and CASP by 14.9 ± 10.7 mmHg, 10.9 ± 8.4 mmHg and 15.3 ± 10.9 mmHg, respectively (all p < 0.001). Every 1.0-mmHg reduction in brachial SBP resulted in a 0.8-mmHg reduction in CASP (p < 0.001). A CASP cut-off of 122.5 mmHg discriminated between controlled and uncontrolled BP (sensitivity 74%, specificity 88%). CONCLUSION Using radial tonometry, we demonstrated good correlation between CASP and brachial SBP reductions after 12 weeks of treatment with valsartan in our study cohort. Correlation analysis between CASP and SBP reductions may be useful for demonstrating whether a drug is able to lower CASP beyond lowering SBP. PMID:26875683

  7. Aging, High Altitude, and Blood Pressure: A Complex Relationship.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Torlasco, Camilla; Salvi, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Bilo, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    Parati, Gianfranco, Juan Eugenio Ochoa, Camilla Torlasco, Paolo Salvi, Carolina Lombardi, and Grzegorz Bilo. Aging, high altitude, and blood pressure: A complex relationship. High Alt Biol Med 16:97-109, 2015.--Both aging and high altitude exposure may induce important changes in BP regulation, leading to significant increases in BP levels. By inducing atherosclerotic changes, stiffening of large arteries, renal dysfunction, and arterial baroreflex impairment, advancing age may induce progressive increases in systolic BP levels, promoting development and progression of arterial hypertension. It is also known, although mainly from studies in young or middle-aged subjects, that exposure to high altitude may influence different mechanisms involved in BP regulation (i.e., neural central and reflex control of sympathetic activity), leading to important increases in BP levels. The evidence is less clear, however, on whether and to what extent advancing age may influence the BP response to acute or chronic high altitude exposure. This is a question not only of scientific interest but also of practical relevance given the consistent number of elderly individuals who are exposed for short time periods (either for leisure or work) or live permanently at high altitude, in whom arterial hypertension is frequently observed. This article will review the evidence available on the relationship between aging and blood pressure levels at high altitude, the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this complex association, as well as some questions of practical interest regarding antihypertensive treatment in elderly subjects, and the effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure response during high altitude exposure.

  8. Oral supplementation with glycine reduces oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome, improving their systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, Margarita; Cruz, Miguel; Duran-Reyes, Genoveva; Munguia-Miranda, Catarina; Loza-Rodríguez, Hilda; Pulido-Casas, Evelyn; Torres-Ramírez, Nayeli; Gaja-Rodriguez, Olga; Kumate, Jesus; Baiza-Gutman, Luis Arturo; Hernández-Saavedra, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species derived from abdominal fat and uncontrolled glucose metabolism are contributing factors to both oxidative stress and the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS). This study was designed to evaluate the effects of daily administration of an oral glycine supplement on antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in MetS patients. The study included 60 volunteers: 30 individuals that were supplemented with glycine (15 g/day) and 30 that were given a placebo for 3 months. We analysed thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb) in plasma; the enzymatic activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in erythrocytes; and the expression of CAT, GPX, and SOD2 in leukocytes. Individuals treated with glycine showed a 25% decrease in TBARS compared with the placebo-treated group. Furthermore, there was a 20% reduction in SOD-specific activity in the glycine-treated group, which correlated with SOD2 expression. G6PD activity and SNO-Hb levels increased in the glycine-treated male group. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) also showed a significant decrease in the glycine-treated men (p = 0.043). Glycine plays an important role in balancing the redox reactions in the human body, thus protecting against oxidative damage in MetS patients.

  9. PATTERNS AND CORRELATES OF BASELINE THIAZIDE-TYPE DIURETIC PRESCRIPTION IN THE SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE INTERVENTION TRIAL (SPRINT)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tara I.; Evans, Gregory; Cheung, Alfred K.; Cushman, William C.; Diamond, Matthew J; Dwyer, Jamie P.; Huan, Yonghong; Kitzman, Dalane; Kostis, John B.; Oparil, Suzanne; Rastogi, Anjay; Roumie, Christianne; Sahay, Rukmani; Stafford, Randall S.; Taylor, Addison A.; Wright, Jackson T.; Chertow, Glenn M.

    2015-01-01

    Thiazides and thiazide-type diuretics are recommended as first-line agents for the treatment of hypertension, but contemporary information on their use in clinical practice is lacking. We examined patterns and correlates of thiazide prescription in a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from participants enrolled in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT). We examined baseline prescription of thiazides in 7582 participants receiving at least one antihypertensive medication by subgroup, and used log-binomial regression to calculate adjusted prevalence ratios for thiazide prescription (versus no thiazide). Forty-three percent of all participants were prescribed a thiazide at baseline, but among participants prescribed a single agent, the proportion was only 16%. The prevalence of thiazide prescription differed significantly by demographic factors, with younger participants, women, and blacks all having higher adjusted prevalence of thiazide prescription than other corresponding subgroups. Participants in the lowest category of kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min per 1.73m2) were half as likely to be prescribed a thiazide as participants with preserved kidney function. In conclusion, among persons with hypertension and heightened cardiovascular risk, we found that thiazide prescription varied significantly by demographics and kidney disease status, despite limited evidence about relative differences in effectiveness. PMID:26865200

  10. Systolic Blood Pressure on Admission and Mortality in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Heart Failure: Observations From the Gulf Acute Heart Failure Registry.

    PubMed

    Al-Lawati, Jawad A; Sulaiman, Kadhim J; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Habib, Khalid F; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Al-Mahmeed, Wael; Al-Faleh, Hussam; El-Asfar, Abdelfatah; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Ridha, Mustafa; Bulbanat, Bassam; Al-Jarallah, Mohammed; Bazargani, Nooshin; Asaad, Nidal; Amin, Haitham

    2016-10-07

    We investigated the role of systolic blood pressure (SBP) in relation to in-hospital and postdischarge mortality in patients admitted with acute heart failure (AHF). The SBP of 4848 patients aged ≥18 years admitted with AHF was categorized into 5 groups: ≤90, 91 to 119, 120 to 139, 140 to 161, and >161 mm Hg. After adjusting for several confounders, multivariate logistic regression models showed that admission SBP was a significant predictor of mortality among both patients with preserved left ventricular function (defined as left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ≥40%) and patients with left ventricular dysfunction (LVEF <40%). The adjusted odds ratios of in-hospital, 3-month, and 1-year mortality in the lowest SBP groups were 7.06 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.28-15.20; P < .001), 2.59 (95% CI: 1.35-4.96; P = .004), and 3.10 (95% CI: 2.04-4.72; P < .001) times the odds in the highest admission group (SBP > 161 mm Hg), respectively. We conclude that low admission SBP is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with AHF. The higher the admission SBP, the better the prognosis, regardless of age or LVEF.

  11. Low systolic blood pressure and mortality from all-cause and vascular diseases among the rural elderly in Korea; Kangwha cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Hong, Seri; Ohrr, Heechoul

    2015-01-01

    The association between low systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular diseases is unclear. The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the association between SBP, especially low SBP, and mortality from all causes and vascular diseases among the elderly in Korea. Six thousand two hundred ninety four residents in a rural community were followed-up for deaths from 1985 to 2008. The adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by Cox proportional hazard model. A stratified analysis was conducted by age at enrollment. Among the elderly aged 65 and above, the lowest SBP (<100 mm Hg) group had an elevated aHR for mortality from vascular diseases (aHR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.9) including stroke (aHR = 2.4, 95% CI = 0.9-6.3) and ischemic heart diseases (aHR = 5.1, 95% CI = 1.0-26.0) compared to those with SBP of 100-119 mm Hg, while higher SBP was associated with higher mortality. This J-curve association was generally maintained when analysis was restricted to those with fair or good self-rated health, or those with no known vascular diseases. In people below 65, increasing SBP nearly monotonically increased the mortality from all-cause and vascular diseases. Our results suggest that elderly persons with low SBP should be treated with caution, since low SBP may increase vascular mortality.

  12. Differential effects of the changes of LDL cholesterol and systolic blood pressure on the risk of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effects of baseline and changes in blood pressure and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol on the carotid intima media thickness (IMT) have not been well documented. Methods A total of 2572 adults (mean age 53.8 years, 54.6% women) in a Taiwanese community undertook three blood pressure and LDL cholesterol examinations over 6 years. Latent growth curve modeling was used to investigate the effects of baseline and change in blood pressure and LDL cholesterol on IMT. Results Greater baseline LDL and blood pressure were associated with an increase in IMT (0.005 ± 0.002 mm per 1 mg/dL [p = 0.006] and 0.041 ± 0.004 mm mmHg [p <0.0001], respectively. Change in blood pressure was associated with a significant increase in IMT (0.047±0.016, P = 0.004), whilst the association between change in LDL and change in IMT was not statistically significant (0.008±0.006, P = 0.20). Conclusions Carotid IMT was associated with baseline blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, yet only changes of blood pressure, not LDL cholesterol, were related to carotid IMT during the 6-year observation. PMID:22900906

  13. Cocoa extract intake for 4 weeks reduces postprandial systolic blood pressure response of obese subjects, even after following an energy-restricted diet

    PubMed Central

    Ibero-Baraibar, Idoia; Suárez, Manuel; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Zulet, M. Angeles; Martinez, J. Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiometabolic profile is usually altered in obesity. Interestingly, the consumption of flavanol-rich foods might be protective against those metabolic alterations. Objective To evaluate the postprandial cardiometabolic effects after the acute consumption of cocoa extract before and after 4 weeks of its daily intake. Furthermore, the bioavailability of cocoa extract was investigated. Design Twenty-four overweight/obese middle-aged subjects participated in a 4-week intervention study. Half of the volunteers consumed a test meal enriched with 1.4 g of cocoa extract (415 mg flavanols), while the rest of the volunteers consumed the same meal without the cocoa extract (control group). Glucose and lipid profile, as well as blood pressure and cocoa metabolites in plasma, were assessed before and at 60, 120, and 180 min post-consumption, at the beginning of the study (Postprandial 1) and after following a 4-week 15% energy-restricted diet including meals containing or not containing the cocoa extract (Postprandial 2). Results In the Postprandial 1 test, the area under the curve (AUC) of systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly higher in the cocoa group compared with the control group (p=0.007), showing significant differences after 120 min of intake. However, no differences between groups were observed at Postprandial 2. Interestingly, the reduction of postprandial AUC of SBP (AUC_Postprandial 2-AUC_Postprandial 1) was higher in the cocoa group (p=0.016). Furthermore, cocoa-derived metabolites were detected in plasma of the cocoa group, while the absence or significantly lower amounts of metabolites were found in the control group. Conclusions The daily consumption of cocoa extract within an energy-restricted diet for 4 weeks resulted in a greater reduction of postprandial AUC of SBP compared with the effect of energy-restricted diet alone and independently of body weight loss. These results suggest the role of cocoa flavanols on postprandial blood

  14. Effects of various factors on Doppler flow ultrasonic radial and coccygeal artery systolic blood pressure measurements in privately-owned, conscious dogs

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Allison P.; Mawby, Dianne I.; Price, Joshua M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of age, body condition score (BCS) and muscle condition score (MCS) on indirect radial and coccygeal Doppler systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) measurements in dogs. Methods Sixty-two privately-owned dogs were enrolled between June and July 2016. The BCS and MCS were determined by two investigators. Blood pressure was measured per published guidelines and using headphones, and the order of measurement site was randomized. Dogs were positioned in right lateral recumbency for radial measurements and sternal recumbency or standing for coccygeal measurements. Associations between SAP and other variables were assessed by correlation coefficients and analysis of covariance. Results Radial and coccygeal SAP measurements were moderately correlated (r = 0.45, P < 0.01). Radial SAP measurements were higher than coccygeal SAP measurements (mean difference 9 mmHg, P < 0.01), but discordance occurred in both directions. No difference was observed between the first measurement taken, the average of measurements 2–6, or the average of all 6 measurements for either the radial (128, 129, and 129 mmHg; P = 0.36) or coccygeal (121, 122, and 122 mmHg; P = 0.82) site. Associations were not found between SAP measurements for either site and age, weight, BCS, MCS, anxiety score, or cuff size. Heart rate decreased significantly from the start of acclimation to the end of the first data collection series regardless of site (P < 0.01). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Initial measurement site can be based on patient and operator preference given lack of associations with patient variables, but the same site should be used for serial SAP measurements given discordant results between sites. PMID:28348930

  15. Age and gender related differences in aortic blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enevoldsen, Marie Sand; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lönn, Lars; Henneberg, Kaj-Åge; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-03-01

    The abdominal aorta (AA) is predisposed to development of abdominal aneurysms (AAA), a focal dilatation with fatal consequences if left untreated. The blood flow patterns is thought to play an important role in the development of AAA. The purpose of this work is to investigate the blood flow patterns within a group of healthy volunteers (six females, eight males) aged 23 to 76 years to identify changes and differences related to age and gender. The healthy volunteers were categorized by gender (male/female) and age (below/above 35 years). Subject-specific flow and geometry data were acquired using the research interface on a Profocus ultrasound scanner (B-K Medical, Herlev, Denmark; segmentation of 3D magnetic resonance angiography (Magnetom Trio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). The largest average diameter was among the elderly males (19.7 (+/- 1.33) mm) and smallest among the young females (12.4 (+/- 0.605) mm). The highest peak systolic velocity was in the young female group (1.02 (+/- 0.336) m/s) and lowest in the elderly male group (0.836 (+/- 0.127) m/s). A geometrical change with age was observed as the AA becomes more bended with age. This also affects the blood flow velocity patterns, which are markedly different from young to elderly. Thus, changes in blood flow patterns in the AA related to age and gender are observed. Further investigations are needed to determine the relation between changes in blood flow patterns and AAA development.

  16. Elevation in systolic blood pressure during heart failure hospitalization is associated with increased short and long-term mortality

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Omer; Segal, Gad; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Goldenberg, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud; Klempfner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between systolic blood pressure (SBP) change during hospitalization of patients with heart failure (HF) and clinical outcomes has never been thoroughly investigated. A total of 3393 patients hospitalized with HF, from 25 hospitals in Israel, were enrolled. The SBP change was calculated by subtracting the discharge SBP values from the admission values and then divided into quartiles of SBP change. We compared the group with upper quartile SBP change to the lower 3 quartiles of change. Both groups had largely similar demographics and clinical characteristics. All-cause mortality rate was 24% at 1-year and 82.6% at 10-years, whereas patients in the upper SBP change group had significantly higher cumulative mortality probability at 1-year (30% vs 22%; log-rank P <0.001), and at 10-years (86% vs 82%; log-rank P <0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis adjusted for comorbidities demonstrated that patients in the upper SBP change quartile have an independent 17% higher mortality risk at 10-years [hazard ratio (HR) 1.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–1.28]. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that mortality risk was more pronounced in patients with preserved ejection fraction and in the subgroup with admission SBP ≥140 mm Hg. SBP change is significantly associated with 1- and 10-year all-cause mortality, as an increased SBP change is associated with worse prognosis. We believe that this readily available marker might facilitate risk stratification of patients and possibly improve care. PMID:28151864

  17. Artificial reproduction of magnetic fields produced by a natural geomagnetic storm increases systolic blood pressure in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.; Miranda-Anaya, M.; Durán, P.; Flores-Chávez, P. L.

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of geomagnetic storms may be associated with changes in circulatory physiology. The way in which the natural variations of the geomagnetic field due to solar activity affects the blood pressure are poorly understood and require further study in controlled experimental designs in animal models. In the present study, we tested whether the systolic arterial pressure (AP) in adult rats is affected by simulated magnetic fields resembling the natural changes of a geomagnetic storm. We exposed adult rats to a linear magnetic profile that simulates the average changes associated to some well-known geomagnetic storm phases: the sudden commencement and principal phase. Magnetic stimulus was provided by a coil inductor and regulated by a microcontroller. The experiments were conducted in the electromagnetically isolated environment of a semi-anechoic chamber. After exposure, AP was determined with a non-invasive method through the pulse on the rat's tail. Animals were used as their own control. Our results indicate that there was no statistically significant effect in AP when the artificial profile was applied, neither in the sudden commencement nor in the principal phases. However, during the experimental period, a natural geomagnetic storm occurred, and we did observe statistically significant AP increase during the sudden commencement phase. Furthermore, when this storm phase was artificially replicated with a non-linear profile, we noticed a 7 to 9 % increase of the rats' AP in relation to a reference value. We suggested that the changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm in its first day could produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response in AP.

  18. Attenuation of systolic blood pressure and pulse transit time hysteresis during exercise and recovery in cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Yan, Bryan P; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Poon, Carmen C Y

    2014-02-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is a cardiovascular parameter of emerging interest due to its potential to estimate blood pressure (BP) continuously and without a cuff. Both linear and nonlinear equations have been used in the estimation of BP based on PTT. This study, however, demonstrates that there is a hysteresis phenomenon between BP and PTT during and after dynamic exercise. A total of 46 subjects including 16 healthy subjects, 13 subjects with one or more cardiovascular risk factors, and 17 patients with cardiovascular disease underwent graded exercise stress test. PTT was measured from electrocardiogram and photoplethysmogram of the left index finger of the subject, i.e., a pathway that includes predominately aorta, brachial, and radial arteries. The results of this study showed that, for the same systolic BP (SBP), PTT measured during exercise was significantly larger than PTT measured during recovery for all subject groups. This hysteresis was further quantified as both normalized area bounded by the SBP-PTT relationship (AreaN) and SBP difference at PTT during peak exercise plus 20 ms (ΔSBP20). Significant attenuation of both AreaN (p <; 0.05) and ΔSBP20 (p <; 0.01) is observed in cardiovascular patients compared with healthy subjects, independent of resting BP. Since the SBP-PTT relationship are determined by the mechanical properties of arterial wall, which is predominately mediated by the sympathetic nervous system through altered vascular smooth muscle (VSM) tone during exercise, results of this study are consistent with the previous findings of autonomic nervous dysfunction in cardiovascular patients. We further conclude that VSM tone has a nonnegligible influence on the BP-PTT relationship and thus should be considered in the PTT-based BP estimation.

  19. Relation of Body's Lean Mass, Fat Mass, and Body Mass Index With Submaximal Systolic Blood Pressure in Young Adult Men.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vivek K; Drenowatz, Clemens; Hand, Gregory A; Lavie, Carl J; Sui, Xuemei; Demello, Madison; Blair, Steven N

    2016-02-01

    We examined the association of body composition and body mass index (BMI) with submaximal systolic blood pressure (SSBP) among young adult men. The analysis included 211 men with BMI between 20 and 35 kg/m(2). Total lean mass and fat mass were measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry and lean mass percentage was calculated from the total lean mass. Fat mass index (FMI) and BMI were calculated using height and weight (total fat mass and total weight, respectively) measurements. SSBP was measured at each stage of a graded exercise test. Quintiles of lean mass percentage, FMI, and BMI were created with quintile 1 the lowest and quintile 5 the highest lean mass percentage, FMI, and BMI. Compared with men in lean mass percentage quintile 1, those in quintiles 2, 3, and 4 had significantly lower SSBP, whereas there was no significant difference in SSBP between quintile 1 and 5 at 6, 8, and 10 minutes. Compared with men in FMI quintile 5, those in quintiles 2, 3, and 4 had significantly lower SSBP, whereas there was no significant difference in SSBP between quintile 1 and 5. SSBP among men in lean mass percentage quintile 5 and FMI quintile 1 were still less than lean mass percentage quintile 1 and FMI quintile 5, respectively. There were no significant differences in SSBP across BMI quintiles 1 to 4 but a significantly higher SSBP in quintile 5 compared with quintiles 1 to 4. In conclusion, there was a J-curve pattern between SSBP and components of body composition, whereas, a linear relation between SSBP and BMI.

  20. Artificial reproduction of magnetic fields produced by a natural geomagnetic storm increases systolic blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bretón, J L; Mendoza, B; Miranda-Anaya, M; Durán, P; Flores-Chávez, P L

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of geomagnetic storms may be associated with changes in circulatory physiology. The way in which the natural variations of the geomagnetic field due to solar activity affects the blood pressure are poorly understood and require further study in controlled experimental designs in animal models. In the present study, we tested whether the systolic arterial pressure (AP) in adult rats is affected by simulated magnetic fields resembling the natural changes of a geomagnetic storm. We exposed adult rats to a linear magnetic profile that simulates the average changes associated to some well-known geomagnetic storm phases: the sudden commencement and principal phase. Magnetic stimulus was provided by a coil inductor and regulated by a microcontroller. The experiments were conducted in the electromagnetically isolated environment of a semi-anechoic chamber. After exposure, AP was determined with a non-invasive method through the pulse on the rat's tail. Animals were used as their own control. Our results indicate that there was no statistically significant effect in AP when the artificial profile was applied, neither in the sudden commencement nor in the principal phases. However, during the experimental period, a natural geomagnetic storm occurred, and we did observe statistically significant AP increase during the sudden commencement phase. Furthermore, when this storm phase was artificially replicated with a non-linear profile, we noticed a 7 to 9 % increase of the rats' AP in relation to a reference value. We suggested that the changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm in its first day could produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response in AP.

  1. Antihypertensive medications and sexual function in women: Baseline data from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Holly N.; Evans, Gregory W.; Berlowtiz, Dan R.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Conroy, Molly B.; Foy, Capri G.; Glasser, Stephen P.; Lewis, Cora E.; Riley, William T.; Russell, Laurie; Williams, Olubunmi; Hess, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hypertension is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular and kidney disease, but treatment can substantially reduce risks. Many patients avoid antihypertensive medications due to fear of side effects. While associations between antihypertensives and sexual dysfunction in men have been documented, it remains unclear whether antihypertensives are associated with sexual dysfunction in women. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from women in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to evaluate the relations among class of antihypertensive medication and the outcomes (a) sexual activity and (b) sexual function. Methods SPRINT enrolled individuals 50 and older with hypertension at high risk for cardiovascular disease. A subset of participants completed questionnaires regarding quality of life (QoL), including sexual function. Antihypertensive class was determined by medications taken at baseline. Results Of 690 women in the QoL subset of SPRINT, 183 (26.5%) were sexually active. There were no significant differences in sexual activity among women taking one or more antihypertensives and women not taking any. Women taking an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) had higher odds of sexual activity [OR 1.66 (1.12-4.27), p=0.011]. Among sexually active women, the prevalence of sexual dysfunction was high (52.5%). No class of medication was associated with sexual dysfunction in the multivariable model. Conclusions ACEI/ARB use was associated with higher odds of sexual activity. While prevalence of sexual dysfunction was high, no single class of antihypertensive medication was associated with sexual dysfunction. PMID:27032074

  2. Absence of sex differences in systolic blood pressure and heart rate responses to exercise in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Maruf, F A; Ogochukwu, U N; Dim, P A; Alada, A Ra

    2012-06-07

    The influence of sex on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR) responses associated with cardiovascular morbidity, in healthy young adults was determined in ninety healthy young adults (47 females and 43 males) exercised using Bruce protocol. SBP and HR were measured pre- and post-exercise, and during recovery. SBPresponse (peak minus pre-exercise SBP), %SBPresponse [(peak minus pre-exercise SBP)÷pre-exercise SBP]x100, SBP3 (SBP 3 minutes into recovery), SBP4 (SBP 4 minutes into recovery), SBP3:peak (SBP3÷peak SBP), %SBPd3 [(peak SBP minus SBP 3 minutes into recovery)x peak SBP]x100, %SBPd4 [(peak SBP minus SBP 4 minutes into recovery)x peak SBP]X100, HRresponse (Peak HR minus pre-exercise HR), %HRresponse [(peak HR minus pre-exercise HR)÷pre-exercise HR]x 100, HR3 (HR 3 minutes into recovery), HR4 (HR 4 minutes into recovery), %HRd3 [(peak HR minus HR 3 minutes into recovery)÷peak HR]x100, %HRd4 [(peak HR minus HR 4 minutes into recovery)÷peak HR]X100, and HR50-70 (HR between 50th and 70th seconds into recovery) were derived from SBP and HR measurements. SBPpeak, HRresponse and %HRresponse were higher in males than in females whereas, SBPresponse, %SBPresponse and HRpeak were not different. There were no significant differences in the post-exercise SBP and HR responses of males and females except for SBP3, SBP4, HR3 and HR4. After adjusting for exercise duration, body mass index (BMI), and resting SBP and HR, these variables became similar. Sex differences in some SBP and HR responses to exercise, become nonexistent after adjusting for BMI, exercise duration, and resting SBP and HR.

  3. Evidence to Maintain the Systolic Blood Pressure Treatment Threshold at 140 mm Hg for Stroke Prevention: The Northern Manhattan Study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chuanhui; Della-Morte, David; Rundek, Tatjana; Wright, Clinton B; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Sacco, Ralph L

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, the Eighth Joint National Committee revised the target maximum systolic blood pressure (SBP) from 140 to 150 mm Hg in patients aged ≥60 years without diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. The evidence from cohort studies supporting this change was sparse, particularly among US minority populations. In the Northern Manhattan Study, 1750 participants aged ≥60 years and free of stroke, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease had SBP measured at baseline and were annually followed up for incident stroke. Mean age at baseline was 72±8 years, 63% were women, 48% Hispanic, 25% non-Hispanic white, and 25% non-Hispanic black. Among all participants, 40% were on antihypertensive medications; 43% had SBP <140 mm Hg, 20% had 140 to 149 mm Hg, and 37% had ≥150 mm Hg. Over a median follow-up of 13 years, 182 participants developed stroke. The crude stroke incidence was greater among individuals with SBP≥150 mm Hg (10.8 per 1000 person-years) and SBP 140 to 149 (12.3) than among those with SBP<140 (6.2). After adjusting for demographics, vascular risk factors, diastolic BP, and medication use, participants with SBP 140 to 149 mm Hg had an increased risk of stroke (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.6) compared with those with SBP <140 mm Hg. The increased stroke risk was most notable among Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks. Raising the SBP threshold from 140 to 150 mm Hg as a new target for hypertension treatment in older individuals without diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease could have a detrimental effect on stroke risk reduction, especially among minority US populations.

  4. Reduced blood pressure-lowering effect of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with isolated systolic hypertension: data from SYMPLICITY HTN-3 and the Global SYMPLICITY Registry

    PubMed Central

    Bakris, George; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Esler, Murray; Ewen, Sebastian; Fahy, Martin; Kandzari, David; Kario, Kazuomi; Mancia, Giuseppe; Weber, Michael; Böhm, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Aims Catheter-based renal artery denervation (RDN) has been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) (systolic BP [SBP] ≥140 mmHg and diastolic BP <90 mmHg), characterized by increased vascular stiffness, is the predominant hypertensive phenotype in elderly patients. This study compared baseline characteristics and SBP change at 6 months between patients with ISH and combined systolic–diastolic hypertension (CH). Methods and results This study pooled data from 1103 patients from SYMPLICITY HTN-3 and the Global SYMPLICITY Registry. A total of 429 patients had ISH, and 674 had CH. Patients with ISH were significantly older than those with CH (66 vs. 55 years), had more type 2 diabetes mellitus (52.9 vs. 34.6%), and a lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (71.8 vs. 78.6 mL/min/1.73 m2); all P < 0.001. At 6 months, the SBP drop for CH patients was −18.7 ± 23.7 mmHg compared with a reduction of −10.9 ± 21.7 mmHg for ISH patients −7.8 mmHg, 95% confidence interval, CI, −10.5, −5.1, P < 0.001). The change in 24-h SBP at 6 months was −8.8 ± 16.2 mmHg in patients with CH vs. −5.8 ± 15.4 mmHg in ISH (−3.0 mmHg, 95% CI −5.4, −0.6, P = 0.015). Presence of ISH at baseline but not age was associated with less pronounced BP changes following the procedure. The strongest predictor of office SBP reduction at 6 months was CH, followed by aldosterone antagonist use and non-use of vasodilators. Conclusion The reduction in BP among patients with ISH following RDN was less pronounced than the reduction in patients with CH. Clinical.Trials.gov identifiers NCT01534299 and NCT01418261. PMID:28158510

  5. Nifedipine GITS/Candesartan Combination Therapy Lowers Blood Pressure Across Different Baseline Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure Categories: DISTINCT Study Subanalyses

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Gloria; Villa, Giuseppe; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract DISTINCT was an 8‐week, double‐blind, randomized study to investigate the antihypertensive efficacy and safety of various nifedipine gastrointestinal treatment system (GITS)/candesartan cilexetil (N/C) dose combinations, vs respective monotherapies or placebo, in patients with diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥95 to <110 mm Hg. The current prespecified analysis compared BP reduction in participants with mild vs moderate baseline hypertension (ie, systolic [S]BP <160 mm Hg vs ≥160 mm Hg and DBP <100 mm Hg vs ≥100 mm Hg). A total of 1362 patients were analyzed by descriptive statistics. In all patient subgroups investigated, the NC combinations (ie, N: 20, 30, or 60 mg; C: 4, 8, 16, or 32 mg daily) provided greater SBP and DBP lowering and higher rates of BP control (defined as BP <140/90 mm Hg) than respective monotherapies or placebo, with greatest absolute BP reductions observed in the moderately elevated SBP or DBP subgroups. A trend to dose‐response relationship was observed in each subgroup. In each SBP and DBP subgroup, treatment‐related vasodilatory events (flushing, headache, or edema) were less frequent for patients receiving NC combination therapy than N monotherapy. These analyses support the use of calcium antagonist and angiotensin receptor blocker combination therapy in patients with both mild and moderate hypertension, for whom effective BP normalization and good drug tolerance would greatly reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. PMID:26829251

  6. Medication adherence and visit-to-visit variability of systolic blood pressure in African Americans with chronic kidney disease in the AASK trial.

    PubMed

    Hong, K; Muntner, P; Kronish, I; Shilane, D; Chang, T I

    2016-01-01

    Lower adherence to antihypertensive medications may increase visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure (VVV of BP), a risk factor for cardiovascular events and death. We used data from the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) trial to examine whether lower medication adherence is associated with higher systolic VVV of BP in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease (CKD). Determinants of VVV of BP were also explored. AASK participants (n=988) were categorized by self-report or pill count as having perfect (100%), moderately high (75-99%), moderately low (50-74%) or low (<50%) proportion of study visits with high medication adherence over a 1-year follow-up period. We used multinomial logistic regression to examine determinants of medication adherence, and multivariable-adjusted linear regression to examine the association between medication adherence and systolic VVV of BP, defined as the coefficient of variation or the average real variability (ARV). Participants with lower self-reported adherence were generally younger and had a higher prevalence of comorbid conditions. Compared with perfect adherence, moderately high, moderately low and low adherence was associated with 0.65% (±0.31%), 0.99% (±0.31%) and 1.29% (±0.32%) higher systolic VVV of BP (defined as the coefficient of variation) in fully adjusted models. Results were qualitatively similar when using ARV or when using pill counts as the measure of adherence. Lower medication adherence is associated with higher systolic VVV of BP in African Americans with hypertensive CKD; efforts to improve medication adherence in this population may reduce systolic VVV of BP.

  7. The effects of increasing levels of dietary garlic bulb on growth performance, systolic blood pressure, hematology, and ascites syndrome in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Varmaghany, Saifali; Karimi Torshizi, Mohammad Amir; Rahimi, Shaban; Lotfollahian, Houshang; Hassanzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    The effects of dietary garlic bulb were studied separately on hematological parameters, ascites incidence, and growth performance of an ascites susceptible broiler hybrid under both standard temperature conditions ( STC: ) and cold temperature conditions ( CTC: ). A total of 336 one-day-old male broiler chickens were allocated to 4 experimental groups with 4 replicates of 21 birds each under STC. In addition, the same grouping with another 336 birds was used for CTC. Under CTC, the birds were exposed to cold temperatures for induction of ascites. Experimental groups were defined by the inclusion of 0 (control), 5, 10 or 15 g/kg garlic bulbs in the diets under both STC and CTC. Growth performance, systolic blood pressure (as a measure of systemic arterial blood pressure), physiological and biochemical parameters, as well as ascites indices (right ventricle [ RV: ], total ventricle [ TV: ] weights, and RV/TV: ) were evaluated. Systolic blood pressure was determined using an indirect method with a sphygmomanometer, a pediatric cuff, and a Doppler device. The final body weight decreased quadratically (P = 0.003), with increasing garlic bulb levels in the diets under STC. The feed conversion ratio showed no significant differences among all groups under both STC and CTC. No significant differences were observed in total mortality and ascites-related mortality in all groups under STC, although total mortality (L: P = 0.01; Q: P = 0.001) and ascites-related mortality (L: P = 0.007; Q: P = 0.001) were significantly different among the diets under CTC. Under STC, the systolic blood pressure, packed cell volume, hemoglobin, RV, TV, and RV/TV did not vary significantly among the diets. However, red blood cell count and erythrocyte osmotic fragility decreased linearly (P < 0.005) with increasing garlic bulb levels in the diets under STC. Under CTC, the systolic blood pressure, packed cell volume, red blood cell count, and erythrocyte osmotic fragility decreased

  8. Fetal growth and blood pressure in a Danish population aged 31-51 years.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, H T; Thulstrup, A M; Nørgdård, B; Engberg, M; Madsen, K M; Johnsen, S P; Olsen, J; Lauritzen, T

    2000-08-01

    During the past decade, studies have shown an inverse association between birth weight and blood pressure and risk of coronary heart disease in adult life. From old public archives we were able to trace the birth records of 545 out of 905 persons (60.2%) aged 31-51 years who participated in the Ebeltoft Health Promotion Project in Denmark. We examined the associations between birth weight, length at birth, Ponderal Index and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. No associations were found for women. For men, the mean systolic blood pressure fell from 131.1 mmHg with a birth weight of less than 3300 g to 129.6 mmHg with a birth weight of more than 4000 g, and for diastolic blood pressure 81.6 mmHg to 80.3 mmHg, respectively. For men, the mean systolic blood pressure fell from 135.7 mm Hg with a birth length of 30-51 cm to 131.6 with a birth length of 55-62 cm, and for diastolic blood pressure 83.0 mmHg to 78.8 mmHg, respectively. The associations may reflect organ programming in fetal life.

  9. Relationships of the systolic blood pressure response during exercise with insulin resistance, obesity, and endurance fitness in men with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, S; Kai, Y; Hanada, H; Uezono, K; Sasaki, H

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationships among the resting systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) or SBP response during exercise with insulin resistance evaluated by a homeostasis model (HOMA-IR), abdominal fat accumulation (visceral fat area [VFA], subcutaneous fat area [SFA]) by computed tomography (CT), and an estimation of the maximal oxygen uptake (V*O2max) in 63 Japanese middle-aged male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) in type 2 DM subjects were significantly higher than in age-matched healthy male control subjects (n = 135) with normal glucose tolerance. Resting SBP (127.7 +/- 16.2 mm Hg v 119.4 +/- 13.0 mm Hg) and DBP (82.2 +/- 11.9mmHg v 76.8 +/- 9.4 mm Hg) levels, and the percentage of hypertension (20.6% v 1.5%) in type 2 DM subjects were significantly higher than in the control subjects (P <.05). According to a multiple regression analysis for resting blood pressure in type 2 DM, VFA was found to be an independent predictor of SBP, while V*O2max and HOMA-IR were independent predictors of DBP. In the controls, however, HOMA-IR was not found to be a significantly independent predictor for either resting SBP or resting DBP. Measurement of the SBP response during graded exercise using a ramp test was performed by an electrical braked cycle ergometer in 54 patients with type 2 DM only. The SBP was measured at 15-second intervals during exercise. The exercise intensity at the double product breaking point (DPBP), which strongly correlated with the exercise intensity at the lactate threshold, was used as an index for the SBP response to standardized exercise intensity. The SBP corresponding to exercise intensity at DPBP (SBP@DPBP) was evaluated as an index of the SBP response to standardized exercise intensity. The change in SBP (deltaSBP = SBP@DPBP - resting SBP) was significantly and positively associated with log area under the curve for glucose

  10. Changes in HbA1c, body weight, and systolic blood pressure in type 2 diabetes patients initiating dapagliflozin therapy: a primary care database study

    PubMed Central

    Scheerer, Markus F; Rist, Roland; Proske, Orm; Meng, Annika; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in type 2 diabetes (T2D) primary care patients initiating dapagliflozin treatment. Methods T2D patients who started dapagliflozin in 985 general and 32 diabetologist practices (Disease Analyzer, Germany: December 2012–October 2014) were analyzed (3- and 6-month follow-up). Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to identify clinical characteristics and comorbidity associated with changes in HbA1c, BW, and SBP. Results The study included 1,169 T2D patients (age: 62.5 years; men: 59.3%; diabetologist care: 23%) with newly initiated dapagliflozin therapy. At the 3-month stage, dapagliflozin significantly reduced HbA1c (−0.8%±1.4%) compared to the baseline (8.5%±1.5%) (P<0.001). Changes were maintained after 6 months (−0.8%±1.5%) (P<0.001). Patients with high baseline HbA1c values (>9%) showed greater reductions in HbA1c than the overall sample (3 months −1.8%, 6 months −1.8%; both P<0.05). BW and SBP also showed statistically significant reductions with dapagliflozin over 3 and 6 months (−2.2 kg, P<0.001; −2.2 mmHg, P=0.003 and −2.5 kg, P<0.001; −2.3 mmHg, P=0.011, respectively). After 3 months, 53% of patients achieved a reduction in both HbA1c and BW; the same holds true for 45% of patients at the 6-month mark. Similar results were observed both in general and diabetologist practices. In multivariate analyses, baseline HbA1c (parameter estimate: −0.6479) and diabetologist care (−0.2553) were independent predictors of HbA1c change (6 months) (all P<0.05). Conclusion T2D patients treated with dapagliflozin therapy achieved statistically significant reductions in HbA1c, BW, and SBP in a real-world primary and diabetologist care setting. The changes were comparable to the results of the dapagliflozin clinical trial program. PMID:27822077

  11. Mediation and Moderation of the Association between Cynical Hostility and Systolic Blood Pressure in Low-Income Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Versey, H. Shellae; Kaplan, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Hostility may be related to risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as blood pressure. However, the process by which hostility affects blood pressure is not fully understood. The current study sought to evaluate abdominal obesity (waist-to-hip ratio [WHR]) as a potential mediator and modifier of the relationship between cynical…

  12. Vasopressin V2 receptor antagonist tolvaptan is effective in heart failure patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function and low blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Abe, Yukihiko; Saito, Tomiyoshi; Ohwada, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Kubota, Isao; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2015-01-01

    Diuresis is a major therapy for the reduction of congestive symptoms in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) patients. Carperitide has natriuretic and vasodilatory effects, and tolvaptan produces water excretion without electrolyte excretion. We previously reported the usefulness of tolvaptan compared to carperitide in ADHF patients with fluid volume retention. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the efficacy of tolvaptan was altered in ADHF patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function and in those with hypotension. A total of 109 hospitalized ADHF patients were randomly assigned to either a tolvaptan or a carperitide treatment group. Baseline clinical characteristics were not different between the two groups. We divided these patients based on the left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) by echocardiography, and blood pressure (BP) at the time of admission. Daily urine volume between the tolvaptan and carperitide groups in patients with preserved EF (≥ 50%) was not different, however, in those with reduced EF (< 50%), the urine volume was significantly higher in the tolvaptan group than in the carperitide group (day 2, 3, 4, P < 0.05 for all). Daily urine volume did not differ between these two groups in the high blood pressure group (BP ≥ 140 mmHg), but was significantly higher in the tolvaptan group than in the carperitide group (day 1, P = 0.021; day 3, P = 0.017) in the low blood pressure group (BP < 140 mmHg). The present study reveals that tolvaptan is more effective than carperitide, especially in ADHF patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function and without hypertension.

  13. Maternal Age of Menarche and Blood Pressure in Adolescence: Evidence from Hong Kong’s “Children of 1997” Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tsz Chun; Leung, Gabriel Matthew; Schooling, C. Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background Age of puberty has declined substantially in developed settings and is now declining in the rest of the world with economic development. Early age of puberty is associated with non-communicable diseases in adulthood, and may be a long-term driver of population health with effects over generations. In a non-Western setting, we examined the association of maternal age of menarche with blood pressure in late childhood/adolescence. Methods We used generalised estimating equations to estimate the adjusted association of maternal age of menarche with age-, sex- and height-adjusted blood pressure z-score from 10 to 16 years in Hong Kong’s population-representative birth cohort, “Children of 1997” (n = 8327). We also assessed whether associations were mediated by body mass index (BMI) or pubertal stage. Results Earlier maternal age of menarche was associated with higher systolic blood pressure in adolescence [-0.02 z-score per year older maternal age of menarche, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.04 to -0.003]. The association of maternal age of menarche with systolic blood pressure was mediated by adiposity and/or pubertal stage at 11 years. Maternal age of menarche was not associated with diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion Earlier maternal age of puberty was associated with higher systolic blood pressure, largely mediated by adiposity, highlighting the importance of tackling childhood obesity as a public health priority in view of the secular trend of declining age of puberty. PMID:27454175

  14. Systolic blood pressure control among individuals with Type 2 Diabetes: A comparative effectiveness analysis of three interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensive lifestyle management or frequent goal-based monitoring with pharmacological management can be successful strategies for blood pressure control in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes....

  15. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability in the Time Domain in Patients with Recent and Long-Standing Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Estañol, Bruno; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio; Fossion, Ruben; Toledo-Roy, Juan C; Mendoza-Temis, Joel; Morales, Irving O; Landa, Emmanuel; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Moreno, Rene; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) affects the cardiovascular response of patients. To study this effect, interbeat intervals (IBI) and beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability of patients during supine, standing and controlled breathing tests were analyzed in the time domain. Simultaneous noninvasive measurements of IBI and SBP for 30 recently diagnosed and 15 long-standing DM patients were compared with the results for 30 rigorously screened healthy subjects (control). A statistically significant distinction between control and diabetic subjects was provided by the standard deviation and the higher moments of the distributions (skewness, and kurtosis) with respect to the median. To compare IBI and SBP for different populations, we define a parameter, α, that combines the variability of the heart rate and the blood pressure, as the ratio of the radius of the moments for IBI and the same radius for SBP. As diabetes evolves, α decreases, standard deviation of the IBI detrended signal diminishes (heart rate signal becomes more "rigid"), skewness with respect to the median approaches zero (signal fluctuations gain symmetry), and kurtosis increases (fluctuations concentrate around the median). Diabetes produces not only a rigid heart rate, but also increases symmetry and has leptokurtic distributions. SBP time series exhibit the most variable behavior for recently diagnosed DM with platykurtic distributions. Under controlled breathing, SBP has symmetric distributions for DM patients, while control subjects have non-zero skewness. This may be due to a progressive decrease of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity to the heart and blood vessels as diabetes evolves.

  16. The evolution of systolic blood pressure as a strong predictor of cardiovascular risk and the effectiveness of fixed-dose ARB/CCB combinations in lowering levels of this preferential target

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure is an important cardiovascular risk factor. Although targets for both diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) are defined by current guidelines, DBP has historically taken precedence in hypertension management. However, there is strong evidence that SBP is superior to DBP as a predictor of cardiovascular events. Moreover, achieving control of SBP is assuming greater importance amongst an aging population. In spite of the growing recognition of the importance of SBP in reducing cardiovascular risk and the emphasis by current guidelines on SBP control, a substantial proportion of patients still fail to achieve SBP targets, and SBP control is achieved much less frequently than DBP control. Thus, new approaches to the management of hypertension are required in order to control SBP and minimize cardiovascular risk. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) therapy is an approach that offers the advantages of multiple drug administration and a reduction in regimen complexity that favors compliance. We have reviewed the latest evidence demonstrating the efficacy in targeting SBP of the most recent FDC products; combinations of the calcium channel blocker (CCB), amlodipine, with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), valsartan or olmesartan. In addition, results from studies with new classes of agent are outlined. PMID:19337545

  17. Does blood pressure inevitably rise with age?: longitudinal evidence among forager-horticulturalists.

    PubMed

    Gurven, Michael; Blackwell, Aaron D; Rodríguez, Daniel Eid; Stieglitz, Jonathan; Kaplan, Hillard

    2012-07-01

    The rise in blood pressure with age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Age-related increases in blood pressure have been observed in almost every population, except among hunter-gatherers, farmers, and pastoralists. Here we tested for age-related increases in blood pressure among Tsimane forager-farmers. We also test whether lifestyle changes associated with modernization lead to higher blood pressure and a greater rate of age-related increase in blood pressure. We measured blood pressure longitudinally on 2248 adults age ≥ 20 years (n=6468 observations over 8 years). Prevalence of hypertension was 3.9% for women and 5.2% for men, although diagnosis of persistent hypertension based on multiple observations reduced prevalence to 2.9% for both sexes. Mixed-effects models revealed systolic, diastolic, and pulse blood pressure increases of 2.86 (P<0.001), 0.95 (P<0.001), and 1.95 mmHg (P<0.001) per decade for women and 0.91 (P<0.001), 0.93 (P<0.001), and -0.02 mmHg (P=0.93) for men, substantially lower than rates found elsewhere. Lifestyle factors, such as smoking and Spanish fluency, had minimal effect on mean blood pressure and no effect on age-related increases in blood pressure. Greater town proximity was associated with a lower age-related increase in pulse pressure. Effects of modernization were, therefore, deemed minimal among Tsimane, in light of their lean physique, active lifestyle, and protective diet.

  18. Consistent regional heterogeneity of passive diastolic stretch and systolic deformation in the healthy heart: age-related changes in left ventricle contractility.

    PubMed

    Jasaityte, Ruta; D'hooge, Jan; Herbots, Lieven; Daraban, Ana M; Rademakers, Frank; Claus, Piet

    2014-01-01

    The consistency of the normal spatial distribution of segmental passive stretch (PreS) and systolic strain (SS) within the left ventricle was investigated and a recently proposed echocardiographic estimate of left ventricular (LV) contractility was used to detect contractility changes with age. Hereto, in 54 healthy subjects, segmental PreS and SS were measured on tissue Doppler images of six left ventricle walls. For each subject, a linear regression line was estimated through the segmental PreS and SS values. The slopes and intercepts of this PreS-SS relationship did not differ between age groups, suggesting no changes in LV contractility with age. Moreover, a consistent regional distribution of PreS was observed, with the highest values measured in the septum, resulting in a similar distribution of SS as a direct consequence of the Frank-Starling mechanism.

  19. Aging changes in the heart and blood vessels

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - aging; Atherosclerosis - aging ... Some changes in the heart and blood vessels normally occur with age. However, many other changes that are common with aging are due to modifiable ...

  20. Systolic blood pressure response after high-intensity interval exercise is independently related to decreased small arterial elasticity in normotensive African American women.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stephen J; Goldsby, TaShauna U; Fisher, Gordon; Plaisance, Eric P; Gower, Barbara A; Glasser, Stephen P; Hunter, Gary R

    2016-05-01

    Aerobic exercise transiently lowers blood pressure. However, limited research has concurrently evaluated blood pressure and small arterial elasticity (SAE), an index of endothelial function, among African American (AA) and European American (EA) women the morning after (i.e., ≈22 h later) acute bouts of moderate-intensity continuous (MIC) and high-intensity interval (HII) exercise matched for total work. Because of greater gradients of shear stress, it was hypothesized that HII exercise would elicit a greater reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP) compared to MIC exercise. After baseline, 22 AA and EA women initiated aerobic exercise training 3 times/week. Beginning at week 8, three follow-up assessments were conducted over the next 8 weeks at random to measure resting blood pressure and SAE. In total all participants completed 16 weeks of training. Follow-up evaluations were made: (i) in the trained state (TS; 8-16 weeks of aerobic training); (ii) ≈22 h after an acute bout of MIC exercise; and (iii) ≈22 h after an acute bout of HII exercise. Among AAs, the acute bout of HII exercise incited a significant increase in SBP (mm Hg) (TS, 121 ± 14 versus HII, 128 ± 14; p = 0.01) whereas responses (TS, 116 ± 12 versus HII, 113 ± 9; p = 0.34) did not differ in EAs. After adjusting for race, changes in SAE were associated (partial r = -0.533; p = 0.01) with changes in SBP following HII exercise. These data demonstrate an acute, unaccustomed bout of HII exercise produces physiological perturbations resulting in a significant increase in SBP that are independently associated with decreased SAE among AA women, but not EA women.

  1. Relaxing music prevents stress-induced increases in subjective anxiety, systolic blood pressure, and heart rate in healthy males and females.

    PubMed

    Knight, W E; Rickard PhD, N S

    2001-01-01

    Previous research suggests that while subjective anxiety is reduced by relaxing music, the effect of music on physiological stress indices is less consistent. In the current study, the effect of relaxing music on participants' subjective and physiological response to stress was explored, with attention paid to methodological factors and mediating variables that might have contributed to inconsistencies in previous studies. Undergraduate students (43 females & 44 males) were exposed to a cognitive stressor task involving preparation for an oral presentation either in the presence of Pachelbel's Canon in D major, or in silence. Measures of subjective anxiety, heart rate, blood pressure, cortisol, and salivary IgA were obtained during rest and after presentation of the stressor. The stressor caused significant increases in subjective anxiety, heart rate, and systolic blood pressure in male and female controls. These stress-induced increases were each prevented by exposure to music, and this effect was independent of gender. Music also enhanced baseline salivary IgA levels in the absence of any stress-induced effects. These findings provide experimental support for claims that music is an effective anxiolytic treatment, the robustness of which is demonstrated by retention of the effect in the presence of a range of potentially mediating variables.

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease Is Characterized by “Double Trouble” Higher Pulse Pressure plus Night-Time Systolic Blood Pressure and More Severe Cardiac Damage

    PubMed Central

    Fedecostante, Massimiliano; Spannella, Francesco; Cola, Giovanna; Espinosa, Emma; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension plays a key role in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but CKD itself affects the blood pressure (BP) profile. The aim of this study was to assess the association of BP profile with CKD and the presence of cardiac organ damage. Methods We studied 1805 patients, referred to our Hypertension Centre, in whom ABPM, blood tests, and echocardiography were clinically indicated. The glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR) using the MDRD equation and CKD was defined as eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Cardiac organ damage was evaluated by echocardiography. Results Among patients with CKD there were higher systolic blood pressure (SBP) during the night-time, greater prevalence of non-dippers (OR: 1.8) and increased pulse pressure (PP) during 24-hour period, daytime and night-time (all p<0.001). Patients with CKD had a greater LVM/h2.7 index, and a higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction (all p<0.001). Nocturnal SBP and PP correlated more strongly with cardiac organ damage (p<0.001). Patients with CKD had a greater Treatment Intensity Score (p<0.001) in the absence of a significantly greater BP control. Conclusions CKD patients have an altered night-time pressure profile and higher PP that translate into a more severe cardiac organ damage. In spite of a greater intensity of treatment in most patients with CKD, BP control was similar to patients without CKD. Our findings indicate the need of a better antihypertensive therapy in CKD, better selected drugs, dosages and posology to provide optimal coverage of 24 hours and night-time BP. PMID:24465931

  3. Heart Rate and Systolic Blood Pressure Variability in the Time Domain in Patients with Recent and Long-Standing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Ana Leonor; Estañol, Bruno; Sentíes-Madrid, Horacio; Fossion, Ruben; Toledo-Roy, Juan C.; Mendoza-Temis, Joel; Morales, Irving O.; Landa, Emmanuel; Robles-Cabrera, Adriana; Moreno, Rene; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) affects the cardiovascular response of patients. To study this effect, interbeat intervals (IBI) and beat-to-beat systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability of patients during supine, standing and controlled breathing tests were analyzed in the time domain. Simultaneous noninvasive measurements of IBI and SBP for 30 recently diagnosed and 15 long-standing DM patients were compared with the results for 30 rigorously screened healthy subjects (control). A statistically significant distinction between control and diabetic subjects was provided by the standard deviation and the higher moments of the distributions (skewness, and kurtosis) with respect to the median. To compare IBI and SBP for different populations, we define a parameter, α, that combines the variability of the heart rate and the blood pressure, as the ratio of the radius of the moments for IBI and the same radius for SBP. As diabetes evolves, α decreases, standard deviation of the IBI detrended signal diminishes (heart rate signal becomes more “rigid”), skewness with respect to the median approaches zero (signal fluctuations gain symmetry), and kurtosis increases (fluctuations concentrate around the median). Diabetes produces not only a rigid heart rate, but also increases symmetry and has leptokurtic distributions. SBP time series exhibit the most variable behavior for recently diagnosed DM with platykurtic distributions. Under controlled breathing, SBP has symmetric distributions for DM patients, while control subjects have non-zero skewness. This may be due to a progressive decrease of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity to the heart and blood vessels as diabetes evolves. PMID:26849653

  4. Brachial blood pressure-independent relations between radial late systolic shoulder-derived aortic pressures and target organ changes.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gavin R; Majane, Olebogeng H I; Maseko, Muzi J; Libhaber, Carlos; Redelinghuys, Michelle; Kruger, Deirdre; Veller, Martin; Sareli, Pinhas; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2012-04-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (BP; BPc) predicts outcomes beyond brachial BP. In this regard, the application of a generalized transfer function (GTF) to radial pulse waves for the derivation of BPc is an easy and reproducible measurement technique. However, the use of the GTF may not be appropriate in all circumstances. Although the peak of the second shoulder of the radial waveform (P2) is closely associated with BPc, and, hence, BPc may be assessed without the need for a GTF, whether P2-derived BPc is associated with adverse cardiovascular changes independent of brachial BP is uncertain. Thus, P2- and GTF-derived aortic BPs were assessed using applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software. Left ventricular mass was indexed for height(1.7) (n=678) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT; n=462) was determined using echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. With adjustments for nurse-derived brachial pulse pressure (PP), P2-derived central PP was independently associated with left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7) (partial r=0.18; P<0.0001) and IMT (partial r=0.40; P<0.0001). These relations were similar to nurse-derived brachial PP-independent relations between GTF-derived central PP and target organ changes (left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7): partial r=0.17, P<0.0001; IMT: partial r=0.37, P<0.0001). In contrast, with adjustments for central PP, nurse-derived brachial PP-target organ relations were eliminated (partial r=-0.21 to 0.05). Twenty-four-hour, day, and night PP-target organ relations did not survive adjustments for nurse-derived brachial BP. In conclusion, central PP derived from P2, which does not require a GTF, is associated with cardiovascular target organ changes independent of brachial BP. Thus, when assessing adverse cardiovascular effects of aortic BP independent of brachial BP, P2-derived measures may complement GTF-derived measures of aortic BP.

  5. Quercetin reduces systolic blood pressure and plasma oxidised low-density lipoprotein concentrations in overweight subjects with a high-cardiovascular disease risk phenotype: a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Egert, Sarah; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; Seiberl, Jasmin; Kürbitz, Claudia; Settler, Uta; Plachta-Danielzik, Sandra; Wagner, Anika E; Frank, Jan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Rimbach, Gerald; Wolffram, Siegfried; Müller, Manfred J

    2009-10-01

    Regular consumption of flavonoids may reduce the risk for CVD. However, the effects of individual flavonoids, for example, quercetin, remain unclear. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of quercetin supplementation on blood pressure, lipid metabolism, markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and body composition in an at-risk population of ninety-three overweight or obese subjects aged 25-65 years with metabolic syndrome traits. Subjects were randomised to receive 150 mg quercetin/d in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial with 6-week treatment periods separated by a 5-week washout period. Mean fasting plasma quercetin concentrations increased from 71 to 269 nmol/l (P < 0.001) during quercetin treatment. In contrast to placebo, quercetin decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) by 2.6 mmHg (P < 0.01) in the entire study group, by 2.9 mmHg (P < 0.01) in the subgroup of hypertensive subjects and by 3.7 mmHg (P < 0.001) in the subgroup of younger adults aged 25-50 years. Quercetin decreased serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.001), while total cholesterol, TAG and the LDL:HDL-cholesterol and TAG:HDL-cholesterol ratios were unaltered. Quercetin significantly decreased plasma concentrations of atherogenic oxidised LDL, but did not affect TNF-alpha and C-reactive protein when compared with placebo. Quercetin supplementation had no effects on nutritional status. Blood parameters of liver and kidney function, haematology and serum electrolytes did not reveal any adverse effects of quercetin. In conclusion, quercetin reduced SBP and plasma oxidised LDL concentrations in overweight subjects with a high-CVD risk phenotype. Our findings provide further evidence that quercetin may provide protection against CVD.

  6. Thermoase-Derived Flaxseed Protein Hydrolysates and Membrane Ultrafiltration Peptide Fractions Have Systolic Blood Pressure-Lowering Effects in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nwachukwu, Ifeanyi D.; Girgih, Abraham T.; Malomo, Sunday A.; Onuh, John O.; Aluko, Rotimi E.

    2014-01-01

    Thermoase-digested flaxseed protein hydrolysate (FPH) samples and ultrafiltration membrane-separated peptide fractions were initially evaluated for in vitro inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and renin activities. The two most active FPH samples and their corresponding peptide fractions were subsequently tested for in vivo antihypertensive activity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The FPH produced with 3% thermoase digestion showed the highest ACE- and renin-inhibitory activities. Whereas membrane ultrafiltration resulted in significant (p < 0.05) increases in ACE inhibition by the <1 and 1–3 kDa peptides, only a marginal improvement in renin-inhibitory activity was observed for virtually all the samples after membrane ultrafiltration. The FPH samples and membrane fractions were also effective in lowering systolic blood pressure (SBP) in SHR with the largest effect occurring after oral administration (200 mg/kg body weight) of the 1–3 kDa peptide fraction of the 2.5% FPH and the 3–5 kDa fraction of the 3% FPH. Such potent SBP-lowering capacity indicates the potential of flaxseed protein-derived bioactive peptides as ingredients for the formulation of antihypertensive functional foods and nutraceuticals. PMID:25302619

  7. Prediction of pharmacologically induced baroreflex sensitivity from local time and frequency domain indices of R-R interval and systolic blood pressure signals obtained during deep breathing.

    PubMed

    Arica, Sami; Firat Ince, N; Bozkurt, Abdi; Tewfik, Ahmed H; Birand, Ahmet

    2011-07-01

    Pharmacological measurement of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is widely accepted and used in clinical practice. Following the introduction of pharmacologically induced BRS (p-BRS), alternative assessment methods eliminating the use of drugs were in the center of interest of the cardiovascular research community. In this study we investigated whether p-BRS using phenylephrine injection can be predicted from non-pharmacological time and frequency domain indices computed from electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood pressure (BP) data acquired during deep breathing. In this scheme, ECG and BP data were recorded from 16 subjects in a two-phase experiment. In the first phase the subjects performed irregular deep breaths and in the second phase the subjects received phenylephrine injection. From the first phase of the experiment, a large pool of predictors describing the local characteristic of beat-to-beat interval tachogram (RR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were extracted in time and frequency domains. A subset of these indices was selected using twelve subjects with an exhaustive search fused with a leave one subject out cross validation procedure. The selected indices were used to predict the p-BRS on the remaining four test subjects. A multivariate regression was used in all prediction steps. The algorithm achieved best prediction accuracy with only two features extracted from the deep breathing data, one from the frequency and the other from the time domain. The normalized L2-norm error was computed as 22.9% and the correlation coefficient was 0.97 (p=0.03). These results suggest that the p-BRS can be estimated from non-pharmacological indices computed from ECG and invasive BP data related to deep breathing.

  8. Association of early systolic blood pressure response to exercise with future cardiovascular events in patients with uncomplicated mild-to-moderate hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Soo; Jang, Sun-Joo; Lee, Chang Hoon; Park, Chong-Hun

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between blood pressure (BP) response during exercise and future cardiovascular events remains unclear. We assessed the association between an increase in early systolic BP (SBP) during exercise tests and future cardiovascular events in patients with sustained hypertension (sHT). Between 2002 and 2005, we enrolled 300 patients newly diagnosed with mild-to-moderate sHT without complications from the Asan Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring registry. All the patients successfully performed treadmill tests, achieving target heart rate according to the Naughton/Balke protocol. The patients were divided into quartiles according to their SBP at 8 min (7.4 metabolic equivalent tasks). The primary outcome was the composite of all-cause death, new-onset ischemic heart disease and stroke. The 5-year survival rates did not differ significantly among quartiles 1-4 (100% vs. 96.6% vs. 94.4% vs. 98.3%, P=0.211). Relative to quartile 1, the 5-year event-free survival rates were significantly lower in patients in quartiles 3 (86.9% vs. 98.3%, P=0.023) and 4 (88.2% vs. 98.3%, P=0.023). After multivariable adjustment for covariates, the risk for the composite end point was higher for patients in quartiles 3 (Hazard ratio (HR) 4.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-17.13, P=0.020) and 4 (HR 3.65, 95% CI 0.92-14.50, P=0.065) than in quartiles 1 and 2. Cardiovascular risk was significantly higher in patients with stage 4 SBP (>180 mm Hg) even after adjustment (HR 4.00, 95% CI 1.19-13.44, P=0.025). Increased submaximal SBP response to exercise may be a predictor of future cardiovascular events in patients with mild-to-moderate sHT.

  9. Brain metabolism and blood flow during aging.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, B

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies of cerebral metabolism have suggested that although cerebral blood flow is reduced during rest in the healthy aged brain, there is little or no decline in resting glucose consumption. Intercorrelations between resting regional cerebral rates for glucose (rCMRglc), as determined by positron emission tomography using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose, were shown to provide a measure of the functional associativity of brain regions. Partial correlation coefficients, controlling for whole brain glucose metabolism, were used in the analysis. Dividing the brain into 59 regions, we found, for 40 healthy males (21-83 years in age) in a state of reduced sensory input, that the strongest correlations generally were between bilaterally symmetric brain regions, and that there were many statistically significant correlations (P less than 0.01) among frontal and parietal lobe regions and also among temporal and occipital lobe areas, but few significant correlations between these two domains. The correlation analysis then was applied to two groups (15 healthy males each) of young (20-32 years old) and elderly (64-83 years old) subjects in the same resting state. Compared with the young group, we found that the elderly subjects have fewer statistically significant (P less than 0.01) correlations, with the most noteworthy reductions being between parietal and frontal lobe regions, and among parietal lobe areas. These findings indicated that cerebral functional interactions were reduced in the healthy elderly. The same analysis, applied to 21 mainly mildly-to-moderately impaired presumed Alzheimer subjects (and 21 age-matched controls), revealed fewer significant correlations between homologous brain regions which correspond to metabolic asymmetries linked to neuropsychological deficiencies.

  10. Effect of an L- and T-Type Calcium Channel Blocker on 24-Hour Systolic Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Takeshi; Ebado, Mio; Takeyama, Youichi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an L- and T-type calcium channel blocker (CCB) on 24-hour systolic blood pressure (24-hour SBP) and heart rate (24-hour HR) profiles in essential hypertensive patients. Subjects and Methods Thirty-seven consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. The 24-hour SBP and HR were recorded before and after treatment with efonidipine (L- and T-type CCB, 40 mg), after waking. Changes in 24-hour SBP and HR and the diurnal to nocturnal SBP ratio were measured. The best-fit curves of changes in SBP and HR were depicted using a periodic function. Results The mean 24-hour SBP and HR decreased significantly after treatment. The diurnal to nocturnal SBP ratio in dipper-type hypertension cases decreased from 16.7±6.1% to 8.3±9.8% (p<0.05), whereas in non-dipper hypertension cases, it increased from 2.3±2.9% to 7.7±5.1% (p<0.01). The antihypertensive effect was minimal at 5.0 hours after drug administration and it slowly recovered at a constant rate (2.1 mm Hg/h) over 12 hours in dipper cases. The median 24-hour changes in HR in the dipper and non-dipper cases were -2.3/min and -5.4/min, respectively. A continuous reduction in the change in HR was seen from 3.5 to 23 hours after drug administration. Conclusion The antihypertensive action of efonidipine was characterized by a slow recovery of the SBP decrease at a constant rate (2.1 mm Hg/h) and a non-administration time dependent reduction in 24-hour HR. PMID:22563335

  11. Reductions in systolic blood pressure with liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes: Insights from a patient-level pooled analysis of six randomized clinical trials☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Vivian A.; DeVries, J. Hans; Henry, Robert R.; Donsmark, Morten; Thomsen, Henrik F.; Plutzky, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Aims To quantify the effect of liraglutide on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and pulse in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and assess the influence of covariates on observed SBP reductions. Methods A patient-level pooled analysis of six phase 3, randomized trials was conducted. Results The analysis included 2792 randomized patients. In the intention-to-treat population (n = 2783), mean [±SE] SBP reductions from baseline with liraglutide 1.2 mg (2.7 [0.8] mmHg) and 1.8 mg (2.9 [0.7] mmHg) once daily were significantly greater than with placebo (0.5 [0.9] mmHg; P = 0.0029 and P = 0.0004, respectively) after 26 weeks, and were evident after 2 weeks. Liraglutide was also associated with significantly greater SBP reductions than glimepiride and, at a dose of 1.8 mg, insulin glargine and rosiglitazone. SBP reductions with liraglutide weakly correlated with weight loss (Pearson’s correlation coefficient: 0.08–0.12; P ≤ 0.0148). No dependence of these reductions on concomitant antihypertensive medications was detected (P = 0.1304). Liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg were associated with mean increases in pulse of 3 beats per minute (bpm), versus a 1 bpm increase with placebo (P < 0.0001 for each dose versus placebo). Conclusions Liraglutide reduces SBP in patients with T2D, including those receiving concomitant antihypertensive medication. PMID:24561125

  12. An Empirical Comparison of Joint and Stratified Frameworks for Studying G × E Interactions: Systolic Blood Pressure and Smoking in the CHARGE Gene-Lifestyle Interactions Working Group.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yun Ju; Winkler, Thomas W; Manning, Alisa K; Aschard, Hugues; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Smith, Albert V; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brown, Michael R; Morrison, Alanna C; Fornage, Myriam; Lin, Li-An; Richard, Melissa; Bartz, Traci M; Psaty, Bruce M; Hayward, Caroline; Polasek, Ozren; Marten, Jonathan; Rudan, Igor; Feitosa, Mary F; Kraja, Aldi T; Province, Michael A; Deng, Xuan; Fisher, Virginia A; Zhou, Yanhua; Bielak, Lawrence F; Smith, Jennifer; Huffman, Jennifer E; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Smith, Blair H; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Bouchard, Claude; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rice, Treva K; Arnett, Donna; Schwander, Karen; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Rotter, Jerome I; Alfred, Tamuno; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Amin, Najaf; Franco, Oscar H; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vojinovic, Dina; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Kardia, Sharon; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Rice, Kenneth; Borecki, Ingrid B; Rao, Dabeeru C; Gauderman, W James; Cupples, L Adrienne

    2016-07-01

    Studying gene-environment (G × E) interactions is important, as they extend our knowledge of the genetic architecture of complex traits and may help to identify novel variants not detected via analysis of main effects alone. The main statistical framework for studying G × E interactions uses a single regression model that includes both the genetic main and G × E interaction effects (the "joint" framework). The alternative "stratified" framework combines results from genetic main-effect analyses carried out separately within the exposed and unexposed groups. Although there have been several investigations using theory and simulation, an empirical comparison of the two frameworks is lacking. Here, we compare the two frameworks using results from genome-wide association studies of systolic blood pressure for 3.2 million low frequency and 6.5 million common variants across 20 cohorts of European ancestry, comprising 79,731 individuals. Our cohorts have sample sizes ranging from 456 to 22,983 and include both family-based and population-based samples. In cohort-specific analyses, the two frameworks provided similar inference for population-based cohorts. The agreement was reduced for family-based cohorts. In meta-analyses, agreement between the two frameworks was less than that observed in cohort-specific analyses, despite the increased sample size. In meta-analyses, agreement depended on (1) the minor allele frequency, (2) inclusion of family-based cohorts in meta-analysis, and (3) filtering scheme. The stratified framework appears to approximate the joint framework well only for common variants in population-based cohorts. We conclude that the joint framework is the preferred approach and should be used to control false positives when dealing with low-frequency variants and/or family-based cohorts.

  13. Influence of the observer's level of experience on systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure measurements using Doppler ultrasonography in healthy conscious cats.

    PubMed

    Gouni, Vassiliki; Tissier, Renaud; Misbach, Charlotte; Balouka, David; Bueno, Hanna; Pouchelon, Jean-Louis; Lefebvre, Hervé P; Chetboul, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of the observer's level of experience on within- and between-day variability, and the percentage of successful systolic (SAP) and diastolic arterial blood pressure (DAP) measurements obtained by Doppler ultrasonography (DU) in awake cats. For this purpose, six healthy conscious cats were used and four observers with different levels of training performed 144 SAP and DAP measurements on 4 days using DU. Measurements were recorded five consecutive times, and mean values were used for statistical analysis. Only the two most skilled observers - a PhD student in cardiology and a Dipl ECVIM-CA (cardiology) - had within- and between-day coefficients of variation (CVs) for SAP ⩽16% (13-16%). Conversely, the two less experienced observers - a fifth-year student and an assistant - had high between-day CVs (61% and 73%). For DAP, only the most experienced observer (Dipl ECVIM-CA) succeeded in 100% of the attempts, with within- and between-day CVs of 11% and 4%, respectively. Conversely, DAP could not be measured by the other three observers in 8%, 19% and 56% of attempts (from the highest to the lowest level of experience); therefore, the corresponding CV values could not be calculated. In conclusion, SAP may be assessed using DU in healthy awake cats with good repeatability and reproducibility by a well-trained observer. Measurement of DAP is more difficult than of SAP, and needs a longer training period, which represents one of the limitations of DU in cats.

  14. The cessation of the long-term exposure to low doses of mercury ameliorates the increase in systolic blood pressure and vascular damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Rizzetti, Danize Aparecida; Torres, João Guilherme Dini; Escobar, Alyne Goulart; da Silva, Taiz Martins; Moraes, Paola Zambelli; Hernanz, Raquel; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Castro, Marta Miguel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, Maria Jesús; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2017-02-18

    This study aimed to verify whether a prolonged exposure to low-level mercury promotes haemodynamic disorders and studied the reversibility of this vascular damage. Rats were divided into seven groups: three control groups received saline solution (im) for 30, 60 or 90 days; two groups received HgCl2 (im, first dose, 4.6μg/kg, subsequent doses 0.07μg/kg/day) for 30 or 60 days; two groups received HgCl2 for 30 or 60 days (im, same doses) followed by a 30-day washout period. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured, along with analysis of vascular response to acetylcholine (ACh) and phenylephrine (Phe) in the absence and presence of endothelium, a nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, superoxide dismutase, a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor and an AT1 receptor blocker. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant power were measured in plasma. HgCl2 exposure for 30 and 60 days: a) reduced the endothelium-dependent relaxation; b) increased the Phe-induced contraction and the contribution of ROS, COX-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids and angiotensin II acting on AT1 receptors to this response while the NO participation was reduced; c) increased the oxidative stress in plasma; d) increased the SBP only after 60 days of exposure. After the cessation of HgCl2 exposure, SBP, endothelium-dependent relaxation, Phe-induced contraction and the oxidative stress were normalised, despite the persistence of the increased COX-derived prostanoids. These results demonstrated that long-term HgCl2 exposure increases SBP as a consequence of vascular dysfunction; however, after HgCl2 removal from the environment the vascular function ameliorates.

  15. A pilot study on the effects of magnesium supplementation with high and low habitual dietary magnesium intake on resting and recovery from aerobic and resistance exercise and systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kass, Lindsy S; Skinner, Philip; Poeira, Filipe

    2013-01-01

    The effects of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) have been studied for over 25 years and results have been inconsistent. Blood pressure reductions in randomized studies have varied from 12 mmHg reductions to no reduction. The objective of this pilot intervention was to investigate the effect of magnesium supplementation on systolic blood pressure whilst resting and during recovery from aerobic and resistance exercise and on performance. A further objective was to see whether the effect of a high vs low habitual dietary magnesium intake affected these results. Sixteen male volunteers were randomly assigned to either a 300 mg·d(-1) magnesium oxide supplementation (MO) or a control group (CG) for 14 days. Resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured before subjects performed a maximal 30 minute cycle, immediately followed by three x 5 second isometric bench press, both at baseline and after the intervention. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded immediately post exercise and after five minutes recovery. A 3 day food diary was recorded for all subjects to measure dietary magnesium intake. At the end of the intervention, the supplemented group, had a reduction in mean resting systolic BP by 8.9 mmHg (115.125 ± 9.46 mmHg, p = 0.01) and post exercise by 13 mmHg (122.625 ± 9. 88 mmHg, p = 0.01). Recovery BP was 11.9 mmHg lower in the intervention group compared to control (p = 0.006) and HR decreased by 7 beats per minute in the experimental group (69.0 ± 11.6 bpm, p = 0. 02). Performance indicators did not change within and between the groups. Habitual dietary magnesium intake affected both resting and post exercise systolic BP and the subsequent effect of the magnesium supplementation. These results have an implication in a health setting and for health and exercise but not performance. Key pointsMagnesium supplementation will have an effect on resting and recovery systolic blood pressure with aerobic exercise

  16. Nonlinear relations of blood pressure to cognitive function: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Waldstein, Shari R; Giggey, Paul P; Thayer, Julian F; Zonderman, Alan B

    2005-03-01

    This investigation examined cross-sectional and longitudinal relations, both linear and nonlinear, of blood pressure (BP) and its interaction with demographic and lifestyle variables to a broad spectrum of cognitive functions. Eight hundred forty-seven participants (503 men and 344 women) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging completed tests of verbal and nonverbal memory, attention, perceptuo-motor speed, executive functions, and confrontation naming, and clinical assessment of BP on 1 to 7 occasions over 11 years. Mixed-effects regression models, adjusted for age, education, gender, alcohol consumption, smoking status, depression scores, and use of antihypertensive medications, revealed nonlinear relations of systolic BP with longitudinal change on tests of nonverbal memory and confrontation naming; cognitive decline was apparent among older (80 years) individuals with higher systolic BP. Cross-sectional findings, across testing sessions, indicated moderated U- and J-shaped relations between BP and cognitive function. Both high and low diastolic BP were associated with poorer performance on tests of executive function and confrontation naming among less-educated persons; with tests of perceptuo-motor speed and confrontation naming among nonmedicated (antihypertensives) individuals; and with executive function among older individuals. Cross-sectional linear relations included higher systolic BP and poorer nonverbal memory in nondrinkers, and higher diastolic BP and poorer working memory among less-educated individuals. Results indicate that cross-sectional and longitudinal relations of BP to cognitive function are predominantly nonlinear and moderated by age, education, and antihypertensive medications. Careful monitoring and treatment of both high and low BP levels may be critical to the preservation of cognitive function.

  17. Effect of Caffeine on near Maximal Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure Recovery in Physically-Active, College-Aged Females

    PubMed Central

    CONNAHAN, LAURA E.; OTT, CHRISTOPHER A.; BARRY, VAUGHN W.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how caffeine affects exercise blood pressure (BP) and active and passive recovery BP after vigorous intensity exercise in physically active college-aged females. Fifteen physically active, ACSM stratified low-risk females (age (y): 23.53 ± 4.07, weight (kg): 60.34 ± 3.67, height (cm): 165.14 ± 7.20, BMI (kg/m2): 22.18 ± 1.55) participated in two Bruce protocol exercise tests. Before each test participants consumed 1) a placebo or 2) 3.3 mg·kg−1 of caffeine at least one hour before exercise in a counterbalanced double-blinded fashion. After reaching 85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, BP was taken and participants began an active (i.e. walking) recovery phase for 6 minutes followed by a passive (i.e. sitting) recovery phase. BP was assessed every two minutes in each phase. Recovery times were assessed until active and passive BP equaled 20 mmHg and 10 mmHg above resting, respectively. Participants completed each test 1–2 weeks a part. Maximal systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not significantly different between the two trials. Active recovery, passive recovery, and total recovery times were all significantly longer during the caffeine trial than the placebo trial. Furthermore, the time to reach age-predicted maximum heart rate was significantly shorter in the placebo trial than the caffeine trial. While caffeine consumption did not significantly affect maximal blood pressure, it did affect active and passive recovery time following vigorous intensity exercise in physically active females. Exercise endurance also improved after consuming caffeine in this population. PMID:28344739

  18. Effect of Caffeine on near Maximal Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure Recovery in Physically-Active, College-Aged Females.

    PubMed

    Connahan, Laura E; Ott, Christopher A; Barry, Vaughn W

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine how caffeine affects exercise blood pressure (BP) and active and passive recovery BP after vigorous intensity exercise in physically active college-aged females. Fifteen physically active, ACSM stratified low-risk females (age (y): 23.53 ± 4.07, weight (kg): 60.34 ± 3.67, height (cm): 165.14 ± 7.20, BMI (kg/m(2)): 22.18 ± 1.55) participated in two Bruce protocol exercise tests. Before each test participants consumed 1) a placebo or 2) 3.3 mg·kg(-1) of caffeine at least one hour before exercise in a counterbalanced double-blinded fashion. After reaching 85% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, BP was taken and participants began an active (i.e. walking) recovery phase for 6 minutes followed by a passive (i.e. sitting) recovery phase. BP was assessed every two minutes in each phase. Recovery times were assessed until active and passive BP equaled 20 mmHg and 10 mmHg above resting, respectively. Participants completed each test 1-2 weeks a part. Maximal systolic and diastolic blood pressures were not significantly different between the two trials. Active recovery, passive recovery, and total recovery times were all significantly longer during the caffeine trial than the placebo trial. Furthermore, the time to reach age-predicted maximum heart rate was significantly shorter in the placebo trial than the caffeine trial. While caffeine consumption did not significantly affect maximal blood pressure, it did affect active and passive recovery time following vigorous intensity exercise in physically active females. Exercise endurance also improved after consuming caffeine in this population.

  19. Assessing Sex Differences in the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality per Increment in Systolic Blood Pressure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Follow-Up Studies in the United States

    PubMed Central

    George, Nysia I.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Hicks, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    In the United States (US), cardiovascular (CV) disease accounts for nearly 20% of national health care expenses. Since costs are expected to increase with the aging population, informative research is necessary to address the growing burden of CV disease and sex-related differences in diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. Hypertension is a major risk factor for CV disease and mortality. To evaluate whether there are sex-related differences in the effect of systolic blood pressure (SBP) on the risk of CV disease and mortality, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. We conducted a comprehensive search using PubMed and Google Scholar to identify US-based studies published prior to 31 December, 2015. We identified eight publications for CV disease risk, which provided 9 female and 8 male effect size (ES) observations. We also identified twelve publications for CV mortality, which provided 10 female and 18 male ES estimates. Our meta-analysis estimated that the pooled ES for increased risk of CV disease per 10 mmHg increment in SBP was 25% for women (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.18, 1.32) and 15% for men (95% CI: 1.11, 1.19). The pooled increase in CV mortality per 10 mm Hg SBP increment was similar for both women and men (Women: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.23; Men: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.22). After adjusting for age and baseline SBP, the results demonstrated that the risk of CV disease per 10 mm Hg SBP increment for women was 1.1-fold higher than men (P<0.01; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.17). Heterogeneity was moderate but significant. There was no significant sex difference in CV mortality. PMID:28122035

  20. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in a nonacademic setting. Effects of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Khoury, S; Yarows, S A; O'Brien, T K; Sowers, J R

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM) are likely to eliminate the stress of visits and observer bias in office blood pressure (BP) recordings, allow consideration of the circadian variability in BP, and correlate well with target organ damage. To define the prevalence of "white coat" hypertension in a rural community to a nonacademic setting, and to assess age and sex related differences, we studied 131 patients who had more than two prior office diastolic BP measurements greater than 90 mm Hg and less than 115 mm Hg. Blood pressure was measured every 10 to 60 min for 24 h using the SpaceLabs 90207 device. Office BP readings were higher than ABPM in the group as a whole, in individual age groups, and in both sexes. The differences were more pronounced at night. Average differences between office and ambulatory BP ranged between 14.4 +/- 1.7/2.9 +/- 2.0 (ABPM at 10:00), and 33.8 +/- 2.3/22.8 +/- 1.5 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic +/- SE) (ABPM at 01:00). The nighttime drop in systolic BP was not apparent in subjects more than 65 years old. Women had a proportionately higher mean office BP than men (115.0 +/- 0.9 office v 110.2 +/- 1.3 mm Hg ABPM in women and 112.3 +/- 0.9 v 104.3 +/- 1.1 mm Hg in men) (P = .013), and the elderly did not display the relationship between ambulatory and office mean BP seen in younger subjects (r = 0.15, P = .30 v r = 0.36, P = .0004, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Association of Hypothyroidism with Body Mass Index, Systolic Blood Pressure and Proteinuria in Diabetic Patients: Does treated Hypothyroidism with Thyroxine Replacement Therapy Prevent Nephropathy/Chronic Renal Disease?

    PubMed

    Aziz, Kamran M A

    2016-01-01

    Untreated or sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with insulin resistance, obesity, adverse effects on cardiovascular system, hypertension and in turn risk of nephropathy. However, these changes are reversible with thyroxine replacement therapy (TRT). Current research studied 4235 diabetic patients, divided into two groups, those with clinical hypothyroidism /on TRT, compared to those without thyroid disease or undiagnosed. BMI, blood pressure, creatinine, urine microalbumin and spot urine protein levels were compared between these two groups. Study finding demonstrated that for hypothyroid cases, BMI was higher (32.2 ± 7.44 versus 29.4 ± 5.7; p < 0.0001), serum creatinine was on lower levels (0.75 ± 0.27 versus 1.0 ± 0.74; p = 0.001), systolic BP was on lower side (123.7 ± 15.9 versus 128.13 ± 16.8; p= 0.015); spot urine microalbumin was on lower side (52.58 ± 71.65; versus 87.77 ± 140.86; p=0.010) and spot urine protein had lower levels (25.3 ± 38.3 versus 44.28 ± 123.58; p < 0.0001). Current research also demonstrated that Pearson`s x2 and odds/protective odds for hypothyroidism (on TRT) was strongly associated with obesity (p <0.0001; odds ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.47 to 3.56). However, they were protected from HTN (p= 0.272; protective odds ratio 1.28, 95%CI 0.824 to 1.98), nephropathy (p=0.386; protective odds 1.36, 95% CI 0.861 to 2.14) and chronic renal disease (p= 0.112; protective odds 3.42, 95% CI 0.83 to 14.13). In conclusion, TRT itself has protective effects on cardiovascular and renal system. Hence, thyroid screening is essential among diabetics to detect sub clinical or clinical hypothyroidism.

  2. Intraoperative blood loss and gestational age at pregnancy termination.

    PubMed

    Marchiano; Thomas; Lapinski; Balwan; Patel

    1998-07-01

    Objective: To establish the relationship of measured intraoperative blood loss to gestational age at pregnancy termination, and to determine which factors, if any, affect the risk of bleeding.Methods: A single-operator series of 363 consecutive women undergoing pregnancy termination between 5 and 24 weeks gestational age, as dated by ultrasound, was prospectively evaluated. All pregnancies under 13 weeks gestation were terminated by mechanical dilation and suction curettage without preoperative cervical ripening. All pregnancies between 13 and 24 weeks gestation were terminated by preoperative osmotic cervical dilation with laminaria tents and subsequent uterine evacuation by a combination of suction curettage, sharp curettage, and Bierer forceps extraction. All patients over 12 weeks gestation received a postoperative oxytocin infusion. Whenever possible, amniotic fluid and blood were collected and measured separately. Patients were excluded from the data analysis for pregnancy demise, PPROM, Potter's syndrome, or inability to separate blood establish their relationship. After adjustment for gestational age, the results were analyzed to determine if blood loss was related to maternal age, smoking history, body habitus, or operative indication.Results: A curvilinear relationship between blood loss and gestational age was observed. Mean blood loss at 24 weeks exceeded 800 mL. After adjustment for gestational age, no factors significantly affected blood loss at dilation and aspiration of first trimester pregnancies. In those patients undergoing dilation and evacuation in the second trimester, both simple and stepwise regression analyses showed obesity (BMI >/=32.3) to be significantly associated with increased blood loss (P <.05). Neither age, parity, previous cesarean section, nor smoking history were significantly associated with increased blood loss at dilation and evacuation.Conclusions: With advancing gestational age, intraoperative blood loss increases in

  3. Human muscle nerve sympathetic activity at rest. Relationship to blood pressure and age

    PubMed Central

    Sundlöf, G.; Wallin, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    1. Recordings of multi-unit sympathetic activity were made from median or peroneal muscle nerve fascicles in thirty-three healthy subjects, resting in recumbent position. Simultaneous recordings of intra-arterial blood pressure were made in seventeen subjects. The neural activity, quantified by counting the number of pulse synchronous sympathetic bursts in the mean voltage neurogram (burst incidence), was plotted against the arterial blood pressure level and the age of the subjects. The effects of spontaneous temporary blood pressure fluctuations were studied by correlating different pressure parameters of individual heart beats to the probability of occurrence of a sympathetic burst and to the amplitude of the occurring burst. 2. Between different subjects there were marked differences in burst incidence, from less than 10 to more than 90 bursts/100 heart beats. No correlation was found to interindividual differences in the arterial blood pressure level but there was a slight tendency for increasing burst incidence with increasing age. 3. Irrespective of the magnitude of the burst incidence, the bursts always occurred more frequently during spontaneous transient blood pressure reductions than during transient increases in blood pressure. When, for each heart cycle, the occurrence of a sympathetic burst was correlated with different blood pressure parameters there was regularly a close negative correlation to diastolic pressure, a low correlation to systolic and an intermediary negative correlation to mean blood pressure. There was a positive correlation to pulse pressure and to pulse interval. 4. When measured for individual heart beats, not only the occurrence but also the mean voltage amplitude of the sympathetic bursts tended to increase with decreasing diastolic pressure. 5. In a given subject when comparing heart beats with the same diastolic pressure, the occurrence as well as the amplitude of the sympathetic bursts was higher for heart beats occurring

  4. [Arterial blood pressure in persons of elderly, senile age and long-livers of Yakutsk: population screening].

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, O V; Nikitin, Iu P; Neustroeva, V N; Shcherbakova, L V; Gorokhova, Z P

    2013-01-01

    The values of arterial blood pressure according to the Yakutsk population screening at the age of 60 and older have been studied. The average values of systolic arterial pressure (both sexes--148, men--145, women--151 mm Hg) are higher than normal values specified by Society of Cardiology of Russian Federation. Long-living persons show its decrease that is more marked in men. The average values of diastolic arterial pressure (both sexes--87, men--88, women--87 mm Hg) correspond to the category of high normal pressure and are decreasing with age to more extent in men than in women. The average values of pulse pressure in elderly and senile age are higher than normal values (both sexes--61, men--57, women--64 mm Hg) with a tendency to grow by 90 years old. Differences in arterial blood pressure levels are educed in gerontic persons depending on presence of abdominal obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, smoking and family anamnesis with cases of hypertension.

  5. Maternal age in pregnancy and offspring blood pressure in childhood in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC).

    PubMed

    Roberts, R J; Leary, S D; Smith, G Davey; Ness, A R

    2005-11-01

    Associations between maternal age in pregnancy and offspring blood pressure (BP) at age 7(1/2) were investigated in 7623 singletons from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). In models adjusted for age and sex there was an inverse relationship between maternal age and BP in children: beta = -0.06 mmHg per year of maternal age (95% CI -0.10 to -0.01, P = 0.02) for systolic BP and beta = -0.04 (95% CI -0.07 to -0.01, P = 0.02) for diastolic BP. However, this association disappeared after adjustment for confounding factors: beta = -0.02 mmHg per year of maternal age (95% CI -0.07 to 0.04, P = 0.5) for systolic BP and beta = -0.03 (95% CI -0.07 to 0.01, P = 0.2) for diastolic BP. We conclude that there is no evidence of a relationship between maternal age in pregnancy and childhood BP in this contemporary birth cohort.

  6. Blood Epigenetic Age may Predict Cancer Incidence and Mortality.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yinan; Joyce, Brian T; Colicino, Elena; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Dai, Qi; Shrubsole, Martha J; Kibbe, Warren A; Gao, Tao; Zhang, Zhou; Jafari, Nadereh; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Hou, Lifang

    2016-03-01

    Biological measures of aging are important for understanding the health of an aging population, with epigenetics particularly promising. Previous studies found that tumor tissue is epigenetically older than its donors are chronologically. We examined whether blood Δage (the discrepancy between epigenetic and chronological ages) can predict cancer incidence or mortality, thus assessing its potential as a cancer biomarker. In a prospective cohort, Δage and its rate of change over time were calculated in 834 blood leukocyte samples collected from 442 participants free of cancer at blood draw. About 3-5 years before cancer onset or death, Δage was associated with cancer risks in a dose-responsive manner (P = 0.02) and a one-year increase in Δage was associated with cancer incidence (HR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10) and mortality (HR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07-1.28). Participants with smaller Δage and decelerated epigenetic aging over time had the lowest risks of cancer incidence (P = 0.003) and mortality (P = 0.02). Δage was associated with cancer incidence in a 'J-shaped' manner for subjects examined pre-2003, and with cancer mortality in a time-varying manner. We conclude that blood epigenetic age may mirror epigenetic abnormalities related to cancer development, potentially serving as a minimally invasive biomarker for cancer early detection.

  7. An adaptive technique for multiscale approximate entropy (MAEbin) threshold (r) selection: application to heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) under postural stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amritpal; Saini, Barjinder Singh; Singh, Dilbag

    2016-06-01

    Multiscale approximate entropy (MAE) is used to quantify the complexity of a time series as a function of time scale τ. Approximate entropy (ApEn) tolerance threshold selection 'r' is based on either: (1) arbitrary selection in the recommended range (0.1-0.25) times standard deviation of time series (2) or finding maximum ApEn (ApEnmax) i.e., the point where self-matches start to prevail over other matches and choosing the corresponding 'r' (rmax) as threshold (3) or computing rchon by empirically finding the relation between rmax, SD1/SD2 ratio and N using curve fitting, where, SD1 and SD2 are short-term and long-term variability of a time series respectively. None of these methods is gold standard for selection of 'r'. In our previous study [1], an adaptive procedure for selection of 'r' is proposed for approximate entropy (ApEn). In this paper, this is extended to multiple time scales using MAEbin and multiscale cross-MAEbin (XMAEbin). We applied this to simulations i.e. 50 realizations (n = 50) of random number series, fractional Brownian motion (fBm) and MIX (P) [1] series of data length of N = 300 and short term recordings of HRV and SBPV performed under postural stress from supine to standing. MAEbin and XMAEbin analysis was performed on laboratory recorded data of 50 healthy young subjects experiencing postural stress from supine to upright. The study showed that (i) ApEnbin of HRV is more than SBPV in supine position but is lower than SBPV in upright position (ii) ApEnbin of HRV decreases from supine i.e. 1.7324 ± 0.112 (mean ± SD) to upright 1.4916 ± 0.108 due to vagal inhibition (iii) ApEnbin of SBPV increases from supine i.e. 1.5535 ± 0.098 to upright i.e. 1.6241 ± 0.101 due sympathetic activation (iv) individual and cross complexities of RRi and systolic blood pressure (SBP) series depend on time scale under consideration (v) XMAEbin calculated using ApEnmax is correlated with cross-MAE calculated using ApEn (0.1-0.26) in steps of 0

  8. Genetic effect on blood pressure is modulated by age: the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network Study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gang; Gu, Chi C; Kraja, Aldi T; Arnett, Donna K; Myers, Richard H; Pankow, James S; Hunt, Steven C; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage analysis was performed for systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the Hypertension Genetic Epidemiology Network. We investigated the role of gene-age interactions using a recently developed variance components method that incorporates age variation in genetic effects. Substantially improved linkage evidence, in terms of both the number of linkage peaks and their significance levels, was observed. Twenty-six linkage peaks were identified with maximum logarithm of odds scores ranging between 3.0 and 4.6, 15 of which were cross-validated by the literature. The chromosomal region 1p36 that showed the highest logarithm of odds score in our study was found to be supported by evidence from 3 studies. The new method also led to vastly improved validation across ethnic groups. Ten of the 15 supported linkage peaks were cross-validated between 2 different ethnic groups, and 2 peaks on chromosomal region 1q31 and 16p11 were validated in 3 ethnic groups. In conclusion, this investigation demonstrates that genetic effects on blood pressure vary by age. The improved genetic linkage results presented here should help to identify the specific genetic variants that explain the observed results.

  9. Blood DNA methylation age is not associated with cognitive functioning in middle-aged monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Starnawska, A; Tan, Q; Lenart, A; McGue, M; Mors, O; Børglum, A D; Christensen, K; Nyegaard, M; Christiansen, L

    2017-02-01

    The epigenetic clock, also known as DNA methylation age (DNAmAge), represents age-related changes of DNA methylation at multiple sites of the genome and is suggested to be a biomarker for biological age. Elevated blood DNAmAge is associated with all-cause mortality, with the strongest effects reported in a recent intrapair twin study where epigenetically older twins had increased mortality risk in comparison to their co-twins. In the study presented here, we hypothesize that DNAmAge in blood is associated with cross-sectional and longitudinal cognitive abilities in middle-aged individuals. In 486 monozygotic twins, we investigated the association of DNAmAge, difference between DNAmAge and chronological age and age acceleration with cognition. Despite using a powerful paired twin design, we found no evidence for association of blood DNAmAge with cognitive abilities. This observation was confirmed in unpaired analyses, where DNAmAge initially correlated with cognitive abilities, until adjusting for chronological age. Overall, our study shows that for middle-aged individuals DNAmAge calculated in blood does not correlate with cognitive abilities.

  10. Perinatal exposure to PBDEs elevate systolic blood pressure in response to hyperosmotic stimulation in aged adult rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are flame retardants used widely throughout the U S. These chemicals are persistent throughout the environment and accumulate in biota. In previous work, we showed that PBDEs and the structurally similar compounds such as PCBs disrupt the s...

  11. Cognitive Functions and Cognitive Reserve in Relation to Blood Pressure Components in a Population-Based Cohort Aged 53 to 94 Years

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Nunzia; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Palatini, Paolo; Bascelli, Anna; Boschetti, Giovanni; De Lazzari, Fabia; Grasselli, Carla; Martini, Bortolo; Caffi, Sandro; Piccoli, Antonio; Mazza, Alberto; Bisiacchi, Patrizia; Casiglia, Edoardo

    2012-01-01

    In 288 men and women from general population in a cross-sectional survey, all neuropsychological tests were negatively associated with age; memory and executive function were also positively related with education. The hypertensives (HT) were less efficient than the normotensives (NT) in the test of memory with interference at 10 sec (MI-10) (−33%, P = 0.03), clock drawing test (CLOX) (−28%, P < 0.01), and mini-mental state examination (MMSE) (−6%, P = 0.02). Lower MMSE, MI-10, and CLOX were predicted by higher systolic (odds ratio, OR, 0.97, P = 0.02; OR 0.98, P < 0.005; OR 0.95, P < 0.001) and higher pulse blood pressure (BP) (OR 0.97, P = 0.02; OR 0.97, P < 0.01; and 0.95, P < 0.0001). The cognitive reserve index (CRI) was 6% lower in the HT (P = 0.03) and was predicted by higher pulse BP (OR 0.82, P < 0.001). The BP vectors of lower MMSE, MI-10, and CLOX were directed towards higher values of systolic and diastolic BP, that of low CRI towards higher systolic and lower diastolic. The label of hypertension and higher values of systolic or pulse BP are associated to worse memory and executive functions. Higher diastolic BP, although insufficient to impair cognition, strengthens this association. CRI is predicted by higher systolic BP associated to lower diastolic BP. PMID:22548150

  12. Drinking water arsenic exposure and blood pressure in healthy women of reproductive age in Inner Mongolia, China

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Richard K. Mendola, Pauline; Liu Zhiyi; Savitz, David A.; Heiss, Gerardo; Ling Heling; Xia Yajuan; Lobdell, Danelle; Zeng Donglin; Thorp, John M.; Creason, John P.; Mumford, Judy L.

    2007-08-01

    The extremely high exposure levels evaluated in prior investigations relating elevated levels of drinking water arsenic and hypertension prevalence make extrapolation to potential vascular effects at lower exposure levels very difficult. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 8790 women who had recently been pregnant in an area of Inner Mongolia, China known to have a gradient of drinking water arsenic exposure. This study observed increased systolic blood pressure levels with increasing drinking water arsenic, at lower exposure levels than previously reported in the literature. As compared to the referent category (below limit of detection to 20 {mu}g of As/L), the overall population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.29 mm Hg (95% CI 0.82, 1.75), 1.28 mm Hg (95% CI 0.49, 2.07), and 2.22 mm Hg (95% CI 1.46, 2.97) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased from 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L, respectively. Controlling for age and body weight (n = 3260), the population mean systolic blood pressure rose 1.88 mm Hg (95% CI 1.03, 2.73), 3.90 mm Hg (95% CI 2.52, 5.29), and 6.83 mm Hg (95% CI 5.39, 8.27) as drinking water arsenic concentration increased, respectively. For diastolic blood pressure effect, while statistically significant, was not as pronounced as systolic blood pressure. Mean diastolic blood pressure rose 0.78 mm Hg (95% CI 0.39, 1.16), 1.57 mm Hg (95% CI 0.91, 2.22) and 1.32 mm Hg (95% CI 0.70, 1.95), respectively, for the overall population and rose 2.11 mm Hg (95% CI 1.38, 2.84), 2.74 mm Hg (95% CI 1.55, 3.93), and 3.08 mm Hg (95% CI 1.84, 4.31), respectively, for the adjusted population (n = 3260) at drinking water arsenic concentrations of 21 to 50, 51 to 100, and > 100 {mu}g of As/L. If our study results are confirmed in other populations, the potential burden of cardiovascular disease attributable to drinking water arsenic is significant.

  13. Effect of age and Blood Pressure on Surrogate Markers of Atherosclerosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Namrata Bindurao; Ganu, Meghana Ulhas; Godbole, Sanjay Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increased arterial stiffness may be an important path- way linking diabetes mellitus to increased cardiovascular risk. Aim: The study was conducted to assess the surrogate markers of arterial stiffness in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and compare with age-matched hypertensive and healthy controls. Also the effect of age and blood pressure on these markers was evaluated. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was carried out at a tertiary care hospital in West India. Methods: After a detailed medical history and anthropometric evaluation, all the participants were subjected to measurements of Arterial Stiffness Index (ASI), Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV), and Augmentation Index (AIx) using a non-invasive oscillometric method. The four study groups consisted of patients with T2DM (>5 years) along with hypertension, newly diagnosed patients with T2DM (<2years) without hypertension, hypertensive controls, and healthy controls. Results: PWV, ASI, AIx were elevated in patients with T2DM compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Patients with T2DM above 60 years had higher carotid-femoral PWV, ASI and AIx than those below 60 years (p<0.05). ASI and AIx were significantly increased in patients with T2DM with hypertension having systolic BP > 140 mmHg compared to those with systolic BP < 140 mmHg. A very strong correlation between PWV and AIx in patients with T2DM and hypertensive controls was observed. Conclusion: This study reveals that markers of arterial stiffness (PWV, ASI, AIx) were increased significantly in patients with T2DM compared to healthy controls. Age and systolic blood pressure had significant influence on these markers. Thus, oscillometric markers have potential utility in identifying subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with T2DM. PMID:25120969

  14. [The Rheological Properties of Blood Depending on Age and Sex].

    PubMed

    Filatova, O V; Sidorenko, A A; Agarkova, S A

    2015-01-01

    The rheological properties of blood (viscosity, concentration of red blood cells, erythrocyte sedimantation rate, prothrombin index, and fibrinogen and blood lipid concentration) were studied in apparently healthy subjects of both sexes within the age range from 1 to 75 years. We observed an increase in blood viscosity from infancy to adulthood, followed by a decrease in older age in males. A progressive increase in viscosity is observed in females with aging. We determined three age periods during which the viscosity values remain constant: 1) from the period of early infancy to the second childhood (3.6 ± 0.07 mPa s regardless of sex); 2) from adolescence to the second period of adulthood (5.1 ± 0.06 in men; 4.3 ± 0.05 mPa s in women); 3) elderly and senile age (4.7 ± 0.13 in men; 4.4 ± 0.09 mPa s in women). Sex-related differences in the absolute value of blood viscosity (p < 0.001) were discovered in the period of adulthood. Moreover, we observed sex-related differences in the values of determination coefficients of interrelation between viscosity and the level of red blood cells (R(M)2 = 0.41, p < 0.001; R(F)2 = 0.35, p < 0.001), and viscosity and cholesterol level (R(M)2 = 0.47, p < 0.001; R(F)2 = 0.68, p < 0.001) among men and women. The factor analysis showed that blood viscosity correlates with the concentration of red blood cells by 28%; with the level of fibrinogen, by 23%; with the cholesterol concentration, by 20%.

  15. The transcriptional landscape of age in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Peters, Marjolein J; Joehanes, Roby; Pilling, Luke C; Schurmann, Claudia; Conneely, Karen N; Powell, Joseph; Reinmaa, Eva; Sutphin, George L; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Schramm, Katharina; Wilson, Yana A; Kobes, Sayuko; Tukiainen, Taru; Ramos, Yolande F; Göring, Harald H H; Fornage, Myriam; Liu, Yongmei; Gharib, Sina A; Stranger, Barbara E; De Jager, Philip L; Aviv, Abraham; Levy, Daniel; Murabito, Joanne M; Munson, Peter J; Huan, Tianxiao; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rooij, Jeroen; Stolk, Lisette; Broer, Linda; Verbiest, Michael M P J; Jhamai, Mila; Arp, Pascal; Metspalu, Andres; Tserel, Liina; Milani, Lili; Samani, Nilesh J; Peterson, Pärt; Kasela, Silva; Codd, Veryan; Peters, Annette; Ward-Caviness, Cavin K; Herder, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Roden, Michael; Singmann, Paula; Zeilinger, Sonja; Illig, Thomas; Homuth, Georg; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Völzke, Henry; Steil, Leif; Kocher, Thomas; Murray, Anna; Melzer, David; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Bandinelli, Stefania; Moses, Eric K; Kent, Jack W; Curran, Joanne E; Johnson, Matthew P; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Westra, Harm-Jan; McRae, Allan F; Smith, Jennifer A; Kardia, Sharon L R; Hovatta, Iiris; Perola, Markus; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Smith, Alicia K; Mehta, Divya; Binder, Elisabeth B; Nylocks, K Maria; Kennedy, Elizabeth M; Klengel, Torsten; Ding, Jingzhong; Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Brody, Jennifer; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der I; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Slagboom, P Eline; Helmer, Quinta; den Hollander, Wouter; Bean, Shannon; Raj, Towfique; Bakhshi, Noman; Wang, Qiao Ping; Oyston, Lisa J; Psaty, Bruce M; Tracy, Russell P; Montgomery, Grant W; Turner, Stephen T; Blangero, John; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Ressler, Kerry J; Yang, Jian; Franke, Lude; Kettunen, Johannes; Visscher, Peter M; Neely, G Gregory; Korstanje, Ron; Hanson, Robert L; Prokisch, Holger; Ferrucci, Luigi; Esko, Tonu; Teumer, Alexander; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Johnson, Andrew D

    2015-10-22

    Disease incidences increase with age, but the molecular characteristics of ageing that lead to increased disease susceptibility remain inadequately understood. Here we perform a whole-blood gene expression meta-analysis in 14,983 individuals of European ancestry (including replication) and identify 1,497 genes that are differentially expressed with chronological age. The age-associated genes do not harbor more age-associated CpG-methylation sites than other genes, but are instead enriched for the presence of potentially functional CpG-methylation sites in enhancer and insulator regions that associate with both chronological age and gene expression levels. We further used the gene expression profiles to calculate the 'transcriptomic age' of an individual, and show that differences between transcriptomic age and chronological age are associated with biological features linked to ageing, such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels, fasting glucose, and body mass index. The transcriptomic prediction model adds biological relevance and complements existing epigenetic prediction models, and can be used by others to calculate transcriptomic age in external cohorts.

  16. The transcriptional landscape of age in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Marjolein J.; Joehanes, Roby; Pilling, Luke C.; Schurmann, Claudia; Conneely, Karen N.; Powell, Joseph; Reinmaa, Eva; Sutphin, George L.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Schramm, Katharina; Wilson, Yana A.; Kobes, Sayuko; Tukiainen, Taru; Nalls, Michael A.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Cookson, Mark R.; Gibbs, Raphael J.; Hardy, John; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Zonderman, Alan B.; Dillman, Allissa; Traynor, Bryan; Smith, Colin; Longo, Dan L.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Troncoso, Juan; van der Brug, Marcel; Weale, Michael E.; O'Brien, Richard; Johnson, Robert; Walker, Robert; Zielke, Ronald H.; Arepalli, Sampath; Ryten, Mina; Singleton, Andrew B.; Ramos, Yolande F.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Fornage, Myriam; Liu, Yongmei; Gharib, Sina A.; Stranger, Barbara E.; De Jager, Philip L.; Aviv, Abraham; Levy, Daniel; Murabito, Joanne M.; Munson, Peter J.; Huan, Tianxiao; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; van Rooij, Jeroen; Stolk, Lisette; Broer, Linda; Verbiest, Michael M. P. J.; Jhamai, Mila; Arp, Pascal; Metspalu, Andres; Tserel, Liina; Milani, Lili; Samani, Nilesh J.; Peterson, Pärt; Kasela, Silva; Codd, Veryan; Peters, Annette; Ward-Caviness, Cavin K.; Herder, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Roden, Michael; Singmann, Paula; Zeilinger, Sonja; Illig, Thomas; Homuth, Georg; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Völzke, Henry; Steil, Leif; Kocher, Thomas; Murray, Anna; Melzer, David; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Bandinelli, Stefania; Moses, Eric K.; Kent, Jack W.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Westra, Harm-Jan; McRae, Allan F.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Hovatta, Iiris; Perola, Markus; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Henders, Anjali K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Smith, Alicia K.; Mehta, Divya; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Nylocks, K Maria; Kennedy, Elizabeth M.; Klengel, Torsten; Ding, Jingzhong; Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Brody, Jennifer; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Slagboom, P. Eline; Helmer, Quinta; den Hollander, Wouter; Bean, Shannon; Raj, Towfique; Bakhshi, Noman; Wang, Qiao Ping; Oyston, Lisa J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tracy, Russell P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Turner, Stephen T.; Blangero, John; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Ressler, Kerry J.; Yang, Jian; Franke, Lude; Kettunen, Johannes; Visscher, Peter M.; Neely, G. Gregory; Korstanje, Ron; Hanson, Robert L.; Prokisch, Holger; Ferrucci, Luigi; Esko, Tonu; Teumer, Alexander; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Johnson, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Disease incidences increase with age, but the molecular characteristics of ageing that lead to increased disease susceptibility remain inadequately understood. Here we perform a whole-blood gene expression meta-analysis in 14,983 individuals of European ancestry (including replication) and identify 1,497 genes that are differentially expressed with chronological age. The age-associated genes do not harbor more age-associated CpG-methylation sites than other genes, but are instead enriched for the presence of potentially functional CpG-methylation sites in enhancer and insulator regions that associate with both chronological age and gene expression levels. We further used the gene expression profiles to calculate the ‘transcriptomic age' of an individual, and show that differences between transcriptomic age and chronological age are associated with biological features linked to ageing, such as blood pressure, cholesterol levels, fasting glucose, and body mass index. The transcriptomic prediction model adds biological relevance and complements existing epigenetic prediction models, and can be used by others to calculate transcriptomic age in external cohorts. PMID:26490707

  17. Aging: a portrait from gene expression profile in blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Calabria, Elisa; Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Dyar, Kenneth Allen; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Bruseghini, Paolo; Morandi, Carlo; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Schena, Federico; Capelli, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of reliable biomarkers of aging is important not only to monitor the effect of interventions and predict the timing of pathologies associated with aging but also to understand the mechanisms and devise appropriate countermeasures. Blood cells provide an easily available tissue and gene expression profiles from whole blood samples appear to mirror disease states and some aspects of the aging process itself. We report here a microarray analysis of whole blood samples from two cohorts of healthy adult and elderly subjects, aged 43±3 and 68±4 years, respectively, to monitor gene expression changes in the initial phase of the senescence process. A number of significant changes were found in the elderly compared to the adult group, including decreased levels of transcripts coding for components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which correlate with a parallel decline in the maximum rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max), as monitored in the same subjects. In addition, blood cells show age-related changes in the expression of several markers of immunosenescence, inflammation and oxidative stress. These findings support the notion that the immune system has a major role in tissue homeostasis and repair, which appears to be impaired since early stages of the aging process. PMID:27545843

  18. Relationship between dietary sodium, potassium, and calcium, anthropometric indexes, and blood pressure in young and middle aged Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyeon; Lee, Jung-Sug; Kim, Jeongseon

    2010-04-01

    Epidemiological evidence of the effects of dietary sodium, calcium, and potassium, and anthropometric indexes on blood pressure is still inconsistent. To investigate the relationship between dietary factors or anthropometric indexes and hypertension risk, we examined the association of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) with sodium, calcium, and potassium intakes and anthropometric indexes in 19~49-year-olds using data from Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) III. Total of 2,761 young and middle aged adults (574 aged 19~29 years and 2,187 aged 30~49 years) were selected from KNHANES III. General information, nutritional status, and anthropometric data were compared between two age groups (19~29 years old and 30~49 years old). The relevance of blood pressure and risk factors such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), weight, waist circumference, and the intakes of sodium, potassium, and calcium was determined by multiple regression analysis. Multiple regression models showed that waist circumference, weight, and BMI were positively associated with SBP and DBP in both age groups. Sodium and potassium intakes were not associated with either SBP or DBP. Among 30~49-year-olds, calcium was inversely associated with both SBP and DBP (P = 0.012 and 0.010, respectively). Our findings suggest that encouraging calcium consumption and weight control may play an important role in the primary prevention and management of hypertension in early adulthood.

  19. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CIRCADIAN BLOOD PRESSURE VARIATION AND AGE ANALYSED FROM 7-DAY MONITORING

    PubMed Central

    SIEGELOVÁ, J.; DUŠEK, J.; FIŠER, B.; HOMOLKA, P.; VANK, P.; MAŠEK, M.; HAVELKOVÁ, A.; CORNÉLISSEN, G.; HALBERG, F.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between age and circadian blood pressure (BP) variation was the aim of the present study. One hundred and eighty-seven subjects (130 males, 57 females), 20-77 years old, were recruited for seven-day BP monitoring. Colin medical instruments (Komaki, Japan) were used for ambulatory BP monitoring (oscillation method, 30-minute interval between measurements). A sinusoidal curve was fitted (minimum square method) and the mean value and amplitude of the curve (double amplitude corresponds to the night-day difference) were evaluated on every day of monitoring. The average 7-day values of the mean (M) and of double amplitude (2A) for systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were determined in each subject. The mean values of M (±SD) for the whole group were: SBP- 127±8, DBP - 79±6 mmHg, HR - 70±6 bpm; of 2A: SBP - 21±7, DBP - 15±5 mmHg, HR - 15±6 bpm. A linear relationship between M of SBP and age (r=0.341, p< 0.001) and DBP and age (r=0.384, p<0.001) was found (difference between 20 and 77 years: SBP - 16, DBP - 12 mmHg). 2A of SBP and DBP was increasing with age up to 35 years, then the curve remained relatively flat up to 55 years (maximum at 45 years), and then it decreased again (difference between 45 and 77 years: SBP - 13mmHg, DBP - 12 mmHg). Heart rate M and 2A were age-independent. The mean values of SBP and DBP were increasing with age up to 75 years, but the night-day difference of SBP and DBP reached its maximum value at 45 years and then decreased. PMID:19436777

  20. Ethnic Differences in Physical Fitness, Blood Pressure and Blood Chemistry in Women (AGES 20-63)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G. W.; Wier, L. T.; Jackson, A. S.; Stuteville, J. E.; Keptra, Sean (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the role of ethnicity on the aerobic fitness, blood pressure, and selected blood chemistry values of women. One hundred twenty-four females (mean age 41.37 +/- 9.0) were medically Examined at the NASA/Johnson Space Center occupational health clinic. Ethnic groups consisted of 23 Black (B), 18 Hispanic (H) and 83 Non-minority (NM). Each woman had a maximum Bruce treadmill stress test (RER greater than or = 1.1) and a negative ECG. Indirect calorimetry, skinfolds, self-report physical activity (NASA activity scale), seated blood pressure, and blood chemistry panel determined VO2max, percent fat, level of physical activity, blood pressure and blood chemistry values. ANOVA revealed that the groups did not differ (p greater than 0.05) in age, VO2 max, weight, percent fat, level of physical activity, total cholesterol, or HDL-C. However, significant differences (p greater than 0.05) were noted in BMI, diastolic blood pressure, and blood chemistries. BMI was 3.17 higher in H than in NM; resting diastolic pressures were 5.69 and 8.05 mmHg. lower in NM and H than in B; triglycerides were 48.07 and 37.21 mg/dl higher in H than in B and NM; hemoglobin was .814 gm/dl higher in NM than B; fasting blood sugar was 15.41 mg/dl higher in H than NM; The results of this study showed that ethnic groups differed in blood pressure and blood chemistry values but not aerobic fitness or physical activity. There was an ethnic difference in BMI but not percent fat.

  1. Differences in the association between high blood pressure and cognitive functioning among the general Japanese population aged 70 and 80 years: The SONIC study.

    PubMed

    Ryuno, Hirochika; Kamide, Kei; Gondo, Yasuyuki; Nakama, Chikako; Oguro, Ryosuke; Kabayama, Mai; Kawai, Tatsuo; Kusunoki, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Serina; Imaizumi, Yuki; Takeya, Miyuki; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Takeda, Masao; Takami, Yoichi; Itoh, Norihisa; Yamamoto, Koichi; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Ikebe, Kazunori; Inagaki, Hiroki; Masui, Yukie; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Takayama, Michiyo; Arai, Yasumichi; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure in middle age (up to 64 years) has been proposed as a predictive indicator of dementia. However, the association between hypertension and the cognitive functioning is controversial in older age groups. The aim of this study was to investigate this association in 70-80-year-old participants in the Japanese study of Septuagenarians, Octogenarians and Nonagenarians Investigation with Centenarians (SONIC). Participants aged 70 (±1) and 80 (±1) years (n=1000 and 973, respectively) were randomly recruited from the general population in Japan. Cognitive functioning was measured by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Blood pressure and other medical and social variables were analyzed by multiple regression analyses. High systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly correlated with a reduced cognitive functioning only in participants aged 70 years. Additionally, this correlation became more marked in participants with uncontrolled blood pressure at age 70 years. In contrast, SBP was not significantly correlated with the cognitive functioning at age 80 years. Nutritional status indicators such as serum albumin and frequency of going outdoors were significantly associated with cognitive functioning at age 80 years. Our findings indicate that high SBP has a significant role in cognitive functioning at age 70 years; however, blood pressure is less important as a risk factor for cognitive decline at age 80 years.

  2. Effects of age and blood pressure on the retinal arterial wall, analyzed using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Arichika, Shigeta; Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Muraoka, Yuki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2015-07-20

    The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) of the vasculature is a promising early marker of retinal microvascular changes. Recently, adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) enabled direct and noninvasive visualization of the arterial wall. Using AOSLO, we analyzed the correlation between age and WLR in 51 normal subjects. In addition, correlations between blood pressure and WLR were analyzed in 73 subjects (51 normal subjects and 22 hypertensive patients). WLR showed a strong correlation with age (r = 0.68, P < 0.0001), while outer diameter and inner diameter did not show significant correlation with age in the normal group (r = 0.13, P = 0.36 and r = -0.12, P =  .41, respectively). In the normal and hypertensive groups, WLR showed a strong correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.60, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.65, P < 0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, AOSLO provided noninvasive and reproducible arterial measurements. WLR is an early marker of morphological changes in the retinal arteries due to age and blood pressure.

  3. Socioeconomic Position, But Not African Genomic Ancestry, Is Associated With Blood Pressure in the Bambui-Epigen (Brazil) Cohort Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    Lima-Costa, M Fernanda; Mambrini, Juliana Vaz de Mello; Leite, Maria Lea Corrêa; Peixoto, Sérgio Viana; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de; Gouveia, Mateus H; Leal, Thiago P; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Macinko, James; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    The study objective is to examine the role of African genome origin on baseline and 11-year blood pressure trajectories in community-based ethnoracially admixed older adults in Brazil. Data come from 1272 participants (aged ≥60 years) of the Bambui cohort study of aging during 11 years of follow-up. Outcome measures were systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and hypertension control. Potential confounding variables were demographic characteristics, socioeconomic position (schooling and household income), and health indicators (smoking, sedentary lifestyle, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, waist circumference, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases), including antihypertensive drug use. We used 370 539 single-nucleotide polymorphisms to estimate each individual's African, European, and Native American trihybrid ancestry proportions. Median African, European, and Native American ancestry were 9.6%, 84.0%, and 5.3%, respectively. Among those with African ancestry, 59.4% came from East and 40.6% from West Africa. Baseline systolic and diastolic blood pressure, controlled hypertension, and their respective trajectories, were not significantly (P>0.05) associated with level (in quintiles) of African genomic ancestry. Similar results were found for West and East African subcontinental origins. Lower schooling level (<4 years versus higher) showed a significant and positive association with systolic blood pressure (Adjusted β=2.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.85-4.99). Lower monthly household income per capita (blood pressure and hypertension control.

  4. Motivating Factors and Potential Deterrents to Blood Donation in High School Aged Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Phan-Tang, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background. To ensure an adequate supply of blood, collection centers must design campaigns that successfully recruit and maintain an active donor pool. Understanding factors that motivate and deter individuals from donating may help centers develop targeted recruitment campaigns. These factors among high school aged blood donors have not yet been fully investigated. Study Design and Methods. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to student donors at high school mobile blood drives. The survey instrument asked the students to rate several potential motivating factors in their importance in the decision to donate blood and several potential deterring factors in their future decision whether or not to donate blood again. The survey also asked the students to rate the desirability of several potential incentives. Results. Motivating factors that reflected prosocial, empathetic, and altruistic thoughts and beliefs were rated highly by students. Pain from phlebotomy was most commonly chosen as potential deterrent. Movie tickets and cookies/snacks at the drive were rated as the most attractive incentives. Conclusion. High school aged blood donors are similar to other donor groups in their expressed motives for donating blood. This group may be unique in the factors that deter them from donating and in their preferences for different incentives. PMID:27293985

  5. Distribution of blood pressure & correlates of hypertension in school children aged 5-14 years from North east India

    PubMed Central

    Borah, Prasanta Kr.; Devi, Utpala; Biswas, Dipankar; Kalita, Hem Ch.; Sharma, Meenakshi; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Elevated blood pressure (BP) in the young predicts serious cardiovascular events in the adults. High prevalence of adult hypertension reported from Assam, North East (NE) India may be linked with elevated blood pressure in the childhood. The present study was an attempt to describe the distribution of BP and correlates of hypertension in children aged 5-14 yr. Methods: A total of 10,003 school children from 99 schools of Dibrugarh district, Assam, NE India, were surveyed by stratified random cluster method. Blood pressure, demographic and anthropometric information were recorded. Blood pressure was categorized in to normal, prehypertension, stage I and stage II hypertension. Results: Girls had significantly higher (104.2 ± 12.0 vs. 103.2 ± 11.6 mm Hg, P<0.001) mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) than boys. Both SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) revealed significant correlation with age, height, weight and BMI in overall and in gender specific analysis. Hypertension was found in 7.6 per cent school children (Boys: 7.3%, Girls: 7.8%). In multivariable analysis older age (OR 3.3, 95% CI: 2.82-3.91), children from tea garden community (OR 1.3, 95% CI: 1.08-1.55) and other community (OR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.18-1.73) and overweight (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.1) were independently associated with hypertension. Interpretation & conclusions: Mean blood pressure in the young school children of 5-14 yr was high. A programme comprising screening, early detection and health promotion through school health programmes may help prevent future complications of hypertension. PMID:26458345

  6. Bone mass loss is associated with systolic blood pressure in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes in Tibet: a retrospective cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Song, J; Yang, S; Meng, S; Lv, X; Yue, J; Mina, A; Puchi, B; Geng, Y; Yang, L

    2017-02-02

    We conducted an observational cross-section study to investigate the status of bone mineral mass of Tibetan postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes and the possible predictors for osteoporosis. We found that prevalence of osteoporosis was 27.0% and blood pressure was an independent risk factor for bone mass loss.

  7. Clock genes explain large proportion of phenotypic variance in systolic blood pressure and this control is not modified by environmental temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Diurnal variation in blood pressure (BP) is regulated, in part, by an endogenous circadian clock; however, few human studies have identified associations between clock genes and BP. Accounting for environmental temperature may be necessary to correct for seasonal bias. METHODS: We examin...

  8. Blood Cell Mitochondrial DNA Content and Premature Ovarian Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca; Arosio, M.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Biondi, M.; Bione, S.; Bruni, V.; Brigante, C.; Cannavo`, S.; Cavallo, L.; Cisternino, M.; Colombo, I.; Corbetta, S.; Crosignani, P.G.; D'Avanzo, M.G.; Dalpra, L.; Danesino, C.; Di Battista, E.; Di Prospero, F.; Donti, E.; Einaudi, S.; Falorni, A.; Foresta, C.; Fusi, F.; Garofalo, N.; Giotti, I.; Lanzi, R.; Larizza, D.; Locatelli, N.; Loli, P.; Madaschi, S.; Maghnie, M.; Maiore, S.; Mantero, F.; Marozzi, A.; Marzotti, S.; Migone, N.; Nappi, R.; Palli, D.; Patricelli, M.G.; Pisani, C.; Prontera, P.; Petraglia, F.; Radetti, G.; Renieri, A.; Ricca, I.; Ripamonti, A.; Rossetti, R.; Russo, G.; Russo, S.; Tonacchera, M.; Toniolo, D.; Torricelli, F.; Vegetti, W.; Villa, N.; Vineis, P.; Wasniewsk, M.; Zuffardi, O.

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  9. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Marco; Somigliana, Edgardo; Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  10. Hemodynamic Correlates of Blood Pressure Across the Adult Age Spectrum: Noninvasive Evaluation in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gary F.; Wang, Na; Palmisano, Joseph N.; Larson, Martin G.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.; Levy, Daniel; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure are substantially higher in older adults. The relative contributions of increased forward versus reflected pressure wave amplitude or earlier arrival of the reflected wave to elevated pulse pressure remain controversial. Methods and Results We measured proximal aortic pressure and flow, forward pressure wave amplitude, global wave reflection, reflected wave timing and pulse wave velocity noninvasively in 6417 (age range, 19 to 90 years; 53% women) Framingham Heart Study Third Generation and Offspring participants. Variation in forward wave amplitude paralleled pulse pressure throughout adulthood. In contrast, wave reflection and pulse pressure were divergent across adulthood: in younger participants, pulse pressure was lower and wave reflection higher with advancing age whereas in older participants, pulse pressure was higher and wave reflection lower with age. Reflected wave timing differed modestly across age groups despite considerable differences in pulse wave velocity. Forward wave amplitude explained 80% (central) and 66% (peripheral) of the variance in pulse pressure in younger participants (<50 years) and 90% and 84% in the older participants (≥50 years, all P<0.0001). In a stepwise model that evaluated age-pulse pressure relations in the full sample, the late accelerated increases in central and peripheral pulse pressure were markedly attenuated when variation in forward wave amplitude was considered. Conclusions Higher pulse pressure at any age and higher pulse pressure with advancing age is predominantly associated with a larger forward pressure wave. The influence of wave reflection on age-related differences in pulse pressure was minor. PMID:20855656

  11. Blood pressure, arterial function, structure, and aging: the role of hormonal replacement therapy in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Scuteri, Angelo; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of natural menopause may indicate that a woman is entering a period of increased risk for cardiovascular disease, due to both chronologic aging and lower levels of estrogen. This brief review aims to demonstrate the relevance of changes in blood pressure and large artery structure and function occurring after menopause. These changes, i.e., thickening and stiffening of large arteries (which, in turn would also result in increased systolic and pulse pressures), were found to predict subsequent cardiovascular events, independently of other known cardiovascular risk. The benefits of early hormone replacement therapy on the life expectancy of women have dramatically lost consensus since publication of the Womens Health Initiative study results. However, the authors believe that those results should increase the attention paid by clinicians and public health researchers to the individualization of hormone replacement therapy prescription for postmenopausal women, and to a better characterization of those vascular parameters and profiles identifying postmenopausal women who are most likely to benefit from specific hormone replacement therapy in terms of cardiovascular protection.

  12. What is a Systolic Algorithm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sailesh K.; Kollath, T.

    1986-07-01

    In this paper, we show that every systolic array executes a Regular Iterative Algorithm with a strongly separating hyperplane and conversely, that every such algorithm can be implemented on a systolic array. This characterization provides us with an unified framework for describing the contributions of other authors. It also exposes the relevance of many fundamental concepts that were introduced in the sixties by Hennie, Waite and Karp, Miller and Winograd, to the present day concern of systolic array

  13. Neurobehavioral Deficits and Increased Blood Pressure in School-Age Children Prenatally Exposed to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Raul; Julvez, Jordi; Murata, Katsuyuki; Barr, Dana; Bellinger, David C.; Debes, Frodi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background The long-term neurotoxicity risks caused by prenatal exposures to pesticides are unclear, but a previous pilot study of Ecuadorian school children suggested that blood pressure and visuospatial processing may be vulnerable. Objectives In northern Ecuador, where floriculture is intensive and relies on female employment, we carried out an intensive cross-sectional study to assess children’s neurobehavioral functions at 6–8 years of age. Methods We examined all 87 children attending two grades in the local public school with an expanded battery of neurobehavioral tests. Information on pesticide exposure during the index pregnancy was obtained from maternal interview. The children’s current pesticide exposure was assessed from the urinary excretion of organophosphate metabolites and erythrocyte acetylcholine esterase activity. Results Of 84 eligible participants, 35 were exposed to pesticides during pregnancy via maternal occupational exposure, and 23 had indirect exposure from paternal work. Twenty-two children had detectable current exposure irrespective of their prenatal exposure status. Only children with prenatal exposure from maternal greenhouse work showed consistent deficits after covariate adjustment, which included stunting and socioeconomic variables. Exposure-related deficits were the strongest for motor speed (Finger Tapping Task), motor coordination (Santa Ana Form Board), visuospatial performance (Stanford-Binet Copying Test), and visual memory (Stanford-Binet Copying Recall Test). These associations corresponded to a developmental delay of 1.5–2 years. Prenatal pesticide exposure was also significantly associated with an average increase of 3.6 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and a slight decrease in body mass index of 1.1 kg/m2. Inclusion of the pilot data strengthened these results. Conclusions These findings support the notion that prenatal exposure to pesticides—at levels not producing adverse health outcomes in the mother

  14. Prevalence of high blood pressure and association with obesity in Spanish schoolchildren aged 4–6 years old

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Espinosa, Noelia; Díez-Fernández, Ana; Sánchez-López, Mairena; Rivero-Merino, Irene; Lucas-De La Cruz, Lidia; Solera-Martínez, Montserrat; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of high blood pressure in children is increasing worldwide, largely, but not entirely, driven by the concurrent childhood obesity epidemic. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension in 4-to-6-year-old Spanish schoolchildren, and to evaluate the association between different blood pressure (BP) components with different adiposity indicators. Methods Cross-sectional study including a sample of 1.604 schoolchildren aged 4-to-6-years belonging to 21 schools from the provinces of Ciudad Real and Cuenca, Spain. We measured height, weight, body mass index (BMI), fat mass percentage (%FM), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), waist circumference (WC), systolic and diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure. Results The estimates of prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension were 12.3% and 18.2%, respectively. In both sexes, adiposity indicators were positively and significantly associated with all BP components (p<0.001), thus schoolchildren in the higher adiposity categories had significantly higher BP levels (p<0.001). Conclusions Our results show a high prevalence of high blood pressure in Spanish children. Moreover, high levels of adiposity are associated with high blood pressure in early childhood, which support that it could be related to cardiovascular risk later in life. PMID:28141860

  15. Aortic distensibility is reduced during intense lower body negative pressure and is related to low frequency power of systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron A; Bredin, Shannon S D; Cote, Anita T; Drury, C Taylor; Warburton, Darren E R

    2013-03-01

    As sympathetic activity approximately doubles during intense lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of -60 mmHg or greater, we examined the relationship between surrogate markers of sympathetic activation and central arterial distensibility during severe LBNP. Eight participants were exposed to progressive 8-min stages of LBNP of increasing intensity (-20, -40, -60, and -80 mmHg), while recording carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cPWV), stroke volume (SV), heart rate, and beat-by-beat blood pressure. The spectral power of low frequency oscillations in SBP (SBP(LF)) was used as a surrogate indicator of sympathetically modulated vasomotor modulation. Total arterial compliance (C) was calculated as C = SV/pulse pressure. Both cPWV and C were compared between baseline, 50 % of the maximally tolerated LBNP stage (LBNP(50)), and the maximum fully tolerated stage of LBNP (LBNP(max)). No change in mean arterial pressure (MAP) occurred over LBNP. An increase in cPWV (6.5 ± 2.2; 7.2 ± 1.4; 9.0 ± 2.5 m/s; P = 0.004) occurred during LBNP(max). Over progressive LBNP, SBP(LF) increased (8.5 ± 4.6; 9.3 ± 5.8; 16.1 ± 12.9 mmHg(2); P = 0.04) and C decreased significantly (18.3 ± 6.8; 14.3 ± 4.1; 11.6 ± 4.8 ml/mmHg × 10; P = 0.03). The mean correlation (r) between cPWV and SBP(LF) was 0.9 ± 0.03 (95 % CI 0.79-0.99). Severe LBNP increased central stiffness and reduced total arterial compliance. It appears that increased sympathetic vasomotor tone during LBNP is associated with reduced aortic distensibility in the absence of changes in MAP.

  16. Genome-Wide Linkage Screen for Systolic Blood Pressure in the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES) of Mexican-Americans and Confirmation of a Major Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 6q14.1

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Sobha; Coletta, Dawn K.; Schneider, Jennifer; Hu, Shirley L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Arya, Rector; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Hypertension or high blood pressure is a strong correlate of diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. We conducted a genome-wide linkage screen to identify susceptibility genes influencing systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Mexican-Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Methods Using data from 1,089 individuals distributed across 266 families, we performed a multipoint linkage analysis to localize susceptibility loci for SBP and DBP by applying two models. In model 1, we added a sensible constant to the observed BP values in treated subjects [Tobin et al.; Stat Med 2005;24:2911–2935] to account for antihypertensive use (i.e. 15 and 10 mm Hg to SBP and DBP values, respectively). In model 2, we fixed values of 140 mm Hg for SBP and 90 mm Hg for DBP, if the treated values were less than the standard referenced treatment thresholds of 140/90 mm Hg for hypertensive status. However, if the observed treated BP values were found to be above these standard treatment thresholds, the actual observed treated BP values were retained in order not to reduce them by substitution of the treatment threshold values. Results The multipoint linkage analysis revealed strong linkage signals for SBP compared with DBP. The strongest evidence for linkage of SBP (model 1, LOD = 5.0; model 2, LOD = 3.6) was found on chromosome 6q14.1 near the marker D6S1031 (89 cM) in both models. In addition, some evidence for SBP linkage occurred on chromosomes 1q, 4p, and 16p. Most importantly, our major SBP linkage finding on chromosome 6q near marker D6S1031 was independently confirmed in a Caucasian population (LOD = 3.3). In summary, our study found evidence for a major locus on chromosome 6q influencing SBP levels in Mexican-Americans. PMID:21293138

  17. Relation of left ventricular mass at age 23 to 35 years to global left ventricular systolic function 20 years later (from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study).

    PubMed

    Kishi, Satoru; Armstrong, Anderson C; Gidding, Samuel S; Jacobs, David R; Sidney, Stephen; Lewis, Cora E; Schreiner, Pamela J; Liu, Kiang; Lima, João A C

    2014-01-15

    Left ventricular (LV) mass and the LV ejection fraction (LVEF) are major independent predictors of future cardiovascular disease. The association of LV mass with the future LVEF in younger populations has not been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation of LV mass index (LVMI) at ages 23 to 35 years to LV function after 20 years of follow-up in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. CARDIA is a longitudinal study that enrolled young adults in 1985 and 1986. In this study, participants with echocardiographic examinations at years 5 and 25 were included. LVMI and the LVEF were assessed using M-mode echocardiography at year 5 and using M-mode and 2-dimensional imaging at year 25. Statistical analytic models assessed the correlation between LVMI and LV functional parameters cross-sectionally and longitudinally. A total of 2,339 participants were included. The mean LVEF at year 25 was 62%. Although there was no cross-sectional correlation between LVMI and the LVEF at year 5, there was a small but statistically significant negative correlation between LVMI at year 5 and the LVEF 20 years later (r = -0.10, p <0.0001); this inverse association persisted for LVMI in the multivariate model. High LVMI was an independent predictor of systolic dysfunction (LVEF <50%) 20 years later (odds ratio 1.46, p = 0.0018). In conclusion, LVMI in young adulthood in association with chronic risk exposure affects systolic function in middle age; the antecedents of heart failure may occur at younger ages than previously thought.

  18. Calibration of the normal cutoff values of systolic dyssynchrony of the left ventricular synchronicity in normal subjects using real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography and the effects of age and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun-Yan; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Jun; Tang, Li; Yip, Gabriel; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2014-05-01

    The normal data of left ventricular (LV) synchronicity by real-time 3-dimensional echocardiography (RT3DE) are lacking. We assessed the normal range/cutoff values of LV dyssynchrony parameters by RT3DE. For this purpose, RT3DE was performed in 130 healthy subjects, aged 53 ± 12 years. Time to the point of minimal regional systolic volume (Tmsv) was measured from time-volume curves in each segment. Standard deviation (SD) and maximal difference (Dif) of Tmsv were calculated from 16 (6 basal/6 mid/4 apical), 12 (6 basal/6 mid), and 6 (basal) LV segments together with the corresponding parameters adjusted by R-R interval. The data show non-significant difference between Tmsv-16-SD (9.24 ± 3.54 ms) and Tmsv-12-SD (8.80 ± 3.82 ms); with a correlation between two by both unadjusted (ms; r = 0.87) and adjusted (%R-R; r = 0.84) methods (P < 0.001). Heart rate correlated negatively with Tmsv (r = -0.13 to -0.34, P < 0.05-0.001) but had no effect on parameters adjusted for %R-R. Age and gender did not affect any of these parameters. Inter-observer variability was 3.3-4.6 % for 16, 4.8-9.1 % for 12, and 14.4-19.7 % for 6 segments. Thus, RT3DE is a reliable technique for detecting LV systolic dyssynchrony whereas the heart rate, but not age and gender, affects Tmsv parameters. Dyssynchrony parameters by 16 or 12 segments are superior to 6 segments in yielding comprehensive information and lower variability.

  19. A systolic array parallelizing compiler

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, P.S. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a completely new approach to the problem of systolic array parallelizing compiler. It describes the AL parallelizing compiler for the Warp systolic array, the first working systolic array parallelizing compiler which can generate efficient parallel code for complete LINPACK routines. This book begins by analyzing the architectural strength of the Warp systolic array. It proposes a model for mapping programs onto the machine and introduces the notion of data relations for optimizing the program mapping. Also presented are successful applications of the AL compiler in matrix computation and image processing. A complete listing of the source program and compiler-generated parallel code are given to clarify the overall picture of the compiler. The book concludes that systolic array parallelizing compiler can produce efficient parallel code, almost identical to what the user would have written by hand.

  20. Influence of age and hypertension treatment-time on ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Crespo, Juan J; Mojón, Artemio; Chayán, Luisa; Fontao, María J; Fernández, José R

    2013-03-01

    Some studies based on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) have reported a reduction in sleep-time relative BP decline towards a more non-dipping pattern in the elderly, but rarely have past studies included a proper comparison with younger subjects, and no previous report has evaluated the potential role of hypertension treatment time on nighttime BP regulation in the elderly. Accordingly, we evaluated the influence of age and time-of-day of hypertension treatment on the circadian BP pattern assessed by 48-h ABPM. This cross-sectional study involved 6147 hypertensive patients (3108 men/3039 women), 54.0 ± 13.7 (mean ± SD) yrs of age, with 2137 (978 men/1159 women) being ≥60 yrs of age. At the time of study, 1809 patients were newly diagnosed and untreated, and 4338 were treated with hypertension medications. Among the later, 2641 ingested all their prescribed BP-lowering medications upon awakening, whereas 1697 ingested the full daily dose of ≥1 hypertension medications at bedtime. Diagnosis of hypertension in untreated patients was based on ABPM criteria, specifically an awake systolic (SBP)/diastolic (DBP) BP mean ≥135/85 mm Hg and/or an asleep SBP/DBP mean ≥120/70 mm Hg. Collectively, older in comparison with younger patients were more likely to have diagnoses of microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome, anemia, and/or obesity. In addition, the group of older vs. younger patients had higher glucose, creatinine, uric acid, triglycerides, and fibrinogen, but lower cholesterol, hemoglobin, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. In older compared with younger patients, ambulatory SBP was significantly higher and DBP significantly lower (p < .001), mainly during the hours of nighttime sleep and initial hours after morning awakening. The prevalence of non-dipping was significantly higher in older than younger patients (63.1% vs. 41.1%; p < .001). The largest difference between

  1. The benefits of intensive lipid lowering in patients with stable coronary heart disease with normal or high systolic blood pressure: an analysis of the Treating to New Targets (TNT) study.

    PubMed

    Kostis, John B; Breazna, Andrei; Deedwania, Prakash C; LaRosa, John C

    2008-05-01

    This post-hoc analysis of the Treating to New Targets (TNT) study evaluated the joint effects of managing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) on cardiovascular outcomes. Patients (N=9739) with clinically evident, stable coronary heart disease (CHD) were randomized to atorvastatin 10 or 80 mg/d. The primary end point was occurrence of a first major cardiovascular event. At 3 months' follow-up, patients were stratified according to SBP (< 140 mm Hg vs > or = 140 mm Hg) and tertiles of LDL-C. At 4.9 years' median follow-up, the rate of major cardiovascular events was reduced most in patients with lower LDL-C (P < .001) and in patients with SBP < 140 mm Hg (P = .014). A 42% relative risk reduction was observed for patients in the lowest LDL-C tertile with an SBP < 140 mm Hg, compared with patients in the highest LDL-C tertile with an SBP > or = 140 mm Hg. The effect of lower SBP on stroke was most pronounced in the lowest LDL-C tertile.

  2. Relationship between blood pressure and cerebral blood flow during supine cycling: influence of aging.

    PubMed

    Smirl, Jonathan D; Hoffman, Keegan; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Hansen, Alex; Ainslie, Philip N

    2016-03-01

    The cerebral pressure-flow relationship can be quantified as a high-pass filter, where slow oscillations are buffered (<0.20 Hz) and faster oscillations are passed through relatively unimpeded. During moderate intensity exercise, previous studies have reported paradoxical transfer function analysis (TFA) findings (altered phase or intact gain). This study aimed to determine whether these previous findings accurately represent this relationship. Both younger (20-30 yr; n = 10) and older (62-72 yr; n = 9) adults were examined. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, large oscillations in blood pressure (via oscillatory lower body negative pressure; OLBNP) were induced during steady-state moderate intensity supine exercise (∼45-50% of heart rate reserve). Beat-to-beat blood pressure, cerebral blood velocity, and end-tidal Pco2 were monitored. Very low frequency (0.02-0.07 Hz) and low frequency (0.07-0.20 Hz) range spontaneous data were quantified. Driven OLBNP point estimates were sampled at 0.05 and 0.10 Hz. The OLBNP maneuvers augmented coherence to >0.97 at 0.05 Hz and >0.98 at 0.10 Hz in both age groups. The OLBNP protocol conclusively revealed the cerebrovascular system functions as a high-pass filter during exercise throughout aging. It was also discovered that the older adults had elevations (+71%) in normalized gain (+0.46 ± 0.36%/%: 0.05 Hz) and reductions (-34%) in phase (-0.24 ± 0.22 radian: 0.10 Hz). There were also age-related phase differences between resting and exercise conditions. It is speculated that these age-related changes in the TFA metrics are mediated by alterations in vasoactive factors, sympathetic tone, or the mechanical buffering of the compliance vessels.

  3. [Atrial filling fraction predicts left ventricular systolic function after myocardial infarction: pre-discharge echocardiographic evaluation].

    PubMed

    Galderisi, M; Fakher, A; Petrocelli, A; Alfieri, A; Garofalo, M; de Divitiis, O

    1995-10-01

    Aim of the study was to examine the relation between Doppler-derived indices of left ventricular diastolic and systolic function early after myocardial infarction. Fifty-three patients (31 males, 22 females) recovering from acute myocardial infarction underwent predischarge Doppler echocardiographic examination. Patients with age > 70 years, previous myocardial infarction, more than mild mitral and aortic regurgitation, mitral and aortic stenosis were excluded. Twenty-two healthy subjects (13 males; 9 females) free of coronary risk factors were selected as the control group. Both end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes and ejection fraction were measured by two-dimensional echocardiography. Pulsed Doppler was used to evaluate mitral inflow and left ventricular outflow velocity patterns. The following indices were measured: peak velocity of early (E) and late (A) flows, ratio of E/A peak velocities, ratio of early to late time velocity integrals, atrial filling fraction (time velocity integral A / time velocity integral of flow during total diastole) and deceleration time of E wave for mitral inflow; peak and time-velocity integral for left ventricular outflow. Stroke volume and cardiac output were obtained by pulsed Doppler using the left ventricular outflow method. The two groups were comparable for age, with blood pressure (p < 0.05) and heart rate (p < 0.01) reduced in myocardial infarction patients. Both end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were significantly higher (both p < 0.0001) and ejection fraction (p < 0.0001) lower after myocardial infarction. Also stroke volume and cardiac output (both p < 0.0001) were reduced in myocardial infarction patients. No significant difference in Doppler indices of diastolic function was observed between the two groups, except for shortened deceleration time (p < 0.0001) in myocardial infarction patients. Multilinear regression analyses were performed separately into the two groups to identify determinants of left

  4. Evaluation and correlation of stress scores with blood pressure, endogenous cortisol levels, and homocysteine levels in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy and comparison with age-matched controls

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Abhishek; Garg, Monika; Dixit, Nikhil; Godara, Rohini

    2016-01-01

    Context: Stress had been associated with the development of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). The study was designed to evaluate the effect of stress on other risk factors of CSC such as serum cortisol levels, serum homocysteine levels, and blood pressure (BP) in CSC patients. Aims: To compare stress scores, serum cortisol and serum homocysteine levels, and BP of CSC patients with that of control population and to correlate stress scores of CSC patients with BP, serum cortisol levels, and serum homocysteine levels. Materials and Methods: Stress scores, serum morning and evening cortisol levels, serum homocysteine levels, systolic and diastolic BP of 54 CSC patients were measured and compared with that of 54 age- and sex-related controls using Student's t-test. Stress scores of CSC patients were correlated with systolic and diastolic BP, serum morning and evening cortisol levels and serum homocysteine levels and Pearson correlation coefficient (r) were calculated. Results: Stress scores, serum homocysteine levels, serum morning and evening cortisol levels, and systolic and diastolic BP were all elevated in CSC patients as compared with age- and sex-related controls (P < 0.05). Stress scores of CSC patients were found to correlate strongly with serum homocysteine levels, serum morning and evening cortisol levels, and systolic and diastolic BP, with r values 0.82, 0.8, 0.8, 0.8, and 0.81, respectively (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Stress scores were elevated in CSC patients and were strongly correlated with serum homocysteine and cortisol levels and BP. PMID:27958201

  5. "Long-term callisthenic exercise-related changes in blood lipids, homocysteine, nitric oxide levels and body composition in middle-aged healthy sedentary women".

    PubMed

    Guzel, Nevin Atalay; Pınar, Lamia; Colakoglu, Filiz; Karacan, Selma; Ozer, Cigdem

    2012-06-30

    "Regular physical exercise plays an important role in reducing obesity, preventing hyperglycemia, lowering blood lipids and reducing systemic blood pressure. But the question about the nature of the relationship between homocysteine, nitric oxide and physical activity remains unanswered. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of callisthenic exercises on plasma lipids, homocysteine (Hcy), total nitric oxide (NOx) and body composition in middle-aged healthy sedentary women. Forty-two middle-aged women (ages: 28-49; mean: 41.40 ± 7.3 years) were asked to perform a callisthenic exercise 50 min per session, 3 times per week for 12 weeks in a sports hall. Before and after the exercise, plasma lipids (total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein and triglyceride), Hcy and NO were determined. Body composition, including body mass index, fat percentage, fat free mass, resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rates were measured. After a 12-week callisthenic exercise program, plasma NOx and Hcy levels were found to be significantly increased (P < 0.05). Body composition parameters, lipid profile, resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate significantly decreased (P < 0.05). Aerobic callisthenic exercises characterized by 50 min/day and 3 days/week resulted in positive changes in important health parameters like reducing obesity, lowering blood lipids and increasing plasma NOx. Cardiovascular improvements might be dependent on the increase of NOx values. But callisthenic exercise in such intensity did not lower the plasma Hcy level. Moreover, Hcy level increased significantly. The result shows that if the Hcy is in the normal levels in healthy subjects, long-term callisthenic exercise do not decrease the Hcy levels despite some beneficial effects on health. On the contrary, the Hcy levels are increased by long-term callisthenic exercises."

  6. High blood pressure in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Helena; Antonio, Natália; Rodrigues, Dina; Da Silva, Marinho; Pêgo, Mariano; Providência, Luís Augusto

    2010-03-01

    The definition of hypertension (HT) in the pediatric age group is based on the normal distribution of blood pressure (BP) in healthy children. Normal BP is defined as being below the 90th percentile for gender, age and height, and hypertension as equal to or higher than the 95th percentile on at least three separate occasions. If the values are above the 90th percentile but below the 95th percentile, the child should be considered prehypertensive. Ambulatory BP monitoring is useful in the assessment of BP levels in the young. P values in children and adolescents have creased in the last decade, in parallel with increases in body mass index, and HT now has a prevalence of 2-5%. Obesity in childhood and adolescence is one of the main predictors of HT in adulthood, but it is also associated with other cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia, abnormal glucose metabolism, insulin resistance, inflammation and impaired vascular function. Left ventricular hypertrophy is the most prominent evidence of target organ damage caused by hypertension in children and adolescents. The goal for antihypertensive treatment is to reduce BP below the 95th percentile. Weight control, with regular physical activity and dietary changes, is the primary therapy for obesity-related hypertension. Weight loss decreases not only BP but also other cardiovascular risk factors. The indications for use of antihypertensive drugs are: symptomatic hypertension, secondary hypertension, established hypertensive target organ damage, stage 2 hypertension and failure of nonpharmacologic measures.

  7. Dynamically Reconfigurable Systolic Array Accelorators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasu, Aravind (Inventor); Barnes, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A polymorphic systolic array framework that works in conjunction with an embedded microprocessor on an FPGA, that allows for dynamic and complimentary scaling of acceleration levels of two algorithms active concurrently on the FPGA. Use is made of systolic arrays and hardware-software co-design to obtain an efficient multi-application acceleration system. The flexible and simple framework allows hosting of a broader range of algorithms and extendable to more complex applications in the area of aerospace embedded systems.

  8. Blood pressure categories and long-term risk of cardiovascular disease according to age group in Japanese men and women.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, Akira; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Miura, Katsuyuki; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Nagasawa, Shin-Ya; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2012-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) categories defined by systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) are commonly used. However, the BP category-specific risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has not been thoroughly investigated in different age groups. The aim of this study was to assess long-term CVD risk and its impact according to BP categories and age group. Pooling individual data from 10 cohorts, we studied 67 309 Japanese individuals (40-89 years old) who were free of CVD at baseline: we categorized them as belonging to three age groups: 'middle-aged' (40-64 years), 'elderly' (65-74 years) and 'very elderly' (75-89 years). BP was classified according to the 2009 Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines. Cox models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios for CVD deaths. We observed 1944 CVD deaths over a mean follow-up of 10.2 years. In all age groups, the overall relationship between BP category and CVD risk was positive, with a greater strength observed for younger age groups. We observed a trend of increased risk from SBP/DBP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg in the very elderly, and a significant increase from SBP/DBP ≥ 120/80 mm Hg in the other age groups. The population attributable fractions (PAFs) of CVD death in reference to the SBP/DBP<120/80 mm Hg category ranged from 23.4% in the very elderly to 60.3% in the middle-aged. We found an overall graded increase in CVD risk with higher BP category in the very elderly. The PAFs suggest that keeping BP levels low is an important strategy for primary CVD prevention, even in an elderly population.

  9. Longitudinal trajectories of arterial stiffness and the role of blood pressure: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging.

    PubMed

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Strait, James B; Morrell, Chris H; Canepa, Marco; Wright, Jeanette; Elango, Palchamy; Scuteri, Angelo; Najjar, Samer S; Ferrucci, Luigi; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-11-01

    Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), a marker of arterial stiffness, is an established independent cardiovascular risk factor. Little information is available on the pattern and determinants of the longitudinal change in PWV with aging. Such information is crucial to elucidating mechanisms underlying arterial stiffness and the design of interventions to retard it. Between 1988 and 2013, we collected 2 to 9 serial measures of PWV in 354 men and 423 women of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, who were 21 to 94 years of age and free of clinically significant cardiovascular disease. Rates of PWV increase accelerated with advancing age in men more than women, leading to sex differences in PWV after the age of 50 years. In both sexes, not only systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140 mm Hg but also SBP of 120 to 139 mm Hg was associated with steeper rates of PWV increase compared with SBP<120 mm Hg. Furthermore, there was a dose-dependent effect of SBP in men with marked acceleration in PWV rate of increase with age at SBP ≥140 mm Hg compared with SBP of 120 to 139 mm Hg. Except for waist circumference in women, no other traditional cardiovascular risk factors predicted longitudinal PWV increase. In conclusion, the steeper longitudinal increase of PWV in men than women led to the sex difference that expanded with advancing age. Age and SBP are the main longitudinal determinants of PWV, and the effect of SBP on PWV trajectories exists even in the prehypertensive range.

  10. Red Blood Cell Volume, Plasma Volume and Total Blood Volume in Healthy Elderly Men and Women Aged 64 to 100

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    had an adeguate oxygen supply to the tissues. The deficiency in red blood cell volume in our elderly subjects was consistent with an adaptive and... ELDERLY MEN AND WOMEN AGED 64 TO 100 BY C.R. VALERI, L.E. PIVACEK, H. SIEBENS, and M.D. ALTSCHULE NAVAL BLOOD RESEARCH LABORATORY BOSTON...TITLE (and Submit) RED BLOOD CELL VOLUME, PLASMA VOLUME AND TOTAL BLOOD VOLUME IN HEALTHY ELDERLY MEN AND WOMEN AGED 64 TO 100 7. AUTHORf»J C

  11. Blood markers of fatty acids and vitamin D, cardiovascular measures, body mass index, and physical activity relate to longitudinal cortical thinning in normal aging.

    PubMed

    Walhovd, Kristine B; Storsve, Andreas B; Westlye, Lars T; Drevon, Christian A; Fjell, Anders M

    2014-05-01

    We hypothesized that higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin D, and physical activity relate to cortical sparing, whereas higher levels of cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index (BMI) relate to increased atrophy in the adult lifespan. Longitudinal measures of cortical thickness were derived from magnetic resonance imaging scans acquired (mean interval 3.6 years) from 203 healthy persons aged 23-87 years. At follow-up, measures of BMI, blood pressure, and physical activity were obtained. Blood levels of docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, vitamin D, and cholesterol were measured in a subsample (n = 92). Effects were tested in cortical surface-based analyses, with sex, age, follow-up interval, and the interactions between each included as covariates. Higher levels of docosahexaenoic acid, vitamin D, and physical activity related to cortical sparing. Higher cholesterol and BMI related to increased cortical thinning. Effects were independent, did not interact with age, and the cholesterol effect was restricted to males. Eicosapentaenoic acid and blood pressure showed no effects. The observed effects show promise for potential factors to reduce cortical atrophy in normal aging.

  12. Systoles in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sara; Grácio, Clara; Ramos, Carlos Correia

    2013-01-01

    The fruitful relationship between Geometry and Graph Theory has been explored by several authors benefiting also the Theory of discrete dynamical systems seen as Markov chains in graphs. In this work we will further explore the relation between these areas, giving a geometrical interpretation of notions from dynamical systems. In particular, we relate the topological entropy with the systole, here defined in the context of discrete dynamical systems. We show that for continuous interval maps the systole is trivial; however, for the class of interval maps with one discontinuity point the systole acquires relevance from the point of view of the dynamical behavior. Moreover, we define the geodesic length spectrum associated to a Markov interval map and we compute the referred spectrum in several examples.

  13. Dynamically Reconfigurable Systolic Array Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasu, Aravind; Barnes, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A polymorphic systolic array framework has been developed that works in conjunction with an embedded microprocessor on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA), which allows for dynamic and complimentary scaling of acceleration levels of two algorithms active concurrently on the FPGA. Use is made of systolic arrays and a hardware-software co-design to obtain an efficient multi-application acceleration system. The flexible and simple framework allows hosting of a broader range of algorithms, and is extendable to more complex applications in the area of aerospace embedded systems. FPGA chips can be responsive to realtime demands for changing applications needs, but only if the electronic fabric can respond fast enough. This systolic array framework allows for rapid partial and dynamic reconfiguration of the chip in response to the real-time needs of scalability, and adaptability of executables.

  14. Cyclooxygenase inhibition augments central blood pressure and aortic wave reflection in aging humans.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jill N; Casey, Darren P; Hines, Casey N; Nicholson, Wayne T; Joyner, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    The augmentation index and central blood pressure increase with normal aging. Recently, cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors, commonly used for the treatment of pain, have been associated with transient increases in the risk of cardiovascular events. We examined the effects of the COX inhibitor indomethacin (Indo) on central arterial hemodynamics and wave reflection characteristics in young and old healthy adults. High-fidelity radial arterial pressure waveforms were measured noninvasively by applanation tonometry before (control) and after Indo treatment in young (25 ± 5 yr, 7 men and 6 women) and old (64 ± 6 yr, 5 men and 6 women) subjects. Aortic systolic (control: 115 ± 3 mmHg vs. Indo: 125 ± 5 mmHg, P < 0.05) and diastolic (control: 74 ± 2 mmHg vs. Indo: 79 ± 3 mmHg, P < 0.05) pressures were elevated after Indo treatment in older subjects, whereas only diastolic pressure was elevated in young subjects (control: 71 ± 2 mmHg vs. Indo: 76 ± 1 mmHg, P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure increased in both young and old adults after Indo treatment (P < 0.05). The aortic augmentation index and augmented pressure were elevated after Indo treatment in older subjects (control: 30 ± 5% vs. Indo 36 ± 6% and control 12 ± 1 mmHg vs. Indo: 18 ± 2 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.05), whereas pulse pressure amplification decreased (change: 8 ± 3%, P < 0.05). In addition, older subjects had a 61 ± 11% increase in wasted left ventricular energy after Indo treatment (P < 0.05). In contrast, young subjects showed no significant changes in any of the variables of interest. Taken together, these results demonstrate that COX inhibition with Indo unfavorably increases central wave reflection and augments aortic pressure in old but not young subjects. Our results suggest that aging individuals have a limited ability to compensate for the acute hemodynamic changes caused by systemic COX inhibition.

  15. Effects of Sacubitril/Valsartan Versus Olmesartan on Central Hemodynamics in the Elderly With Systolic Hypertension: The PARAMETER Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryan; Cockcroft, John R; Kario, Kazuomi; Zappe, Dion H; Brunel, Patrick C; Wang, Qian; Guo, Weinong

    2017-03-01

    Effective treatment of systolic hypertension in elderly patients remains a major therapeutic challenge. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized controlled trial with sacubitril/valsartan (LCZ696), a first-in-class angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, was conducted to determine its effects versus olmesartan (angiotensin receptor blocker) on central aortic pressures, in elderly patients (aged ≥60 years) with systolic hypertension and pulse pressure >60 mm Hg, indicative of arterial stiffness. Patients (n=454; mean age, 67.7 years; mean seated systolic blood pressure, 158.6 mm Hg; mean seated pulse pressure, 69.7 mm Hg) were randomized to receive once-daily sacubitril/valsartan 200 mg or olmesartan 20 mg, force titrated to double the initial doses after 4 weeks, before primary assessment at 12 weeks. The study extended double-blind treatment for 12 to 52 weeks, during which amlodipine (2.5-5 mg) and subsequently hydrochlorothiazide (6.25-25 mg) were added-on for patients not achieving blood pressure target (<140/90). At week 12, sacubitril/valsartan reduced central aortic systolic pressure (primary assessment) greater than olmesartan by -3.7 mm Hg (P=0.010), further corroborated by secondary assessments at week 12 (central aortic pulse pressure, -2.4 mm Hg, P<0.012; mean 24-hour ambulatory brachial systolic blood pressure and central aortic systolic pressure, -4.1 mm Hg and -3.6 mm Hg, respectively, both P<0.001). Differences in 24-hour ambulatory pressures were pronounced during sleep. After 52 weeks, blood pressure parameters were similar between treatments (P<0.002); however, more patients required add-on antihypertensive therapy with olmesartan (47%) versus sacubitril/valsartan (32%; P<0.002). Both treatments were equally well tolerated. The PARAMETER study (Prospective Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor Neprilysin Inhibitor With Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Measuring Arterial Stiffness in the Elderly), for the first time, demonstrated

  16. Increased epigenetic age and granulocyte counts in the blood of Parkinson's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Steve; Ritz, Beate R.

    2015-01-01

    It has been a long standing hypothesis that blood tissue of PD Parkinson's disease (PD) patients may exhibit signs of accelerated aging. Here we use DNA methylation based biomarkers of aging (“epigenetic clock”) to assess the aging rate of blood in two ethnically distinct case-control data sets. Using n=508 Caucasian and n=84 Hispanic blood samples, we assess a) the intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration of blood (IEAA), which is independent of blood cell counts, and b) the extrinsic epigenetic age acceleration rate of blood (EEAA) which is associated with age dependent changes in blood cell counts. Blood of PD subjects exhibits increased age acceleration according to both IEAA (p=0.019) and EEAA (p=6.1×10−3). We find striking differences in imputed blood cell counts between PD cases and controls. Compared to control subjects, PD subjects contains more granulocytes (p=1.0×10−9 in Caucasians, p=0.00066 in Hispanics) but fewer T helper cells (p=1.4×10−6 in Caucasians, p=0.0024 in Hispanics) and fewer B cells (p=1.6×10−5 in Caucasians, p=4.5×10−5 in Hispanics). Overall, this study shows that the epigenetic age of the immune system is significantly increased in PD patients and that granulocytes play a significant role. PMID:26655927

  17. Distribution of body composition index and the relationship with blood pressure among children aged 7 to 12 years in Shandong, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Xiu; Wang, Shu-Rong

    2012-11-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is widely used to assess the prevalence of childhood obesity in populations, and the relationship of BMI with blood pressure has been observed. However, no study has reported on the distribution of body composition index and the relationship with blood pressure. The present study examined the distribution of body composition index and the relationship with blood pressure among children aged 7 to 12 years in Shandong, China. A total of 4326 students (2165 boys and 2161 girls) aged 7 to 12 years participated in this study. Height, weight, skinfold thickness, and blood pressure of all the subjects were measured. Body fat percentage (BF%) was calculated by regression equation, and fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) were calculated according to following expressions: FMI = BF% × weight/height(2) and FFMI = (weight - BF% × weight)/height(2). The 50th percentile values of FMI and FFMI increased with age in both sexes. The mean values of FFMI were significantly higher in boys than in girls (P < .01), but no statistically significant differences in mean FMI between the 2 sexes were observed (P > .05). Both systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were significantly positively related to FMI and FFMI in both boys and girls (P < .05). FMI and FFMI are potentially useful in evaluating the body composition of individuals with different stature. There is a strong positive relationship between FMI and blood pressure in children; these findings emphasize the importance of the prevention of obesity in children and adolescents.

  18. [Age-related changes in blood plasma antioxidant activity in population of the southern Altai].

    PubMed

    Chanchaev, E A; Aĭzman, R I

    2012-01-01

    The blood plasma antioxidant activity was studied in the Russian and Kazakh aborigines of the southern Altai low and high mountains. There was established a decrease of the blood plasma antioxidant activity with age and a relatively low plasma antioxidant activity in the mid-mountain population; in its senior age groups, the gender differences of this parameter were revealed.

  19. The relationship of age, body mass index and waist circumference with blood pressure in Bengalee Hindu male jute mill workers of Belur, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Bose, Kaushik; Ghosh, Arnab; Roy, Sabyasachi; Gangopadhyay, Somnath

    2005-06-01

    A cross-sectional study of 150 adult Bengalee Hindu male jute mill workers of Belur, a suburb of Kolkata, West Bengal, India, was undertaken to study the relationship of age, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) with systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) and mean arterial (MAP) blood pressure. The mean age and the BMI of the subjects were 40.7 years (S.D. = 15.2) and 23.2 kg/m2 (S.D. = 3.2), respectively. The mean SBP, DBP and MAP were 124.7 mmHg (S.D. = 7.8), 81.5 mmHg (S.D. = 5.7) and 95.9 mmHg (S.D. = 6.1), respectively. Age had similar significant (p < 0.001) correlations with BMI and WC. Age and WC were significantly correlated (p < 0.001) with all the three blood pressure variables. In general, the correlations of BMI with SBP (r = 0.24, p < 0.01), DBP (r = 0.15, n.s.) and MAP (r = 0.19, p < 0.05) were weaker. Age controlled multiple regression analyses demonstrated that BMI did not have a significant effect of any blood pressure variable. However, WC had a significant impact (p < 0.0001) on SBP (t = 7.068), DBP (t = 5.190) and MAP (t = 6.387), even after adjusting for the effect of age. Moreover, even after age adjustment, percent variations in SBP (20.7%), DBP (12.5%) and MAP (17.2%) explained by WC were high. This significant impact (p < 0.0001) of WC on SBP (t = 9.426), DBP (t = 8.349) and MAP (t = 9.642) remained even after controlling for the combined effects of age and BMI.

  20. Blood Pressure in Infants, Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Arthur J.

    1981-01-01

    In infants the flush and Doppler methods of blood pressure measurement are usually used. The flush method measures mean pressure; the Doppler method, systolic and diastolic pressures. Normal flush values from 1 to 12 months of age do not exceed 100 mm of mercury; Doppler systolic levels do not exceed 113 mm of mercury. Data concerning normal limits for children and adolescents are conflicting. For practical purposes, a persistent pressure of 140 mm of mercury systolic or 90 mm of mercury diastolic in patients more than 10 years of age is indicative of hypertension. In those younger than 10 years, systolic pressure does not normally exceed 130 mm of mercury and diastolic pressure does not normally exceed 85 mm of mercury. Primary hypertension is relatively infrequent in pediatric patients and diagnosis should be made with deliberation and caution. Antihypertensive drug therapy is indicated only for severe hypertension and in selected cases of moderate hypertension. PMID:7245735

  1. Impact of the age of stored blood on trauma patient mortality: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, Nicholas; Froese, Patrick C.; Erdogan, Mete; Green, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of the age of stored red blood cells on mortality in patients sustaining traumatic injuries requiring transfusion of blood products is unknown. The objective of this systematic review was to identify and describe the available literature on the use of older versus newer blood in trauma patient populations. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, Lilac and the Cochrane Database for published studies comparing the transfusion of newer versus older red blood cells in adult patients sustaining traumatic injuries. Studies included for review reported on trauma patients receiving transfusions of packed red blood cells, identified the age of stored blood that was transfused and reported patient mortality as an end point. We extracted data using a standardized form and assessed study quality using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Results Seven studies were identified (6780 patients) from 3936 initial search results. Four studies reported that transfusion of older blood was independently associated with increased mortality in trauma patients, while 3 studies did not observe any increase in patient mortality with the use of older versus newer blood. Three studies associated the transfusion of older blood with adverse patient outcomes, including longer stay in the intensive care unit, complicated sepsis, pneumonia and renal dysfunction. Studies varied considerably in design, volumes of blood transfused and definitions applied for old and new blood. Conclusion The impact of the age of stored packed red blood cells on mortality in trauma patients is inconclusive. Future investigations are warranted. PMID:26384149

  2. Vascular mineralocorticoid receptor regulates microRNA-155 to promote vasoconstriction and rising blood pressure with aging

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, Jennifer J.; McCurley, Amy; Davel, Ana P.; McCarthy, Joseph; Bender, Shawn B.; Hong, Kwangseok; Yang, Yan; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Aronovitz, Mark; Baur, Wendy E.; Christou, Demetra D.; Hill, Michael A.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is nearly universal yet poorly controlled in the elderly despite proven benefits of intensive treatment. Mice lacking mineralocorticoid receptors in smooth muscle cells (SMC-MR-KO) are protected from rising blood pressure (BP) with aging, despite normal renal function. Vasoconstriction is attenuated in aged SMC-MR-KO mice, thus they were used to explore vascular mechanisms that may contribute to hypertension with aging. MicroRNA (miR) profiling identified miR-155 as the most down-regulated miR with vascular aging in MR-intact but not SMC-MR-KO mice. The aging-associated decrease in miR-155 in mesenteric resistance vessels was associated with increased mRNA abundance of MR and of predicted miR-155 targets Cav1.2 (L-type calcium channel (LTCC) subunit) and angiotensin type-1 receptor (AgtR1). SMC-MR-KO mice lacked these aging-associated vascular gene expression changes. In HEK293 cells, MR repressed miR-155 promoter activity. In cultured SMCs, miR-155 decreased Cav1.2 and AgtR1 mRNA. Compared to MR-intact littermates, aged SMC-MR-KO mice had decreased systolic BP, myogenic tone, SMC LTCC current, mesenteric vessel calcium influx, LTCC-induced vasoconstriction and angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction and oxidative stress. Restoration of miR-155 specifically in SMCs of aged MR-intact mice decreased Cav1.2 and AgtR1 mRNA and attenuated LTCC-mediated and angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction and oxidative stress. Finally, in a trial of MR blockade in elderly humans, changes in serum miR-155 predicted the BP treatment response. Thus, SMC-MR regulation of miR-155, Cav1.2 and AgtR1 impacts vasoconstriction with aging. This novel mechanism identifies potential new treatment strategies and biomarkers to improve and individualize antihypertensive therapy in the elderly. PMID:27683672

  3. Fractionated Concurrent Exercise throughout the Day Does Not Promote Acute Blood Pressure Benefits in Hypertensive Middle-aged Women

    PubMed Central

    Azevêdo, Luan M.; de Souza, Alice C.; Santos, Laiza Ellen S.; Miguel dos Santos, Rodrigo; de Fernandes, Manuella O. M.; Almeida, Jeeser A.; Pardono, Emerson

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a chronic disease that affects about 30% of the world’s population, and the physical exercise plays an important role on its non-pharmacological treatment. Anywise, the dose–response of physical exercise fractionation throughout the day demands more investigation, allowing new exercise prescription possibilities. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the acute blood pressure (BP) kinetics after 1 h of exercises and the BP reactivity after different concurrent exercise (CE) sessions and its fractioning of hypertensive middle-aged women. In this way, 11 hypertensive women voluntarily underwent three experimental sessions and one control day [control session (CS)]. In the morning session (MS) and night session (NS), the exercise was fully realized in the morning and evening, respectively. For the fractionized session (FS), 50% of the volume was applied in the morning and the remaining 50% during the evening. The MS provided the greatest moments (p ≤ 0.05) of post-exercise hypotension (PEH) for systolic BP (SBP) and highest reduction of BP reactivity for SBP (~44%) and diastolic BP (DBP) (~59%) compared to CS (p ≤ 0.05). The findings of the present study have shown that MS is effective for PEH to SBP, as well as it promotes high quality of attenuation for BP reactivity, greater than the other sessions. PMID:28261583

  4. Fractionated Concurrent Exercise throughout the Day Does Not Promote Acute Blood Pressure Benefits in Hypertensive Middle-aged Women.

    PubMed

    Azevêdo, Luan M; de Souza, Alice C; Santos, Laiza Ellen S; Miguel Dos Santos, Rodrigo; de Fernandes, Manuella O M; Almeida, Jeeser A; Pardono, Emerson

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a chronic disease that affects about 30% of the world's population, and the physical exercise plays an important role on its non-pharmacological treatment. Anywise, the dose-response of physical exercise fractionation throughout the day demands more investigation, allowing new exercise prescription possibilities. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the acute blood pressure (BP) kinetics after 1 h of exercises and the BP reactivity after different concurrent exercise (CE) sessions and its fractioning of hypertensive middle-aged women. In this way, 11 hypertensive women voluntarily underwent three experimental sessions and one control day [control session (CS)]. In the morning session (MS) and night session (NS), the exercise was fully realized in the morning and evening, respectively. For the fractionized session (FS), 50% of the volume was applied in the morning and the remaining 50% during the evening. The MS provided the greatest moments (p ≤ 0.05) of post-exercise hypotension (PEH) for systolic BP (SBP) and highest reduction of BP reactivity for SBP (~44%) and diastolic BP (DBP) (~59%) compared to CS (p ≤ 0.05). The findings of the present study have shown that MS is effective for PEH to SBP, as well as it promotes high quality of attenuation for BP reactivity, greater than the other sessions.

  5. Effects of swimming training on blood pressure and vascular function in adults >50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Nualnim, Nantinee; Parkhurst, Kristin; Dhindsa, Mandeep; Tarumi, Takashi; Vavrek, Jackie; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    Swimming is ideal for older adults because it includes minimum weight-bearing stress and decreased heat load. However, there is very little information available concerning the effects of regular swimming exercise on vascular risks. We determined if regular swimming exercise would decrease arterial blood pressure (BP) and improve vascular function. Forty-three otherwise healthy adults >50 years old (60 ± 2) with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension and not on any medication were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of swimming exercise or attention time controls. Before the intervention period there were no significant differences in any of the variables between groups. Body mass, adiposity, and plasma concentrations of glucose and cholesterol did not change in either group throughout the intervention period. Casual systolic BP decreased significantly from 131 ± 3 to 122 ± 4 mm Hg in the swimming training group. Significant decreases in systolic BP were also observed in ambulatory (daytime) and central (carotid) BP measurements. Swimming exercise produced a 21% increase in carotid artery compliance (p <0.05). Flow-mediated dilation and cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity improved after the swim training program (p <0.05). There were no significant changes in any measurements in the control group that performed gentle relaxation exercises. In conclusion, swimming exercise elicits hypotensive effects and improvements in vascular function in previously sedentary older adults.

  6. Decreased cord-blood phospholipids in young age-at-onset type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Daria; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Larsson, Helena E; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Ivarsson, Sten A; Lernmark, Ake; Oresic, Matej

    2013-11-01

    Children developing type 1 diabetes may have risk markers already in their umbilical cord blood. It is hypothesized that the risk for type 1 diabetes at an early age may be increased by a pathogenic pregnancy and be reflected in altered cord-blood composition. This study used metabolomics to test if the cord-blood lipidome was affected in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before 8 years of age. The present case-control study of 76 index children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before 8 years of age and 76 healthy control subjects matched for HLA risk, sex, and date of birth, as well as the mother's age and gestational age, revealed that cord-blood phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines were significantly decreased in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before 4 years of age. Reduced levels of triglycerides correlated to gestational age in index and control children and to age at diagnosis only in the index children. Finally, gestational infection during the first trimester was associated with lower cord-blood total lysophosphatidylcholines in index and control children. In conclusion, metabolomics of umbilical cord blood may identify children at increased risk for type 1 diabetes. Low phospholipid levels at birth may represent key mediators of the immune system and contribute to early induction of islet autoimmunity.

  7. Anthropometric, body composition, and blood pressure measures among rural elderly adults of Asian Indian origin: the Santiniketan aging study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arnab; Bala, Sanjib Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The number of older adults is increasing in industrialized and in developing countries. The present community-based cross sectional work was undertaken to study the anthropometric, body composition, and blood pressure characteristics of rural-dwelling elderly adults of Asian Indian origin. A total of 300 individuals (Male = 157 and Female = 143) from the Bolpur-Sriniketan area of West Bengal, India, took part in the study. Participants were divided into four age-groups: Group I, 55-59 years (Male:Female = 55:61); Group II, 60-64 years (Male:Female = 41:33); Group III, 65-69 years (Male:Female = 27:21); Group IV, 70 years and older (Male:Female = 34:28). Anthropometric measures were taken using standard techniques. Body mass index, waist-hip ratio, and the sum of four skin folds were subsequently computed. Body composition measures, namely percentage of body fat, fat mass, fat free mass, arm muscle circumference, arm muscle area, and arm fat area, were calculated accordingly. Left-arm systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) were also measured, and mean arterial pressure was subsequently calculated. Overall observations in the study population indicate a predominance of body weights below the normal body mass index of 25 kg/m(2). More than half the subjects reported the lack of adequate sanitation facilities and education levels were generally low. Rates of smoking (65.6%) and habitual consumption of alcohol (38.9%) were high in male participants. Upon comparison across the four age groups, results revealed decreases in percent body fat, fat mass, and mid upper arm muscle circumference for Groups III and IV versus Group I for men and for Group IV versus I for women. The overall trend for both SBP and DBP was for small increases with age in men in contrast to slight decreases with age in women. Our findings of generally low body weights, detrimental age-related changes in body composition, and a number of other health-related concerns highlight

  8. Kidney function and blood pressure in preschool-aged children exposed to cadmium and arsenic - potential alleviation by selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Skröder, Helena; Hawkesworth, Sophie; Kippler, Maria; El Arifeen, Shams; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Moore, Sophie E.; Vahter, Marie

    2015-07-15

    Background: Early-life exposure to toxic compounds may cause long-lasting health effects, but few studies have investigated effects of childhood exposure to nephrotoxic metals on kidney and cardiovascular function. Objectives: To assess effects of exposure to arsenic and cadmium on kidney function and blood pressure in pre-school-aged children, and potential protection by selenium. Methods: This cross-sectional study was part of the 4.5 years of age (range: 4.4–5.4 years) follow-up of the children from a supplementation trial in pregnancy (MINIMat) in rural Bangladesh, and nested studies on early-life metal exposures. Exposure to arsenic, cadmium and selenium from food and drinking water was assessed by concentrations in children's urine, measured by ICP-MS. Kidney function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, n=1106), calculated from serum cystatin C, and by kidney volume, measured by ultrasound (n=375). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was measured (n=1356) after five minutes rest. Results: Multivariable-adjusted regression analyzes showed that exposure to cadmium, but not arsenic, was inversely associated with eGFR, particularly in girls. A 0.5 µg/L increase in urinary cadmium among the girls (above spline knot at 0.12) was associated with a decrease in eGFR of 2.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2}, corresponding to 0.2SD (p=0.022). A slightly weaker inverse association with cadmium was also indicated for kidney volume, but no significant associations were found with blood pressure. Stratifying on children's urinary selenium (below or above median of 12.6 µg/L) showed a three times stronger inverse association of U-Cd with eGFR (all children) in the lower selenium stratum (B=−2.8; 95% CI: −5.5, −0.20; p=0.035), compared to those with higher selenium (B=−0.79; 95% CI: −3.0, 1.4; p=0.49). Conclusions: Childhood cadmium exposure seems to adversely affect kidney function, but not blood pressure, in this population of young children

  9. SEM analysis of red blood cells in aged human bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Hortolà, P

    1992-08-01

    Mammal red blood cells (RBC) in bloodstains have been previously detected by light microscopy on stone tools from as early as 100,000 +/- 25,000 years ago. In order to evaluate the degree of morphological preservation of erythrocytes in bloodstains, an accidental human blood smear on white chert and several experimental bloodstains on hard substrates (the same stone-white chert; another type of stone-graywacke; a non-stone support-stainless steel), were stored in a room, in non-sterile and fluctuating conditions, for lengths of time ranging from 3 to 18 months. Afterwards, the specimens were coated with gold and examined by a Cambridge Stereoscan 120 scanning electron microscope. Results revealed a high preservation of RBC integrity, with the maintenance of several discocytary shapes, a low tendency to echinocytosis and a frequent appearance of a moon-like erythrocytary shape in the thinner areas of the bloodstains.

  10. Effects of high-intensity circuit training, low-intensity circuit training and endurance training on blood pressure and lipoproteins in middle-aged overweight men

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the physiological effects of an high-intensity circuit training (HICT) on several cardiovascular disease risk factors in healthy, overweight middle-aged subjects, and to compare the effects of HICT to traditional endurance training (ET) and low-intensity circuit training (LICT). Methods Fifty-eight participants (ages 61±3.3 yrs, BMI 29.8±0.9) were randomly assigned to one of the three exercise treatment groups: HICT, LICT and ET. The three groups exercised three times per week, 50 min per session for 12 weeks. Baseline and after intervention anthropometric characteristics: body weight (BW), fat mass (FM); blood pressure: diastolic (DBP) and systolic (SBP), blood parameters; CHOL-t (total cholesterol), LDL-C (low density lipoprotein-cholesterol), HDL-C (high density lipoprotein-cholesterol), TG (triglycerides), ApoB and ratio ApoB/ApoA1 were measured. Results Compared to other groups, HICT showed significantly higher reductions in FM, DBP, CHOLt, LDL-C, TG, ApoB and significantly greater increases in high density HDL-C. LICT resulted in the greatest reduction in SBP. All groups showed a significant improvement of BW without any significant differences between groups. Conclusions Our findings indicate that high-intensity circuit training is more effective in improving blood pressure, lipoproteins and triglycerides than endurance training alone or lower intensity circuit training. PMID:24004639

  11. Regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise in ageing humans.

    PubMed

    Hearon, Christopher M; Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-04-15

    The regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery to contracting skeletal muscle is complex and involves the mechanical effects of muscle contraction; local metabolic, red blood cell and endothelium-derived substances; and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). With advancing age in humans, skeletal muscle blood flow is typically reduced during dynamic exercise and this is due to a lower vascular conductance, which could ultimately contribute to age-associated reductions in aerobic exercise capacity, a primary predictor of mortality in both healthy and diseased ageing populations. Recent findings have highlighted the contribution of endothelium-derived substances to blood flow control in contracting muscle of older adults. With advancing age, impaired nitric oxide availability due to scavenging by reactive oxygen species, in conjunction with elevated vasoconstrictor signalling via endothelin-1, reduces the local vasodilatory response to muscle contraction. Additionally, ageing impairs the ability of contracting skeletal muscle to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction (i.e. 'functional sympatholysis'), which is critical for the proper regulation of tissue blood flow distribution and oxygen delivery, and could further reduce skeletal muscle perfusion during high intensity and/or large muscle mass exercise in older adults. We propose that initiation of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization is the underlying signalling event necessary to properly modulate sympathetic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle, and that age-associated impairments in red blood cell adenosine triphosphate release and stimulation of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation may explain impairments in both local vasodilatation and functional sympatholysis with advancing age in humans.

  12. Systolic VLSI for Kalman filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-G.; Chang, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    A novel two-dimensional parallel computing method for real-time Kalman filtering is presented. The mathematical formulation of a Kalman filter algorithm is rearranged to be the type of Faddeev algorithm for generalizing signal processing. The data flow mapping from the Faddeev algorithm to a two-dimensional concurrent computing structure is developed. The architecture of the resulting processor cells is regular, simple, expandable, and therefore naturally suitable for VLSI chip implementation. The computing methodology and the two-dimensional systolic arrays are useful for Kalman filter applications as well as other matrix/vector based algebraic computations.

  13. Association of pulsatile and mean cerebral blood flow velocity with age and neuropsychological performance.

    PubMed

    Pase, Matthew P; Grima, Natalie A; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew; Pipingas, Andrew

    2014-05-10

    Low cerebral blood flow velocity is associated with cognitive decline. However, the association between pulsatile brain blood flow velocity and cognition has not been investigated. High pulsatile hemodynamic stress in the brain may impair cognitive function through damage to small cerebral vessels. The current objective was to examine the cross-sectional association of pulsatile and mean cerebral blood flow velocity with age and neuropsychological performance. We also examined whether cerebral blood flow velocity was associated with aortic pulse pressure, a measure of arterial ageing and aortic stiffness. Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery using Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TDU) while neuropsychological performance was measured using a computerized cognitive test battery. Aortic pulse pressure was non-invasively derived from applanation tonometry of the radial artery. The sample comprised 160 healthy adults aged 50-70 years. Results indicated that increasing age correlated with lower mean (r=-0.23, p<0.01) and higher pulsatile (r=0.27, p<0.01) brain blood flow velocity. In multivariate adjusted models, both peripheral (β=0.28, p<0.05) and aortic (β=0.24, p<0.05) pulse pressure were associated with higher pulsatile flow velocity through the middle cerebral artery. In adjusted models, neither mean nor pulsatile cerebral blood flow velocity was associated with performance on any cognitive task. In conclusion, arterial ageing was associated with increased pulsatile hemodynamic stress in the brain. However, this was not associated with impaired neuropsychological performance.

  14. Age-related changes in pial arterial structure and blood flow in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye-Min; Sohn, Inkyung; Jung, Junyang; Jeong, Joo-Won; Park, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cerebral blood flow decreases are thought to deteriorate cognition and cause senescence, although the related mechanism is unclear. To investigate the relationships between aging and changes in cerebral blood flow and vasculature, we obtained fluorescence images of young (2-month-old) and old (12-month-old) mice using indocyanine green (ICG). First, we found that the blood flow in old mice's brains is lower than that in young mice and that old mice had more curved pial arteries and fewer pial artery junctions than young mice. Second, using Western blotting, we determined that the ratio of collagen to elastin (related to cerebral vascular wall distensibility) increased with age. Finally, we found that the peak ICG intensity and blood flow index decreased, whereas the mean transit time increased, with age in the middle cerebral artery and superior sagittal sinus. Age-related changes in pial arterial structure and composition, concurrent with the observed changes in the blood flow parameters, suggest that age-related changes in the cerebral vasculature structure and distensibility may induce altered brain blood flow.

  15. Crossover comparison of atenolol, enalapril, hydrochlorothiazide and isradipine for isolated systolic systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Silagy, C A; McNeil, J J; McGrath, B P

    1992-11-15

    The benefit of antihypertensive therapy in reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with isolated systolic hypertension has now been established by the Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly Program. However, there is little information about the relative effectiveness of different drug regimens in this condition. This study compared the efficacy and tolerability of 50 mg of atenolol, 10 mg of enalapril, 25 mg of hydrochlorothiazide and 2.5 mg of isradipine in the treatment of isolated systolic hypertension. After a 3-week placebo run-in phase, 24 subjects were randomized into a 4-period double-blind crossover study by use of an orthogonal latin square design. Treatment periods were of 6 weeks' duration with titration to a higher dose after 4 weeks in those not reaching goal blood pressure (BP). Each active treatment was followed by a 3-week placebo washout. Casual clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BP (Accutracker II) were measured at the end of each treatment phase. Routine biochemistry was also performed after the placebo run-in, at the end of each active treatment phase, and after the placebo run-out. Of the 24 subjects entered (mean age 72.3 years, 38% men) 20 completed the whole study. Mean +/- standard deviation of supine clinic and daytime ambulatory BP on entry were 181/79 +/- 21/9 mm Hg and 165/82 +/- 23/15 mm Hg, respectively. All drugs reduced mean casual and ambulatory BP significantly relative to placebo but only hydrochlorothiazide and enalapril produced a consistent hypotensive effect throughout the entire 24-hour period. Isradipine and enalapril exhibited a relatively greater effect on reducing systolic BP than either hydrochlorothiazide or atenolol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Wave reflection augments central systolic and pulse pressures during facial cooling.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David G; Roy, Matthew S; Prasad, Raju Y

    2008-06-01

    Cardiovascular events are more common in the winter months, possibly because of hemodynamic alterations in response to cold exposure. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of acute facial cooling on central aortic pressure, arterial stiffness, and wave reflection. Twelve healthy subjects (age 23 +/- 3 yr; 6 men, 6 women) underwent supine measurements of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), brachial artery blood pressure, and central aortic pressure (via the synthesis of a central aortic pressure waveform by radial artery applanation tonometry and generalized transfer function) during a control trial (supine rest) and a facial cooling trial (0 degrees C gel pack). Aortic augmentation index (AI), an index of wave reflection, was calculated from the aortic pressure waveform. Measurements were made at baseline, 2 min, and 7 min during each trial. Facial cooling increased (P < 0.05) peripheral and central diastolic and systolic pressures. Central systolic pressure increased more than peripheral systolic pressure (22 +/- 3 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05), resulting in decreased pulse pressure amplification ratio. Facial cooling resulted in a robust increase in AI and a modest increase in PWV (AI: -1.4 +/- 3.8 vs. 21.2 +/- 3.0 and 19.9 +/- 3.6%; PWV: 5.6 +/- 0.2 vs. 6.5 +/- 0.3 and 6.2 +/- 0.2 m/s; P < 0.05). Change in mean arterial pressure but not PWV predicted the change in AI, suggesting that facial cooling may increase AI independent of aortic PWV. Facial cooling and the resulting peripheral vasoconstriction are associated with an increase in wave reflection and augmentation of central systolic pressure, potentially explaining ischemia and cardiovascular events in the cold.

  17. Pulse pressure is inversely related to aortic root diameter implications for the pathogenesis of systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Farasat, S Morteza; Morrell, Christopher H; Scuteri, Angelo; Ting, Chih-Tai; Yin, Frank C P; Spurgeon, Harold A; Chen, Chen-Huan; Lakatta, Edward G; Najjar, Samer S

    2008-02-01

    Hypertension accelerates the age-associated increase in aortic root diameter (AoD), likely because of chronically elevated distending pressures. However, the pulsatile component of blood pressure may have a different relationship with AoD. We sought to assess the relationship between AoD and pulse pressure (PP) while accounting for left ventricular and central arterial structural and functional properties, which are known to influence PP. The study population was composed of 1256 individuals, aged 30 to 79 years (48% women and 48% hypertensive), none of whom were on antihypertensive medications. Blood pressure was measured in the sitting position with conventional sphygmomanometry. PP was calculated as the difference between systolic and diastolic blood pressures. AoD was measured at end diastole at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva with echocardiography. The relationship between AoD and PP was evaluated with multiple regression analyses. PP was 50+/-14 mm Hg in men and 54+/-18 mm Hg in women, and AoD was 31.9+/-3.5 mm in men and 28.9+/-3.5 mm in women. After adjusting for age, age(2), height, weight, and mean arterial pressure, AoD was independently and inversely associated with PP in both sexes. After further adjustments for central arterial stiffness and wall thickness, reflected waves, and left ventricular geometry, AoD remained inversely associated with PP in both men (coefficient=-0.48; P=0.0003; model R(2)=0.51) and women (coefficient=-0.40; P=0.01; model R(2)=0.61). Thus, AoD is inversely associated with PP, suggesting that a small AoD may contribute to the pathogenesis of systolic hypertension. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine this possibility.

  18. Gold, Blood, and Power: Finance and War Through the Ages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    spending in the event of a future military crisis. The Strategic Studies Institute hopes this historical survey will draw attention to an aspect of...bad as this fragmentation was, the true dam- age to the Empire’s future prospects was the economic changes that were occurring almost unnoticed...foundation of wisdom grounded in mastery of the profession of arms, and by serving as a crucible for educating future leaders in the analysis

  19. Gene-age interactions in blood pressure regulation: a large-scale investigation with the CHARGE, Global BPgen, and ICBP Consortia.

    PubMed

    Simino, Jeannette; Shi, Gang; Bis, Joshua C; Chasman, Daniel I; Ehret, Georg B; Gu, Xiangjun; Guo, Xiuqing; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Sijbrands, Eric; Smith, Albert V; Verwoert, Germaine C; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Cadby, Gemma; Chen, Peng; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Corre, Tanguy; de Boer, Rudolf A; Goel, Anuj; Johnson, Toby; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nolte, Ilja M; Sim, Xueling; Sõber, Siim; van der Most, Peter J; Verweij, Niek; Zhao, Jing Hua; Amin, Najaf; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bouchard, Claude; Dehghan, Abbas; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Elosua, Roberto; Franco, Oscar H; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Hercberg, Serge; Hofman, Albert; James, Alan L; Johnson, Andrew D; Kähönen, Mika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kutalik, Zoltan; Larson, Martin G; Launer, Lenore J; Li, Guo; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Kiang; Morrison, Alanna C; Navis, Gerjan; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Papanicolau, George J; Penninx, Brenda W; Psaty, Bruce M; Raffel, Leslie J; Raitakari, Olli T; Rice, Kenneth; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rose, Lynda M; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Siscovick, David S; Stolk, Ronald P; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Vaidya, Dhananjay; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Watkins, Hugh; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Bochud, Murielle; Farrall, Martin; Hartman, Catharina A; Laan, Maris; Lakatta, Edward G; Lehtimäki, Terho; Loos, Ruth J F; Lucas, Gavin; Meneton, Pierre; Palmer, Lyle J; Rettig, Rainer; Snieder, Harold; Tai, E Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; van der Harst, Pim; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wong, Tien Yin; Fornage, Myriam; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Levy, Daniel; Palmas, Walter; Ridker, Paul M; Rotter, Jerome I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2014-07-03

    Although age-dependent effects on blood pressure (BP) have been reported, they have not been systematically investigated in large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWASs). We leveraged the infrastructure of three well-established consortia (CHARGE, GBPgen, and ICBP) and a nonstandard approach (age stratification and metaregression) to conduct a genome-wide search of common variants with age-dependent effects on systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean arterial (MAP), and pulse (PP) pressure. In a two-staged design using 99,241 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 20 genome-wide significant (p ≤ 5 × 10(-8)) loci by using joint tests of the SNP main effect and SNP-age interaction. Nine of the significant loci demonstrated nominal evidence of age-dependent effects on BP by tests of the interactions alone. Index SNPs in the EHBP1L1 (DBP and MAP), CASZ1 (SBP and MAP), and GOSR2 (PP) loci exhibited the largest age interactions, with opposite directions of effect in the young versus the old. The changes in the genetic effects over time were small but nonnegligible (up to 1.58 mm Hg over 60 years). The EHBP1L1 locus was discovered through gene-age interactions only in whites but had DBP main effects replicated (p = 8.3 × 10(-4)) in 8,682 Asians from Singapore, indicating potential interethnic heterogeneity. A secondary analysis revealed 22 loci with evidence of age-specific effects (e.g., only in 20 to 29-year-olds). Age can be used to select samples with larger genetic effect sizes and more homogenous phenotypes, which may increase statistical power. Age-dependent effects identified through novel statistical approaches can provide insight into the biology and temporal regulation underlying BP associations.

  20. Bias and variability in blood pressure measurement with ambulatory recorders.

    PubMed

    Pannarale, G; Bebb, G; Clark, S; Sullivan, A; Foster, C; Coats, A J

    1993-10-01

    This study sought to determine whether patient characteristics such as age, sex, blood pressure, and pulse pressure differently affect the accuracy of an oscillometric (SpaceLabs 90207) and a microphonic (TM2420 version 7) blood pressure monitor. Blood pressure recorded by two oscillometric and two microphonic ambulatory monitors was compared with simultaneous readings by two pairs of trained, blinded observers using random-zero sphygmomanometry. One hundred and eighteen subjects (53 men and 65 women, aged 17 to 94 years; systolic pressure, 89 to 211 mm Hg; diastolic, 44 to 116 mm Hg) were studied. There were no significant differences within each observer pair or between the two observer pairs as well as no correlation between interobserver differences and patient characteristics. The differences between the monitor and trained observers' readings were 2.8 +/- 9.9 mm Hg systolic and 3.9 +/- 6.8 mm Hg diastolic for the SpaceLabs and 5.0 +/- 5.2 mm Hg systolic and 3.4 +/- 6.1 mm Hg diastolic for the TM2420. Patient characteristics that predicted measurement error were defined by multiple regression. For oscillometry, systolic measurement error was highly correlated with systolic pressure, pulse pressure, and subject age. The diastolic error was significantly correlated with pulse pressure, diastolic pressure, and subject sex. For the oscillometric monitor, patient characteristics accounted for 36.6% of the variation of the systolic error and 34.7% of the variation of the diastolic error. For the microphonic monitor, only age correlated with diastolic error, and no significant correlations were seen with systolic error. Patient characteristics accounted for only 1.2% of the systolic and 8.9% of the diastolic error.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. ME 04-1 ASSESSMENT OF CENTRAL BLOOD PRESSURE FOR CLINICAL APPLICATION.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Trefor

    2016-09-01

    Central Systolic Blood Pressure is lower than brachial artery blood Pressure due to reflected waves and greater augmentation at the periphery. The relationship is not consistent during life and alters with aging of the blood vessels. Increasing stiffness means that a greater component of the reflected waves returns to the central aorta during systolic contraction causing more amplification and a higher systolic blood pressure. Diastolic blood pressure on the other hand is always higher in the aorta than at the periphery allowing blood flow. The heart contracts against the central aortic pressure and it is likely that cardiac hypertrophy iis dependent on this value. Likewise damage to the larger blood vessels are more likely to be related to central rather than brachial pressure and this may reflect a greater association with stroke.Central aortic pressure may be measured directly but not practicable in large groups of patients or indirect using tonometry and transformation equations. While the correlation is not ideal there is significant correlation. Central aortic systolic blood pressure is associated with mortality, stokes, heart attacks and cardiac hypertrophy with a higher p value than brachial artery blood pressure. The question is whether it is an independent predictor of these events and whether measurement is justifiable in clinical practice. There is a strong correlation between aortic and brachial systolic blood pressure reducing the ability of the central BP to be independent. In addition the question arises does the measurement of central systolic BP provide extra information above pulse wave velocity?Measuring central systolic blood pressure has allowed an exploration of the effects of different drug classes on central systolic blood pressure. Thus beta blockers increase the amplification index meaning that the fall in central systolic blood pressure is not as great as the fall in brachial artery systolic BP. This may explain in part why beta blockers

  2. Effects of Aged Stored Autologous Red Blood Cells on Human Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Kanias, Tamir; Triulzi, Darrel; Donadee, Chenell; Barge, Suchitra; Badlam, Jessica; Jain, Shilpa; Belanger, Andrea M.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A major abnormality that characterizes the red cell “storage lesion” is increased hemolysis and reduced red cell lifespan after infusion. Low levels of intravascular hemolysis after transfusion of aged stored red cells disrupt nitric oxide (NO) bioavailabity, via accelerated NO scavenging reaction with cell-free plasma hemoglobin. The degree of intravascular hemolysis post-transfusion and effects on endothelial-dependent vasodilation responses to acetylcholine have not been fully characterized in humans. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of blood aged to the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage time on the human microcirculation and endothelial function. Methods: Eighteen healthy individuals donated 1 U of leukopheresed red cells, divided and autologously transfused into the forearm brachial artery 5 and 42 days after blood donation. Blood samples were obtained from stored blood bag supernatants and the antecubital vein of the infusion arm. Forearm blood flow measurements were performed using strain-gauge plethysmography during transfusion, followed by testing of endothelium-dependent blood flow with increasing doses of intraarterial acetylcholine. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that aged stored blood has higher levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin. Compared with 5-day blood, the transfusion of 42-day packed red cells decreases acetylcholine-dependent forearm blood flows. Intravascular venous levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin increase immediately after red cell transfusion, with more significant increases observed after infusion of 42-day-old blood. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the transfusion of blood at the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage has a significant effect on the forearm circulation and impairs endothelial function. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01137656) PMID:26222884

  3. The effect of resistance exercise on fitness, blood pressure, and blood lipid of hypertensive middle-aged men

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Jong-Won

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of resistance exercise on fitness, blood pressure, and blood lipid of hypertensive middle-aged men. To achieve the goal of the study, a total of 23 subjects were selected. Among them, 14 subjects who exercised regularly were selected as the exercise group, while the remaining 9 subjects were selected as the control group. In terms of data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 software was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. Regarding the verification of difference on the change of means between the groups, analysis of covariance was used for statistical process. As a result, significant differences were found in cardiovascular endurance, muscle endurance, flexibility, and triglyceride. These results indicate that the resistance exercise only had slight effect on hypertensive middle-aged men. PMID:28349040

  4. Chronic stress impairs collateral blood flow recovery in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Sood, Subeena; Chakraborty, Nabarun; Jhamnani, Sunny; Aghili, Nima; Nashin, Hajra; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti; Epstein, Stephen E; Burnett, Mary Susan

    2014-11-01

    Chronic stress is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Aging is also associated with vascular dysfunction. We hypothesize that chronic stress accelerates collateral dysfunction in old mice. Mice were subjected to either chronic social defeat (CSD) or chronic cold stress (CCS). The CSD mice were housed in a box inside an aggressor's cage and exposed to the aggressor. The CCS group was placed in iced water. After chronic stress, mice underwent femoral artery ligation (FAL) and flow recovery was measured. For the CSD group, appearance and use scores of the foot and a behavioral test were performed. CSD impaired collateral flow recovery after FAL. Further, stressed mice had greater ischemic damage, impaired foot function, and altered behavior. The CCS mice also showed impaired collateral flow recovery. Chronic stress causes hind limb collateral dysfunction in old mice, a conclusion reinforced by the fact that two types of stress produced similar changes.

  5. Peripheral mechanisms of thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow in aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry

    2010-01-01

    Human skin blood flow is controlled via dual innervation from the sympathetic nervous system. Reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction and vasodilation are both impaired with primary aging, rendering the aged more vulnerable to hypothermia and cardiovascular complications from heat-related illness. Age-related alterations in the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow occur at multiple points along the efferent arm of the reflex, including 1) diminished sympathetic outflow, 2) altered presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis, 3) reduced vascular responsiveness, and 4) impairments in downstream (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle) second-messenger signaling. This mechanistic review highlights some of the recent findings in the area of aging and the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow. PMID:20413421

  6. Age-related memory impairments due to reduced blood glucose responses to epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ken A; Chang, Qing; Mohler, Eric G; Gold, Paul E

    2010-12-01

    Increases in blood glucose levels are an important component of the mechanisms by which epinephrine enhances memory formation. The present experiments addressed the hypothesis that a dysfunction in the blood glucose response to circulating epinephrine contributes to age-related memory impairments. Doses of epinephrine and glucagon that significantly increased blood glucose levels in young adult rats were far less effective at doing so in 2-year-old rats. In young rats, epinephrine and glucose were about equally effective in enhancing memory and in prolonging post-training release of acetylcholine in the hippocampus. However, glucose was more effective than epinephrine in enhancing both memory and acetylcholine release in aged rats. These results suggest that an uncoupling between circulating epinephrine and glucose levels in old rats may lead to an age-related reduction in the provision of glucose to the brain during training. This in turn may contribute to age-related changes in memory and neural plasticity.

  7. The application of blood flow measurements to the study of aging muscle.

    PubMed

    McCully, K K; Posner, J D

    1995-11-01

    Blood flow to skeletal muscle is a potentially important factor in the reduction of muscle function associated with aging (sarcopenia). The main influence of reduced blood flow capacity on muscle function is in limiting oxidative metabolism. Direct measures of blood flow include: intravital-microscopy, plethysmography, radioactive microspheres, 133Xenon washout, thermodilution, and Doppler ultrasound. Indirect measurement of blood flow includes arm-to-ankle pressure index and the rate of phosphocreatine recovery after exercise. Several new methodologies have been developed to evaluate muscle blood flow, including color-Doppler imaging, magnetic resonance imaging/angiography (MRI/MRA), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). As adaptations of traditional techniques, these methods promise more precise information under less invasive conditions. MRI is an expensive and technically challenging method able to measure vessel location, blood flow, and wall diameter in blood vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. Color-Doppler provides excellent temporal resolution blood flow throughout the cardiac cycle, along with some anatomical information. NIRS is an inexpensive and portable technology that can measure changes in oxygen saturation and provide information on tissue oxygen delivery in studies of frailer and more difficult-to-study subjects. Muscle blood flow is not thought to limit oxidative metabolism under normal conditions in young individuals. However, it is not clear what happens to muscle blood flow in healthy older individuals. Reduced capillary density, less maximal blood flow, and a slower hyperemic flow response have been reported in some, but not all, studies. Further studies with the newer methodologies are needed to re-examine age-related changes in muscle blood flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Age-related alterations in blood and colonic dendritic cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Durant, Lydia; Reddi, Durga; Hart, Ailsa L.; Fell, John M. E.; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Knight, Stella C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DC) determine initiation, type and location of immune responses and, in adults, show decreased Toll-like receptors and some increased cytokine levels on ageing. Few studies in children have characterised DC or explored DC-related mechanisms producing age-related immune changes. Results The pDC marker BDCA2 (but not CD123) was absent in pre-pubertal children and numbers of pDC decreased with age. Blood and colonic DC were more mature and activated in adults. Decrease in pDC numbers correlated with reduced GM-CSF levels with aging, but increasing IL-4 and IL-8 levels correlated with a more activated DC profile in blood. CXCL16 levels decreased with age. Methods Blood and colonic DC phenotypes were determined in healthy adults and children by flow cytometry and correlated with aging. Blood DC were divided into plasmacytoid (pDC) and myeloid (mDC) while only mDC were identified in colon. Serum cytokine levels were determined by multiplex cytokine assays and correlated with DC properties. Conclusions In children, lack of BDCA2, a receptor mediating antigen capture and inhibiting interferon induction, may be immunologically beneficial during immune development. Conversely, reduced pDC numbers, probably secondary to decreasing GM-CSF and increasing cytokine-induced maturation of DC are likely to determine deteriorating immunity with ageing. PMID:26942871

  9. Effects of 24-week resistance exercise training on carotid peak systolic and end diastolic flow velocity in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effect of resistance exercise on carotid intima-media thickness, luminal diameter, peak systolic flow velocity, end diastolic flow velocity, and wall shear rate in healthy elderly men. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy elderly men (age ≥65 years) were randomly divided into a control (n=15) and resistance exercise (n=15) groups. The 24-week exercise intervention consisted of 3 days of resistance exercise per week using an elastic band per week. Body composition, physical function, blood pressure, and carotid variables were measured at baseline and after 24 weeks. [Results] Body fat percent, skeletal muscle mass, systolic blood pressure, grip strength, arm curl, chair stand up, sit and reach, maximum walking speed, time up and go, and two-minute step test showed significant interaction. Peak systolic flow velocity, end diastolic flow velocity, and wall shear rate also showed significant interaction. [Conclusion] A 24-week resistance exercise program, using elastic bands, effectively improves carotid flow velocity and wall shear rate in healthy elderly men. PMID:27821937

  10. Serum Folate Shows an Inverse Association with Blood Pressure in a Cohort of Chinese Women of Childbearing Age: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Minxue; Tan, Hongzhuan; Zhou, Shujin; Retnakaran, Ravi; Smith, Graeme N.; Davidge, Sandra T.; Trasler, Jacquetta; Walker, Mark C.; Wen, Shi Wu

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been reported that higher folate intake from food and supplementation is associated with decreased blood pressure (BP). The association between serum folate concentration and BP has been examined in few studies. We aim to examine the association between serum folate and BP levels in a cohort of young Chinese women. Methods We used the baseline data from a pre-conception cohort of women of childbearing age in Liuyang, China, for this study. Demographic data were collected by structured interview. Serum folate concentration was measured by immunoassay, and homocysteine, blood glucose, triglyceride and total cholesterol were measured through standardized clinical procedures. Multiple linear regression and principal component regression model were applied in the analysis. Results A total of 1,532 healthy normotensive non-pregnant women were included in the final analysis. The mean concentration of serum folate was 7.5 ± 5.4 nmol/L and 55% of the women presented with folate deficiency (< 6.8 nmol/L). Multiple linear regression and principal component regression showed that serum folate levels were inversely associated with systolic and diastolic BP, after adjusting for demographic, anthropometric, and biochemical factors. Conclusions Serum folate is inversely associated with BP in non-pregnant women of childbearing age with high prevalence of folate deficiency. PMID:27182603

  11. Age, Sex, and Religious Beliefs Impact the Attitude towards Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Sundell, Inger Birgitta; Setzer, Teddi J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a self-administered questionnaire was used to assess opinions about stem cell research and cord blood banking. Three attitudes were examined: willingness to accept cord blood banking, willingness to accept embryonic stem cell research, and religious belief system. A total of 90 Wayne State University students enrolled in the study in response to an invitation posted on a web page for the university. Sex distribution among study participants was 79 females and eight males; three declined to state their sex. Support for cord blood banking was high (> 70%) among students. Students over the age of 25 years of age were more (85%) positive than students 18 to 24 years old (57%). They prefered a public cord blood bank over a private cord blood bank. Atheist/agnostic or spiritual/not religious students (> 90%), Catholic students (78%) and Christian students (58%) support cord blood banking. Age, sex and religion seems influence the student's attitude towards stem cell research and cord blood banking.

  12. DNA Methylation Patterns in Cord Blood of Neonates Across Gestational Age

    PubMed Central

    Braid, Susan M.; Okrah, Kwame; Shetty, Amol; Corrada Bravo, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Background A statistical methodology is available to estimate the proportion of cell types (cellular heterogeneity) in adult whole blood specimens used in epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS). However, there is no methodology to estimate the proportion of cell types in umbilical cord blood (also a heterogeneous tissue) used in EWAS. Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine whether differences in DNA methylation (DNAm) patterns in umbilical cord blood are the result of blood cell type proportion changes that typically occur across gestational age and to demonstrate the effect of cell type proportion confounding by comparing preterm infants exposed and not exposed to antenatal steroids. Methods We obtained DNAm profiles of cord blood using the Illumina HumanMethylation27k BeadChip array for 385 neonates from the Boston Birth Cohort. We estimated cell type proportions for six cell types using the deconvolution method developed by Houseman et al. (2012). Results The cell type proportion estimates segregated into two groups that were significantly different by gestational age, indicating that gestational age was associated with cell type proportion. Among infants exposed to antenatal steroids, the number of differentially methylated CpGs dropped from 127 to 1 after controlling for cell type proportion. Discussion EWAS utilizing cord blood are confounded by cell type proportion. Careful study design including correction for cell type proportion and interpretation of results of EWAS using cord blood are critical. PMID:28125511

  13. Normalization effect of sports training on blood pressure in hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Liang; Liu, Yuh-Feng; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Harris, Brennan; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2010-02-01

    Exercise is recommended as a lifestyle intervention in preventing hypertension based on epidemiological findings. However, previous intervention studies have presented mixed results. This discrepancy could be associated with shortcomings related to sample sizes or the inclusion of normotensive participants. The aim of this prospective cohort study (N = 463) was to compare the chronic effect of increasing sports training time on resting blood pressure for normotensives and hypertensives. We assessed systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for 69 untreated hypertensive patients (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg) and 394 normotensive controls (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years) before training and at follow-up visits at 12 months. All participants enrolled in various sports training lessons for 8 hours a week. The baseline BMI and HOMA-IR in the hypertensive group were significantly higher than those in the control group. For the normotensive control group, no significant changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed after training. However, for the hypertensives, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly reduced after training by approximately 15 mmHg and approximately 4 mmHg, respectively, and HOMA-IR was reduced by approximately 25%. In conclusion, the effect of sports training to lower blood pressure was confined to the group of hypertensives, which may account for the overall minimal reduction in blood pressure observed in previous intervention studies.

  14. [Dynamics of elements distribution in blood, depending on age, by example of Moscow Region residents].

    PubMed

    Yuvs, G G; Ignatova, T N; Anuchin, A M; Lebedeva, V L; Shilov, V V; Khapalyuk, A V

    2015-01-01

    Elemental status of a person determines the qualitative and quantitative content of chemical elements in the human body. This marker allows us to estimate the level of imbalance of chemical elements and therefore health risks. The method for simultaneous quantitative and qualitative analysis of 67 elements in biomaterials has been proposed. The detailed elemental analysis of whole blood samples of 1711 healthy people (age range 0-100 years) of Moscow Region has been performed. A number of patterns of age-related changes of the element status conditionally healthy people has been estimated. Na content in the samples increased with the age of the person. Presumably, this result reflects the studied populations nutrition disorders associated with immoderate consumption of table salt. The maximum content of Ca was observed in blood samples of people age range 0-20 years (66-69 mg/kg), the Ca content in the blood samples of people age range 26-85 years was significantly lower (59-62 mg/kg). The maximum decrease of Ca was detected in blood samples of people age range of 85-100 years (57-59 mg/kg). Thisreductionin the concentration of Ca, apparently due to age-related changes of Ca balance, correlates with decrease of bone mineral density and bone mass. Iron content decreased in the blood samples of people age range 10-100 years from 480 to 390 mg/kg. Selenium content in blood of people age range 0-25 years linearly increased, remained stable high in the blood of people age range 25-55 years (0,13-0,136 mg/kg) and then gradually decreased. A graph of As content dependence from a person's age is a mirror image of the graph of Se content dependence from a person's age, which is evidence of the antagonistic effects of these elements. Graphic changes in the content of rare earth elements Eu and Ho reflect the unidirectional trend of these elements accumulation. The maximum content of these elements was observed in blood samples of people age range of 25-65 years. Perhaps a

  15. Comparison of Cord Blood Lipid Profile in Preterm Small for Gestational Age and Appropriate for Gestational Age Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Katragadda, Tejasree; Shetty, Subodh; Baliga, Shantharam

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Coronary heart disease is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in current era. The roots of this epidemic have been traced to as early as foetal life by foetal origin hypothesis. There are a few studies which have compared the cord blood lipid profile of preterm and term babies and thereby leading a path to primordial prevention of chronic diseases. Aim To study cord blood lipid profile of preterm appropriate for gestational age and preterm small for gestational age neonates and compare atherogenic index of both groups. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 109 preterm infants. Cord blood samples were collected from placental side of umbilical cord at birth and analyzed for lipid profile which includes serum cholesterol, triglycerides, Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL), High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) and apolipoproteins which include ApoA1, Apo B. Results Preterm Small for Gestational Age (SGA) neonates had statistically significant higher values of triglycerides, Apo B and atherogenic index compared to preterm Appropriate for Gestational Age (AGA) neonates. Other measured lipid levels were not statistically significant, though the values were higher than reference ranges for term babies. Conclusion Prematurity as a factor associated with a more atherogenic lipid profile is re-affirmed and SGA as an additional risk factor has been proven giving scope for future research and primordial prevention. PMID:28274013

  16. Individual variability in human blood metabolites identifies age-related differences

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Itsuo; Takada, Junko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites present in human blood document individual physiological states influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle factors. Using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we performed nontargeted, quantitative metabolomics analysis in blood of 15 young (29 ± 4 y of age) and 15 elderly (81 ± 7 y of age) individuals. Coefficients of variation (CV = SD/mean) were obtained for 126 blood metabolites of all 30 donors. Fifty-five RBC-enriched metabolites, for which metabolomics studies have been scarce, are highlighted here. We found 14 blood compounds that show remarkable age-related increases or decreases; they include 1,5-anhydroglucitol, dimethyl-guanosine, acetyl-carnosine, carnosine, ophthalmic acid, UDP-acetyl-glucosamine, N-acetyl-arginine, N6-acetyl-lysine, pantothenate, citrulline, leucine, isoleucine, NAD+, and NADP+. Six of them are RBC-enriched, suggesting that RBC metabolomics is highly valuable for human aging research. Age differences are partly explained by a decrease in antioxidant production or increasing inefficiency of urea metabolism among the elderly. Pearson’s coefficients demonstrated that some age-related compounds are correlated, suggesting that aging affects them concomitantly. Although our CV values are mostly consistent with those CVs previously published, we here report previously unidentified CVs of 51 blood compounds. Compounds having moderate to high CV values (0.4–2.5) are often modified. Compounds having low CV values, such as ATP and glutathione, may be related to various diseases because their concentrations are strictly controlled, and changes in them would compromise health. Thus, human blood is a rich source of information about individual metabolic differences. PMID:27036001

  17. Vascular innervation in human skeletal muscle with and without neuromuscular disease. A quantitative ultrastructural study with references to the effects of age and different blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Case, C P; Girling, A J

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative ultrastructural study has been made of the innervation of 461 arterioles in 114 skeletal muscle biopsies of patients with or without neuromuscular disease excluding diabetes and autonomic neuropathy. In 18 controls the number of nerves and Schwann cells around each vessel was related to the size of the vessel, whether the vessel was within a muscle fascicle or between muscle fascicles. The innervation of arterioles increased with increased diastolic blood pressure. There was no statistically significant change in innervation with increased systolic blood pressure or with age, from 4 to 85 years. In 96 cases of neuromuscular disease and especially in motor neurone disease, axonal varicosities in cross section tended to be larger, more often contained no vesicles or only a few and had altered satellite cell cover depending on the location of the arteriole. Whilst the numerical density of Schwann cells did not change with disease, fewer varicosities were identified within Schwann cells in motor neurone disease, metabolic myopathy and neuropathy and myopathy due to toxins or vascular disease. Preterminal axons in nerve fascicles adjacent to arterioles were lost in polymyositis and muscle disease due to toxins or vascular disease. In polymyositis, metabolic myopathy and motor neurone disease there was some evidence of compensatory nerve sprouting, either in the nerve fascicles or in the adventitia of the arterioles. These structural changes may be related to the changes in blood flow or vascular reactivity described by others in motor neurone disease, polymyositis and metabolic myopathy. It is concluded that the ultrastructure of the vascular innervation of human skeletal muscle is similar to that in other mammals and is changed more with increased diastolic blood pressure and neuromuscular disease than with age.

  18. Hemodynamic correlates of late systolic flow velocity augmentation in the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Augustine, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-01

    Background. The contour of the common carotid artery (CCA) blood flow velocity waveform changes with age; CCA flow velocity increases during late systole, and this may contribute to cerebrovascular disease. Late systolic flow velocity augmentation can be quantified using the flow augmentation index (FAIx). We examined hemodynamic correlates of FAIx to gain insight into determinants of CCA flow patterns. Methods. CCA Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis (WIA) were used to assess regional hemodynamics in 18 young healthy men (age 22 ± 1 years). Forward waves (W 1) and backward waves (negative area, NA) were measured and used to calculate the reflection index (NA/W 1 = RIx). Additional parameters included W 2 which is a forward travelling expansion/decompression wave of myocardial origin that produces suction, CCA single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a measure of arterial stiffness, and CCA pressure augmentation index (AIx). Results. Primary correlates of FAIx included W 2 (r = - 0.52, P < 0.05), logRIx (r = 0.56, P < 0.05), and AIx (r = 0.60, P < 0.05). FAIx was not associated with CCA stiffness (P > 0.05). Conclusions. FAIx is a complex ventricular-vascular coupling parameter that is associated with both increased expansion wave magnitude (increased suction from the left ventricle) and increased pressure from wave reflections.

  19. Association between Blood Lead Levels and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ho Sik; Lee, Seung Bum; Jee, Donghyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between blood lead levels and prevalence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods A nationwide population-based cross-sectional study included 4,933 subjects aged over 40 years who participated in the 2008–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and for whom fundus photographs were available. All participants underwent a standardized interview, evaluation of blood lead concentration, and a comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Digital fundus photographs (45°) were taken of both eyes under physiological mydriasis. All fundus photographs were graded using an international classification and grading system. Results Mean blood lead levels were 3.15 μg/dL in men and 2.27 μg/dL in women (P < 0.001). After adjusting for potential confounders including age, gender, smoking status, total cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, heart problems and strokes, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) in women for any AMD was 1.86 (95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.03–3.36) and for early AMD was 1.92 (95% CI, 1.06–3.48), for those in the highest quintile of lead level compared with the lowest quintile. In men, however, blood lead level was not significantly associated with AMD. Conclusions Blood lead levels were higher in men, but were only associated with AMD in women. Increased levels of blood lead may be involved in the pathogenesis of AMD development in women. PMID:26252225

  20. Common variation in the WNK1 gene and blood pressure in childhood: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Martin D; Timpson, Nicholas J; Wain, Louise V; Ring, Susan; Jones, Louise R; Emmett, Pauline M; Palmer, Thomas M; Ness, Andrew R; Samani, Nilesh J; Smith, George Davey; Burton, Paul R

    2008-11-01

    WNK1 gene variants have been associated with adult blood pressure. We aimed to investigate relationships between WNK1 variants and blood pressure, as well as blood pressure change with age, in a longitudinal childhood study. Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in WNK1 and blood pressure and the rate of blood pressure change between 7 and 11 years were examined in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parent and Children Study (n=5326 for systolic blood pressure at 11 years). We observed associations (P<0.05) with diastolic blood pressure gradient with age for 33 of 82 typed and imputed polymorphisms, including polymorphisms in exons 4, 10, and 11 (rs10774466, rs1012729, and rs9804992). The minor allele (G) of rs1012729 (frequency: 25.6%) was associated with a gender-adjusted change in a diastolic blood pressure gradient of -0.11 mm Hg/y (95% CI: -0.20 to -0.03 mm Hg/y; P=0.0054). No associations were shown with the systolic blood pressure gradient. At age 11 years, 30 polymorphisms showed association (P<0.05) with systolic blood pressure, including variants in exons 4 and 10 (rs10774466 and rs1012729). Only 3 polymorphisms were associated with diastolic blood pressure at 11 years. In exploration of polymorphism-dietary cation interactions on systolic blood pressure at 11 years, 59 reached significance (P<0.05; 12.3 expected by chance), mostly (n=33) related to dietary calcium. The findings show that common intronic and exonic WNK1 variants are associated with diastolic blood pressure gradient from 7 to 11 years and with systolic blood pressure at 11 years. Our study suggests that previously reported effects of WNK1 variants on blood pressure are mediated via effects on the gradient of blood pressure change with age.

  1. Effect of age on cerebral blood flow during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Brusino, F.G.; Reves, J.G.; Smith, L.R.; Prough, D.S.; Stump, D.A.; McIntyre, R.W.

    1989-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured in 20 patients by xenon 133 clearance methodology during nonpulsatile hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass to determine the effect of age on regional cerebral blood flow during these conditions. Measurements of cerebral blood flow at varying perfusion pressures were made in patients arbitrarily divided into two age groups at nearly identical nasopharyngeal temperature, hematocrit value, and carbon dioxide tension and with equal cardiopulmonary bypass flows of 1.6 L/min/m2. The range of mean arterial pressure was 30 to 110 mm Hg for group I (less than or equal to 50 years of age) and 20 to 90 mm Hg for group II (greater than or equal to 65 years of age). There was no significant difference (p = 0.32) between the mean arterial pressure in group I (54 +/- 28 mm Hg) and that in group II (43 +/- 21 mm Hg). The range of cerebral blood flow was 14.8 to 29.2 ml/100 gm/min for group I and 13.8 to 37.5 ml/100 gm/min for group II. There was no significant difference (p = 0.37) between the mean cerebral blood flow in group I (21.5 +/- 4.6 ml/100 gm/min) and group II (24.3 +/- 8.1 ml/100 gm/min). There was a poor correlation between mean arterial pressure and cerebral blood flow in both groups: group I, r = 0.16 (p = 0.67); group II, r = 0.5 (p = 0.12). In 12 patients, a second cerebral blood flow measurements was taken to determine the effect of mean arterial pressure on cerebral blood flow in the individual patient. Changes in mean arterial pressure did not correlate with changes in cerebral blood flow (p less than 0.90). We conclude that age does not alter cerebral blood flow and that cerebral blood flow autoregulation is preserved in elderly patients during nonpulsatile hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass.

  2. Evidence for a major gene influencing 7-year increases in diastolic blood pressure with age

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shu-Chuan Cheng; Carmelli, D.; Hunt, S.C.

    1995-11-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to blood pressure levels is well established. The contribution of genes to the longitudinal change in blood pressure has been less well studied, because of the lack of longitudinal family data. The present study investigated a possible major-gene effect on the observed increase with age in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels. Subjects included 965 unmedicated adults (age {ge}18 years) in 73 pedigrees collected in Utah as part of a longitudinal cardiovascular family study. Segregation analysis of DBP change over 7.2 years of follow-up identified a recessive major-gene effect with a gene frequency of p = .23. There was also a significant age effect on the genotypic means, which decreased expression of the major gene at older ages. For those inferred to have the genotype responsible for large DBP increases, DBP increased 32.3%, compared with a 1.5% increase in the nonsusceptible group (P < .0001). The relative risk of developing hypertension between the susceptible and nonsusceptible groups after 7.2 years was 2.4 (P = .006). Baseline DBP reactivities to mental arithmetic (P < .0001) and isometric hand-grip (P < .0001) stress tests were greatest in those assigned to the susceptible genotype. We conclude that age-related changes in DBP are influenced by a major gene. Characteristics of this major-gene effect for greater age-related blood pressure increases include greater reactivity to mental and physical stressors. The present study thus provides evidence for genetic control of changes in blood pressure, in addition to the previously suggested genetic control of absolute blood pressure level. 28 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Blood pressure measurement using finger cuff.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Choi, E; Jeong, H; Kim, K; Park, J

    2005-01-01

    Many research groups have studied blood pressure measurement in finger artery because of its convenience. But, low accuracy prohibits many hypertension patients from using this device. So, we suggest measurement algorithm that measure systolic and diastolic blood pressure in finger artery. And we also develop calibration method that decreases the error from difference of finger circumference by subjects. We apply our methods for 90 subjects (age form 20 to 49, 55 male, 35 female) to test feasibility of our method by AAMI SP10 standard. The mean difference of our system is ±4.7mmHg for systolic pressure, ±4.2mmHg for systolic pressure. It proved that the feasibility of our method is clinically acceptable.(under ±5mmHg).

  4. Shear-induced hemolysis: effects of blood chemistry (including aging in storage) and shearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Offeman, R D; Williams, M C

    1976-01-01

    Rotating disks were used to hemolyze blood under low-stress laminar flow conditions. In the first sequence of tests, kinetic hemolysis curves (KHC) were obtained with polyethylene disks for three well-characterized bloods and repeated over a period of four weeks. Each blood had a KHC with different shape, which maintained its characteristics while aging. Correlations were sought between D6000 (percent of complete hemolysis, after 6000 sec of shear) and D0 (measured before shear) by two means of data analysis, in terms of blood chemistry. It was found that uric acid and very-low-density lipoprotein levels were most useful in predicting the characteristic D6000 vs. D0 relation for each blood, and that glucose levels correlated the rate of aging as measured by hemolysis. Other chemical factors are also displayed in terms of their influence on D0. The second series of tests consisted of comparing the KHC for four disk materials using a fourth blood, then repeating with a fifth blood. Hemolytic rankings of the materials were the same with these two blood, although the KHC shapes differed. The rankings were: polyvinyl chloride greater than Silastic approximately equal to polyethylene greater than polyether urethane, with PVC most hemolytic. In another sequence for examining materials effects, five different bloods were used to compare the hemolytic properties of Teflon, nylon, and polyethylene disks. Although the KHC for the three disks bore different relationships to each other with each different blood, extrapolation of data beyond 6000 sec suggests a ranking of Teflon greater than nylon greater than polyethylene.

  5. An effective strategy to reduce blood pressure after forest walking in middle-aged and aged people

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Masahiro; Endo, Junko; Akatsuka, Shin; Hasegawa, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Eriko; Uno, Tadashi; Kikuchi, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Forest walking may be effective for human health, but little information is available about effects of energy expenditure on blood pressure responses after forest walking. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the activity energy expenditure and changes in blood pressure in individuals after forest walking. [Subjects] The subjects were 54 middle-aged and elderly people. [Methods] All subjects walked in the forest for approximately 90 min. Blood pressure, salivary amylase, and the Profile of Mood States were evaluated before and after forest walking, and activity energy expenditure was monitored throughout forest walking. Subjects were divided into two groups according to mean arterial pressure changes: a responder group (>5% decreases) and a nonresponder group (<5%). [Results] Forest walking significantly reduced the mean arterial pressure and improved the Profile of Mood States in both groups. Activity energy expenditure was related to changes in mean arterial pressure in the responder group, while this relation was not observed in the nonresponder group. Differential activity energy expenditure did not strongly affect improvement of the Profile of Mood States. [Conclusion] Greater walking-related greater activity energy expenditure might be required to accentuate physiological beneficial effects on in middle-aged and aged people. Furthermore, the forest environment per se can attenuate psychological stress. PMID:26834337

  6. Decreases in bone blood flow and bone material properties in aging Fischer-344 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Susan A.; Hogan, Harry A.; Delp, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify precisely aging-induced changes in skeletal perfusion and bone mechanical properties in a small rodent model. Blood flow was measured in conscious juvenile (2 months old), adult (6 months old), and aged (24 months old) male Fischer-344 rats using radiolabeled microspheres. There were no significant differences in bone perfusion rate or vascular resistance between juvenile and adult rats. However, blood flow was lower in aged versus adult rats in the forelimb bones, scapulas, and femurs. To test for functional effects of this decline in blood flow, bone mineral density and mechanical properties were measured in rats from these two age groups. Bone mineral density and cross-sectional moment of inertia in femoral and tibial shafts and the femoral neck were significantly larger in the aged versus adult rats, resulting in increased (+14%-53%) breaking strength and stiffness. However, intrinsic material properties at midshaft of the long bones were 12% to 25% lower in the aged rats. Although these data are consistent with a potential link between decreased perfusion and focal alterations in bone remodeling activity related to clinically relevant bone loss, additional studies are required to establish the mechanisms for this putative relationship.

  7. Long-term ambient particle exposures and blood DNA methylation age: findings from the VA normative aging study

    PubMed Central

    Nwanaji-Enwerem, Jamaji C.; Colicino, Elena; Trevisi, Letizia; Kloog, Itai; Just, Allan C.; Shen, Jincheng; Brennan, Kasey; Dereix, Alexandra; Hou, Lifang; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ambient particles have been shown to exacerbate measures of biological aging; yet, no studies have examined their relationships with DNA methylation age (DNAm-age), an epigenome-wide DNA methylation based predictor of chronological age. Objective We examined the relationship of DNAm-age with fine particulate matter (PM2.5), a measure of total inhalable particle mass, and black carbon (BC), a measure of particles from vehicular traffic. Methods We used validated spatiotemporal models to generate 1-year PM2.5 and BC exposure levels at the addresses of 589 older men participating in the VA Normative Aging Study with 1–3 visits between 2000 and 2011 (n = 1032 observations). Blood DNAm-age was calculated using 353 CpG sites from the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. We estimated associations of PM2.5 and BC with DNAm-age using linear mixed effects models adjusted for age, lifestyle/environmental factors, and aging-related diseases. Results After adjusting for covariates, a 1-µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (95% CI: 0.30, 0.75, P<0.0001) was significantly associated with a 0.52-year increase in DNAm-age. Adjusted BC models showed similar patterns of association (β = 3.02, 95% CI: 0.48, 5.57, P = 0.02). Only PM2.5 (β = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.84, P = 0.0004) remained significantly associated with DNAm-age in two-particle models. Methylation levels from 20 of the 353 CpGs contributing to DNAm-age were significantly associated with PM2.5 levels in our two-particle models. Several of these CpGs mapped to genes implicated in lung pathologies including LZTFL1, PDLIM5, and ATPAF1. Conclusion Our results support an association of long-termambient particle levels with DNAm-age and suggest that DNAm-age is a biomarker of particle-related physiological processes. PMID:27453791

  8. Systolic closure of aortic valve in patients with prosthetic mitral valves.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar, M; Motro, M; Rath, S; Schy, N; Neufeld, H N

    1982-01-01

    Systolic closure of the aortic valve was found in 10 of 36 patients who underwent mitral valve replacement. Eight patients had early systolic closure, and two had mid-systolic closure. The left ventricular outflow tract dimension on M-mode and two dimensional echocardiograms, left ventricular posterior wall and septal thickness, left ventricular dimensions in systole and diastole, aortic valve opening, and mitral to aortic valve distance were not significantly different between patients with and without systolic closure of the aortic valve. Two of the 10 patients with systolic aortic valve closure were catheterised and in neither was there a gradient between the left ventricle and the aorta. The two patients with mid-systolic closure, however, were the patients who had the narrowest left ventricular outflow tract which could cause significant distortion of blood flow. Systolic closure of the aortic valve in patients with mitral valve replacement is probably not caused by left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, though abnormalities in laminar flow from the left ventricular outflow tract may be involved. Images PMID:7082513

  9. Analysis of DNA methylation of potential age-related methylation sites in canine peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Genta; Yoshimura, Kuniko; Momoi, Yasuyuki

    2017-04-08

    Reliable methodology for predicting the age of mature dogs is currently unavailable. In this study, amplicon sequencing of 50 blood samples obtained from diseased dogs was used to measure methylation in seven DNA regions. Significant correlations between methylation level and age were identified in four of the seven regions. These four regions were then tested in samples from 31 healthy toy poodles, and correlations were detected in two regions. The age of another 11 dogs was predicted using data from the diseased dogs and the healthy poodles. The mean difference between the actual and calculated ages was 34.3 and 23.1 months, respectively. Further research is needed to identify additional sites of age-related methylation and allow accurate age prediction in dogs.

  10. Endothelium-mediated coronary blood flow modulation in humans. Effects of age, atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Zeiher, A M; Drexler, H; Saurbier, B; Just, H

    1993-01-01

    The effects of age, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia on vascular function of the coronary circulation were studied by subselective intracoronary infusions of acetylcholine, which releases endothelium-derived relaxing factor, and papaverine, which directly relaxes vascular smooth muscle, in normal patients (n = 18; no risk factors for coronary artery disease), in patients with evidence of early atherosclerosis but normal cholesterol levels and normal blood pressure (n = 12), in patients with hypertension without left ventricular hypertrophy (n = 12), and in patients with hypercholesterolemia (n = 20). Papaverine-induced maximal increases in coronary blood flow were significantly greater in normals, but no differences were noted between the groups of patients with early atherosclerosis, with hypertension, and with hypercholesterolemia. The capacity of the coronary system to increase blood flow in response to acetylcholine was similar in normal and normocholesterolemic patients with epicardial atherosclerosis and/or hypertension but was significantly impaired in patients with hypercholesterolemia, irrespective of evidence of epicardial atherosclerotic lesions. Age (r = -0.62, P < 0.0001) and total serum cholesterol levels (r = -0.70; P < 0.0001) were the only significant independent predictors of a blunted coronary blood flow response to acetylcholine. Thus, hypercholesterolemia and advanced age selectively impair endothelium-mediated relaxation of the coronary microvasculature in response to acetylcholine, whereas endothelial dysfunction is restricted to epicardial arteries in age-matched normocholesterolemic patients with evidence of coronary atherosclerosis and/or hypertension. Images PMID:8349804

  11. Blood lead levels in children aged 24 to 36 months in Vancouver.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, A; Hertzman, C; Peck, S H; Lockitch, G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the blood lead levels in children and to identify risk factors for elevated levels. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Vancouver. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of children aged 24 to 36 months, born and still resident in Vancouver. The sample was stratified proportionally by the median annual family income in the census tract where each family resided. OUTCOME MEASURES: Blood lead levels and risk factors for elevated blood lead levels, determined from a questionnaire administered to parents. RESULTS: Of the children in the sample, 42% (178/422) were ineligible or could not be located. Of the remaining children, 73% (177/244) participated and adequate blood specimens were obtained from 172. The mean blood lead level was 0.29 mumol/L (standard deviation 0.13 mumol/L). (A blood lead level of 1 mumol/L is equivalent to 20.7 micrograms/dL.) The lowest level was 0.06 mumol/L, and the highest was 0.85 mumol/L. Of children with adequate samples, 8.1% (14/172) had blood lead levels of 0.48 mumol/L or higher, and 0.6% (1/172) had a level higher than 0.72 mumol/L. The logarithms of the levels were normally distributed, with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.26 mumol/L (geometric standard deviation 1.56). Of approximately 70 possible predictors of blood lead levels analysed, those that showed a statistically significant association (p < 0.05) with increased blood lead levels were soldering performed in the home as part of an electronics hobby (GM blood lead level 0.34 mumol/L, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27 to 0.39 mumol/L), aboriginal heritage (GM blood lead level 0.33 mumol/L, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.39 mumol/L), dwelling built before 1921 (GM blood lead level 0.32 mumol/L, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.37 mumol/L), age of water service connection to dwelling (predicted blood lead level 0.00087 mumol/L [95% CI 0.00005 to 0.00169 mumol/L] higher per year since service connection) and decreased stature (predicted blood lead level 0.018 mumol/L [95% CI 0.0353 to 0

  12. Distribution and observed associations of orthostatic blood pressure changes in elderly general medicine outpatients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; DesJardin, J. A.; Lichtenstein, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Factors associated with orthostatic blood pressure change in elderly outpatients were determined by surveying 398 medical clinical outpatients aged 65 years and older. Blood pressure was measured with random-zero sphygmomanometers after patients were 5 minutes in a supine and 5 minutes in a standing position. Orthostatic blood pressure changes were at normally distributed levels with systolic and diastolic pressures dropping an average of 4 mm Hg (standard deviation [SD]=15 mm Hg) and 2 mm Hg (SD=11 mm Hg), respectively. Orthostatic blood pressure changes were unassociated with age, race, sex, body mass, time since eating, symptoms, or other factors. According to multiple linear regression analysis, supine systolic pressure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and diabetes mellitus were associated with a decrease in systolic pressure on standing. Hypertension, antiarthritic drugs, and abnormal heartbeat were associated with an increase in systolic pressure on standing. For orthostatic diastolic pressure changes, supine diastolic pressure and COPD were associated with a decrease in diastolic pressure on standing. Congestive heart failure was associated with an increase in standing diastolic pressure. Using logistic regression analysis, only supine systolic pressure was associated with a greater than 20-mm Hg drop in systolic pressure (n=53, prevalence=13%). Supine diastolic pressure and COPD were the only variables associated with a greater than 20-mm Hg drop in diastolic pressure (n=16, prevalence=4%). These factors may help physicians in identifying older persons at risk for having orthostatic hypotension.

  13. Radiographic evaluation of destructive periodontal disease in blue mink in relation to age and blood morphology

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract In this study, blood samples and jaws were collected from 2 genotypes of blue mink (n = 289) in order to examine phenotypic expression of specific characteristics of Chediak-Higashi Syndrome (C-HS). Blood samples were subjected to differential counts to assess the proportion of abnormal polymorphonuclear leukocytes characteristic for CH-S (C-HS-leukocytes). Abnormal leukocytes with characteristic signs of C-HS were found in blood smears from all mink included in this study. Four teeth in one half of the mandible (P3, P4, M1, M2) were subjected to quantitative radiographic evaluation of alveolar bone loss and tooth loss. There was a high prevalence of destructive periodontal disease among blue mink included in this study. Mild to moderate periodontal disease (defined by less than 50% alveolar bone loss related to 1 or more teeth) affected 73.7% of young mink (age = 7 mo) and 67.9% of older animals (age ≥ 19 mo). Severe periodontal disease (defined by more than 50% bone loss related to one or more teeth) was not detected in mink aged 7 mo, but affected 15.3% of mink aged 19 mo and 39.6% of mink aged 31 mo. The positive relationship between age and periodontal disease was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The prevalence of tooth loss was found to be high among blue mink aged >19 mo (21.6%) and was also significantly related to age (P < 0.01). A significant positive interaction between alveolar bone loss and tooth loss (P < 0.01), implies that the highly prevalent tooth loss in the mink was related to and possibly caused by destructive periodontal disease. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of periodontal disease between the 2 genotypes and age was found to be the only statistical predictor of poor production results (P < 0.01) in blue mink. PMID:15971677

  14. Red blood cell complement receptor one level varies with Knops blood group, α+thalassaemia and age among Kenyan children

    PubMed Central

    Opi, D H; Uyoga, S; Orori, E N; Williams, T N; Rowe, J A

    2016-01-01

    Both the invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by Plasmodium falciparum parasites and the sequestration of parasite-infected RBCs in the microvasculature are mediated in part by complement receptor one (CR1). RBC surface CR1 level can vary between individuals by more than 20-fold and may be associated with the risk of severe malaria. The factors that influence RBC CR1 level variation are poorly understood, particularly in African populations. We studied 3535 child residents of a malaria-endemic region of coastal Kenya and report, for the first time, that the CR1 Knops blood group alleles Sl2 and McCb, and homozygous HbSS are positively associated with RBC CR1 level. Sickle cell trait and ABO blood group did not influence RBC CR1 level. We also confirm the previous observation that α+thalassaemia is associated with reduced RBC CR1 level, possibly due to small RBC volume, and that age-related changes in RBC CR1 expression occur throughout childhood. RBC CR1 level in malaria-endemic African populations is a complex phenotype influenced by multiple factors that should be taken into account in the design and interpretation of future studies on CR1 and malaria susceptibility. PMID:26844958

  15. Human red blood cell aging: correlative changes in surface charge and cell properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Wu, Zheng-Jie; Mehrishi, Jitendra; Huang, Bao-Tian; Chen, Xing-Yao; Zheng, Xin-Jing; Liu, Wen-Jing; Luo, Man

    2011-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) during microcirculation, aging and storage, lose N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) and other biomaterials thereby altering cell structures, some properties and functions. Such cell damage very likely underlies the serious adverse effects of blood transfusion. However, a controversy has remained since 1961-1977 as to whether with aging, the RBCs, suffering loss of NANA, do have a decreased charge density. Any correlation between the changes in the cell properties with cell aging is also not clear. Therefore, to remove the ambiguity and uncertainty, we carried out multiparameteric studies on Percoll fractions of blood of 38 volunteers (lightest-young-Y-RBCs, densest-old-O-RBCs, two middle fractions).We found that there were striking differences between the properties of Y-RBCs and O-RBCs. The ζ-potential of Y-RBCs decreased gradually with aging. Studies in parallel on RBC fractions incubated with both positively charged quantum dots and Sambucus Nigra-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) along with their ζ-potentials provide for the first time direct visual evidence about the lesser amount of charge density and NANA on O-RBCs, and a collinear decrease in their respective ζ-potentials. Close correlation was found between the surface charge on an aging RBC and its structure and functions, from the cell morphology, the membrane deformability to the intracellular Hb structure and oxidation ability. This quantitative approach not only clarifies the picture but also has implications in biology and medicine.

  16. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts, and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red ...

  17. Improved age determination of blood and teeth samples using a selected set of DNA methylation markers

    PubMed Central

    Kamalandua, Aubeline

    2015-01-01

    Age estimation from DNA methylation markers has seen an exponential growth of interest, not in the least from forensic scientists. The current published assays, however, can still be improved by lowering the number of markers in the assay and by providing more accurate models to predict chronological age. From the published literature we selected 4 age-associated genes (ASPA, PDE4C, ELOVL2, and EDARADD) and determined CpG methylation levels from 206 blood samples of both deceased and living individuals (age range: 0–91 years). This data was subsequently used to compare prediction accuracy with both linear and non-linear regression models. A quadratic regression model in which the methylation levels of ELOVL2 were squared showed the highest accuracy with a Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) between chronological age and predicted age of 3.75 years and an adjusted R2 of 0.95. No difference in accuracy was observed for samples obtained either from living and deceased individuals or between the 2 genders. In addition, 29 teeth from different individuals (age range: 19–70 years) were analyzed using the same set of markers resulting in a MAD of 4.86 years and an adjusted R2 of 0.74. Cross validation of the results obtained from blood samples demonstrated the robustness and reproducibility of the assay. In conclusion, the set of 4 CpG DNA methylation markers is capable of producing highly accurate age predictions for blood samples from deceased and living individuals PMID:26280308

  18. Right ventricular systolic function is not the sole determinant of tricuspid annular motion.

    PubMed

    López-Candales, Angel; Rajagopalan, Navin; Saxena, Neil; Gulyasy, Beth; Edelman, Kathy; Bazaz, Raveen

    2006-10-01

    Maximal tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) correlates well with right ventricular (RV) function; however, little is known regarding the impact of left ventricular (LV) systolic function on TAPSE. Consequently, TAPSE was examined in 206 patients (105 men; mean age 56 +/- 17 years), and the data were analyzed with respect to RV (RV fractional area change 45 +/- 19%) and LV (56 +/- 17%) systolic function. The mean TAPSE for the population studied was 1.97 +/- 0.72 cm. Although a strong linear correlation was noted between RV fractional area change and TAPSE (r = 0.73, p <0.0001), relative differences with regard to TAPSE were also found. First, the greatest TAPSE was noted only when RV and LV systolic function were normal (2.46 +/- 0.50 cm). Second, patients with reduced RV systolic function had the smallest TAPSE (1.28 +/- 0.48 cm, p <0.0001). Third, patients with normal RV function but reduced LV systolic function had TAPSE (1.91 +/- 0.54 cm, p <0.0001) that was intermediate between that of patients with normal RV and LV systolic function and those with abnormal RV systolic function. Fourth, patients with reduced biventricular function had the smallest TAPSE (1.16 +/- 0.41 cm, p <0.0001). In conclusion, TAPSE is not only determined by RV systolic function but also appears to depend on LV systolic function. TAPSE <2.0 cm is associated with some degree of either RV or LV dysfunction, whereas a value >2.0 cm suggests normal biventricular systolic function.

  19. Effects of Adult Age and Blood Pressure on Executive Function and Speed of Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, Barbara; Madden, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has established that the effects of chronically increased blood pressure (BP) on cognition interact with adult age, but the relevant cognitive processes are not well defined. In this cross sectional study, using a sample matched for age, years of education, and sex, 134 individuals with either normal BP (n = 71) or chronically high BP (n = 63) were categorized into younger (19-39 years), middle-aged (41-58 years), and older (60-79 years) groups. Using a between-subjects ANOVA, covarying for race and years of education, composite measures of executive function and perceptual speed both exhibited age-related decline. The executive function measure, however, was associated with a differential decline in high BP older adults. This result held even when the executive function scores were covaried for speed, demonstrating an independent, age-related effect of higher BP on executive function. PMID:20209419

  20. Age and regional cerebral blood flow at rest and during cognitive activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, R.C.; Gur, R.E.; Obrist, W.D.; Skolnick, B.E.; Reivich, M.

    1987-07-01

    The relationship between age and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) activation for cognitive tasks was investigated with the xenon (Xe 133) inhalation technique. The sample consisted of 55 healthy subjects, ranging in age from 18 to 72 years, who were studied during rest and during the performance of verbal analogy and spatial orientation tasks. The dependent measures were indexes of gray-matter rCBF and average rCBF (gray and white matter) as well as the percentage of gray-matter tissue. Advanced age was associated with reduced flow, particularly pronounced in anterior regions. However, the extent and pattern of rCBF changes during cognition was unaffected by age. For the percentage of gray matter, there was a specific reduction in anterior regions of the left hemisphere. The findings suggest the utility of this research paradigm for investigating neural underpinnings of the effects of dementia on cognitive functioning, relative to the effects of normal aging.

  1. Effects of exercise training on neurovascular control and skeletal myopathy in systolic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Middlekauff, Holly R.; Gomes-Santos, Igor L.; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurohormonal excitation and dyspnea are the hallmarks of heart failure (HF) and have long been associated with poor prognosis in HF patients. Sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and ventilatory equivalent of carbon dioxide (VE/VO2) are elevated in moderate HF patients and increased even further in severe HF patients. The increase in SNA in HF patients is present regardless of age, sex, and etiology of systolic dysfunction. Neurohormonal activation is the major mediator of the peripheral vasoconstriction characteristic of HF patients. In addition, reduction in peripheral blood flow increases muscle inflammation, oxidative stress, and protein degradation, which is the essence of the skeletal myopathy and exercise intolerance in HF. Here we discuss the beneficial effects of exercise training on resting SNA in patients with systolic HF and its central and peripheral mechanisms of control. Furthermore, we discuss the exercise-mediated improvement in peripheral vasoconstriction in patients with HF. We will also focus on the effects of exercise training on ventilatory responses. Finally, we review the effects of exercise training on features of the skeletal myopathy in HF. In summary, exercise training plays an important role in HF, working synergistically with pharmacological therapies to ameliorate these abnormalities in clinical practice. PMID:25681428

  2. Endothelial function in postmenopausal women with nighttime systolic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Faye S.; Hinderliter, Alan L.; McFetridge-Durdle, Judith; Blumenthal, James A.; Paine, Nicola J.; Sherwood, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypertension becomes more prevalent in women during their postmenopausal years. Nighttime systolic blood pressure (SBP) is especially predictive of adverse cardiac events and the relationship between rising nighttime SBP and cardiovascular risk increases more rapidly in women compared to men. The reasons for the prognostic significance of nighttime SBP are not completely known, but may involve vascular endothelial dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of nighttime SBP and endothelial function, assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and to determine whether postmenopausal women with nighttime hypertension (SBP≥120 mm Hg) evidenced greater endothelial dysfunction compared to women with normal nighttime SBP. Methods One-hundred postmenopausal women (mean age: 65.8 ± 7.5 years, body mass index: 28.3 ± 4.7 kg/m2, hypertension: 47%, coronary artery disease: 51%, mean clinic BP 137 ± 17/67 ± 11 mm Hg, 34 with nighttime hypertension) underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, actigraphy, and brachial artery FMD assessments. Results Multivariate regression models showed that higher nighttime SBP and larger baseline artery diameter were inversely related to FMD. Nighttime SBP and baseline artery diameter accounted for 23% of the variance in FMD. After adjusting for baseline artery diameter, women with nighttime hypertension had lower FMD than women with normal nighttime SBP (2.95%±0.65 vs 5.52%±0.46, p = .002). Conclusions In postmenopausal women, nighttime hypertension was associated with reduced endothelial function. Research examining the therapeutic benefits of treating nighttime hypertension on endothelial function and future cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women is warranted. PMID:25563797

  3. Color-coded Doppler imaging of systolic flow patterns in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tencate, F J; Mayala, A P; Vletter, W B; Roelandt, J

    1985-01-01

    We studied 11 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by color Doppler echocardiography (Group I: 6 patients with outflow obstruction, and Group II: 5 patients without outflow obstruction) to assess systolic structure and function as observed by cross-sectional echocardiography in relation to the flow dynamics. The structure and function included systolic anterior motion of mitral valve (SAM), midsystolic aortic valve closure (AoC), systolic cavity obliteration and the presence and timing of mitral incompetence. Their occurrence and timing was related to presence of aortic systolic flow and presence of turbulence. While all patients in Group I had SAM and turbulence, none of the patients in Group II had SAM nor turbulence. Early mitral incompetence appearing before SAM and turbulence, occurred in all patients of Group I and in none of Group II. Midsystolic aortic valve closure was only present in Group I and blood flow was unilaterally directed so that only 60% of aortic cross-sectional area showed blood flow. We conclude that mitral incompetence in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in early systole is common when outflow gradient is present and is independent of mitral incompetence of mid- and late systole. During SAM, turbulence in the subaortic area and mid and late mitral incompetence occurred simultaneously. The midsystolic aortic valve closure was related to the unilaterally directed blood flow through the aortic cross-sectional area.

  4. Involvement of blood mononuclear cells in the infertility, age-associated diseases and cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    Blood mononuclear cells consist of T cells and monocyte derived cells. Beside immunity, the blood mononuclear cells belong to the complex tissue control system (TCS), where they exhibit morphostatic function by stimulating proliferation of tissue stem cells followed by cellular differentiation, that is stopped after attaining the proper functional stage, which differs among various tissue types. Therefore, the term immune and morphostatic system (IMS) should be implied. The TCS-mediated morphostasis also consists of vascular pericytes controlled by autonomic innervation, which is regulating the quantity of distinct tissues in vivo. Lack of proper differentiation of tissue cells by TCS causes either tissue underdevelopment, e.g., muscular dystrophy, or degenerative functional failures, e.g., type 1 diabetes and age-associated diseases. With the gradual IMS regression after 35 years of age the gonadal infertility develops, followed by a growing incidence of age-associated diseases and cancers. Without restoring an altered TCS function in a degenerative disease, the implantation of tissue-specific stem cells alone by regenerative medicine can not be successful. Transfused young blood could temporarily restore fertility to enable parenthood. The young blood could also temporarily alleviate aging diseases, and this can be extended by substances inducing IMS regeneration, like the honey bee propolis. The local and/or systemic use of honey bee propolis stopped hair and teeth loss, regressed varicose veins, improved altered hearing, and lowered high blood pressure and sugar levels. Complete regression of stage IV ovarian cancer with liver metastases after a simple elaborated immunotherapy is also reported. PMID:28074124

  5. Cardiorespiratory fitness mediates the effects of aging on cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Benjamin; Sutton, Bradley P.; Low, Kathy A.; Fletcher, Mark A.; Tan, Chin Hong; Schneider-Garces, Nils; Li, Yanfen; Ouyang, Cheng; Maclin, Edward L.; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The brain's vasculature is likely to be subjected to the same age-related physiological and anatomical changes affecting the rest of the cardiovascular system. Since aerobic fitness is known to alleviate both cognitive and volumetric losses in the brain, it is important to investigate some of the possible mechanisms underlying these beneficial changes. Here we investigated the role that estimated cardiorespiratory fitness (eCRF) plays in determining the relationship between aging and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a group of older adults (ages 55–85). Using arterial spin labeling to quantify CBF, we found that blood flow in the gray matter was positively correlated with eCRF and negatively correlated with age. Subsequent analyses revealed that eCRF fully mediated the effects of age on CBF in the gray matter, but not in the white matter. Additionally, regional measures of CBF were related to regional measures of brain volume. These findings provide evidence that age-related effects on cerebrovascular health and perfusion in older adults are largely influenced by their eCRF levels. PMID:24778617

  6. Age-associated physiological and pathological changes at the blood-brain barrier: A review.

    PubMed

    Erdő, Franciska; Denes, László; de Lange, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The age-associated decline of the neurological and cognitive functions becomes more and more serious challenge for the developed countries with the increasing number of aged populations. The morphological and biochemical changes in the aging brain are the subjects of many extended research projects worldwide for a long time. However, the crucial role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment and disruption in the pathological processes in age-associated neurodegenerative disorders received special attention just for a few years. This article gives an overview on the major elements of the blood-brain barrier and its supporting mechanisms and also on their alterations during development, physiological aging process and age-associated neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, pharmacoresistant epilepsy). Besides the morphological alterations of the cellular elements (endothelial cells, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, neuronal elements) of the BBB and neurovascular unit, the changes of the barrier at molecular level (tight junction proteins, adheres junction proteins, membrane transporters, basal lamina, extracellular matrix) are also summarized. The recognition of new players and initiators of the process of neurodegeneration at the level of the BBB may offer new avenues for novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of numerous chronic neurodegenerative disorders currently without effective medication.

  7. Caloric restriction increases ketone bodies metabolism and preserves blood flow in aging brain

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Xiaoli; Watts, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to increase the life span and health span of a broad range of species. However, CR effects on in vivo brain functions are far from explored. In this study, we used multimetric neuroimaging methods to characterize the CR-induced changes of brain metabolic and vascular functions in aging rats. We found that old rats (24 months of age) with CR diet had reduced glucose uptake and lactate concentration, but increased ketone bodies level, compared with the age-matched and young (5 months of age) controls. The shifted metabolism was associated with preserved vascular function: old CR rats also had maintained cerebral blood flow relative to the age-matched controls. When investigating the metabolites in mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, we found that citrate and α-ketoglutarate were preserved in the old CR rats. We suggest that CR is neuroprotective; ketone bodies, cerebral blood flow, and α-ketoglutarate may play important roles in preserving brain physiology in aging. PMID:25896951

  8. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children and adolescents: coming of age?

    PubMed

    Lurbe, Empar; Torró, María Isabel; Alvarez, Julio

    2013-06-01

    Over the last years, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been introduced into the pediatric population, contributing to a significant increase in the bulk of knowledge of crucial clinically relevant issues. Guidelines have established the currently known conditions where ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is useful and where it will provide additional information in children and adolescents. How common and important the intra-individual differences are within clinical and ambulatory blood pressure is the keystone to the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as a diagnostic tool. By using not only office, but also ambulatory blood pressure, four possible situations arise. Two of these have values in agreement for normotension or hypertension. Two have values that are discrepant. The latter two are known as white coat and masked hypertension. The relationship with hypertension-induced organ damage, the prognostic value and the assessment of treatment goals are key issues of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. In children, the accurate identification of hypertension at the earliest possible age would, therefore, give health-care providers the opportunity to initiate preventive measures, thereby reducing the chance of developing end-organ damage and its attendant morbidity and mortality.

  9. Quantile Regression Analysis of the Distributional Effects of Air Pollution on Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Variability, Blood Lipids, and Biomarkers of Inflammation in Elderly American Men: The Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Bind, Marie-Abele; Peters, Annette; Koutrakis, Petros; Coull, Brent; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have observed associations between air pollution and heart disease. Susceptibility to air pollution effects has been examined mostly with a test of effect modification, but little evidence is available whether air pollution distorts cardiovascular risk factor distribution. Objectives: This paper aims to examine distributional and heterogeneous effects of air pollution on known cardiovascular biomarkers. Methods: A total of 1,112 men from the Normative Aging Study and residents of the greater Boston, Massachusetts, area with mean age of 69 years at baseline were included in this study during the period 1995–2013. We used quantile regression and random slope models to investigate distributional effects and heterogeneity in the traffic-related responses on blood pressure, heart rate variability, repolarization, lipids, and inflammation. We considered 28-day averaged exposure to particle number, PM2.5 black carbon, and PM2.5 mass concentrations (measured at a single monitor near the site of the study visits). Results: We observed some evidence suggesting distributional effects of traffic-related pollutants on systolic blood pressure, heart rate variability, corrected QT interval, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). For example, among participants with LDL cholesterol below 80 mg/dL, an interquartile range increase in PM2.5 black carbon exposure was associated with a 7-mg/dL (95% CI: 5, 10) increase in LDL cholesterol, while among subjects with LDL cholesterol levels close to 160 mg/dL, the same exposure was related to a 16-mg/dL (95% CI: 13, 20) increase in LDL cholesterol. We observed similar heterogeneous associations across low versus high percentiles of the LDL distribution for PM2.5 mass and particle number. Conclusions: These results suggest that air pollution distorts the distribution of cardiovascular risk factors, and that, for several outcomes, effects may be

  10. Systolic time intervals in children with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hedvall, G

    1983-03-01

    Of the systolic time intervals, the preejection period is known to correlate well with invasively measured isometric contraction time, and increase of the quotient preejection period/left ventricular ejection time (PEP/LVET) is considered to be of a good indicator of left ventricular failure. The different systolic time intervals have been recorded from the carotid pulse curve from 40 normal children, 20 aged five and 20 aged ten years. Their PEP/LVET was 0.31 +/- 0.04. Seventy-eight children with different heart diseases were then investigated. In patients with congenital total heart block or extrasystoles, there was a negative correlation between PEP/LVET and the R-R interval, in accordance with the Frank-Starling law. In patients with ventricular septal defects PEP/LVET differentiates between small and large shunts; the increased PEP/LVET of the latter normalizes after operation. The increased PEP/RVET of children with transposition of the great arteries is an expression of the inadequacy of the right ventricle as a systemic chamber. In aortic stenosis "normalization" of a previously decreased PEP/LVET may indicate early left ventricular failure. In primary myocardial disease registration of the systolic time intervals enables us to follow the left ventricular function more closely than is possible with invasive techniques.

  11. How Cell Number and Cellular Properties of Blood-Banked Red Blood Cells of Different Cell Ages Decline during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Wei-Wei; Wang, Di; Liang, Wen-Jing; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Aims Numerous studies have suggested that transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) stored over a long period of time may induce harmful effects due to storage-induced lesions. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this damage have not been identified. Furthermore, it is unclear why and how up to 30% of long-stored RBCs disappear from the circulation within 24 hours after transfusion. The aim of this study was to determine how the cell number of RBCs of different ages changes during storage and how these cells undergo cumulative structural and functional changes with storage time. Methods and Results We used Percoll centrifugation to fractionate the RBCs in blood bank stored RBC units into different aged sub-populations and then measured the number of intact cells in each sub-population as well the cells’ biomechanical and biochemical parameters as functions of the storage period. We found that the RBC units stored for ≤ 14 days could be separated into four fractions: the top or young cell fraction, two middle fractions, and the lower or old fraction. However, after 14 days of storage, the cell number and cellular properties declined rapidly whereby the units stored for 21 days only exhibited the three lower fractions and not the young fraction. The cell number within a unit stored for 21 days decreased by 23% compared to a fresh unit and the cells that were lost had hemolyzed into harmful membrane fragments, microparticles, and free hemoglobin. All remaining cells exhibited cellular properties similar to those of senescent cells. Conclusion In RBC units stored for greater than 14 days, there were fewer intact cells with no healthy cells present, as well as harmful membrane fragments, microparticles, and free hemoglobin. Therefore, transfusion of these stored units would not likely help patients and may induce a series of clinical problems. PMID:25167052

  12. Effects of aging and exercise training on skeletal muscle blood flow and resistance artery morphology

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Michael W.; Stabley, John N.; Dominguez, James M.; Davis, Robert T.; McCullough, Danielle J.; Muller-Delp, Judy M.; Delp, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    With old age, blood flow to the high-oxidative red skeletal muscle is reduced and blood flow to the low-oxidative white muscle is elevated during exercise. Changes in the number of feed arteries perforating the muscle are thought to contribute to this altered hyperemic response during exercise. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would ameliorate age-related differences in blood flow during exercise and feed artery structure in skeletal muscle. Young (6–7 mo old, n = 36) and old (24 mo old, n = 25) male Fischer 344 rats were divided into young sedentary (Sed), old Sed, young exercise-trained (ET), and old ET groups, where training consisted of 10–12 wk of treadmill exercise. In Sed and ET rats, blood flow to the red and white portions of the gastrocnemius muscle (GastRed and GastWhite) and the number and luminal cross-sectional area (CSA) of all feed arteries perforating the muscle were measured at rest and during exercise. In the old ET group, blood flow was greater to GastRed (264 ± 13 and 195 ± 9 ml·min−1·100 g−1 in old ET and old Sed, respectively) and lower to GastWhite (78 ± 5 and 120 ± 6 ml·min−1·100 g−1 in old ET and old Sed, respectively) than in the old Sed group. There was no difference in the number of feed arteries between the old ET and old Sed group, although the CSA of feed arteries from old ET rats was larger. In young ET rats, there was an increase in the number of feed arteries perforating the muscle. Exercise training mitigated old age-associated differences in blood flow during exercise within gastrocnemius muscle. However, training-induced adaptations in resistance artery morphology differed between young (increase in feed artery number) and old (increase in artery CSA) animals. The altered blood flow pattern induced by exercise training with old age would improve the local matching of O2 delivery to consumption within the skeletal muscle. PMID:23042906

  13. Effect of breast milk lead on infant blood lead levels at 1 month of age.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Adrienne S; Téllez-Rojo, Martha María; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Bellinger, David; Peterson, Karen; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2004-10-01

    Nursing infants may be exposed to lead from breast milk, but relatively few data exist with which to evaluate and quantify this relationship. This route of exposure constitutes a potential infant hazard from mothers with current ongoing exposure to lead as well as from mothers who have been exposed previously due to the redistribution of cumulative maternal bone lead stores. We studied the relationship between maternal breast milk lead and infant blood lead levels among 255 mother-infant pairs exclusively or partially breast-feeding through 1 month of age in Mexico City. A rigorous, well-validated technique was used to collect, prepare, and analyze the samples of breast milk to minimize the potential for environmental contamination and maximize the percent recovery of lead. Umbilical cord and maternal blood lead were measured at delivery; 1 month after delivery (+/- 5 days) maternal blood, bone, and breast milk and infant blood lead levels were obtained. Levels of lead at 1 month postpartum were, for breast milk, 0.3-8.0 microg/L (mean +/- SD, 1.5 +/- 1.2); maternal blood lead, 2.9-29.9 microg/dL (mean +/- SD, 9.4 +/- 4.5); and infant blood lead, 1.0-23.1 microg/dL (mean +/- SD, 5.5 +/- 3.0). Infant blood lead at 1 month postpartum was significantly correlated with umbilical cord (Spearman correlation coefficient rS = 0.40, p < 0.0001) and maternal (rS= 0.42, p < 0.0001) blood lead at delivery and with maternal blood (rS= 0.67, p < 0.0001), patella rS = 0.19, p = 0.004), and breast milk (rS = 0.32, p < 0.0001) lead at 1 month postpartum. Adjusting for cord blood lead, infant weight change, and reported breast-feeding status, a difference of approximately 2 microg/L (ppb; from the midpoint of the lowest quartile to the midpoint of the highest quartile) breast milk lead was associated with a 0.82 microg/dL increase in blood lead for breast-feeding infants at 1 month of age. Breast milk lead accounted for 12% of the variance of infant blood lead levels, whereas

  14. Age-Related Somatic Structural Changes in the Nuclear Genome of Human Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Lars A.; Rasi, Chiara; Razzaghian, Hamid R.; Pakalapati, Geeta; Waite, Lindsay; Thilbeault, Krista Stanton; Ronowicz, Anna; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Tiwari, Hemant K.; Boomsma, Dorret; Westerman, Maxwell P.; Harris, Jennifer R.; Lyle, Robert; Essand, Magnus; Eriksson, Fredrik; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Iribarren, Carlos; Strachan, Eric; O'Hanlon, Terrance P.; Rider, Lisa G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Absher, Devin; Dumanski, Jan P.

    2012-01-01

    Structural variations are among the most frequent interindividual genetic differences in the human genome. The frequency and distribution of de novo somatic structural variants in normal cells is, however, poorly explored. Using age-stratified cohorts of 318 monozygotic (MZ) twins and 296 single-born subjects, we describe age-related accumulation of copy-number variation in the nuclear genomes in vivo and frequency changes for both megabase- and kilobase-range variants. Megabase-range aberrations were found in 3.4% (9 of 264) of subjects ≥60 years old; these subjects included 78 MZ twin pairs and 108 single-born individuals. No such findings were observed in 81 MZ pairs or 180 single-born subjects who were ≤55 years old. Recurrent region- and gene-specific mutations, mostly deletions, were observed. Longitudinal analyses of 43 subjects whose data were collected 7–19 years apart suggest considerable variation in the rate of accumulation of clones carrying structural changes. Furthermore, the longitudinal analysis of individuals with structural aberrations suggests that there is a natural self-removal of aberrant cell clones from peripheral blood. In three healthy subjects, we detected somatic aberrations characteristic of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. The recurrent rearrangements uncovered here are candidates for common age-related defects in human blood cells. We anticipate that extension of these results will allow determination of the genetic age of different somatic-cell lineages and estimation of possible individual differences between genetic and chronological age. Our work might also help to explain the cause of an age-related reduction in the number of cell clones in the blood; such a reduction is one of the hallmarks of immunosenescence. PMID:22305530

  15. Blood pressure monitors for home

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of blood pressure monitor for home use. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORS A digital device will also have a cuff that wraps ... on its own. The screen will show a digital readout of your systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ...

  16. Association of low-level blood lead and blood pressure in NHANES 1999-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Scinicariello, Franco; Abadin, Henry G.; Edward Murray, H.

    2011-11-15

    This study investigated whether low blood-lead levels ({<=}10 {mu}g/dL) were associated with blood pressure (BP) outcomes. The authors analyzed data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2006 and participants aged 20 years or older. Outcome variables were systolic and diastolic BP measurements, pulse pressure, and hypertension status. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions stratified by race/ethnicity and gender were performed. Blood lead levels (BLL) were significantly correlated with higher systolic BP among black men and women, but not white or Mexican-American participants. BLLs were significantly associated with higher diastolic BPs among white men and women and black men, whereas, a negative association was observed in Mexican-American men that had, also, a wider pulse pressure. Black men in the 90th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{>=}3.50 {mu}g/dL) compared to black men in the 10th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{<=}0.7 {mu}g/dL) had a significant increase of risk of having hypertension (adjusted POR=2.69; 95% CI: 1.08-6.72). In addition, blood cadmium was significantly associated with hypertension and systolic and diastolic blood. This study found that, despite the continuous decline in blood lead in the U.S. population, lead exposure disparities among race and gender still exist.

  17. [Some disorder features of blood circulation in lungs in older age influenza patients].

    PubMed

    Roganova, I V

    2011-01-01

    Patients aged 51-65 years with influenza develop circulatory disorders of the lung. Tone of the arteries of small and medium-caliber and venular vessels of the vascular bed of the lungs persistently reduced during the illness and a month after its start. The flow of venous blood from the vessels of the lungs disturbs: it is slow, difficult and becomes unstable. Such circulatory disorders in the lungs of influenza patients of older age groups appear during the illness and persist for a long time in the recovery period, which is a risk factor associated with complications of the respiratory system, not only during the illness, but after the disease.

  18. Antioxidant protection against curative and palliative doses of ionizing irradiation in human blood decreases with aging.

    PubMed

    Kasapović, Jelena; Stojiljković, Vesna; Gavrilović, Ljubica; Popović, Nataša; Milićević, Zorka

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are independently recognized to play a significant role in radiation-induced damage on healthy tissue and in aging process. However, an age-related alteration of antioxidant (AO) system in radiation response in humans is poorly investigated. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the irradiation effects on the activities and expression of AO system in the blood of healthy women during aging. Blood samples were irradiated with curative and palliative doses of 2 Gy or 9 Gy γ-rays. AO capacity for detoxification of O(2)•(-) and H(2)O(2) in response to 2 Gy γ-irradiation decreases in women above 58 years, while in response to 9 Gy shows signs of weakening after 45 years of age. Due to reduction of AO capacity during aging, cytotoxic effects of curative and palliative doses of irradiation, mediated by ROS, may significantly increase in older subjects, while removal of H(2)O(2) excess could reduce them.

  19. Aging in blood vessels. Medicinal agents FOR systemic arterial hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Soto, María Elena; Pastelín, Gustavo; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2014-11-01

    Aging impairs blood vessel function and leads to cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms underlying the age-related endothelial, smooth muscle and extracellular matrix vascular dysfunction are discussed. Vascular dysfunction is caused by: (1) Oxidative stress enhancement. (2) Reduction of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, by diminished NO synthesis and/or augmented NO scavenging. (3) Production of vasoconstrictor/vasodilator factor imbalances. (4) Low-grade pro-inflammatory environment. (5) Impaired angiogenesis. (6) Endothelial cell senescence. The aging process in vascular smooth muscle is characterized by: (1) Altered replicating potential. (2) Change in cellular phenotype. (3) Changes in responsiveness to contracting and relaxing mediators. (4) Changes in intracellular signaling functions. Systemic arterial hypertension is an age-dependent disorder, and almost half of the elderly human population is hypertensive. The influence of hypertension on the aging cardiovascular system has been studied in models of hypertensive rats. Treatment for hypertension is recommended in the elderly. Lifestyle modifications, natural compounds and hormone therapies are useful for initial stages and as supporting treatment with medication but evidence from clinical trials in this population is needed. Since all antihypertensive agents can lower blood pressure in the elderly, therapy should be based on its potential side effects and drug interactions.

  20. Perfluorinated chemicals in blood serum of inhabitants in central Poland in relation to gender and age.

    PubMed

    Góralczyk, Katarzyna; Pachocki, Krzysztof A; Hernik, Agnieszka; Struciński, Paweł; Czaja, Katarzyna; Lindh, Christian H; Jönsson, Bo A G; Lenters, Virissa; Korcz, Wojciech; Minorczyk, Maria; Matuszak, Małgorzata; Ludwicki, Jan K

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to determine concentrations of seven selected perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs): perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoDA) in the blood serum of men and women of reproductive age from the central region of Poland. The relation between sex of tested subjects and the levels of compounds in blood serum of humans will also be considered and analysed as an element of the risk assessment. The study was made on the blood serum samples collected from 253 women and 176 men of reproductive age between 20 and 44 years from Warsaw and surrounding areas. Higher concentrations of five (PFOS, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnDA) from among seven selected PFASs were observed in men in comparison to women from the same populations. Only the concentrations of PFHxS and PFDoDA were slightly higher in women than in men. These differences were statistically significant in all cases, except for PFUnDA. The hypothesis that the concentrations of said compounds increase with age of the test subjects, regardless of gender has not been confirmed.

  1. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... that die or are lost from the body. White Blood Cells White blood cells (WBCs, and also ... of severe pain. previous continue Diseases of the White Blood Cells Neutropenia (pronounced: new-truh-PEE-nee- ...

  2. Excess Weight, Anthropometric Variables and Blood Pressure in Schoolchildren aged 10 to 18 years

    PubMed Central

    Schommer, Vânia Ames; Barbiero, Sandra Mari; Cesa, Cláudia Ciceri; Oliveira, Rosemary; Silva, Anelise Damiani; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of hypertension among children and adolescents is estimated to range between 1% and 13%. Excess weight and central obesity are related to blood pressure levels in adults, and may be important in the early pathogenesis of SH when present in childhood. Objectives To study the association between anthropometric variables and blood pressure levels in schoolchildren from the 5th and 8th grades, and to identify which parameter was more strongly correlated with blood pressure levels. Methods Contemporary cross-sectional study with probabilistic population-based cluster sampling of schoolchildren enrolled from the 5th to the 8th grades in public elementary schools of Porto Alegre. Data on familial risk factors and anthropometry were collected. Statistical analysis included correlations and cluster-adjusted confidence intervals. Results The mean age of participants was 12.57 (± 1.64) years, and 55.2% of them were females. Abnormal blood pressure levels were found in 11.3% of the sample and borderline values, in 16.2%. Among the anthropometric variables analyzed, hip circumference was the one with the strongest correlation with increased blood pressure (r = 0.462, p < 0.001), followed by waist circumference (r = 0.404, p < 0.001) and abdominal skinfold (r = 0.291, p < 0.001). Conclusion We observed an association of waist circumference and skinfolds with increased blood pressure levels in the schoolchildren of the sample. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance that early measurements of blood pressure, and waist and hip circumferences become a routine in health services in order to prevent this condition. PMID:24676224

  3. Alloimmunization is associated with older age of transfused red blood cells in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Desai, Payal C; Deal, Allison M; Pfaff, Emily R; Qaqish, Bahjat; Hebden, Leyna M; Park, Yara A; Ataga, Kenneth I

    2015-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a significant clinical complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It can lead to difficulty with cross-matching for future transfusions and may sometimes trigger life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the association of clinical complications and age of RBC with alloimmunization in patients with SCD followed at a single institution from 2005 to 2012. One hundred and sixty six patients with a total of 488 RBC transfusions were evaluated. Nineteen patients (11%) developed new alloantibodies following blood transfusions during the period of review. The median age of RBC units was 20 days (interquartile range: 14-27 days). RBC antibody formation was significantly associated with the age of RBC units (P = 0.002), with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% CI: 1.71-7.11) for a RBC unit that was 7 days old and 9.8 (95% CI: 2.66-35.97) for a unit that was 35 days old, 28 days after the blood transfusion. No association was observed between RBC alloimmunization and acute vaso-occlusive complications. Although increased echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was associated with the presence of RBC alloantibodies (P = 0.02), TRV was not significantly associated with alloimmunization when adjusted for patient age and number of transfused RBC units. Our study suggests that RBC antibody formation is significantly associated with older age of RBCs at the time of transfusion. Prospective studies in patients with SCD are required to confirm this finding.

  4. Simplified Assay for Epigenetic Age Estimation in Whole Blood of Adults

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Bralo, Laura; Lopez-Golan, Yolanda; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Biological age is not always concordant with chronological age and the departures are of interest for understanding how diseases and environmental insults affect tissue function, organismal health, and life expectancy. The best-known biological age biomarker is telomere length, but there are more accurate biomarkers as the recently developed based in epigenetic, transcriptomic, or biochemical changes. The most accurate are the epigenetic biomarkers based on specific changes in DNA methylation referred as DNA methylation age measures (DmAM). Here, we have developed and validated a new DmAM that addresses some limitations of the previously available. The new DmAM includes the study in whole blood (WB) of 8 CpG sites selected as the most informative on a training set of 390 healthy subjects. The 8 CpG DmAM showed better accuracy than other DmAM based in few CpG in an independent validation set of 335 subjects. Results were not significantly influenced by sex, smoking, or variation in blood cell subpopulations. In addition, the new 8 CpG DmAM was amenable to study in a single multiplex reaction done with methylation-sensitive single-nucleotide primer extension (MS-SNuPE), a methodology based on commercially available reagents and run in capillary electrophoresis sequencers. In this way, the high cost of DNA methylation microarrays or of a pyrosequencer, which are needed for alternative DmAM, was avoided. Performance of the DmAM with MS-SNuPE was assessed in a set of 557 donors, showing high call rate (>97%), low CV (<3.3%) and high accuracy (Mean Absolute Deviation = 6.07 years). Therefore, the 8 CpG DmAM is a feasible and accurate tool for assessing the epigenetic component of biological age in blood of adults. PMID:27471517

  5. Distribution of blood lead levels in a birth cohort of New Zealanders at age 21.

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, J P; Williams, S M; Heydon, J L; Walmsley, T A; Menkes, D B

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about lead exposure in the general population of young adults. In this study, whole blood lead concentration (PbB) was determined in a sample of the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a well-documented birth cohort of New Zealanders aged 21 years in 1993-1994. PbB in those who consented to venipuncture at 21 years of age (n = 779; 411 males, 368 females) was compared to PbB for the same cohort at age 11 years. The PbB at age 21 ranged from 0.4 to 56 micrograms/dl with a geometric mean of 4.5 micrograms/dl (95% CI, 4.3-4.7 micrograms/dl). Only three individuals had a PbB above 30 micrograms/dl. Males had significantly higher PbB than females (geometric mean 6.0 vs. 3.2 micrograms/dl; p < 0.0001). The PbB at age 21 was 53% lower than in the same individuals at age 11 (geometric mean 4.8 vs. 10.2 micrograms/dl; p < 0.001; n = 480) and the correlation between corresponding values was weak (r = 0.19; p < 0.001). PbB at age 21 showed significant associations with high risk occupational activities, recreational exposure, domicile close to a main road, smoking, and male sex. Blood lead concentrations continue to fall in New Zealand, but occupational and recreational activities remain a significant source of lead exposure. Images Figure 1. PMID:9118875

  6. Effect of age and blood pressure on aortic size and stroke distance.

    PubMed Central

    Towfiq, B A; Weir, J; Rawles, J M

    1986-01-01

    The diameters of the ascending and descending aorta at the level of the carina were measured from computerised tomograms in 200 adults without cardiac or aortic disease. At all ages the ascending aorta had a greater cross sectional area than the descending aorta, and both areas increased significantly with age. The increase was proportionately greater in the descending than in the ascending aorta and the percentage changes were similar in males and females, the latter having a smaller mean descending aortic diameter. The extent of the increase in cross sectional area of the aorta is sufficient to explain the observed fall of stroke distance that occurs with age. The effect of changing blood pressure on aortic cross sectional area, and hence the relation between stroke distance and stroke volume, was calculated from published data on aortic compliance at different ages. Assuming constant peripheral resistance, stroke distance would change by 34, 82, and 94% for a 100% change of stroke volume at age 20, 50, and 80 respectively. At age 80 the aorta behaves like a rigid pipe but at age 20 its elasticity is such that constancy of aortic size cannot be assumed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3718794

  7. The trajectory of the blood DNA methylome ageing rate is largely set before adulthood: evidence from two longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Kananen, L; Marttila, S; Nevalainen, T; Kummola, L; Junttila, I; Mononen, N; Kähönen, M; Raitakari, O T; Hervonen, A; Jylhä, M; Lehtimäki, T; Hurme, M; Jylhävä, J

    2016-06-01

    The epigenetic clock, defined as the DNA methylome age (DNAmAge), is a candidate biomarker of ageing. In this study, we aimed to characterize the behaviour of this marker during the human lifespan in more detail using two follow-up cohorts (the Young Finns study, calendar age i.e. cAge range at baseline 15-24 years, 25-year-follow-up, N = 183; The Vitality 90+ study, cAge range at baseline 19-90 years, 4-year-follow-up, N = 48). We also aimed to assess the relationship between DNAmAge estimate and the blood cell distributions, as both of these measures are known to change as a function of age. The subjects' DNAmAges were determined using Horvath's calculator of epigenetic cAge. The estimate of the DNA methylome age acceleration (Δ-cAge-DNAmAge) demonstrated remarkable stability in both cohorts: the individual rank orders of the DNAmAges remained largely unchanged during the follow-ups. The blood cell distributions also demonstrated significant intra-individual correlation between the baseline and follow-up time points. Interestingly, the immunosenescence-associated features (CD8+CD28- and CD4+CD28- cell proportions and the CD4/CD8 cell ratio) were tightly associated with the estimate of the DNA methylome age. In summary, our data demonstrate that the general level of Δ-cAge-DNAmAge is fixed before adulthood and appears to be quite stationary thereafter, even in the oldest-old ages. Moreover, the blood DNAmAge estimate seems to be tightly associated with ageing-associated shifts in blood cell composition, especially with those that are the hallmarks of immunosenescence. Overall, these observations contribute to the understanding of the longitudinal aspects of the DNAmAge estimate.

  8. Determinants of all-cause mortality in different age groups in patients with severe systolic left ventricular dysfunction receiving an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (from the Italian ClinicalService Multicenter Observational Project).

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Gasparini, Maurizio; Landolina, Maurizio; Lunati, Maurizio; Boriani, Giuseppe; Proclemer, Alessandro; Santini, Massimo; Mangoni, Lorenza; Padeletti, Margherita; Marchionni, Niccolò; Padeletti, Luigi

    2014-05-15

    Heart failure (HF) is a common condition in elderly patients. Despite great improvements in medical therapy, HF mortality remains high. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) significantly lengthens the survival rate of subjects with severe HF, but little evidence exists on its effect in elderly persons. Aim of this study was to compare the age-related determinants of prognosis in a large population of patients with ICD. We divided all patients who underwent an ICD implantation in 117 Italian centers of the "ClinicalService Project" into 3 age groups (<65, 65 to 74, ≥ 75 years), and collected clinical and instrumental variables at baseline and during follow-up (median length: 27 months). Between 2004 and 2011, 6,311 patients were enrolled (5,174 men; left ventricular ejection fraction 29% ± 9%); 1,510 subjects were ≥ 75 years (23.9%; mean age 78 ± 3 years). The prevalence of co-morbidities increased with age. HF was most frequently due to coronary artery disease in the elderly, who also showed the worst New York Heart Association class. At multivariate analysis, older age, coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic renal failure, diabetes, complex ventricular arrhythmias, and left ventricular ejection fraction were significant predictors of all-cause mortality. After adjustment, the hazard ratio(age group) for mortality was 22.6% less than at univariate analysis. When groups were analyzed separately, age alone predicted mortality in the oldest. In conclusion, a large proportion of our population was aged ≥ 75 years. Mortality was related to age and several co-morbidities, except for the oldest patients in whom age alone resulted predictive.

  9. ALTERATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF RED BLOOD CELLS MEMBRANES PROTEINS OF DIFFERENT AGE AND SEX VOLUNTEERS.

    PubMed

    Pruidze, N; Khetsuriani, R; Sujashvili, R; Ioramashvili, I; Arabuli, M; Sanikidze, T

    2015-01-01

    Considering the age and sex-dependent trend in the manifestation of various diseases, as well as an important pathogenic role of circulatory disorders, we decided to study the age-dependent changes in the physical properties of RBCs membrane proteins (their electric charge and molecular weight) in healthy people of different sex (males and females) and age. Blood of 56 healthy volunteers (Tbilisi, Georgia) of different sex and gender was studied (the patients were divided in 8 groups (7 patients in each groups): 1 - 18-25 years old male, 2 - 18-25 years old female, 3 - 25-44 years old male, 4 - 25-44 years old female, 5 - 44-60 years old male, 6 - 44-60 years old female; 7 - 60-80 years old male, 8 - 70-80 years old female). In groups 6 and 8 were women in menopause was determined according 12 months of amenorrhea. Individuals often consume alcohol addicts, pregnant women and patients with chronic diseases were excluded from the study. The study protocol was approved by Ethical Committee of the Tbilisi State Medical University. RBCs membrane proteins have been extracted from human heparinized blood and their mobility was studied by electrophoretic method. The electrophoretic mobility of RBCs membrane proteins decreases with age of healthy volunteers, that indicates decrease of total charge of proteins, depending on the electrically charged amino acids content. In female patients the electrophoretic mobility of the RBCs membrane proteins especially intensively decreases in period of menopause. Increase of molecular weight of proteins (100-200 kDa) from RBCs' membranes of alder age group was manifested. Intensively decrease electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes membrane proteins from female patients in period of menopause indicates on estrogen related mechanism of the regulation of membrane protein conformation and composition in females. Increased content of high molecular weight proteins in the RBCs membranes from patients of older age groups may be caused to

  10. Effects of aging on cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolism, and blood oxygenation level dependent responses to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ances, Beau M; Liang, Christine L; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E; Fleisher, Adam S; Lansing, Amy E; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-04-01

    Calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive technique to assess functional metabolic changes associated with normal aging. We simultaneously measured both the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses in the visual cortex for separate conditions of mild hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) and a simple checkerboard stimulus in healthy younger (n = 10, mean: 28-years-old) and older (n = 10, mean: 53-years-old) adults. From these data we derived baseline CBF, the BOLD scaling parameter M, the fractional change in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) with activation, and the coupling ratio n of the fractional changes in CBF and CMRO(2). For the functional activation paradigm, the magnitude of the BOLD response was significantly lower for the older group (0.57 +/- 0.07%) compared to the younger group (0.95 +/- 0.14%), despite the finding that the fractional CBF and CMRO(2) changes were similar for both groups. The weaker BOLD response for the older group was due to a reduction in the parameter M, which was significantly lower for older (4.6 +/- 0.4%) than younger subjects (6.5 +/- 0.8%), most likely reflecting a reduction in baseline CBF for older (41.7 +/- 4.8 mL/100 mL/min) compared to younger (59.6 +/- 9.1 mL/100 mL/min) subjects. In addition to these primary responses, for both groups the BOLD response exhibited a post-stimulus undershoot with no significant difference in this magnitude. However, the post-undershoot period of the CBF response was significantly greater for older compared to younger subjects. We conclude that when comparing two populations, the BOLD response can provide misleading reflections of underlying physiological changes. A calibrated approach provides a more quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes than the BOLD response alone.

  11. Cerebral blood flow and vasoreactivity in aging: an arterial spin labeling study.

    PubMed

    Leoni, R F; Oliveira, I A F; Pontes-Neto, O M; Santos, A C; Leite, J P

    2017-03-23

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in young and elderly participants were assessed using pulsed arterial spin labeling (ASL) and blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in combination with inhalation of CO2. Pulsed ASL and BOLD-MRI were acquired in seventeen asymptomatic volunteers (10 young adults, age: 30±7 years; 7 elderly adults, age: 64±8 years) with no history of diabetes, hypertension, and neurological diseases. Data from one elderly participant was excluded due to the incorrigible head motion. Average baseline CBF in gray matter was significantly reduced in elderly (46±9 mL·100 g-1·min-1) compared to young adults (57±8 mL·100 g-1·min-1; P=0.02). Decreased pulsed ASL-CVR and BOLD-CVR in gray matter were also observed in elderly (2.12±1.30 and 0.13±0.06 %/mmHg, respectively) compared to young adults (3.28±1.43 and 0.28±0.11 %/mmHg, respectively; P<0.05), suggesting some degree of vascular impairment with aging. Moreover, age-related decrease in baseline CBF was observed in different brain regions (inferior, middle and superior frontal gyri; precentral and postcentral gyri; superior temporal gyrus; cingulate gyri; insula, putamen, caudate, and supramarginal gyrus). In conclusion, CBF and CVR were successfully investigated using a protocol that causes minimal or no discomfort for the participants. Age-related decreases in baseline CBF and CVR were observed in the cerebral cortex, which may be related to the vulnerability for neurological disorders in aging.

  12. Idiopathic scoliosis. Gas exchange and the age dependence of arterial blood gases.

    PubMed Central

    Kafer, E R

    1976-01-01

    The aims were to examine the gas exchange and arterial blood gas abnormalities among patients with scoliosis, and the correlation of these abnormalities with age and severity of deformity. Means among 51 patients were as follows: age 25.4 +/- 17.5 yr, angle of scoliosis 80.2 +/- 29.9 (SD), vital capacity 1.94 +/- 0.91 (SD) (i.e. 60.6 +/- 19.2% of predicted), PaO2 85.8 +/- 12.0 (SD), PaCO2 42.4 +/- 8.0, physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio 0.438 +/- 0.074 (SD), and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference breathing air 14.9 +/- 8.9 (SD). Statistically significant correlations were as follows: the PaCO2 and physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio increased with age, and the PaO2 and alveolar ventilation decreased with age. The PaO2, alveolar ventilation, and tidal volume were inversely related to the angle of scoliosis and directly related to the vital capacity, precent predicted vital capacity, and the compliance of the respiratory system. The physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio and the alveolar-arterial oxygen difference were inversely related to the vital capacity, percent predicted vital capacity, and the compliance of the respiratory system. PaCO2 was directly related to the elastance of the respiratory system. We conclude that ventilation-blood flow maldistribution as a result of deformity of the rib cage was the primary abnormality in gas exchange, and that with age there was progressive deterioration in gas exchange. The age-dependent increase in PaCO2 and decrease in alveolar ventilation were due to the increasing physiological dead space to tidal volume ratio and failure of a compensatory increase in ventilation. PMID:965490

  13. Alpha-synuclein levels in blood plasma decline with healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Niklas K U; Stransky, Elke; Meyer, Mirjam; Gaertner, Susanne; Shing, Mona; Schnaidt, Martina; Celej, Maria S; Jovin, Thomas M; Leyhe, Thomas; Laske, Christoph; Batra, Anil; Buchkremer, Gerhard; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Wernet, Dorothee; Richartz-Salzburger, Elke

    2015-01-01

    There is unequivocal evidence that alpha-synuclein plays a pivotal pathophysiological role in neurodegenerative diseases, and in particular in synucleinopathies. These disorders present with a variable extent of cognitive impairment and alpha-synuclein is being explored as a biomarker in CSF, blood serum and plasma. Considering key events of aging that include proteostasis, alpha-synuclein may not only be useful as a marker for differential diagnosis but also for aging per se. To explore this hypothesis, we developed a highly specific ELISA to measure alpha-synuclein. In healthy males plasma alpha-synuclein levels correlated strongly with age, revealing much lower concentrations in older (avg. 58.1 years) compared to younger (avg. 27.6 years) individuals. This difference between the age groups was enhanced after acidification of the plasmas (p<0.0001), possibly reflecting a decrease of alpha-synuclein-antibody complexes or chaperone activity in older individuals. Our results support the concept that alpha-synuclein homeostasis may be impaired early on, possibly due to disturbance of the proteostasis network, a key component of healthy aging. Thus, alpha-synuclein may be a novel biomarker of aging, a factor that should be considered when analyzing its presence in biological specimens.

  14. Prolonged water immersion. Effects on blood pressure maturation in normotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Magrini, F; Reggiani, P; Ciulla, M; Meazza, R; Branzi, G

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the impact of simulated microgravity and of chronic removal of hydrostatic pressure gradients on blood pressure maturation and body growth in rats. A special device was developed in our laboratory to transfer prolonged "dry" water immersion (a technique that has been used for training astronauts under hypogravic conditions) to six Sprague-Dawley test rats (immersion-G group). The time course of heart rate, systolic blood pressure, urinary output, and body weight was monitored from weaning to maturity and then compared with those responses from six sex- and age-matched Sprague-Dawley rats grown in a gravity environment (group G). A downward shift in systolic blood pressure and body weight maturation curves was observed in immersion-G rats from the age of 60 days. Cessation of dry water immersion produced a gradual, significant rise in systolic blood pressure but not in body weight to control values. No marked changes in heart rate and urinary output between G and immersion-G rats were noticed throughout the investigation. Our results provide indirect evidence that an interference in the natural history of blood pressure maturation was introduced by immersion, which dissociated the effects of body weight increase during growth from the effects of ageing per se. It is concluded that the physiological increase in systolic blood pressure during growth is partly gravity-dependent.

  15. Weight gain in infancy and early childhood is associated with school age body mass index but not intelligence and blood pressure in very low birth weight children.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L; Nixon, P; Snively, B; Tennyson, A; O'Shea, T M

    2010-10-01

    Rates of weight gain in infancy and early childhood can influence later neurocognitive, metabolic and cardiovascular health. We studied the relationship of weight gain during infancy and early childhood to intelligence quotient (IQ), blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI) at age 9 in children born with very low birth weight (VLBW). Sixty-five children born prematurely with VLBW were followed longitudinally and at 9 years IQ, BP and BMI were measured. The mean weight z-scores at birth, neonatal intensive care discharge, 1 year corrected for prematurity, 5 and 9 years were -0.17, -2.09, -1.3, -0.68 and 0.06, respectively. Weight gain during infancy (discharge to 1 year corrected for prematurity) and early childhood (1 year corrected age to 5 years) was expressed as rate of change in weight, rate of change in weight z-score and interval change in weight z-score. In multiple regression analyses that adjusted for race, gender, maternal education, antenatal steroids, birth weight z-score, major intracranial lesions on ultrasound and chronic lung disease, rates of weight gain in infancy and early childhood were predictive of BMI z-score at 9 years, regression coefficients (95% confidence intervals); 0.19 (0.02, 0.36) and 0.37 (0.11, 0.63), respectively, expressed as change in BMI z-score per 10 g/week weight increase. Rates of weight gain were not predictive of systolic BP z-score, Verbal IQ or Performance IQ. In VLBW infants, more rapid weight gain during infancy, and especially early childhood, is associated with higher BMI at school age.

  16. The Association between the Lipids Levels in Blood and Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Wang, Mingxu; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Qianyu; Nie, Jing; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Xiaohong; Ma, Le

    2016-01-01

    Lipid metabolism may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with blood lipids. We performed a meta-analysis including a total of 19 studies to evaluate associations between blood lipids and this disease. The result reported that the high level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) obtained with an increment of 1 mmol/L could result in a significantly increase in the AMD risk of approximately 18% (relative risk (RR), 1.18; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01 to 1.35; I2 = 53.8%; p = 0.007). High levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) were significantly associated with a decreased risk of AMD (RRs ranging from 0.92 to 0.95; all p < 0.05). The stratified analysis based on AMD subtypes showed that these blood lipids were only significantly associated with the risk of early AMD (all p < 0.05). The association between the blood lipids and AMD risk did not differ substantially based on the other characteristics of the participants. A high HDL-C level was associated with an increased AMD risk, whereas participants with high TC, LDL-C, and TG concentrations may show a decreased risk for this disease. Further well-designed large studies are warranted to confirm the conclusions. PMID:27782072

  17. Blood typing profile of a school-aged population of a North Togo township.

    PubMed

    Vovor, Ahoefa; Fétéké, Lochina; Kueviakoe, Irénée M; Kpatarou, Laye; Mawussi, Koffi; Magnang, Hézouwè; Ségbéna, Akuété Y

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of hemoglobin (Hb) variants and ABO blood groups in a school population aged 6 to 9 years in the township of Agbandé-Yaka in North Togo. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 570 children of four primary schools at Agbande-Yaka, between March and July 2010. Hemoglobin characterization was done by alkaline buffer electrophoresis and the blood types ABO-Rhesus (Rh) D by immuno-hematological methods. A Hb variant was detected in 37.0% of the schoolchildren. Among them, the AS trait accounted for 11.9% and the AC trait for 20.2%. Homozygous Hb S (HBB: c.20A>T) was not found but Hb C (HBB: c.19G>A) appeared at a frequency of 3.3%, while compound heterozygotes carrying Hb SC were seen at a frequency of 1.6%. The O, B and A blood groups accounted for 49.0, 26.8 and 21.9%, respectively. The Hb anomalies reached a high prevalence in this school population. These results are remarkable by the absence of homozygous Hb S individuals compared to homozygous Hb C individuals, which were as numerous as expected. The frequencies of the ABO blood groups are similar to what has been found in other West African populations.

  18. Association of blood pressure in late adolescence with subsequent mortality: cohort study of Swedish male conscripts

    PubMed Central

    Neovius, Martin; Tynelius, Per; Rasmussen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the nature and magnitude of relations of systolic and diastolic blood pressures in late adolescence to mortality. Design Nationwide cohort study. Setting General community in Sweden. Participants Swedish men (n=1 207 141) who had military conscription examinations between 1969 and 1995 at a mean age of 18.4 years, followed up for a median of 24 (range 0-37) years. Main outcome measures Total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and non-cardiovascular mortality. Results During follow-up, 28 934 (2.4%) men died. The relation of systolic blood pressure to total mortality was U shaped, with the lowest risk at a systolic blood pressure of about 130 mm Hg. This pattern was driven by the relation to non-cardiovascular mortality, whereas the relation to cardiovascular mortality was monotonically increasing (higher risk with higher blood pressure). The relation of diastolic blood pressure to mortality risk was monotonically increasing and stronger than that of systolic blood pressure, in terms of both relative risk and population attributable fraction (deaths that could be avoided if blood pressure was in the optimal range). Relations to cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality were similar, with an apparent risk threshold at a diastolic blood pressure of about 90 mm Hg, below which diastolic blood pressure and mortality were unrelated, and above which risk increased steeply with higher diastolic blood pressures. Conclusions In adolescent men, the relation of diastolic blood pressure to mortality was more consistent than that of systolic blood pressure. Considering current efforts for earlier detection and prevention of risk, these observations emphasise the risk associated with high diastolic blood pressure in young adulthood. PMID:21343202

  19. Usefulness of verapamil for congestive heart failure associated with abnormal left ventricular diastolic filling and normal left ventricular systolic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Setaro, J.F.; Zaret, B.L.; Schulman, D.S.; Black, H.R.; Soufer, R. )

    1990-10-15

    Normal left ventricular systolic performance with impaired left ventricular diastolic filling may be present in a substantial number of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). To evaluate the effect of oral verapamil in this subset, 20 men (mean age 68 +/- 5 years) with CHF, intact left ventricular function (ejection fraction greater than 45%) and abnormal diastolic filling (peak filling rate less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes per second (edv/s)) were studied in a placebo-controlled, double-blind 5-week crossover trial. All patients underwent echocardiography to rule out significant valvular disease, and thallium-201 stress scintigraphy to exclude major active ischemia. Compared to baseline values, verapamil significantly improved exercise capacity by 33% (13.9 +/- 4.3 vs 10.7 +/- 3.4 minutes at baseline) and peak filling rate by 30% (2.29 +/- 0.54 vs 1.85 +/- 0.45 edv/s at baseline) (all p less than 0.05). Placebo values were 12.3 +/- 4.0 minutes and 2.16 +/- 0.48 edv/s, respectively (difference not significant for both). Improvement from baseline in an objective clinico-radiographic heart failure score (scale 0 to 13) was significantly greater with verapamil compared to placebo (median improvement in score: 3 vs 1, p less than 0.01). Mean ejection fraction and systolic blood pressure were unchanged from baseline; diastolic blood pressure and heart rate decreased to a small degree. Verapamil may have therapeutic efficacy in patients with CHF, preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic filling.

  20. Relation of cord blood thyroxine and thyrotropin levels to gestational age and birth weight.

    PubMed Central

    Prato, F S; Reese, L; Tevaarwerk, G J; Mackenzie, R; Hurst, C J

    1980-01-01

    A program of screening cord blood for evidence of primary neonatal hypothyroidism was implemented in a general hospital. In 13 months 3456 newborns were screened: the thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations were measured in cord blood samples, and when the T4 level was below 8.0 micrograms/dl thyrotropin was also assayed in the sample. The two-tier program was effective. One hypothyroid newborn was detected and treated. More boys than girls had T4 levels below 8.0 micrograms/dl (9.7% v. 4.7%). The T4 level correlated with birth weight slightly better in the boys (r = 0.28 v. 0.21), and in the boys this correlation was stronger when the birth weight was lower. Regression analysis of the data for 54 sets of twins indicated that the T4 level was more strongly related to gestational age than to birth weight. PMID:7192594

  1. Decreased growth rate of P. falciparum blood stage parasitemia with age in a holoendemic population.

    PubMed

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Petravic, Janka; Chelimo, Kiprotich; Vulule, John; Kazura, James W; Moormann, Ann M; Davenport, Miles P

    2014-04-01

    In malaria holoendemic settings, decreased parasitemia and clinical disease is associated with age and cumulative exposure. The relative contribution of acquired immunity against various stages of the parasite life cycle is not well understood. In particular, it is not known whether changes in infection dynamics can be best explained by decreasing rates of infection, or by decreased growth rates of parasites in blood. Here, we analyze the dynamics of Plasmodium falciparum infection after treatment in a cohort of 197 healthy study participants of different ages. We use both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microscopy detection of parasitemia in order to understand parasite growth rates and infection rates over time. The more sensitive PCR assay detects parasites earlier than microscopy, and demonstrates a higher overall prevalence of infection than microscopy alone. The delay between PCR and microscopy detection is significantly longer in adults compared with children, consistent with slower parasite growth with age. We estimated the parasite multiplication rate from delay to PCR and microscopy detections of parasitemia. We find that both the delay between PCR and microscopy infection as well as the differing reinfection dynamics in different age groups are best explained by a slowing of parasite growth with age.

  2. Reference values of blood parameters in beef cattle of different ages and stages of lactation.

    PubMed Central

    Doornenbal, H; Tong, A K; Murray, N L

    1988-01-01

    Reference (normal) values for 12 blood serum components were determined for 48 Shorthorn cows (2-10 years old) and their 48 calves, 357 crossbred cows (12-14 years old), 36 feedlot bulls and 36 feedlot steers. In addition, hemoglobin, hematocrit, triiodothyronine, thyroxine and cortisol levels were determined for the crossbred cows, and feedlot bulls and steers. Reference values were tabulated according to sex, age and stage of lactation. Serum concentrations of urea, total protein and bilirubin, and serum activity of aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase increased with age (P less than 0.05), while calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase decreased with age (P less than 0.05) from birth to the age of ten years. The Shorthorn cows had the highest levels of glucose at parturition (P less than 0.05) with decreasing levels during lactation. Creatinine concentration decreased during lactation and increased during postweaning. Both lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase levels increased (P less than 0.05) during lactation. Urea and uric acid were present at higher concentrations in lactating than nonlactating cows (P less than 0.05). The values reported, based on a wide age range and large number of cattle, could serve as clinical guides and a basis for further research. PMID:3349406

  3. Quantitative analysis of mechanisms that govern red blood cell age structure and dynamics during anaemia.

    PubMed

    Savill, Nicholas J; Chadwick, William; Reece, Sarah E

    2009-06-01

    Mathematical modelling has proven an important tool in elucidating and quantifying mechanisms that govern the age structure and population dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs). Here we synthesise ideas from previous experimental data and the mathematical modelling literature with new data in order to test hypotheses and generate new predictions about these mechanisms. The result is a set of competing hypotheses about three intrinsic mechanisms: the feedback from circulating RBC concentration to production rate of immature RBCs (reticulocytes) in bone marrow, the release of reticulocytes from bone marrow into the circulation, and their subsequent ageing and clearance. In addition we examine two mechanisms specific to our experimental system: the effect of phenylhydrazine (PHZ) and blood sampling on RBC dynamics. We performed a set of experiments to quantify the dynamics of reticulocyte proportion, RBC concentration, and erythropoietin concentration in PHZ-induced anaemic mice. By quantifying experimental error we are able to fit and assess each hypothesis against our data and recover parameter estimates using Markov chain Monte Carlo based Bayesian inference. We find that, under normal conditions, about 3% of reticulocytes are released early from bone marrow and upon maturation all cells are released immediately. In the circulation, RBCs undergo random clearance but have a maximum lifespan of about 50 days. Under anaemic conditions reticulocyte production rate is linearly correlated with the difference between normal and anaemic RBC concentrations, and their release rate is exponentially correlated with the same. PHZ appears to age rather than kill RBCs, and younger RBCs are affected more than older RBCs. Blood sampling caused short aperiodic spikes in the proportion of reticulocytes which appear to have a different developmental pathway than normal reticulocytes. We also provide evidence of large diurnal oscillations in serum erythropoietin levels during anaemia.

  4. Estimated Pulse Wave Velocity Calculated from Age and Mean Arterial Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Sara V.; Laurent, Stephan; Olsen, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    In a recently published paper, Greve et al [J Hypertens 2016;34:1279-1289] investigate whether the estimated carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (ePWV), calculated using an equation derived from the relationship between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), age, and blood pressure, predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) as good as the measured cfPWV. Because ePWV predicts CVD as good as cfPWV, some might wonder whether ePWV could be replaced by cfPWV, which is a time-consuming measurement requiring an expensive apparatus. This question is addressed in this mini-review. PMID:28229052

  5. Brachial vs. central systolic pressure and pulse wave transmission indicators: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    This critique is intended to provide background for the reader to evaluate the relative clinical utilities of brachial cuff systolic blood pressure (SBP) and its derivatives, including pulse pressure, central systolic pressure, central augmentation index (AI), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). The critical question is whether the newer indicators add sufficient information to justify replacing or augmenting brachial cuff blood pressure (BP) data in research and patient care. Historical context, pathophysiology of variations in pulse wave transmission and reflection, issues related to measurement and model errors, statistical limitations, and clinical correlations are presented, along with new comparative data. Based on this overview, there is no compelling scientific or practical reason to replace cuff SBP with any of the newer indicators in the vast majority of clinical situations. Supplemental value for central SBP may exist in defining patients with exaggerated PPA ("spurious systolic hypertension"), managing cardiac and aortic diseases, and in studies of cardiovascular drugs, but there are no current standards for these possibilities.

  6. Reference values of tricuspid annular peak systolic velocity in healthy pediatric patients, calculation of z score, and comparison to tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion.

    PubMed

    Koestenberger, Martin; Nagel, Bert; Ravekes, William; Avian, Alexander; Heinzl, Bernd; Cvirn, Gerhard; Fritsch, Peter; Fandl, Andrea; Rehak, Thomas; Gamillscheg, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The tricuspid annular peak systolic velocity (TAPSV) is an echocardiographic measurement assessing right ventricular systolic function in children and adults. We determined the growth-related changes of the TAPSV to establish the references values for the entire pediatric age group. A prospective study was conducted of a group of 860 healthy pediatric patients (age 1 day to 18 years; body surface area [BSA] 0.14 to 2.30 m(2)). We determined the effects of age, gender, and BSA on the TAPSV values. Stepwise linear multiple regression analysis was used to estimate the TAPSV from the age, BSA, and gender. A correlation of normal TAPSV with normal tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion values was performed. The TAPSV ranged from a mean of 7.2 cm/s (z score ± 2: 4.8 to 9.5 cm/s) in the newborn to 14.3 cm/s (z score ± 2: 10.6 to 18.6 cm/s) in the 18-year-old adolescent. The TAPSV values showed a positive correlation with age and BSA, with a nonlinear course. No significant difference was found in the TAPSV values according to gender. A significant correlation was found between the TAPSV and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion values in our pediatric population. In conclusion, the z scores of the TAPSV values were calculated, and percentile charts were established to serve as reference data for patients with congenital heart disease.

  7. Effects of Aging on Cerebral Blood Flow, Oxygen Metabolism, and Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent Responses to Visual Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ances, Beau M.; Liang, Christine L.; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E.; Fleisher, Adam S.; Lansing, Amy E.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Calibrated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a noninvasive technique to assess functional metabolic changes associated with normal aging. We simultaneously measured both the magnitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses in the visual cortex for separate conditions of mild hypercapnia (5% CO2) and a simple checkerboard stimulus in healthy younger (n = 10, mean: 28-years-old) and older (n = 10, mean: 53-years-old) adults. From these data we derived baseline CBF, the BOLD scaling parameter M, the fractional change in the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2) with activation, and the coupling ratio n of the fractional changes in CBF and CMRO2. For the functional activation paradigm, the magnitude of the BOLD response was significantly lower for the older group (0.57 ± 0.07%) compared to the younger group (0.95 ± 0.14%), despite the finding that the fractional CBF and CMRO2 changes were similar for both groups. The weaker BOLD response for the older group was due to a reduction in the parameter M, which was significantly lower for older (4.6 ± 0.4%) than younger subjects (6.5 ± 0.8%), most likely reflecting a reduction in baseline CBF for older (41.7 ± 4.8 mL/100 mL/min) compared to younger (59.6 ± 9.1 mL/100 mL/min) subjects. In addition to these primary responses, for both groups the BOLD response exhibited a post-stimulus undershoot with no significant difference in this magnitude. However, the post-undershoot period of the CBF response was significantly greater for older compared to younger subjects. We conclude that when comparing two populations, the BOLD response can provide misleading reflections of underlying physiological changes. A calibrated approach provides a more quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes than the BOLD response alone. PMID:18465743

  8. Nonuniform, age-related decrements in regional sweating and skin blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Lacy M.; Kenney, W. Larry

    2013-01-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated thermoregulatory function that varies regionally over the body. Decrements in vasodilation and sweating are well documented with age, yet limited data are available concerning the regional relation between these responses. We aimed to examine age-related alterations in the relation between regional sweating (RSR) and skin blood flow (SkBF) to thermal and pharmacological stimuli. Four microdialysis fibers were inserted in the ventral forearm, abdomen, thigh, and lower back of eight healthy aged subjects (64 ± 7 yr) and nine young (23 ± 3 yr) during 1) ACh dose response (1 × 10−7 to 0.1 M, mean skin temperature 34°C) and 2) passive whole body heating to Δ1°C rise in oral temperature (Tor). RSR and SkBF were measured over each microdialysis membrane using ventilated capsules and laser-Doppler flowmetry. Maximal SkBF was measured at the end of both protocols (50 mM SNP). Regional sweating thresholds and RSR were attenuated in aged vs. young at all sites (P < 0.0001) during whole body heating. Vasodilation thresholds were similar between groups (P > 0.05). Attenuated SkBF were observed at the arm and back in the aged, representing 56 and 82% of those in the young at these sites, respectively (0.5 ΔTor). During ACh perfusion, SkBF (P = 0.137) and RSR were similar between groups (P = 0.326). Together these findings suggest regional age-related decrements in heat-activated sweat gland function but not cholinergic sensitivity. Functional consequences of such thermoregulatory impairment include the compromised ability of older individuals to defend core temperature during heat exposure and a subsequently greater susceptibility to heat-related illness and injury. PMID:23926135

  9. Systolic hypertension in the elderly: long-term lacidipine treatment. Objective, protocol, and organization. SHELL Study Group.

    PubMed

    Malacco, E; Gnemmi, A E; Romagnoli, A; Coppini, A

    1994-01-01

    Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) is a definite risk factor for cardiovascular complications (i.e., cardiac failure, coronary artery disease, and stroke) independent of diastolic elevation. The prevalence of ISH is estimated to be approximately 15-20% in the population above the age of 60 years, and increases with advancing age. The Systolic Hypertension in the Elderly (SHELL) study is planned to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of lacidipine, matched with the diuretic chlorthalidone, in treatment of ISH in elderly hypertensive patients (EHP). One hundred fifteen Italian centers will participate in the study. Fifty centers are associated with the Società Italiana di Geriatria Ospedaliera and 65 centers are departments of internal medicine or outpatient clinics for management of hypertension. A total of 4,800 patients will be enrolled in the trial. Two subprojects will consist of periodical echocardiographic evaluation and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The primary end point of the SHELL study is the incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in EHP with ISH, treated with either lacidipine or chlorthalidone. In particular, the SHELL trial is intended to determine whether lacidipine treatment will significantly reduce fatal myocardial events and total cardiovascular mortality.

  10. The ageing of the blood supply and the lymphatic drainage of the skin.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Terence

    2004-01-01

    The anatomy and functions of the blood and lymph vessels of human skin are described. Variation in these due to site, ageing and events during life consequent to exposure to a threatening environment are emphasised. Gradual atrophy and greater heterogeneity are features of ageing. Responses to injury and repair are complex and the interaction of mechanical signals distorting skin cells with numerous chemical signals are referred to. The lymphatics are part of an immunosurveillance system to monitor skin barrier penetration. The review attempts to draw attention to key recent advances in our understanding of the cytokine and growth factor production of the skin in the context of previous mainly physiological reviews especially influenced by 50 years of clinical practice as a dermatologist with an eye on both the skin and the fields of microcirculation and lymphology.

  11. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure.

  12. Age of red blood cells and mortality in the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In critically ill patients, it is uncertain whether exposure to older red blood cells (RBCs) may contribute to mortality. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between the age of RBCs and outcome in a large unselected cohort of critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand. We hypothesized that exposure to even a single unit of older RBCs may be associated with an increased risk of death. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter observational study in 47 ICUs during a 5-week period between August 2008 and September 2008. We included 757 critically ill adult patients receiving at least one unit of RBCs. To test our hypothesis we compared hospital mortality according to quartiles of exposure to maximum age of RBCs without and with adjustment for possible confounding factors. Results Compared with other quartiles (mean maximum red cell age 22.7 days; mortality 121/568 (21.3%)), patients treated with exposure to the lowest quartile of oldest RBCs (mean maximum red cell age 7.7 days; hospital mortality 25/189 (13.2%)) had an unadjusted absolute risk reduction in hospital mortality of 8.1% (95% confidence interval = 2.2 to 14.0%). After adjustment for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score, other blood component transfusions, number of RBC transfusions, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac surgery, the odds ratio for hospital mortality for patients exposed to the older three quartiles compared with the lowest quartile was 2.01 (95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 3.77). Conclusions In critically ill patients, in Australia and New Zealand, exposure to older RBCs is independently associated with an increased risk of death. PMID:21496231

  13. Blood cadmium levels in women of childbearing age vary by race/ethnicity

    SciTech Connect

    Mijal, Renee S. Holzman, Claudia B.

    2010-07-15

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is long-lived in the body and low-level cumulative exposure, even among non-smokers, has been associated with changes in renal function and bone metabolism. Women are more susceptible to the adverse effects of Cd and have higher body burdens. Due to increased dietary absorption of Cd in menstruating women and the long half-life of the metal, reproductive age exposures are likely important contributors to overall body burden and disease risk. We examined blood Cd levels in women of reproductive age in the US and assessed variation by race/ethnicity. Blood Cd concentrations were compared among female NHANES participants aged 20-44, who were neither pregnant nor breastfeeding. Sample size varied primarily based on inclusion/exclusion of smokers (n=1734-3121). Mean Cd concentrations, distributions and odds ratios were calculated using SUDAAN. For logistic regression Cd was modeled as high (the upper 10% of the distribution) vs. the remainder. Overall, Mexican Americans had lower Cd levels than other groups due to a lower smoking prevalence, smoking being an important source of exposure. Among never-smokers, Mexican Americans had 1.77 (95% CI: 1.06-2.96) times the odds of high Cd as compared to non-Hispanic Whites after controlling for age and low iron (ferritin). For non-Hispanic Blacks, the odds were 2.96 (CI: 1.96-4.47) times those of non-Hispanic Whites in adjusted models. Adjustment for relevant reproductive factors or exposure to environmental tobacco smoke had no effect. In this nationally representative sample, non-smoking Mexican American and non-Hispanic Black women were more likely to have high Cd than non-Hispanic White women. Additional research is required to determine the underlying causes of these differences.

  14. Blood acid-base and plasma electrolyte values in healthy ostriches: the effect of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Bouda, J; Núñez-Ochoa, L; Avila-González, E; Doubek, J; Fuente-Martínez, B; Aguilar-Bobadilla, J

    2009-08-01

    The effect of age and sex on blood acid-base and plasma electrolyte values was determined in venous blood samples from 45 clinically healthy ostriches (Struthio camelus) from 26 days to 6 years of age. Animals were divided by age into four groups and the group of adults was divided by sex into two subgroups. Blood samples were collected without sedation. There was a significant (P<0.05) age difference in blood values of base excess (BE), plasma HCO(3)(-), total CO(2) (TCO(2)), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) and anion gap (AG). The highest plasma concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-) and value of AG were found in adult ostriches with a steady decrease to chicks. A significant (P<0.05) sex difference in adult animals with higher blood pH, lower blood values of pCO(2), BE, plasma concentrations of HCO(3)(-), TCO(2) and K(+) was found in females. We concluded that blood acid-base values and plasma electrolyte concentrations in ostriches are affected by age and sex.

  15. Aging-related differences in cerebral capillary blood flow in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Michèle; Berti, Romain; Lefebvre, Joël; Dubeau, Simon; Lesage, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    Age-related decreases in baseline cerebral blood flow have been measured with various imaging modalities, however, the contribution of capillary flow to this phenomenon remain to elucidate. This study used 2-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy to measure capillary diameter, red blood cell speed, and flux in individual capillaries in the sensory-motor cortex of 12 adult (3-month-old) and 12 old (24-month-old) male Long-Evans rats under isoflurane anesthesia. The average (± standard deviation) diameter and speed over 921 capillaries were 6.4 ± 1.4 μm and 1.3 ± 1.1 mm/s, respectively. Red blood cell speed and flux were significantly higher, by 48% and 15%, respectively, in old compared with young animals (p < 5%). The diameter also showed a similar tendency (7% higher, p = 5.7%). Furthermore, capillary hematocrit and density were significantly lower in the older group (p < 5%), by 32% and 20%, respectively.

  16. Effect of age and vascular anatomy on blood flow in major cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Du, Xinjian; Pandey, Dilip K; Thulborn, Keith R; Charbel, Fady T

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of volume flow rates in major cerebral vessels can be used to evaluate the hemodynamic effects of cerebrovascular disease. However, both age and vascular anatomy can affect flow rates independent of disease. We prospectively evaluated 325 healthy adult volunteers using phase contrast quantitative magnetic resonance angiography to characterize these effects on cerebral vessel flow rates and establish clinically useful normative reference values. Flows were measured in the major intracranial and extracranial vessels. The cohort ranged from 18 to 84 years old, with 157 (48%) females. All individual vessel flows and total cerebral blood flow (TCBF) declined with age, at 2.6 mL/minute per year for TCBF. Basilar artery (BA) flow was significantly decreased in individuals with one or both fetal posterior cerebral arteries (PCAs). Internal carotid artery flows were significantly higher with a fetal PCA and decreased with a hypoplastic anterior cerebral artery. Indexing vessel flows to TCBF neutralized the age effect, but anatomic variations continued to impact indexed flow in the BA and internal carotid artery. Variability in normative flow ranges were reduced in distal vessels and by examining regional flows. Cerebral vessel flows are affected by age and cerebrovascular anatomy, which has important implications for interpretation of flows in the disease state.

  17. Sub-Clinical Cognitive Decline and Resting Cerebral Blood Flow in Middle Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Otto Mølby; Hansen, Naja Liv; Osler, Merete; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Hallam, Dorte Merete; Pedersen, Esben Thade; Chappell, Michael; Lauritzen, Martin Johannes; Rostrup, Egill

    2017-01-01

    Background Although dementia is associated with both global and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, little is known about cerebral perfusion in the early pre-clinical stages of cognitive decline preceding overt cognitive dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of early sub-clinical cognitive decline with CBF. Materials and Methods The study participants were recruited from a cohort of Danish men born in 1953. Based on a regression model we selected men who performed better (Group A, n = 94) and poorer (Group B, n = 95) on cognitive testing at age 57 than expected from testing at age 20. Participants underwent supplementary cognitive testing, blood sampling and MRI including measurements of regional and global CBF. Results Regional CBF was lower in group B than in group A in the posterior cingulate gyrus and the precuneus. The associations were attenuated when corrected for global atrophy, but remained significant in regions of interest based analysis adjusting for regional gray matter volume and vascular risk factors. No influence of group on global CBF was observed. Conclusions We conclude that early sub-clinical cognitive decline is associated with reduced perfusion in the precuneus and posterior cingulate gyrus independently of regional atrophy and vascular risk factors, but cannot be statistically separated from an association with global atrophy. PMID:28095458

  18. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  19. The Use of Dried Blood Spot Sampling in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes the methods used for and issues associated with collection and analysis of dried blood spot (DBS) samples for the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project and provides the basic distributions of the resulting analytes. Methods DBSs from capillary finger sticks were collected by nonmedically trained interviewers from 2,044 individuals, aged 57–85 years. The quality and quantity of DBS samples were evaluated to allow for analysis of interviewer performance. Levels of C-reactive protein, antibodies to the Epstein–Barr virus, hemoglobin, and glycosylated hemoglobin were assayed using various analytic methods. Results Cooperation rate for DBS collection was 84.5%, with 99% of the cards yielding enough sample for at least one analysis. The distribution, mean, and standard deviation of the analytes obtained from DBSs are also presented in this paper. Conclusions The high cooperation rate and quality of the spots collected suggest that the collection of DBSs in population-based research is a feasible and viable alternative to venous blood draws. The relative ease of sample collection, transport, and storage are significant benefits. Care should be taken, however, when comparing results from analysis of DBS samples with those obtained from serum or plasma samples. PMID:19244547

  20. In vitro assays and clinical trials in red blood cell aging: Lost in translation.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Michel; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2015-06-01

    The age of erythrocyte concentrates (EC) in transfusion medicine and the adverse outcomes when transfusing long-term-stored EC are highly controversial issues. Whereas the definition of a short-term-stored EC or a long-term-stored EC is unclear in clinical trials, data based on in vitro storage assays can help defining a limit in addition of the expiration date. The present review merges together these data in order to highlight an EC age cut-off and points out potential misleading consideration. The analysis of in vitro data highlights the presence of reversible and irreversible storage lesions and demonstrates that red blood cells (RBC) exhibit two limits during storage: one around 2 weeks and another one around 4 weeks of storage. Of particular importance, the first lesions to appear, i.e. the reversible ones, are per se reversible once transfused, whereas the irreversible lesions are not. In clinical trials, the EC age cut-off for short-term storage is in general fewer than 14 days (11 ± 4 days) and more disperse for long-term-stored EC (17 ± 13 days), regardless the clinical outcomes. Taking together, EC age cut-off in clinical trials does not totally fall into line of in vitro aging data, whereas it is the key criteria in clinical studies. Long-term-stored EC considered in clinical trials are not probably old enough to answer the question: "Does transfusion of long-term-stored EC (older than 4 weeks) result in worse clinical outcomes?" Depending on ethical concerns and clinical practices, older EC than currently assayed in clinical trials should have to be considered. These two worlds trying to understand the aging of erythrocytes and the impact on patients do not seem to speak the same language.

  1. Haematology and some blood chemical parameters of young carp till the age of three years.

    PubMed

    Svetina, A; Matasin, Zeljka; Tofant, Alenka; Vucemilo, Marija; Fijan, N

    2002-01-01

    Haematological and biochemical analyses of blood were performed in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) kept in small ponds. Caught and anaesthetised carp were clinically examined and blood samples were taken at regular intervals during the three years. In the first year of examinations, the haemoglobin and haematocrit values of carp fry significantly increased (P < 0.01) from June to September. The intensive growth of carp in the summer period in the second year was accompanied by adequate erythropoiesis. During hibernation haematocrit and haemoglobin significantly decreased (P < 0.05) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) increased (P < 0.01) in both scaly and mirror carp. MCHC increased also with the age and increasing body weight of the fish. Mirror carp had lower haematocrit and haemoglobin values than scaly carp (P < 0.01). Comparative haematological analyses between carp of normal and poor body condition showed that moderate anaemia appeared in those with poor body condition. The results indicate that there is marked seasonal and age-dependent variation in the values of haematocrit and haemoglobin. Pond water quality investigations indicated good environmental conditions. A 50% increase (P < 0.05) of glucose concentration was found from June to September in the blood plasma of carp in the third year, accompanied by an even more increased (80%; P < 0.01) concentration of total lipids. At the same time, considerable changes of cholesterol and total protein concentrations were not observed. The results suggest that the investigated haematological and biochemical variables could be successfully utilised in monitoring the metabolic balance and health status of fish in intensive culture.

  2. Office and ambulatory blood pressure are independently associated with albuminuria in older subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Moran, Andrew; Palmas, Walter; Pickering, Thomas G; Schwartz, Joseph E; Field, Lesley; Weinstock, Ruth S; Shea, Steven

    2006-05-01

    Blood pressure strongly predicts microalbuminuria and later progression to renal failure in people with diabetes. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring seems to be superior to office blood pressure in predicting progression to microalbuminuria in type 1 diabetes. The associations of ambulatory blood pressure with office blood pressure and microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes remain unclear. We studied the association of office blood pressure taken with an automated device and ambulatory blood pressure with spot urine albumin:creatinine ratio in 1180 older people with type 2 diabetes participating in the Informatics for Diabetes Education and Telemedicine Study. Office and awake systolic blood pressure were independently associated with albuminuria (P<0.001 for both) in a multivariate linear regression analysis that adjusted for age, gender, duration of diabetes, hemoglobin A1c, number of antihypertensive medications, and use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker. Twelve percent of participants had well-controlled office blood pressure but not ambulatory blood pressure, whereas 14% had well-controlled ambulatory but not office blood pressure. The prevalence of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria in these subgroups was intermediate between those with well-controlled or uncontrolled blood pressure by both methods. We found, in a multiethnic group of older subjects with type 2 diabetes, that office systolic blood pressure and awake systolic ambulatory blood pressure exhibited independent associations with degree of albuminuria.

  3. The Burden of Blood-Pressure-Related Cardiovascular Mortality in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Hernández, Dora E.; Lundelin, Krista J.; Picazzo-Palencia, Esteban; de la Cruz, Juan J.; Sánchez, José J.; Banegas, José R.

    2014-01-01

    This study shows that in Mexico, a country at an advanced stage in the epidemiologic transition, with the national burden of disease dominated by noncommunicable diseases, elevated blood pressure is a major clinical and public health problem. 31.7% of the Mexican individuals aged 50 and over had systolic hypertension, and 47.3% were at systolic prehypertensive levels. Also, approximately half of all cardiovascular deaths that occurred annually in the population of Mexico aged ≥50 years are attributable to above optimal levels of systolic blood pressure. We think these estimates may help order health priorities in Mexico (and other middle-income countries) at a time when the costs of medical care take a considerable share of the gross national product in most countries. PMID:24678416

  4. The burden of blood-pressure-related cardiovascular mortality in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Hernández, Dora E; Lundelin, Krista J; Picazzo-Palencia, Esteban; de la Cruz, Juan J; Sánchez, José J; Banegas, José R

    2014-01-01

    This study shows that in Mexico, a country at an advanced stage in the epidemiologic transition, with the national burden of disease dominated by noncommunicable diseases, elevated blood pressure is a major clinical and public health problem. 31.7% of the Mexican individuals aged 50 and over had systolic hypertension, and 47.3% were at systolic prehypertensive levels. Also, approximately half of all cardiovascular deaths that occurred annually in the population of Mexico aged ≥50 years are attributable to above optimal levels of systolic blood pressure. We think these estimates may help order health priorities in Mexico (and other middle-income countries) at a time when the costs of medical care take a considerable share of the gross national product in most countries.

  5. [The specific distribution of erythrocytes and blood platelets according to the volume of cells in different-age children].

    PubMed

    Matiushichev, V B; Sharmatova, V G

    2005-01-01

    The reference volumes of erythrocytes and blood platelets were evaluated for different age groups of children. The mean volume of cells and the parameters of its distribution, i.e. SD, As and Ex, were found. The mean volume of erythrocytes and the value of positive Ex for the volume of blood platelets were shown to be reliably higher in adults. The investigated blood parameters in children were proven to depend in children on their age and sex. It was concluded that the mentioned peculiarities should be considered in the practice of clinical laboratory examinations.

  6. Sex, ageing and resting blood pressure: gaining insights from the integrated balance of neural and haemodynamic factors.

    PubMed

    Hart, Emma C; Joyner, Michael J; Wallin, B Gunnar; Charkoudian, Nisha

    2012-05-01

    Young women tend to have lower blood pressure, and less risk of hypertension, compared to young men. As people age, both blood pressure and the risk of hypertension increase in both sexes; this occurs most strikingly in women after menopause. However, the mechanisms for these influences of sex and age remain incompletely understood. In this review we are specifically interested in the interaction between neural (sympathetic nerve activity; SNA) and haemodynamic factors (cardiac output, blood pressure and vascular resistance) and how these change with sex and age. While peripheral vascular SNA can vary 7- to 10-fold among normotensive young men and women, it is reproducible in a given individual. Surprisingly, higher levels of SNA are not associated with higher blood pressures in these groups. In young men, high SNA is associated with higher total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR), and appears to be balanced by lower cardiac output and less peripheral vascular responsiveness to adrenergic stimulation. Young women do not exhibit the SNA-TPR relationship. Recent evidence suggests that β-adrenergic vasodilatation offsets the vasoconstrictor effects of α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in young women, which may contribute to the generally lower blood pressures in this group. Sympathetic nerve activity increases with age, and in groups over 40, levels of SNA are more tightly linked to levels of blood pressure. The potentially protective β-adrenergic effect seen in young women appears to be lost after menopause and probably contributes to the increased blood pressure and increased risk of hypertension seen in older women.

  7. The Effects of Oxidative Damage on In Vivo Aging, Density, and Survival of Baboon Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the plate. The biotin-treated and avidin-isolated red blood cells were washed three times in glucose phosphate buffered saline and labeled with 51Cr...OF BABOON RED BLOOD CELLS BY J.B. McKENNEY, C.R. VALERI, A. GIORGIO, G. RAGNO, J. TRAINOR, N. FORTIER, B. WODA, AND L.M. SNYDER NAVAL BLOOD ...TITLE (and Subtitle) THE EFFECTS OF OX I DATIVE DAMAGE ON IN VIVO AGING, DENSITY, AND SURVIVAL OF BABOON RED BLOOD CELLS 7. AUTHORf«; J.B

  8. The effect of endogenous estrogen on Doppler-estimated right ventricular systolic pressure during exercise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vicki N; Ahmed, Mavra; Ciofani, Amelia; Sasson, Zion; Granton, John T; Mak, Susanna

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of endogenous estrogen levels on exercise-related changes in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) of healthy, eumenorrheic, sedentary women. Volunteers were studied at two separates phases of the menstrual cycle (LO and HI estrogen phases), exercised on a semi-supine ergometer with escalating workload and monitored continuously by 12-lead ECG and automated blood pressure cuff. At each exercise stage, Doppler echocardiography measurements were obtained and analyzed to determine RVSP. Fourteen subjects (age 24 ± 5) were studied. Exercise duration was significantly higher on the HI estrogen day, but no significant differences in hemodynamic response to exercise were found between the two study days. There were also no significant differences with respect to heart rate (HR) acceleration during early exercise, as well as resting and peak RVSP, HR, blood pressure, and rate pressure product. Doppler-estimated RVSP demonstrated a linear relationship to HR at a ratio of 1 mm Hg (1 mm Hg = 133.3224 Pa) for every 5 bpm (beats per minute) increase in HR. There were no differences in the slope of this relationship between HI and LO estrogen phases of the menstrual cycle. Our findings did not demonstrate any effect of endogenous estrogen levels on the modulation of the pulmonary vascular response to exercise in healthy women.

  9. Blood-type and age affect human plasma levels of histidine-rich glycoprotein in a large population.

    PubMed

    Drasin, T; Sahud, M

    1996-11-01

    Histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) is an alpha2-glycoprotein that was first described by Heimberger, et al, in 1972. Today, HRG is generally regarded as a mild prothrombotic protein. Blood samples of 585 individuals were collected with the aid of the Alameda-Contra Costa Medical Association (ACCMA) Blood Bank, Oakland, CA. Sex, age, ethnic origin, and blood-type information were available for each sample. The blood was processed to isolate the cell free plasma, and plasma HRG concentration was measured relative to that of a normal pool through a modified Laurell technique. Among Caucasian individuals, the mean HRG level of blood-type AB subjects, 125 +/- 28%, was found to be significantly greater than the means for subjects with A and O blood-types, 103 +/- 35% and 105 +/- 30% respectively (P = .0246). In addition, the average HRG level appears to increase linearly with age. The mean plasma level of HRG in subjects 50-59 years old was significantly greater than the level in subjects 30-39 years old (P = .0020). The correlation observed between blood-type and plasma HRG level in this study supports previously reported results that indicate significant genetic control over the plasma level of this protein. The age and blood-type based correlations observed in this study raise the question of whether these variables need be addressed if HRG level were to be employed in a clinical setting as a diagnostic tool.

  10. Blood Lead Levels Among Children Aged <6 Years - Flint, Michigan, 2013-2016.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Chinaro; Yard, Ellen; Dignam, Timothy; Buchanan, Sharunda; Condon, Suzanne; Brown, Mary Jean; Raymond, Jaime; Rogers, Helen Schurz; Sarisky, John; de Castro, Rey; Arias, Ileana; Breysse, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    During April 25, 2014-October 15, 2015, approximately 99,000 residents of Flint, Michigan, were affected by changes in drinking water quality after their water source was switched from the Detroit Water Authority (DWA), sourced from Lake Huron, to the Flint Water System (FWS), sourced from the Flint River.* Because corrosion control was not used at the FWS water treatment plant, the levels of lead in Flint tap water increased over time. Adverse health effects are associated with lead exposure (1). On January 2, 2015, a water advisory was issued because of detection of high levels of trihalomethanes, byproducts of disinfectants.(†)(,)(§) Studies conducted by local and national investigators detected an increase in the prevalence of blood lead levels (BLLs) ≥5 µg/dL (the CDC reference level) among children aged <5 years living in Flint (2) and an increase in water lead levels after the water source switch (3). On October 16, 2015, the Flint water source was switched back to DWA, and residents were instructed to use filtered tap water for cooking and drinking. During that time, pregnant and breastfeeding women and children aged <6 years were advised to consume bottled water.(¶) To assess the impact on BLLs of consuming contaminated drinking water, CDC examined the distribution of BLLs ≥5 µg/dL among children aged <6 years before, during, and after the switch in water source. This analysis enabled determination of whether the odds of having BLLs ≥5 µg/dL before the switch differed from the odds during the switch to FWS (before and after the January 2, 2015, water advisory was issued), and after the switch back to DWA. Overall, among 9,422 blood lead tests in children aged <6 years, 284 (3.0%) BLLs were ≥5 µg/dL during April 25, 2013-March 16, 2016. The adjusted probability of having BLLs ≥5 µg/dL was 46% higher during the period after the switch from DWA to FWS (and before the January 2, 2015, water advisory) than during the period before the

  11. Relationships between blood pressure and health and fitness-related variables in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jeong Yeop; Ha, Chang Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to separately compare systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure with health and fitness-related variables among Asian obese and normal weight middle-aged women. [Subjects and Methods] The study included 1,201 women aged 30–59 years. The participants were classified into obese and normal weight groups. The blood pressure and health and fitness-related variables of all participants were assessed. [Results] Significant interaction effects were observed for most blood pressure and health and fitness-related variables between the groups. However, significant interaction effects were not observed for standard weight, basal metabolic rate, and heart rate. Blood pressure showed significant positive correlations with weight, body fat, fat weight, core fat, body mass index, and basal metabolic rate in both groups. Systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with muscular endurance, power, and agility in the obese group and with VO2max and flexibility in the normal weight group. Diastolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with muscular endurance and power in the obese group and with VO2max in the normal weight group. [Conclusion] The relationships between systolic blood pressure and heart rate, muscle endurance, power, and agility are stronger than the relationships between diastolic blood pressure and these variables. PMID:27821965

  12. Dynamics of lipoprotein level in blood plasma of pregnant women as a function of gestational age according to FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolik, E. V.; Korolenko, E. A.; Tretinnikov, O. N.; Kozlyakova, O. V.; Korolik, A. K.; Kirkovskiy, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    Results of an IR spectroscopic investigation of films of blood plasma taken from women of reproductive age, pregnant women with positive and negative Rh factors, and Rh-immunized women were presented as a function of gestational age. It was found that the lipoprotein content in blood plasma of all groups of pregnant women increased during the early stages of pregnancy (17-23 weeks) irrespective of the Rh factor and attained its peak value by weeks 30-35. It was shown that the lipoprotein level in blood plasma as a function of gestational age was quantitatively the same for pregnant women with positive and negative Rh factors. It was established for the first time that this dependence for Rh-immunized women featured a considerable increase of lipoprotein content at gestational age 30-32 weeks and declined acutely by week 36.

  13. Effect of age and gender on sudomotor and cardiovagal function and blood pressure response to tilt in normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.; Denq, J. C.; Opfer-Gehrking, T. L.; Dyck, P. J.; O'Brien, P. C.; Slezak, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Normative data are limited on autonomic function tests, especially beyond age 60 years. We therefore evaluated these tests in a total of 557 normal subjects evenly distributed by age and gender from 10 to 83 years. Heart rate (HR) response to deep breathing fell with increasing age. Valsalva ratio varied with both age and gender. QSART (quantitative sudomotor axon-reflex test) volume was consistently greater in men (approximately double) and progressively declined with age for all three lower extremity sites but not the forearm site. Orthostatic blood pressure reduction was greater with increasing age. HR at rest was significantly higher in women, and the increment with head-up tilt fell with increasing age. For no tests did we find a regression to zero, and some tests seem to level off with increasing age, indicating that diagnosis of autonomic failure was possible to over 80 years of age.

  14. Cuffless Blood Pressure Estimation with Photoplethysmograph Signal by Classifying on Account of Cardiovascular Characteristics of Old Aged Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satomi; Oguri, Koji

    Blood Pressure (BP) is a very important factor for monitoring the cardiovascular condition. In general, non-invasive BP measurements need a cuff. However, such measurement techniques can hardly monitor BP continuously. Recently it has gotten easier to measure biological signals daily because sensor technologies have well-developed, and because of availability of many kinds of miniaturized measurement instruments consuming less power. This study suggests a method of estimating Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) with a wearable sensor instead of a cuff. In particular, our study depends on only one pulse wave signal detected by a Photoplethysmograph (PPG) sensor since the PPG sensor is very small. Moreover, the human subject just wears the sensor on the surface of the body to measure the signal. Cardiovascular peculiarities keep changing as people get older. Additionally, the peculiarities vary among individuals according to the advanced rate of arteriosclerosis. Hence, it is necessary for estimating the SBP to divide the data into several classes, by parameters that relate to individual cardiovascular peculiarities. In this study, the regression equation of SBP was calculated from individual information and from features of the PPG signal in each class. As a result, the estimation accuracy was improved. This technique would make cuffless SBP monitoring become more convenient and helpful as only one device is required for monitoring, which is smaller than traditional measurements.

  15. Hypertension in aging patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension, especially isolated systolic hypertension, is commonly found in older (60-79 years of age) and elderly (≥80 years of age) people. Antihypertensive drug therapy should be considered in all aging hypertensive patients, as treatment greatly reduces cardiovascular events. Most classes of antihypertensive medications may be used as first-line treatment with the possible exception of α- and β-blockers. An initial blood pressure treatment goal is less than 140/90 mmHg in all older patients and less than 150/80 mmHg in the nonfrail elderly. The current paradigm of delaying therapeutic interventions until people are at moderate or high cardiovascular risk, a universal feature of hypertensive patients over 60 years of age, leads to vascular injury or disease that is only partially reversible with treatment. Future management will likely focus on intervening earlier to prevent accelerated vascular aging and irreversible arterial damage.

  16. Correlation of Cardiac Markers and Biomarkers With Blood Pressure of Middle-Aged Marathon Runners.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Joo; Ahn, Jae Ki; Shin, Kyung-A; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Yoon-Hee; Park, Kyoung-Min

    2015-11-01

    Runners with exercise-induced high blood pressure have recently been reported to exhibit higher levels of cardiac markers, vasoconstrictors, and inflammation. The authors attempted to identify correlations between exercise-related personal characteristics and the levels of biochemical/cardiac markers in marathon runners in this study. Forty healthy runners were enrolled. Blood samples were taken both before and after finishing a full marathon. The change in each cardiac/biochemical marker over the course of the marathon was determined. All markers were significantly (P<.001) increased immediately after the marathon (creatine kinase-MB [CK-MB]: 7.9 ± 2.7 ng/mL, cardiac troponin I (cTnI): 0.06 ± 0.10 ng/mL, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP): 95.7 ± 76.4, endothelin-1: 2.7 ± 1.16, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP]: 0.1 ± 0.09, creatine kinase [CK]: 315.7 ± 94.0, lactate dehydrogenase [LDH]: 552.8 ± 130.3) compared with their premarathon values (CK-MB: 4.3 ± 1.3, cTnI: 0.01 ± 0.003, NT-proBNP: 27.6 ± 31.1, endothelin-1: 1.11 ± 0.5, hs-CRP: 0.06 ± 0.07, CK: 149.2 ± 66.0, LDH: 399 ± 75.1). In middle-aged marathon runners, factors related to increased blood pressure were correlated with marathon-induced increases in cTnI, NT-proBNP, endothelin-1, and hs-CRP. These correlations were observed independent of running history, records of finishing, and peak oxygen uptake.

  17. Predialysis systolic BP variability and outcomes in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Tariq; Sozio, Stephen M; Bandeen-Roche, Karen J; Ephraim, Patti L; Luly, Jason R; St Peter, Wendy L; McDermott, Aidan; Scialla, Julia J; Crews, Deidra C; Tangri, Navdeep; Miskulin, Dana C; Michels, Wieneke M; Jaar, Bernard G; Herzog, Charles A; Zager, Philip G; Meyer, Klemens B; Wu, Albert W; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-04-01

    BP variability (BPV) is an important predictor of outcomes in the general population, but its association with clinical outcomes in hemodialysis patients is not clear. We identified 11,291 patients starting dialysis in 2003-2008 and followed them through December 31, 2008 (median=22 months). Predialysis systolic BPV was assessed over monthly intervals. Outcomes included factors associated with BPV, mortality (all-cause and cardiovascular), and first cardiovascular event (cardiovascular death or hospitalization). Patients' mean age was 62 years, 55% of patients were men, and 58% of patients were white. Modifiable factors associated with higher BPV included obesity, higher calcium-phosphate product levels, and lower hemoglobin concentration; factors associated with lower BPV included greater fluid removal, achievement of prescribed dry weight during dialysis, higher hemoglobin concentration, and antihypertensive regimens without β-blockers or renin-angiotensin system blocking agents. In total, 3200 deaths occurred, including 1592 cardiovascular deaths. After adjustment for demographics, comorbidities, and clinical factors, higher predialysis BPV was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] per 1 SD increase in BPV, 1.13 to 1.22), cardiovascular mortality (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.24), and first cardiovascular event (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.15). Results were similar when BPV was categorized in tertiles and patients were stratified by baseline systolic BP. In summary, predialysis systolic BPV is an important, potentially modifiable risk factor for death and cardiovascular outcomes in incident hemodialysis patients. Studies of BP management in dialysis patients should focus on both absolute BP and BPV.

  18. Hippocampal blood flow in normal aging measured with arterial spin labeling at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Rusinek, Henry; Brys, Miroslaw; Glodzik, Lidia; Switalski, Remigiusz; Tsui, Wai-Hon; Haas, Francois; Mcgorty, Kellyanne; Chen, Qun; de Leon, Mony J.

    2011-01-01

    Due to methodological difficulties related to the small size, variable distribution of hippocampal arteries, and the location of the hippocampus in the proximity of middle cranial fossa, little is known about hippocampal blood flow (HBF). We have tested the utility of a pulsed ASL sequence based on multi-shot TrueFISP to measure HBF in 34 normal volunteers (17 women, 17 men, 26-92 years old). Flow sensitivity to a mild hypercapnic challenge was also examined. Coregistered 3D MPRAGE sequence was used to eliminate from hippocampal and cortical regions of interest all voxel with <75% of gray matter. Large blood vessels were also excluded. HBF in normal volunteers averaged 61.2±9.0 ml/(100g min). There was no statistically significant age or gender effect. Under a mild hypercapnia challenge (end tidal CO2 pressure increase of 6.8±1.9 mg Hg over the baseline), HBF response was 14.1±10.8 ml/(100g min), whereas cortical gray matter flow increased by 18.0±12.2 ml/(100g min). Flow response among women was significantly larger than in the men. The average absolute difference between two successive HBF measures was 3.6 ml/(100g min), or 5.4%. The 3T TrueFISP ASL method offers a HBF measurement strategy that combines good spatial resolution, sensitivity, and minimal image distortions. PMID:20939094

  19. Estrogenic Compounds, Estrogen Receptors and Vascular Cell Signaling in the Aging Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Dia A.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    estrogen in the aging blood vessels and thereby enhancing the efficacy and safety of MHT in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:19442151

  20. Changes in Angiotensin Receptor Distribution and in Aortic Morphology Are Associated with Blood Pressure Control in Aged Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Torrico-Lavayen, Rocío; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; Carvajal-Aguilera, Karla G.; Castrejón-Tellez, Vicente; Rubio-Ruiz, María Esther

    2016-01-01

    The role of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in blood pressure regulation in MS during aging is unknown. It participates in metabolic syndrome (MS) and aging regulating vascular tone and remodeling. RAS might participate in a compensatory mechanism decreasing blood pressure and allowing MS rats to reach 18 months of age and it might form part of therapeutical procedures to ameliorate MS. We studied histological changes and distribution of RAS receptors in aortas of MS aged rats. Electron microscopy images showed premature aging in MS since the increased fibrosis, enlarged endothelium, and invasion of this layer by muscle cells that was present in control 18-month-old aortas were also found in 6-month-old aortas from MS rats. AT1, AT2, and Mas receptors mediate the effects of Ang II and Ang 1-7, respectively. Fluorescence from AT2 decreased with age in control and MS aortas, while fluorescence of AT1 increased in aortas from MS rats at 6 months and diminished during aging. Mas expression increased in MS rats and remained unchanged in control rats. In conclusion, there is premature aging in the aortas from MS rats and the elevated expression of Mas receptor might contribute to decrease blood pressure during aging in MS. PMID:27293881

  1. Blood pressure and associated factors in a rural Kenyan community.

    PubMed

    Poulter, N; Khaw, K T; Hopwood, B E; Mugambi, M; Peart, W S; Rose, G; Sever, P S

    1984-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) and associated factors were determined in 1737 men in a remote Kenyan agricultural community. Systolic BP showed no significant rise with age until after 54 years; diastolic BP showed a small rise with age. Both systolic and diastolic BP correlated with weight independent of age. Systolic and diastolic BP correlated positively with casual urinary sodium/potassium and negatively with potassium/creatinine ratios. Both systolic and diastolic BP correlated significantly with the number of years of education, as did urinary sodium/potassium and sodium/creatinine ratios. Potassium/creatinine ratios were negatively correlated with the number of years of education. Blood pressure and urinary sodium/creatinine ratios were significantly lower in subsistence farmers compared with those in other occupations, and potassium/creatinine ratios were significantly higher. Two pilot studies of Luo tribesmen showed a strong correlation between casual urinary electrolyte ratios and those derived from 24-hour urine samples and a greater variance of sodium excretion between these people than that found within individuals. These results suggest that a relationship between BP and casual urine electrolyte estimations may be identifiable in communities where there is less day-to-day dietary variation. They also suggest that some of the changes in BP associated with urbanization could be mediated by changes in dietary electrolytes.

  2. Consumption of policosanol enhances HDL functionality via CETP inhibition and reduces blood pressure and visceral fat in young and middle-aged subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Seong-Min; Kim, Suk-Jeong; Lee, Eun-Young; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    It is well-known that policosanol can improve serum lipid profiles, although the physiological mechanism is still unknown. Here, we investigated functional and structural changes in lipoproteins after consumption of policosanol. To investigate the physiological effect of policosanol, we analyzed serum parameters in young non-smoker (YN; n=7, 24.0±2.4 years), young smoker (YS; n=7, 26.3±1.5 years), and middle-aged subjects (MN; n=11, 52.5±9.8 years) who consumed policosanol daily (10 mg/day) for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, systolic blood pressure was significantly lowered to 4% (7 mmHg, p=0.022) from initial levels in the YS and MN groups. Moisture content of facial skin increased up to 38 and 18% from initial levels in the YS and MN groups, respectively. Serum triglyceride (TG) levels decreased to 28 and 26% from initial levels in the YN and MN groups, respectively. The percentage of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) in total cholesterol was elevated in all subjects (YN, 36%; YS, 35%; MN, 8%) after 8 weeks of policosanol consumption. All groups showed a reduction in serum glucose and uric acid levels. Serum cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity was significantly diminished up to 21 and 32% from initial levels in the YN and MN groups, respectively. After 8 weeks, oxidation of the low-density lipoprotein fraction was markedly reduced accompanied by decreased apolipoprotein B (apoB) fragmentation. In the HDL fraction, paraoxonase activity was elevated by 17% along with elevation of apoA-I and cholesterol contents. Electron microscopy revealed that the size and number of HDL particles increased after 8 weeks, and the YS group showed a 2-fold increase in particle size. Daily consumption of policosanol for 8 weeks resulted in lowered blood pressure, reduced serum TG level and CETP activity, and elevated HDL-C contents. These functional enhancements of HDL can prevent and/or attenuate aging-related diseases, hypertension, diabetes and coronary heart

  3. Community-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Blood Pressure and Glucose among Middle-Aged and Older Adults in China: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Aihua; Zhang, Guanrong; Liu, Zhiting; Gu, Jing; Chen, Weiqing; Luo, Futian

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that lifestyle interventions can reduce blood pressure (BP) and glucose levels, there is little information about the feasibility of such interventions when implemented in community settings. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a community-based lifestyle intervention on BP and glucose in the middle-aged and older Chinese population. By using a cluster randomisation approach, 474 participants from two communities were assigned to the intervention group which received intensive health education and behavioural intervention, or the control group which received conventional education. Linear mixed models were used to compare between-group differences on change in BP and fasting glucose after 6, 12 and 24 months. At the 12-month follow-up, the intervention group experienced significantly reductions in systolic BP (−4.9 vs. 2.4 mmHg; mean difference [MD] −7.3 mmHg; p < 0.001), diastolic BP (−1.9 vs. 1.9 mmHg; MD −3.8 mmHg; p < 0.001) and fasting glucose (−0.59 vs. 0.08 mmol/L; MD −0.67 mmol/L; p < 0.001). These differences were sustained at the 24-month follow-up. With only two communities, it was not possible to adjust for potential clustering by site. This approach of lifestyle interventions conducted through primary care services may be a potential solution for combating hypertension and diabetes in a resource-limited country context in China. PMID:25402562

  4. Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Centile Curves and Distributions by Age of Hospitalized Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, Danny; Goodwin, Andrew J.; Greer, Robert; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Laussen, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) form the basis for monitoring the physiological state of patients. Although norms have been published for healthy and hospitalized children, little is known about their distributions in critically ill children. The objective of this study was to report the distributions of these basic physiological variables in hospitalized critically ill children. Continuous data from bedside monitors were collected and stored at 5-s intervals from 3,677 subjects aged 0–18 years admitted over a period of 30 months to the pediatric and cardiac intensive care units at a large quaternary children’s hospital. Approximately 1.13 billion values served to estimate age-specific distributions for these two basic physiological variables: HR and intra-arterial BP. Centile curves were derived from the sample distributions and compared to common reference ranges. Properties such as kurtosis and skewness of these distributions are described. In comparison to previously published reference ranges, we show that children in these settings exhibit markedly higher HRs than their healthy counterparts or children hospitalized on in-patient wards. We also compared commonly used published estimates of hypotension in children (e.g., the PALS guidelines) to the values we derived from critically ill children. This is a first study reporting the distributions of basic physiological variables in children in the pediatric intensive care settings, and the percentiles derived may serve as useful references for bedside clinicians and clinical trials. PMID:28367430

  5. IQ and blood lead from 2 to 7 years of age: are the effects in older children the residual of high blood lead concentrations in 2-year-olds?

    PubMed

    Chen, Aimin; Dietrich, Kim N; Ware, James H; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Rogan, Walter J

    2005-05-01

    Increases in peak blood lead concentrations, which occur at 18-30 months of age in the United States, are thought to result in lower IQ scores at 4-6 years of age, when IQ becomes stable and measurable. Data from a prospective study conducted in Boston suggested that blood lead concentrations at 2 years of age were more predictive of cognitive deficits in older children than were later blood lead concentrations or blood lead concentrations measured concurrently with IQ. Therefore, cross-sectional associations between blood lead and IQ in school-age children have been widely interpreted as the residual effects of higher blood lead concentrations at an earlier age or the tendency of less intelligent children to ingest more leaded dust or paint chips, rather than as a causal relationship in older children. Here we analyze data from a clinical trial in which children were treated for elevated blood lead concentrations (20-44 microg/dL) at about 2 years of age and followed until 7 years of age with serial IQ tests and measurements of blood lead. We found that cross-sectional associations increased in strength as the children became older, whereas the relation between baseline blood lead and IQ attenuated. Peak blood lead level thus does not fully account for the observed association in older children between their lower blood lead concentrations and IQ. The effect of concurrent blood level on IQ may therefore be greater than currently believed.

  6. Influence of Age and Dose of African Swine Fever Virus Infections on Clinical Outcome and Blood Parameters in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Post, Jacob; Weesendorp, Eefke; Montoya, Maria; Loeffen, Willie L

    African swine fever (ASF) is a fatal disease for domestic pigs, leading to serious economic losses in countries where ASF is endemic. Despite extensive research, efficient vaccines against ASF are lacking. Since peripheral blood cells are important mediators for vaccines, we study the impact of ASF on blood parameters in pigs with different ages and infected with different doses of ASF virus. Four different groups were studied: (1) 12 weeks of age/low virus dose; (2) 12 weeks of age/high virus dose; (3) 18 weeks of age/low virus dose; and (4) 18 weeks of age/high virus dose. By varying in age and/or ASFV inoculation dose, we monitor blood parameters during different degrees of disease. Thirty percent of the pigs survived the infection with a moderately virulent strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV). Animals that did survive infection were generally older, independent from the inoculation dose used. A firm reduction in many different cell types at 3-5 days postinfection (DPI) was accompanied by an increase in body temperature, followed by clinical signs and mortality from day 6 PI. While blood parameters generally normalized in survivors, γδ T cells and IL-10 levels could be related to mortality. These conclusions should be considered in new approaches for protection against ASF.

  7. Dietary phosphorus and blood pressure: international study of macro- and micro-nutrients and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul; Kesteloot, Hugo; Appel, Lawrence J; Dyer, Alan R; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Chan, Queenie; Brown, Ian J; Zhao, Liancheng; Stamler, Jeremiah

    2008-03-01

    Raised blood pressure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; improved nutritional approaches to population-wide prevention are required. Few data are available on dietary phosphorus and blood pressure and none are available on possible combined effects of phosphorus, magnesium, and calcium on blood pressure. The International Study of Macro- and Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure is a cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 4680 men and women ages 40 to 59 from 17 population samples in Japan, China, United Kingdom, and United States. Blood pressure was measured 8 times at 4 visits. Dietary intakes were obtained from four 24-hour recalls plus data on supplement use. Dietary phosphorus was inversely associated with blood pressure in a series of predefined multiple regression models, with the successive addition of potential confounders, both nondietary and dietary. Estimated blood pressure differences per 232 mg/1000 kcal (2 SD) of higher dietary phosphorus were -1.1 to -2.3 mm Hg systolic/-0.6 to -1.5 mm Hg diastolic (n=4680) and -1.6 to -3.5 mm Hg systolic/-0.8 to -1.8 mm Hg diastolic for 2238 "nonintervened" individuals, ie, those without special diet/nutritional supplements or diagnosis/treatment for cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Dietary calcium and magnesium, correlated with phosphorus (partial r=0.71 and r=0.68), were inversely associated with blood pressure. Blood pressures were lower by 1.9 to 4.2 mm Hg systolic/1.2 to 2.4 mm Hg diastolic for people with intakes above versus below country-specific medians for all 3 of the minerals. These results indicate the potential for increased phosphorus/mineral intake to lower blood pressure as part of the recommendations for healthier eating patterns for the prevention and control of prehypertension and hypertension.

  8. Bone turnover markers in peripheral blood and marrow plasma reflect trabecular bone loss but not endocortical expansion in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Shahnazari, Mohammad; Dwyer, Denise; Chu, Vivian; Asuncion, Frank; Stolina, Marina; Ominsky, Michael; Kostenuik, Paul; Halloran, Bernard

    2012-03-01

    We examined age-related changes in biochemical markers and regulators of osteoblast and osteoclast activity in C57BL/6 mice to assess their utility in explaining age-related changes in bone. Several recently discovered regulators of osteoclasts and osteoblasts were also measured to assess concordance between their systemic levels versus their levels in marrow plasma, to which bone cells are directly exposed. MicroCT of 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old mice indicated an early age-related loss of trabecular bone volume and surface, followed by endocortical bone loss and periosteal expansion. Trabecular bone loss temporally correlated with reductions in biomarkers of bone formation and resorption in both peripheral blood and bone marrow. Endocortical bone loss and periosteal bone gain were not reflected in these protein biomarkers, but were well correlated with increased expression of osteocalcin, rank, tracp5b, and cathepsinK in RNA extracted from cortical bone. While age-related changes in bone turnover markers remained concordant in blood versus marrow, aging led to divergent changes in blood versus marrow for the bone cell regulators RANKL, OPG, sclerostin, DKK1, and serotonin. Bone expression of runx2 and osterix increased progressively with aging and was associated with an increase in the number of osteoprogenitors and osteoclast precursors. In summary, levels of biochemical markers of bone turnover in blood and bone marrow plasma were predictive of an age-related loss of trabecular surfaces in adult C57BL/6 mice, but did not predict gains in cortical surfaces resulting from cortical expansion. Unlike these turnover markers, a panel of bone cell regulatory proteins exhibited divergent age-related changes in marrow versus peripheral blood, suggesting that their circulating levels may not reflect local levels to which osteoclasts and osteoblasts are directly exposed.

  9. Front microrheology of the non-Newtonian behaviour of blood: scaling theory of erythrocyte aggregation by aging.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Soto, C; Costa-Miracle, E; Rodriguez-Villarreal, I; Cid, J; Castro, M; Alarcon, T; Hernandez-Machado, A

    2017-04-04

    We introduce a new framework to study the non-Newtonian behaviour of fluids at the microscale based on the analysis of front advancement. We apply this methodology to study the non-linear rheology of blood in microchannels. We carry out experiments in which the non-linear viscosity of blood samples is quantified at different haematocrits and ages. Under these conditions, blood exhibits a power-law dependence on the shear rate. In order to analyse our experimental data, we put forward a scaling theory which allows us to define an adhesion scaling number. This theory yields a scaling behaviour of the viscosity expressed as a function of the adhesion capillary number. By applying this scaling theory to samples of different ages, we are able to quantify how the characteristic adhesion energy varies as time progresses. This connection between microscopic and mesoscopic properties allows us to estimate quantitatively the change in the cell-cell adhesion energies as the sample ages.

  10. Methylome-wide association study of whole blood DNA in the Norfolk Island isolate identifies robust loci associated with age.

    PubMed

    Benton, Miles C; Sutherland, Heidi G; Macartney-Coxson, Donia; Haupt, Larisa M; Lea, Rodney A; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-02-28

    Epigenetic regulation of various genomic functions, including gene expression, provide mechanisms whereby an organism can dynamically respond to changes in its environment and modify gene expression accordingly. One epigenetic mechanism implicated in human aging and age-related disorders is DNA methylation. Isolated populations such as Norfolk Island (NI) should be advantageous for the identification of epigenetic factors related to aging due to reduced genetic and environmental variation. Here we conducted a methylome-wide association study of age using whole blood DNA in 24 healthy female individuals from the NI genetic isolate (aged 24-47 years). We analysed 450K methylation array data using a machine learning approach (GLMnet) to identify age-associated CpGs. We identified 497 CpG sites, mapping to 422 genes, associated with age, with 11 sites previously associated with age. The strongest associations identified were for a single CpG site in MYOF and an extended region within the promoter of DDO. These hits were validated in curated public data from 2316 blood samples (MARMAL-AID). This study is the first to report robust age associations for MYOF and DDO, both of which have plausible functional roles in aging. This study also illustrates the value of genetic isolates to reveal new associations with epigenome-level data.

  11. Characterization of blood biochemical markers during aging in the Grey Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus): impact of gender and season

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hematologic and biochemical data are needed to characterize the health status of animal populations over time to determine the habitat quality and captivity conditions. Blood components and the chemical entities that they transport change predominantly with sex and age. The aim of this study was to utilize blood chemistry monitoring to establish the reference levels in a small prosimian primate, the Grey Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus). Method In the captive colony, mouse lemurs may live 10–12 years, and three age groups for both males and females were studied: young (1–3 years), middle-aged (4–5 years) and old (6–10 years). Blood biochemical markers were measured using the VetScan Comprehensive Diagnostic Profile. Because many life history traits of this primate are highly dependent on the photoperiod (body mass and reproduction), the effect of season was also assessed. Results The main effect of age was observed in blood markers of renal functions such as creatinine, which was higher among females. Additionally, blood urea nitrogen significantly increased with age and is potentially linked to chronic renal insufficiency, which has been described in captive mouse lemurs. The results demonstrated significant effects related to season, especially in blood protein levels and glucose rates; these effects were observed regardless of gender or age and were likely due to seasonal variations in food intake, which is very marked in this species. Conclusion These results were highly similar with those obtained in other primate species and can serve as references for future research of the Grey Mouse Lemur. PMID:23131178

  12. Selenium status and GSH-Px activity in semen and blood of boars at different ages used for artificial insemination.

    PubMed

    Lasota, B; Błaszczyk, B; Seremak, B; Udała, J

    2004-10-01

    This study was performed to determine the relationship between selenium (Se) content and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in blood and semen, and semen quality of boars at different age used in an artificial insemination (AI) station. Routine macroscopic and microscopic analyses of semen quality were accompanied by measurement of Se content and GSH-Px activity in blood and semen. The Se concentration in blood plasma, seminal fluid and spermatozoa was measured by fluorometric method, the GSH-Px activity by a method based on NADPH-coupled reaction. A total of 155 ejaculates and 58 blood samples were investigated. The results of this study showed that there was no direct relationship between the Se content and GSH-Px activity in blood plasma and semen, and semen quality of sexual matured boars. The mechanisms controlling Se content and GSH-Px activity in blood and semen seem to be independent. The age of boars as a differentiating factor for Se content and GSH-Px activity in blood and semen is possible. It is concluded that a determination of Se status and/or GSH-Px activity in organism before Se supplementation is indicated.

  13. Impaired fasting blood glucose is associated to cognitive impairment and cerebral atrophy in middle-aged non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Djelti, Fathia; Dhenain, Marc; Terrien, Jérémy; Picq, Jean-Luc; Hardy, Isabelle; Champeval, Delphine; Perret, Martine; Schenker, Esther; Epelbaum, Jacques; Aujard, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive impairment is a major health and social issue because of increasing aged population. Cognitive decline is not homogeneous in humans and the determinants leading to differences between subjects are not fully understood. In middle-aged healthy humans, fasting blood glucose levels in the upper normal range are associated with memory impairment and cerebral atrophy. Due to a close evolutional similarity to Man, non-human primates may be useful to investigate the relationships between glucose homeostasis, cognitive deficits and structural brain alterations. In the grey mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus, spatial memory deficits have been associated with age and cerebral atrophy but the origin of these alterations have not been clearly identified. Herein, we showed that, on 28 female grey mouse lemurs (age range 2.4-6.1 years-old), age correlated with impaired fasting blood glucose (rs=0.37) but not with impaired glucose tolerance or insulin resistance. In middle-aged animals (4.1-6.1 years-old), fasting blood glucose was inversely and closely linked with spatial memory performance (rs=0.56) and hippocampus (rs=−0.62) or septum (rs=−0.55) volumes. These findings corroborate observations in humans and further support the grey mouse lemur as a natural model to unravel mechanisms which link impaired glucose homeostasis, brain atrophy and cognitive processes. PMID:28039490

  14. Impact of Exercise and Aging on Rat Urine and Blood Metabolome. An LC-MS Based Metabolomics Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Deda, Olga; Gika, Helen G.; Taitzoglou, Ioannis; Raikos, Νikolaos; Theodoridis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Aging is an inevitable condition leading to health deterioration and death. Regular physical exercise can moderate the metabolic phenotype changes of aging. However, only a small number of metabolomics-based studies provide data on the effect of exercise along with aging. Here, urine and whole blood samples from Wistar rats were analyzed in a longitudinal study to explore metabolic alterations due to exercise and aging. The study comprised three different programs of exercises, including a life-long protocol which started at the age of 5 months and ended at the age of 21 months. An acute exercise session was also evaluated. Urine and whole blood samples were collected at different time points and were analyzed by LC-MS/MS (Liquid Chromatography–tandem Mass Spectrometry). Based on their metabolic profiles, samples from trained and sedentary rats were differentiated. The impact on the metabolome was found to depend on the length of exercise period with acute exercise also showing significant changes. Metabolic alterations due to aging were equally pronounced in sedentary and trained rats in both urine and blood analyzed samples. PMID:28241477

  15. Age-Associated Induction of Cell Membrane CD47 Limits Basal and Temperature-Induced Changes in Cutaneous Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Natasha M.; Roberts, David D.; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis that the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), through binding to and activation of the cell receptor CD47, inhibits basal and thermal-mediated cutaneous blood flow. Background Data Abnormal and decreased cutaneous blood flow in response to temperature changes or vasoactive agents is a feature of cardiovascular disease and aging. The reasons for decreased cutaneous blood flow remain incompletely understood. Further, a role for matricellular proteins in the regulation skin blood flow has never been proposed. Methods C57BL/6 wild type, TSP1- and CD47-null 12 and 72 week old male mice underwent analysis of skin blood flow (SkBF) via laser Doppler in response to thermal stress and vasoactive challenge. Results Young and aged TSP1- and CD47-null mice displayed enhanced basal and thermal sensitive SkFB changes compared to age matched wild type controls. Nitric oxide-mediated increases in SkBF were also greater in null mice. TSP1 and CD47 were expressed in skin from young wild type mice, and both were significantly upregulated in aged animals. Tissue 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a potent vasodilator, was greater in skin samples from null mice compared to wild type regardless of age. Finally, treating wild type animals with a CD47 monoclonal antibody, that inhibits TSP1 activation of CD47, enhanced SkBF in both young and aged animals. Conclusions The above results suggest that secreted TSP1, via its cognate receptor CD47, acutely modulates SkBF. These data further support therapeutically targeting CD47 to mitigate age-associated loss of SkBF and maximize wound healing. PMID:23275312

  16. Biological consequences of stress: conflicting findings on the association between job strain and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Fornari, C; Ferrario, M; Menni, C; Sega, R; Facchetti, R; Cesana, G C

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective is to verify the relation between job strain and clinic blood pressure in a working population from the Milan municipality (1,909 men, 3,786 women) enrolled from 1992 to 1996. Job strain was investigated through the Karasek model. Clinic blood pressure was evaluated using standard procedures from the MONICA project. The association between the two was calculated controlling for age, education, smoking, body mass index, total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Significantly, associations were found for systolic blood pressure in men and for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in women. However, these results do not reflect biological plausibility. The relationship between job strain and blood pressure is an unfinished business: sample characteristics and measurement methods should be carefully considered.

  17. Age-Dependent Variation in Hormonal Concentration and Biochemical Constituents in Blood Plasma of Indian Native Fowl

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Avishek; Mohan, Jag; Sastry, Kochigant Venkata Hanumant

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was to investigate the age-related changes in hormonal concentration and biochemical constituents of blood plasma in Indian native desi fowl. One hundred and sixty two (54 from each breed, i.e., Kadaknath (KN), Aseel peela (AP), and White leghorn (WLH)) day-old female chicks were randomly divided into nine groups each of 18 chicks (3 groups × 3 replicates). WLH was taken in this study to compare the characteristics of Indian native desi fowl. The highest level of estrogen hormone in WLH and desi fowl in blood plasma was occurred at 18 and 24 wks of age, respectively. Whereas, the peak of progesterone hormone in WLH hens noticed around 24 wks, in case of desi fowls, it was at 30 wks of age. Irrespective of the breed, the hormonal profile of Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxine (T4) in blood plasma was found highest around 6 to 12 wks of age. Activities of acid phosphatase (ACP) increased with the reduction of alkaline phosphate (ALP) activities at different time intervals. Irrespective of the breed, transaminases (glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT)) activities of blood plasma increased linearly with the advancement of the age. From this study, it may be concluded that sexual maturity of the Indian native desi fowl occurred nearly 6 wk later (24 wk) than WLH. PMID:21234314

  18. [Ultrasonographic study of blood flow in the renal arteries of patients with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Makarenko, E S; Dombrovskiĭ, V I; Nelasov, N Iu

    2012-01-01

    Vascular duplex ultrasound duplex with simultaneous ECG registration was made to estimate the quantitative and time parameters of blood flow in the renal arteries with grade 1-2 arterial hypertension. There were increases in vascular resistance indices and acceleration phase index and a reduction in systolic phase index. There were correlations of the time parameters of blood flow in the renal arteries with age and lipidogram values.

  19. The Preoperative Patient With a Systolic Murmur

    PubMed Central

    Cowie, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patients with undifferentiated systolic murmurs present commonly during the perioperative period. Traditional bedside assessment and auscultation has not changed significantly in almost 200 years and relies on interpreting indirect acoustic events as a means of evaluating underlying cardiac pathology. This is notoriously inaccurate, even in expert cardiology hands, since many different valvular and cardiac diseases present with a similar auditory signal. Evidence Acquisition: The data on systolic murmurs, physical examination, perioperative valvular disease in the setting of non-cardiac surgery is reviewed. Results: Significant valvular heart disease increases perioperative risk in major non-cardiac surgery and increases long term patient morbidity and mortality. We propose a more modern approach to physical examination that incorporates the use of focused echocardiography to allow direct visualization of cardiac structure and function. This improves the diagnostic accuracy of clinical assessment, allows rational planning of surgery and anaesthesia technique, risk stratification, postoperative monitoring and appropriate referral to physicians and cardiologists. Conclusions: With a thorough preoperative assessment incorporating focused echocardiography, anaesthetists are in the unique position to enhance their role as perioperative physicians and influence short and long term outcomes of their patients. PMID:26705529

  20. Dietary potassium and blood pressure in a population.

    PubMed

    Khaw, K T; Barrett-Connor, E

    1984-06-01

    A population based study of 685 men and women aged 20 to 79 yr in a predominantly Caucasian community in Southern California found dietary potassium intake estimated from 24-h recall dietary history to be significantly and negatively correlated with age-adjusted systolic pressure in both men and women and with age-adjusted diastolic blood pressure in men. These correlations remained after exclusion of persons taking antihypertension medication or those with categorical hypertension (blood pressure greater than 160/95), and also persisted after adjusting for other dietary variables including alcohol and calcium intake. In women, correlations with blood pressure increased after excluding those taking sex hormones, suggesting that hormonal status may be an important determinant of blood pressure in women and may obscure other relationships. These findings support the etiological relationship of dietary potassium with blood pressure in populations.

  1. Blood pressure in Tokelauan children in two contrasting environments.

    PubMed

    Beaglehole, R; Eyles, E; Salmond, C; Prior, I

    1978-10-01

    To assess the influence of the environment on blood pressure levels in children, the patterns of blood pressure in Tokelauan children resident in the isolated atolls of Tokelau and in New Zealand are compared. Blood pressure was measured twice by one observer using a random zero sphygmomanometer on 571 (96% response) Tokelauan children resident on the atolls and on 856 (95% response) Tokelauan children resident in New Zealand. After adjusting for cuff size and controlling for age, weight and height, the systolic blood pressure of New Zealand resident children was found to be significantly higher in boys of all ages and in girls under the age of eight. The difference does not appear to be due to selective migration; the association of the heavier weight of the New Zealand resident children with part of this blood pressure difference may be important from a preventive viewpoint.

  2. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... increased red blood cell destruction can affect teens: G6PD deficiency. G6PD is an enzyme that helps to protect ... can cause red cells to hemolyze, or burst. G6PD deficiency is a common hereditary disease among people of ...

  3. Systolic and Diastolic Dysfunction of the Right Heart Ventricle in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Extremely Cold Climate

    PubMed Central

    Sivtseva, Anna Innokentievna; Strutynsky, Andrew Vladislavovich; Krivoshapkin, Vadim Grigorievich; Sivtseva, Elena Nikolaevna; Ivanova, Marianna Adolfovna; Timofeev, Leonid Fedorovich

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes echocardiographic values of systolic and diastolic dysfunction the right heart ventricle in 229 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In our patients the values AvPAP (≥25 mmHg while resting), FDDrv and FSDrv (>26 and 20 mm respectively), the thickness of front wall the RV (>5 mm), the dimension of AD (>35 mm), as well as the reduction the vestibular-distal shortening of RV (<23%), maximum blood velocity and the blood evacuation time from reflect indirectly the progressive reduction the contractive capacity RV myocardium and the occurrence of systolic dysfunction. In patients with severe de-compensation a restrictive type diastolic function is more characteristic – acceleration of early diastolic filling and blood velocity decrease during the auricular systole. PMID:25948460

  4. Systolic and diastolic dysfunction of the right heart ventricle in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in extremely cold climate.

    PubMed

    Sivtseva, Anna Innokentievna; Strutynsky, Andrew Vladislavovich; Krivoshapkin, Vadim Grigorievich; Sivtseva, Elena Nikolaevna; Ivanova, Marianna Adolfovna; Timofeev, Leonid Fedorovich

    2014-11-30

    The paper describes echocardiographic values of systolic and diastolic dysfunction the right heart ventricle in 229 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In our patients the values AvPAP (?25 mmHg while resting), FDDrv and FSDrv (>26 and 20 mm respectively), the thickness of front wall the RV (>5 mm), the dimension of AD (>35 mm), as well as the reduction the vestibular-distal shortening of RV (<23%), maximum blood velocity and the blood evacuation time from reflect indirectly the progressive reduction the contractive capacity RV myocardium and the occurrence of systolic dysfunction. In patients with severe de-compensation a restrictive type diastolic function is more characteristic - acceleration of early diastolic filling and blood velocity decrease during the auricular systole.

  5. Effects of late-onset and long-term captopril and nifedipine treatment in aged spontaneously hypertensive rats: Echocardiographic studies.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Julia; Hawlitschek, Christina; Rabald, Steffen; Hagendorff, Andreas; Zimmer, Heinz-Gerd; Rassler, Beate

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze the changes in blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) wall thickness and LV systolic function of aged spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) either with or without antihypertensive therapy. Twenty-one SHRs aged 60.5±0.25 weeks were investigated over 22 weeks. They were divided into the following three groups (7 per group): untreated controls (CTRL), treatment with captopril (CAP, 60 mg kg(-1) daily) and treatment with captopril plus nifedipine (CAP+NIF, 60+10 mg kg(-1) daily). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was regularly measured using the tail cuff method, and an echocardiogram was repeatedly obtained to examine the LV systolic and diastolic area, LV systolic fractional area change, cardiac output and LV myocardial wall thickness. Finally, heart catheterization was performed. While SBP remained stable in the CTRL animals over the experimental period, both of the antihypertensive treatments significantly reduced SBP by 20% in the treated animals (P<0.001). Echocardiography demonstrated that both the systolic and the diastolic LV function of the untreated SHRs deteriorated over time, whereas both types of antihypertensive treatments attenuated and delayed but did not completely prevent the decline in LV systolic function. Cardiac output, as determined by pulsed wave Doppler echocardiography, remained significantly higher in the treated animals than in CTRLs until week 20, but it then decreased. Heart catheterization showed a significant decrease in LV function, as reflected by the LV systolic pressure and contractility, in the CTRLs but not in treated animals. These findings clearly indicate that late-onset antihypertensive treatment with CAP or CAP+NIF is beneficial with respect to blood pressure reduction, LV hypertrophy attenuation and LV systolic function preservation.

  6. Allometric Growth of Testes in Relation to Age, Body Weight and Selected Blood Parameters in Male Japanese Quail (Coturnix japonica).

    PubMed

    Vatsalya, Vatsalya; Arora, Kashmiri L

    2012-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a very valuable animal model for research in a variety of biological disciplines. The purpose of this study was to characterize and interrelate age-dependent testicular parameters with various blood constituents: blood glucose, plasma proteins and packed cell volume that are developing concurrently in the growing bird. Another objective of the study was to identify selective physioanatomical markers for predicting the testicular growth and the onset of sexual maturity. Male Japanese quail hatchlings were raised in temperature controlled brooders for up to 3 weeks of age under a constant light and then shifted to hanging cages in an air conditioned room set at ~73° F under a 14L: 10D lighting system and ad libitum access to feed and water. Starting d8, a group of 8-10 birds of uniform size and weight were selected randomly at 4-day intervals up to d52 of age for the project. The birds were weighed and blood sampled using the brachial vein and Blood Glucose (BGL), Total Plasma Proteins (PP) and Packed Cell Volume (PCV) levels were measured prior to euthanization. The testes were removed and measured for weight, length, width and Volume (VOL). All the testicular measurements were then correlated with age and body weight. The left testes were larger than the right testes and their differences were evident at d36 of age. Testicular measurements also reflected two distinct growth surges at d28, d32 and d36 of age. Combined Testes Weight (CTW) and Combined Testes Volume (CTV) revealed a strong positive correlation with PCV and PP and a negative correlation with Blood Glucose Level (BGL). Accordingly, these measurements could serve as reliable markers of growth rate and sexual maturation in male Japanese quail.

  7. Blood Lead Levels in Children Aged 0–6 Years Old in Hunan Province, China from 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jun; Wang, Kewei; Wu, Xiaoli; Xiao, Zhenghui; Lu, Xiulan; Zhu, Yimin; Zuo, Chao; Yang, Yongjia; Wang, Youjie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to describe blood lead levels (BLLs) and the prevalence of elevated blood lead levels (EBLLs) in children aged 0–6 years old and to analyze the BLL trend in children from 2009 to 2013 in China. Methods A total of 124,376 children aged 0–6 years old were recruited for this study from January 1st 2009 to December 31st 2013. Their blood lead levels were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrometry. Results The median BLL was 64.3 μg/L (IQR: 49.6–81.0), and the range was 4.3–799.0 μg/L. Blood lead levels were significantly higher in boys (66.0 μg/L) than in girls (61.9 μg/L) (P<0.001). The overall prevalence of BLLs≥100 μg/L was 10.54% in children aged 0–6 years in Hunan Province. Between 2009 and 2013, the prevalence of EBLLs (≥100 μg/L) decreased from 18.31% to 4.26% in children aged 0–6 years and increased with age. The prevalence of EBLLs has dramatically decreased in two stages (2009–2010 and 2012–2013), with a slight fluctuation in 2010 and 2011. Conclusions Both BLLs and the prevalence of EBLLs in children aged 0–6 years old declined substantially from 2009 to 2013 in Hunan Province; however, both remain at unacceptably high levels compared to developed countries. Comprehensive strategies are required to further reduce blood lead levels in children. PMID:25830596

  8. Blood-based biomarkers of age-associated epigenetic changes in human islets associate with insulin secretion and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bacos, Karl; Gillberg, Linn; Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Eiberg, Hans; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Almgren, Peter; Groop, Leif; Eliasson, Lena; Vaag, Allan; Dayeh, Tasnim; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Aging associates with impaired pancreatic islet function and increased type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Here we examine whether age-related epigenetic changes affect human islet function and if blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect these changes and associate with future T2D. We analyse DNA methylation genome-wide in islets from 87 non-diabetic donors, aged 26–74 years. Aging associates with increased DNA methylation of 241 sites. These sites cover loci previously associated with T2D, for example, KLF14. Blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related methylation changes in 83 genes identified in human islets (for example, KLF14, FHL2, ZNF518B and FAM123C) and some associate with insulin secretion and T2D. DNA methylation correlates with islet expression of multiple genes, including FHL2, ZNF518B, GNPNAT1 and HLTF. Silencing these genes in β-cells alter insulin secretion. Together, we demonstrate that blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related DNA methylation changes in human islets, and associate with insulin secretion in vivo and T2D. PMID:27029739

  9. Blood-based biomarkers of age-associated epigenetic changes in human islets associate with insulin secretion and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bacos, Karl; Gillberg, Linn; Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Eiberg, Hans; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Almgren, Peter; Groop, Leif; Eliasson, Lena; Vaag, Allan; Dayeh, Tasnim; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-03-31

    Aging associates with impaired pancreatic islet function and increased type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Here we examine whether age-related epigenetic changes affect human islet function and if blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect these changes and associate with future T2D. We analyse DNA methylation genome-wide in islets from 87 non-diabetic donors, aged 26-74 years. Aging associates with increased DNA methylation of 241 sites. These sites cover loci previously associated with T2D, for example, KLF14. Blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related methylation changes in 83 genes identified in human islets (for example, KLF14, FHL2, ZNF518B and FAM123C) and some associate with insulin secretion and T2D. DNA methylation correlates with islet expression of multiple genes, including FHL2, ZNF518B, GNPNAT1 and HLTF. Silencing these genes in β-cells alter insulin secretion. Together, we demonstrate that blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related DNA methylation changes in human islets, and associate with insulin secretion in vivo and T2D.

  10. Laser microbeams for DNA damage induction, optical tweezers for the search on blood pressure relaxing drugs: contributions to ageing research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigaravicius, P.; Monajembashi, S.; Hoffmann, M.; Altenberg, B.; Greulich, K. O.

    2009-08-01

    One essential cause of human ageing is the accumulation of DNA damages during lifetime. Experimental studies require quantitative induction of damages and techniques to visualize the subsequent DNA repair. A new technique, the "immuno fluorescent comet assay", is used to directly visualize DNA damages in the microscope. Using DNA repair proteins fluorescently labeled with green fluorescent protein, it could be shown that the repair of the most dangerous DNA double strand breaks starts with the inaccurate "non homologous end joining" pathway and only after 1 - 1 ½ minutes may switch to the more accurate "homologous recombination repair". One might suggest investigating whether centenarians use "homologous recombination repair" differently from those ageing at earlier years and speculate whether it is possible, for example by nutrition, to shift DNA repair to a better use of the error free pathway and thus promote healthy ageing. As a complementary technique optical tweezers, and particularly its variant "erythrocyte mediated force application", is used to simulate the effects of blood pressure on HUVEC cells representing the inner lining of human blood vessels. Stimulating one cell induces in the whole neighbourhood waves of calcium and nitric oxide, known to relax blood vessels. NIFEDIPINE and AMLODIPINE, both used as drugs in the therapy of high blood pressure, primarily a disease of the elderly, prolong the availability of nitric oxide. This partially explains their mode of action. In contrast, VERAPAMILE, also a blood pressure reducing drug, does not show this effect, indicating that obviously an alternative mechanism must be responsible for vessel relaxation.

  11. [Age-dependent characteristics of the skin peripheral blood flow oscillations by nonlinear dynamics methods in humans].

    PubMed

    Tankanag, A V; Tikhonova, I V; Chemeris, N K

    2008-03-01

    Study of peripheral microhaemodynamics was carried out with laser Doppler flowmetry in healthy volunteers of different age groups. The ageing changes in the state of the skin peripheral blood flow, in the functioning of separate links and regulatory systems ofmicrovascular bed have been estimated in terms of relative entropy and fractal dimension values. The revealed significant age-dependent decrease of relative entropy values in the respiratory rhythm ranges, the neurogenic and myogenic activities yielded some evidence concerning the reduction of the microcirculation system chaotic changes within these frequency ranges during the ageing. The significant increase of fractal dimension values in the ranges of cardio-rhythm and the endothelial activity in the oldest group with the mean age of 77 years indicated that the structural complexity of the oscillations in these frequency ranges increased during ageing.

  12. [Features of arterial blood pressure in elderly persons of different ethnic groups in Yakutsk].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Iu P; Tatarinova, O V; Neustroeva, V N; Shcherbakova, L V; Sidorov, A S

    2013-01-01

    The differences in arterial blood pressure in the sample of population in the age of 60 and older of different ethnic groups in Yakutsk, as well as its connection with the other cardiovascular diseases risk factors have been analyzed. It was shown that the average values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure in subsample of the Yakuts appeared to be lower than in Caucasoid gerontic persons. The average values of systolic arterial blood pressure both in the Yakuts and in the Caucasoids were detected higher than normal values in all age-dependent subgroups. The average values of diastolic blood pressure in both ethnic groups were within the limits of high normal level. From 60 to 90 years and older the decrease in systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure was detected; it was more marked in Caucasoid gerontic persons. The average values of pulse pressure in the Yakuts and in the Caucasoids appeared to be higher than the existing standard and didn't have any differences in ethnic groups. In both ethnical subsamples, pulse pressure values increase was observed in persons of 60-89 years old and its decrease after 90. Persons with overweight, obesity, central (abdominal) obesity, dyslypoproteidemias irrespective of belonging to ethnical group were characterized as having higher levels of arterial blood pressure. Statistically significant differences in the levels of arterial blood pressure in the Yakuts and in the Caucasoids depending on hyperglycemia, smoking, the presence of burdened anamnesis, educational level, marital status was not detected.

  13. Age-related changes in skin blood flow at four anatomic sites of the body in males studied by xenon-133

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, Y.

    1990-04-01

    The normal skin blood flow in healthy subjects consisting of 28 males whose ages ranged from 20 to 72 years was measured by the xenon-133 clearance method at four different sites of the body to determine the presence of any age-related changes. The following results were obtained: Significant age-related changes were observed in the skin blood flow of the deltoid region, anterior chest, dorsum of the hand, and dorsum of the foot. Normal skin blood flow was demonstrated to be highly dependent on age and to significantly decrease with age. Average skin blood flow at these four regions of those 70 years of age decreased by 30 to 40 percent when compared to that of those 20 years of age. The skin blood flow at the deltoid region of healthy subjects was higher by 6.3 ml/100 gm per minute than that of patients in poor condition with cancer of the head and neck.

  14. Modeling systolic pressure variation due to positive pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Messerges, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    Although many clinical techniques have been proposed to assess blood volume none have been established as an undisputed standard practice, Volume studies suggest systolic pressure variation (SPV) as a promising volume indicator but underlying influences on SPV are not well understood. Successful modeling of SPV will reveal the major SPV influencers, guide algorithm development to accommodate these influencers, and potentially lead to a more clinically relevant interpretation of SPV values, thus improving upon current clinical methods for assessing blood volume. This study takes a first step towards identifying SPV influencers by investigating three variations of an existing pressure-flow cardiovascular model. Each successive version introduces an additional modification in attempt to model SPV under normovolemic and hypovolemic conditions, where the last model accounts for positive pressure ventilation, venous compression, and a rightward septum shift. Under normovolemic conditions, each model yields SPV values of 5.8, 6.4, and 6.7 mmHg, respectively. Under hypovolemic conditions the results do not agree with clinical findings, suggesting these three mechanisms alone do not dictate the clinical SPV response to a decrease in volume. Model results are used to suggest improvements for future work.

  15. A Logical Characterization of Systolic Languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Angelo; Peron, Adriano

    In this paper we study, in the framework of mathematical logic, ℒ(SBTA) i.e. the class of languages accepted by Systolic Binary Tree Automata. We set a correspondence (in the style of Büchi Theorem for regular languages) between ℒ(SBTA) and MSO[Sig], i.e. a decidable Monadic Second Order logic over a suitable infinite signature Sig. We also introduce a natural subclass of ℒ(SBTA) which still properly contains the class of regular languages and which is proved to be characterized by Monadic Second Order logic over a finite signature Sig' ⊂ Sig. Finally, in the style of McNaughton Theorem for star free regular languages, we introduce an expression language which precisely denotes the class of languages defined by the first order fragment of MSO[Sig'].

  16. Singular value decomposition with systolic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipsen, I. C. F.

    1984-01-01

    Systolic arrays for determining the singular value decomposition of a mxn, m n, matrix A of bandwidth w are presented. After A has been reduced to bidiagonal form B by means of Givens plane rotations, the singular values of B are computed by the Golub-Reinsch iteration. The products of plane rotations form the matrices of left and right singular vectors. Assuming each processor can compute or supply a plane rotation, O(wn) processors accomplish the reduction to bidiagonal form in O(np) steps, where p is the number of superdiagonals. A constant number of processors then determines each singular value in about 6n steps. The singular vectors are computed by rerouting the rotations through the arrays used for the reduction to bidiagonal form, or else along the way by employing another rectangular array of O(wm) processors.

  17. How Old Do You Feel? The Role of Age Discrimination and Biological Aging in Subjective Age

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Yannick; Sutin, Angelina R.; Terracciano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Subjective age, or how young or old individuals experience themselves to be relative to their chronological age, is a crucial construct in gerontology. Subjective age is a significant predictor of important health outcomes, but little is known about the criteria by which individuals' subjectively evaluate their age. To identify psychosocial and biomedical factors linked to the subjective evaluation of age, this study examined whether perceived age discrimination and markers of biological aging are associated with subjective age. Participants were 4776 adults (Mage = 68) from the 2008 and 2010 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) who completed measures of subjective age, age discrimination, demographic variables, self-rated health and depression, and had physical health measures, including peak expiratory flow, grip strength, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Telomere length was available for a subset of participants in the 2008 wave (n = 2214). Regression analysis indicated that perceived age discrimination, lower peak expiratory flow, lower grip strength, and higher waist circumference were associated with an older subjective age, controlling for sociodemographic factors, self-rated health, and depression. In contrast, blood pressure and telomere length were not related to subjective age. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that how old a person feels depends in part on psychosocial and biomedical factors, including the experiences of ageism and perceptible indices of fitness and biological age. PMID:25738579

  18. High blood pressure in acute ischemic stroke and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuhiro; Kono, Syoichiro; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Narai, Hisashi; Omori, Nobuhiko

    2009-11-16

    This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of acute phase blood pressure in patients with acute ischemic stroke by determining whether or not it contributes to clinical outcome. We studied 515 consecutive patients admitted within the first 48 hours after the onset of ischemic strokes, employing systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements recorded within 36 hours after admission. High blood pressure was defined when the mean of at least 2 blood pressure measurements was ≥200 mmHg systolic and/or ≥110 mmHg diastolic at 6 to 24 hours after admission or ≥180 mmHg systolic and/or ≥105 mmHg diastolic at 24 to 36 hours after admission. The high blood pressure group was found to include 16% of the patients. Age, sex, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, ischemic heart disease, stroke history, carotid artery stenosis, leukoaraiosis, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) on admission and mortality were not significantly correlated with either the high blood pressure or non-high blood pressure group. High blood pressure on admission was significantly associated with a past history of hypertension, kidney disease, the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) on discharge and the length of stay. On logistic regression analysis, with no previous history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation, and kidney disease were independent risk factors associated with the presence of high blood pressure [odds ratio (OR), 1.85 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-3.22), 1.89 (95% CI: 1.11-3.22), and 3.31 (95% CI: 1.36-8.04), respectively]. Multi-organ injury may be presented in acute stroke patients with high blood pressure. Patients with high blood pressure had a poor functional outcome after acute ischemic stroke.

  19. Hematology and blood chemistry reference values and age-related changes in wild Bearded Vultures (Gypaetus barbatus).

    PubMed

    Hernández, M; Margalida, A

    2010-04-01

    Normal hematologic and blood chemistry values for clinical use and age-related changes are reported as reference values for the endangered Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus). Blood samples were obtained from 21 nestlings and 26 free-living subadults and adults. No significant differences were found between subadults and adults or between sexes for any of the studied parameters. Reference ranges have been established for Bearded Vulture nestlings (less than 3 mo of age) and for free-living Bearded Vultures, with subadult and adult data combined without affecting clinical interpretation. Some reference values for the parameters reported in this study are similar to those previously described for vultures and other raptor species, although creatine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were higher than those reported for birds of prey. Significant age-related differences were identified in urea, uric acid, triglycerides, total serum protein, inorganic phosphorus, and magnesium concentrations, as well as aspartate aminotransferase, creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, amylase, and lipase activities (P<0.05). Additionally, significant age-related differences were noted in red and white blood cell counts, packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, fibrinogen level, and heterophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils (P<0.005). The results obtained from this study provide reference ranges that will be useful for evaluating the pathologic conditions and general health of Bearded Vulture populations and reveal the existence of important age-related differences in the species.

  20. Single Agent Antihypertensive Therapy and Orthostatic Blood Pressure Behaviour in Older Adults Using Beat-to-Beat Measurements: The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Mark; O’Connell, Matthew D. L.; Murphy, Catriona M.; O’Leary, Neil; Little, Mark A.; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired blood pressure (BP) stabilisation after standing, defined using beat-to-beat measurements, has been shown to predict important health outcomes. We aimed to define the relationship between individual classes of antihypertensive agent and BP stabilisation among hypertensive older adults. Methods Cross-sectional analysis from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing, a cohort study of Irish adults aged 50 years and over. Beat-to-beat BP was recorded in participants undergoing an active stand test. We defined grade 1 hypertension according to European Society of Cardiology criteria (systolic BP [SBP] 140-159mmHg ± diastolic BP [DBP] 90-99mmHg). Outcomes were: (i) initial orthostatic hypotension (IOH) (SBP drop ≥40mmHg ± DBP drop ≥20mmHg within 15 seconds [s] of standing accompanied by symptoms); (ii) sustained OH (SBP drop ≥20mmHg ± DBP drop ≥10mmHg from 60 to 110s inclusive); (iii) impaired BP stabilisation (SBP drop ≥20mmHg ± DBP drop ≥10mmHg at any 10s interval during the test). Outcomes were assessed using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Results A total of 536 hypertensive participants were receiving monotherapy with a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system inhibitor (n = 317, 59.1%), beta-blocker (n = 89, 16.6%), calcium channel blocker (n = 89, 16.6%) or diuretic (n = 41, 7.6%). A further 783 untreated participants met criteria for grade 1 hypertension. Beta-blockers were associated with increased odds of initial OH (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.31–3.21) and sustained OH (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.87–6.03) versus untreated grade 1 hypertension. Multivariable adjustment did not attenuate the results. Impaired BP stabilisation was evident at 20s (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.58–4.25) and persisted at 110s (OR 2.90, 95% CI 1.64–5.11). No association was found between the other agents and any study outcome. Conclusion Beta-blocker monotherapy was associated with a >2-fold increased odds of initial OH and a >3-fold increased odds of sustained OH

  1. Prevalence of inter-arm blood pressure difference among clinical out-patients

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Balkishan; Ramawat, Pramila

    2016-01-01

    Objectives An increased inter-arm blood pressure difference is an easily determined physical finding, may use as an indicator of cardio vascular event and other sever diseases. Authors evaluated 477 patients to determine the prevalence and significance of inter-arm blood pressure difference. Methodology 477 routine outdoor patients selected to observe the inter-arm blood pressure difference. Age, height, weight, body mass index, history of disease and blood pressure recorded. Results The prevalence of ≥10 mmHg systolic inter-arm blood pressure difference was 5.0% was more as compared to 3.8% had diastolic inter-arm blood pressure difference. The prevalence of systolic and diastolic inter-arm difference between 6 to 10 mmHg was 31.4% and 27.9% respectively. Mean systolic inter-arm blood pressure difference was significantly higher among those patients had a multisystem disorder (10.57±0.98 mmHg) and followed by patients with cardiovascular disease (10.22±0.67 mmHg) as compared to healthy patients (2.71±0.96 mmHg). Various diseases highly influenced the increase in blood pressure irrespective of systolic or diastolic was confirmed strongly significant (p<0.001) at different inter arm blood pressure difference levels. Conclusion This study supports the view of inter-arm blood pressure difference as an alarming stage of increased disease risk that incorporated to investigate potential problems at an early diagnostic stage. A significant mean difference between left and right arm blood pressure recorded for many diseases. PMID:27103905

  2. Persistent Organochlorine Pollutants with Endocrine Activity and Blood Steroid Hormone Levels in Middle-Aged Men

    PubMed Central

    Emeville, Elise; Giton, Frank; Giusti, Arnaud; Oliva, Alejandro; Fiet, Jean; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Blanchet, Pascal; Multigner, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies relating long-term exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants (POPs) with endocrine activities (endocrine disrupting chemicals) on circulating levels of steroid hormones have been limited to a small number of hormones and reported conflicting results. Objective We examined the relationship between serum concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione, androstenediol, testosterone, free and bioavailable testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, estrone, estrone sulphate, estradiol, sex-hormone binding globulin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone as a function of level of exposure to three POPs known to interfere with hormone-regulated processes in different way: dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 153, and chlordecone. Methods We collected fasting, morning serum samples from 277 healthy, non obese, middle-aged men from the French West Indies. Steroid hormones were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, except for dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, which was determined by immunological assay, as were the concentrations of sex-hormone binding globulin, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone. Associations were assessed by multiple linear regression analysis, controlling for confounding factors, in a backward elimination procedure, in multiple bootstrap samples. Results DDE exposure was negatively associated to dihydrotestosterone level and positively associated to luteinizing hormone level. PCB 153 was positively associated to androstenedione and estrone levels. No association was found for chlordecone. Conclusions These results suggested that the endocrine response pattern, estimated by determining blood levels of steroid hormones, varies depending on the POPs studied, possibly reflecting differences in the modes of action generally attributed to these compounds. It remains to be investigated whether this response pattern

  3. Insulin resistance is associated with lower arterial blood flow and reduced cortical perfusion in cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Kellawan, J Mikhail; Berman, Sara E; Rivera-Rivera, Leonardo A; Krause, Rachel A; Oh, Jennifer M; Beeri, Michal S; Rowley, Howard A; Wieben, Oliver; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Schrage, William G; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with poor cerebrovascular health and increased risk for dementia. Little is known about the unique effect of IR on both micro- and macrovascular flow particularly in midlife when interventions against dementia may be most effective. We examined the effect of IR as indexed by the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) on cerebral blood flow in macro- and microvessels utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged individuals. We hypothesized that higher HOMA-IR would be associated with reduced flow in macrovessels and lower cortical perfusion. One hundred and twenty cognitively asymptomatic middle-aged adults (57 ± 5 yrs) underwent fasting blood draw, phase contrast-vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (PC VIPR) MRI, and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion. Higher HOMA-IR was associated with lower arterial blood flow, particularly within the internal carotid arteries (ICAs), and lower cerebral perfusion in several brain regions including frontal and temporal lobe regions. Higher blood flow in bilateral ICAs predicted greater cortical perfusion in individuals with lower HOMA-IR, a relationship not observed among those with higher HOMA-IR. Findings provide novel evidence for an uncoupling of macrovascular blood flow and microvascular perfusion among individuals with higher IR in midlife.

  4. Blood levels of the heavy metal, lead, and caries in children aged 24-72 months: NHANES III.

    PubMed

    Wiener, R Constance; Long, D Leann; Jurevic, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Lead remains a significant pollutant. It has acute toxic and chronic effects on many tissues and accumulates in teeth and bones. The researchers for this study investigated the association of blood lead levels with the extent/severity of caries as measured by the number of decayed/filled teeth of children aged 24-72 months using data from NHANES III (the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey), accounting for the excess zero caries in the analysis and using less than 2 µg/dl as the reference blood lead level (n = 3,127). Zero-inflated negative binomial regression models indicated unadjusted extent/severity mean ratios of 1.79, 1.88 and 1.94 for the number of decayed/filled teeth in children whose blood lead levels were 2-5, 5-10 and >10 µg/dl, respectively, compared with children having <2 µg/dl blood lead levels. The results did not attenuate when other variables were added to the model for the 5-10 and >10 µg/dl levels of exposure. The adjusted extent/severity mean ratios were 1.84, 2.14 and 1.91, respectively, for the categories. This study indicated a strong association of blood lead levels with increasing numbers of carious teeth in children aged 24-72 months. These findings support other studies in an innovative analysis handling cases of children with no caries. The findings may inform caries risk assessment.

  5. Recursive least squares estimation and Kalman filtering by systolic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M. J.; Yao, K.

    1988-01-01

    One of the most promising new directions for high-throughput-rate problems is that based on systolic arrays. In this paper, using the matrix-decomposition approach, a systolic Kalman filter is formulated as a modified square-root information filter consisting of a whitening filter followed by a simple least-squares operation based on the systolic QR algorithm. By proper skewing of the input data, a fully pipelined time and measurement update systolic Kalman filter can be achieved with O(n squared) processing cells, resulting in a system throughput rate of O (n).

  6. [Estimating cardiovascular age of civil flying personnel by means of heart rate and blood pressure variability analysis].

    PubMed

    Niu, Y G; Zhang, L F; Zhang, Y H; Wang, S Y; Xu, X Y; Su, J X; Yan, Y B

    2001-06-01

    Objective. To estimate the cardiovascular age of civil flying personnel by means of heart rate and blood pressure variability analysis and to evaluate its significance in aviation medicine. Method. First, heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure variability (BPV) and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) were analyzed among 89 healthy civil flying personnel by using conventional AR spectral analysis and sequence method respectively. Then, principal component analysis was conducted over original and derived variables of HRV and BPV spectral and BRS data. Finally, by the use of multiple regression in which the chronological age acted as the dependent variable and the components significantly related to age were used as the regressors, the equation for estimating the cardiovascular age was established. Result. Only seven principal components can exactly reflect the same information of autonomic regulatory function which was embodied in the 17 variables of HRV and BPV spectral and BRS parameters. Among the seven principal components, the PC2orig, PC4orig and PC2deri were negatively correlated with chronological age (P<0.05), whereas the PC3orig was positively correlated with the chronological age (P<0.01). The cardiovascular age derived from the equation was significantly correlated with the chronological age of the civil flying personnel (r= 0.73, P<0.01). Conclusion. The cardiovascular age estimated by means of a multi-variate analysis of HRV, BPV and BRS can be treated as a comprehensive indicator reflecting the age dependency of autonomic regulatory function of cardiovascular system in healthy civil flying personnel, and its interpretation and significance in application are surely worthy of further and fully dedicated efforts.

  7. Relationships between body weight, fasting blood glucose concentration, sex and age in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis).

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Chang, Q; Zhang, Y; Zou, X; Chen, L; Zhang, L; Lv, L; Liang, B

    2013-12-01

    The tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) is a squirrel-like lower primate or a close relative of primates, commonly used as an animal model in biomedical research. Despite more than three decades of usage in research, the clear relationships between body weight, fasting blood glucose concentration, sex and age among tree shrews remain unclear. Based on an investigation of 992 tree shrews (454 males and 538 females) aged between 4 months and 4 years old, we found that male tree shrews have significantly higher body weight and fasting blood glucose concentration than female tree shrews (p < 0.001). The concentration of fasting blood glucose slightly increased with body weight in males (r = 0.152, p < 0.001). Meanwhile, in females, the body weight, concentration of fasting blood glucose and waist circumference positively increased with age (p < 0.001). Additionally, 17 tree shrews with Lee index [body weight (g)*0.33*1000/body length (cm)] above 290 had significantly higher body weight, waist circumference and glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) than non-obese tree shrews with a Lee index score below 290 (p < 0.001). Interestingly, 6 of 992 tree shrews (three males and three females, 2-4 years old) displayed impaired plasma triglycerides, HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein and oral glucose tolerance test, suggestive of the early symptoms of metabolic syndrome. This study provides the first clear relationships between body weight, fasting blood glucose concentration, sex and age in tree shrews, further improving our understanding of this relationship in metabolic syndrome (MetS). Given the similarity of tree shrews to humans and non-human primates, this finding supports their potential use as an animal model in the research of MetS.

  8. Chronic high blood flow potentiates shear stress-induced release of NO in arteries of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Changdong; Huang, An; Kaley, Gabor; Sun, Dong

    2011-01-01

    Aging impairs shear-stress-dependent dilation of arteries via increased superoxide production, decreased SOD activity, and decreased activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). In the present study, we investigated whether chronic increases in shear stress, elicited by increases in blood flow, would improve vascular endothelial function of aged rats. To this end, second-order mesenteric arteries of young (6 mo) and aged (24 mo) male Fischer-344 rats were selectively ligated for 3 wk to elevate blood flow in a first-order artery [high blood flow (HF)]. An in vitro study was then conducted on first-order arteries with HF and normal blood flow (NF) to assess shear stress (1, 10, and 20 dyn/cm2)-induced release of NO into the perfusate. In HF arteries of both age groups, shear stress-induced NO production increased significantly. In 24-mo-old rats, the reduced shear stress-induced NO production in NF arteries was normalized by HF to a level similar to that in NF arteries of 6-mo-old rats. The increased NO production in HF arteries of 24-mo-old rats was associated with increased shear stress-induced dilation, expression of eNOS protein, and shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, reduced shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation and vasodilation. Superoxide production decreased significantly in HF compared with NF arteries in 24-mo-old rats. The decreased superoxide production was associated with significant increases in CuZn-SOD and extracellular SOD protein expressions and total SOD activity. These results suggest that stimulation with chronic HF restores shear-stress-induced activation of eNOS and antioxidant ability in aged arteries. PMID:17873019

  9. Urinary cadmium and blood pressure: results from the NHANES II survey.

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, A S; DiCiccio, Y; Provenzano, G

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between urinary cadmium levels and blood pressure were examined in a sample of 951 adult men and women who participated in the Second National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES II). Among all participants, positive relationships were seen between urinary cadmium levels and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.01, respectively), after adjusting for age, sex, race, relative body weight, smoking status, and hypertensive medication use. However, analyses for subgroups determined by sex and smoking status were inconsistent. Among current smokers, urinary cadmium levels were significantly positively associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure for women, and with diastolic blood pressure for men. Yet among former smokers and lifelong nonsmokers of both sexes, urinary cadmium was not significantly associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Evidence that some hypertensive medications increase urinary cadmium excretion suggests that the positive associations seen among current smokers may reflect high urinary cadmium levels among hypertensives induced by hypertensive treatment. After treated hypertensives were removed from the analysis, regression coefficients relating blood pressure to cadmium dropped by a factor of two and lost statistical significance. We conclude that the present data provide little support for a causal association between systemic cadmium and hypertension at nonoccupational exposure levels. Further, conflicting results of previous studies may reflect failure to control adequately for age, smoking status, and hypertensive treatment. PMID:2040243

  10. Urinary cadmium and blood pressure: Results from the NHANES II survey

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; DiCiccio, Y. ); Provenzano, G. )

    1991-02-01

    Relationships between urinary cadmium levels and blood pressure were examined in a sample of 951 adult men and women who participated in the Second National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES 2). Among all participants, positive relationships were seen between urinary cadmium levels and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure after adjusting for age, sex, race, relative body weight, smoking status, and hypertensive medication use. However, analyses for subgroups determined by sex and smoking status were inconsistent. Among current smokers, urinary cadmium levels were significantly positively associated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressure for women, and with diastolic blood pressure for men. Yet among former smokers and lifelong nonsmokers of both sexes, urinary cadmium was not significantly associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Evidence that some hypertensive medications increase urinary cadmium excretion suggests that the positive associations seen among current smokers may reflect high urinary cadium levels among hypertensives induced by hypertensive treatment. After treated hypertensives were removed from the analysis, regression coefficients relating blood pressure to cadmium dropped by a factor of two and lost statistical significance. The authors conclude that the present data provide little support for a causal association between systemic cadmium and hypertension at nonoccupational exposure levels. Further, conflicting results of previous studies may reflect failure to control adequately for age, smoking status, and hypertensive treatment.

  11. A preliminary study of mercury exposure and blood pressure in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Fillion, Myriam; Mergler, Donna; Passos, Carlos José Sousa; Larribe, Fabrice; Lemire, Mélanie; Guimarães, Jean Rémy Davée

    2006-01-01

    Background Fish is considered protective for coronary heart disease (CHD), but mercury (Hg) intake from fish may counterbalance beneficial effects. Although neurotoxic effects of methylmercury (MeHg) are well established, cardiovascular effects are still debated. The objective of the present study was to evaluate blood pressure in relation to Hg exposure and fish consumption among a non-indigenous fish-eating population in the Brazilian Amazon. Methods The study was conducted among 251 persons from six communities along the Tapajós River, a major tributary of the Amazon. Data was obtained for socio-demographic information, fish consumption, height and weight to determine body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and Hg concentration in hair samples. Results Results showed that overall, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, were relatively low (mean: 113.9 mmHg ± 14.6 and 73.7 mmHg ± 11.0). Blood pressure was significantly associated with hair total Hg (H-Hg), age, BMI and gender. No association was observed between fish consumption and blood pressure, although there were significant inter-community differences. Logistic regression analyses showed that the Odds Ratio (OR) for elevated systolic blood pressure (≥ 130 mmHg) with H-Hg ≥ 10 μg/g was 2.91 [1.26–7.28], taking into account age, BMI, smoking, gender and community. Conclusion The findings of this preliminary study add further support for Hg cardiovascular toxicity. PMID:17032453

  12. Cardiac systolic regional function and synchrony in endurance trained and untrained females

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Kristofer; Tamás, Éva; Bjarnegård, Niclas; Brudin, Lars; Nylander, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background Most studies on cardiac function in athletes describe overall heart function in predominately male participants. We aimed to compare segmental, regional and overall myocardial function and synchrony in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in age-matched sedentary females (CON). Methods In 46 ATH and 48 CON, echocardiography was used to measure peak longitudinal systolic strain and myocardial velocities in 12 left ventricular (LV) and 2 right ventricular (RV) segments. Regional and overall systolic function were calculated together with four indices of dyssynchrony. Results There were no differences in regional or overall LV systolic function between groups, or in any of the four dyssynchrony indices. Peak systolic velocity (s′) was higher in the RV of ATH than in CON (9.7±1.5 vs 8.7±1.5 cm/s, p=0.004), but not after indexing by cardiac length (p=0.331). Strain was similar in ATH and CON in 8 of 12 LV myocardial segments. In septum and anteroseptum, basal and mid-ventricular s′ was 6–7% and 17–19% higher in ATH than in CON (p<0.05), respectively, while s′ was 12% higher in CON in the basal LV lateral wall (p=0.013). After indexing by cardiac length, s′ was only higher in ATH in the mid-ventricular septum (p=0.041). Conclusions We found differences between trained and untrained females in segmental systolic myocardial function, but not in global measures of sys