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Sample records for age temperature burial

  1. Soil temperature calculation for burial site analysis.

    PubMed

    Prangnell, Jonathan; McGowan, Glenys

    2009-10-30

    The effect of air and water temperature upon the decomposition of human remains and upon biological activity has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been devoted to the temperature of the soil surrounding burials, despite its potential influence upon chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of human remains, drugs and toxins, as well as upon microbial and insect activity. A soil temperature calculation equation usually employed in civil engineering was used to calculate soil temperature at various depths in a cemetery located in Brisbane, Australia, in order to explain the extensive degradation of human remains and funerary objects observed at exhumation. The results showed that for the 160 years of the site's history, ground temperature at burial level had been sufficiently high for biological activity and chemical degradation reactions to continue right up until the time of exhumation. The equation used has potential in the analysis of both cemetery and clandestine burials, since it allows ground temperature to be calculated from ambient air temperature figures, for a variety of depths, soil types and vegetation conditions.

  2. Distribution of maximum burial temperatures across northern Appalachian Basin and implications for Carboniferous sedimentation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Clay-mineral diagenesis and apatite fission-track age data indicate that the maximum burial temperatures to which the Middle Devonian Tioga metabentonite was exposed rise abruptly from low values in western New York State to higher values in the east. The highest temperatures, which approach 175/sup 0/C, were reached just west of Syracuse. Neither the pattern nor the magnitude of burial temperatures can be explained solely by burial of the metabentonite beneath Upper Devonian sediments. Although spatial variations in the geothermal gradient could have produced the observed pattern of burial temperatures, it is more likely that Carboniferous sediments, no longer preserved in the area, were responsible for the indicated burial. The inferred presence of thick Carboniferous sequences in western New York State suggests that the Allegheny orogeny had a stronger influence on sedimentation in the northern Appalachian Basin than has been previously recognized. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Hypercapnia increases core temperature cooling rate during snow burial.

    PubMed

    Grissom, Colin K; Radwin, Martin I; Scholand, Mary Beth; Harmston, Chris H; Muetterties, Mark C; Bywater, Tim J

    2004-04-01

    Previous retrospective studies report a core body temperature cooling rate of 3 degrees C/h during avalanche burial. Hypercapnia occurs during avalanche burial secondary to rebreathing expired air, and the effect of hypercapnia on hypothermia during avalanche burial is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the core temperature cooling rate during snow burial under normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions. We measured rectal core body temperature (T(re)) in 12 subjects buried in compacted snow dressed in a lightweight clothing insulation system during two different study burials. In one burial, subjects breathed with a device (AvaLung 2, Black Diamond Equipment) that resulted in hypercapnia over 30-60 min. In a control burial, subjects were buried under identical conditions with a modified breathing device that maintained normocapnia. Mean snow temperature was -2.5 +/- 2.0 degrees C. Burial time was 49 +/- 14 min in the hypercapnic study and 60 min in the normocapnic study (P = 0.02). Rate of decrease in T(re) was greater with hypercapnia (1.2 degrees C/h by multiple regression analysis, 95% confidence limits of 1.1-1.3 degrees C/h) than with normocapnia (0.7 degrees C/h, 95% confidence limit of 0.6-0.8 degrees C/h). In the hypercapnic study, the fraction of inspired carbon dioxide increased from 1.4 +/- 1.0 to 7.0 +/- 1.4%, minute ventilation increased from 15 +/- 7 to 40 +/- 12 l/min, and oxygen saturation decreased from 97 +/- 1 to 90 +/- 6% (P < 0.01). During the normocapnic study, these parameters remained unchanged. In this study, T(re) cooling rate during snow burial was less than previously reported and was increased by hypercapnia. This may have important implications for prehospital treatment of avalanche burial victims.

  4. Interrelationship of age and diet in Romania's oldest human burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsall, Clive; Boroneanţ, Adina; Soficaru, Andrei; McSweeney, Kathleen; Higham, Tom; Miriţoiu, Nicolae; Pickard, Catriona; Cook, Gordon

    2012-04-01

    In 1968, excavations in the Climente II cave in the Iron Gates gorge of the River Danube in southwest Romania unearthed the skeleton of an adult male. The burial was assumed to be of Late Pleistocene age because of the presence of Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP) artefacts in the cave. However, there was no strong supporting stratigraphic evidence, and the body position is reminiscent of Early Neolithic burial practice in the region. Here, we report the results of radiocarbon and stable isotope analyses of the Climente II skeleton, which show that the skeleton dates to the Bølling-Allerød Interstadial ~14,500 cal BP. This is several millennia older than any previously dated human remains from the Iron Gates region and confirms its status as the oldest known burial from Romania. The stable isotope results indicate a diet with an emphasis on aquatic resources, contrary to the commonly held view that the LUP inhabitants of the Iron Gates subsisted mainly by hunting large land mammals.

  5. Interrelationship of age and diet in Romania's oldest human burial.

    PubMed

    Bonsall, Clive; Boroneanţ, Adina; Soficaru, Andrei; McSweeney, Kathleen; Higham, Tom; Miriţoiu, Nicolae; Pickard, Catriona; Cook, Gordon

    2012-04-01

    In 1968, excavations in the Climente II cave in the Iron Gates gorge of the River Danube in southwest Romania unearthed the skeleton of an adult male. The burial was assumed to be of Late Pleistocene age because of the presence of Late Upper Palaeolithic (LUP) artefacts in the cave. However, there was no strong supporting stratigraphic evidence, and the body position is reminiscent of Early Neolithic burial practice in the region. Here, we report the results of radiocarbon and stable isotope analyses of the Climente II skeleton, which show that the skeleton dates to the Bølling-Allerød Interstadial ~14,500 cal BP. This is several millennia older than any previously dated human remains from the Iron Gates region and confirms its status as the oldest known burial from Romania. The stable isotope results indicate a diet with an emphasis on aquatic resources, contrary to the commonly held view that the LUP inhabitants of the Iron Gates subsisted mainly by hunting large land mammals.

  6. Time-temperature-burial significance of Devonian anthracite implies former great (approx. 6. 5 km) depth of burial of Catskill Mountains, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.M.; Sanders, J.E.

    1982-02-01

    Specimens of coalified plant debris in Tully-correlative strata of the Gilboa Formation (uppermost Middle Devonian) within the eastern Catskill Mountains of New York State have been converted to anthracite having a vitrinite reflectance of 2.5%. This implies a level of organic metamorphism (LOM) of 16. The specimens are about 350 m.y. old; if 200 m.y. is taken as the duration of the time of exposure to the maximum geothermal temperature, then the LOM of 16 and other thermal indicators imply a maximum temperature of 190/sup 0/C. Using a geothermal gradient of 26/sup 0/C.km/sup -1/ (17/sup 0/F.1,000 ft/sup -1/), a former depth of burial of 6.5 km is implied. Such former deep burial is not usually inferred for the Catskills, but it is consistent with the idea that the thick (about 6.4 km or 21,000 ft) Carboniferous strata of northeastern Pennsylvania formerly extended northeast far enough to bury the Catskills. The lack of metamorphism of the Paleozoic strata lying about 4.5 km beneath the Tully-correlative rocks and exposed in the adjacent Hudson Valley places low limits on the former geothermal gradient; this supports the concept of great depth of former burial of the Catskills. For example, 6.5 km of former burial and a geothermal gradient of 26/sup 0/C.km/sup -1/ imply a temperature of 307/sup 0/C for the base of the Paleozoic. By contrast, only 1 km of former burial requires a geothermal gradient of 170/sup 0/C.km/sup -1/, which would have subjected the base of the Paleozoic to a temperature of 955/sup 0/GAMMA, which is far higher than the 600 to 650/sup 0/C recently inferred for the Acadian-age metamorphism of the Taconic allochthon in southwestern Massachusetts and adjoining areas.

  7. Diversity of burial rates in convergent settings decreased as Earth aged

    PubMed Central

    Nicoli, Gautier; Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The evolution and the growth of the continental crust is inextricably linked to the evolution of Earth’s geodynamic processes. The detrital zircon record within the continental crust, as well as the isotopic composition of this crust, indicates that the amount of juvenile felsic material decreased with time and that in geologically recent times, the generation of new crust is balanced by recycling of the crust back into the mantle within subduction zones. However it cannot always have been so; yet the nature of the crust and the processes of crustal reworking in the Precambrian Earth are not well constrained. Here we use both detrital zircon ages and metamorphic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) information from metasedimentary units deposited in proposed convergent settings from Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains to characterize the evolution of minimum estimates of burial rate (km.Ma−1) as a function of the age of the rocks. The demonstrated decrease in burial rate correlates positively with a progressive decrease in the production of juvenile felsic crust in the Archaean and Proterozoic. Burial rates are also more diverse in the Archaean than in modern times. We interpret these features to reflect a progressive decrease in the diversity of tectonic processes from Archaean to present, coupled with the emergence of the uniquely Phanerozoic modern-style collision. PMID:27216133

  8. Diversity of burial rates in convergent settings decreased as Earth aged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoli, Gautier; Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary

    2016-05-01

    The evolution and the growth of the continental crust is inextricably linked to the evolution of Earth’s geodynamic processes. The detrital zircon record within the continental crust, as well as the isotopic composition of this crust, indicates that the amount of juvenile felsic material decreased with time and that in geologically recent times, the generation of new crust is balanced by recycling of the crust back into the mantle within subduction zones. However it cannot always have been so; yet the nature of the crust and the processes of crustal reworking in the Precambrian Earth are not well constrained. Here we use both detrital zircon ages and metamorphic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) information from metasedimentary units deposited in proposed convergent settings from Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains to characterize the evolution of minimum estimates of burial rate (km.Ma‑1) as a function of the age of the rocks. The demonstrated decrease in burial rate correlates positively with a progressive decrease in the production of juvenile felsic crust in the Archaean and Proterozoic. Burial rates are also more diverse in the Archaean than in modern times. We interpret these features to reflect a progressive decrease in the diversity of tectonic processes from Archaean to present, coupled with the emergence of the uniquely Phanerozoic modern-style collision.

  9. Diversity of burial rates in convergent settings decreased as Earth aged.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Gautier; Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary

    2016-05-24

    The evolution and the growth of the continental crust is inextricably linked to the evolution of Earth's geodynamic processes. The detrital zircon record within the continental crust, as well as the isotopic composition of this crust, indicates that the amount of juvenile felsic material decreased with time and that in geologically recent times, the generation of new crust is balanced by recycling of the crust back into the mantle within subduction zones. However it cannot always have been so; yet the nature of the crust and the processes of crustal reworking in the Precambrian Earth are not well constrained. Here we use both detrital zircon ages and metamorphic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) information from metasedimentary units deposited in proposed convergent settings from Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains to characterize the evolution of minimum estimates of burial rate (km.Ma(-1)) as a function of the age of the rocks. The demonstrated decrease in burial rate correlates positively with a progressive decrease in the production of juvenile felsic crust in the Archaean and Proterozoic. Burial rates are also more diverse in the Archaean than in modern times. We interpret these features to reflect a progressive decrease in the diversity of tectonic processes from Archaean to present, coupled with the emergence of the uniquely Phanerozoic modern-style collision.

  10. Time-temperature-burial significance of Devonian anthracite implies former great (˜6.5 km) depth of burial of Catskill Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gerald M.; Sanders, John E.

    1982-02-01

    Specimens of coalified plant debris in Tully-correlative strata of the Gilboa Formation (uppermost Middle Devonian) within the eastern Cat-skill Mountains of New York State have been converted to anthracite having a vitrinite reflectance of 2.5%. This implies a level of organic metamorphism (LOM) of 16. A similar degree of thermal activity is implied by the black color (Staplin kerogen-alteration index of 4) of the associated (possibly recycled) carbonized kerogen, a conodont-alteration index of 4, and authigenic chlorite and local sericite fillings of the former interparticle pores of interbedded sandstones. The specimens are about 350 m.y. old; if 200 m.y. is taken as the duration of the time of exposure to the maximum geothermal temperature, then the LOM of 16 and other thermal indicators imply a maximum temperature of 190 °C. Using a geothermal gradient of 26 °C · km-1 (17 °F · 1,000 ft-1), a former depth of burial of 6.5 km is implied. Such former deep burial is not usually inferred for the Catskills, but it is consistent with the idea that the thick (about 6.4 km or 21,000 ft) Carboniferous strata of northeastern Pennsylvania formerly extended northeast far enough to bury the Catskills. The lack of metamorphism of the Paleozoic strata lying about 4.5 km beneath the Tully-correlative rocks and exposed in the adjacent Hudson Valley places low limits on the former geothermal gradient; this supports the concept of great depth of former burial of the Catskills. For example, 6.5 km of former burial and a geothermal gradient of 26 °C · km-1 imply a temperature of 307 °C for the base of the Paleozoic. By contrast, only 1 km of former burial requires a geothermal gradient of 170 °C · km-1, which would have subjected the base of the Paleozoic to a temperature of 955 °C, which is far higher than the 600 to 650 °C recently inferred for the Acadian-age metamorphism of the Taconic allochthon in southwestern Massachusetts and adjoining areas.

  11. Holocene age of the Yuha burial: Direct radiocarbon determinations by accelerator mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, Thomas W.; Jull, A.J.T.; Zabel, T.H.; Donahue, D.J.; Duhamel, R.C.; Brendel, K.; Haynes, C.V.; Bischoff, J.L.; Payen, L.A.; Taylor, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The view that human populations may not have arrived in the Western Hemisphere before about 12,000 radiocarbon yr BP1,2 has been challenged by claims of much greater antiquity for a small number of archaeological sites and human skeleton samples. One such site is the Homo sapiens sapiens cairn burial excavated in 1971 from the Yuha desert, Imperial County, California3-5. Radiocarbon analysis of caliche coating one of the bones of the skeleton yielded a radiocarbon age of 21,500??1,000 yr BP4, while radiocarbon and uranium series analyses of caliche coating a cairn boulder yielded ages of 22,125??400 and 19,000??3,000 yr BP, respectively5. The late Pleistocene age assignment to the Yuha burial has been challenged by comparing the cultural context of the burial with other cairn burials in the same region6, on the basis of the site's geomorphological context and from radiocarbon analyses of soil caliches. 7,8 In rebuttal, arguments in defence of the original age assignment have been presented9,10 as well as an amino acid racemization analysis on the Yuha skeleton indicating an age of 23,600??2,600 yr BP11. The tandem accelerator mass spectrometer at the University of Arizona has now been used to measure the ratio of 14C/13C in several organic and inorganic fractions of post-cranial bone from the Yuha H. sapiens sapiens skeleton. Isotope ratios from six chemical fractions all yielded radiocarbon ages for the skeleton of less than 4,000 yr BP. These results indicate that the Yuha skeleton is of Holocene age, in agreement with the cultural context of the burial, and in disagreement with the previously assigned Pleistocene age of 19,000-23,000 yr. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  12. A revised burial dose estimation procedure for optical dating of youngand modern-age sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, L.J.; Roberts, R.G.; Galbraith, R.F.; DeLong, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of genuinely zero-age or near-zero-age grains in modern-age and very young samples poses a problem for many existing burial dose estimation procedures used in optical (optically stimulated luminescence, OSL) dating. This difficulty currently necessitates consideration of relatively simplistic and statistically inferior age models. In this study, we investigate the potential for using modified versions of the statistical age models of Galbraith et??al. [Galbraith, R.F., Roberts, R.G., Laslett, G.M., Yoshida, H., Olley, J.M., 1999. Optical dating of single and multiple grains of quartz from Jinmium rock shelter, northern Australia: Part I, experimental design and statistical models. Archaeometry 41, 339-364.] to provide reliable equivalent dose (De) estimates for young and modern-age samples that display negative, zero or near-zero De estimates. For this purpose, we have revised the original versions of the central and minimum age models, which are based on log-transformed De values, so that they can be applied to un-logged De estimates and their associated absolute standard errors. The suitability of these 'un-logged' age models is tested using a series of known-age fluvial samples deposited within two arroyo systems from the American Southwest. The un-logged age models provide accurate burial doses and final OSL ages for roughly three-quarters of the total number of samples considered in this study. Sensitivity tests reveal that the un-logged versions of the central and minimum age models are capable of producing accurate burial dose estimates for modern-age and very young (<350??yr) fluvial samples that contain (i) more than 20% of well-bleached grains in their De distributions, or (ii) smaller sub-populations of well-bleached grains for which the De values are known with high precision. Our results indicate that the original (log-transformed) versions of the central and minimum age models are still preferable for most routine dating applications

  13. A paleolatitude approach to assessing surface temperature history for use in burial heating models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    Calculations using heat flow theory as well as case histories show that over geologic time scales (106 years), changes in mean annual surface temperature (Ts) on the order of 10°C penetrate kilometers deep into the crust. Thus, burial heating models of sedimentary basins, which typically span kilometers in depth and persist over geological time frames, should consider Ts history to increase their accuracy. In any case, Ts history becomes important when it changes enough to be detected by a thermal maturation index like vitrinite reflectance, a parameter widely used to constrain burial heating models. Assessment of the general temperature conditions leading to petroleum generation indicates that changes in Ts as small as 6°C can be detected by vitrinite reflectance measurements. This low temperature threshold indicates that oil and gas windows can be significantly influenced by Ts history. A review of paleoclimatic factors suggests the significant and geologically resolvable factors affecting Ts history are paleolatitude, long-term changes between cool and warm geological periods (climate mode), the degree to which a basin is removed from the sea (geographic isolation), and elevation or depth relative to sea level. Case studies using geologically realistic data ranges or different methods of estimating Ts in a burial heating model indicate a significant impact of Ts when: (1) continental drift, subduction, tectonism and erosion significantly change paleolatitude, paleoaltitude, or paleogeography; (2) strata are at, or near, maximum burial, and changes in Ts directly influence maximum burial temperature; and (3), when a significant change in Ts occurs near the opening or closing of the oil or gas windows causing petroleum generation to begin or cease. Case studies show that during the burial heating and petroleum generation phase of basin development changes in climate mode alone can influence Ts by about 15°C. At present, Ts changes from the poles to the equator

  14. Resetting of RbSr ages of volcanic rocks by low-grade burial metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asmeroma, Y.; Damon, P.; Shafiqullah, M.; Dickinson, W.R.; Zartman, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    We report a nine-point RbSr whole-rock isochron age of 70??3 Ma (MSWD 3.97) for Mid-Jurassic volcanic rocks. The same rocks have also been dated by the UThPb method on zircon, giving a crystallization age of 166 ?? 11 Ma, over twice as old as the RbSr age. The data demonstrate that whole-rock RbSr ages of volcanic rocks, even lava flows with SiO2 content as low as 57 wt.%, are susceptible to complete resetting. The rocks range in composition from rhyodacite tuffs to andesite lavas. The complete breakdown of all major minerals that contain Rb and Sr resulted in an alteration mineral assemblage consisting of phengite, albite, secondary quartz, and minor amounts of chlorite and epidote. Phengite is the K-bearing product of the breakdown of biotite and K-feldspar. Pressure during low-grade metamorphism of the volcanic rocks, estimated from phengite composition to have been in the range of 4 to 6 kbar, points to thrust-related burial as the main cause of resetting. Consequently, such reset isochrons may date large-scale events such as regional thrusting and metamorphism. The coherent resetting of the RbSr isochron suggests large-scale pervasive fluid movement during thrust-related burial metamorphism. ?? 1991.

  15. The presence of nuclear families in prehistoric collective burials revisited: the bronze age burial of Montanissell Cave (Spain) in the light of aDNA.

    PubMed

    Simón, Marc; Jordana, Xavier; Armentano, Nuria; Santos, Cristina; Díaz, Nancy; Solórzano, Eduvigis; López, Joan B; González-Ruiz, Mercedes; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2011-11-01

    Ancient populations have commonly been thought to have lived in small groups where extreme endogamy was the norm. To contribute to this debate, a genetic analysis has been carried out on a collective burial with eight primary inhumations from Montanissell Cave in the Catalan pre-Pyrenees. Radiocarbon dating clearly placed the burial in the Bronze Age, around 3200 BP. The composition of the group-two adults (one male, one female), one young woman, and five children from both sexes-seemed to represent the structure of a typical nuclear family. The genetic evidence proves this assumption to be wrong. In fact, at least five out of the eight mitochondrial haplotypes were different, denying the possibility of a common maternal ancestor for all of them. Nevertheless, 50% of the inhumations shared haplogroup J, so the possibility of a maternal relationship cannot be ruled out. Actually, combining different analyses performed using ancient and living populations, the probability of having four related J individuals in Montanissell Cave would range from 0.9884 to 0.9999. Owing to the particularities of this singular collective burial (small number of bodies placed altogether in a hidden cave, the evidence of non-simultaneous interments, close dating and unusual grave goods), we suggest that it might represent a small group with a patrilocal mating system.

  16. [Historical and biological approaches to the study of Modern Age French plague mass burials].

    PubMed

    Bianuccii, Raffaella; Tzortzis, Stéfan; Fornaciari, Gino; Signoli, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The "Black Death" and subsequent epidemics from 1346 to the early 18th century spread from the Caspian Sea all over Europe six hundred years after the outbreak of the Justinian plague (541-767 AD). Plague has been one of the most devastating infectious diseases that affected the humankind and has caused approximately 200 million human deaths historically. Here we describe the different approaches adopted in the study of several French putative plague mass burials dating to the Modern Age (16th-18th centuries). Through complementation of historical, archaeological and paleobiological data, ample knowledge of both the causes that favoured the spread of the Medieval plague in cities, towns and small villages and of the modification of the customary funerary practices in urban and rural areas due to plague are gained.

  17. Age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus determined with (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Guanjun; Gao, Xing; Gao, Bin; Granger, Darryl E

    2009-03-12

    The age of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus, commonly known as 'Peking Man', has long been pursued, but has remained problematic owing to the lack of suitable dating methods. Here we report cosmogenic (26)Al/(10)Be burial dating of quartz sediments and artefacts from the lower strata of Locality 1 in the southwestern suburb of Beijing, China, where early representatives of Zhoukoudian Homo erectus were discovered. This study marks the first radioisotopic dating of any early hominin site in China beyond the range of mass spectrometric U-series dating. The weighted mean of six meaningful age measurements, 0.77 +/- 0.08 million years (Myr, mean +/- s.e.m.), provides the best age estimate for lower cultural layers 7-10. Together with previously reported U-series dating of speleothem calcite and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy, as well as sedimentological considerations, these layers may be further correlated to S6-S7 in Chinese loess stratigraphy or marine isotope stages (MIS) 17-19, in the range of approximately 0.68 to 0.78 Myr ago. These ages are substantially older than previously supposed and may imply early hominin's presence at the site in northern China through a relatively mild glacial period corresponding to MIS 18.

  18. Evidence of elevated pressure and temperature during burial of the Salem Limestone in south-central Indiana, USA, and its implications for surprisingly deep burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambers, Clifford P.

    2001-09-01

    A minor, normal fault related to compaction of the grainstone shoal facies of the Salem Limestone in south-central Indiana provides an unusual opportunity to test the pressure and temperature of both faulting and associated stylolitization. Syn-deformational sphalerite occurs in voids along the fault where it intersects an organic-rich shale parting in the sand flat facies overlying the grainstone. The sphalerite contains fluid inclusions that can be used for microthermobaric measurements. Most fluid inclusions in the sphalerite are demonstrably cogenetic with the host sphalerite and of the two-phase aqueous type common in Indiana, although many contain petroleum and others contain gas. Crushing tests in kerosene indicate that the aqueous inclusions contain dissolved methane in varying amounts as high as 1000 ppm. Microthermometry shows that late sphalerite growth, late fault movement, and late stylolitization all occurred as conditions approached 108°C and 292 bars. This pressure is in accord with a normal, basinal, geothermal gradient of 32.5°C/km that would produce the observed temperature under hydrostatic conditions at a burial depth of 2.7 km using an average fluid density of 1.1 g/cm 3. These results serve as a reminder that fluid inclusions in diagenetic minerals hold important temperature and pressure information regarding burial diagenesis of Paleozoic rocks across the North American midcontinent. Detailed study of dissolved gases in fluids trapped in disseminated sphalerite that is common across the midcontinent could help resolve the enigma of sedimentary rocks with high thermal maturity exposed at the surface across the region.

  19. Pliocene Cosmogenic Nuclide Burial Ages of the Nenana Gravel: Progress in Dating and Implications for Alaska Range Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, B. M.; Bemis, S. P.; Ward, D.; Caffee, M. W.; Sortor, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Nenana Gravel is an up to 1.2 km thick foreland basin deposit that spans the north flank of the Alaska Range. It is uplifted relative to the active foreland basin to the north. It is also deformed to various degree dependent on its location within the northern Alaska Range thrust system. Because this foreland basin sequence records the unroofing and northward propagation of the Alaska Range, direct dating of the Nenana Gravel, especially over wide spatial distribution along the Alaska Range, will substantially advance our understanding of the style and timing of deformation of the Alaska Range. At present though, age estimates for the Nenana Gravel are limited to a single maximum limiting age and uncertain minimum limiting age with no little or no insight as to the spatial variation in Nenana Gravel deposition timing. We present the first direct dates of deposition ages of the Nenana Gravel using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating. Results indicate that deposition of the Nenana Gravel began ca. 6.5 Ma, in stratigraphic agreement with a maximum limiting tephra age from the underlying Usibelli Group. Additional samples from the Nenana Gravel basal contact and higher in the section are presently underway. The resultant burial ages are amongst the oldest 26Al-10Be burial ages ever produced and highlight the potential of the method to directly date sediments in the Pliocene, particularly given recent advancements in the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of 26Al/27Al isotope ratios.

  20. Dating the incision of the Yangtze River gorge at the First Bend using three-nuclide burial ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, Devin; Hoke, Gregory D.; Liu-Zeng, Jing; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Incision of the Yangtze River gorge is widely interpreted as evidence for lower crustal flow beneath the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Previous work focused on the onset of incision, but the duration of incision remains unknown. Here we present cosmogenic nuclide burial ages of sediments collected from caves on the walls of the gorge that show the gorge was incised ~1 km sometime between 18 and 9 Ma. Thereafter, incision slowed substantially. We resolve middle Miocene burial ages by using three nuclides and accounting for in situ muogenic production. This approach explains the absolute concentrations of 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne, as well as 26Al/10Be and 21Ne/10Be ratios. A declining incision rate challenges existing geodynamic interpretations by suggesting that either (1) surface uplift has ceased immediately south of the plateau margin or (2) gorge incision is not a useful proxy for the timing of surface uplift.

  1. LIDAR-based coastal landscape reconstruction and harbour location: The Viking-age royal burial site of Borre (Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, Erich; Doneus, Michael; Gansum, Terje

    2013-04-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) has found wide application in archaeological research for the detection and documentation of archaeological and palaeo-environmental features. In this study we demonstrate the analysis of an LIDAR derived 1x1 m digital elevation model (DTM) combined with geoarchaeological research of the coastal Viking-age burial site in Borre, Olso Fjord (Norway). Borre is an exceptional burial site in Scandinavia, containing burial mounds up to 40 m in diameter and 6 m height, mentioned in Nordic Sagas, especially in the skaldic poem Ynglingatal, as the burial place of one or two kings of the Ynglinga dynasty. Archaeological findings and radiocarbon ages indicate that the Borre burial ground had been in use broadly between 600-1000 AD. Despite the reasonable expectation that a coastal site connected with the Viking kings of Vestfold, with hall buildings and ship graves demands a harbour, up to now no harbour has not been found with traditional archaeological surveys. Since the area of Borre is affected by a continuous land uplift related to glacial rebound of Scandinavia, any former harbour site is expected to be exposed to the land surface today. The present day vertical crustal uplift is calculated around 2.5 mm/yr in the area of Borre. Burial mounds and surrounding borrow pits as well as geomorphological features of the uplifted coast of Borre have been analysed by the 1x1 m LIDAR-DTM, using hillshade, slope and local relief model for visualisation. Altogether, 41 burial mounds and further 6 potential mounds are visible in the high-resolution DTM. A succession of more than 14 beach ridges, cross-cut by the burial mounds, is visible from the present shore line up to 18 m asl. They are more or less parallel and similar in size, except between at ca. 4-6 m asl, where the most prominent ridge is located, which probably has been enforced artificially. Using published shoreline displacement curves from nearby areas, the shore-line at

  2. [Skeleton or mummy: practices and structures for secondary burial in southern Italy in modern and contemporary age].

    PubMed

    Fornaciari, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The ancient concepts of death as duration and the practices of secondary burial,first analysed by Robert Hertz, still survive in many areas of southern Italy. According to these beliefs death was perceived not as a sudden event, but as a long-lasting process, during which the deceased person had to go through a transitory phase, passing from one state of existence to another. Recent archeological research documents the persistence of secondary burial rites in Southern Italy during the Modern Age. A survey conducted in the province of Messina in Eastern Sicily has identified two surviving architectural structures appointed for the treatment of the bodies: the 'sitting colatoio' aimed at favoring the skeletonisation and the 'horizontal colatoio' used to obtain mummification by dehydration. Both these structures controlled the corpse's decay and transformed the body in a stable and durable simulacra of the dead.

  3. Unraveling rift margin evolution and escarpment development ages along the Dead Sea fault using cosmogenic burial ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matmon, A.; Fink, D.; Davis, M.; Niedermann, S.; Rood, D.; Frumkin, A.

    2014-07-01

    The Dead Sea fault (DSF) is one of the most active plate boundaries in the world. Understanding the Quaternary history and sediments of the DSF requires investigation into the Neogene development of this plate boundary. DSF lateral motion preceded significant extension and rift morphology by ~ 10 Ma. Sediments of the Sedom Formation, dated here between 5.0 ± 0.5 Ma and 6.2- 2.1+ inf Ma, yielded extremely low 10Be concentrations and 26Al is absent. These reflect the antiquity of the sediments, deposited in the Sedom Lagoon, which evolved in a subdued landscape and was connected to the Mediterranean Sea. The base of the overlying Amora Formation, deposited in the terminal Amora Lake which developed under increasing relief that promoted escarpment incision, was dated at 3.3- 0.8+ 0.9 Ma. Burial ages of fluvial sediments within caves (3.4 ± 0.2 Ma and 3.6 ± 0.4 Ma) represent the timing of initial incision. Initial DSF topography coincides with the earliest Red Sea MORB's and the East Anatolian fault initiation. These suggest a change in the relative Arabian-African plate motion. This change introduced the rifting component to the DSF followed by a significant subsidence, margin uplift, and a reorganization of relief and drainage pattern in the region resulting in the topographic framework observed today.

  4. Monumental megalithic burial and rock art tell a new story about the Levant Intermediate Bronze "Dark Ages".

    PubMed

    Sharon, Gonen; Barash, Alon; Eisenberg-Degen, Davida; Grosman, Leore; Oron, Maya; Berger, Uri

    2017-01-01

    The Intermediate Bronze Age (IB) in the Southern Levant (ca. 2350-2000 BCE) is known as the "Dark Ages," following the collapse of Early Bronze urban society and predating the establishment of the Middle Bronze cities. The absence of significant settlements and monumental building has led to the reconstruction of IB social organization as that of nomadic, tribal society inhabiting rural villages with no central governmental system. Excavation in the Shamir Dolmen Field (comprising over 400 dolmens) on the western foothills of the Golan Heights was carried out following the discovery of rock art engravings on the ceiling of the central chamber inside one of the largest dolmens ever recorded in the Levant. Excavation of this multi-chambered dolmen, covered by a basalt capstone weighing some 50 tons, revealed a secondary multi-burial (of both adults and children) rarely described in a dolmen context in the Golan. Engraved into the rock ceiling above the multi-burial is a panel of 14 forms composed of a vertical line and downturned arc motif. 3D-scanning by structured-light technology was used to sharpen the forms and revealed the technique employed to create them. Building of the Shamir dolmens required a tremendous amount of labor, architectural mastery, and complex socio-economic organization well beyond the capacity of small, rural nomadic groups. The monumental megalithic burial of the Shamir dolmens indicates a hierarchical, complex, non-urban governmental system. This new evidence supports a growing body of recent criticism stemming from new discoveries and approaches that calls for rethinking our views of the Levantine IB "Dark Ages."

  5. The New Space Age in the making: Emergence of exo-mining, exo-burials and exo-marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capova, Klara Anna

    2016-10-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century we witness considerable global developments in space exploration and a new era has begun: the New Space Age. The principal symbols of that age are firstly internationalization of space activities, secondly commercial utilization of space technologies, and lastly emergence of outer space economy. This paper presents selected signposts of the New Space Age. Three cases of recent outer space enterprises: recovery of asteroid resources (exo-mining), post-cremation memorial spaceflight (exo-burials) and first extraterrestrial advert (exo-marketing), are introduced in order to emphasize the monetary and social dimension of commercial application of space technologies. To give an illustration of these trends, this paper provides a brief socioculturally minded account of three outer space undertakings that are interpreted as signposts of the new era.

  6. New cosmogenic burial ages for Sterkfontein Member 2 Australopithecus and Member 5 Oldowan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, Darryl E.; Gibbon, Ryan J.; Kuman, Kathleen; Clarke, Ronald J.; Bruxelles, Laurent; Caffee, Marc W.

    2015-06-01

    The cave infills at Sterkfontein contain one of the richest assemblages of Australopithecus fossils in the world, including the nearly complete skeleton StW 573 (`Little Foot') in its lower section, as well as early stone tools in higher sections. However, the chronology of the site remains controversial owing to the complex history of cave infilling. Much of the existing chronology based on uranium-lead dating and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy has recently been called into question by the recognition that dated flowstones fill cavities formed within previously cemented breccias and therefore do not form a stratigraphic sequence. Earlier dating with cosmogenic nuclides suffered a high degree of uncertainty and has been questioned on grounds of sediment reworking. Here we use isochron burial dating with cosmogenic aluminium-26 and beryllium-10 to show that the breccia containing StW 573 did not undergo significant reworking, and that it was deposited 3.67 +/- 0.16 million years ago, far earlier than the 2.2 million year flowstones found within it. The skeleton is thus coeval with early Australopithecus afarensis in eastern Africa. We also date the earliest stone tools at Sterkfontein to 2.18 +/- 0.21 million years ago, placing them in the Oldowan at a time similar to that found elsewhere in South Africa at Swartkans and Wonderwerk.

  7. New cosmogenic burial ages for Sterkfontein Member 2 Australopithecus and Member 5 Oldowan.

    PubMed

    Granger, Darryl E; Gibbon, Ryan J; Kuman, Kathleen; Clarke, Ronald J; Bruxelles, Laurent; Caffee, Marc W

    2015-06-04

    The cave infills at Sterkfontein contain one of the richest assemblages of Australopithecus fossils in the world, including the nearly complete skeleton StW 573 ('Little Foot') in its lower section, as well as early stone tools in higher sections. However, the chronology of the site remains controversial owing to the complex history of cave infilling. Much of the existing chronology based on uranium-lead dating and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy has recently been called into question by the recognition that dated flowstones fill cavities formed within previously cemented breccias and therefore do not form a stratigraphic sequence. Earlier dating with cosmogenic nuclides suffered a high degree of uncertainty and has been questioned on grounds of sediment reworking. Here we use isochron burial dating with cosmogenic aluminium-26 and beryllium-10 to show that the breccia containing StW 573 did not undergo significant reworking, and that it was deposited 3.67 ± 0.16 million years ago, far earlier than the 2.2 million year flowstones found within it. The skeleton is thus coeval with early Australopithecus afarensis in eastern Africa. We also date the earliest stone tools at Sterkfontein to 2.18 ± 0.21 million years ago, placing them in the Oldowan at a time similar to that found elsewhere in South Africa at Swartkans and Wonderwerk.

  8. Guilds and middle-class welfare, 1550–1800: provisions for burial, sickness, old age, and widowhood.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, Marco H D

    2012-01-01

    Guilds provided for masters' and journeymen's burial, sickness, old age, and widowhood. Guild welfare was of importance to artisans, to the functioning of guilds, to the myriad of urban social relations, and to the political economy. However, it is an understated and neglected aspect of guild activities. This article looks at welfare provision by guilds, with the aim of addressing four questions. Firstly, for which risks did guild welfare arrangements exist in the Netherlands between 1550 and 1800, and what were the coverage, contributions, benefit levels, and conditions? Secondly, can guild welfare arrangements be regarded as insurance? Thirdly, to what extent and how did guilds overcome classic insurance problems such as adverse selection, moral hazards, and correlated risks? Finally, what was the position of guild provision in the Dutch political economy and vis-à-vis poor relief?

  9. 21Ne, 10Be and 26Al cosmogenic burial ages of near-surface eolian sand from the Packard Dune field, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Augustinus, Paul; Rhodes, Ed; Bristow, Charles; Balco, Greg

    2015-04-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, have been ice-free for at least 10 Ma. In Victoria Valley, the largest of the Dry Valleys, permafrosted yet still actively migrating dune-fields, occupy an area of ~8 km2 with dune thicknesses varying from ~5 to 70 meters. High-resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging of selected dunes reveal numerous unconformities and complex stratigraphy inferring cycles of sand accretion and deflation from westerly katabatic winter winds sourced from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet and anabatic summer winds sourced from the Ross Sea. Samples above permafrost depth were taken for OSL and cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial ages. OSL ages from shallow (<1m) pits range from modern to ~1.3ka suggesting that deposition/reworking of the dunes is on-going and their present configuration is a late Holocene feature. The same 7 samples gave a mean 26Al/10Be = 4.53 +/- 5% with an average apparent continuous 10Be surface exposure age of 525 +/- 25 ka surprisingly indicating a common pre-history independent of depth. Correcting for minor post-burial production based on OSL ages, the minimum (integrated) burial period for these sand grains is 0.51+/- 0.12 Ma which represents the burial age at the time of arrival at the dune. A possible explanation is that this common burial signal reflects recycling episodes of exposure, deposition, burial and deflation, sufficiently frequent to move all grains towards a common pre-dune deposition history. However, it is unclear over what length of time this processes has been active and fraction of time the sand has been buried. Consequently we also analysed purified quartz aliquots of the same samples for a third and stable nuclide, 21Ne, to determine the total surface and burial exposure periods. Using the 21Ne/10Be system we obtain burial ages of 1.10 +/- 0.10 Ma. Further coring below permafrost is planned for austral summer 2015.

  10. The Influence of Organic Material and Temperature on the Burial Tolerance of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Considerations for the Management of Marine Aggregate Dredging

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Richard S.; Black, Kenny D.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Experimental Approach Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic smothering events using a multi-factorial design, including organic matter concentration, temperature, sediment fraction size and duration of burial as important predictor variables. Results and Discussion Mussel mortality was significantly higher in organically loaded burials when compared to control sediments after just 2 days. Particularly, M. edulis specimens under burial in fine sediment with high (1%) concentrations of organic matter experienced a significantly higher mortality rate (p<0.01) than those under coarse control aggregates. Additionally, mussels exposed to the summer maximum temperature treatment (20°C) exhibited significantly increased mortality (p<0.01) compared to those in the ambient treatment group (15°C). Total Oxygen Uptake rates of experimental aggregates were greatest (112.7 mmol m-2 day-1) with 1% organic loadings in coarse sediment at 20°C. Elevated oxygen flux rates in porous coarse sediments are likely to be a function of increased vertical migration of anaerobically liberated sulphides to the sediment-water interface. However, survival of M. edulis under bacterial mats of Beggiatoa spp. indicates the species’ resilience to sulphides and so we propose that the presence of reactive organic matter within the burial medium may facilitate bacterial growth and increase mortality through pathogenic infection. This may be exacerbated under the stable interstitial conditions in fine sediment and increased bacterial metabolism under high temperatures. Furthermore, increased temperature may impose metabolic demands upon the mussel that cannot be met during burial-induced anaerobiosis. Summary Lack of

  11. An Early Cretaceous garnet pressure-temperature path recording synconvergent burial and exhumation from the hinterland of the Sevier orogenic belt, Albion Mountains, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Eric D.; Hoisch, Thomas D.; Wells, Michael L.; Vervoort, Jeffrey D.; Beyene, Mengesha A.

    2015-08-01

    Rocks may undergo complex pressure-temperature ( P- T) histories during orogenesis in response to alternating episodes of synconvergent burial and exhumation. In this study, chemical zoning in garnets combined with textural and chemical evidence from the schist of Willow Creek in the Albion Mountains of south-central Idaho (USA), reveals a complex P- T path during the early stages of Sevier orogenesis. The distribution of quartz inclusions combined with internal resorption features establishes a hiatus in garnet growth. Chemical zoning was simulated using a G-minimization approach to yield a P- T path consisting of three distinct pressure changes during increasing temperature, defining an "N" shape. Lu-Hf isochron ages from multiple garnet fractions and whole-rock analyses in two samples are 132.1 ± 2.4 and 138.7 ± 3.5 Ma. The samples were collected from the hanging wall of the Basin-Elba thrust fault and yielded results similar to those previously obtained from the footwall. This leads to several conclusions: (1) Both the hanging wall and footwall experienced the same metamorphic event, (2) the paths document a previously unrecognized crustal thickening and synorogenic extension cycle that fills an important time gap in the shortening history of the Sevier retroarc, suggesting progressive eastward growth of the orogen rather than a two-stage history, and (3) episodes of extensional exhumation during protracted convergent orogenesis are increasingly well recognized and highlight the dynamic behavior of orogenic belts.

  12. Symbolic metal bit and saddlebag fastenings in a Middle Bronze Age donkey burial.

    PubMed

    Bar-Oz, Guy; Nahshoni, Pirhiya; Motro, Hadas; Oren, Eliezer D

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the unprecedented discovery of the skeleton of a ritually interred donkey with a metal horse bit in association with its teeth and saddlebag fastenings on its back. This discovery in the Middle Bronze Age III sacred precinct (1700/1650-1550 BCE) at Tel Haror, Israel, presents a unique combination of evidence for the early employment of equid harnessing equipment, both for chariot bridling (horse bit) and pack animals (saddlebags). The ritually deposited donkey with its unique accoutrements advances our understanding of the broad social and religious significance of equids in the Levantine Bronze Age, previously known mainly from textual and iconographical sources.

  13. Symbolic Metal Bit and Saddlebag Fastenings in a Middle Bronze Age Donkey Burial

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Oz, Guy; Nahshoni, Pirhiya; Motro, Hadas; Oren, Eliezer D.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the unprecedented discovery of the skeleton of a ritually interred donkey with a metal horse bit in association with its teeth and saddlebag fastenings on its back. This discovery in the Middle Bronze Age III sacred precinct (1700/1650-1550 BCE) at Tel Haror, Israel, presents a unique combination of evidence for the early employment of equid harnessing equipment, both for chariot bridling (horse bit) and pack animals (saddlebags). The ritually deposited donkey with its unique accoutrements advances our understanding of the broad social and religious significance of equids in the Levantine Bronze Age, previously known mainly from textual and iconographical sources. PMID:23484046

  14. Large igneous provinces and organic carbon burial: Controls on global temperature and continental weathering during the Early Cretaceous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Stéphane; Meissner, Philipp; Janssen, Nico M. M.; Steuber, Thomas; Mutterlose, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    There is an abundance of evidence for short intervals of cold climatic conditions during the Early Cretaceous. However, the lack of a high-resolution, long-term Early Cretaceous paleotemperature record hampers a full-scale synthesis of these putative ;cold snap; episodes, as well as a more holistic approach to Early Cretaceous climate changes. We present an extended compilation of belemnite-based oxygen, carbon and strontium isotope records covering the Berriasian-middle Albian from the Vocontian Basin (SE France). This dataset clearly demonstrates three intervals of cold climatic conditions during the Early Cretaceous (late Valanginian-earliest Hauterivian, late early Aptian, latest Aptian-earliest Albian). Each of these intervals is associated with rapid and high amplitude sea-level fluctuations, supporting the hypothesis of transient growth of polar ice caps during the Early Cretaceous. As evidenced by positive carbon isotope excursions, each cold episode is associated with enhanced burial of organic matter on a global scale. Moreover, there is a relatively good match between the timing and size of large igneous province eruptions and the amplitude of Early Cretaceous warming episodes. Altogether, these observations confirm the instrumental role of atmospheric CO2 variations in driving Early Cretaceous climate change. From a long-term perspective, the coupling of global paleotemperature and seawater strontium isotopic ratio during the Early Cretaceous is best explained by temperature-controlled changes of continental crust weathering rates.

  15. Effects of soil temperature, moisture, and burial depths on carpogenic germination of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and S. minor.

    PubMed

    Wu, B M; Subbarao, K V

    2008-10-01

    Extensive studies have been conducted on the carpogenic germination of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, but carpogenic germination in S. minor has not been studied adequately. It remains unclear why apothecia of this pathogen have seldom been observed in nature. In this study, a new method was developed to produce apothecia in the absence of soil or sand, and carpogenic germination without preconditioning was recorded for 95 of the 96 S. sclerotiorum isolates tested. Carpogenic germination of the two species was compared under a variety of temperature, soil moisture, burial depths, and short periods of high temperature and low soil moisture. The optimal temperatures for rapid germination and for maximum germination rates were both lower for S. minor than for S. sclerotiorum. The temperature range for carpogenic germination was also narrower for S. minor than for S. sclerotiorum. A 5-day period at 30 degrees C, either starting on the 10th or 20th day of incubation, did not significantly affect carpogenic germination of S. sclerotiorum. For both S. minor and S. sclerotiorum, the percentage of carpogenically germinated sclerotia increased as soil water potential increased from -0.3 to -0.01 MPa. In the greenhouse, a 10- or 20-day dry period completely arrested carpogenic germination of S. sclerotiorum, and new apothecia appeared after an interval of 35 days following rewetting, similar to the initial carpogenic germination regardless of when the dry period was imposed. In naturally infested fields, the number of sclerotia in 100 cc of soil decreased as depth increased from 0 to 10 cm before tillage, but became uniform between 0 and 10 cm after conventional tillage for both species. Most apothecia of S. minor were, however, produced from sclerotia located at a depth shallower than 0.5 cm while some apothecia of S. sclerotiorum were produced from sclerotia located as deep as 4 to 5 cm. These results provide the much needed information to assess the epidemiological roles of

  16. Circadian temperature variation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to summarize current knowledge concerning the daily body temperature rhythm and its age-dependent alterations. Homeostatic and circadian control mechanisms are considered. Special attention is paid to the circadian system, as the mechanisms of autonomic control are the topic of another contribution to this special issue. Also, the interactions of the core body temperature rhythm with other circadian functions are discussed in detail as they constitute an essential part of the internal temporal order of living systems and thus guarantee their optimal functioning. In the second part of the paper, age-dependent changes in the circadian body temperature rhythm and their putative causes, considering circadian and homeostatic components, are described. Consequences for health and fitness and some possibilities to prevent adverse effect are mentioned in the final section.

  17. Temperature calibration of amino acid racemization: age implications for the Yuha skeleton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Childers, W.M.

    1979-01-01

    D/L of aspartic acid ranged from 0.52 to 0.56 for femur samples of the Yuha skeleton. Subsurface temperature measurements made at the burial site indicate average annual temperature is 18??C and diagenetic temperature is 21.6??C. These data and a relation derived for the dependence of the aspartic acid rate constant on diagenetic temperature indicate an age of 23,600. The result is consistent with 14C and 230Th dating of calcrete found coating the bones. ?? 1979.

  18. A distinct section of the Early Bronze Age society? Stable isotope investigations of burials in settlement pits and multiple inhumations of the Únětice culture in central Germany.

    PubMed

    Knipper, Corina; Fragata, Matthias; Nicklisch, Nicole; Siebert, Angelina; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Hubensack, Vera; Metzner-Nebelsick, Carola; Meller, Harald; Alt, Kurt W

    2016-03-01

    Inhumations in so-called settlement pits and multiple interments are subordinate burial practices of the Early Bronze Age Únětice culture in central Germany (2200-1700/1650 BC). The majority of the Únětice population was entombed as single inhumations in rectangular grave pits with a normative position of the body. The goal of the study was to test archaeological hypotheses that the deviant burials may represent socially distinct or nonlocal individuals. The study comprised up to two teeth and one bone each of 74 human individuals from eight sites and faunal comparative samples. The inhumations included regular, deviant burials in so-called settlement or storage pits, and multiple burials. We investigated radiogenic strontium isotope compositions of tooth enamel ((87) Sr/(86) Sr) and light stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen of bone collagen (δ(13) C, δ(15) N) aiming at the disclosure of residential changes and dietary patterns. Site-specific strontium isotope data ranges mirror different geological properties including calcareous bedrock, loess, and glacial till. Independent from burial types, they disclose low portions of nonlocal individuals of up to some 20% at the individual sites. The light stable isotope ratios of burials in settlement pits and rectangular graves overlap widely and indicate highly similar dietary habits. The analytical results let to conclude that inhumations in settlement pits and multiple burials were two of the manifold burial practices of the Early Bronze Age. The selection criteria of the individuals for the different forms of inhumation remained undisclosed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Respiratory failure and spontaneous hypoglycemia during noninvasive rewarming from 24.7°C (76.5°F) core body temperature after prolonged avalanche burial.

    PubMed

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Nardin, Michele; Zanon, Peter; Kaufmann, Marc; Kritzinger, Meinhard; Brugger, Hermann

    2012-08-01

    Clinical reports on management and rewarming complications after prolonged avalanche burial are not common. We present a case of an unreported combination of respiratory failure and unexpected spontaneous hypoglycemia during noninvasive rewarming from severe hypothermia. We collected anecdotal observations in a 42-year-old, previously healthy, male backcountry skier admitted to the ICU at a tertiary care center after 2 hours 7 minutes of complete avalanche burial, who presented with a patent airway and a core body temperature of 25.0°C (77.0°F) on extrication. There was no decrease in core body temperature during transport (from 25.0°C [77.0°F] to 24.7°C [76.5°F]). Atrial fibrillation occurred during active noninvasive external rewarming (to 37.0°C [98.6°F] during 5 hours), followed by pulmonary edema and respiratory failure (SaO(2) 73% and PaO(2)/FIO(2) 161 mm Hg), which resolved with endotracheal intubation and continuous positive end-respiratory pressure. Moreover, a marked spontaneous glycemic imbalance (from 22.2 to 1.4 mmol/L) was observed. Despite a possible favorable outcome, clinicians should be prepared to identify and treat severe respiratory problems and spontaneous hypoglycemia during noninvasive rewarming of severely hypothermic avalanche victims.

  20. 20 CFR 416.1231 - Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses. 416.1231 Section 416.1231 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1231...

  1. 20 CFR 416.1231 - Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses. 416.1231 Section 416.1231 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1231...

  2. 20 CFR 416.1231 - Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses. 416.1231 Section 416.1231 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Resources and Exclusions § 416.1231...

  3. Considerations on Temperature, Longevity and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    A modest reduction in body temperature prolongs longevity and possibly retards aging in both poikilotherm and homeotherm animals. Some of the possible mechanisms mediating these effects are considered here with respect to major aging models and theories. PMID:18425417

  4. Considerations on temperature, longevity and aging.

    PubMed

    Conti, B

    2008-06-01

    A modest reduction in body temperature prolongs longevity and may retard aging in both poikilotherm and homeotherm animals. Some of the possible mechanisms mediating these effects are considered here with respect to major aging models and theories.

  5. Alternations in burial and exhumation along the Selimiye (Kayabükü) shear zone in the Menderes Massif from detailed garnet pressure-temperature paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, E. D.; Atakturk, K. R.; Catlos, E. J.; Lizzadro-McPherson, D. J.; Cemen, I.; Lovera, O. M.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-temperature (P-T) paths derived from garnet chemical zoning and supported by thermal modeling record alternating burial and exhumation during Main Menderes Metamorphism in western Turkey. We studied six rocks along the Selimiye (Kayabükü) shear zone, three from the footwall (Çine nappe) and three from the hanging wall (Selimiye nappe). The shear zone bounds the southern Menderes Massif metamorphic core complex and has been suggested to record compression followed by extension. The rocks are lower-amphibolite facies garnet-bearing metapelites with nearly identical mineral suites. Retrograde overprinting hinders classical thermobarometry; to overcome this, preserved chemical zoning in garnet combined with a G-minimization approach was used to construct detailed P-T paths (e.g., 50 points in some paths). During continuous temperature increase, the Çine nappe paths show increasing, decreasing, and then increasing pressure (an N-shaped path) ending at 7-8 kbar and ~565-590 °C. The Selimiye nappe paths show a single increase in P-T ending at ~7.3 kbar and ~580 °C. Similar bulk-rock compositions in all samples and the separation by the shear zone suggest that garnets grew during distinct events in each nappe. The timing of garnet growth, and thus the P-T paths, is currently undetermined, as monazite inclusions in garnet appear secondary and complicated by excess common Pb. The Çine nappe N-shaped path describes alternations in burial and exhumation, possibly due to thrust motion along the shear zone. To demonstrate the physical plausibility of the P-T paths, a 2-D finite difference solution to the diffusion-advection equation was applied. The results of the thermal modeling suggest that thrusting, denudation, and renewed thrusting would produce similar changes in P-T to the N-shaped path. Thus, the Çine nappe N-shaped P-T path appears to record a gap in thrust motion along the Selimiye (Kayabükü) shear zone prior to ultimate unroofing of the massif.

  6. Age and activation of microbial communities in soils under burial mounds and in recent surface soils of steppe zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkina, T. S.; Khomutova, T. E.; Kashirskaya, N. N.; Demkina, E. V.; Stretovich, I. V.; El-Registan, G. I.; Demkin, V. A.

    2008-12-01

    Chestnut paleosols buried under steppe kurgans about 4800, 4000, and 2000 years ago and their background analogues were studied in the dry steppe zone on the Volga-Don interfluve. Morphological, chemical, microbiological, biochemical, and radiocarbon studies were performed. Paleoclimatic conditions in the region were reconstructed on the basis of paleosol data. The ages of microbial fractions isolated from the buried and surface soils were determined using the method of 14C atomic mass-spectrometry. It reached 2100 years in the A1 horizon of the buried paleosol, which corresponded to the archaeological age of the kurgan (1st century AD). The ages of microbial biomass isolated from the B2 horizons of the buried paleosol and the background surface soil comprised 3680 ± 35 and 3300 ± 30 years, respectively. The obtained data confirmed our assumption about preservation of microorganisms of the past epochs in the paleosols buried under archaeological monuments. It is ensured by various mechanisms of adaptation of soil microbial communities to unfavorable environmental conditions (anabiosis, transformation of bacteria into nanoforms, etc.). The possibility to stimulate germination of the ancient dormant microbial pool isolated from the buried paleosols by 2-3 orders of magnitude with the use of β-indolyl-3-acetic acid as a signal substance was demonstrated.

  7. Overpressure by burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury; Dabrowski, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    Preservation of peak metamorphic assemblages cannot be explain by sluggish kinetics only due to high temperatures. Moreover, frequently reported near isothermal decompression from peak conditions testify continuing capacity of lower pressure metamorphic reactions to overcome kinetic barriers. Often these observations come from the same rock sample, or even or from a single host crystal. Natural conclusion on preservation of peak pressures in a 'pressure vessel' in order to preserve the peak mineral assemblages was firmly made already in the first years after convincing identifying of ultra-high pressure minerals in continental rocks. The 'pressure vessels' model is thus the current view on mechanical state during retrogression assuming up to several GPa excess pressure in inclusion maintained by host mineral all the way through retrogression. Same arguments apply to preservation of outcrop scale eclogite boudins in lower pressure amphibolite gneisses. If strength of rocks and minerals is sufficient to keep the pressure difference during retrogression, the same applies to the prograde stage of the metamorphic history of the rock. We investigate and quantify the overpressure development during burial of continental rocks. We show that eclogite lenses are expected to develop over mafic lithology embedded in average crustal rock at lower crustal condition, thus eliminating the need for 'deep continental subduction' as the only mechanism to form it.

  8. Numerical simulations of complex temperature, burial, and erosion histories for sedimentary basins and their calibration: Examples from western Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Buker, C.; Littke, R.; Welte, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The detailed and reliable reconstruction of the geological and thermal evolution of sedimentary basins forms the indispensable basis of any simulation of generation, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons. For this purpose - although often not taken into account - analysing and quantifying the uplift and erosion history is as important as the subsidence and temperature history. The reconstruction of the timing of hydrocarbon generation, petroleum expulsion and migration and the changing reservoir characteristics is only possible based on such an integrated approach. Applying this technique on the Carboniferous Ruhr Basin and the Lower Saxony Basin (western Germany) by utilising 1-D and 2-D forward modeling approaches resulted in important and new quantitative information on their temperature, subsidence and erosion histories which are of fundamental geological interest. The basin evolution models were calibrated using vitrinite reflectance data, fluid inclusion temperatures, and apatite and zircon fission track data. The detailed knowledge of the geological and thermal basin evolution then allowed in combination with a new kinetic model for gas generation from coals the modeling of generation, migration and accumulation of methane from Carboniferous coal seams.

  9. Foreign elites from the Oxus civilization? A craniometric study of anomalous burials from Bronze Age Tepe Hissar.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, B E

    1999-12-01

    Discovery of a small number of individuals in the Period III necropolis at the large northern Iranian Bronze Age site of Tepe Hissar directly associated with a complex of imported artifacts raises the question of whether these individuals represent elites who had access to these exotic commodities, or an imposed foreign elite that may have brought these unusual artifacts from their homelands. The source of the atypical objects is believed to be the Oxus civilization of central Asia. This study investigates the identity of these individuals by employing canonical discriminant function analysis of 20 craniometric variables among 174 adult males from Tepe Hissar Period III and Oxus civilization males from Sapalli tepe and Djarkutan. Dicriminant function analysis provides a strong separation between Tepe Hissar Period III males and Oxus civilization males and a high level of correct assignation by sample (95.8%). Imposition of the five males associated with imported central Asian artifacts from the Period III necropolis indicates that the majority (4/5) are phenetically indistinguishable from other Period III Tepe Hissar males. The results indicate that these individuals most likely represent local elite inhabitants of Tepe Hissar, rather than the presence of an imposed foreign elite. However, given the scarcity of crucial specimens, especially females, and comparative skeletal series, this conclusion must remain tentative.

  10. Evaluation of the continuous rate of supply lead-210 sediment age model: Two sources of potential bias and implications for carbon burial rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonneea, M. E.; Kroeger, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    The past century has been a period of rapid environmental change and ecosystem response to this change is of great interest, particularly in coastal wetlands. Lead-210 is an important sediment chronometer that yields accurate dates over the past century in sediments typically considered too young for carbon-14 dates. Since originally proposed by Appleby and Oldfield in 1978, sediments from a wide range of environments, including salt marshes and mangroves, have been dated with the lead-210 continuous rate of supply (CRS) age model. The power of this model is that it allows ages and accretion rates to be calculated for each interval with measured 210Pb activity, as opposed to a single accretion rate using the constant initial concentration model. There are two sources of potential bias in the model as it is applied to real 210Pb sediment profiles. First, the formulation originally proposed to calculate the mass accretion rate is sensitive to the thickness of sediment sampling intervals, and results in underestimation of mass accretion rates at typical (1 to 2 cm) sampling intervals. Such underestimation is greatest for large intervals and small accretion rates. For example, 1 cm intervals would result in 15% and 2 cm intervals in 22% underestimation for a 1 mm y-1 linear sedimentation rate. Secondly, the continuous rate of supply model requires integration of the total 210Pb profile; failure to measure the entire profile results in calculated ages that are too old and accretion rates that are too low. We propose that 210Pb profiles must be counted to an age of 200 years to avoid this bias within sediments deposited over the past century; profiles integrated to 150 years underestimate accretion rates by 22% at 100 years. It is possible to estimate the sediment concentration of 210Pb at 200 years as a function of 210Pb supply from the atmosphere, sedimentation rate and dry bulk density. Using published core data, we demonstrate that it is particularly important to

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR BURIAL ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1961-05-01

    A burial assembly is shown whereby an entire reactor core may be encased with lead shielding, withdrawn from the reactor site and buried. This is made possible by a five-piece interlocking arrangement that may be easily put together by remote control with no aligning of bolt holes or other such close adjustments being necessary.

  12. Large increases in carbon burial in northern lakes during the Anthropocene

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Adam J.; Anderson, N. John; Prairie, Yves T.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Northern forests are important ecosystems for carbon (C) cycling and lakes within them process and bury large amounts of organic-C. Current burial estimates are poorly constrained and may discount other shifts in organic-C burial driven by global change. Here we analyse a suite of northern lakes to determine trends in organic-C burial throughout the Anthropocene. We found burial rates increased significantly over the last century and are up to five times greater than previous estimates. Despite a correlation with temperature, warming alone did not explain the increase in burial, suggesting the importance of other drivers including atmospherically deposited reactive nitrogen. Upscaling mean lake burial rates for each time period to global northern forests yields up to 4.5 Pg C accumulated in the last 100 years—20% of the total burial over the Holocene. Our results indicate that lakes will become increasingly important for C burial under future global change scenarios. PMID:26607672

  13. Large increases in carbon burial in northern lakes during the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Adam J; Anderson, N John; Prairie, Yves T; Engstrom, Daniel R; del Giorgio, Paul A

    2015-11-26

    Northern forests are important ecosystems for carbon (C) cycling and lakes within them process and bury large amounts of organic-C. Current burial estimates are poorly constrained and may discount other shifts in organic-C burial driven by global change. Here we analyse a suite of northern lakes to determine trends in organic-C burial throughout the Anthropocene. We found burial rates increased significantly over the last century and are up to five times greater than previous estimates. Despite a correlation with temperature, warming alone did not explain the increase in burial, suggesting the importance of other drivers including atmospherically deposited reactive nitrogen. Upscaling mean lake burial rates for each time period to global northern forests yields up to 4.5 Pg C accumulated in the last 100 years--20% of the total burial over the Holocene. Our results indicate that lakes will become increasingly important for C burial under future global change scenarios.

  14. Twenty-five thousand-year-old triple burial from Dolní Vĕstonice: an ice-age family?

    PubMed

    Alt, K W; Pichler, S; Vach, W; Klíma, B; Vlcek, E; Sedlmeier, J

    1997-01-01

    In 1986 a paleolithic triple burial was discovered near Dolní Vĕstonice (Czech Republic). The occurrence of anatomic variants in all three skeletons gave rise to speculations that the buried individuals may have been closely related. To test this hypothesis the skeletons were submitted to a systematic kinship analysis based on odontologic and other non-metric traits. Statistical tests showed that the coincident occurrence of several rare traits in the individuals is highly unlikely to occur at random. This and further data included in the analysis therefore suggest that the three individuals buried together were genetically related and actually belonged to one family.

  15. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  16. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  17. Paleomagnetic dating of burial diagenesis in Mississippian carbonates, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumstein, Angela M.; Elmore, R. Douglas; Engel, Michael H.; Elliot, Crawford; Basu, Ankan

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study is to test models for the origin of widespread secondary magnetizations in the Mississippian Deseret Limestone. The Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone is a source rock for hydrocarbons, and modeling studies indicate that it entered the oil window in the Early Cretaceous during the Sevier orogeny. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the Deseret Limestone and the stratigraphically equivalent Chainman Shale in central and western Utah indicate that the units contain two ancient magnetizations residing in magnetite. Burial temperatures are too low for the magnetizations to be thermoviscous in origin, and they are interpreted to be chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs). Fold tests from western Utah indicate the presence of a prefolding Triassic to Jurassic CRM. Geochemical (87Sr/86Sr, δ13C, and δ18O) and petrographic analyses suggest that externally derived fluids did not alter these rocks. This CRM was acquired at the beginning of the oil window and is interpreted to be the result of burial diagenesis of organic matter. A second younger CRM in western central Utah is apparently postfolding and is probably Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary in age. On the basis of the thermal modeling, the timing overlaps with the oil window. These results are consistent with a connection between organic matter maturation and remagnetization. Modeling of the smectite-to-illite transformation in the Deseret Limestone suggests a mean age prior to acquisition of both CRMs, although the range for illitization overlaps with the Triassic to Jurassic CRM. The results of this study support the hypothesis that pervasive CRMs can be related to burial diagenetic processes. In addition, paleomagnetism can be used to determine the timing of such processes, which can benefit hydrocarbon exploration efforts.

  18. The effect of the burial environment on adipocere formation.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Shari L; Stuart, Barbara H; Dent, Boyd B

    2005-11-10

    Adipocere is a decomposition product comprising predominantly of saturated fatty acids which results from the hydrolysis and hydrogenation of neutral fats in the body. Adipocere formation may occur in various decomposition environments but is chiefly dependent on the surrounding conditions. In a soil burial environment these conditions may include such factors as soil pH, temperature, moisture and the oxygen content within the grave site. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of these particular burial factors on the rate and extent of adipocere formation. Controlled laboratory experiments were conducted in an attempt to form adipocere from pig adipose tissue in model burial environments. Infrared spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were employed to determine the lipid profile and fatty acid composition of the adipocere product which formed in the burial environments. The results suggest that adipocere can form under a variety of burial conditions. Several burial factors were identified as enhancing adipocere formation whilst others clearly inhibited its formation. This study acts as a preliminary investigation into the effect of the burial environment on the resultant preservation of decomposing tissue via adipocere formation.

  19. Tracking Burial, Displacement and Exhumation in the Lesser Himalayas, Eastern Bhutan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuarrie, N.; Long, S. P.; Tobgay, T.; Reiners, P. W.; Coutand, I.

    2010-12-01

    We present data on the burial, displacement and exhumation history of Lesser Himalayan (LH) rocks in eastern Bhutan by presenting quartz deformation microstructure, U-Pb geochronology of zircon metamorphic rim growth, and zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) and apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology combined with sequentially-restored geologic cross-sections. These data highlight the magnitude and timing of displacement of large, discrete structures such as the Main Central thrust (MCT), the Shumar thrust (ST) and a series of thrust faults that comprise the LH duplex, by first tracking the burial history of footwall rocks, and then their subsequent exhumation. ZHe ages (~200°C closure temperature) in LH rocks range from 11.9±1.1 Ma, to 5.65±0.27 Ma and display a general trend of increasing ages to the south with a slight decrease in age within 5 km of the MBT. AFT ages in LH rocks are uniformly young, ranging between 4.5 ± 0.73 to 3.38 ± 0.68 Ma, and do not show a N-S age progression. These LH AFT ages are all younger than previously reported AFT ages in proximal Greater Himalayan rocks exposed at structurally and topographically higher levels to the east and west. Quartz and feldspar deformation microstructures indicate that lower LH rocks were buried to temperatures of 400°-450° via thrust emplacement of the MCT. Half of the total burial depth is attributed to the thickness of the Paleoproterozoic LH section (assuming a 25-30° C/km geothermal gradient). Published prograde monazite ages suggest LH burial was underway by 20-18 Ma. Upper LH rocks were in turn buried by lower LH rocks. Zircon metamorphic rim ages (LA-MC-ICP-MS) ranging from 17-15 Ma date the timing of burial of the northern upper LH section by emplacement of the ST. Plastically-elongated and partially-recrystallized quartz porphyroclasts in the upper LH Baxa Group indicate both temperature of deformation (280°-400°) and synchronous layer normal flattening (LNF) strain. Corresponding burial depths

  20. Indien Personhood III: Water Burial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Water burial is a way to return a body to its key primal element. It revives and transforms both the soul and the person. Sometimes water burial leads to a new life floating in a womb. Sometimes it disperses to provide a moist and nutrient-rich medium for a vast variety of other lives, making a contribution to the much larger whole. In this…

  1. Indien Personhood III: Water Burial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Water burial is a way to return a body to its key primal element. It revives and transforms both the soul and the person. Sometimes water burial leads to a new life floating in a womb. Sometimes it disperses to provide a moist and nutrient-rich medium for a vast variety of other lives, making a contribution to the much larger whole. In this…

  2. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1610 Burial in national cemeteries; burial of... veteran is in a national cemetery, provided that burial in a national cemetery is desired by the person...

  3. Neil Armstrong Burial at Sea

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-13

    US Navy personnel carry the cremains of Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong off of a military aircraft at Naval Station Mayport the day before the Armstrong burial at sea service, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, Mayport, Fla. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. 78 FR 76574 - Burial Benefits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... include burial allowances for service-connected and non-service-connected deaths, a plot or interment... and plot or interment allowances that are equal to the maximum benefit authorized by law, and priority... allowance for service-connected deaths (38 U.S.C. 2307). Congress also authorized VA to pay a plot...

  5. 20 CFR 61.205 - Burial expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Burial expense. 61.205 Section 61.205... § 61.205 Burial expense. (a) When the death of a person listed in § 61.1(a) results from an injury caused by a war-risk hazard, the Office shall pay reasonable burial expenses up to the amount...

  6. 20 CFR 61.205 - Burial expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Burial expense. 61.205 Section 61.205... § 61.205 Burial expense. (a) When the death of a person listed in § 61.1(a) results from an injury caused by a war-risk hazard, the Office shall pay reasonable burial expenses up to the amount...

  7. 20 CFR 61.205 - Burial expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Burial expense. 61.205 Section 61.205... § 61.205 Burial expense. (a) When the death of a person listed in § 61.1(a) results from an injury caused by a war-risk hazard, the Office shall pay reasonable burial expenses up to the amount...

  8. 20 CFR 61.205 - Burial expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Burial expense. 61.205 Section 61.205... § 61.205 Burial expense. (a) When the death of a person listed in § 61.1(a) results from an injury caused by a war-risk hazard, the Office shall pay reasonable burial expenses up to the amount...

  9. 20 CFR 61.205 - Burial expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Burial expense. 61.205 Section 61.205... § 61.205 Burial expense. (a) When the death of a person listed in § 61.1(a) results from an injury caused by a war-risk hazard, the Office shall pay reasonable burial expenses up to the amount...

  10. Preliminary soilwater conductivity analysis to date clandestine burials of homicide victims.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Jamie K; Cassella, John P; Jervis, John R

    2010-05-20

    This study reports on a new geoscientific method to estimate the post-burial interval (PBI) and potential post-mortem interval (PMI) date of homicide victims in clandestine graves by measuring decomposition fluid conductivities. Establishing PBI/PMI dates may be critical for forensic investigators to establish time-lines to link or indeed rule out suspects to a crime. Regular in situ soilwater analysis from a simulated clandestine grave (which contained a domestic buried pig carcass) in a semi-rural environment had significantly elevated conductivity measurements when compared to background values. A temporal rapid increase of the conductivity of burial fluids was observed until one-year post-burial, after this values slowly increased until two years (end of the current study period). Conversion of x-axis from post-burial days to 'accumulated degree days' (ADDs) corrected for both local temperature variations and associated depth of burial and resulted in an improved fit for multiple linear regression analyses. ADD correction also allowed comparison with a previous conductivity grave study on a different site with a different soil type and environment; this showed comparable results with a similar trend observed. A separate simulated discovered burial had a conductivity estimated PBI date that showed 12% error from its actual burial date. Research is also applicable in examining illegal animal burials; time of burial and waste deposition. Further research is required to extend the monitoring period, to use human cadavers and to repeat this with other soil types and depositional environments.

  11. GPR and bulk ground resistivity surveys in graveyards: locating unmarked burials in contrasting soil types.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James D; Pringle, Jamie K; Goodwin, Jon

    2014-04-01

    With graveyards and cemeteries globally being increasingly designated as full, there is a growing need to identify unmarked burial positions to find burial space or exhume and re-inter if necessary. In some countries, for example the U.S. and U.K., burial sites are not usually re-used; however, most graveyard and cemetery records do not have maps of positions. One non-invasive detection method is near-surface geophysics, but there has been a lack of research to-date on optimal methods and/or equipment configuration. This paper presents three case studies in contrasting burial environments, soil types, burial styles and ages in the U.K. Geophysical survey results reveal unmarked burials could be effectively identified from these case studies that were not uniform or predicted using 225 MHz frequency antennae GPR 2D 0.5 m spaced profiles. Bulk ground electrical surveys, rarely used for unmarked burials, revealed 1 m probe spacings were optimal compared to 0.5 m, with datasets needing 3D detrending to reveal burial positions. Results were variable depending upon soil type; in very coarse soils GPR was optimal; whereas resistivity was optimal in clay-rich soils and both were optimal in sandy and black earth soils. Archaeological excavations revealed unmarked burials, extra/missing individuals from parish records and a variety of burial styles from isolated, brick-lined, to vertically stacked individuals. Study results, evidence unmarked burial targets were significantly different from clandestine burials of murder victims which are used as analogues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 38 CFR 3.1700 - Types of VA burial benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Types of VA burial... ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: General § 3.1700 Types of VA burial benefits. Pt. 3, Subpt. B, Nt. (a) Burial benefits. VA provides the following types of burial benefits, which are discussed in §§...

  13. Being cool: how body temperature influences ageing and longevity.

    PubMed

    Keil, Gerald; Cummings, Elizabeth; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Temperature is a basic and essential property of any physical system, including living systems. Even modest variations in temperature can have profound effects on organisms, and it has long been thought that as metabolism increases at higher temperatures so should rates of ageing. Here, we review the literature on how temperature affects longevity, ageing and life history traits. From poikilotherms to homeotherms, there is a clear trend for lower temperature being associated with longer lifespans both in wild populations and in laboratory conditions. Many life-extending manipulations in rodents, such as caloric restriction, also decrease core body temperature. Nonetheless, an inverse relationship between temperature and lifespan can be obscured or reversed, especially when the range of body temperatures is small as in homeotherms. An example is observed in humans: women appear to have a slightly higher body temperature and yet live longer than men. The mechanisms involved in the relationship between temperature and longevity also appear to be less direct than once thought with neuroendocrine processes possibly mediating complex physiological responses to temperature changes. Lastly, we discuss species differences in longevity in mammals and how this relates to body temperature and argue that the low temperature of the long-lived naked mole-rat possibly contributes to its exceptional longevity.

  14. Taenia sp. in human burial from Kan River, East Siberia.

    PubMed

    Slepchenko, Sergey Mikhailovich; Ivanov, Sergey Nikolaevich; Vybornov, Anton Vasilevich; Alekseevich, Tsybankov Alexander; Sergeyevich, Slavinsky Vyacheslav; Lysenko, Danil Nikolaevich; Matveev, Vyacheslav Evgenievich

    2017-05-01

    We present an arhaeoparasitological analysis of a unique burial from the Neftprovod II burial ground in East Siberia, which dated from the Bronze Age. Analysis of a sediment sample from the sacral region of the pelvis revealed the presence of Taenia sp. eggs. Because uncooked animal tissue is the primary source of Taenia, this indicated that the individual was likely consuming raw or undercooked meat of roe deer, red deer, or elk infected with Taenia. This finding represents the oldest case of a human infected with Taenia sp. from Eastern Siberia and Russia.

  15. Parallel circuits control temperature preference in Drosophila during ageing.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsiang-Wen; Wu, Chia-Lin; Chang, Sue-Wei; Liu, Tsung-Ho; Lai, Jason Sih-Yu; Fu, Tsai-Feng; Fu, Chien-Chung; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2015-07-16

    The detection of environmental temperature and regulation of body temperature are integral determinants of behaviour for all animals. These functions become less efficient in aged animals, particularly during exposure to cold environments, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we identify an age-related change in the temperature preference of adult fruit flies that results from a shift in the relative contributions of two parallel mushroom body (MB) circuits—the β'- and β-systems. The β'-circuit primarily controls cold avoidance through dopamine signalling in young flies, whereas the β-circuit increasingly contributes to cold avoidance as adult flies age. Elevating dopamine levels in β'-afferent neurons of aged flies restores cold sensitivity, suggesting that the alteration of cold avoidance behaviour with ageing is functionally reversible. These results provide a framework for investigating how molecules and individual neural circuits modulate homeostatic alterations during the course of senescence.

  16. Neil Armstrong Burial at Sea

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-13

    Mark Armstrong, left, and his family look on as US Navy personnel carry the cremains of his father, Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, off of a military aircraft at Naval Station Mayport the day before the Armstrong burial at sea service, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, Mayport, Fla. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Neil Armstrong Burial at Sea

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-09-13

    US Navy personnel salute as the cremains of Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong are transferred from a military aircraft at Naval Station Mayport the day before the Armstrong burial at sea service, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012, Mayport, Fla. Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission, died Saturday, Aug. 25. He was 82. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. TEMPERATURE AND MOISTURE CONTROL OF SEED AGING IN RYE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The interactions between temperature and moisture that regulate seed aging were measured using rye seeds. Experiments include a number of long term storage studies under conditions of varying relative humidity (RH), water content and temperature. Decrease in germination percentage and radicle leng...

  19. Low-Temperature Aging Mechanisms in U-6wt% Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L L

    2004-12-07

    Phase stability and aging mechanisms in a water-quenched (WQ) U-6wt% Nb (U-14at% Nb) alloy artificially aged at 200 C and naturally aged at ambient temperature for 15 years have been investigated and studied using Vickers-hardness measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Age hardening/softening phenomenon is recorded from the artificially aged samples based upon the microhardness measurement. The age hardening can be readily rationalized by the occurrence of fine-scaled Nb segregation, or spinodal decomposition, within the {alpha}'' domains, which results in the formation of a modulated structure containing nano-scaled Nb-rich and Nb-lean domains. Prolonged aging leads to age softening of the alloy by coarsening of the modulated structure. Chemical ordering, or disorder-order phase transformation, is found within the naturally aged alloy according to TEM observations of antiphase domain boundaries (APBs) and superlattice diffraction patterns. A possible superlattice structure for the ordered {alpha}'' phase observed in the naturally aged sample and underlying low-temperature aging mechanisms are proposed.

  20. Effect of head and face insulation on cooling rate during snow burial.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Crouch, Andre K; Dorais, Andrew; McDevitt, Marion; Wilson, Courtney; Harmston, Chris H; Radwin, Marty I; Grissom, Colin K

    2015-03-01

    Avalanche victims are subjected to a number of physiological stressors during burial. We simulated avalanche burial to monitor physiological data and determine whether wearing head and face insulation slows cooling rate during snow burial. In addition, we sought to compare 3 different types of temperature measurement methods. Nine subjects underwent 2 burials each, 1 with head and face insulation and 1 without. Burials consisted of a 60-minute burial phase followed by a 60-minute rewarming phase. Temperature was measured via 3 methods: esophageal probe, ingestible capsule, and rectal probe. Cooling and rewarming rates were not statistically different between the 2 testing conditions when measured by the 3 measurement methods. All temperature measurement methods correlated significantly. Head and face insulation did not protect the simulated avalanche victim from faster cooling or rewarming. Because the 3 temperature measurement methods correlated, the ingestible capsule may provide an advantageous noninvasive method for snow burial and future hypothermia studies if interruptions in data transmission can be minimized. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ageing under Shear: Effect of Stress and Temperature Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Asheesh; Joshi, Yogesh M.

    2008-07-01

    In this work we studied the effect of oscillatory stress and temperature on the ageing dynamics of aqueous suspension of laponite. At the higher magnitude of stress, elastic and viscous moduli of the system underwent a sharp rise with the ageing time. The age at the onset of rise and the sharpness of the same increased with the magnitude of stress. We propose that at the beginning of ageing, the strain associated with the oscillatory stress field affects the lower modes in the relaxation time distribution. The higher modes, which are not significantly affected by the deformation field, continue to grow increasing the viscosity of the system thereby lowering the magnitude of the deformation field. Progressive decrease in the later reduces the range of relaxation modes affected by it. This dynamics eventually leads to an auto-catalytic increase in the elastic and viscous moduli. An increase in temperature accelerates the ageing process by shifting the ageing dynamics to a lower ageing time. This is due the microscopic relaxation dynamics, which causes ageing, becomes faster with increase in the temperature.

  2. Stressed stem cells: Temperature response in aged mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stolzing, Alexandra; Sethe, Sebastian; Scutt, Andrew M

    2006-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from young (6 week) and aged (56 week) Wistar rats were cultured at standard (37 degrees C) and reduced (32 degrees C) temperature and compared for age markers and stress levels. (ROS, NO, TBARS, carbonyls, lipofuscin, SOD, GPx, apoptosis, proteasome activity) and heat shock proteins (HSP27, -60, -70, -90). Aged MSCs display many of the stress markers associated with aging in other cell types, but results vary across marker categories and are temperature dependant. In young MSCs, culturing at reduced temperature had a generally beneficial effect: the anti-apoptotic heat shock proteins HSP 27, HSP70, and HSP90 were up-regulated; pro-apoptotic HSP60 was downregulated; SOD, GPx increased; and levels in ROS, NO, TBARS, carbonyl, and lipofuscin were diminished. Apoptosis was reduced, but also proteasome activity. In contrast, in aged MSCs, culturing at reduced temperature generally produced no 'beneficial' changes in these parameters, and can even have detrimental effects. Implications for tissue engineering and for stem cell gerontology are discussed. The results suggest that a 'hormesis' theory of stress response can be extended to MSCs, but that cooling cultivation temperature stress produces positive effects in young cells only.

  3. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ning

    2008-01-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1), followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1) and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1). Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market. PMID:18173850

  4. Aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, M. V.; Kamzin, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The process of aging of ceramic carbonized hydroxyapatite (CHA) produced in a dry carbon dioxide atmosphere at temperatures of 800-1200°C has been studied by chemical and X-ray structural analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy methods. The phase composition and structure of initial prepared ceramics samples and those aged for a year have been compared. It has been shown that relaxation of internal stresses occurring during pressed sample sintering causes plastic deformation of crystallites at room temperature, accompanied by redistribution of carbonate ions between A1, A2, B1, and B2 sites and CHA decomposition with the formation of CaO separations.

  5. 38 CFR 3.1703 - Claims for burial benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims for burial... ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: General § 3.1703 Claims for burial benefits. Pt. 3, Subpt. B, Nt... section, VA must receive a claim for the non-service-connected burial allowance no later than 2...

  6. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of a...

  7. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of a...

  8. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of a...

  9. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of a...

  10. 20 CFR 416.1231 - Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... resources of an individual, the value of burial spaces for the individual, the individual's spouse or any member of the individual's immediate family will be excluded from resources. (2) Burial spaces defined... any accumulated interest, will be excluded from resources. We do not consider a burial space “held for...

  11. Effect of aging time and temperature on the aging behavior in Sn containing AZ91 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Kyun; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Kang Cheol; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang

    2017-03-01

    Effects of aging temperature and time on the aging behavior in AZ91 alloy and Sn containing AZ91 alloy (AZT915) have been investigated in the present study. The mode of precipitation, i.e. discontinuous and continuous precipitation in both alloys is strongly affected by the aging temperature. At low aging temperature of 403 K, only discontinuous precipitation occurs at the grain boundaries, whereas at high aging temperatures of 573 and 623 K only continuous precipitation occurs inside the grains. At intermediate temperature range (443 or 498 K) both discontinuous and continuous precipitation reactions occur. In AZT915, the Mg2Sn particles at the grain boundary effectively reduce the available nucleation sites for discontinuous β precipitates, and slow down the movement of the grain boundary, resulting in suppression of discontinuous precipitation. In addition, increased local lattice strain by the presence of Sn in the α-Mg solid solution matrix accelerates the nucleation of the continuous precipitates at the early stage of aging treatment. Therefore, significantly higher peak hardness can be obtained within a shorter aging time in AZT915.

  12. Effect of aging time and temperature on the aging behavior in Sn containing AZ91 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Kyun; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Kang Cheol; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang

    2017-02-01

    Effects of aging temperature and time on the aging behavior in AZ91 alloy and Sn containing AZ91 alloy (AZT915) have been investigated in the present study. The mode of precipitation, i.e. discontinuous and continuous precipitation in both alloys is strongly affected by the aging temperature. At low aging temperature of 403 K, only discontinuous precipitation occurs at the grain boundaries, whereas at high aging temperatures of 573 and 623 K only continuous precipitation occurs inside the grains. At intermediate temperature range (443 or 498 K) both discontinuous and continuous precipitation reactions occur. In AZT915, the Mg2Sn particles at the grain boundary effectively reduce the available nucleation sites for discontinuous β precipitates, and slow down the movement of the grain boundary, resulting in suppression of discontinuous precipitation. In addition, increased local lattice strain by the presence of Sn in the α-Mg solid solution matrix accelerates the nucleation of the continuous precipitates at the early stage of aging treatment. Therefore, significantly higher peak hardness can be obtained within a shorter aging time in AZT915.

  13. Incision of the Yangtze River at the First Bend Determined by Three-Nuclide Burial Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhillips, D. F.; Hoke, G. D.; Rood, D. H.; Bierman, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    On the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau, the evolution of the Yangtze River and its major tributaries has become an important source of data for investigating geodynamics. In particular, the timing of river incision is frequently interpreted as a proxy for the timing of surface uplift in the absence of structural evidence. We investigate the timing of the incision of the gorge at the First Bend using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating of coarse, quartz sediments from caves. Sediments were deposited when the caves were near river level and subsequently abandoned as the river incised. To resolve burial ages >5 Ma, we measured the radionuclides 10Be and 26Al, and the stable nuclide 21Ne. Results from 4 caves show that 26Al and 10Be concentrations are an order of magnitude lower in abandoned cave samples than in a river-level cave sample where deposition is active (10Be: 1.3x104 and 3.4x105 at/g). In contrast, 26Al/10Be ratios in all caves are ≥6.2 and indistinguishable within error. 21Ne concentrations range from 2.1x106 to 7.8x106 at/g. The results are consistent with an old age for the abandoned cave deposits, such that most of the radionuclides initially present have decayed and the concentrations that we measure today are the result of millions of years of exposure to muons. We solve for burial ages, taking into account in situ muogenic production, and find that the majority of the gorge (1 km) was likely incised between ~12 and 9 Ma. The results also require that the rate of river incision declined after the gorge was cut below the lowest elevation cave at 9 Ma. Inverse modeling of published low-temperature thermochronology (Ouimet et al., 2010) supports our burial age results. River capture near the First Bend, which likely integrated the modern Yangtze, likely occurred prior to the mid-Miocene incision of the gorge. In view of the geographic position of the First Bend—just downslope from the southeast margin of the Plateau—it is difficult to explain

  14. Land-use change, not climate, controls organic carbon burial in lakes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, N J; Dietz, R D; Engstrom, D R

    2013-10-22

    Lakes are a central component of the carbon cycle, both mineralizing terrestrially derived organic matter and storing substantial amounts of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments. However, the rates and controls on OC burial by lakes remain uncertain, as do the possible effects of future global change processes. To address these issues, we derived OC burial rates in (210)Pb-dated sediment cores from 116 small Minnesota lakes that cover major climate and land-use gradients. Rates for individual lakes presently range from 7 to 127 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and have increased by up to a factor of 8 since Euro-American settlement (mean increase: 2.8×). Mean pre-disturbance OC burial rates were similar (14-22 g C m(-2) yr(-1)) across all land-cover categories (prairie, mixed deciduous and boreal forest), indicating minimal effect of the regional temperature gradient (approx. 4 °C) on background carbon burial. The relationship between modern OC burial rates and temperature was also not significant after removal of the effect of total phosphorus. Contemporary burial rates were strongly correlated with lake-water nutrients and the extent of agricultural land cover in the catchment. Increased OC burial, documented even in relatively undisturbed boreal lake ecosystems, indicates a possible role for atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results suggest that globally, future land-cover change, intensification of agriculture and associated nutrient loading together with atmospheric N-deposition will enhance OC sequestration by lakes.

  15. Investigation of temperature dependence of development and aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacher, G. A.

    1969-01-01

    Temperature dependence of maturation and metabolic rates in insects, and the failure of vital processes during development were investigated. The paper presented advances the general hypothesis that aging in biological systems is a consequence of the production of entropy concomitant with metabolic activity.

  16. Age-dependent changes in temperature regulation - a mini review.

    PubMed

    Blatteis, Clark M

    2012-01-01

    It is now well recognized that the body temperature of older men and women is lower than that of younger people and that their tolerance of thermal extremes is more limited. The regulation of body temperature does not depend on a single organ, but rather involves almost all the systems of the body, i.e. systems not exclusively dedicated to thermoregulatory functions such as the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Since these deteriorate naturally with advancing age, the decrement in their functions resonates throughout all the bodily processes, including those that control body temperature. To the extent that the age-related changes in some of these, e.g. in the musculoskeletal system, can be slowed, or even prevented, by certain measures, e.g. fitness training, so can the decrements in thermoregulatory functions. Some deficits, however, are unavoidable, e.g. structural skin changes and metabolic alterations. These impact directly on the ability of the elderly to maintain thermal homeostasis, particularly when challenged by ambient thermal extremes. Since the maintenance of a relatively stable, optimal core temperature is one of the body's most important activities, its very survival can be threatened by these disorders. The present article describes the principal, age-associated changes in physiological functions that could affect the ability of seniors to maintain their body temperature when exposed to hot or cold environments.

  17. 77 FR 4676 - Parents Eligible for Burial

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... reflect a new statutory authority to extend eligibility for burial in a national cemetery to include... training-related injury, is interred in a VA national cemetery in a gravesite with available space, and has... burial, in a national cemetery. DATES: Effective Date: This rule is effective January 31,...

  18. Relative Burial Depths of Nakhlites: An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Koizumi, E.; Makishima, J.; McKay, G.

    2006-03-01

    We updated our model of the nakhlite igneous body in terms of their relative burial depths. Olivine chemical zoning gave burial depths of 1-2 m for NWA817, 4 m for MIL03346, 7 m for Y000593, 10 m for Nakhla/Gov. Val. and >30 m for Lafayette/ NWA998.

  19. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  20. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  1. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  2. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  3. 38 CFR 3.954 - Burial allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Burial allowance. 3.954..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.954 Burial allowance. When any person who had a status under any law in effect on December 31, 1957, which afforded entitlement to...

  4. Basal body temperature as a biomarker of healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Simonsick, Eleanor M; Meier, Helen C S; Shaffer, Nancy Chiles; Studenski, Stephanie A; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    Scattered evidence indicates that a lower basal body temperature may be associated with prolonged health span, yet few studies have directly evaluated this relationship. We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between early morning oral temperature (95.0-98.6 °F) and usual gait speed, endurance walk performance, fatigability, and grip strength in 762 non-frail men (52 %) and women aged 65-89 years participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Since excessive adiposity (body mass index ≥35 kg/m(2) or waist-to-height ratio ≥0.62) may alter temperature set point, associations were also examined within adiposity strata. Overall, controlling for age, race, sex, height, exercise, and adiposity, lower temperature was associated with faster gait speed, less time to walk 400 m quickly, and lower perceived exertion following 5-min of walking at 0.67 m/s (all p ≤ 0.02). In the non-adipose (N = 662), these associations were more robust (all p ≤ 0.006). Direction of association was reversed in the adipose (N = 100), but none attained significance (all p > 0.22). Over 2.2 years, basal temperature was not associated with functional change in the overall population or non-adipose. Among the adipose, lower baseline temperature was associated with greater decline in endurance walking performance (p = 0.006). In longitudinal analyses predicting future functional performance, low temperature in the non-adipose was associated with faster gait speed (p = 0.021) and less time to walk 400 m quickly (p = 0.003), whereas in the adipose, lower temperature was associated with slower gait speed (p = 0.05) and more time to walk 400 m (p = 0.008). In older adults, lower basal body temperature appears to be associated with healthy aging in the absence of excessive adiposity.

  5. Shallow land burial technology: Humid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. C.; Yeh, G. T.

    Trench lining and grouting, are being demonstrated and evaluated experimental trenches containing compacted low-level waste. Two finite-element hydrologic models were developed to model water movement and solute transport at a waste disposal site. Though the economic analysis of the two trench treatments favored Hypalon lining, results of field experiments examining waste hydrologic isolation favored the cement-bentonite grout treatment. Data from water pump-out and water pump-in tests suggest that the original goal of constructing watertight liners in three experimental trenches was not achieved. Trench-cover subsidence measured over two of the three lined trenches did not occur over any of the three grouted or three control (untreated) trenches. Results indicate that the cement-bentonite treatment provides a degree of waste isolation not afforded by the lined and control trenches and should be considered for use at shallow land burial (SLB) sites with water-related problems.

  6. Micromorphology of two prehistoric ritual burials from Yemen, and considerations on methodological aspects of sampling the burial matrix - work in progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usai, Maria-Raimonda; Brothwell, Don; Buckley, Stephen; Ai-Thour, Kalid; Canti, Matthew

    2010-05-01

    Introduction In the central area of Yemen, two burial sites placed high in the crevices of vertical cliff face of Cretaceous sandstone (Tawilah Group) provided evidence of human remains and yielded burial soils. Radiocarbon dating indicated c.2500-2900 years BP for the burials. In other local comparable sites the deep horizontal crevices yielded Bronze Age human remains, in exceptional state of preservation Questions: What was the nature of the burial matrix? Are other human influences superimposed on the soils derived from it? Is it simply decomposed crevice rock, scraped together at the time of burial, or the result of a more complex burial practice? Such questions are also relevant to a variety of other burials of different periods and world regions. Methods Seven matrix samples from Cliff Burials (A) Talan (Layers 4,10,12,14,18,20 and 22, from top to bottom) and (B) Shiban Kawkaban (Layer 1 and 9) were analysed with micromorphology, supplemented by SEM microprobe, X-ray diffraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Cliff Burial Site Talan. The presence of cholesterol was confirmed in the lower sample. The second layer contained darker earth with fibrous plant material. A hard calcareous upper capping contrasted with the other levels of matrix, and it displayed a highly birefingent material with a significant component of uric acid. The other levels had variable organic content and plant inclusions, and possibly pollen. In Layer 10, aromatic acids indicative of balsam and sugar markers suggested plant gum. Cholesterol was the major sterol in Layers 10 and 22, but whilst in Layer 10 its oxidation products were present and cholestanol was abundant as normally in soils, it was only a minor component of Layer 22 where, rather, a significant amount of coprostanol indicated faecal input, and cholesterol oxidation products were absent. Cliff Burial Site Shiban Kawkaban. Although no stratification was visible to the naked eye, variation was observed at a

  7. Carbon Sequestration via Wood Burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, N.

    2007-12-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which forest dead wood or old trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It was estimated that the carbon sequestration potential of forest wood harvest and burial is 10GtC y-1 with an uncertainty range of 5-15 GtC y-1. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost was crudely estimated at $50/tC, significantly lower than the cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage, a carbon sequestration technique currently under most serious consideration. The low cost is largely because the CO2 capture is achieved at little cost by the natural process of photosynthesis. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe and can be stopped or reversed at any time. The relatively low cost may soon be competitive enough for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon trading market. In tropical regions with ongoing deforestation, wood burial instead of burning will immediately reduce that portion of the anthropogenic CO2 emission.

  8. View southwest toward Eldred Avenue from within Friend's Burial Ground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest toward Eldred Avenue from within Friend's Burial Ground, Benjamin Carr Farm in distance through the trees - Friends' Burial Ground, Eldred & Beacon Avenues, Jamestown, Newport County, RI

  9. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, Vicki J.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  10. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  11. The aging correlation (RH + t): Relative humidity (%) + temperature (deg C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    An aging correlation between corrosion lifetime, and relative humidity RH (%) and temperature t (C) has been reported in the literature. This aging correlation is a semi-log plot of corrosion lifetime on the log scale versus the interesting summation term RH(%) + t(C) on the linear scale. This empirical correlation was derived from observation of experimental data trends and has been referred to as an experimental law. Using electrical resistivity data of polyvinyl butyral (PVB) measured as a function of relative humidity and temperature, it was found that the electrical resistivity could be expressed as a function of the term RH(%) t(C). Thus, if corrosion is related to leakage current through an organic insulator, which, in turn, is a function of RH and t, then some partial theoretical validity for the correlation is indicated. This article describes the derivation of the term RH(%) t(C) from PVB electrical resistivity data.

  12. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Zoë L.; Hendrick, Vicki J.; Burrows, Michael T.; Wilson, Ben; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are discussed. PMID:26982582

  13. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Zoë L; Hendrick, Vicki J; Burrows, Michael T; Wilson, Ben; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are discussed.

  14. Effects of Age on Temperature Responses During Exposure to Hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, C.K.; Baer, L. A.; Moran, M. M.; Wang, T. J.; Yuan, F.; Daunton, N. G.; Corcoran, M. L.; Wade, C. E.; Dalfan, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Rats subjected to centrifugation show a marked decrease in body temperature relating to gravity level. Several studies have indicated, that an initial response to centrifugation is followed by acclimation. To test for differences between young (Y; 2 months) and mature (M; 8 months) rats in their response in temperature, both groups were exposed to hypergravity induced by centrifugation. Thirty-six male rats were divided into four groups according to age and G-load (control (1.0G-Y and 1.0G-M), 2.0G-Y or 2.0G-M) and were housed in pairs in standard vivarium cages. During the 7-day period of centrifugation, temperature was measured every five minutes by surgically implanted telemeters. Body mass was measured daily. We found that initial body temperature in 2.0G-M was less than that of 2.0G-Y. Both hypergravity groups (2.0G-Y and 2.0G-M) showed a decrease in temperature at the onset of centrifugation, and the change in temperature (Delta = 0.5 C) remained the same between the groups. Significant differences persisted with 2.0G-Y recovering to control values in four days and 2.0G-M recovering in five days. These results indicate that the mature animals have a similar response as the younger animals, but take longer to acclimate.

  15. Effect of Temperature on the Aging rate of Li Ion Battery Operating above Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Feng; Tan, Cher Ming; Pecht, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is known to have a significant impact on the performance, safety, and cycle lifetime of lithium-ion batteries (LiB). However, the comprehensive effects of temperature on the cyclic aging rate of LiB have yet to be found. We use an electrochemistry-based model (ECBE) here to measure the effects on the aging behavior of cycled LiB operating within the temperature range of 25 °C to 55 °C. The increasing degradation rate of the maximum charge storage of LiB during cycling at elevated temperature is found to relate mainly to the degradations at the electrodes, and that the degradation of LCO cathode is larger than graphite anode at elevated temperature. In particular, the formation and modification of the surface films on the electrodes as well as structural/phase changes of the LCO electrode, as reported in the literatures, are found to be the main contributors to the increasing degradation rate of the maximum charge storage of LiB with temperature for the specific operating temperature range. Larger increases in the Warburg elements and cell impedance are also found with cycling at higher temperature, but they do not seriously affect the state of health (SoH) of LiB as shown in this work. PMID:26245922

  16. Effect of Temperature on the Aging rate of Li Ion Battery Operating above Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Leng, Feng; Tan, Cher Ming; Pecht, Michael

    2015-08-06

    Temperature is known to have a significant impact on the performance, safety, and cycle lifetime of lithium-ion batteries (LiB). However, the comprehensive effects of temperature on the cyclic aging rate of LiB have yet to be found. We use an electrochemistry-based model (ECBE) here to measure the effects on the aging behavior of cycled LiB operating within the temperature range of 25 °C to 55 °C. The increasing degradation rate of the maximum charge storage of LiB during cycling at elevated temperature is found to relate mainly to the degradations at the electrodes, and that the degradation of LCO cathode is larger than graphite anode at elevated temperature. In particular, the formation and modification of the surface films on the electrodes as well as structural/phase changes of the LCO electrode, as reported in the literatures, are found to be the main contributors to the increasing degradation rate of the maximum charge storage of LiB with temperature for the specific operating temperature range. Larger increases in the Warburg elements and cell impedance are also found with cycling at higher temperature, but they do not seriously affect the state of health (SoH) of LiB as shown in this work.

  17. U-Th Burial Dates on Ostrich Eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, W. D.; Fylstra, N. D.; Tryon, C. A.; Faith, J. T.; Peppe, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Obtaining precise and accurate dates at archaeological sites beyond the range of radiocarbon dating is challenging but essential for understanding human origins. Eggshells of ratites (large flightless birds including ostrich, emu and others) are common in many archaeological sequences in Africa, Australia and elsewhere. Ancient eggshells are geochemically suitable for the U-Th technique (1), which has about ten times the range of radiocarbon dating (>500 rather than 50 ka), making eggshells attractive dating targets. Moreover, C and N isotopic studies of eggshell provide insights into paleovegetation and paleoprecipitation central to assessing past human-environment interactions (2,3). But until now, U-Th dates on ratite eggshell have not accounted for the secondary origin of essentially all of their U. We report a novel approach to U-Th dating of eggshell that explicitly accounts for secondary U uptake that begins with burial. Using ostrich eggshell (OES) from Pleistocene-Holocene east African sites, we have measured U and 232Th concentration profiles across OES by laser ablation ICP-MS. U commonly peaks at 10s to 100s of ppb and varies 10-fold or more across the ~2 mm thickness of OES, with gradients modulated by the layered structure of the eggshell. Common Th is high near the shell surfaces, but low in the middle "pallisade" layer of OES, making it optimal for U-Th dating. We determine U-Th ages along the U concentration gradient by solution ICP-MS analyses of two or more fractions of the pallisade layer. We then estimate OES burial dates using a simple model for diffusive uptake of uranium. Comparing such "U-Th burial dates" with radiocarbon dates for OES calcite from the same shells, we find good agreement in 7 out of 9 cases, consistent with rapid burial and confirming the accuracy of the approach. The remaining 2 eggshells have anomalous patterns of apparent ages that reveal they are unsuitable for U-Th dating, thereby providing reliability criteria innate

  18. Preliminary report on a glass burial experiment in granite

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Zhu, B.F.; Robinson, R.S.; Wicks, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results of a two-year burial experiment in granite are discussed. Three compositions of simulated alkali borosilicate waste glasses were placed in boreholes approximately 350 meters deep. The glass sample configurations include mini-cans (stainless steel rings into which glass has been cast) and pineapple slices (thin sections from cylindrical blocks). Assemblies of these glass samples were prepared by stacking them together with granite, compacted bentonite and metal rings to provide several types of interfaces that are expected to occur in the repository. The assemblies were maintained at either ambient mine temperature (8 to 10/sup 0/C) or 90/sup 0/C. The glasses were analyzed before burial and after one month storage at 90/sup 0/C. The most extensive surface degradation occurred on the glasses interfaced with bentonite. In general, very little attack was observed on glass surfaces in contact with the other materials. The limited field and laboratory data are compared.

  19. Two contemporaneous mitogenomes from terminal Pleistocene burials in eastern Beringia.

    PubMed

    Tackney, Justin C; Potter, Ben A; Raff, Jennifer; Powers, Michael; Watkins, W Scott; Warner, Derek; Reuther, Joshua D; Irish, Joel D; O'Rourke, Dennis H

    2015-11-10

    Pleistocene residential sites with multiple contemporaneous human burials are extremely rare in the Americas. We report mitochondrial genomic variation in the first multiple mitochondrial genomes from a single prehistoric population: two infant burials (USR1 and USR2) from a common interment at the Upward Sun River Site in central Alaska dating to ∼11,500 cal B.P. Using a targeted capture method and next-generation sequencing, we determined that the USR1 infant possessed variants that define mitochondrial lineage C1b, whereas the USR2 genome falls at the root of lineage B2, allowing us to refine younger coalescence age estimates for these two clades. C1b and B2 are rare to absent in modern populations of northern North America. Documentation of these lineages at this location in the Late Pleistocene provides evidence for the extent of mitochondrial diversity in early Beringian populations, which supports the expectations of the Beringian Standstill Model.

  20. Two contemporaneous mitogenomes from terminal Pleistocene burials in eastern Beringia

    PubMed Central

    Tackney, Justin C.; Potter, Ben A.; Raff, Jennifer; Powers, Michael; Watkins, W. Scott; Warner, Derek; Reuther, Joshua D.; Irish, Joel D.; O’Rourke, Dennis H.

    2015-01-01

    Pleistocene residential sites with multiple contemporaneous human burials are extremely rare in the Americas. We report mitochondrial genomic variation in the first multiple mitochondrial genomes from a single prehistoric population: two infant burials (USR1 and USR2) from a common interment at the Upward Sun River Site in central Alaska dating to ∼11,500 cal B.P. Using a targeted capture method and next-generation sequencing, we determined that the USR1 infant possessed variants that define mitochondrial lineage C1b, whereas the USR2 genome falls at the root of lineage B2, allowing us to refine younger coalescence age estimates for these two clades. C1b and B2 are rare to absent in modern populations of northern North America. Documentation of these lineages at this location in the Late Pleistocene provides evidence for the extent of mitochondrial diversity in early Beringian populations, which supports the expectations of the Beringian Standstill Model. PMID:26504230

  1. Interface degradation in CAS/Nicalon during elevated temperature aging

    SciTech Connect

    Plucknett, K.P.; Cain, R.L.; Lewis, M.H.

    1995-03-01

    A CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (CAS)/Nicalon glass-ceramic matrix composite has been subjected to elevated temperature oxidation heat-treatments between 375 and 1200{degrees}C, for up to 100 hours. Micro- and macro-mechanical properties have been determined by fiber push-down, using a mechanical properties microprobe, and flexure testing, respectively. Aging between 450 and 800{degrees}C results in significant property degradation, with reduced bending modulus and flexure strength, increased fiber sliding stress, and a transition to a purely brittle failure mode. Aging degradation is due to oxidative removal of the carbon interlayer, with the subsequent formation of a silica bond between fiber and matrix. At higher temperatures, carbon is retained due to the formation of a protective silica plug at exposed fiber ends, with the subsequent retention of composite properties. Short duration pre-treatment schedules, at 1000 or 1100{degrees}C, were developed to prevent intermediate temperature property degradation.

  2. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-2 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    W. S. Thompson

    2006-12-28

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-2 Burial Ground, also referred to as Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2; Burial Ground No. 2; 318-2; and Dry Waste Burial Site No. 2. This waste site was used primarily for the disposal of contaminated equipment, materials and laboratory waste from the 300 Area Facilities.

  4. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  5. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  6. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  7. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  8. Age Spreads and the Temperature Dependence of Age Estimates in Upper Sco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiliang; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Rizzuto, Aaron

    2017-06-01

    Past estimates for the age of the Upper Sco Association are typically 11-13 Myr for intermediate-mass stars and 4-5 Myr for low-mass stars. In this study, we simulate populations of young stars to investigate whether this apparent dependence of estimated age on spectral type may be explained by the star formation history of the association. Solar and intermediate mass stars begin their pre-main sequence evolution on the Hayashi track, with fully convective interiors and cool photospheres. Intermediate-mass stars quickly heat up and transition onto the radiative Henyey track. As a consequence, for clusters in which star formation occurs on a timescale similar to that of the transition from a convective to a radiative interior, discrepancies in ages will arise when ages are calculated as a function of temperature instead of mass. Simple simulations of a cluster with constant star formation over several Myr may explain about half of the difference in inferred ages versus photospheric temperature; speculative constructions that consist of a constant star formation followed by a large supernova-driven burst could fully explain the differences, including those between F and G stars where evolutionary tracks may be more accurate. The age spreads of low-mass stars predicted from these prescriptions for star formation are consistent with the observed luminosity spread of Upper Sco. The conclusion that a lengthy star formation history will yield a temperature dependence in ages is expected from the basic physics of pre-main sequence evolution, and is qualitatively robust to the large uncertainties in pre-main sequence evolutionary models.

  9. Optimum temperature for growth and preferred temperatures of age-0 lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Cleland, Joshua

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the thermal preferences and optimum temperature for growth of age-0 lake trout Salvelinus namaycush to help predict the thermal habitat they select when they leave the spawning grounds and to assess the risk posed to them in the Great Lakes by piscivorus, nonnative fishes whose thermal habitat preferences are known. The test fish were hatched in the laboratory from eggs taken from wild fish, acclimated to 5, 10, 15, and 18°C, and fed to excess with commercial trout food for 47 d. The test fish grew at all of the temperatures, and the specific growth rate was highest at about 12.5°C (3.8% wet body weight/d). Fish used in the growth study were also tested in a vertical thermal gradient tank and had a final thermal preferendum between 10.1°C and 10.2°C. These results, which generally agreed with those of an earlier laboratory study of the temperature preference of age-1 lake trout and the limited information on thermal habitat use by age-0 lake trout in the Great Lakes, indicated age-0 lake trout would tend to seek temperatures near 10°C, or as high as 12.5°C, during summer if food was abundant. Published information on thermal habitat use of age-1 and adult alewives Alosa pseudoharengus and rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax indicated they would be expected to co-occur with age-0 lake trout during much of the time when the lake trout were small enough to be eaten by these two introduced piscivores.

  10. Paleobiology, palaeopathology and necrophobic practices in early Iron Age burials (IX-VII century BC) in Capo Colonna, Trani, Apulia, southern Italy--the state of health of a small sample from Iron Age.

    PubMed

    Sublimi Saponetti, Sandro; Scattarella, Fabio; De Lucia, Amelia; Scattarella, Vito

    2007-03-01

    In this palaeobiological and palaeopathological study of skeletal remains, we attempt to define the physical characteristics, living conditions and the state of health of a small sample from two early Iron Age (IX-VIII century BC) graves at Capo Colonna, Trani (Bari, Apulia, southern Italy). In the thoraco-lumbar segment (T11-L1) of the vertebral column of an adult male 35 years old, we found wedge-shaped deformation of the anterior part of T12 with kyphosis of the affected tract. Digital radiography and volumetric reconstruction by 3D CT indicated that the alteration did not result from an infectious process (Pott's disease). Instead, it was a traumatic lesion probably caused by falling from a height. The archaeological investigation revealed extraordinary arrangements of the bodies in the graves: they were buried with a boulder placed on the coffin. This practice has been seen in similar graves in the Balkan area, particularly in Greece, from the Neolithic to the Early Middle Ages. The most likely explanation is a funeral ritual characterized by necrophobia, the purpose of which was to prevent the deceased from returning to terrorize the living.

  11. The effect of temperature on organic carbon degradation in marine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Malinverno, Alberto; Martinez, Ernesto A.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of sedimentary particulate organic carbon (POC) is a key carbon cycle process that fuels the deep subseafloor biosphere. The reactivity of POC is expected to decrease with increasing sediment age, severely restricting the energy available to microorganisms. Conversely, increasing temperatures during burial have been proposed to stimulate POC degradation, possibly supplying significant energy to the deep biosphere. To test the importance of temperature, we assembled POC measurements in two global sets of drill sites where sediments underwent either relatively low or high temperatures during burial, which should have resulted in different rates of POC degradation. For ages 5–10 Ma, the decrease of the average POC content with burial is clearly more pronounced in the sites with high temperature histories. Our results support the hypothesis that temperature is one of the fundamental controls on the rate of POC degradation within deeply buried marine sediments. PMID:26640172

  12. Plant Sensitivity to Burial and Coastal Foredune Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, E. B.; Moore, L. J.; deVries, E.; Jass, T. L.; Duran Vinent, O.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal dunes arise from a feedback between plant growth and aeolian sediment transport. Dune plants are uniquely adapted to the harsh coastal environment, and are able to tolerate high temperature, drought, salt spray, and burial by sand. Accurate modeling of coastal dunes relies on understanding how coastal plants respond to these stresses, and how the dune building feedback is modified as a result. We use two years of data from an experimental planting on Hog Island, VA, USA to parameterize a logistic growth model that explicitly includes the effects of plant burial on three species of common dune plants on the US East Coast: Spartina patens, Ammophila breviligulata, and Uniola paniculata. We couple this new plant growth model to the Coastal Dune Model of Durán and Moore (2013). Using this enhanced model we explore the consequences of plant sensitivity to burial on coastal dune growth. These results will add to the growing literature on coupled vegetation and sand transport models, specifically the modeling of coastal dunes.

  13. Shallow Land Burial Technology - Humid

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The Shallow Land Burial Technology - Humid Project is being conducted for the Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program with the objective of identifying and demonstrating improved technology for disposing of low-level solid waste in humid environments. Two improved disposal techniques are currently being evaluated using nine demonstration trenches at the Engineered Test Facility (ETF). The first is use of a cement-bentonite grout applied as a waste backfill material prior to trench closure and covering. The second is complete hydrologic isolation of waste by emplacement in a trench that is lined on all four sides, top and bottom using synthetic impermeable lining material. An economic analysis of the trench grouting and lining demonstration favored the trench lining operation ($1055/demonstration trench) over trench grouting ($1585/demonstration trench), with the cost differential becoming even greater (as much as a factor of 6 in favor of lining for typical ORNL trenches) as trench dimensions increase and trench volumes exceed those of the demonstration trenches. In addition to the evaluation of trench grouting and lining, major effort has centered on characterization of the ETF site. Though only a part of the overall study, characterization is an extremely important component of the site selection process; it is during these activities that potential problems, which may obviate the site from further consideration, are found. Characterization of the ETF has included studies of regional and site-specific geology, the physical and chemical properties of the soils in which the demonstration trenches are located, and hydrology of the small watershed of which the ETF is a part. 12 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Shallow land burial technology: humid

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Yeh, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    Applying engineered modifications to present shallow land burial (SLB) practices is one method of ensuring safe operation and improving overall disposal-site performance. Two such engineered modifications, trench lining and grouting, are being demonstrated and evaluated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Engineered Test Facility (ETF), using nine 28-m/sup 3/ experimental trenches containing compacted low-level waste (LLW). Concurrent to this field demonstration experiment, two finite-element hydrologic models have been developed to model water movement and solute transport at a waste disposal site. This paper covers progress made in these two areas during FY 1984. Though the economic analysis of the two trench treatments favored Hypalon lining (lining costs were 33% lower at this demonstration scale), results of field experiments examining waste hydrologic isolation favored the cement-bentonite grout treatment. Data from water pump-out and water pump-in tests, combined with observed intratrench water-level fluctuations, suggest that the original goal of constructing watertight liners in three experimental trenches was not achieved. In addition, trench-cover subsidence of approx. 2% of the total trench depth has been measured over two of the three lined trenches but has not occurred over any of the three grouted or three control (untreated) trenches. The evaluation of the two trench treatments is continuing. However, results indicate that the cement-bentonite treatment, implemented at a cost of $160/m/sup 3/ of grout, provides a degree of waste isolation not afforded by the lined and control trenches and should be considered for use at SLB sites with water-related problems. 11 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Ocular surface temperature in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sodi, Andrea; Matteoli, Sara; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Finocchio, Lucia; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  16. Ocular Surface Temperature in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sodi, Andrea; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Corvi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to investigate the ocular thermographic profiles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) eyes and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities, which could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Methods. 32 eyes with early AMD, 37 eyes with atrophic AMD, 30 eyes affected by untreated neovascular AMD, and 43 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included. The control group consisted of 44 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, diabetes mellitus, and a body temperature higher than 37.5°C. A total of 186 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The ocular surface temperature (OST) of three ocular points was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for statistical analyses. Results. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P value >0.272). OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Considering the possible relationship between ocular blood flow and OST, these findings might support the central role of ischemia in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25436140

  17. General description of the hydrology and burial trenches at the low-level radioactive waste burial facility near Barnwell, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    The Barnwell low-level radioactive solid waste burial site is located in Barnwell County, South Carolina, 5 miles west of the city of Barnwell. Approximately 1,050 feet of stratified gravel, sand, silt, clay, and limestone, ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene, underlie the burial site. Ground water within the study area occurs under water table, semi-confined, and artesian conditions. Overland flow and most precipitation that recharges the ground-water system at the burial site is discharged to Marys Branch Creek. This creek originates as a spring about 3,000 feet south of the burial site and flows to the southwest into lower Three Runs. Lower Three Runs discharges into the Savannah River. Waste shipments to the site were reduced from 200,000 cubic feet per month for the period 1971 to 1979 to 100,000 cubic feet per month by October 1981. The wastes consist of both nonfuel cycle and nuclear fuel-cycle wastes. The standard trench dimensions at the burial site are 100 feet wide by 1,000 feet long and 22 feet deep. Trench bottoms are a minimum of 5 feet above the water table. Seven soil mapping units occur at the waste disposal facility. The three major soil types are all well drained and cover approximately 84 percent of the study area. (USGS)

  18. Room Temperature Dynamic Strain Aging in Ultrafine-Grained Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Felipe Perissé D.; Lu, Chia Hui; Zhao, Shiteng; Monteiro, Sergio N.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic strain aging (DSA) in coarse-grained (CG) titanium is usually observed at intermediate to high temperatures 473 K to 973 K (200 °C to 700 °C) and is characterized by serrations in the stress vs strain curves. In the present work, despite the absence of apparent serrations, ultrafine-grained titanium (UFG Ti) undergoes DSA at room temperature, exhibited through an abnormal increase in the elastic limit and negative strain rate sensitivity. This effect is observed at 293 K (20 °C) in the strain rate interval of 10-4 to 10-2 s-1, and at 203 K (-70 °C) and 373 K (100 °C) in a distinct strain rate range. Based on a calculated activation energy of 17.3 kJ/mol and microstructural observations by transmission electron microscopy, it is proposed that the dominant mechanism for DSA in UFG Ti involves interstitial solutes interacting with dislocations emitted from grain boundaries. The interstitials migrate from the grain boundaries along dislocation lines bowing out as they are emitted from the boundaries, a mechanism with a low calculated activation energy which is comparable with the experimental measurements. The dislocation velocities and interstitial diffusion along the dislocation cores are consistent.

  19. Controls on the Burial Efficiency of Sediments in Lake Billy Chinook, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratton, L. E.; Goni, M. A.; Grant, G.

    2016-12-01

    The importance of water reservoirs to the global carbon cycle has been recognized for at least a decade, but the processes controlling carbon mineralization and burial in reservoir systems remain poorly understood. Most studies of surface emissions from reservoirs have generally ignored the complication of carbon burial in reservoir sediments, despite the fact that while riverine sediment transport has increased compared to pre-Anthropocene rates, less sediment now enters world oceans. To better understand the importance of carbon mineralization and burial in reservoir sediments, this study investigates the burial efficiency of sediments in Lake Billy Chinook, a major hydropower reservoir in Jefferson County, Oregon. Burial efficiency is the mass balance between the total input of organic carbon to the sediment/water interface, losses of organic carbon due to respiration in the biologically active surface sediments, and sequestration of organic carbon by burial. Because Lake Billy Chinook inundates the confluence of three distinct river systems sourced in different climates and terrains, it provides a natural laboratory to investigate differences in sediment input, nutrient loading, and water temperature. Buried organic carbon and total mass accumulation rate are estimated through a combination of organic content analysis, stratigraphy, bathymetric data, and depth-dependent radionuclide concentrations (210Pb, 137Cs) of sediments in cores collected from the topset and prodelta environments of each reservoir arm. Mineralization rates are estimated by inverse modeling of the diffusion and reaction equations conditioned to pore-water profiles and bottom water concentrations. Calculated burial efficiency of sediments in each tributary and analyzed average precipitation, discharge, and water temperature, calculated C:N ratios in buried sediments, lithology, and hydrograph characteristics.

  20. An application of Petrochronology: U/Th-Pb geochronologic rates of burial and exhumation in the Cordilleran hinterland, northern Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, B. W.

    2014-12-01

    Monazite and zircon U/Th-Pb dating and yttrium thermometry results from metapelitic rocks of the northern East Humboldt Range, Nevada provide insight into the tectonic evolution of the North American Cordillera. Combining a petrologic approach with in situ U/Th-Pb SHRIMP geochronology gives constraints on the timing and rates of burial and exhumation. When integrated with the results from studies of the intrusive igneous and structural evolution of a complexly deformed crustal block, a broad picture of the behavior of the thickened middle crust in an orogenic wedge begins to emerge. In samples from the upper limb of the south verging Winchell Lake nappe, monazite cores giving moderate YPO4 components yield a mean U-Pb age of 82.8 ± 1.3 Ma representing initial growth near garnet zone conditions. A cycle of burial and heating giving way to decompression and melting, followed by zircon growth accompanied by low YPO4 monazite growth giving a wide range of ages (77.1-62.4 Ma) apparently documents cooling and melt crystallization. Monazite core and zircon ages from these samples bracket the time frame for this cycle through peak pressure and then temperature. Rates of burial therefore are ~1.0­-4.5 mm/year for the Winchell Lake nappe. Migmatitic pelites from the Lizzies Basin area, structurally beneath the Winchell Lake nappe give U-Pb monazite age brackets of 96.5-79.4 Ma, yielding a narrower range of burial rates, ~0.5-2.0 mm/year. Calculated exhumation rates for the same rocks from both the upper limb of the Winchell Lake nappe and the Lizzies Basin area fall between ~0.4 and 1.7 mm/year. Rapid burial followed by rapid exhumation is consistent with thickening by an overthrust mechanism followed by vertical ductile thinning, underplating, erosion, and/or normal faulting. Exhumation is generally slower than estimates for exhumation of metamorphic core complexes north of the Snake River Plain calculated by Bendick and Baldwin (2009). This may represent a difference in

  1. Effects of sediment burial on grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella (Valenciennes,1844), eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Amy E.; Chapman, Duane C.; Deters, Joseph E.; Erwin, Susannah O.; Hayer, Cari-Ann

    2015-01-01

    It is thought that grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) eggs must remain suspended in the water column in order to hatch successfully. Using sand, the effects of varying sediment levels on grass carp eggs were tested at different developmental states and temperatures. Survival was high (15–35%, depending on temperature and trial) in the unburied treatment where eggs rested on a sand bed but were not covered by sediment. Survival was lower in the partial burial (5–10%) and very low (0–4%) in the full burial treatment. In all treatments, delayed hatching (organisms remaining in membranes past the stage of hatching competence) was noted. Deformities such as missing heads and pericardial edema occurred at high rates in the partial and full burials. Eggs that come in contact with the benthos and are resuspended in the water column should be considered in embryonic drift models.

  2. Dating of Pliocene Colorado River sediments: Implications for cosmogenic burial dating and the evolution of the lower Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.; Matmon, Ari; Stock, Greg M.; Granger, Darryl E.

    2017-01-01

    We applied cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial dating to sedimentary deposits of the ancestral Colorado River. We compared cosmogenic burial ages of sediments to the age of an independently well-dated overlying basalt flow at one site, and also applied cosmogenic burial dating to sediments with less precise independent age constraints. All dated gravels yielded old ages that suggest several episodes of sediment burial over the past ∼5.3 m.y. Comparison of burial ages to the overlying 4.4 Ma basalt yielded good agreement and suggests that under the most favorable conditions, cosmogenic burial dating can extend back 4–5 m.y. In contrast, results from other sites with more broadly independent age constraints highlight the complexities inherent in burial dating; these complexities arise from unknown and complicated burial histories, insufficient shielding, postburial production of cosmogenic isotopes by muons, and unknown initial 26Al/10Be ratios. Nevertheless, and in spite of the large range of burial ages and large uncertainties, we identify samples that provide reasonable burial age constraints on the depositional history of sediment along the lower ancestral Colorado River. These samples suggest possible sediment deposition and burial at ca. 5.3, 4.7, and 3.6 Ma.Our calculated basinwide erosion rate for sediment transported by the modern Colorado River (∼187 mm k.y.−1) is higher than the modern erosion rates inferred from the historic sediment load (80–100 mm k.y.−1). In contrast, basinwide paleo-erosion rates calculated from Pliocene sediments are all under 40 mm k.y.−1 The comparatively lower denudation rates calculated for the Pliocene sediment samples are surprising given that the sampled time intervals include significant Pliocene aggradation and may include much incision of the Grand Canyon and its tributaries. This conflict may arise from extensive storage of sediment along the route of the Colorado River, slower paleobedrock erosion, or the

  3. Dating of Pliocene Colorado River sediments: implications for cosmogenic burial dating and the evolution of the lower Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, Ari; Stock, Greg M.; Granger, Darryl E.; Howard, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    We applied cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial dating to sedimentary deposits of the ancestral Colorado River. We compared cosmogenic burial ages of sediments to the age of an independently well-dated overlying basalt flow at one site, and also applied cosmogenic burial dating to sediments with less precise independent age constraints. All dated gravels yielded old ages that suggest several episodes of sediment burial over the past ∼5.3 m.y. Comparison of burial ages to the overlying 4.4 Ma basalt yielded good agreement and suggests that under the most favorable conditions, cosmogenic burial dating can extend back 4–5 m.y. In contrast, results from other sites with more broadly independent age constraints highlight the complexities inherent in burial dating; these complexities arise from unknown and complicated burial histories, insufficient shielding, postburial production of cosmogenic isotopes by muons, and unknown initial 26Al/10Be ratios. Nevertheless, and in spite of the large range of burial ages and large uncertainties, we identify samples that provide reasonable burial age constraints on the depositional history of sediment along the lower ancestral Colorado River. These samples suggest possible sediment deposition and burial at ca. 5.3, 4.7, and 3.6 Ma. Our calculated basinwide erosion rate for sediment transported by the modern Colorado River (∼187 mm k.y.−1) is higher than the modern erosion rates inferred from the historic sediment load (80–100 mm k.y.−1). In contrast, basinwide paleo-erosion rates calculated from Pliocene sediments are all under 40 mm k.y.−1 The comparatively lower denudation rates calculated for the Pliocene sediment samples are surprising given that the sampled time intervals include significant Pliocene aggradation and may include much incision of the Grand Canyon and its tributaries. This conflict may arise from extensive storage of sediment along the route of the Colorado River, slower paleobedrock erosion, or the inclusion

  4. Late Quaternary strata and carbon burial records in the Yellow River delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangming; Ye, Siyuan; Li, Guangxue; Ding, Xigui; Yuan, Hongming

    2015-06-01

    Sediment carbon sequestration plays an essential role in mitigating atmospheric CO2 increases and the subsequently global greenhouse effect. To clarify the late Quaternary strata and carbon burial records in Yellow River delta (YRD), detailed analysis of benthic foraminifera, total carbon (TC), organic carbon (Corg), sedimentary characteristics and moisture contents of sediments, was performed on core ZK3, 30.3 m in length and obtained from YRD in 2007. Eight depositional units (designated U1-U8 in ascending order) were identified. A comprehensive analysis method of historical geography and sedimentary geology was used to determine the precise depositional ages of the modern Yellow River delta (MYRD), from which pre-MYRD ages were deduced. The results indicates that the maximum burial rates of TC, inorganic carbon (IC) and Corg occurred in the delta front (U5), and the minimum in the shallow sea (U3). Remarkable high sedimentation rates in the MYRD are responsible for burial efficiency of carbon, with an average rate of Corg burial reaching 2087±251 g (m2 yr)-1, and that of IC reaching 13741±808 g (m2 yr)-1, which are much higher than those of other regions with high contents of Corg. Therefore, YRD has a significant burial efficiency for carbon sequestration.

  5. 38 CFR 38.620 - Persons eligible for burial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.620 Persons eligible for burial. The following is a list of those individuals who are eligible for burial in a national cemetery:...

  6. The evaluation of Bedfordshire burial registration, 1538-1851.

    PubMed

    Razzell, Peter; Spence, Christine; Woollard, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    This article is based mainly on a digital transcript of burials for 126 Bedfordshire parishes 1538-1851, and a county index of wills for the same period. The comparison of probate with burial register data indicated that there was little long-term change over time in burial under-registration, with between 21 and 27 per cent of will entries missing in the registers. There was also little variation between parishes of different population sizes, suggesting that burial under-registration was predominantly a random process linked to clerical negligence. A comparison of 1841 and 1851 census data, linked to the Bedfordshire burial database, revealed that missing burials amongst married couples was 29 per cent, similar to that found in the probate/burial register comparison in the 1840s. These findings on the adequacy of burial registers suggest that similar research on others counties will be necessary in order to establish reliable conclusions about England's population history.

  7. Deep-burial diagenesis in carbonates. Final report, January 16, 1984-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.M.

    1985-03-01

    The objectives were to gain an understanding of what makes or breaks porosity in carbonate rocks as a result of deep-burial, to develop criteria for deep-burial diagenesis in carbonate rocks, and to apply these criteria for interpretation of carbonate rocks now at shallow depth. Compaction tests reveal that ooid samples show substantial reductions of bulk-volume and porosity when squeezed at temperatures and pressures comparable to overburden of 3.5 to 6.5 km. Particle breakage and deformed particle contacts developed that are comparable to those reported from oolites from the rock record. Reproducibility of pressure solution by compaction supports the conclusion that initial pore-volume reduction through mechanical grain adjustments and ultimate pressure solution are major processes in the diagenetic evolution of limestone. In the deep Analdarko Basin of Oklahoma and Texas, the Hunton Group carbonate rocks of Upper Ordovician to Lower Devonian show that dolostones alone provide porosity. Studies reveal that corrected measurement of bulk densities yield improved estimates of true porosity and water saturation. The mechanism of burial dolomitization was suggested to be the underlying marine Sylvan Shale which provided necessary Mg+2 and Fe+2 during smectite-to-illite transition. Also detailed studies of core samples and thin sections from the Lower Ordovician Ellenberger carbonate rocks in the Permian Basin demonstrated that carbonate rocks below 10,000 ft are exclusively dolostone showing some evidence of deep-burial dolomitization. Lower Ordovician carbonate strata in undeformed belts of the northern Appalachian Basin yield depth of burial and paleotemperature data implying a former depth of burial which has not been usually inferred for this area. Fluid-inclusion suggests burial depth of several kilometers. 41 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. New hydroxyproline radiocarbon dates from Sungir, Russia, confirm early Mid Upper Palaeolithic burials in Eurasia.

    PubMed

    Nalawade-Chavan, Shweta; McCullagh, James; Hedges, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sungir (Russia) is a key Mid-Upper Palaeolithic site in Eurasia, containing several spectacular burials that disclose early evidence for complex burial rites in the form of a range of grave goods deposited along with the dead. Dating has been particularly challenging, with multiple radiocarbon dates ranging from 19,160±270 to 28,800±240 BP for burials that are believed to be closely similar in age. There are disparities in the radiocarbon dates of human bones, faunal remains and charcoal found on the floor of burials. Our approach has been to develop compound-specific methods using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to separate single amino acids, such as hydroxyproline, and thereby avoid the known human contamination on the bones themselves. Previously, we applied this technique to obtain radiocarbon dates of ∼30,000 BP for Sungir 2, Sungir 3 and a mammoth bone from the occupation levels of the site. The single amino acid radiocarbon dates were in good agreement with each other compared to all the dates previously reported, supporting their reliability. Here we report new hydroxyproline dates for two more human burials from the same site, Sungir 1 and Sungir 4. All five hydroxyproline dates reported are statistically indistinguishable and support an identical age for the group. The results suggest that compound-specific radiocarbon analysis should be considered seriously as the method of choice when precious archaeological remains are to be dated because they give a demonstrably contaminant-free radiocarbon age. The new ages are, together with the previously dated 'Red Lady of Paviland' human in the British Isles, the earliest for Mid Upper Palaeolithic burial behaviour in Eurasia, and point to the precocious appearance of this form of rite in Europe Russia.

  9. New Hydroxyproline Radiocarbon Dates from Sungir, Russia, Confirm Early Mid Upper Palaeolithic Burials in Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Nalawade-Chavan, Shweta; McCullagh, James; Hedges, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sungir (Russia) is a key Mid-Upper Palaeolithic site in Eurasia, containing several spectacular burials that disclose early evidence for complex burial rites in the form of a range of grave goods deposited along with the dead. Dating has been particularly challenging, with multiple radiocarbon dates ranging from 19,160±270 to 28,800±240 BP for burials that are believed to be closely similar in age. There are disparities in the radiocarbon dates of human bones, faunal remains and charcoal found on the floor of burials [1], [2], [3]. Our approach has been to develop compound-specific methods using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to separate single amino acids, such as hydroxyproline, and thereby avoid the known human contamination on the bones themselves. Previously, we applied this technique to obtain radiocarbon dates of ∼30,000 BP for Sungir 2, Sungir 3 and a mammoth bone from the occupation levels of the site [4]. The single amino acid radiocarbon dates were in good agreement with each other compared to all the dates previously reported, supporting their reliability. Here we report new hydroxyproline dates for two more human burials from the same site, Sungir 1 and Sungir 4. All five hydroxyproline dates reported are statistically indistinguishable and support an identical age for the group. The results suggest that compound-specific radiocarbon analysis should be considered seriously as the method of choice when precious archaeological remains are to be dated because they give a demonstrably contaminant-free radiocarbon age. The new ages are, together with the previously dated ‘Red Lady of Paviland’ human in the British Isles, the earliest for Mid Upper Palaeolithic burial behaviour in Eurasia, and point to the precocious appearance of this form of rite in Europe Russia. PMID:24416120

  10. The Role of Variability in Mine Burial Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    The Role of Variability in Mine Burial Prediction Roy H. Wilkens Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology University of Hawaii 1680 East...www.mbp.unh.edu LONG-TERM GOALS The ultimate long-term goal of the ONR Mine Burial Prediction (MBP) program is the development of mine burial...burial predictive capabilities by using existing models and an enhanced understanding of environmental databases and seafloor geotechnical properties

  11. Development of an Expert System for Mine Burial Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    Development of an Expert System for Mine Burial Prediction Alan Brandt Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory 11100 Johns Hopkins...about mine burial processes into a Mine Burial Expert System Model (MBESM). Specific technical objectives include: • Identify and incorporate...Develope a prototype Mine Burial Expert System Model (MBESM) to provide a systematic organization of this knowledge base, combining physics-based models

  12. 20 CFR 416.1231 - Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... separation; i.e., a circumstance beyond an individual's control which makes conversion/separation impossible... parental deeming situations. If an individual is an eligible child, the burial funds (up to $1,500) that...

  13. 40 CFR 229.1 - Burial at sea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Burial at sea. 229.1 Section 229.1... Burial at sea. (a) All persons subject to title I of the Act are hereby granted a general permit to... location for the purpose of burial at sea and to bury such remains at sea subject to the...

  14. 40 CFR 229.1 - Burial at sea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Burial at sea. 229.1 Section 229.1... Burial at sea. (a) All persons subject to title I of the Act are hereby granted a general permit to... location for the purpose of burial at sea and to bury such remains at sea subject to the...

  15. 40 CFR 229.1 - Burial at sea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Burial at sea. 229.1 Section 229.1... Burial at sea. (a) All persons subject to title I of the Act are hereby granted a general permit to... location for the purpose of burial at sea and to bury such remains at sea subject to the...

  16. Age-surface temperature estimation model: When will oil palm plantation reach the same surface temperature as natural forest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushayati, S. B.; Hermawan, R.; Meilani, R.

    2017-01-01

    Oil palm plantation has often been accused as the cause of global warming. However, along with its growth, it would be able to decrease surface temperature. The question is ‘when will the plantation be able to reach the same surface temperature as natural forest’. This research aimed to estimate the age of oil palm plantation that create similar surface temperature to those in natural forest (land cover before the opening and planting of oil palm). The method used in this research was spatial analysis of land cover and surface temperature distribution. Based on the spatial analysis of surface temperature, five points was randomly taken from each planting age (age 1 15 years). Linear regression was then employed in the analysis. The linear regression formula between surface temperature and age of oil palm plantation was Y = 26.002 – 0.1237X. Surface temperature will decrease as much as 0.1237 ° C with one year age growth oil palm. Surface temperature that was similar to the initial temperature, when the land cover was natural forest (23.04 °C), was estimated to occur when the oil palm plantation reach the age 24 year.

  17. Burial history influence on the generation of some Italian oils

    SciTech Connect

    Mattavelli, L.; Novelli, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Many Italian oils were sourced by Triassic source rock; evidence of this exists in the Po Plain. In the Adriatic Sea, and offshore southern Sicily. Bulk and geochemical characteristics of these oils are quite dissimilar: heavy oils as well as gasolines were discovered. Such differences are partly attributable to the organic matter type and to environmental conditions, but the role of the source rock's burial histories is fundamental in determining oil characteristics. The different burial histories in these two areas definitely account for these differences. In the Po Plain, the Raethian Argilliti di Riva di Solto Formation, source rock of condensates of the Malossa area, started to generate very early as a consequence of the noticeable Rhaetian-Liassic subsidence. The generation of oil continued for a long geological time, but probably hydrocarbons were lost for the lack of traps. Only condensates, generated by the further Pliocene-Quaternary burial, were accumulated in the Neogene traps. In the western part of the Po Plain, Gaggiano and Villafortuna oils (34 and 40{degree} API), sourced by the Ladinian Meride Formation, were generated only during the sizeable Neogene-Quaternary subsidence. The high heating rate in this case probably enhanced expulsion efficiency, allowing secondary migration toward shallower depths and, consequently, preventing hydrocarbons from secondary cracking. Offshore in southern Sicily (Gela field), the recent subsidence (Pliocene-Pleistocene) is responsible for Triassic source rock maturation. In this case the shallower depth reached by the source rock and, consequently, the lower temperatures at which maturity occurred are partly responsible for the generation of heavy oils, even if other factors such as early expulsion due to tectonics and organic matter type probably play a more important role.

  18. Impact of temperature on the aging mechanisms of arsenic in soils: fractionation and bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guanxing; Chen, Zongyu; Wang, Jia; Hou, Qinxuan; Zhang, Ying

    2016-03-01

    The present study focused on the influence of temperature variation on the aging mechanisms of arsenic in soils. The results showed that higher temperature aggravated the decrease of more mobilizable fractions and the increase of less mobilizable or immobilizable fractions in soils over time. During the aging process, the redistribution of both carbonate-bound fraction and specifically sorbed and organic-bound fraction in soils occurred at various temperatures, and the higher temperature accelerated the redistribution of specifically sorbed and organic-bound fraction. The aging processes of arsenic in soils at different temperatures were characterized by several stages, and the aging processes were not complete within 180 days. Arsenic bioaccessibility in soils decreased significantly by the aging, and the decrease was intensified by the higher temperature. In terms of arsenic bioaccessibility, higher temperature accelerated the aging process of arsenic in soils remarkably.

  19. Electrical resistivity survey to search for a recent clandestine burial of a homicide victim, UK.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Jamie K; Jervis, John R

    2010-10-10

    This case report details an electrical resistivity survey to assist the search for a suspected 1-year-old clandestine burial of a murder victim in North Wales in the UK. Conventional search techniques (victim recovery dogs and probing) proved unsuccessful, and with a significant survey area and a high clay content soil precluding GPR as a geophysical search method, a resistivity survey was instead trialled. Ten resistivity grids were collected and site detrended with user-specified, contoured anomalies being generated. The resulting anomalies were compared to anomalies derived from similar-aged, simulated clandestine burial surveys. Seven anomalies with comparative sizes and amplitudes (±3Ω) of the simulated burials were identified within the search area and prioritised for further investigation. The shallowly buried victim was subsequently recovered outside the survey area.

  20. Short-Term Sediment Burial Effects on the Seagrass Phyllospadix scouleri

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    additive. Seasonal, age-related, or phenological differences may also dictate how resistant to burial a population might be. Future work should compare...growing season; add a field-based component; and design an experiment to account for genetic variation and local adaptation to sediment dynamics. 7 ERDC

  1. 38 CFR 3.1702 - Persons who may receive burial benefits; priority of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... relationship; (iii) His or her children, regardless of age; (iv) His or her parents or the surviving parent; or... limitations prescribed in §§ 3.1708 and 3.1709. (3) VA will pay burial benefits to a single representative of...

  2. Suspect burial excavation procedure: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Ruffell, Alastair; Donnelly, Colm; Carver, Naomi; Murphy, Eileen; Murray, Emily; McCambridge, James

    2009-01-10

    Geographic location, time of reporting and need for rapid evaluation contributed to a lack of intelligence concerning a suspect burial site in scrub woodland (approximately 15 km from the last known location of a missing person) in Northern Ireland. Police received reports of a subsiding 'grave', which was evaluated positively using GPR and victim recovery dogs (VRD). After 24h work, archaeological excavation showed a vertical-sided, stepped excavation on undisturbed clay with no inhumation. Subsequent research showed the feature to be an engineering trial pit. The GPR response was a water table and rocks, VRD were possibly reacting to disturbed ground. The work serves as a demonstration of good archaeological practice in suspect burial excavation, following a lack of landscape evaluation and poor overall intelligence.

  3. SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.; Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

    1998-01-21

    Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities.

  4. Burial at Srebrenica: linking place and trauma.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Craig Evan

    2003-02-01

    Five years after the massacre at Srebrenica in Bosnia-Herzegovina, survivors were faced with the decision: where did they want their loved ones buried? This report explores the reasons for their choice in qualitative interviews with 37 survivors of the massacre and 22 key informants performed over the summer 2000. Survivors wanted the loved ones buried at Potocari, a site just outside of Srebrenica, because it represented the site of ultimate horror, was connected to their sense of home, and underscored the various power relationships. The data points to the importance of place for health. Trauma, as it occurs in particular locations, breaks the sense of attachment to a particular place. Restoring the physical and social environment through burial and memorials mitigates the consequences of the trauma. The burial at Potocari provides a window into the mourning, politics, and recovery after mass violence.

  5. Expert System for Mine Burial Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    of the mine deployment and environmental conditions. Therefore, a probabilistic predictive structure is appropriate. An expert system that synthesizes...Team for Sea Mine Burial Expert System (ST-SMBES). Further research into the scour portion of the expert system is continuing....predictive performance as well as documentation of the operational shell used by NAVOCEANO to provide input and output connectivity with the expert

  6. Short communication: Changes in body temperature of calves up to 2 months of age as affected by time of day, age, and ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Hill, T M; Bateman, H G; Suarez-Mena, F X; Dennis, T S; Schlotterbeck, R L

    2016-11-01

    Extensive measurements of calf body temperature are limited in the literature. In this study, body temperatures were collected by taping a data logger to the skin over the tail vein opposing the rectum of Holstein calves between 4 and 60d of age during 3 different periods of the summer and fall. The summer period was separated into moderate (21-33°C average low to high) and hot (25-37°C) periods, whereas the fall exhibited cool (11-19°C) ambient temperatures. Tail temperatures were compared in a mixed model ANOVA using ambient temperature, age of calf, and time of day (10-min increments) as fixed effects and calf as a random effect. Measures within calf were modeled as repeated effects of type autoregressive 1. Calf temperature increased 0.0325°C (±0.00035) per 1°C increase in ambient temperature. Body temperature varied in a distinct, diurnal pattern with time of day, with body temperatures being lowest around 0800h and highest between 1700 and 2200h. During periods of hot weather, the highest calf temperature was later in the day (~2200h). Calf minimum, maximum, and average body temperatures were all higher in hot than in moderate periods and higher in moderate than in cool periods. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 500,000-year temperature record challenges ice age theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snow, K. Mitchell

    1994-01-01

    Just outside the searing heat of Death Valley lies Devils Hole (fig. 1), a fault-created cave that harbors two remnants of the Earth's great ice ages. The endangered desert pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) has long made its home in the cave. A 500,000-year record of the planet's climate that challenges a widely accepted theory explaining the ice ages also has been preserved in Devils Hole.

  8. Effect of Blade Tenderization, Aging Time and Aging Temperature on Tenderness of Beef Longissimus Lumborum and Gluteus Medius

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of blade tenderization, aging time, and aging temperature on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) steaks. Beef strip loins (n = 300) and top sirloin butts (n = 300) were selected from a large beef processor and transported...

  9. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Maxey Flats radioactive waste burial site, Fleming County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Zehner, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Part of a hilltop named Maxey Flats was used as a commercial radioactive waste burial site from 1963 to 1977. The hill is about 9 miles from the city of Morehead. The climate of the area is humid, with normal annual precipitation 44.30 in. for the period 1941 through 1970. Most of the 47 burial trenches on the site are completed in weathered shale. They are covered with clay and crushed shale, but water infiltrates the covers and accumulates in the waste. The contaminated trench water is later removed and evaporated. Assuming water in trenches would not overflow onto the ground surface, flow through fractured rocks would be the principal means of contaminated-water transport if trench water were to move from the burial site. The bases of most trenches consist of a 1.5-ft-thick sandstone bed, at a depth of about 25 ft below ground level. Radionuclides have moved laterally through fractures in the bed as much as 270 feet from the nearest burial trench. Rocks underlying the burial site are of Mississippian, Devonian, and Silurian age, about 80% of which are shale. The bedrock has poor water-transmitting capability, and virtually all flow is through fractures. The spacing between most fractures is several feet, although it ranges from a few inches to more than 100 ft. Most fractures terminate, or are offset, at bedding planes. The ground-water system is therefore very nonuniform, and more permeable in the horizontal direction. At least eight hydrologic units underlie the burial site.

  10. WATER CONTENT-TEMPERATURE INTERACTIONS REGULATE SEED AGING

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Water content and temperature are important factors that influence the duration of seed survival in storage. The interacting effect of these two factors and the consequences on seed longevity is rarely recognized. An experiment to quantify the interaction was begun in 1994, using lettuce (Lactuca s...

  11. Probing the age and temperature of rifting in Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, John; Goes, Saskia; Ferguson, David; Hammond, James; Calais, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Rifting along the southern part of the Red Sea margin in NE Africa (leading to formation of Afar) has been closely associated with magmatic activity since the initiation of extension at around ~ 25Ma. Numerous active volcanoes are currently found along rift zones here and magma intrusion into the crust has potentially accommodated significant amounts of extension. This extensive present-day volcanism has been linked to elevated mantle temperature, perhaps due to a thermal plume, or as a consequence of passive flow in the mantle beneath the extending lithosphere. Geochemical evidence for basaltic lavas erupted in Afar have been used to suggest that mantle temperatures are in the range 1370 to 1490°C, and that the region is currently experiencing late stage rifting. Analysis of changes in shear wave seismic velocities and relative travel time tomography suggests mantle temperatures are within a similar range, yet the region has greater similarities to a young spreading centre. The range in potential temperature estimates is however very large, with different implications for the volcanic history of the region and hence timing of break-up. Rather than focusing a single observable, we use a relatively straight forward model of extension and decompression melting to predict the seismic-velocity and attenuation structure of the asthenosphere and lithosphere, synthetic receiver functions as a result of this seismic structure, crustal thickness as a result of decompression and finally the melt composition. From this combined study we find that melt composition and seismic structure are dependent on both temperature and time. If mantle potential temperature is 1350°C then both the seismic structure and melt composition can be matched if the duration of extension is more than 30 Myr. However this is longer than the estimated duration of extension from plate reconstructions, and given the low rate of extension in Afar, this cold model only generates up to 5 km of igneous

  12. Ontogeny and aging of the distal skin temperature rhythm in humans.

    PubMed

    Batinga, H; Martinez-Nicolas, A; Zornoza-Moreno, M; Sánchez-Solis, M; Larqué, E; Mondéjar, M T; Moreno-Casbas, M; García, F J; Campos, M; Rol, M A; Madrid, J A

    2015-01-01

    In circadian terms, human ontogeny is characterized by the emergence of a daily pattern, from a previous ultradian pattern, for most variables during the first 6 months of life. Circadian aging in humans is characterized by a phase advance, accompanied by rhythm fragmentation and flattening. Despite an expanding body of literature focused on distal skin temperature, little information is available about the ontogeny and practically nothing about age-related changes in this rhythm. Thus, the aim was to evaluate the degree of maturation and aging of the circadian pattern of distal skin temperature to identify those parameters that are modified throughout life and could be used to differentiate subjects according to their age. For this, distal skin temperature was measured in 197 volunteers (55 % women), including babies aged 15 days (30 subjects), 1 month (28 subjects), 3 months (31 subjects), and 6 months (10 subjects); young adults aged 19 years (37 subjects); middle-aged persons aged 46 years (27 subjects); older people aged 72 (34 subjects). Circadian system maturation was associated with an increase in amplitude and a reduction in skin temperature during sleep. During adulthood, women showed a more robust pattern (lower fragmentation, and higher night-time temperature, amplitude, circadian function index, and first harmonic relative power); however, these differences were lost with aging, a period of life that was consistently associated with a phase advance of the rhythm. In summary, distal skin temperature pattern can be used as a robust variable to discern between different ages throughout the life.

  13. Characterization of Al-Mg Alloy Aged at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Gaosong; Cullen, David A.; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Golumbfskie, William; Sundberg, Erik; Free, Michael L.

    2017-02-01

    Long-term aged [343 K (70 °C) for 30 months and natural exposure for over 10 years] Al 5456 H116 samples were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), state-of-the-art energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) systems, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). ASTM G-67 mass loss tests of the sensitized Al 5456 alloy samples were conducted. Intragranular Mg-rich precipitates, such as Guinier-Preston (GP) zones, were confirmed in Al 5456 H116 aged at 343 K (70 °C) for 30 months, and the volume of these precipitates is 1.39 pct. β' phase is identified at the grain boundary of a navy ship sample, while high-resolution STEM results reveal no intragranular precipitates. Intergranular corrosion (IGC) of Al 5456 was found to be related to the continuity of intergranular precipitates.

  14. Characterization of Al-Mg Alloy Aged at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Gaosong; Cullen, David A.; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Golumbfskie, William; Sundberg, Erik; Free, Michael L.

    2017-04-01

    Long-term aged [343 K (70 °C) for 30 months and natural exposure for over 10 years] Al 5456 H116 samples were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), state-of-the-art energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) systems, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). ASTM G-67 mass loss tests of the sensitized Al 5456 alloy samples were conducted. Intragranular Mg-rich precipitates, such as Guinier-Preston (GP) zones, were confirmed in Al 5456 H116 aged at 343 K (70 °C) for 30 months, and the volume of these precipitates is 1.39 pct. β' phase is identified at the grain boundary of a navy ship sample, while high-resolution STEM results reveal no intragranular precipitates. Intergranular corrosion (IGC) of Al 5456 was found to be related to the continuity of intergranular precipitates.

  15. Cleanup Verification Package for the118-F-2 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron and K. A. Anselm

    2008-02-21

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance with cleanup criteria for the 118-F-2 Burial Ground. This burial ground, formerly called Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 1, was the original solid waste disposal site for the 100-F Area. Eight trenches contained miscellaneous solid waste from the 105-F Reactor and one trench contained solid waste from the biology facilities.

  16. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-8 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2006-08-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-8 Burial Ground, also referred to as the Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 8, 318-8, and the Early Solid Waste Burial Ground. During its period of operation, the 618-8 site is speculated to have been used to bury uranium-contaminated waste derived from fuel manufacturing, and construction debris from the remodeling of the 313 Building.

  17. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-3 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2006-09-12

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-3 Solid Waste Burial Ground, also referred to as Burial Ground Number 3 and the Dry Waste Burial Ground Number 3. During its period of operation, the 618-3 site was used to dispose of uranium-contaminated construction debris from the 311 Building and construction/demolition debris from remodeling of the 313, 303-J and 303-K Buildings.

  18. Pesticide burial grounds in Poland: a review.

    PubMed

    Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Migaszewski, Zdzisław M; Manecki, Piotr

    2011-10-01

    Obsolete pesticides were stored in Poland from the middle sixties until the late eighties of the 20th century mostly in underground disposal sites, called "pesticide burial grounds" or "pesticide tombs". The total amount of pesticide waste and packaging materials disposed of in these landfills exceeded 20000 Mg. Typically, the content of a pesticide tomb was dominated by organochlorine pesticides (comprising 10-100% of the total waste volume) with DDT as the prevailing compound. Other pesticide types, such as phosphoroorganic, carbamate insecticides, dinitrophenols, phenoxyacids, and inorganic compounds were stored in smaller quantities, usually not exceeding 10-20% of the total waste volume. With the growing awareness of the threats that these landfills posed to the environment, the first inventory for the whole country was made in 1993 and remediation was initiated in 1999. The total amount of waste, which had to be removed from the known pesticide tombs (hazardous substances, contaminated soils, construction materials etc.) was about 100000 Mg. According to the National Waste Management Plan, the reclamation of pesticide tombs was assumed to have been finished by the end of 2010, however, this goal has not been achieved. The aim of this review is to present a historical perspective of pesticide burial grounds in Poland with an emphasis on their creation, function, inventory, and remediation. Based on unpublished reports, and other published materials of limited availability written in Polish, this review may serve as a source of information for representatives of other countries, where remediation of pesticide burial grounds is still in progress. The experience gained over a ten-year period, when restoration of pesticide tombs was implemented in Poland, reveals that there are many obstacles to this action arising not only from technical, but also from economic and social issues.

  19. Cretaceous–Cenozoic burial and exhumation history of the Chukchi shelf, offshore Arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craddock, William H.; Houseknecht, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Apatite fission track (AFT) and vitrinite reflectance data from five exploration wells and three seafloor cores illuminate the thermal history of the underexplored United States Chukchi shelf. On the northeastern shelf, Triassic strata in the Chevron 1 Diamond well record apatite annealing followed by cooling, possibly during the Triassic to Middle Jurassic, which is a thermal history likely related to Canada Basin rifting. Jurassic strata exhumed in the hanging wall of the frontal Herald Arch thrust fault record a history of probable Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous structural burial in the Chukotka fold and thrust belt, followed by rapid exhumation to near-surface temperatures at 104 ± 30 Ma. This history of contractional tectonism is in good agreement with inherited fission track ages in low-thermal-maturity, Cretaceous–Cenozoic strata in the Chukchi foreland, providing complementary evidence for the timing of exhumation and suggesting a source-to-sink relationship. In the central Chukchi foreland, inverse modeling of reset AFT samples from the Shell 1 Klondike and Shell 1 Crackerjack wells reveals several tens of degrees of cooling from maximum paleo-temperatures, with maximum heating permissible at any time from about 100 to 50 Ma, and cooling persisting to as recent as 30 Ma. Similar histories are compatible with partially reset AFT samples from other Chukchi wells (Shell 1 Popcorn, Shell 1 Burger, and Chevron 1 Diamond) and are probable in light of regional geologic evidence. Given geologic context provided by regional seismic reflection data, we interpret these inverse models to reveal a Late Cretaceous episode of cyclical burial and erosion across the central Chukchi shelf, possibly partially overprinted by Cenozoic cooling related to decreasing surface temperatures. Regionally, we interpret this kinematic history to be reflective of moderate, transpressional deformation of the Chukchi shelf during the final phases of contractional tectonism in the

  20. Miscellaneous Burial Recovery in Eastern Washington, 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    identification of the cloth and beetle specimens, respectively. Office and laboratory support was cheerfully provided by Cathy Lubben and Chris Fuhrman...shell shell button tar paper wood/ bark Total 1 1 1 2 7 2 1 17 12 30 93 5 98 30 1 31 27 27 766 312 10 279 1374 3 13 12 28 120 7 1 1...Palus Reburial Site overlooking the original burial location. The hide, possibly buffalo, was found to have been infested with some sort of beetle

  1. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

    2008-01-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

  2. Jurassic Haynesville limestones of east Texas: burial diagenesis and more burial diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dravis, J.J.

    1989-03-01

    Progressive loss of primary porosity due to a continuum of pressure solution and associated burial cementation dominated Haynesville porosity evolution. Porosity loss, however, was punctuated at depth by major grain dissolution and microporosity development in oolitic grainstones. Absence of freshwater precompaction cements allowed incipient burial diagenesis to affect the entire Haynesville sequence. Micritic facies experienced extensive stylolitization and associated cementation, losing their effective porosities relatively early in their burial history. Oolitic grainstones also initially lost porosity due to pervasive suturing of ooids and concomitant interparticle cementation, a relationship confirmed by cathodoluminescence and cement geochemistry. Yet they retained sufficient primary porosity to later reservoir bitumen. Subsequent to bitumen emplacement, however, ooids underwent extensive burial dissolution which created uniform micromoldic porosity, now the dominant pore type in these gas reservoirs. Dissolution postdated most pressure solution fabrics in these grainstones; adjacent micritic facies were unaffected by this dissolution. Cathodoluminescence and vertical porosity profiles demonstrate that reduction of some reservoir quality in these oolitic grainstones resulted from renewed pressure solution and cementation, controlled largely by grainstone thickness and proximity to micritic facies.

  3. Understanding and controlling low-temperature aging of nanocrystalline materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Boyce, Brad Lee; Brons, Justin G.; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Holm, Elizabeth A; Padilla, Henry A.,; Sharon, John Anthony; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2013-10-01

    Nanocrystalline copper lms were created by both repetitive high-energy pulsed power, to produce material without internal nanotwins; and pulsed laser deposition, to produce nan- otwins. Samples of these lms were indented at ambient (298K) and cryogenic temperatures by immersion in liquid nitrogen (77K) and helium (4K). The indented samples were sectioned through the indented regions and imaged in a scanning electron microscope. Extensive grain growth was observed in the lms that contained nanotwins and were indented cryogenically. The lms that either lacked twins, or were indented under ambient conditions, were found to exhibit no substantial grain growth by visual inspection. Precession transmission elec- tron microscopy was used to con rm these ndings quantitatively, and show that 3 and 7 boundaries proliferate during grain growth, implying that these interface types play a key role in governing the extensive grain growth observed here. Molecular dynamics sim- ulations of the motion of individual grain boundaries demonstrate that speci c classes of boundaries - notably 3 and 7 - exhibit anti- or a-thermal migration, meaning that their mobilities either increase or do not change signi cantly with decreasing temperature. An in-situ cryogenic indentation capability was developed and implemented in a transmission electron microscope. Preliminary results do not show extensive cryogenic grain growth in indented copper lms. This discrepancy could arise from the signi cant di erences in con g- uration and loading of the specimen between the two approaches, and further research and development of this capability is needed.

  4. 38 CFR 3.1710 - Escheat (payment of burial benefits to an estate with no heirs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... burial benefits to an estate with no heirs). 3.1710 Section 3.1710 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: Other § 3.1710 Escheat (payment of burial benefits to an estate with no heirs). VA will not pay burial benefits if...

  5. 38 CFR 3.1701 - Deceased veterans for whom VA may provide burial benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... whom VA may provide burial benefits. 3.1701 Section 3.1701 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: General § 3.1701 Deceased veterans for whom VA may provide burial benefits. For purposes of providing burial benefits under subpart...

  6. Room Temperature Aging Study of Butyl O-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Wilson

    2009-08-07

    During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Tests showed that sealing force values for these suspect o-rings were much lower than expected and their physical properties were very sensitive to further post curing at elevated temperatures. Further testing confirmed that these o-rings were approximately 50% cured versus the typical industry standard of > 90% cured. Despite this condition, all suspect o-rings fully conformed to their QC acceptance requirements, including their individual product drawing requirements.

  7. Effects of high temperature aging in an impure helium environment on low temperature embrittlement of Alloy 617 and Haynes 230

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daejong; Sah, Injin; Jang, Changheui

    2010-10-01

    The effects of high temperature environmental damage on low temperature embrittlement of wrought nickel-base superalloys, Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 were evaluated. They were aged in an impure helium environment at 1000 °C for up to 500 h before tensile tested at room temperature. The tensile test results showed that the loss of ductility was associated with the increase in the inter-granular fracture with aging time. For Alloy 617, inter-granular oxidation and coarsening of grain boundary carbides contributed to the embrittlement. The significant loss of ductility in Haynes 230 was only observed after 500 h of aging when the globular intermetallic precipitates were extensively formed and brittle inter-granular cracking began to occur.

  8. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  9. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity.

  10. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C

    2015-01-13

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity.

  11. Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect

    Jaegge, W.J.; Kolb, N.L.; Looney, B.B.; Marine, I.W.; Towler, O.A.; Cook, J.R.

    1987-03-01

    This document provides environmental information on postulated closure options for the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds at the Savannah River Plant and was developed as background technical documentation for the Department of Energy`s proposed Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on waste management activities for groundwater protection at the plant. The results of groundwater and atmospheric pathway analyses, accident analysis, and other environmental assessments discussed in this document are based upon a conservative analysis of all foreseeable scenarios as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (CFR, 1986). The scenarios do not necessarily represent actual environmental conditions. This document is not meant to be used as a closure plan or other regulatory document to comply with required federal or state environmental regulations. The closure options considered for the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated.

  12. Relative Burial Depths of Nakhlites: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Koizumi, E.; Makishima, J.; McKay, G.

    2006-01-01

    Nakhlites are augite-rich cumulate rocks with variable amounts of olivine and groundmass plus minor Fe, Ti oxides [e.g., 1]. Our previous studies revealed that nakhlites showed correlated petrography and mineralogy that could be explained by different locations (burial depths) in a common cooling cumulate pile [e.g., 2]. We so far analyzed six of the seven currently known nakhlites, Nakhla (Nak), Governador Valadares (GV), Lafayette (Laf), NWA817, Y000593 (Y) and MIL03346 (MIL) [e.g., 2,3] and calculated cooling rates of four nakhlites (Nak, GV, Laf, and NWA817) by using chemical zoning of olivine [e.g., 4]. In this abstract, we complete our examination of petrographic and mineralogical variation of all currently known nakhlites by adding petrology and mineralogy of NWA998. We also report results of cooling calculations for Y, MIL and NWA998. Then, we update our model of the nakhlite igneous body in terms of relative burial depth of each sample.

  13. Effect of temperature on the rate of ageing: an experimental study of the blowfly Calliphora stygia.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Megan A; Zieba, Adam P; Buttemer, William A; Hulbert, A J

    2013-01-01

    All organisms age, the rate of which can be measured by demographic analysis of mortality rates. The rate of ageing is thermally sensitive in ectothermic invertebrates and we examined the effects of temperature on both demographic rates of ageing and on cellular senescence in the blowfly, Calliphora stygia. The short lifespan of these flies is advantageous for demographic measurements while their large body size permits individual-based biochemical characterisation. Blowflies maintained at temperatures from 12°C to 34°C had a five to six-fold decrease in maximum and average longevity, respectively. Mortality rates were best described by a two-phase Gompertz relation, which revealed the first-phase of ageing to be much more temperature sensitive than the second stage. Flies held at low temperatures had both a slower first-phase rate of ageing and a delayed onset of second-phase ageing, which significantly extended their longevity compared with those at high temperatures. Blowflies that were transferred from 29°C to 15°C had higher first-phase mortality rates than those of flies held at constant 15°C, but their onset of second-phase ageing was deferred beyond that of flies held constantly at this temperature. The accumulation of fluorescent AGE pigment, a measure of cellular oxidative damage, increased steadily over time in all blowflies, irrespective of the temporal pattern of mortality. Pigment accumulated steadily during periods of 'negligible senescence', as measured by minimal rate of mortality, and the rate of accumulation was significantly affected by temperature. Thus accumulation of AGE pigment is more representative of chronological age than a reflection of biological age or a cause of mortality.

  14. Effect of Temperature on the Rate of Ageing: An Experimental Study of the Blowfly Calliphora stygia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Megan A.; Zieba, Adam P.; Buttemer, William A.; Hulbert, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    All organisms age, the rate of which can be measured by demographic analysis of mortality rates. The rate of ageing is thermally sensitive in ectothermic invertebrates and we examined the effects of temperature on both demographic rates of ageing and on cellular senescence in the blowfly, Calliphora stygia. The short lifespan of these flies is advantageous for demographic measurements while their large body size permits individual-based biochemical characterisation. Blowflies maintained at temperatures from 12°C to 34°C had a five to six-fold decrease in maximum and average longevity, respectively. Mortality rates were best described by a two-phase Gompertz relation, which revealed the first-phase of ageing to be much more temperature sensitive than the second stage. Flies held at low temperatures had both a slower first-phase rate of ageing and a delayed onset of second-phase ageing, which significantly extended their longevity compared with those at high temperatures. Blowflies that were transferred from 29°C to 15°C had higher first-phase mortality rates than those of flies held at constant 15°C, but their onset of second-phase ageing was deferred beyond that of flies held constantly at this temperature. The accumulation of fluorescent AGE pigment, a measure of cellular oxidative damage, increased steadily over time in all blowflies, irrespective of the temporal pattern of mortality. Pigment accumulated steadily during periods of ‘negligible senescence’, as measured by minimal rate of mortality, and the rate of accumulation was significantly affected by temperature. Thus accumulation of AGE pigment is more representative of chronological age than a reflection of biological age or a cause of mortality. PMID:24019937

  15. Effects of Rapid High Temperature Cyclic Aging on a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, Nathan; Nguyen, Ke; Bunting, Bruce G; Toops, Todd J; Howe, Janet E

    2009-01-01

    In this study, high-temperature deactivation of a fully-formulated lean NOx trap (LNT) is investigated with an accelerated aging protocol where accelerated aging is accomplished by rapid temperature cycling and by higher temperatures. Thermal aging is carried out in a bench-flow reactor at nominal temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 C using an aging cycle consisting of a 130s lean-phase and a 50s rich-phase. After a prescribed number of lean/rich aging cycles, the NOx conversion of the aged LNT is evaluated at 200, 300, and 400 C. The NOx performance is obtained at a GHSV of 30,000 h-1 using an evaluation cycle consisting of a 60s lean-phase and 5s rich-phase. The effects of aging on the LNT washcoat are determined with EPMA, XRD, STEM/EDS, and BET. Aging at 700 and 800 C has a minimal effect on LNT performance and material properties. However, at aging temperatures of 900 and 1000 C reduction in surface area and sintering of PGM particles are observed and result in a drastic reduction in NOx conversion. Additionally, after aging at 900 C and 1000 C the NOx storage medium, BaCO3, is no longer visible in the XRD patterns, even though a Ba-phase identified by EPMA still exists in all aged samples. BaAl2O4 is not identified at any aging temperatures; possibly due to stabilization effects provided by washcoat additives present in this particular LNT.

  16. Organomineral nanocomposite carbon burial during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhr, S. C.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2014-05-01

    Organic carbon (OC) enrichment in sediments deposited during Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) is commonly attributed to elevated productivity and marine anoxia. We find that OC enrichment in the late Cenomanian aged OAE2 at Demerara Rise was controlled by co-occurrence of anoxic bottom-water, sufficient productivity to saturate available mineral surfaces and variable deposition of high surface area detrital smectite clay. Redox indicators show consistently oxygen-depleted conditions, while a strong correlation between OC concentration and sediment mineral surface area (R2=0.92) occurs across a range of TOC values from 9-33%. X-ray diffraction data indicates intercalation of OC in smectite interlayers while electron, synchrotron infrared and X-ray microscopy show an intimate association between clay minerals and OC, consistent with preservation of OC as organomineral nanocomposites and aggregates rather than discrete, μm-scale pelagic detritus. Since the consistent ratio between TOC and mineral surface area suggests that excess OC relative to surface area is lost, we propose that it is the varying supply of smectite that best explains variable organic enrichment against a backdrop of continuous anoxia, which is conducive to generally high TOC during OAE2 at Demerara Rise. Smectitic clays are unique in their ability to form stable organomineral nanocomposites and aggregates that preserve organic matter, and are common weathering products of continental volcanic deposits. An increased flux of smectite coinciding with high carbon burial is consistent with evidence for widespread volcanism during OAE2, so that organomineral carbon burial may represent a potential feedback to volcanic degassing of CO2.

  17. Organomineral nanocomposite carbon burial during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhr, S. C.; Kennedy, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Organic carbon (OC) enrichment in sediments deposited during Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs) is commonly attributed to elevated productivity and marine anoxia. We find that OC enrichment in the late Cenomanian aged OAE 2 at the Demerara Rise was controlled by the co-occurrence of anoxic bottom water, sufficient productivity to saturate available mineral surfaces, and variable deposition of high surface area detrital smectite clay. Redox indicators show consistently oxygen-depleted conditions, while a strong correlation between OC concentration and sediment mineral surface area (R2 = 0.92) occurs across a range of total organic carbon (TOC) values from 9 to 33%. X-ray diffraction data indicate the intercalation of OC in smectite interlayers, while electron, synchrotron infrared and X-ray microscopy show an intimate association between clay minerals and OC, consistent with preservation of OC as organomineral nanocomposites and aggregates rather than discrete, μm-scale pelagic detritus. Since the consistent ratio between TOC and mineral surface area suggests that excess OC relative to surface area is lost, we propose that it is the varying supply of smectite that best explains variable organic enrichment against a backdrop of continuous anoxia, which is conducive to generally high TOC during OAE 2 at the Demerara Rise. Smectitic clays are unique in their ability to form stable organomineral nanocomposites and aggregates that preserve organic matter, and are common weathering products of continental volcanic deposits. An increased flux of smectite coinciding with high carbon burial is consistent with evidence for widespread volcanism during OAE 2, so that organomineral carbon burial may represent a potential feedback to volcanic degassing of CO2.

  18. Effect of Blade Tenderization, Aging Time, and Aging Temperature on Tenderness of Beef Longissimus Lumborum and Gluteus Medius

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Purveyors are concerned about the food safety risk of non-intact meat products and are seeking strategies to ensure adequate meat tenderness without blade tenderization. This study was conducted to determine the effects of blade tenderization and time and temperature of aging on beef longissimus lu...

  19. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle... VA national cemetery where a privately-purchased outer burial receptacle has been used in lieu of a... permitted in the same grave unless the national cemetery director determines that the already...

  20. Urban Stream Burial Increases Watershed-Scale Nitrate Export

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jake J.; Golden, Heather E.; Knightes, Christopher D.; Mayer, Paul M.; Kaushal, Sujay S.; Pennino, Michael J.; Arango, Clay P.; Balz, David A.; Elonen, Colleen M.; Fritz, Ken M.; Hill, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that reduces nutrient loading to downstream ecosystems. Here we synthesize studies that investigated the effects of urban stream burial on N-uptake in two metropolitan areas and use simulation modeling to scale our measurements to the broader watershed scale. We report that nitrate travels on average 18 times farther downstream in buried than in open streams before being removed from the water column, indicating that burial substantially reduces N uptake in streams. Simulation modeling suggests that as burial expands throughout a river network, N uptake rates increase in the remaining open reaches which somewhat offsets reduced N uptake in buried reaches. This is particularly true at low levels of stream burial. At higher levels of stream burial, however, open reaches become rare and cumulative N uptake across all open reaches in the watershed rapidly declines. As a result, watershed-scale N export increases slowly at low levels of stream burial, after which increases in export become more pronounced. Stream burial in the lower, more urbanized portions of the watershed had a greater effect on N export than an equivalent amount of stream burial in the upper watershed. We suggest that stream daylighting (i.e., uncovering buried streams) can increase watershed-scale N retention. PMID:26186731

  1. Urban Stream Burial Increases Watershed-Scale Nitrate Export.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jake J; Golden, Heather E; Knightes, Christopher D; Mayer, Paul M; Kaushal, Sujay S; Pennino, Michael J; Arango, Clay P; Balz, David A; Elonen, Colleen M; Fritz, Ken M; Hill, Brian H

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that reduces nutrient loading to downstream ecosystems. Here we synthesize studies that investigated the effects of urban stream burial on N-uptake in two metropolitan areas and use simulation modeling to scale our measurements to the broader watershed scale. We report that nitrate travels on average 18 times farther downstream in buried than in open streams before being removed from the water column, indicating that burial substantially reduces N uptake in streams. Simulation modeling suggests that as burial expands throughout a river network, N uptake rates increase in the remaining open reaches which somewhat offsets reduced N uptake in buried reaches. This is particularly true at low levels of stream burial. At higher levels of stream burial, however, open reaches become rare and cumulative N uptake across all open reaches in the watershed rapidly declines. As a result, watershed-scale N export increases slowly at low levels of stream burial, after which increases in export become more pronounced. Stream burial in the lower, more urbanized portions of the watershed had a greater effect on N export than an equivalent amount of stream burial in the upper watershed. We suggest that stream daylighting (i.e., uncovering buried streams) can increase watershed-scale N retention.

  2. URBAN STREAM BURIAL INCREASES WATERSHED-SCALE NITRATE EXPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial reduces the capacity of streams to remove nitrate (NO3-) from the water column by in...

  3. URBAN STREAM BURIAL INCREASES WATERSHED-SCALE NITRATE EXPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial reduces the capacity of streams to remove nitrate (NO3-) from the water column by in...

  4. Fire hazards analysis for solid waste burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, K.M.

    1995-09-28

    This document comprises the fire hazards analysis for the solid waste burial grounds, including TRU trenches, low-level burial grounds, radioactive mixed waste trenches, etc. It analyzes fire potential, and fire damage potential for these facilities. Fire scenarios may be utilized in future safety analysis work, or for increasing the understanding of where hazards may exist in the present operation.

  5. Evidence for hydraulic fracturing at Gale crater, Mars: Implications for burial depth of the Yellowknife Bay formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caswell, Tess E.; Milliken, Ralph E.

    2017-06-01

    NASA's Curiosity rover identified a formerly habitable environment within strata informally known as the Yellowknife Bay formation. The stratigraphic relationship, and thus depositional age, of these rocks relative to other geologic units in Gale crater is not clear from orbital data alone. If part of lower Aeolis Mons (informally known as Mount Sharp), the Yellowknife Bay rocks have been deeply buried and exhumed prior to 3.2-3.3 Ga. If part of younger alluvial fan deposits, however, they likely have never experienced more than ∼100 m of burial. Knowledge of burial history can thus constrain the stratigraphic placement of Yellowknife Bay and the habitable environment preserved therein. The mechanics of natural hydraulic fractures observed in mudstone at YKB allow us to evaluate its burial history and imply a minimum burial depth of 1.2 km. This is consistent with burial by the entirety of lower Mount Sharp and a depositional age of ∼ 3.6- 3.8 Ga, providing observation-based evidence that Mount Sharp was once much more laterally extensive than its present form. Rocks of the Yellowknife Bay formation thus represent the oldest strata that Curiosity will encounter during its journey in Gale crater, and any additional habitable environments discovered along Curiosity's future path represent conditions at younger times.

  6. Age-stage, two-sex life table of Parapoynx crisonalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Li, Ni; Wang, Xing; Ma, Li; Huang, Jian-Bin; Huang, Guo-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Parapoynx crisonalis is an important pest of many aquatic vegetables including water chestnuts. Understanding the relationship between temperature variations and the population growth rates of P. crisonalis is essential to predicting its population dynamics in water chestnuts ponds. These relationships were examined in this study based on the age-stage, two-sex life table of P. crisonalis developed in the laboratory at 21, 24, 27, 30, 33 and 36°C. The results showed that the values of Sxj (age-stage-specific survival rate), fxj (age-stage-specific fecundity), lx (age specific survival rate) and mx (age-specific fecundity) increased as the temperature rose from 21 to 27°C, then decreased from 30 to 36°C. Temperature also had a significant effect on the net reproductive rate (R0), gross reproductive rate (GRR), intrinsic rate of increase (r) and finite rate of increase (λ). The value of these parameters were at low levels at 21, 33, and 36°C. Further, the r value decreased as the temperature rose from 24 to 30°C, while the GRR reached its highest level at 27°C. The results indicated that optimal growth and development of P. crisonalis occurred at temperatures between 24°C to 30°C when compared to the lowest temperature (21°C) and higher temperatures of 33°C and 36°C.

  7. Age-stage, two-sex life table of Parapoynx crisonalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Li, Ni; Wang, Xing; Ma, Li; Huang, Jian-Bin; Huang, Guo-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Parapoynx crisonalis is an important pest of many aquatic vegetables including water chestnuts. Understanding the relationship between temperature variations and the population growth rates of P. crisonalis is essential to predicting its population dynamics in water chestnuts ponds. These relationships were examined in this study based on the age-stage, two-sex life table of P. crisonalis developed in the laboratory at 21, 24, 27, 30, 33 and 36°C. The results showed that the values of Sxj (age-stage–specific survival rate), fxj (age-stage-specific fecundity), lx (age specific survival rate) and mx (age-specific fecundity) increased as the temperature rose from 21 to 27°C, then decreased from 30 to 36°C. Temperature also had a significant effect on the net reproductive rate (R0), gross reproductive rate (GRR), intrinsic rate of increase (r) and finite rate of increase (λ). The value of these parameters were at low levels at 21, 33, and 36°C. Further, the r value decreased as the temperature rose from 24 to 30°C, while the GRR reached its highest level at 27°C. The results indicated that optimal growth and development of P. crisonalis occurred at temperatures between 24°C to 30°C when compared to the lowest temperature (21°C) and higher temperatures of 33°C and 36°C. PMID:28264022

  8. Effect of blade tenderization, aging time, and aging temperature on tenderness of beef longissimus lumborum and gluteus medius.

    PubMed

    King, D A; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Pfeiffer, K D; Nickelson, R; Koohmaraie, M

    2009-09-01

    Purveyors are concerned about the potential food safety risk of nonintact meat products and are seeking strategies to ensure adequate meat tenderness without blade tenderization. This study was conducted to determine the effects of blade tenderization and time and temperature of aging on beef longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) tenderness. Beef strip loins (n = 300) and top sirloin butts (n = 300) were assigned to storage at -0.5 or 3.3 degrees C for 12, 26, or 40 d. Cuts were blade tenderized (BT) or not blade tenderized (NBT) before steak cutting. One 2.54-cm steak from each subprimal was used for slice shear force determination and Western blotting of desmin. Desmin degradation was less (P < 0.05) in LL stored at -0.5 degrees C than LL stored at 3.3 degrees C (57 and 65%, respectively). Aging from 12 to 26 d increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis (50 to 65%) in LL. Regardless of aging time, BT reduced (P < 0.05) LL slice shear force values. Aging time did not affect (P > 0.05) slice shear force values of BT LL steaks (10.4, 9.9, and 9.4 kg for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively), but reduced (P < 0.05) NBT steak slice shear force values (15.1, 13.8, and 12.3 kg for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively). Greater temperature did not affect (P > 0.05) slice shear force values of BT LL steaks (10.2 and 9.6 kg for steaks aged at -0.5 and 3.3 degrees C, respectively), but improved (P < 0.05) slice shear force of NBT LL steaks (15.1 and 12.4, respectively). Aging at 3.3 degrees C increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis in GM steaks (43 and 54% for -0.5 and 3.3 degrees C, respectively). Longer aging times increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis (40, 46, and 60% for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively) in GM steaks. Blade-tenderized GM steaks had dramatically less (P < 0.05) slice shear force values than NBT steaks (13.7 and 19.9 kg, respectively). Raising aging temperature from -0.5 to 3.3 degrees C reduced (17.6 vs. 16.0 kg; P < 0.05) and increasing aging time from 12 d

  9. Mesozoic burial, Mesozoic and Cenozoic exhumation of the Funeral Mountains core complex, Death Valley, Southeastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyene, Mengesha Assefa

    2011-12-01

    The Funeral Mountains of Death Valley National Park, CA, provide an opportunity to date metamorphism resulting from crustal shortening and subsequent episodic extensional events in the Sevier hinterland. It was not clear whether crustal shortening and thus peak temperature metamorphism in the hinterland of the Sevier-Laramide orogenic wedge have occurred whether in Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous or somewhere between. Particularly ambiguous is the timing of crustal shortening in the deep levels of the hinterland of the Sevier belt, now manifest in the metamorphic core complexes, and how and when these middle-to-lower crustal rocks were exhumed. A 6-point garnet and a whole rock Savillax isochron from middle greenschist facies pelitic schist of the southeastern Funeral Mountains core complex yields an age of 162.1 +/- 5.8 Ma (2sigma). Composite PT paths determined from growth-zoned garnets from the same samples show a nearly isothermal pressure increase of ˜2 kbar at ˜490°C, suggesting thrust burial at 162.1 +/- 5.8 Ma. A second sample of Johnnie Formation from the comparatively higher metamorphic grade area to the northwest (East of Chloride Cliff) yielded an age of 172.9 +/- 4.9 Ma (2sigma) suggesting an increase of thrust burial age towards the higher grade rocks (northwest part of the core complex), consistent with paleo-depth interpretation and metamorphic grade. 40Ar/ 39Ar muscovite ages along footwall of the Boundary Canyon detachment fault and intra-core Chloride Cliff shear zone exhibit significant 40Ar/39Ar muscovite age differences. For samples from the immediate footwall of BCD, the pattern of ages decreasing toward the northwest is consistent with differences in depth of metamorphism, and for Late Cretaceous, top-to-northwest exhumation by motion along the precursor BCD; consistent with mesoscopic and microscopic kinematic studies. Samples from the footwall of the structurally-lower Chloride Cliff shear zone yield Tertiary 40Ar/39Ar

  10. Burial and exhumation of the western border of the Ukrainian shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreucci, Benedetta; Schito, Andrea; Aldega, Luca; Corrado, Sveva; Di Paolo, Lea; Zattin, Massimiliano; Szaniawski, Rafal; Jankowski, Leszek; Mazzoli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The Podolia region is located on the western border of the Eastern European Craton and it has been part, between the Paleozoic and the Miocene, of an epicontinental basin system. Using indicators of paleotemperature and low temperature thermochronometry, the burial and exhumation history of the Paleozoic succession has been reconstructed, in order to investigate the effects, on this region, of the orogenic cycles occurring along the plate margin. Maximum burial for Silurian and Devonian rocks occurred during the Devonian and Early Carboniferous at depths of 4-4.7 km, as constrained by vitrinite reflectance and mixed layers illite-smectite. Thermochronometric data indicate that exhumation through the 40-120°C temperature range occurred between the Late Triassic and the Early Jurassic, and that no significant burial occurred afterwards (temperatures remaining lower than ca. 60°C). These results point to a major exhumation event occurred at the same time of the Cimmerian orogenesis, taking place a few hundreds of Km away from this region. On the other hand no significant effect of the Alpine orogenesis was recorded, although the collisional front was located less than 100 Km from the Podolia region.

  11. Possible Role of Coryneform Bacteria in Age Gelation of Ultrahigh-Temperature-Processed Milk

    PubMed Central

    Keogh, Barbara P.; Pettingill, G.

    1982-01-01

    Two strains of psychrotrophic, gram-positive, proteolytic bacteria isolated from raw milk were identified as Arthrobacter or closely related coryneform species. We inoculated raw-milk samples with the strains (one strain per sample) and compared rates of gelation after ultrahigh-temperature processing with that of ultrahigh-temperature-processed controls. The trial indicated that either organism could play a role in age gelation of ultrahigh-temperature-processed milk. PMID:16346043

  12. Evidence for a little ice age and recent warming from a borehole temperature data inversion procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Fivez, J.; Thoen, J.

    2004-11-15

    In this article, we apply our analytical theory, published earlier in this journal, to obtain information on the earth surface temperature history from some borehole temperature data. Compared to the results of the five different methods applied to the same temperature data, our method seems to be easier, assumption-free, and yields internally consistent results. The results suggest a cooling a few centuries ago, followed by a continuing warming up to these days, in agreement with a little ice age scenario.

  13. EFFECT OF PRESTRAIN TEMPERATURE ON THE STRAIN AGING OF ALPHA-IRON

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Yield point measurements were made on polycrystalline specimens of alpha - iron deformed various amounts at 77, 195 and 273 K; aged; and redeformed at...formation of dislocation barriers during the initial low temperature deformation. The aging kinetics of polycrystalline alpha - iron wires deformed at

  14. Weak temperature dependence of ageing of structural properties in atomistic model glassformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkinson, Thomas; Crowther, Peter; Turci, Francesco; Royall, C. Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Ageing phenomena are investigated from a structural perspective in two binary Lennard-Jones glassformers, the Kob-Andersen and Wahnström mixtures. In both, the geometric motif assumed by the glassformer upon supercooling, the locally favoured structure (LFS), has been established. The Kob-Andersen mixture forms bicapped square antiprisms; the Wahnström model forms icosahedra. Upon ageing, we find that the structural relaxation time has a time-dependence consistent with a power law. However, the LFS population and potential energy increase and decrease, respectively, in a logarithmic fashion. Remarkably, over the time scales investigated, which correspond to a factor of 104 change in relaxation times, the rate at which these quantities age appears almost independent of temperature. Only at temperatures far below the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman temperature do the ageing dynamics slow.

  15. Evaluation method of leachate leaking from carcass burial site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, H.; Lee, M.; Lee, K.; Kim, S.; Kim, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T.; Han, J.

    2012-12-01

    More than 150,000 cattle carcasses and 3,140,000 pig carcasses were buried all over the nation in Korea because of 2010 outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD). Various disposal Techniques such as incineration, composting, rendering, and burial have been developed and applied to effectively dispose an animal carcass. Since a large number of carcasses should be disposed for a short-term period to prevent the spread of FMD virus, most of the carcasses were disposed by mass burial technique. However, a long-term management and monitoring of leachate discharges are required because mass burial can cause soil and groundwater contamination. In this study, we used key parameters related to major components of leachate such as NH4-N, NO3-N, Cl-, E.coli and electrical conductivity as potential leachate contamination indicator to determine leachate leakage from the site. We monitored 300 monitoring wells in both burial site and the monitoring well 5m away from burial sites to identify leachate leaking from burial site. Average concentration of NH3-N in 300 monitoring wells, both burial site and the well 5m away from burial sites, were 2,593 mg/L and 733 mg/L, respectively. 24% out of 300 monitoring wells showed higher than 10 mg/L NH4-N, 100 mg/L Cl- and than 800 μS/cm electrical conductivity. From this study, we set up 4 steps guidelines to evaluate leachate leakage like; step 1 : High potential step of leachate leakage, step 2 : Middle potential step of leachate leakage, step 3 : Low potential step of leachate leakage, step 4 : No leachate leakage. On the basis of this result, we moved 34 leachate leaking burial sites to other places safely and it is necessary to monitor continuously the monitoring wells for environmental protection and human health.

  16. Evaluation of oxidative behavior of polyolefin geosynthetics utilizing accelerated aging tests based on temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengjia

    Polyolefin geosynthetics are susceptible to oxidation, which eventually leads to the reduction in their engineering properties. In the application of polyolefin geosynthetics, a major issue is an estimate of the materials durability (i.e. service lifetime) under various aging conditions. Antioxidant packages are added to the polyolefin products to extend the induction time, during which antioxidants are gradually depleted and polymer oxidation reactions are prevented. In this PhD study, an improved laboratory accelerating aging method under elevated and high pressure environments was applied to evaluate the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the depletion of the antioxidants and the oxidation of polymers. Four types of commercial polyolefn geosynthetic materials selected for aging tests included HDPE geogrid, polypropylene woven and nonwoven geotextiles. A total of 33 different temperature/pressure aging conditions were used, with the incubation duration up to 24 months. The applied oven temperature ranged from 35°C to 105°C and the partial oxygen pressure ranged from 0.005 MPa to 6.3 MPa. Using the Oxidative Induction Time (OIT) test, the antioxidant depletion, which is correlated to the decrease of the OIT value, was found to follow apparent first-order decay. The OIT data also showed that, the antioxidant depletion rate increased with temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, while under constant temperatures, the rate increased exponentially with the partial pressure of oxygen. A modified Arrhenius model was developed to fit the antioxidant depletion rate as a function of temperature and pressure and to predict the antioxidant lifetime under various field conditions. This study has developed new temperature/pressure incubation aging test method with lifetime prediction models. Using this new technique, the antioxidant lifetime prediction results are close to regular temperature aging data while the aging duration can be reduced considerably

  17. Investigation on microstructure and magnetic properties of Sm2Co17 magnets aged at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Haibo; Chen, Hongsheng; Guo, Zhaohui; Pan, Wei; Zhu, Minggang; Li, Wei

    2011-04-01

    The Sm2Co17 magnet is the most promising candidate for high temperature applications. The microstructure evolutions and losses in the magnetic properties of the magnet in high temperature aging status have been investigated. The Sm(CobalFe0.22Cu0.068Zr0.025)7.75 magnets were prepared using the conventional powder sintering method. The magnet samples were isothermally aged at 500°C, 600 °C, and 700 °C for 72 h, respectively. The magnetic properties and the demagnetization curve were kept invariable for the magnet samples aged at 500 °C. The coercivity Hcj of the magnet samples decreased with increasing aging temperature. The Hcj decreased from 29.2 kOe for the original status samples to 10.8 kOe for the samples aged at 700 °C. The cell structure in the magnet is not destroyed after aging at 700 °C for 72 h. The deterioration of the magnetic properties and the demagnetization-curve squareness was caused by an increasing lattice mismatch between the 2:17R cell phase and the cell-boundary 1:5H phase, and by an increasing cell diameter for the magnet sample aged at a high temperature.

  18. Interaction of hen production type, age, and temperature on laying pattern and egg quality.

    PubMed

    Tumová, E; Gous, R M

    2012-05-01

    The effect of production type (layer vs. broiler breeder), age (onset and end of laying cycle), and temperature (20 and 28°C) on various aspects of the egg production process and quality was evaluated. Highly significant differences were detected between laying hens and broiler breeders (P ≤ 0.001) in all production parameters. Similarly, age significantly affected rate of lay (P ≤ 0.001; 75.4% for young vs. 62.6% for old), mean sequence length (P ≤ 0.001; 7.7 d for young vs. 2.6 d for old), and time of oviposition (P ≤ 0.001). However, there was no effect of temperature on rate of lay, sequence length, or feed intake. Significant interactions between hen type and age were apparent in rate of lay (P ≤ 0.001), sequence length (P ≤ 0.001), and time of oviposition (P ≤ 0.001). A significant interaction between production type and age (P ≤ 0.015) was evident in egg weight, but egg component proportions were dependent only on hen type. Egg shape index was significantly affected by age (P ≤ 0.004), by temperature (P ≤ 0.028), and an interaction between type and age (P ≤ 0.001). Specific gravity declined with age (P ≤ 0.035) and increasing temperature (P ≤ 0.013).

  19. Identification and Tracing Groundwater Contamination by Livestock Burial Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Ha, K.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K.

    2011-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) or hoof-and-mouth disease is a severe plague for animal farming that affects cloven-hoofed animals such as cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Since it is highly infectious and can be easily proliferated by infected animals, contaminated equipments, vehicles, clothing, people, and predators. It is widely known that the virus responsible for FMD is a picornavirus, the prototypic member of the genus Aphthovirus. A serious outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease, leading to the stamping out of 3.53 millions of pigs and cattle and the construction of 4,538 burial sites until 15th March, 2011. The build-up of carcass burial should inevitably produce leachate by the decomposition of buried livestock affecting the surround environment such as air, soil, groundwater, and surface water. The most important issues which are currently raised by scientists are groundwater contamination by leachate from the livestock burial sites. This study examined the current status of FMD outbreak occurred in 2010-2011 and the issues of groundwater contamination by leachate from livestock burial sites. The hydrogeochemical, geophysical, and hydrogeological studies were executed to identify and trace groundwater contamination by leachate from livestock burial sites. Generally livestock mortality leachate contains high concentrations of NH3-N, HCO3-, Cl-, SO42-, K+, Na+, P along with relative lesser amounts of iron, calcium, and magnesium. The groundwater chemical data around four burial sites showed high NH3-N, HCO3-, and K+ suggesting the leachate leakage from burial sites. This is also proved by resistivity monitoring survey and tracer tests. The simulation results of leachate dispersion showed the persistent detrimental impacts for groundwater environment for a long time (~50 years). It is need to remove the leachate of burial sites to prevent the dispersion of leachate from livestock burial to groundwater and to monitor the groundwater quality. The most important

  20. The Influence of Laterally Migrating Topographic Features on Low-temperature Thermochronometric Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeleit, E. C.; Brandon, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the simplified notion of erosion as a top down process, landforms evolve by both vertical and horizontal migration of surface features. Low-temperature thermochronometry has the potential to resolve laterally migrating features if vertical relief is the same scale as the closure depth of the thermochronometer. In actively eroding landscapes this is about 2 km for (U-Th)/He thermochronometry. The issue of migrating surface topography has been addressed at a large scale in the cases of mountain divide migration and plateau retreat, but not for glacial and fluvial valley formation. Here we show that valley walls will have distinct 'C' shaped patterns of cooling age vs. elevation in valleys formed by retreating escarpments. The other end-member, a prograding escarpment will exhibit a distinct '7' shaped age-elevation profile. Our schematic model simulates propagation of an escarpment in a valley for a range of vertical rock velocities and horizontal escarpment velocities and cooling ages are predicted for a range of isotherms. High temperature isotherms are essentially flat and the exhumation rate determined from the cooling age-elevation profile is exactly equal to the vertical rock velocity regardless of the horizontal velocity of the migrating feature. Very low temperature isotherms are highly perturbed by the overlying topography and the magnitude and direction of the horizontal rock velocity towards the surface greatly influence the shape of the cooling age-elevation profile. We show that valleys carved by headward erosion have relatively older low temperature cooling ages at low elevations, characterized by a 'C' shaped cooling age-elevation profile. This pattern of cooling ages is also expected for landscapes that have undergone a decrease in topographic relief, highlighting the potential of misinterpretation of low-temperature thermochronometric data. Traditional analysis of thermochronometric data collected along vertical transects has focused on

  1. Multiple episodes of dolomitization and dolomite recrystallization during shallow burial in Upper Jurassic shelf carbonates: eastern Swabian Alb, southern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhold, C.

    1998-10-01

    The Upper Jurassic of the eastern Swabian Alb is composed of oolitic platform sands with associated microbe-siliceous sponge mounds at the platform margins. They are surrounded by argillaceous or calcareous mudstones and marl-limestone alternations, deposited in adjacent marl basins. Partial to complete dolomitization is predominantly confined to the mound facies. Six types of dolomite, as well as one type of ankerite, document a complex diagenetic history during shallow burial with multiple episodes of dolomite formation and recrystallization. The earliest massive matrix dolomitization is Ca-rich, has slightly depleted oxygen isotope values relative to Late Jurassic seawater, and carbon isotopic values in equilibrium with Late Jurassic seawater. This initial massive matrix dolomitization occurred during latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous and is related to pressure dissolution during very shallow burial at temperatures of at least 50°C. Hydrologic conditions and mass-balance calculations indicate that burial compaction provided sufficient fluids for dolomitization. Mg is derived from negligibly modified seawater, that was expelled from the adjacent off-reef strata into the mound facies. Position of the mounds along the platform margins controlled the distribution of the shallow-burial dolomite. Covariant trends between textural modification, increasing stoichiometry, partial changes in trace element content (Mn, Fe, Sr) and depletion in stable isotopes as well as distinctive CL pattern illustrate two recrystallization phases of the precursor matrix dolomite during further burial at elevated temperatures. Strong Sr enrichment of the second phase of recrystallized dolomite is ascribed to Sr-rich meteoric waters descending from overlying aragonite-bearing reef limestones or evaporite-bearing peritidal carbonates. Late-stage coarsely crystalline dolomite cements occur as vug and fracture fillings and formed during burial. Ankerite, associated with sulphide and

  2. Variation in the effects of burial in different peatland successional stages on seed survival of four wetland species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egawa, Chika

    2017-01-01

    The availability of viable seeds in soil helps to determine the success of ecological restoration in disturbed habitats. Although seed survival in soil generally increases with an increase in burial depth, whether the effects of burial on seed survival are comparable across different sites is unclear. In this study, I tested the hypothesis that the positive effects of burial on seed survival decrease as vegetation develops through succession. Four wetland species, Drosera rotundifolia, Lobelia sessilifolia, Rhynchospora alba and Moliniopsis japonica, were used for the study. The four species differ in their light requirement for germination; i.e., D. rotundifolia, L. sessilifolia and R. alba germinate best in light, whereas M. japonica germinates equally well in light and darkness. The seeds of these species were buried for two years at three depths (litter, 0 and 4 cm) in three successional stages with different amounts of vegetation and litter in a post-mined peatland. The photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and temperature at each of litter layer, 0 cm and 4 cm depths were measured for each successional stage. The between-depth differences in PAR and temperature fluctuations decreased as succession progressed. For the three light-demanding species, burial promoted seed survival more in the initial successional stage than in the later successional stages, whereas for M. japonica, burial promoted seed survival equally in all successional stages. This study revealed significant variation in the effects of burial on seed survival, particularly for light-sensitive seeds, and that the soil surface layers in vegetated sites can contain persistent seeds, which could be used as a seed source in restoration.

  3. Tectonic significance of precambrian apatite fission-track ages from the midcontinent United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, K.D.; Naeser, C.W.; Babel, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Apparent apatite fission-track ages from drill core penetrating basement on the flank of the Transcontinental Arch in northwestern Iowa range from 934 ?? 86 to 641 ?? 90 Ma. These ages, the oldest reported in North America, record at least two thermal events. The 934 Ma age, which is synchronous with KAr ages in the Grenville Province and many KAr whole-rock and RbSr isochron ages from the Lake Superior region, may document basement cooling caused by regional uplift and erosion of the crust. The remaining fission-track ages are products of a more recent thermal event, relative to the age of the samples, which raised temperatures into the zone of partial annealing. Heating may have occurred between the Middle Ordovician and Middle Cretaceous by burial of the basement with additional sediment. It is estimated that burial raised temperatures in the part of the basement sampled by the core to between 50 and 75??C. These temperature estimates imply paleogeothermal gradients of about 20??C/km, approximately two and one-half times present-day values, and burial of the basement by an additional 2-3 km of sediment. ?? 1986.

  4. SECTION D, WITH FLAT GROUP BURIAL MARKER AT RIGHT FOREGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECTION D, WITH FLAT GROUP BURIAL MARKER AT RIGHT FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  5. Bone foreshafts from a clovis burial in southwestern montana.

    PubMed

    Lahren, L; Bonnichsen, R

    1974-10-11

    Formal and functional analyses of bone artifacts from a Clovis burial in southwestern Montana suggest that they were constructed to serve as (detachable or nondetachable) foreshafts for attaching fluted projectile points to lance shafts.

  6. [The craniofacial identification of the remains from the Yekaterinburg burial].

    PubMed

    Abramov, S S

    1998-01-01

    Based on expert evaluation of remains of 7 members of Imperial Romanov family and 4 persons in their attendance, the author demonstrates methodological approaches to identification craniocephalic studies in cases with group burials.

  7. The effect of the method of burial on adipocere formation.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Shari L; Stuart, Barbara H; Dent, Boyd B

    2005-11-10

    A controlled laboratory experiment was conducted in order to investigate the effect of the method of burial (i.e. the presence of coffin and clothing) on the formation of adipocere. This study follows previous studies by the authors who have investigated the effect of physical conditions on the formation of adipocere present in a controlled burial environment. The study utilises infrared spectroscopy to provide a preliminary lipid profile of the remains following a 12 month decomposition period. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was employed as a technique for determining the salts of fatty acids present in adipocere. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used as the confirmatory test for the identification and determination of the chemical composition of adipocere which formed in the controlled burial environments. The results suggest that coffins will retard the rate at which adipocere forms but that clothing enhances its formation. The results concur with previous observations on adipocere formation in burial environments.

  8. 38 CFR 3.1709 - Transportation expenses for burial in a national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for burial in a national cemetery. 3.1709 Section 3.1709 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: Allowances & Expenses Paid by Va A08se3. § 3.1709 Transportation expenses for burial in a national cemetery. (a) General. VA...

  9. 25 CFR 20.324 - When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? 20.324... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.324 When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? In the absence of other resources, the Bureau can provide Burial Assistance...

  10. 25 CFR 20.324 - When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? 20.324... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.324 When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? In the absence of other resources, the Bureau can provide Burial Assistance...

  11. 38 CFR Pt. 3, Subpt. B, Nt. - Burial of a veteran whose remains are unclaimed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Burial of a veteran whose...' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: Allowances & Expenses Paid by Va A08se3. Pt. 3, Subpt. B, Nt. Burial of a veteran whose remains are unclaimed. (a)...

  12. 25 CFR 20.324 - When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? 20.324... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.324 When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? In the absence of other resources, the Bureau can provide Burial Assistance...

  13. 25 CFR 20.326 - Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? 20.326... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.326 Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? Transportation costs directly associated with burials are normally a part...

  14. 25 CFR 20.326 - Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? 20.326... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.326 Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? Transportation costs directly associated with burials are normally a part...

  15. 25 CFR 20.324 - When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? 20.324... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.324 When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? In the absence of other resources, the Bureau can provide Burial Assistance...

  16. 25 CFR 20.325 - Who can apply for Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who can apply for Burial Assistance? 20.325 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.325 Who can apply for Burial Assistance? If you are a relative of a deceased Indian, you can apply for burial assistance for the...

  17. 38 CFR - § 3.1705 Burial allowance based on non-service-connected death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false § 3.1705 Burial... OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: Allowances & Expenses Paid by Va A08se3. § 3.1705 Burial allowance based on non-service-connected death. (a) General rule. VA will pay...

  18. 25 CFR 20.325 - Who can apply for Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who can apply for Burial Assistance? 20.325 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.325 Who can apply for Burial Assistance? If you are a relative of a deceased Indian, you can apply for burial assistance for the...

  19. 25 CFR 20.326 - Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? 20.326... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.326 Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? Transportation costs directly associated with burials are normally a part...

  20. 38 CFR 3.1600 - Payment of burial expenses of deceased veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Payment of burial... VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1600 Payment of burial expenses of deceased veterans. For the purpose of payment of burial expenses the term veteran includes a person who died during a...

  1. 25 CFR 20.326 - Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? 20.326... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.326 Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? Transportation costs directly associated with burials are normally a part...

  2. 25 CFR 20.325 - Who can apply for Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who can apply for Burial Assistance? 20.325 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.325 Who can apply for Burial Assistance? If you are a relative of a deceased Indian, you can apply for burial assistance for the...

  3. 25 CFR 20.325 - Who can apply for Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can apply for Burial Assistance? 20.325 Section 20... AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.325 Who can apply for Burial Assistance? If you are a relative of a deceased Indian, you can apply for burial assistance for the...

  4. 25 CFR 20.324 - When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? 20.324... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.324 When can the Bureau provide Burial Assistance? In the absence of other resources, the Bureau can provide Burial Assistance...

  5. 25 CFR 20.325 - Who can apply for Burial Assistance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who can apply for Burial Assistance? 20.325 Section 20.325... SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.325 Who can apply for Burial Assistance? If you are a relative of a deceased Indian, you can apply for burial assistance for the...

  6. 25 CFR 20.326 - Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? 20.326... ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Direct Assistance Burial Assistance § 20.326 Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? Transportation costs directly associated with burials are normally a part...

  7. [Ideas and projects for Napoleonic Naples burial reform].

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Diego

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to describe the attempts made by Napoleonic administrators in Naples to reforming the urban burials system, paying attention, firstly, on medical theories at the basis of the new cemetery projects, secondarily on people involved in the reform, especially technicians. The article deals also with the origins of the European need for burial reform in 18th century and its following establishment by the Napoleonic laws, through an hard compromise between traditional practices and hygienic principles.

  8. LLCE burial container high density polyethylene chemical compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, E.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    An independent chemical compatibility review of LLCE HDPE polyethylene burial containers was conducted to evaluate the container resistance to the chemicals and constituents thought to reside within the Tank Farms. The study concluded that the LLCE Burial Container fabricated from HDPE Polyethylene was a good choice for this application. The reviewer was unaware that the specification for these containers require 2 - 3 percent finely dispensed carbon black which allows long term storage outside.

  9. The development of a ductility-based aging model for low temperature aged U-6Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, B

    2005-03-24

    This study focuses on the ductility evaluation of low-temperature (100 and 200 C) aged U-6Nb alloy. The objective is to develop a ductility-based aging model to improve lifetime prediction for weapon components in the stockpile environment. Literature review shows that the work hardening n-value and the strain-rate hardening mvalue are the two most important metallurgical factors for the uniform and the post-uniform (necking) ductility control, respectively. Unfortunately, both n and m values of the U-6Nb alloy are lacking. The study shows that the total ductility of U-6Nb is dominated by the uniform ductility, which deteriorates in both 100 C and 200 C aging. Further analysis shows that the uniform ductility correlates well with the work hardening n-value of the later stage deformation in which dislocation-slip is the mechanism. The kinetics of the loss of uniform ductility and the associated reduction in work-hardening n-value in low temperature aging will be used for the development of a ductility-based aging model. The necking ductility appears to be a minor but significant factor in the total ductility of U-6Nb. It does not show a clear trend due to large data scatter. The uncertain nature of necking failure may always hinder a reliable measurement of necking ductility. Consequently, a precise measurement of strain-rate hardening m-value could be a viable alternative to model the metallurgical contribution to the necking ductility. The conventional strain rate step-change method and the ABI (Automated-Ball-Indentation) test both show promising result in m-value measurement.

  10. On the Use of Accelerated Aging Methods for Screening High Temperature Polymeric Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Grayson, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A rational approach to the problem of accelerated testing of high temperature polymeric composites is discussed. The methods provided are considered tools useful in the screening of new materials systems for long-term application to extreme environments that include elevated temperature, moisture, oxygen, and mechanical load. The need for reproducible mechanisms, indicator properties, and real-time data are outlined as well as the methodologies for specific aging mechanisms.

  11. Constitutive Modeling and Testing of Polymer Matrix Composites Incorporating Physical Aging at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are desirable for structural materials in diverse applications such as aircraft, civil infrastructure and biomedical implants because of their improved strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. For example, the next generation military and commercial aircraft requires applications for high strength, low weight structural components subjected to elevated temperatures. A possible disadvantage of polymer-based composites is that the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix often change significantly over time due to the exposure of elevated temperatures and environmental factors. For design, long term exposure (i.e. aging) of PMC's must be accounted for through constitutive models in order to accurately assess the effects of aging on performance, crack initiation and remaining life. One particular aspect of this aging process, physical aging, is considered in this research.

  12. Telomeric attrition with age and temperature in Eastern mosquitofish ( Gambusia holbrooki)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollings, Nicky; Miller, Emily; Olsson, Mats

    2014-03-01

    Telomeric attrition has repeatedly been found to correlate with the ageing of organisms; however, recent research is increasingly showing that the determinants of attrition dynamics are not well understood. This study examined the relative telomere lengths in Eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, kept at different temperatures and at different ages. Newly born fry were randomly selected for one of four treatment groups: 20, 30, 20-30, and 30-20 °C, where the third and fourth treatment groups were gradually changed from their starting temperature to their final temperature between days 10 and 14. Telomere length was measured, and it was found that length decreased with age and that fish exposed to the 20 °C treatment had significantly shorter telomeres than those that received the 30-20 °C treatment. Telomeric attrition with age agrees with results previously found in studies of telomeres; however, the variation in attrition with temperature was not simply predictable and may be the synergistic effects of temperature and some other factor.

  13. Low-Temperature Aging and Phase Stability of U6Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M; Briant, C L; Chasse, K R

    2003-11-21

    Aging behavior and phase stability of a water-quenched U-6wt%Nb (U-14at%Nb) alloy artificially aged at 200 C and naturally aged at ambient temperature for 15 years have been investigated using Vickers hardness test, X-ray diffraction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Age hardening/softening phenomenon is observed from the artificially aged samples according to microhardness measurement. The age hardening can be rationalized by the occurrence of spinodal decomposition, or fine scale of Nb segregation, which results in the formation of a nano-scale modulated structure within the artificially aged samples. Coarsening of the modulated structure after prolonged aging leads to the age softening. The occurrence of chemical ordering (disorder-order transformation) is found in the naturally aged sample based upon the observations of antiphase domain boundaries (APB's) and superlattice diffraction patterns. A possible superlattice structure is accordingly proposed for the chemically ordered phase observed in the naturally aged alloy sample.

  14. Spent fuel temperature and age determination from the analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopics

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Mark R; Eccleston, George W; Bedell, Jeffrey J; Lockard, Chanelle M

    2009-01-01

    The capability to determine the age (time since irradiation) of spent fuel can be useful for verification and safeguards. While the age of spent fuel can be determined based on measurements of short-lived fission products, these measurements are not routinely done nor generally reported. As an alternative, age can also be determined if the uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopic values are available. Uranium isotopics are not strongly affected by fuel temperature, and bumup is determined from the {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U isotopic values. Age is calculated after estimating the {sup 241}Pu at the end of irradiation while accounting for the fuel temperature, which is determined from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 240}Pu. Burnup and age determinations are calibrated to reactor models that provide uranium and plutonium isotopics over the range of fuel irradiation. The reactor model must contain sufficient fidelity on details of the reactor type, fuel burnup, irradiation history, initial fuel enrichment and fuel temperature to obtain accurate isotopic calculations. If the latter four are unknown, they can be derived from the uranium and plutonium isotopics. Fuel temperature has a significant affect on the production of plutonium isotopics; therefore, one group cross section reactor models, such as ORIGEN, cannot be used for these calculations. Multi-group cross section set codes, such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TRITON code, must be used.

  15. Motor excitability measurements: the influence of gender, body mass index, age and temperature in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Casanova, I; Diaz, A; Pinto, S; de Carvalho, M

    2014-04-01

    The technique of threshold tracking to test axonal excitability gives information about nodal and internodal ion channel function. We aimed to investigate variability of the motor excitability measurements in healthy controls, taking into account age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and small changes in skin temperature. We examined the left median nerve of 47 healthy controls using the automated threshold-tacking program, QTRAC. Statistical multiple regression analysis was applied to test relationship between nerve excitability measurements and subject variables. Comparisons between genders did not find any significant difference (P>0.2 for all comparisons). Multiple regression analysis showed that motor amplitude decreases with age and temperature, stimulus-response slope decreases with age and BMI, and that accommodation half-time decrease with age and temperature. The changes related to demographic features on TRONDE protocol parameters are small and less important than in conventional nerve conduction studies. Nonetheless, our results underscore the relevance of careful temperature control, and indicate that interpretation of stimulus-response slope and accommodation half-time should take into account age and BMI. In contrast, gender is not of major relevance to axonal threshold findings in motor nerves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Tritium in the burial ground of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    This memorandum reviews the available information on tritium-contaminated material discarded to burial grounds. Tritium was the first isotope studied because it represents the most immediate concern with regard to release to the environment. Substantial amounts of tritium are known to be present in the ground water underneath the area, and outcropping of this ground water in springs and seeps has been observed. The response to this release of tritium from the burial ground is a current concern. The amount of tritium emplaced in the burial ground facilities is very uncertain, however, some general conclusions can be made. In particular, most of the tritium buried is associated with spent equipment and other waste, rather than spent melts. Correspondingly, most of the tritium in the ground water seems to be associated with burials of this type, rather than the spent melts. Maps are presented showing the location of burials of tritiated waste by type, and the location of the largest individual burials according to COBRA records.

  17. Phanerozoic burial and unroofing of the western Slave craton and Wopmay orogen from apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry: assessing links between surface and deep-seated geodynamic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. K.; Flowers, R. M.; Bowring, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Low temperature thermochronology of cratonic regions offers the potential for elucidating linkages between burial and unroofing patterns, surface uplift and subsidence, and lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions. The Slave craton contains >4.0 Ga rocks, is underlain by a cold, thick, chemically depleted lithospheric mantle root, was stabilized by late Archean time, and then surrounded by Proterozoic orogens. Despite its insulation from plate margin processes and apparent stability, both mafic dikes and kimberlites have repeatedly disrupted the Slave craton in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. Phanerozoic sedimentary xenoliths contained in kimberlites that range in age from ca. 610 to 0.45 Ma record the past extent of strata that were subsequently denuded, indicating that the Slave craton underwent a more dynamic history of burial and unroofing than widely recognized. These observations raise the question of whether cratonic deposition and denudation was influenced by Phanerozoic thermal and mechanical perturbations associated with kimberlite emplacement, changing mantle flow regimes, and/or far-field plate boundary processes. We present new apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry data for nine samples along an E-W transect from the interior of the Slave craton into the adjacent Paleoproterozoic Wopmay orogen to more comprehensively constrain the region's burial and unroofing history. The transect was designed both to address the issues outlined above and to specifically assess how the cratonic architecture across the Paleoproterozoic suture between these two terranes may have controlled the lithospheric response to Phanerozoic perturbations. All samples yielded Permian to mid-Triassic apatite (U-Th)/He dates. When combined with geologic and stratigraphic constraints, the results can be modeled as consistent with a history characterized by complete He loss from the apatites between the Devonian and Triassic. Assuming a surface temperature of 5°C and a 20°C/km geotherm

  18. Temperature of foods sent by parents of preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Almansour, Fawaz D; Sweitzer, Sara J; Magness, Allison A; Calloway, Eric E; McAllaster, Michael R; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia R; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Briley, Margaret E

    2011-09-01

    To measure the temperatures of foods in sack lunches of preschool-aged children before consumption at child care centers. All parents of 3- to 5-year-old children in full-time child care at 9 central Texas centers were invited to participate in the study. Foods packed by the parents for lunch were individually removed from the sack and immediately measured with noncontact temperature guns 1.5 hours before food was served to the children. Type of food and number of ice packs in the lunch sack were also recorded. Descriptive analyses were conducted by using SPSS 13.0 for Windows. Lunches, with at least 1 perishable item in each, were assessed from 235 parent-child dyads. Approximately 39% (n = 276) of the 705 lunches analyzed had no ice packs, 45.1% (n = 318) had 1 ice pack, and 88.2% (n = 622) of lunches were at ambient temperatures. Only 1.6% (n = 22) of perishable items (n = 1361) were in the safe temperature zone. Even with multiple ice packs, the majority of lunch items (>90%) were at unsafe temperatures. These results provide initial data on how frequently sack lunches sent by parents of preschool-aged children are kept at unsafe temperatures. Education of parents and the public must be focused on methods of packing lunches that allow the food to remain in the safe temperature zone to prevent foodborne illness.

  19. Changes in CaCO3 Burial Trump the Biological Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toggweiler, J.; Dunne, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The dramatic increases in atmospheric CO2 at the ends of ice ages are usually attributed to a one-two punch coming from the ocean. First, a weakened biological pump vents organically cycled CO2 from the deep ocean via changes in the ventilation of the deep ocean around Antarctica. The initial CO2 increase is then augmented by an enhancement of CaCO3 burial due to a process called CaCO3 compensation (after Broecker, W. S and T.-H. Peng, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 1, 15-29, 1987). Here, we argue that the importance of the biological pump has been exaggerated. The main effect comes from circulation-induced changes in the burial of CaCO3. As shown in a recent paper by Andreas Schmittner and co-authors (Schmittner, A., E. Brook and J. Ahn, Impact of the ocean's overturning circulation on atmospheric CO2, in Ocean Circulation: Mechanisms and Impacts, Geophys. Monogr. 173, A. Schmittner, J. Chiang, and S. Hemming, eds., pp. 209-246, AGU, 2007) changes in the ventilation of the deep ocean around Antarctica gave rise to 20-30 ppm increases in atmospheric CO2 every 5,000-7,000 years during isotope stages 3 and 4 (30,000 to 70,000 years ago). None of these venting events gave rise to a compensation response. Meanwhile, Jaccard et al. (Science, 308, 1003-1006, 2005) show that all the big CO2 increases during terminations through stage 11 were accompanied by huge increases in CaCO3 burial. This suggests that the enhanced burial of CaCO3 is obligatory rather than compensatory with respect to the dramatic CO2 increases. Broecker and Peng's compensation idea is based on an assumption that the rain of CaCO3 to the sea floor is the same everywhere. More specifically, it assumes that there is no spatial correlation between the production of CaCO3 at the surface and the burial on the sea floor. We find instead that the production and burial of CaCO3 tend to be co-located in regional "hot spots" and that burial in the hot spots balances the input of Ca++ and HCO3- ions in rivers. The

  20. Design and evaluation of a bioreactor with application to forensic burial environments.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Melissa A; Weisensee, Katherine E; Mikhailova, Elena A; Harman, Melinda K

    2015-12-01

    Existing forensic taphonomic methods lack specificity in estimating the postmortem interval (PMI) in the period following active decomposition. New methods, such as the use of citrate concentration in bone, are currently being considered; however, determining the applicability of these methods in differing environmental contexts is challenging. This research aims to design a forensic bioreactor that can account for environmental factors known to impact decomposition, specifically temperature, moisture, physical damage from animals, burial depth, soil pH, and organic matter content. These forensically relevant environmental variables were characterized in a soil science context. The resulting metrics were soil temperature regime, soil moisture regime, slope, texture, soil horizon, cation exchange capacity, soil pH, and organic matter content. Bioreactor chambers were constructed using sterilized thin-walled polystyrene boxes housed in calibrated temperature units. Gravesoil was represented using mineral soil (Ultisols), and organic soil proxy for Histosols, horticulture mix. Gravesoil depth was determined using mineral soil horizons A and Bt2 to simulate surface scatter and shallow grave burial respectively. A total of fourteen different environmental conditions were created and controlled successfully over a 90-day experiment. These results demonstrate successful implementation and control of forensic bioreactor simulating precise environments in a single research location, rather than site-specific testing occurring in different geographic regions. Bone sections were grossly assessed for weathering characteristics, which revealed notable differences related to exposure to different temperature regimes and soil types. Over the short 90-day duration of this experiment, changes in weathering characteristics were more evident across the different temperature regimes rather than the soil types. Using this methodology, bioreactor systems can be created to replicate many

  1. Proton NMR Study of Room Temperature Aging in Isotactic Polypropylene and Ethylene/Octene Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhart, David; Snyder, Chad; Alamo, Rufina

    2003-03-01

    The Bloch-decay proton spectra of 2 isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) and 2 ethylene/octene (EO) copolymers have been monitored as a function of room-temperature aging time, t_age, from 10 min to 4 d. Conditions for initiating aging were air-quench from the melt for EO and 6 min annealing near 90 ^oC for iPP. We focused on elucidating the nature of aging, both morphologically and via concepts like secondary crystallization. To this end, some multiple-pulse experiments were also conducted. Aging always reduced the population of the most mobile species. It was linear in log(t_age)and the (minimum) amount of motionally transformed material was only a few percent. In iPP, aging was dominated by secondary crystallization rather than a general densification of the amorphous region. Aging-induced crystallization in EO is less well defined. The iPP samples had significant contrast in defect content, mass dispersion, and amorphous content; however, the contrast in aging amounts was only modest. No definitive morphological placement of the aging structures formed could be deduced; but possibilites consistent with the data will be discussed.

  2. Multiple Palaeoproterozoic carbon burial episodes and excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. P.; Prave, A. R.; Condon, D. J.; Lepland, A.; Fallick, A. E.; Romashkin, A. E.; Medvedev, P. V.; Rychanchik, D. V.

    2015-08-01

    Organic-rich rocks (averaging 2-5% total organic carbon) and positive carbonate-carbon isotope excursions (δ13C > + 5 ‰ and locally much higher, i.e. the Lomagundi-Jatuli Event) are hallmark features of Palaeoproterozoic successions and are assumed to archive a global event of unique environmental conditions following the c. 2.3 Ga Great Oxidation Event. Here we combine new and published geochronology that shows that the main Palaeoproterozoic carbon burial episodes (CBEs) preserved in Russia, Gabon and Australia were temporally discrete depositional events between c. 2.10 and 1.85 Ga. In northwest Russia we can also show that timing of the termination of the Lomagundi-Jatuli Event may have differed by up to 50 Ma between localities, and that Ni mineralisation occurred at c. 1920 Ma. Further, CBEs have traits in common with Mesozoic Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs); both are exceptionally organic-rich relative to encasing strata, associated with contemporaneous igneous activity and marked by organic carbon isotope profiles that exhibit a stepped decrease followed by a stabilisation period and recovery. Although CBE strata are thicker and of greater duration than OAEs (100 s of metres versus metres, ∼106 years versus ∼105 years), their shared characteristics hint at a commonality of cause(s) and feedbacks. This suggests that CBEs represent processes that can be either basin-specific or global in nature and a combination of circumstances that are not unique to the Palaeoproterozoic. Our findings urge circumspection and re-consideration of models that assume CBEs are a Deep Time singularity.

  3. The effect of aging, temperature and brine composition on the mechanical strength of chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsnes, Reidar Inge; Nermoen, Anders; Stødle, Trond; Vika Storm, Eirik; Vadla Madland, Merete

    2014-05-01

    Chalk strength has been of great focus for several research communities since the 1980s when the Ekofisk subsidence problem was discovered. Sea water injection was initiated in 1987 to improve the oil production and to re-pressurize the reservoirs to halt the subsidence. The oil production was improved significantly, but the reservoir compaction in the water saturated regions continued, in contrast to the regions with no water breakthrough. This observation indicates a water weakening effect of the chalk. Extensive studies have been performed during the last decades to enlighten how the brine chemistry alters the rock mechanical properties. These studies have shown that the elastic bulk modulus, yield strength, creep and the deformation rate at constant stress conditions depend on the pore fluid composition. In general, the injected brine is in non-equilibrium with the rock surface inducing alteration of the rock mineralogy. In this study we examined two aspects of the mechanical strength, namely the bulk modulus and the onset of yield during hydrostatic stress loading with 0.7 MPa pore pressure. The test program consisted of aged and un-aged cores, ambient and 130°C test temperature, and four brine compositions: MgCl2, NaCl, Na2SO4, and synthetic sea water (SSW) at ion strengths of 0.657 M. The aging was performed by submerging saturated cores in a closed container with the respective test brine for three weeks at 130°C. Un-aged cores were saturated the same day as they were tested. For each brine composition we present four test setups; (a) aged and tested at 130°C, (b) aged and tested at ambient temperature, (c) un-aged and tested at 130°C, and (d) un-aged and tested at ambient conditions. The main results from our study are: 1. By using NaCl and MgCl2 as saturating brines, neither the test temperature nor the aging procedure affected the yield stress and bulk modulus significantly. 2. Using Na2SO4, the yield point and bulk moduli were reduced if the core

  4. Age-related changes of serum mitochondrial uncoupling 1, rumen and rectal temperature in goats.

    PubMed

    Arfuso, Francesca; Rizzo, Maria; Giannetto, Claudia; Giudice, Elisabetta; Fazio, Francesco; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Thermoregulatory processes are induced not only by exposure to cold or heat but also by a variety of physiological situations including age, fasting and food intake that result in changes in body temperature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the differences in serum mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), rumen temperature (TRUMEN) and rectal temperature (TRECTAL) values between adult and kids goats. Ten adult male Maltese goats aged 3-5 years old (Group A) and 30 male kids, raised for meat, were enrolled in this study. The kids were equally divided into 3 groups according to their age: Group B included kids aged 3 months, Group C included kids aged 4 months and Group D included kids aged 5 months. Blood samples and measurements of TRUMEN and TRECTAL were obtained from each animal. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to evaluate the effect of age on the studied parameters. Statistically significant higher serum UCP1 levels (P<0.001) were found in Group A as compared to Groups B, C and D. Higher TRUMEN values (P<0.001) were found in Group A than in Groups B, C and D, and in Group B than in Groups C and D. Group A showed lower TRECTAL values (P<0.001) than Groups B, C and D. The Pearson's Correlation test was applied to assess significant relationship among studied parameters showing a statistically significant negative correlation between the values of TRECTAL and serum UCP1 in all studied Groups (P<0.001). These results indicate that goats have good control of body temperature suggesting that further details about the thermogenic capacity and the function of UCP1 in kids and adult goats are worth exploring.

  5. Hydrology of the Melton Valley radioactive-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, D.A.; Bradley, M.W.

    1988-12-31

    Burial grounds 4, 5, and 6 were used sequentially from 1951 to the present for the disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste by burial in shallow trenches and auger holes. Abundant rainfall, a generally thin unsaturated zone, geologic media of inherently low permeability, and the operational practices employed have contributed to partial saturation of the buried waste, leaching of radionuclides, and transport of dissolved matter from the burial areas. Two primary methods of transport from these sites are by dissolution in circulating ground water, and the overflow of fluids in trenches and subsequent flow across land surface. The waste-disposal areas are underlain by the Conasauga Group (Cambrian age), a complex sequence of mudstone, siltstone, and limestone interbeds grading from one lithotype to the other, both laterally and vertically. Compressional forces that caused regional thrust faulting also caused much internal deformation of the beds. Folds, bedding-plane faults, and joints are widespread. Small solution openings have developed in some areas where the structurally-related openings have provided ingress to ground water.

  6. Structural transition in sputter-deposited amorphous germanium films by aging at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Okugawa, M.; Nakamura, R. Numakura, H.; Ishimaru, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yasuda, H.

    2016-06-07

    The structure of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films prepared by sputter-deposition and the effects of aging at ambient temperature and pressure were studied by pair-distribution-function (PDF) analysis from electron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. The PDFs of the as-deposited and aged samples for 3–13 months showed that the major peaks for Ge-Ge bonds decrease in intensity and broaden with aging for up to 7 months. In the PDFs of a-Ge of molecular dynamics simulation obtained by quenching liquid at different rates, the major peak intensities of a slowly cooled model are higher than those of a rapidly cooled model. Analyses on short- and medium-range configurations show that the slowly cooled model includes a certain amount of medium-range ordered (MRO) clusters, while the rapidly cooled model includes liquid-like configurations rather than MRO clusters. The similarity between experimental and computational PDFs implies that as-deposited films are similar in structure to the slowly cooled model, whereas the fully aged films are similar to the rapidly cooled model. It is assumed that as they undergo room-temperature aging, the MRO clusters disintegrate and transform into liquid-like regions in the same matrix. This transition in local configurations is discussed in terms of instability and the non-equilibrium of nanoclusters produced by a vapor-deposition process.

  7. Structural transition in sputter-deposited amorphous germanium films by aging at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okugawa, M.; Nakamura, R.; Ishimaru, M.; Watanabe, K.; Yasuda, H.; Numakura, H.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films prepared by sputter-deposition and the effects of aging at ambient temperature and pressure were studied by pair-distribution-function (PDF) analysis from electron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. The PDFs of the as-deposited and aged samples for 3-13 months showed that the major peaks for Ge-Ge bonds decrease in intensity and broaden with aging for up to 7 months. In the PDFs of a-Ge of molecular dynamics simulation obtained by quenching liquid at different rates, the major peak intensities of a slowly cooled model are higher than those of a rapidly cooled model. Analyses on short- and medium-range configurations show that the slowly cooled model includes a certain amount of medium-range ordered (MRO) clusters, while the rapidly cooled model includes liquid-like configurations rather than MRO clusters. The similarity between experimental and computational PDFs implies that as-deposited films are similar in structure to the slowly cooled model, whereas the fully aged films are similar to the rapidly cooled model. It is assumed that as they undergo room-temperature aging, the MRO clusters disintegrate and transform into liquid-like regions in the same matrix. This transition in local configurations is discussed in terms of instability and the non-equilibrium of nanoclusters produced by a vapor-deposition process.

  8. Fatigue limit of polycrystalline zirconium oxide ceramics: Effect of grinding and low-temperature aging.

    PubMed

    Pereira, G K R; Silvestri, T; Amaral, M; Rippe, M P; Kleverlaan, C J; Valandro, L F

    2016-08-01

    The following study aimed to evaluate the effect of grinding and low-temperature aging on the fatigue limit of Y-TZP ceramics for frameworks and monolithic restorations. Disc specimens from each ceramic material, Lava Frame (3M ESPE) and Zirlux FC (Ivoclar Vivadent) were manufactured according to ISO:6872-2008 and assigned in accordance with two factors: (1) "surface treatment"-without treatment (as-sintered, Ctrl), grinding with coarse diamond bur (181µm; Grinding); and (2) "low-temperature aging (LTD)" - presence and absence. Grinding was performed using a contra-angle handpiece under constant water-cooling. LTD was simulated in an autoclave at 134°C under 2-bar pressure for 20h. Mean flexural fatigue limits (20,000 cycles) were determined under sinusoidal loading using stair case approach. For Lava ceramic, it was observed a statistical increase after grinding procedure and different behavior after LTD stimuli (Ctrltemperature aging promoted a statistical increase in the fatigue limit (Ctrltemperature aging did not damage the fatigue limit values significantly for both materials evaluated, even though those conditions promoted increase in m-phase.

  9. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties Using Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Eshan V.

    2009-01-01

    Asphalt concrete pavements are inherently graded viscoelastic structures. Oxidative aging of asphalt binder and temperature cycling due to climatic conditions being the major cause of non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis and simulation procedures dwell on the use of layered approach to account for these non-homogeneities. The conventional…

  10. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties Using Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Eshan V.

    2009-01-01

    Asphalt concrete pavements are inherently graded viscoelastic structures. Oxidative aging of asphalt binder and temperature cycling due to climatic conditions being the major cause of non-homogeneity. Current pavement analysis and simulation procedures dwell on the use of layered approach to account for these non-homogeneities. The conventional…

  11. Impact of age, submersion time and water temperature on outcome in near-drowning.

    PubMed

    Suominen, P; Baillie, C; Korpela, R; Rautanen, S; Ranta, S; Olkkola, K T

    2002-03-01

    Because children have less subcutaneous fat, and a higher surface area to body weight ratio than adults, it has been suggested that children cool more rapidly during submersion, and therefore have a better outcome following near-drowning incidents. To study the impact of age, submersion time, water temperature and rectal temperature in the emergency room on outcome in near-drowning. This retrospective study included all near-drowning victims admitted to the intensive care units of Helsinki University Central Hospital after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation between 1985 and 1997. There were 61 near-drowning victims (age range: 0.5-60 years, median 29 years). Males were in the majority (40), and 26 were children (<16 years). The median water temperature was 17 degrees C (range: 0-33 degrees C). The median submersion time for the 43 survivors (70%) was 10 min (range: 1-38 min). Intact survivors and those with mild neurological disability (n=26, 43%) had a median submersion time of 5 min (range: 1-21 min). In non-survivors the median submersion time was 16 min (range: 2-75 min). Submersion time was the only independent predictor of survival in linear regression analysis (P<0.01). Patient age, water temperature and rectal temperature in the emergency room were not significant predictors of survival. Although submersion time is usually an estimate, it is the best prognostic factor after a near drowning incident. Children did not have a better outcome than adults.

  12. Comparison of influence of ageing on low-temperature characteristics of asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacková, Pavla; Valentin, Jan; Benešová, Lucie

    2017-09-01

    Ability of relaxation of asphalt mixtures and thus its resilience to climate change and traffic load is decreasing by influence of aging – in this case aging of bituminous binder. Binder exposed to climate and UV ages and becomes more fragile and susceptible to damage. The results of the research presented in this paper are aimed to finding a correlation between low-temperature properties of referential and aged asphalt mixture specimens and characteristics (not low-temperature) of bituminous binders. In this research there were used conventional road binders, commonly used modified binders and binders additionally modified in the laboratory. The low-temperature characteristics were determined by strength flexural test, commonly used in the Czech Republic for High Modulus Asphalt Mixtures (TP 151), and semi-cylindrical bending test (EN 12697-44). Both of the tests were extended by specimens exposed to artificial long-term aging (EN 12697-52) – storing at 85° C for 5 days. The results were compared with characteristics of binders for finding a suitable correlation between characteristics of binders and asphalt mixtures.

  13. Burial and thermal history of the central Appalachian basin, based on three 2-D models of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, Elisabeth L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Three regional-scale, cross sectional (2-D) burial and thermal history models are presented for the central Appalachian basin based on the detailed geologic cross sections of Ryder and others (2004), Crangle and others (2005), and Ryder, R.T., written communication. The models integrate the available thermal and geologic information to constrain the burial, uplift, and erosion history of the region. The models are restricted to the relatively undeformed part of the basin and extend from the Rome trough in West Virginia and Pennsylvania northwestward to the Findlay arch in Ohio. This study expands the scope of previous work by Rowan and others (2004) which presented a preliminary burial/thermal history model for a cross section (E-E') through West Virginia and Ohio. In the current study, the burial/thermal history model for E-E' is revised, and integrated with results of two additional cross sectional models (D-D' and C-C'). The burial/thermal history models provide calculated thermal maturity (Ro%) values for the entire stratigraphic sequence, including hydrocarbon source rocks, along each of the three cross sections. In contrast, the Ro and conodont CAI data available in the literature are sparse and limited to specific stratigraphic intervals. The burial/thermal history models also provide the regional temperature and pressure framework that is needed to model hydrocarbon migration.

  14. Effects of sand burial on dew deposition on moss soil crust in a revegetated area of the Tennger Desert, Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Rong-liang; Li, Xin-rong; Liu, Li-chao; Pan, Yan-xia; Gao, Yan-hong; Wei, Yong-ping

    2014-11-01

    Sand burial and dew deposition are two fundamental phenomena profoundly influencing biological soil crusts in desert areas. However, little information is available regarding the effects of sand burial on dew deposition on biological soil crusts in desert ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sand burial at depths of 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mm on dew formation and evaporation of three dominant moss crusts in a revegetated area of the Tengger Desert (Northern China) in 2010. The results revealed that sand burial significantly decreased the amount of dew deposited on the three moss crust types by acting as a semi-insulator retarding the dew formation and evaporation rates. The changes in surface temperature cannot fully explain the variations of the formation and evaporation rates of dew by moss crusts buried by sand. The extension of dew retention time was reflected by the higher dew ratios (the ratio of dew amount at a certain time to the maximum value in a daily course) in the daytime, and may to some extent have acted as compensatory mechanisms that diminished the negative effects of the reduction of dew amount induced by sand burial of moss crusts. The resistances to reduction of dewfall caused by sand burial among the three moss crusts were also compared and it was found that Bryum argenteum crust showed the highest tolerance, followed by crusts dominated by Didymodon vinealis and Syntrichia caninervis. This sequence corresponds well with the successional order of the three moss crusts in the revegetated area, thereby suggesting that resistance to reduction of dewfall may act as one mechanism by which sand burial drives the succession of moss crusts in desert ecosystems. This side effect of dew reduction induced by sand burial on biological soil crusts should be considered in future ecosystem construction and management of desert area.

  15. Scour and Burial of Submerged Mines in Wave Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, K. A.; Foster, D. L.; Traykovski, P.; Smith, H. D.

    2004-12-01

    Resolving the hydrodynamics and sediment response leading to the scour and burial of three-dimensional submarine objects remains an area of interest for engineers, oceanographers, and military personnel. Improving methods for detection of buried and submerged mines is of great importance due to the limitations of the present detection methods. A computational fluid dynamics model, FLOW-3D is used for the three-dimensional simulation of flow around individual cylindrical mines. FLOW-3D is a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic finite difference model that closes the continuity and Navier-Stokes equations with a k-ɛ closure scheme. In this presentation, numerical simulations are performed for a single storm event observed during the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) Mine Burial Experiment in 2003. Significant wave heights of 3 m with peak periods of 4-8 s resulted in significant amounts of mine scour and burial during the event. The model is forced with 4 different conditions representing the free stream flow prior to, during, and following the storm event. In each case, simulations are performed for two grain sizes with bottom boundary conditions specified with 1) a fixed flat bed with no initial mine burial or scour and 2) the observed bed profile. Patterns of scour and deposition are inferred from calculations of the bed shear velocity and Rouse parameter, respectively. Model results are compared with two-axis sonar images obtained during the MVCO Mine Burial Experiment. Consistent with the observations, model simulations indicate mine scour initiates at the ends of the mine. Model simulations also show that subsequent mine burial and scour is highly sensitive to the initial assumption of the bed profile. These results may allow us to improve our understanding and predictive capability for mine burial and scour.

  16. Photoreducible Mercury Loss from Arctic Snow Is Influenced by Temperature and Snow Age.

    PubMed

    Mann, Erin A; Mallory, Mark L; Ziegler, Susan E; Avery, Trevor S; Tordon, Rob; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2015-10-20

    Mercury (Hg) is an important environmental contaminant, due to its neurotoxicity and ability to bioaccumulate. The Arctic is a mercury-sensitive region, where organisms can accumulate high Hg concentrations. Snowpack mercury photoredox reactions may control how much Hg is transported with melting Arctic snow. This work aimed to (1) determine the significance of temperature combined with UV irradiation intensity and snow age on Hg(0) flux from Arctic snow and (2) elucidate the effect of temperature on snowpack Hg photoreduction kinetics. Using a Teflon flux chamber, snow temperature, UV irradiation, and snow age were found to significantly influence Hg(0) flux from Arctic snow. Cross-correlation analysis results suggest that UV radiation has a direct effect on Hg(0)flux, while temperature may indirectly influence flux. Laboratory experiments determined that temperature influenced Hg photoreduction kinetics when snow approached the melting point (>-2 °C), where the pseudo-first-order reduction rate constant, k, decreased twofold, and the photoreduced Hg amount, Hg(II)red, increased 10-fold. This suggests that temperature influences Hg photoreduction kinetics indirectly, likely by altering the solid:liquid water ratio. These results imply that large mass transfers of Hg from snow to air may take place during the Arctic snowmelt period, altering photoreducible Hg retention and transport with snow meltwater.

  17. Temperature dependent ageing mechanisms in Lithium-ion batteries - A Post-Mortem study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas; Wilka, Marcel; Kasper, Michael; Fleischhammer, Meike; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2014-09-01

    The effects of temperatures in the range of -20 °C to 70 °C on the ageing behaviour of cycled Lithium-ion batteries are investigated quantitatively by electrochemical methods and Post-Mortem analysis. Commercial 18650-type high-power cells with a LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2/LiyMn2O4 blend cathode and graphite/carbon anode were used as test system. The cells were cycled at a rate of 1 C until the discharge capacity falls below 80% of the initial capacity. Interestingly, an Arrhenius plot indicates two different ageing mechanisms for the ranges of -20 °C to 25 °C and 25 °C to 70 °C. Below 25 °C, the ageing rates increase with decreasing temperature, while above 25 °C ageing is accelerated with increasing temperature. The aged 18650 cells are inspected via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), measurements of electrode thickness and X-ray diffraction (XRD) after disassembly to learn more about the chemical reasons of the degradation. The effect of different temperatures on the electrode polarizations are evaluated by assembling electrodes in pouch cells with reference electrode as a model system. We find that the dominating ageing mechanism for T < 25 °C is Lithium plating, while for T > 25 °C the cathodes show degeneration and the anodes will be increasingly covered by SEI layers.

  18. Characterization of Stoichiometric and Aging Effects on NiTiHf High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Daniel Robert

    NiTiHf ternary alloys exhibit attractive high temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) properties. Material properties include moderate transformation strain, relatively high transformation temperature, stable pseudoelastic (PE) behavior, and very small irrecoverable strain during load biased tests. The addition of Hf is more attractive than Pt and Pd due to the fact that Hf has a lower cost. Four NiTiHf alloys with different chemical compositions spanning stoichiometry were used to analyze microstructure and mechanical behavior. Research will mainly be focused on the Ni-rich alloys based on that the Ni-lean alloys do not exhibit the previously mentioned HTSMA material properties. The alloys analyzed all had 20(at.)% Hf with varying Ti concentrations (29(at.)%, 29.7(at.)%, 30(at.)%, and 30.5(at.)%). All of the alloys were formed by induction melting, homogenized at 1050C for 72hrs, and then hot extruded with a diameter reduction of 7:1 at a temperature of 900C. In addition to the homogenized and extruded condition, several short-term aging cycles above 400C were completed on each of the alloys. Certain microstructure and mechanical properties are obtained when Hf is added to NiTi and a proper aging cycle is used. Results from isothermal compression tests that were executed above the austenite finish temperature determined that the Ni-rich NiTiHf alloys exhibited all the necessary properties to be considered for HTSMA applications. The test temperature range of the isothermal compression tests were chosen to characterize the transition from PE behavior to austenite plasticity and to examine the deformation behavior of the B2 phase at high temperatures. Results from compression tests showed a strengthening effect when the test temperature was increased through the PE test region. The strengthening effect is due to the yield stress and plasticity being related to the stress induced martensite that is created during the compression test executed above the austenite

  19. "Interred with their bones" - linking soil micromorphology and chemistry to unlock the hidden archive of archaeological human burials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothwell, Don; Usai, Maria-Raimonda; Keely, Brendan; Pickering, Matt; Wilson, Clare

    2010-05-01

    "Interred with their bones" Acronym: InterArChive - an ERC-funded project *** " Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; " I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. " The evil that men do lives after them; " The good is oft 'interred with their bones'; " So let it be with Caesar. William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene 2. *** Background The state of decay within soils in archaeological graves is often such that degradable objects are not preserved in a condition that can be visually recognised. However, microscopic soil features, inorganic element distributions and organic residues can be measured. Thus, archaeological burial soils have the potential to reveal signatures of decay; pre-burial treatment; presence and nature of associated clothing and perishable artefacts; diet of the individual; cause of death; evidence of morbidity and drug-use. Aims • To develop and test a multidisciplinary approach linking soil micromorphology and chemistry to recover environmental and cultural information; • Revealing the hidden archaeological archive within the burial soil • Developing soil sampling and analysis recommendations for archaeological human burials Methods 1: Sampling and soil field description from archaeological sites contrasting in soil, geology, age, and culture and from experimental piglet burials 2: Microscopic/micromorphological analysis (micro-scale observations) of remains and features in burial soils. We will establish the order of occurrence, spatial patterns, displacement, mode of formation and decay of micromorphological features including exotic components, parasites, hair and remnants of footwear and clothing [cf. pilot study of soils from Yemen]; microfabrics and textural pedofeatures, also to facilitate resolution of body decay products from other accumulations. 3: Microprobe analysis (nano-scale) will generate elemental maps of soil thin sections, allowing identification of features with distinct chemical signatures

  20. Strain aging and load relaxation behavior of type 316 stainless steel at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannula, S. P.; Korhonen, M. A.; Li, C. Y.

    1986-10-01

    The strain aging and load relaxation behavior of type 316 stainless steel (SS) at room temperature were studied. It is shown that rapid aging occurs in 316 SS at room temperature to an extent that affects the load relaxation behavior of the material. Qualitatively, the aging behavior was found to agree with those reported earlier for Fe-Ni-C-alloys, and the observed aging characteristics could be explained by using an earlier proposed vacancy-interstitial mechanism. The load relaxation behavior is analyzed in terms of Hart’s state variable model. Effects of strain aging and strain hardening on the load relaxation behavior and the scaling of the relaxation curves are determined. It is shown that aging can be accounted for by a time-dependent change in a model parameter, which is dependent on the mobile dislocation density and the dislocation mobility. In addition, a dependency on plastic state of the same parameter previously held constant was found. It is concluded that this phenomenon, which in 316 SS could be rationalized in terms of increasing forest dislocation density, is likely to be more general, and a provision for it should be made in the state variable theory.

  1. Rapid Discoloration of Aged Beef Muscles after Short-Term/Extreme Temperature Abuse during Retail Display.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Setyabrata, Derico; Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Yuan H Brad

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a short-term/extreme temperature abuse (STA) on color characteristics and oxidative stability of aged beef muscles during simulated retail display. Two beef muscles (longissimus lumborum, LL and semitendinosus, ST) were aged for 7 (A7), 14 (A14), 21 (A21), and 28 d (A28), and further displayed at 2℃ for 7 d. The STA was induced by placing steak samples at 20℃ for 1 h on the 4th d of display. Instrumental and visual color evaluations, ferric ion reducing capacity (FRC) and 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay were performed. Initially, redness, yellowness and hue angle of all beef muscles were similar, regardless of aging time before display (p>0.05). An increase in postmortem aging time increased lipid oxidation and caused a rapid discoloration after STA during display (p<0.05). ST muscle was more sharply discolored and oxidized after STA, when compared to LL muscle (p<0.05). The FRC value of beef muscles was decreased after 7 d of display (p<0.05). The results from the current study indicate adverse impacts of postmortem aging on color and oxidative stabilities of beef muscles, particularly under temperature abusing conditions during retail display. Thus, developing a specific post-harvest strategy to control quality attributes in retail levels for different muscle types and aging conditions would be required.

  2. Rapid Discoloration of Aged Beef Muscles after Short-Term/Extreme Temperature Abuse during Retail Display

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a short-term/extreme temperature abuse (STA) on color characteristics and oxidative stability of aged beef muscles during simulated retail display. Two beef muscles (longissimus lumborum, LL and semitendinosus, ST) were aged for 7 (A7), 14 (A14), 21 (A21), and 28 d (A28), and further displayed at 2℃ for 7 d. The STA was induced by placing steak samples at 20℃ for 1 h on the 4th d of display. Instrumental and visual color evaluations, ferric ion reducing capacity (FRC) and 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay were performed. Initially, redness, yellowness and hue angle of all beef muscles were similar, regardless of aging time before display (p>0.05). An increase in postmortem aging time increased lipid oxidation and caused a rapid discoloration after STA during display (p<0.05). ST muscle was more sharply discolored and oxidized after STA, when compared to LL muscle (p<0.05). The FRC value of beef muscles was decreased after 7 d of display (p<0.05). The results from the current study indicate adverse impacts of postmortem aging on color and oxidative stabilities of beef muscles, particularly under temperature abusing conditions during retail display. Thus, developing a specific post-harvest strategy to control quality attributes in retail levels for different muscle types and aging conditions would be required. PMID:27433105

  3. Silica burial enhanced by iron limitation in oceanic upwelling margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichevin, L. E.; Ganeshram, R. S.; Geibert, W.; Thunell, R.; Hinton, R.

    2014-07-01

    In large swaths of the ocean, primary production by diatoms may be limited by the availability of silica, which in turn limits the biological uptake of carbon dioxide. The burial of biogenic silica in the form of opal is the main sink of marine silicon. Opal burial occurs in equal parts in iron-limited open-ocean provinces and upwelling margins, especially the eastern Pacific upwelling zone. However, it is unclear why opal burial is so efficient in this margin. Here we measure fluxes of biogenic material, concentrations of diatom-bound iron and silicon isotope ratios using sediment traps and a sediment core from the Gulf of California upwelling margin. In the sediment trap material, we find that periods of intense upwelling are associated with transient iron limitation that results in a high export of silica relative to organic carbon. A similar correlation between enhanced silica burial and iron limitation is evident in the sediment core, which spans the past 26,000 years. A global compilation also indicates that hotspots of silicon burial in the ocean are all characterized by high silica to organic carbon export ratios, a diagnostic trait for diatoms growing under iron stress. We therefore propose that prevailing conditions of silica limitation in the ocean are largely caused by iron deficiency imposing an indirect constraint on oceanic carbon uptake.

  4. Aging of solid 4He under torsional oscillation at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumann, P.; Kojima, H.

    2013-10-01

    Observations have been made to reveal unusual aging behavior in solid 4He samples contained in a torsional oscillator. Oscillation of samples is initiated at a given oscillator drive amplitude near 100 mK. After the samples are cooled to a measurement temperature, they are "aged" for a waiting time, tw, between 15 min and 25 h. The drive amplitude is then halved and subsequent variation in the oscillator response amplitude, A(t), and frequency are monitored as time t elapses. When the measurement temperature is lower than Ts = 40 mK, A(t) shows unusual behavior: A(t) initially undershoots to less than half of the original value, partially recovers exponentially and eventually continues to increase logarithmically. The amount of undershoot, partial recovery magnitude and the rate of logarithmic increase all show aging effect with logarithmic dependence on tw. When the measurement temperature is greater than Ts, the above unusual behavior in A(t) disappears. If solid 4He cooled below Ts behaved analogously to spin glasses, A(t/tw) would be independent of tw. Such behavior of A(t/tw) is not observed. Origin of the unusual aging behavior in solid 4He is not yet clear. Motion of dislocation lines is discussed as a possible origin.

  5. Relevance of Water Temperature, Apparatus, and Age to Children's Pain during the Cold Pressor Task.

    PubMed

    Birnie, Kathryn A; Parker, Jennifer A; Chambers, Christine T

    2016-01-01

    Effective use of experimental pain in research depends on a thorough understanding of factors influencing their use. Although studies using the cold pressor task (CPT) have critically advanced our knowledge of pain mechanisms, assessment, and management in adults and children, the impact of identified methodological variability in its use is not known (ie, water temperature and apparatus); furthermore, whether methodological variations differentially impact children across development. Pain outcomes were examined in 113 healthy children from three age groups (8- to 9-, 10- to 11-, and 12- to 14-year-olds) who completed three CPTs at different water temperatures (5, 7, 10°C) in counterbalanced order. Children were randomly assigned to one of two apparatus (ice- vs. electric-cooled) for all CPTs. Children's hand was warmed to its baseline temperature between CPTs. Colder water (2 to 3°C decreases) was associated with significantly higher pain intensity and unpleasantness, and lower pain tolerance and threshold. Older children (12 to 14 years) reported significantly worse pain intensity and unpleasantness as compared to 8- to 9-year-olds, likely due to longer pain tolerance. Pain outcomes in 10- to 11-year-olds fell between the other age groups, with significant differences for pain unpleasantness and pain tolerance (at 10°C). Higher pain-related fear and pain unpleasantness occurred with the electric-cooled apparatus. Girls had higher pain tolerance and threshold at all temperatures. These results provide critically important information about water temperature, apparatus, and child age on CPT pain responding. It informs design of future CPT studies and directs consideration of methodological variability and child age when interpreting study findings. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  6. Effects of aging temperature on microstructural evolution at dissimilar metal weld interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Taeho; Bahn, Chi Bum; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-07-01

    From the earlier study which characterized the region of a fusion boundary between a low-alloy steel (LAS) and a Ni-based weld metal of as-welded and aged samples at 450 °C for a 30-y-equivalent time, it was observed in the microstructure that the aging treatment induced the formation and growth of Cr precipitates in the fusion boundary region because of the thermodynamic driving force. Now, this research extends the text matrix and continues the previous study by compiling all the test data, with an additional aging heat treatment conducted at 400 °C for 15- and 30-y-equivalent times (6450 and 12,911 h, respectively). The results for the extended test matrix primarily represent the common features of and disparities in the effects of thermal aging on the aged samples at two different heat-treatment temperatures (400 and 450 °C). Although no difference was expected between the samples, because the heat treatment conditions simulate thermal aging effects during the same service time of 30 y, the sample aged at 450 °C exhibited slightly more severe effects of thermal aging than the sample aged at 400 °C. Nevertheless, the trends for these effects are similar and the simulation of thermal aging effects for a light-water reactor appears to be reliable. However, according to a simulation of the same degree of thermal aging effects, it appears that the activation energy for Cr diffusion should be larger than the numerical value used in this study.

  7. Fission-track analysis of apatite and zircon defines a burial depth of 4 to 7 km for lowermost Upper Devonian, Catskill Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, Stephen; Miller, Donald S.

    1983-02-01

    Apatite and zircon grains separated from a sandstone layer of earliest Late Devonian age, Catskill Mountains, have been subjected to fission-track analysis. A 125-m.y. age, obtained on the apatite grains, requires a temperature for the sediment of less than 120 °C during the past 125 m.y. At some time prior to 125 m.y. ago, temperatures were above 120 °C long enough to cause complete fading of tracks. Analysis of zircon grains resulted in a fission-track age of 320 m.y. Zircon data indicate that the temperature of the sediment layer enclosing the grains did not exceed 175 to 200 °C over a 235-rn.y. period (time between sedimentation and 125 m.y. ago). If one assumes a typical geothermal gradient of 25 °C/km, a burial depth of between 4 and 7 km is indicated for the lowermost Upper Devonian, atskill Mountains. *Present address: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12181

  8. Microstructural evolution of René N4 during high temperature creep and aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgetti, Alessandro; Monti, Cosimo; Tognarelli, Leonardo; Mastromatteo, Francesco

    The main scope of this work is to describe the microstructure evolution of single-crystal (SX) superalloy René N4 during creep and static aging at high temperatures, in function of time, stress and temperature. During creep at high temperatures, SX microstructure evolves from a dense and ordered distribution of cuboidal γ‧ particles to a configuration characterized by alternate rafts of γ‧ phase and γ matrix, through a process known as rafting. The microstructural evolution of superalloys is very important to derive models able to predict service conditions of a component through microstructural analysis. In this work two microstructural parameters were identified and analyzed for René N4: matrix channels width w along the [0 0 1] lattice direction and periodicity width λ, given by the sum of w and the width of the γ‧ precipitates along [0 0 1]. Both parameters were measured on some creep-damaged and some statically aged specimens, as well as on the virgin material to analyze their trends in function of time, temperature and stress. In particular, the parameter Δλ looks independent of both the stress level and the microstructural morphology and could be used in future works to develop microstructural evolution model of René N4 in function of service time and temperature.

  9. Early age thermal conditioning immediately reduces body temperature of broiler chicks in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    De Basilio, V; Requena, F; León, A; Vilariño, M; Picard, M

    2003-08-01

    Early age thermal conditioning (TC) durably improves resistance of broilers to heat stress and reduces body temperature (Tb). Three experiments on broiler chicks were conducted to evaluate the effects of TC at 5 d of age on Tb variation measured by thermometer between 4 and 7 d of age, under a tropical environment. Because manipulation of chickens to measure Tb with a thermometer may increase Tb, a preliminary experiment on 13 3-to-4-wk-old male broilers compared Tb measured by telemetry to Tb measured in the terminal colon during three successive periods at 22, 33, and 22 degrees C. During heat exposure, Tb rapidly increased by 0.9 degrees C and plateaued over 24 h. During the last period, seven of the broilers rapidly reduced Tb to a plateau lower than the initial Tb, although six broilers exhibited more variable Tb. Measurement by thermometer underestimated on average core Tb by 0.28 degrees C at 22 degrees C and by 0.57 degrees C at 33 degrees C, whereas Tb recorded by telemetry was not affected by manipulation of the chickens. TC reduced Tb 24 h later in the three experiments. Compared to unexposed control chicks (N), 12 h of TC at 40 degrees C did not significantly reduce Tb at 7 d of age, although 24 h did. TC at 38 and 40 degrees C over 24 h significantly reduced Tb variation from 4 to 7 d of age compared to N chicks, whereas 36 degrees C did not. Withdrawing feed from the chicks for 2 h prior to measurement did not significantly reduce Tb at 4 and 7 d of age, but Tb reduction due to TC was greater in fed chicks (0.28 degrees C) than in chicks without feed (0.05 degrees C). Early age thermal conditioning at 38 to 40 degrees C at 5 d of age for 24 h reduced body temperature of 7-d-old male broilers.

  10. Oxygen-isotope evidence for upward, cross-formational porewater flow in a sedimentary basin near maximum burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Caritat, Patrice; Baker, Julian C.

    1992-07-01

    Authigenic ankerite in the gas-bearing mid-Permian Aldebaran Sandstone (Denison Trough, Queensland, Australia) has an anomalously light oxygen-isotopic composition ( δ 18O SMOW range: +7.6 to +14.4‰ ) and exhibits a trend of 18O-enrichment from the base to the top of the unit. Textural relationships, together with burial and thermal modelling, indicate that this carbonate precipitated at temperatures of about 100 to 140°C, when the sequence approached maximum burial during the Late Triassic. This implies that ankerite precipitated from porewater very depleted in 18O with respect to marine water ( δ 18O SMOW = -9 to -5‰ ). The formation of this deep, relatively high-temperature ankerite is difficult to reconcile with downward percolation of meteoric water at that time since the basin was then undergoing its first burial/compactional cycle. We interpret the ankerite to have precipitated from porewater expelled upward from the earliest Permian Reids Dome beds. This thick unit, consisting mainly of high-latitude continental sandstones, mudrocks and coals, was initially saturated with very 18O-depleted meteoric water ( δ 18O SMOW ≈ -17‰ ) partly derived from melted snow and ice, and is likely to have undergone overpressuring during rapid burial (at rates up to 1 km/Ma). Tectonically induced expulsion of "connate meteoric" porewater out of the Reids Dome beds took place as the sequence approached maximum burial prior to Late Triassic basin uplift. This water was flushed upward through the overlying units, retaining a (modified) meteoric isotopic signature, which was recorded by the precipitating ankerite. Computer modelling of heat transport, isotopic mass balance and water mixing quantitatively shows that this interpretation is viable, lending support to the suggested mechanism of upward, cross-formational porewater flow deep in a sedimentary basin.

  11. Mechanical properties improvement of silica aerogel through aging: Role of solvent type, time and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omranpour, H.; Dourbash, A.; Motahari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Effective parameters that enhance mechanical properties during aging were investigated in the present study. Silica aerogels were made from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), water, methanol and NH4F in molar ratio 1:4:8:2×10-3 using a one-step method. Different time, temperature and aging solvents in aging stage were studied. Subsequently, solvent exchange with n-hexane, modification under TMCS solution and ambient pressure drying (APD) were performed for all samples. The aerogels had densities within the range of 0.1 and 0.6 g/cm3. The FTIR, mechanical properties, density and BET results, porosity, pore volume, pore diameter and surface area of the samples, were discussed. The compression properties of the gel increased with the increase in the time and temperature of aging. It was observed that solvents with more polarity improved polymerization, which enhanced the mechanical properties of the related samples. However, the stresses and capillary forces of water during drying were so large that inhibited "spring-back effect" during APD, and consequently a collapsed silica network with higher density was fabricated. In other words, the specific compression strength and modulus declined drastically. For methanol, alcohols inhibit the reactions inconveniently causing more shrinkage. In aging by n-hexane, capillary pressure declined significantly and thereby shrinkage was eliminated and silica aerogels with low bulk densities (0.095 g/cm3), high specific surface areas (600 m2/g), and large pore volumes (2.6 cm3/g) were synthesized.

  12. Temperature affects longevity and age-related locomotor and cognitive decay in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri.

    PubMed

    Valenzano, Dario R; Terzibasi, Eva; Cattaneo, Antonino; Domenici, Luciano; Cellerino, Alessandro

    2006-06-01

    Temperature variations are known to modulate aging and life-history traits in poikilotherms as different as worms, flies and fish. In invertebrates, temperature affects lifespan by modulating the slope of age-dependent acceleration in death rate, which is thought to reflect the rate of age-related damage accumulation. Here, we studied the effects of temperature on aging kinetics, aging-related behavioural deficits, and age-associated histological markers of senescence in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri. This species shows a maximum captive lifespan of only 3 months, which is tied with acceleration in growth and expression of aging biomarkers. These biological peculiarities make it a very convenient animal model for testing the effects of experimental manipulations on life-history traits in vertebrates. Here, we show that (i) lowering temperature from 25 degrees C to 22 degrees C increases both median and maximum lifespan; (ii) life extension is due to reduction in the slope of the age-dependent acceleration in death rate; (iii) lowering temperature from 25 degrees C to 22 degrees C retards the onset of age-related locomotor and learning deficits; and (iv) lowering temperature from 25 degrees C to 22 degrees C reduces the accumulation of the age-related marker lipofuscin. We conclude that lowering water temperature is a simple experimental manipulation which retards the rate of age-related damage accumulation in this short-lived species.

  13. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  14. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  15. Sulfate Burial Constraints on the Phanerozoic Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, Itay; Peters, Shanan E.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2012-07-01

    The sulfur cycle influences the respiration of sedimentary organic matter, the oxidation state of the atmosphere and oceans, and the composition of seawater. However, the factors governing the major sulfur fluxes between seawater and sedimentary reservoirs remain incompletely understood. Using macrostratigraphic data, we quantified sulfate evaporite burial fluxes through Phanerozoic time. Approximately half of the modern riverine sulfate flux comes from weathering of recently deposited evaporites. Rates of sulfate burial are unsteady and linked to changes in the area of marine environments suitable for evaporite formation and preservation. By contrast, rates of pyrite burial and weathering are higher, less variable, and largely balanced, highlighting a greater role of the sulfur cycle in regulating atmospheric oxygen.

  16. Sulfate burial constraints on the Phanerozoic sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Halevy, Itay; Peters, Shanan E; Fischer, Woodward W

    2012-07-20

    The sulfur cycle influences the respiration of sedimentary organic matter, the oxidation state of the atmosphere and oceans, and the composition of seawater. However, the factors governing the major sulfur fluxes between seawater and sedimentary reservoirs remain incompletely understood. Using macrostratigraphic data, we quantified sulfate evaporite burial fluxes through Phanerozoic time. Approximately half of the modern riverine sulfate flux comes from weathering of recently deposited evaporites. Rates of sulfate burial are unsteady and linked to changes in the area of marine environments suitable for evaporite formation and preservation. By contrast, rates of pyrite burial and weathering are higher, less variable, and largely balanced, highlighting a greater role of the sulfur cycle in regulating atmospheric oxygen.

  17. Tripartite associations among bacteriophage WO, Wolbachia, and host affected by temperature and age in Tetranychus urticae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Hong; Zhang, Kai-Jun; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2012-11-01

    A phage density model of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), which means lytic phages reduce bacterial density associated with CI, significantly enhances our understanding of the tripartite associations among bacteriophage WO, Wolbachia and host. However, WO may alternate between lytic and lysogenic life cycles or change phage production under certain conditions including temperature, host age and host species background. Here, extreme temperatures can induce an alteration in the life cycle of WO and change the tripartite associations among WO, Wolbachia and CI. Based on the accumulation of the WO load, WO can transform into the lytic life cycle with increasing age. These findings confirmed that the environment plays an important role in the associations among WO, Wolbachia and host.

  18. New insights into Eastern Beringian mortuary behavior: A terminal Pleistocene double infant burial at Upward Sun River

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Ben A.; Irish, Joel D.; Reuther, Joshua D.; McKinney, Holly J.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report on the discovery of two infant burials dating to ∼11,500 calibrated years (cal) B.P. at the Upward Sun River site in central Alaska. The infants were interred in a pit feature with associated organic and lithic grave goods, including the earliest known North American hafted bifaces with decorated antler foreshafts. Skeletal and dental analyses indicate that Individual 1 died shortly after birth and Individual 2 was a late-term fetus, making these the youngest-aged late Pleistocene individuals known for the Americas and the only known prenate, offering, to our knowledge, the first opportunity to explore mortuary treatment of the youngest members of a terminal Pleistocene North American population. This burial was situated ∼40 cm directly below a cremated 3-y-old child previously discovered in association with a central hearth of a residential feature. The burial and cremation are contemporaneous, and differences in body orientation, treatment, and associated grave goods within a single feature and evidence for residential occupation between burial episodes indicate novel mortuary behaviors. The human remains, grave goods, and associated fauna provide rare direct data on organic technology, economy, seasonality of residential occupations, and infant/child mortality of terminal Pleistocene Beringians. PMID:25385599

  19. New insights into Eastern Beringian mortuary behavior: a terminal Pleistocene double infant burial at Upward Sun River.

    PubMed

    Potter, Ben A; Irish, Joel D; Reuther, Joshua D; McKinney, Holly J

    2014-12-02

    Here we report on the discovery of two infant burials dating to ∼11,500 calibrated years (cal) B.P. at the Upward Sun River site in central Alaska. The infants were interred in a pit feature with associated organic and lithic grave goods, including the earliest known North American hafted bifaces with decorated antler foreshafts. Skeletal and dental analyses indicate that Individual 1 died shortly after birth and Individual 2 was a late-term fetus, making these the youngest-aged late Pleistocene individuals known for the Americas and the only known prenate, offering, to our knowledge, the first opportunity to explore mortuary treatment of the youngest members of a terminal Pleistocene North American population. This burial was situated ∼40 cm directly below a cremated 3-y-old child previously discovered in association with a central hearth of a residential feature. The burial and cremation are contemporaneous, and differences in body orientation, treatment, and associated grave goods within a single feature and evidence for residential occupation between burial episodes indicate novel mortuary behaviors. The human remains, grave goods, and associated fauna provide rare direct data on organic technology, economy, seasonality of residential occupations, and infant/child mortality of terminal Pleistocene Beringians.

  20. Controls on biogenic silica burial in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Zanna; Kohfeld, Karen E.; Matsumoto, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the controls on opal export in the Southern Ocean can inform both the prediction of how the leakage of silicic acid from the Southern Ocean responds to climate and the interpretation of paleo-proxies. We have compiled a database of 185 230Thorium-normalized opal burial rates and 493 opal concentration measurements in Southern Ocean sediments and matched these with environmental climatologies. By subdividing the Southern Ocean on the basis of oceanographic regions and interpolating the opal burial rates, we estimate a total biogenic Si burial south of 40°S of 2.3 ± 1.0 Tmol Si yr-1. In both the seasonally ice-covered and permanently ice-free regions we can explain 73% of opal burial variability from surface ocean properties. Where sea ice is present for at least part of the year, the length of the ice-free season determines the upper limit of opal burial in the underlying sediments. In the ice-free regions of the Southern Ocean, the supply of silicic acid through winter mixing is the most important factor. Our results do not support a strong role of iron in controlling opal burial. We do however find that satellite-derived net primary production increases with increasing (modeled) dust delivery. These findings support the decoupling between carbon and opal fluxes in the Southern Ocean. When corrected for opal dissolution, the observed opal fluxes are in reasonable agreement with fluxes simulated using an ocean biogeochemical model. However, the results suggest current preservation algorithms for opal could be improved by incorporating the composition of particle flux, not only its magnitude.

  1. Effect of the Aging Temperature of Steel on the Parameters of Fatigue Resistance and Microstrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myl'nikov, V. V.; Romanov, A. D.; Shetulov, D. I.; Khlybov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The interrelation of the parameters of microplastic strain, the slope of the left-hand branch of the fatigue curve, and the fatigue limit of a maraging steel is studied. The growth in the microplastic strain is shown to match the growth in the fatigue limit and the decrease in the slope of the left-hand branch of the fatigue curve. The strength of the steel decreases with decrease in the temperature of post-quenching aging.

  2. Characterization of Critical Fundamental Aging Mechanisms of High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    carbon fiber composites , especially crosslinked bismaleimide(BMI) thermosets and thermoplastic polyimide(PI) for the future applications in commercial and military aircraft. The studies involved combined stress, temperature, thermal cycling or thermal spike, moisture, time and oxygen service environment exposure which could lead to complex synergistic environmental-induced degradation mechanisms of composite performance and their critical physical and chemical aging mechanisms in terms of damage initiation and propagation on the molecular, microscopic and

  3. Medieval Warm Period, Little Ice Age and 20th century temperature variability from Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Kamiya, T.; Schwede, S.; Willard, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present paleoclimate evidence for rapid (< 100 years) shifts of ~2-4oC in Chesapeake Bay (CB) temperature ~2100, 1600, 950, 650, 400 and 150 years before present (years BP) reconstructed from magnesium/calcium (Mg/Ca) paleothermometry. These include large temperature excursions during the Little Ice Age (~1400-1900 AD) and the Medieval Warm Period (~800-1300 AD) possibly related to changes in the strength of North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC). Evidence is presented for a long period of sustained regional and North Atlantic-wide warmth with low-amplitude temperature variability between ~450 and 1000 AD. In addition to centennial-scale temperature shifts, the existence of numerous temperature maxima between 2200 and 250 years BP (average ~70 years) suggests that multi-decadal processes typical of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) are an inherent feature of late Holocene climate. However, late 19th and 20th century temperature extremes in Chesapeake Bay associated with NAO climate variability exceeded those of the prior 2000 years, including the interval 450-1000 AD, by 2-3oC, suggesting anomalous recent behavior of the climate system.

  4. Alternatives to the burial of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J. Mark

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The approach for management of LLRW in different countries has evolved differently due to many factors such as culture and public sentiment, systems of government, public policy, and geography. There are also various methods to disposition LLRW including but not limited to: - Long term statutes and unconditional or conditional release of material, - Direct Burial, - Treatment (Processing) {yields} Burial, - Treatment {yields} Unconditional Release, - Recycle for Unconditional Release or Reuse Within Any Industry, - Controlled Recycle within Nuclear Industry. (author)

  5. Temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient of thin films and aging effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossel, C.; Sousa, M.; Abel, S.; Caimi, D.; Suhm, A.; Abergel, J.; Le Rhun, G.; Defay, E.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique to measure the temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient e31,f of thin films of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), aluminum nitride, and BaTiO3 deposited on Si wafers. It is based on the collection of electric charges induced by the deflection of a Si cantilever coated with the piezoelectric film. The aim of this work is to assess the role of temperature in the decay of the remnant polarization of these materials, in particular, in optimized gradient-free PZT with composition PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3. It is found that in contrast to theoretical predictions, e31,f decreases with temperature because of the dominance of relaxation effects. The observation of steps in the logarithmic aging decay law is reminiscent of memory effects seen in frustrated spin glasses.

  6. Temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient of thin films and aging effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rossel, C. Sousa, M.; Abel, S.; Caimi, D.; Suhm, A.; Abergel, J.; Le Rhun, G.; Defay, E.

    2014-01-21

    We present a technique to measure the temperature dependence of the transverse piezoelectric coefficient e{sub 31,f} of thin films of lead zirconate titanate (PZT), aluminum nitride, and BaTiO{sub 3} deposited on Si wafers. It is based on the collection of electric charges induced by the deflection of a Si cantilever coated with the piezoelectric film. The aim of this work is to assess the role of temperature in the decay of the remnant polarization of these materials, in particular, in optimized gradient-free PZT with composition PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3}. It is found that in contrast to theoretical predictions, e{sub 31,f} decreases with temperature because of the dominance of relaxation effects. The observation of steps in the logarithmic aging decay law is reminiscent of memory effects seen in frustrated spin glasses.

  7. Temperature and Pomaceous Flower Age Related to Colonization by Erwinia amylovora and Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pusey, P L; Curry, E A

    2004-08-01

    ABSTRACT Fire blight of apple and pear is initiated by epiphytic populations of Erwinia amylovora on flower stigmas. Predicting this disease and managing it with microbial antagonists depends on an understanding of bacterial colonization on stigmas. Detached 'Manchurian' crab apple flowers were inoculated with E. amylovora and subjected to a range of constant temperatures or various fluctuating temperature regimes. Results may have application to disease risk assessment systems such as the Cougarblight model, which now are based on in vitro growth of the pathogen. In other experiments, detached crab apple flowers and attached 'Gala' apple flowers were maintained at different temperatures for various periods before inoculation with E. amylovora or antagonists (Pseudomonas fluorescens strain A506 and Pantoea agglomerans strains C9-1 and E325). Maximum stigma age supporting bacterial multiplication decreased as temperature increased, and was reduced by pollination. Stigmas were receptive to bacteria at ages older than previously reported, probably due to less interference from indigenous organisms. The study revealed antagonist limitations that possibly affect field performance (e.g., the inability of strain A506 to grow on relatively old stigmas conducive to the pathogen). Such deficiencies could be overcome by selecting other antagonists or using antagonist mixtures in the orchard.

  8. Effect of temperature, ration, body size and age on sulphur isotope fractionation in fish.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Carolyn; Jennings, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Sulphur isotope analysis (delta(34)S) is increasingly identified as a valuable tool for source differentiation and the determination of trophic level in food webs, but there are still many uncertainties associated with the interpretation of delta(34)S data. To investigate the effects of temperature, ration, body size and age on sulphur trophic fractionation (Deltadelta(34)S) in fish, we reared European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) on identical diets at 11 and 16 degrees C at three ration levels for over 600 days. Deltadelta(34)S was between 0 and -1 per thousand. The effect of temperature on Deltadelta(34)S was small and inconsistent, varying over the course of the experiment and depending on ration. This contrasts with temperature effects on bass Deltadelta(13)C and Deltadelta(15)N, where Deltadelta(13)C increases at warm temperatures while Deltadelta(15)N falls. Body size and age had a positive relationship with Deltadelta(34)S but the relationship with size was not significant for bass that weighed >20 g. As Deltadelta(34)S is small and the range in delta(34)S of potential diet items can be much greater than the range in delta(13)C or delta(15)N, our results show that sulphur stable isotopes are particularly useful for source differentiation in fish.

  9. Temperature, age and crust thickness distributions of Loki Patera on Io: implications for resurfacing mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.

    2003-01-01

    A high-spatial-resolution, multi-wavelength observation by the Galileo NIMS instrument has been analysed to determine the temperature and area distribution of a large portion of the ionian volcano Loki Patera. The temperatures of the cooler components from a two-temperature fit to the data can be used to determine ages of the surface. The age of the floor along a profile across the floor of the caldera ranges from 10 to 80 days. This puts the start of the resurfacing in July/early August 2001, yielding a resurfacing rate of approximately 1 km/day, with the new lava spreading from the SW corner of the caldera in a NE direction. This rate is consistent with resurfacing by foundering of the crust on a lava lake. However,the temperature distribution may also result from the emplacement of flows. Implied crust thicknesses (derived using a lava cooling model) range from 2.6 to 0.9 m.

  10. The growth responses of coastal dune species are determined by nutrient limitation and sand burial.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Matthew; Pammenter, Norman; Ripley, Brad

    2008-05-01

    Past work suggests that burial and low nutrient availability limit the growth and zonal distribution of coastal dune plants. Given the importance of these two factors, there is a surprising lack of field investigations of the interactions between burial and nutrient availability. This study aims to address this issue by measuring the growth responses of four coastal dune plant species to these two factors and their interaction. Species that naturally experience either high or low rates of burial were selected and a factorial burial by nutrient addition experiment was conducted. Growth characteristics were measured in order to determine which characteristics allow a species to respond to burial. Species that naturally experience high rates of burial (Arctotheca populifolia and Scaevola plumieri) displayed increased growth when buried, and this response was nutrient-limited. Stable-dune species had either small (Myrica cordifolia, N-fixer) or negligible responses to burial (Metalasia muricata), and were not nutrient-limited. This interspecific difference in response to burial and/or fertiliser is consistent with the idea that burial maintains the observed zonation of species on coastal dunes. Species that are unable to respond to burial are prevented from occupying the mobile dunes. Species able to cope with high rates of burial had high nitrogen-use efficiencies and low dry mass costs of production, explaining their ability to respond to burial under nutrient limitation. The interaction between burial and nutrient limitation is understudied but vital to understanding the zonation of coastal dune plant species.

  11. Geotropic sensitivity exhibited by single hornets: The influence of caste, age, light and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishay, Jacob S.; Rosenzweig, Eyal; Abir, Irit

    Hornet (Vespa orientalis, Hymenoptera: Vespinae) workers, queens and males, aged 0-24 hours (i.e. juveniles) and 24 hours and more (i.e. adults) were tested for their responses to changes in the direction of the gravitational force while placed on a flat surface gradually tilted between 0.5° and 180°. The tests were run on non-blind and blind hornets, at temperatures ranging between 18°C and 35°C, in daylight as well as in the dark. Up to 18 hours of age, negative phototaxis prevailed among the hornets, which displayed a clear preference for remaining in the dark regardless of the geotropic position. Between 18-24 hours of age, there was gradual appearance of a sensitivity to change in the geotropic position. Above 24 hr of age, the hornets became sensitive to changes in their declinations, with workers becoming sensitive at a 3-5° declination, queens at 4-5° and males at a declination of 8-19° from the horizontal. Hornet response takes the form of an upward climb, to the highest point of the test surface. Such response required a temperature exceeding 24.8-25°C for workers, 23.2°C for queens and 20.8-21°C for males.

  12. Burial history of Lockport formation (Middle Silurian), New York, in light of studies of Ellenburger group (Lower Ordovician), west Texas-southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.; Ergin, M.; Friedman, G.M.

    1986-05-01

    For studies of burial depth of the Lockport Formation (Middle Silurian) of the Appalachian basin, the authors used as a control data from petrographic, stable isotope, and two-phase fluid-inclusion analyses of carbonate rocks cored from 5000 to 23,000 ft (1.5 to 7 km) burial depth of the Ellenburger Group, west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. The coarse to very coarse crystalline nature of the host-rock dolomite, the vug-filling and fracture-filling saddle dolomite containing relatively light oxygen isotope compositions ranging from -6 to -12 per thousand (PDB), and the high mean homogenization temperatures for saddle dolomite formation from 100/sup 0/ to 260/sup 0/C, all suggest diagenetic changes occurred under deep burial conditions. Using Ellenburger carbonates as a control for burial depth diagenesis studies of saddle dolomite of the surface-exposed Lockport Formation, New York, other literature, and the regional conodont color alteration index (CAI) of 2-3, a former burial depth for the Lockport Formation strata of up to 5 km is indicated, much greater than the present estimation of less than 2 km of paleogeographic reconstruction. This depth was confirmed by delta/sup 18/O values ranging from -9 to -11 per thousand, and two-phase fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures ranging from 110/sup 0/ to 200/sup 0/C with an average of 150/sup 0/C.

  13. A 150 year record of inter-annual climate variability and organic carbon burial in Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Hagadorn, J.W.; Stott, L.D.; Sinha, A.; Rincon, M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Schimmelmann, A. . Scripps Inst. of Oceanography)

    1992-01-01

    Stable isotopic measurements were conducted on total organic carbon (TOC) and fossil planktonic foraminifera in laminated sediments collected from Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins, California Borderland, in order to investigate relationships between climatic variability and organic carbon burial. These data currently provide biannual sample resolution back to 1750 AD. During the past 150 years, there has been a positive covariance between the carbon isotopic composition of fossil planktonic foraminifera and of TOC. Periods of increased delta C-13 of TOC and foraminifera correspond to higher organic carbon burial in Santa Monica and Santa Barbara Basins. When combined, these patterns are interpreted as variation in productivity within the basins. Isotopic variability in TOC and planktonic foraminifera is significantly higher prior to 1900 AD. Although spring sea surface temperatures were also significantly more variable during this period, the authors do not recognize a systematic relationship between temperature and organic carbon burial. Spectral analysis of isotopic compositions of fossil foraminifera calcite, TOC, organic carbon burial and lamination frequency in the sediments reveal distinct spectral peaks at 5 and 7.7 years, corresponding to ENSO/El Nino frequencies. Additional spectral peaks occur at 19 and 20 years. Previous time series analyses of tree ring width records indicate similar decadal-scale frequencies and suggest a possible link to solar and/or lunar nodal tidal cycles. While these initial results suggest a relationship between climate-cyclicity, primary productivity and organic carbon burial, the phase relationship cannot be deciphered from this preliminary data set.

  14. Effects of ration and temperature on growth of age-0 Atlantic sturgeon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, J.L.; Arnold, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Our objective was to gain insight into the optimum temperature and ration for growth of age-0 Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus in culture. We conducted two trials, each for 8 weeks. Trial 1 started with 60-g fish, trial 2 started with 0 3-g fish. Water temperatures of 15, 17, and 19??C were used separately in each trial. Rations (dry food, wet weight of fish) for 60-g fish were 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% of biomass per day, for 0.3-g fish, rations were 3, 5, and 7% of biomass per day. We set up three tank replicates, of equal fish biomass, at each combination of temperature and ration. The highest growth rate in trial 1 (for 60-g fish) was 0.014/d at 15??C and the 1.5% ration, although this growth rate was not significantly different from the growth rate at 17??C and 1.5% ration or at 17??C and 1.0% ration. The highest growth rate in trial 2 (for 0.3-g fish) was 0.067/d at 19??C and the 7.0% ration. Instantaneous growth at these conditions was significantly different from all other combinations of temperature and ration. Although these results may not completely define the temperature and ration under which fish could achieve maximum growth rate, they provide a solid starting point for further development of Atlantic sturgeon culture.

  15. The effects of temperature, age and sex on presentations of renal colic in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Steven; Macbean, Catherine; Taylor, David

    2010-12-01

    To determine whether renal colic incidence in the temperate environment of Melbourne, Australia, varies with ambient temperature and season. This was a retrospective analysis of patients with renal colic who presented, between 1999 and 2005 inclusive, to a Victorian inner city emergency department. The emergency department database was interrogated to identify patients with an International Classification of Diseases 10th revision diagnostic code of renal colic. All weather data were obtained from the Bureau of Meteorology (Melbourne, Australia). The primary study endpoints were renal colic incidence and mean monthly temperature and humidity. Data were analysed using Spearman's correlation coefficient and the normal Z-test. About 3070 cases were identified. Mean age was 45.0 (SD 14.0) years. Males predominated with 2374 (77.3%) cases. For both sexes, renal colic incidence was lower amongst younger and older patients. The summer rate was significantly greater than the winter rate (1.53 vs. 1.24 presentations/day, rate difference 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.43, P<0.001). There were significant positive correlations between the mean monthly maximum temperature and the absolute number (R = 0.34, P = 0.002) and rate (presentations/day, R = 0.26, P = 0.017) of presentations. The summer/winter ratio of renal colic incidence was not affected by age or sex. The incidence of renal colic in the temperate environment increases with sustained increases in ambient temperature and is unaffected by age or sex. Patients at risk of renal colic should increase their fluid intake over the whole of the summer period not just during periods of extreme heat.

  16. Evolution of stocks and massifs from burial of salt sheets, continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Salt structures in a 4000-km{sup 2} region of the continental slope, the northeast Green Canyon area, include stocks, massifs, remnant structures, and an allochthonous sheet. Salt-withdrawal basins include typical semicircular basins and an extensive linear trough that is largely salt-free. Counterregional growth faults truncate the landward margin of salt sheets that extend 30-50 km to the Sigsbee Escarpment. The withdrawal basins, stocks, and massifs occur within a large graben between an east-northeast-trending landward zone of shelf-margin growth faults and a parallel trend of counterregional growth faults located 48-64 km basinward. The graben formed by extension and subsidence as burial of the updip portion of a thick salt sheet produced massifs and stocks by downbuilding. Differential loading segmented the updip margin of the salt sheet into stocks and massifs separated by salt-withdrawal basins. Initially, low-relief structures evolved by trap-door growth as half-graben basins buried the salt sheet. Remnant-salt structures and a turtle-structure anticline overlay a salt-weld disconformity in sediments formerly separated by a salt sheet. Age of sediments below the weld is inferred to be be late Miocene to early Pliocene (4.6-5.3 Ma); age of sediments above the weld is late Pliocene (2.8-3.5 Ma). The missing interval of time (1-2.5 Ma) is the duration between emplacement of the salt sheet and burial of the sheet. Sheet extrusion began in the late Miocene to early Pliocene, and sheet burial began in the late Pliocene in the area of the submarine trough to early Pleistocene in the area of the massifs.

  17. Social structures and social relations--an archaeological and anthropological examination of three early Medieval separate burial sites in Bavaria.

    PubMed

    Czermak, Andrea; Ledderose, Anja; Strott, Nadja; Meier, Thomas; Grupe, Gisela

    2006-09-01

    As part of an interdisciplinary cooperation, three early medieval separated burial sites from central Bavaria were subjected to archaeological and anthropological examinations. Separated burial sites are probably an expression of social stratification. This paper focuses on two characteristic aspects of these separated burial sites: (1) structure of the site, and (2) biological manifestation of a social upper class. The separated burial grounds Etting/Sandfeld (31 individuals), Grossmehring (44 individuals) and Kelheim (43 individuals), all located in southern Bavaria, were analyzed. Sex and age at death of all individuals were determined, and dietary behaviour was reconstructed by means of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in bone collagen. Local conditions such as climate, soil conditions or the intensity of agriculture can provoke significant variations in plant delta15N-values, which could lead to a shift of the baseline values of the corresponding trophic web. To facilitate the comparison of isotopic data from different sites, delta15N values of cattle bones were taken as a reference for the human data (presuming the diet to consumer chain). The results of dietary reconstruction indicate that the populations enjoyed very good living conditions with a primarily animal protein-based diet. Furthermore, the isotope analysis revealed more detailed indications for certain individuals regarding their social status. Some individuals can even be appointed as possible chiefs of the population, since anthropological and archaeological interpretations were in total agreement: It was possible to identify persons of a higher social status based on the structure of the burial site, grave goods and the isotopic analysis.

  18. Influence of coating on nanocrystalline magnetic properties during high temperature thermal ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekdim, Atef; Morel, Laurent; Raulet, Marie-Ange

    2017-05-01

    Since their birth or mergence the late 1980s, the nanocrystalline ultrasoft magnetic materials are taking a great importance in power electronic systems conception. One of the main advantages that make them more attractive nowadays is their ability to be packaged since the reduction of the magnetostrictive constant to almost zero. In aircraft applications, due to the high component compactness and to their location (for example near the jet engine), the operating temperature increases and may reach easily 200 °C and more. Consequently, the magnetic thermal ageing may occur but is, unfortunately, weakly studied. This paper focuses on the influence of the coating (packaging type) on the magnetic nanocrystalline performances during a thermal ageing. This study is based on monitoring the magnetic characteristics of two types of nanocrystalline cores (naked and coated) during a thermal activated ageing (100, 150 and 200 °C). Based on a dedicated monitoring protocol, a large magnetic characterization has been done and analyzed. Elsewhere, X-Ray Diffraction and magnetostriction measurements were carried out to support the study of the anisotropy energies evolution with ageing. This latter is discussed in this paper to explain and give hypothesis about the ageing phenomena.

  19. Early-age cold conditioning of broilers: effects of timing and temperature.

    PubMed

    Shahir, M H; Dilmagani, S; Tzschentke, B

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of early-age cold conditioning (CC) on performance, ascites mortality, thyroid hormones status and immune response (leucocytes count) of broiler chickens. 2. A total of 336 chicks at 2 and 3 d of age were exposed to 20 or 25°C (for 3 or 6 h) in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment, while a control group was kept under normal temperature conditions (30°C). Thereafter, both control and cold conditioned birds were reared under standard conditions until 42 d of age. 3. The results showed that performance (weight gain and feed efficiency) was improved by CC at the end of the rearing period. Carcase traits (breast, thigh and abdominal fat percentage) were not affected by different treatments. Heart weight was lower in cold conditioned birds accompanied with lower ascites mortality. Total leucocyte count was higher in CC birds. Higher concentrations of thyroxin (T(4)) were found in plasma of treated groups, while triiodothyronine (T(3)) to T(4) ratio was decreased. 4. In conclusion, it seems that early age CC improves performance and reduces ascites mortality of broilers through altered thyroid hormones metabolism and leucocyte function. According to the results, the best timing for CC of broilers was 20°C for 6 h at the age of 2 d, and no significant benefit was observed by repeated CC.

  20. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a “standard” model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors. PMID:26030468

  1. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival.

    PubMed

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E

    2015-05-28

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a "standard" model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors.

  2. 40 CFR 229.1 - Burial at sea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Burial at sea. 229.1 Section 229.1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING GENERAL PERMITS § 229.1... materials which are readily de-com-pos-a-ble in the marine environment may be disposed of under the general...

  3. Effect of Burial Depth on Seismic Signals. Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    from a buried explosion receives positive or negative reinforcement from the free- surface reflection. The more refined calculations, which include...wave is relatively delayed in time, so that transitions between positive and negative reinforcement occur at shallower depths of burial. A surface

  4. 38 CFR 38.620 - Persons eligible for burial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... was directed at a hostile force or what was thought to be a hostile force; or (C) Died from a training...) of this section. (2) A parent is not eligible for burial if the veteran dies due to the elements, a...

  5. 38 CFR 38.620 - Persons eligible for burial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... was directed at a hostile force or what was thought to be a hostile force; or (C) Died from a training...) of this section. (2) A parent is not eligible for burial if the veteran dies due to the elements, a...

  6. 38 CFR 38.620 - Persons eligible for burial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... was directed at a hostile force or what was thought to be a hostile force; or (C) Died from a training...) of this section. (2) A parent is not eligible for burial if the veteran dies due to the elements, a...

  7. Burial preservation of trace fossils as indicator of storm deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.J.

    1986-05-01

    Positive semirelief epichnia (ridgelike trace fossils on the top surface of a bed) commonly represent burrow structures, perhaps originally supported by a mucoidal matrix, that have been infilled by sediment. The preservation of these structures, in addition to other trace fossils on a bed superface, suggests an instantaneous burial event and a minimum of concomitant erosion. This supposition can be verified by an absence of paucity of biogenic sedimentary structures accompanied by certain physical sedimentary structures (laminated shell hashes, graded bedding, fissile shales) in strata directly overlying bioturbated surfaces. The main process involved in this burial preservation (the rapid burial of biogenic sedimentary structures with minimum erosion) are probably storm-generated in most instances. Sediments would be deposited primarily in the suspension mode, and mean storm wave base would be slightly above the sediment-water interface. This burial preservation model is most applicable to relatively small stratigraphic intervals (several centimeters or decimeters) representing deposition on an open-marine shelf. Positive semirelief epichnia, interpreted as burrow system infilling, from the Cincinnatian Series (Upper Ordovician) of Ohio and Indiana are used to illustrate these concepts.

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    H. M. Sulloway

    2008-10-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

  9. The effects of burial on drug detection in skeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Watterson, James H

    2010-07-01

    Skeletal tissues have recently been investigated for use in post-mortem toxicology. Variables affecting drug concentration in these tissues, however, are still poorly characterized. In this work, the relative effects of burial on the response of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) assays were examined. Rats were acutely exposed to ketamine or diazepam, euthanized and buried outdoors. After one month, the remains were exhumed and skeletal tissue drug levels were compared those of non-buried rats. A climate-controlled burial was also undertaken using defleshed bones to approximate an extended decomposition. Long bones (femora, tibiae) were isolated and separated into tissue type (diaphyseal bone, epiphyseal bone, and marrow), and according to treatment (i.e. buried or non-buried). Following methanolic extraction (bone) or simple homogenization (marrow), samples were analyzed with ELISA. Samples were then pooled according to treatment, extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE) and confirmed with GC-MS. Under the conditions examined, the effects of burial appear to be drug and tissue dependent. Ketamine-exposed tissues demonstrated the greatest differences, especially in bone marrow. In diazepam-exposed tissues, burial did not seem to greatly affect drug response and some gave greater assay response compared to the non-buried set. Overall, the data suggest that fresh tissue samples may not be representative of decomposed samples in terms of skeletal tissue drug levels.

  10. 40 CFR 229.1 - Burial at sea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... transport human remains from the United States and all persons owning or operating a vessel or aircraft... instrumentalities of the United States are hereby granted a general permit to transport human remains from any... conditions: (1) Except as herein otherwise provided, human remains shall be prepared for burial at sea and...

  11. Organic carbon burial efficiency in a subtropical hydroelectric reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Raquel; Kosten, Sarian; Sobek, Sebastian; Jaqueline Cardoso, Simone; Figueiredo-Barros, Marcos Paulo; Henrique Duque Estrada, Carlos; Roland, Fábio

    2016-06-01

    Hydroelectric reservoirs bury significant amounts of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments. Many reservoirs are characterized by high sedimentation rates, low oxygen concentrations in bottom water and a high share of terrestrially derived OC, and all of these factors have been linked to a high efficiency of OC burial. However, investigations of OC burial efficiency (OCBE, i.e., the ratio between buried and deposited OC) in reservoirs are limited to a few studies, none of which include spatially resolved analyses. In this study we determined the spatial variation in OCBE in a large subtropical reservoir and related it to sediment characteristics. Our results show that the sediment accumulation rate explains up to 92 % of the spatial variability in OCBE, outweighing the effect of other variables, such as OC source and oxygen exposure time. OCBE at the pelagic sites varied from 48 to 86 % (mean 67 %) and decreased towards the dam. At the margins, OCBE was lower (9-17 %) due to the low sediment accumulation in shallow areas. Our data show that the variability in OCBE both along the rivers-dam and the margin-pelagic axes must be considered in whole-reservoir assessments. Combining these results with a spatially resolved assessment of sediment accumulation and OC burial in the studied reservoir, we estimated a spatially resolved mean OC burial efficiency of 57 %. Being the first assessment of OCBE with such a high spatial resolution in a reservoir, these results suggest that reservoirs may bury OC more efficiently than natural lakes.

  12. Deep-burial diagenesis: Its implications for vertical movements of the crust, uplift of the lithosphere and isostatic unroofing—A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gerald M.

    1987-03-01

    Various techniques of study of strata exposed at the surface in undeformed areas of the Appalachian Basin and Ozark Done, imply that these strata have been heated to temperatures that suggest a former great depth of burial. The data reveal that the strata have been much more deeply buried than previously thought. If such former deep burial has taken place, then subsequent uplift and erosion must also have taken place to bring these formerly deeply buried strata to the present land surface. Unexpectedly large amounts of uplift and erosion, ranging from 4.3 to 7 km, have re-exposed these formerly deeply buried rocks. This leads to the surprising conclusion that isostatic unroofing has stripped off thick sections of strata whose presence was previously unsuspected. Therefore, the lithosphere, in its isostatic unroofing of thick sequences of sedimentary strata, has undergone much larger vertical motions than many geologists had previously estimated. Case histories in this review include strata of the Silurian of the Northern Appalachian Basin and of the Ordovician of the Ozark Dome, which reached interpreted maximum burial depths of 5 and 4.3 km, respectively; Devonian strata in the Catskill Mountains of New York imply a former depth of burial of ˜ 6.5 km. Lower Ordovician carbonate sequences of the Northern Appalachian Basin imply a depth of burial in excess of 7 km; Middle Ordovician strata from the same basin signify a depth of burial of approximately 5 km; and Devonian strata, a paleodepth of 4.5-5 km. Such former great depths of burial of undeformed strata, which are now exposed at the surface, reflect large-scale vertical movements of the crust and uplift of the lithosphere. These drastic changes represent isostatic unroofing with widespread implications for paleogeography of a kind unrecognized at present.

  13. Age-related maintenance of eccentric strength: a study of temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Power, Geoffrey A; Flaaten, Nordan; Dalton, Brian H; Herzog, Walter

    2016-04-01

    With adult aging, eccentric strength is maintained better than isometric strength leading to a higher ratio of eccentric/isometric force production (ECC/ISO) in older than younger adults. The purpose was to investigate the ECC/ISO during electrical activation of the adductor pollicis during lengthening (20-320° s(-1)) contractions in 24 young (n = 12, ∼24 years) and old (n = 12, ∼72 years) males across muscle temperatures (cold ∼19 °C; normal ∼30 °C; warm ∼35 °C). For isometric force, the old were 20-30 % weaker in the normal and cold conditions (P < 0.05) with no difference for the warm condition compared to young (P > 0.05). Half-relaxation time (HRT) did not differ across age for the normal and warm temperatures (P > 0.05), but it slowed significantly for old in the cold condition compared with young (∼15 %; P < 0.05), as well, there was a 20 and 40 % increase in muscle stiffness for the young and old, respectively. ECC/ISO was 50-60 % greater for the cold condition than the normal and warm conditions. There was no age difference in ECC/ISO across ages for the normal and warm conditions (P > 0.05), but for the cold, the old exhibited a 20-35 % higher ECC/ISO than did the young for velocities above 60° s(-1) (P < 0.05). A contributing factor to the elevated ECC/ISO is an increased proportion of weakly compared to strongly bound crossbridges. These findings highlight the relationship (r = 0.70) between intrinsic muscle contractile speed (HRT) and eccentric strength in old age.

  14. Circadian clocks in rat skin and dermal fibroblasts: differential effects of aging, temperature and melatonin.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Cristina; Liu, Taole; Malan, André; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule

    2015-06-01

    As a peripheral tissue localized at the interface between internal and external environments, skin performs functions which are critical for the preservation of body homeostasis, in coordination with environmental changes. Some of these functions undergo daily variations, such as temperature or water loss, suggesting the presence of time-keeping mechanisms. Rhythmic functions are controlled by a network of circadian oscillators present virtually in every cell and coordinated by the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. At the molecular level, circadian rhythms are generated by conserved transcriptional-translational feedback loops involving several clock genes, among which Per1 and Per2 play a central role. Here we characterize clock activity in skin of the transgenic Per1-luciferase rat during postnatal development and adulthood, by real-time recording of bioluminescence in explants and primary dermal fibroblasts, and report marked transformation in circadian properties, from early life to aging. Using primary dermal fibroblast cultures we provide evidence that melatonin treatment phase dependently increases the amplitude of circadian oscillations and that ambient temperature impacts on their period, with slight overcompensation. Together, these findings demonstrate that skin contains a self-sustained circadian clock undergoing age-dependent changes. Dermal fibroblasts, one of the major skin cell types, also exhibit robust, yet specific, circadian rhythmicity which can be fine-tuned by both internal (melatonin) and external (temperature) factors.

  15. Cerebrolysin Accelerates Metamorphosis and Attenuates Aging-Accelerating Effect of High Temperature in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Navrotskaya, V.; Vorobyova, L.; Sharma, H.; Muresanu, D.; Summergrad, P.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrolysin® (CBL) is a neuroprotective drug used for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. CBL’s mechanisms of action remain unclear. Involvement of tryptophan (TRP)–kynurenine (KYN) pathway in neuroprotective effect of CBL might be suggested considering that modulation of KYN pathway of TRP metabolism by CBL, and protection against eclosion defect and prolongation of life span of Drosophila melanogaster with pharmacologically or genetically-induced down-regulation of TRP conversion into KYN. To investigate possible involvement of TRP–KYN pathway in mechanisms of neuroprotective effect of CBL, we evaluated CBL effects on metamorphosis and life span of Drosophila melanogaster maintained at 23 °C and 28 °C ambient temperature. CBL accelerated metamorphosis, exerted strong tendency (p = 0.04) to prolong life span in female but not in male flies, and attenuated aging-accelerating effect of high (28 °C) ambient temperature in both female and male flies. Further research of CBL effects on metamorphosis and resistance to aging-accelerating effect of high temperature might offer new insights in mechanisms of its neuroprotective action and expand its clinical applications. PMID:25798213

  16. Prediction and observation of munitions burial in energetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klammler, Harald; Sheremet, Alexandru; Calantoni, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    The fate of munitions or unexploded ordnance (UXO) resting on a submarine sediment bed is a critical safety concern. Munitions may be transported in uncontrolled ways to create potentially dangerous situations at places like beaches or ports. Alternatively, they may remain in place or completely disappear for significant but unknown periods, after becoming buried in the sediment bed. Clearly, burial of munitions drastically complicates the detection and removal of potential threats. Here, we present field data of wave height and (surrogate) munitions burial depths near the 8-m isobath at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Field Research Facility, Duck, North Carolina, observed between January and March 2015. The experiment captured a remarkable sequence of storms that included at least 10 events, of which 6 were characterized by wave fields of significant heights exceeding 2 m and with peak periods of approximately 10 s. During the strongest storm, waves of 14 s period and heights exceeding 2 m were recorded for more than 3 days; significant wave height reached 5 m at the peak of activity. At the end of the experiment, divers measured munition burial depths of up to 60 cm below the seabed level. However, the local bathymetry showed less than 5 cm variation between the before and after-storm states, suggesting the local net sediment accumulation / loss was negligible. The lack of bathymetric variability excludes the possibility of burial by a migrating bed form or by sediment deposition, and strongly indicates that the munitions sank into the bed. The depth of burial also suggest an extreme state of sand agitation during the storm. For predicting munitions burial depths, we explore existing analytical solutions for the dynamic interaction between waves and sediment. Measured time series of wave pressure near the sediment bed were converted into wave-induced changes in pore pressures and the effective stress states of the sediment. Different sediment failure criteria

  17. Laryngeal apnea in rat pups: effects of age and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Xia, Luxi; Leiter, James C; Bartlett, Donald

    2008-01-01

    In neonatal mammals of many species, including human infants, apnea and other reflex responses frequently arise from stimulation of laryngeal receptors by ingested or regurgitated liquids. These reflexes, mediated by afferents in the superior laryngeal nerves (SLNs), are collectively known as the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR) and are suspected to be responsible for some cases of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The LCR is strongly enhanced by mild increases in body temperature in decerebrate piglets, a finding that is of interest because SIDS victims are often found in overheated environments. Because of the experimental advantages of studying reflex development and mechanisms in neonatal rodents, we have developed methods for eliciting laryngeal apnea in anesthetized rat pups and have examined the influence of mild hyperthermia in animals ranging in age from 3 to 21 days. We found that apnea and respiratory disruption, elicited either by intralaryngeal water or by electrical stimulation of the SLN, occurred at all ages studied. Raising body temperature by 2-3 degrees C prolonged the respiratory disturbance in response to either stimulus. This effect of hyperthermia was prominent in the youngest animals and diminished with age. We conclude that many studies of the LCR restricted to larger neonatal animals in the past can be performed in infant rodents using appropriate methods. Moreover, the developmental changes in the LCR and in the thermal modulation of the LCR seem to follow different temporal profiles, implying that distinct neurophysiological processes may mediate the LCR and thermal prolongation of the LCR.

  18. The formation of the patterns of desert shrub communities on the Western Ordos Plateau, China: the roles of seed dispersal and sand burial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yange; Yang, Xiaohui; Shi, Zhongjie

    2013-01-01

    The western Ordos Plateau is a key area of shrub diversity and a National Nature Reserve of endangered shrub species in north-west China. Desert expansion is becoming the most important threat to these endangered species. However, little is known about the effects of sand burial on the dynamics of the shrub community. This study aims to investigate how the shrubs as a community and as different individual shrubs respond to the disturbances caused by the desert expansion. The approach used by this study is to separate the seed-dispersal strategy from the sand-burial forces that are involved in structuring the shrub communities at different disturbance stages. Four communities for different disturbance stages were surveyed by using 50×50 m plots. The individual shrubs were classified into coloniser and successor groups at the seed-dispersal stage and strong and weak sand-burial tolerance groups at the sand-expansion stage. We employed spatial point pattern analysis with null models for each community to examine the seed-dispersal strategy and sand-burial forces affecting community distribution patterns. At the seed-dispersal stage, the interactions between the colonisers and the successors showed significant positive correlation at a scale of 0-1 m and significant negative correlation at a scale of 2 m; significant negative correlations between the groups with strong and weak sand-burial tolerance in the early stage of sand expansion at scales of 3-6 m, and significant positive correlation in the later stage of sand expansion at a scale of 13 m, were found. Seed-dispersal strategy is a reasonable mechanism to explain the shrub community pattern formation in the earlier stages, whereas sand burial is the primary reason for the disappearance of shrubs with weak sand-burial tolerance, this irreversible disturbance causes homogenisation of the community structure and produces aging populations of shrub species. This has an important influence on the succession direction

  19. Evaluation of the ORNL area for future waste burial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lomenick, T.F.; Byerly, D.W.; Gonzales, S.

    1983-10-01

    Additional waste-burial facilities will be needed at ORNL within this decade. In order to find environmentally acceptable sites, the ORNL area must be systematically evaluated. This document represents the first step in that selection process. Geologic and hydrologic data from the literature and minor field investigations are used to identify more favorable sites for Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7. Also underway at this time is a companion study to locate a Central Waste Storage Area which could be used in the future to accommodate wastes generated by the X-10, Y-12, and K-25 facilities. From the several watershed options available, the Whiteoak Creek drainage basin is selected as the most promising hydrologic regime. This area contains all past and present waste-disposal facilities and is thus already well monitored. The seven bedrock units within the ORNL area are evaluated as potential burial media. Shales of the Conasauga Group, which are currently used for waste burial in the Whiteoak Creek drainage basin, and the Knox Group are considered the leading candidates. Although the residuum derived from and overlying the Knox dolomite has many favorable characteristics and may be regarded as having a high potential for burial of low-level wastes, at the present it is unproven. Therefore, the Conasauga shales are considered a preferable option for SWSA 7 within the ORNL area. Since the Conasauga interval is currently used for waste burial, it is better understood. One tract in Melton Valley that is underlain by Conasauga shales is nominated for detailed site-characterization studies, and several other tracts are recommended for future exploratory drilling. Exploration is also suggested for a tract in the upper Whiteoak Creek basin where Knox residuum is the shallow subsurface material.

  20. 20 CFR 219.59 - Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... burial expenses. 219.59 Section 219.59 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER... Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses. The Board will ask for the following evidence... funeral home expenses or paid some or all of these expenses or other burial expenses; or the name...

  1. 77 FR 20888 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Burial Benefits) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Application for Burial Benefits) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... information needed to determine a deceased veteran's eligibility for burial benefits. DATES: Written comments... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Application for Burial Benefits...

  2. 38 CFR 1.516 - Disclosure of information to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran. 1.516 Section 1.516 Pensions, Bonuses, and... burial of a deceased veteran. When an undertaker requests information believed to be necessary in connection with the burial of a deceased veteran, such as the name and address of the beneficiary of...

  3. 38 CFR 1.516 - Disclosure of information to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran. 1.516 Section 1.516 Pensions, Bonuses, and... burial of a deceased veteran. When an undertaker requests information believed to be necessary in connection with the burial of a deceased veteran, such as the name and address of the beneficiary of...

  4. 20 CFR 219.58 - When evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When evidence regarding payment of burial... evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required. If a person applies for the lump-sum death payment because he or she is responsible for paying the funeral home or burial expenses of the employee...

  5. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home... eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home will prescribe rules governing burial in the Soldiers' Home National Cemetery....

  6. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home... eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home will prescribe rules governing burial in the Soldiers' Home National Cemetery....

  7. 20 CFR 219.58 - When evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true When evidence regarding payment of burial... evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required. If a person applies for the lump-sum death payment because he or she is responsible for paying the funeral home or burial expenses of the employee...

  8. 38 CFR 1.516 - Disclosure of information to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran. 1.516 Section 1.516 Pensions, Bonuses, and... burial of a deceased veteran. When an undertaker requests information believed to be necessary in connection with the burial of a deceased veteran, such as the name and address of the beneficiary of...

  9. 20 CFR 219.59 - Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... burial expenses. 219.59 Section 219.59 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER... Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses. The Board will ask for the following evidence... funeral home expenses or paid some or all of these expenses or other burial expenses; or the name...

  10. 20 CFR 219.59 - Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... burial expenses. 219.59 Section 219.59 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER... Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses. The Board will ask for the following evidence... funeral home expenses or paid some or all of these expenses or other burial expenses; or the name...

  11. 38 CFR 1.516 - Disclosure of information to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran. 1.516 Section 1.516 Pensions, Bonuses, and... burial of a deceased veteran. When an undertaker requests information believed to be necessary in connection with the burial of a deceased veteran, such as the name and address of the beneficiary of...

  12. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home... eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers' and Airmen's Home will prescribe rules governing burial in the Soldiers' Home National Cemetery....

  13. 20 CFR 219.59 - Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... burial expenses. 219.59 Section 219.59 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER... Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses. The Board will ask for the following evidence... funeral home expenses or paid some or all of these expenses or other burial expenses; or the name...

  14. 20 CFR 219.58 - When evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When evidence regarding payment of burial... evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required. If a person applies for the lump-sum death payment because he or she is responsible for paying the funeral home or burial expenses of the employee...

  15. 38 CFR 1.516 - Disclosure of information to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to undertaker concerning burial of a deceased veteran. 1.516 Section 1.516 Pensions, Bonuses, and... burial of a deceased veteran. When an undertaker requests information believed to be necessary in connection with the burial of a deceased veteran, such as the name and address of the beneficiary of...

  16. 20 CFR 219.58 - When evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When evidence regarding payment of burial... evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required. If a person applies for the lump-sum death payment because he or she is responsible for paying the funeral home or burial expenses of the employee...

  17. 20 CFR 219.59 - Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... burial expenses. 219.59 Section 219.59 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER... Evidence of responsibility for or payment of burial expenses. The Board will ask for the following evidence... funeral home expenses or paid some or all of these expenses or other burial expenses; or the name...

  18. 20 CFR 219.58 - When evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true When evidence regarding payment of burial... evidence regarding payment of burial expenses is required. If a person applies for the lump-sum death payment because he or she is responsible for paying the funeral home or burial expenses of the employee...

  19. 77 FR 35114 - Agency Information Collection (NCA PreNeed Burial Planning) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (NCA PreNeed Burial Planning) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY... INFORMATION: Title: NCA PreNeed Burial Planning, VA Form 40-10007. OMB Control Number: 2900--New. Type of... the pre-need burial program should be extended to all Veterans and service members, and not limited...

  20. Emplacement, rapid burial, and exhumation of 90-Ma plutons in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Himmelberg, G.R.; Haeussler, P.J.; Brew, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    In southeastern Alaska, granodiorite-tonalite plutons of the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt intruded the Jurassic-Cretaceous Gravina belt along the eastern side of the Alexander terrane around 90 Ma. These plutons postdate some deformation related to a major contractional event between the previously amalgamated Wrangellia and Alexander terranes and the previously accreted terranes of the North American margin. We studied the aureole mineral assemblages of these plutons near Petersburg, Alaska, determined pressure and temperature of equilibration, and examined structures that developed within and adjacent to these plutons. Parallelism of magmatic and submagmatic fabrics with fabrics in the country rock indicates synchroneity of pluton emplacement with regional deformation and suggests that magma transport to higher crustal levels was assisted by regional deformation. Replacement of andalusite by kyanite or sillimanite indicates crustal thickening soon after pluton emplacement. Regional structural analysis indicates the crustal thickening was accomplished by thrust burial. Thermobarometric analyses indicate the aureoles reached near-peak temperatures of 525 to 635 ??C at pressures of 570 to 630 MPa. Consideration of the rate of thermal decay of the aureoles suggests that burial was rapid and occurred at rates around 5 to 8 mm/year. Structural observations indicate there was contractional deformation before, during, and after emplacement of the 90-Ma plutons. Initial exhumation of the Admiralty-Revillagedo belt in the Petersburg area may have occurred along a thrust west of the pluton belt within the Gravina belt. ?? 2004 NRC Canada.

  1. Improving tribological performance of gray cast iron by laser peening in dynamic strain aging temperature regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xu; Zhou, Jianzhong; Mei, Yufen; Huang, Shu; Sheng, Jie; Zhu, Weili

    2015-09-01

    A high and stable brake disc friction coefficient is needed for automobile safety, while the coefficient degrades due to elevated temperature during the braking process. There is no better solution except changes in material composition and shape design optimization. In the dynamic strain aging(DSA) temperature regime of gray cast iron, micro-dimples with different dimple depth over diameter and surface area density are fabricated on the material surface by laser peening(LP) which is an LST method. Friction behavior and wear mechanism are investigated to evaluate the effects of surface texturing on the tribological performance of specimens under dry conditions. Through LP impacts assisted by DSA, the friction coefficients of the LPed specimens increase noticeably both at room temperature and elevated temperature in comparison to untreated specimens. Moreover, the coefficient of specimen with dimple depth over diameter of 0.03 and surface area density of 30% is up to 0.351 at room temperature, which dramatically rises up to 1.33 times that of untextured specimen and the value is still up to 0.3305 at 400°C with an increasing ratio of 35% compared to that of untreated specimen. The surface of textured specimen shows better wear resistance compared to untreated specimen. Wear mechanism includes adhesive wear, abrasive wear and oxidation wear. It is demonstrated that LP assisted by DSA can substantially improve wear resistance, raise the friction coefficient as well as its stability of gray cast iron under elevated temperatures. Heat fade and premature wear can be effectively relieved by this surface modification method.

  2. Anomalous diffusion, localization, aging, and subaging effects in trap models at very low temperature.

    PubMed

    Monthus, Cécile

    2003-09-01

    We study in detail the dynamics of the one-dimensional symmetric trap model via a real-space renormalization procedure which becomes exact in the limit of zero temperature. In this limit, the diffusion front in each sample consists of two delta peaks, which are completely out of equilibrium with each other. The statistics of the positions and weights of these delta peaks over the samples allows to obtain explicit results for all observables in the limit T-->0. We first compute disorder averages of one-time observables, such as the diffusion front, the thermal width, the localization parameters, the two-particle correlation function, and the generating function of thermal cumulants of the position. We then study aging and subaging effects: our approach reproduces very simply the two different aging exponents and yields explicit forms for scaling functions of the various two-time correlations. We also extend the real-space renormalization group method to include systematic corrections to the previous zero temperature procedure via a series expansion in T. We then consider the generalized trap model with parameter alpha in [0,1] and obtain that the large scale effective model at low temperature does not depend on alpha in any dimension, so that the only observables sensitive to alpha are those that measure the "local persistence," such as the probability to remain exactly in the same trap during a time interval. Finally, we extend our approach at a scaling level for the trap model in d=2 and obtain the two relevant time scales for aging properties.

  3. Evidence that Arrhenius high-temperature aging behavior for an EPDM o-ring does not extrapolate to lower temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, K.T.; Wise, J.; Celina, M.; Clough, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    Because of the need to significantly extend the lifetimes of weapons, and because of potential implications of environmental O-ring failure on degradation of critical internal weapon components, the authors have been working on improved methods of predicting and verifying O-ring lifetimes. In this report, they highlight the successful testing of a new predictive method for deriving more confident lifetime extrapolations. This method involves ultrasensitive oxygen consumption measurements. The material studied is an EPDM formulation use for the environmental O-ring the W88. Conventional oven aging (155 C to 111 C) was done on compression molded sheet material; periodically, samples were removed from the ovens and subjected to various measurements, including ultimate tensile elongation, density and modulus profiles. Compression stress relaxation (CSR) measurements were made at 125 C and 111 C on disc shaped samples (12.7 mm diameter by 6 mm thick) using a Shawbury Wallace Compression Stress Relaxometer MK 2. Oxygen consumption measurements were made versus time, at temperatures ranging from 160 C to 52 C, using chromatographic quantification of the change in oxygen content caused by reaction with the EPDM material in sealed containers.

  4. Effect of Physical Aging on Mechanical Behavior of an Elastomeric Glass under Combined Pressure and Temperature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER Technical Report No. 7 C.- 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S . TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Effect of Physical Aging on...Mechanical Behavior of an Elastomeric Glass Under Combined Pressure and Temperature G. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) S . CONTRACT OR GRANT...NUMBER( s ) K. Vijayan and K. D. Pae NOOO14-82-K-0608 9. PERFORMING r" GANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK High PrE 3,ure

  5. Mixing times towards demographic equilibrium in insect populations with temperature variable age structures.

    PubMed

    Damos, Petros

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we use entropy related mixing rate modules to measure the effects of temperature on insect population stability and demographic breakdown. The uncertainty in the age of the mother of a randomly chosen newborn, and how it is moved after a finite act of time steps, is modeled using a stochastic transformation of the Leslie matrix. Age classes are represented as a cycle graph and its transitions towards the stable age distribution are brought forth as an exact Markov chain. The dynamics of divergence, from a non equilibrium state towards equilibrium, are evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Moreover, Kullback-Leibler distance is applied as information-theoretic measure to estimate exact mixing times of age transitions probabilities towards equilibrium. Using empirically data, we show that on the initial conditions and simulated projection's trough time, that population entropy can effectively be applied to detect demographic variability towards equilibrium under different temperature conditions. Changes in entropy are correlated with the fluctuations of the insect population decay rates (i.e. demographic stability towards equilibrium). Moreover, shorter mixing times are directly linked to lower entropy rates and vice versa. This may be linked to the properties of the insect model system, which in contrast to warm blooded animals has the ability to greatly change its metabolic and demographic rates. Moreover, population entropy and the related distance measures that are applied, provide a means to measure these rates. The current results and model projections provide clear biological evidence why dynamic population entropy may be useful to measure population stability.

  6. Effect of temperature on replicative aging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Molon, Mateusz; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2016-04-01

    The use of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in gerontological studies was based on the assumption that the reproduction limit of a single cell (replicative aging) is a consequence of accumulation of a hypothetical universal "senescence factor" within the mother cell. However, some evidence suggests that molecules or structures proposed as the "aging factor", such as rDNA circles, oxidatively damaged proteins (with carbonyl groups) or mitochondria, have little effect on replicative lifespan of yeast cells. Our results also suggest that protein aggregates associated with Hsp104, treated as a marker of yeast aging, do not seem to affect the numeric value of replicative lifespan of yeast. What these results indicate, however, is the need for finding a different way of expressing age and longevity of yeast cells instead of the commonly used number of daughters produced over units of time, as in the case of other organisms. In this paper, we show that the temperature has a stronger influence on the time of life (the total lifespan) than on the reproductive potential of yeast cells.

  7. Argon-Argon Age Measurements and Calculations of Temperatures Resulting From Asteroidal Break-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, G.

    1981-02-01

    In addition to providing chronological information, 40Ar-39Ar measurements on meteorites can be used as a geothermometer providing a record of the thermal history of the fragmentation events that have led from asteroidal parent body to museum specimen. A simple method of treating the experimental data is in terms of effective outgassing temperature. This is the temperature required to produce, in the laboratory, a fractional release of neutron induced 39Ar equal to the loss of radiogenic 40Ar determined from the 40Ar-39Ar age spectrum. The effective temperature, T_e, of a meteorite heated to a temperature T for a time t during a single parent body fragmentation or cratering event is given by prac{1}{T_e} = prac{1}{T} - prac{R}{E} ln (prac{t}{t_0}), where t_0 is the duration of the laboratory heating, E the activation energy for argon diffusion and R the gas constant. An attempt has been made to relate the experimentally observed distribution of T_e for meteorites to the unknown distribution of fragmentation temperatures, T, by using a Monte Carlo model to predict the distribution of fragment cooling times, t. It is concluded that for ordinary chondrites the mean temperature rise during at least one such event is of the order of 200 to 400 K, corresponding to a mean energy dissipation of more than 2 x 10^5 J kg-1. This conclusion is relatively insensitive to details of the model because of the logarithmic dependence of T_e on t. Two mechanisms are suggested to account for these high values, which are two orders of magnitude larger than the minimum required to produce fragmentation in laboratory experiments. One possibility is that we are seeing the effects of the break-up of a large asteroid, with a mass of the order of 1019 kg, where such a large energy input would be required to overcome the gravitational potential energy. A second explanation is that the mechanism for transferring material from the asteroid belt to Earth-crossing orbit selects only the high

  8. Changed clonal growth form induced by sand burial facilitates the acclimation of Carex brevicuspis to competition.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Xie, Yonghong; Zhu, Lianlian; Jiang, Li; Chen, Xinsheng; Pan, Baihan; Deng, Zhengmiao

    2015-01-01

    Both competition and burial are important factors that influence plant growth and structuring plant communities. Competition intensity may decline with increased burial stress. However, experimental evidence is scarce. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of burial stress in influencing plant competition by investigating biomass accumulation, biomass allocation, and clonal growth performance of Carex brevicuspis, one of the dominant species in the Dongting Lake wetland in China. The experiment was conducted with two typical wetland species, C. brevicuspis (target plant) and Polygonum hydropiper (neighbor plant), in a target-neighbor design containing three densities (0, 199, and 398 neighbor plants m-2) and two burial depths (0 and 12 cm). The biomass accumulation of C. brevicuspis decreased with increment of P. hydropiper density in the 0 cm burial treatment. However, in the 12 cm burial treatment, biomass accumulation of C. brevicuspis did not change under medium and high P. hydropiper densities. The relative neighbor effect index (RNE) increased with enhancement of P. hydropiper density but decreased with increasing burial depth. The shoot mass fraction decreased with P. hydropiper density in the 12 cm burial treatments, but the root mass fraction was only affected by burial depth. However, the rhizome mass fraction increased with both P. hydropiper density and burial depth. The number of ramets decreased with increasing P. hydropiper density. With increasing burial depth and density, the proportion of spreading ramets increased from 34.23% to 80.44%, whereas that of clumping ramets decreased from 65.77% to 19.56%. Moreover, increased P. hydropiper density and burial depth led to greater spacer length. These data indicate that the competitive effect of P. hydropiper on C. brevicuspis was reduced by sand burial, which was reflected by different patterns of biomass accumulation and RNE at the two burial depth treatments. A change from a phalanx to a

  9. In situ spectroscopic detection of SMSI effect in a Ni/CeO2 system: hydrogen-induced burial and dig out of metallic nickel.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Alfonso; Holgado, Juan P; Gonzalez-delaCruz, Victor M; Habas, Susan E; Herranz, Tirma; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-02-21

    In situ APPES technique demonstrates that the strong metal support interaction effect (SMSI) in the Ni-ceria system is associated with the decoration and burial of metallic particles by the partially reduced support, a phenomenon reversible by evacuation at high temperature of the previously absorbed hydrogen.

  10. In situ spectroscopic detection of SMSI effect in a Ni/CeO2 system: hydrogen-induced burial and dig out of metallic nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Alfonso; Holgado, Juan P.; Gonzalez-delaCruz, Victor M.; Habas, Susan e.; Herranz, Tirma; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-06-29

    In situ APPES technique demonstrates that the strong metal support interaction effect (SMSI) in the Ni-ceria system is associated with the decoration and burial of metallic particles by the partially reduced support, a phenomenon reversible by evacuation at high temperature of the previously absorbed hydrogen.

  11. Role of initial state and final quench temperature on aging properties in phase-ordering kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corberi, Federico; Villavicencio-Sanchez, Rodrigo

    2016-05-01

    We study numerically the two-dimensional Ising model with nonconserved dynamics quenched from an initial equilibrium state at the temperature Ti≥Tc to a final temperature Tf below the critical one. By considering processes initiating both from a disordered state at infinite temperature Ti=∞ and from the critical configurations at Ti=Tc and spanning the range of final temperatures Tf∈[0 ,Tc[ we elucidate the role played by Ti and Tf on the aging properties and, in particular, on the behavior of the autocorrelation C and of the integrated response function χ . Our results show that for any choice of Tf, while the autocorrelation function exponent λC takes a markedly different value for Ti=∞ [λC(Ti=∞ ) ≃5 /4 ] or Ti=Tc [λC(Ti=Tc) ≃1 /8 ] the response function exponents are unchanged. Supported by the outcome of the analytical solution of the solvable spherical model we interpret this fact as due to the different contributions provided to autocorrelation and response by the large-scale properties of the system. As changing Tf is considered, although this is expected to play no role in the large-scale and long-time properties of the system, we show important effects on the quantitative behavior of χ . In particular, data for quenches to Tf=0 are consistent with a value of the response function exponent λχ=1/2 λC(Ti=∞ ) =5 /8 different from the one [λχ∈(0.5 -0.56 ) ] found in a wealth of previous numerical determinations in quenches to finite final temperatures. This is interpreted as due to important preasymptotic corrections associated to Tf>0 .

  12. Effect of multi-temperature aging on the characterization of aluminum based castings heat treated using fluidized bed technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, Kh. A.; Samuel, A. M.; Al-Ahmari, A. M. A.; Samuel, F. H.; Doty, H. W.

    2013-07-01

    The current study investigates the influences of the fluidized bed heat treatment on the quality indices and microstructural characterization of A356.2 and B319.2 castings. Traditional heat treatment technology, employing circulating air convection furnaces (CF), was used to establish a relevant comparison with fluidized sand bed (FB) for the heat treatment of the alloys investigated, employing T6 continuous aging cycles or multi-temperature aging cycles. The results of alloys subjected to multi-temperature aging cycles reveal that the strength results obtained after the T6 continuous aging treatment of A356 alloys are not improved by means of multi-temperature aging cycles, indicating therefore that the optimum properties are obtained using a T6 aging treatment. The optimum strength properties of B319.2 alloys, however, is obtained by applying multi-temperature aging cycles such as, for example, 230 °C/2 h followed by 180 °C/8 h, rather than T6 aging treatment. In the case of multi-temperature aging cycles, the modification factor has the most significant role in improving the quality index values of 356 and 319 alloys. The FB heattreated alloys have the highest strength values for all heat treatment cycles compared to CF heat-treated alloys; however, the FB has no significant effect on the quality values of 319 alloys compared to the CF.

  13. Hydrology of the low-level radioactive solid waste burial site and vicinity near Barnwell, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, James M.

    1982-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic conditions at a burial site for low-level radioactive waste were studied, and migration of leachates from the buried waste into surrounding unconsolidated sediments were evaluated. The burial site and vicinity are underlain by a sequence of unconsolidated sediments of Late Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary age. These sediments are deposited over a graben which has been filled with sedimentary rocks of Triassic age. Hydraulic properties of the sediments beneath the burial site were determined by laboratory and field tests. Laboratory hydraulic conductivity values ranged from about 10^-7 to 10^-1 feet per day for the clayey sediments to nearly 22 feet per day for aquifer sands. Field aquifer tests indicate a transmissivity of about 22,000 feet squared per day for Cretaceous sediments and about 6,000 feet squared per day for Tertiary sediments. Aquifer tests indicate heterogeneity in the upper 200 feet of the Tertiary sediments. Water samples were analyzed from 51 wells, 5 streams, a Carolina bay, and rainfall at the burial site. The total dissolved solids of the ground water ranged from about 7 to 40 milligrams per liter in the upper clayey sediments to about 150 milligrams per liter in the water in the deeper calcareous sediments. The pH of the ground water ranges from 4.8 to 6.5. This slightly acidic water is corrosive to buried metal. Tritium activity greater than background was detected in sediment cores taken from drill holes adjacent to the burial trenches. High tritium activity occurred at depths above the trench floor. This indicates upward movement of water or vapor to the land surface. Tritium and organic constituents greater than background concentrations were observed in a monitoring well about 10 feet from a trench, indicating lateral migration of radionuclides from the buried waste. Traces of cobalt-60 and tritium greater than background activity were observed in sediment cores collected 5.8 feet beneath the trench floor at

  14. The (RH+t) aging correlation. Electrical resistivity of PVB at various temperatures and relative humidities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Electrical products having organic materials functioning as pottants, encapsulants, and insulation coatings are commonly exposed to elevated conditions of temperature and humidity. In order to assess service life potential from this method of accelerated aging, it was empirically observed that service life seems proportional to an aging correlation which is the sum of temperature in degrees Celsius (t), and the relative humidity (RH) expressed in percent. Specifically, the correlation involves a plot of time-to-failure on a log scale versus the variable RH + T plotted on a linear scale. A theoretical foundation is provided for this empirically observed correlation by pointing out that the correlation actually involves a relationship between the electrical resistivity (or conductivity) of the organic material, and the variable RH + t. If time-to-failure is a result of total number of coulombs conducted through the organic material, then the correlation of resistivity versus RH + t is synonymous with the empirical correlation of time-to-failure versus RH + t.

  15. Effect of aging temperature on formation of sol-gel derived fluor-hydroxyapatite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Joughehdoust, S; Behnamghader, A; Jahandideh, R; Manafi, S

    2010-04-01

    Synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) has been recognized as one of the most important bone substitute materials in orthopaedics and dentistry over past few decades because of its chemical and biological similarity to the mineral phase of human bone. One solution for reduction the solubility of HA in biological environments is replacing F- by OH in HA structure and forming fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) solid solution. In this paper, FHA nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by a sol-gel method. Also, the influence of aging temperature on formation of FHA powder was studied. Equimolar solutions of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, triethyl phosphite and ammonium fluoride in ethanol were used as Ca, P and F precursors. After aging at different temperatures, the synthesized powders were heat treated at 550 degrees C. The powders were investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED), energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) and zetasizer measurement. The results of XRD proved the presence of fluorapatite (FA) and HA in all samples. In addition, the formation of FHA was confirmed by FT-IR results. XRD studies also showed that the crystallites were in nanometric scale. At the same time, this result was in good agreement with the result of zetasizer analysis.

  16. Soil burial contribution to deep soil organic carbon storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaopricha, N. T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2013-12-01

    Previous reviews of deep soil C have focused on root inputs and the vertical transport of particulate and dissolved organic matter through mixing, gravity, and preferential flowpaths as the main modes of delivery of C to the deep subsoil. Depositional processes have received considerable attention in the context of long-range soil erosion and sedimentation on land, but the role of soil burial in the sequestration of C photosynthesized in situ at depositional sites has been largely absent from discussions of deep soil organic C (SOC) dynamics. Burial can disconnect a soil from atmospheric conditions and slow or inhibit microbial decomposition. Buried soil horizons, which are former surface soils that have been buried through various depositional processes, can store more SOC than would exist at such depths from in situ root inputs and leaching from upper horizons. Here, we discuss factors contributing to SOC storage in soils below 1 m with a focus on soil burial. We review the contributions of geomorphic and anthropogenic depositional processes to deep SOC storage and describe how environmental conditions or state factors during and since burial influence SOC persistence in buried soils. We draw from examples in the paleosol and geomorphology literature to identify the effects of soil burial by volcanic, aeolian, alluvial, colluvial, glacial, and anthropogenic processes on soil C storage. Buried soils have been traditionally studied for information about past environments and can also serve as useful case studies for understanding both the sensitivity of landscape processes to future environmental change and the mechanisms contributing to soil organic matter stabilization. Soil burial can store SOC at any depth. Here, we focus particularly on buried soil horizons at ≥ 1 m depth to highlight how much SOC exists at depths below those typically considered in SOC inventories, studies of soil organic matter dynamics, and most biogeochemical models. Understanding the

  17. Body temperature variability (Part 1): a review of the history of body temperature and its variability due to site selection, biological rhythms, fitness, and aging.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Greg

    2006-12-01

    Body temperature is a complex, non-linear data point, subject to many sources of internal and external variation. While these sources of variation significantly complicate interpretation of temperature data, disregarding knowledge in favor of oversimplifying complex issues would represent a significant departure from practicing evidence-based medicine. Part 1 of this review outlines the historical work of Wunderlich on temperature and the origins of the concept that a healthy normal temperature is 98.6 degrees F (37.0 degrees C). Wunderlich's findings and methodology are reviewed and his results are contrasted with findings from modern clinical thermometry. Endogenous sources of temperature variability, including variations caused by site of measurement, circadian, menstrual, and annual biological rhythms, fitness, and aging are discussed. Part 2 will review the effects of exogenous masking agents - external factors in the environment, diet, or lifestyle that can influence body temperature, as well as temperature findings in disease states.

  18. Temperature-humidity-bias aging technique to identify defective surface mount capacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Chanchani, R.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic chip capacitors can potentially crack due to thermal stresses in a surface mount assembly process. The electrical performance of the cracked capacitors will degrade with time, and they will prematurely short. In high reliability applications, the cracked capacitors must be identified and eliminated. We have developed and demonstrated the temperature-humidity-bias (THB) aging technique to identify cracked capacitors. The initial phase of the study involved setting up automated test equipment to monitor 100 surface mounted capacitors at 85% relative humidity, 85{degree}C with 50 volts dc bias. The capacitors subjected to severe thermal shock were aged along with control samples. Failure mode analysis was done on the failed capacitors. The capacitors with surface cracks short-out within the first 8 hours of aging, whereas the capacitors that failed after a longer aging time (8 to 1000 hours) had a shorting path in an internal void. Internal voids are typical defects introduced during manufacturing of multilayer ceramic (MLC) capacitors. In the second phase of the study, we used the THB aging technique to study the effect of surface mount processes on capacitor cracking and, thus the reliability. The surface mount processes studied were vapor phase, infra-red (IR) and convection belt reflow soldering. The results shoed that 6.3% of vapor phase soldered capacitors, and 1.25% of the IR and convection belt soldered capacitors had cracks. In all capacitors, regardless of the solder process used, an additional 3 to 4% of the capacitors failed due to a shorting path in the internal void. The results of this study confirm that this technique can be used to screen cracked capacitors and compare different solder and manufacturing processes.

  19. Salt rock of the Alpine Haselgebirge Formation - ages, temperatures and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, C.; Neubauer, F.; Urai, J.; Genser, J.; Borojevic-Sostaric, B.; Schoenherr, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Upper Permian salt bearing Haselgebirge Formation (257-251 Ma) of the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) shows unusual features different from other evaporite successions: (1) extreme tectonic deformation, (2) a large proportion of mudrock and anhydrite rock, and (3) the absence of K-bearing evaporite minerals other than polyhalite. Intact mudrock and anhydrite rocks allow the reconstruction of early diagenetic events. Migrating mineralized hydrous fluids, released from mudrock and gypsum, led to the extensive growth of polyhalite, which forms massive rocks with various fabrics. This growth happened during the ongoing opening of the Meliata Ocean. Polyhalite age dating shows a maximum of measured ages ca. 233-234 Ma (40Ar/39Ar age). The investigated rock salt deposits (Altaussee, Berchtesgaden-Bad Dürrnberg) show a thermal overprint during Alpine orogeny. Polyhalite age data scatter broadly with maxima during Jurassic (closure of Meliata Ocean) and Cretaceous (eo-Alpine thrusting event). Our fluid inclusions and vitrinite reflexion measurements yield a peak temperature of 180°C for Berchtesgaden and >240°C for Altaussee. Rock salt and mudrock form a two-component tectonite ("haselgebirge", Schauberger, 1986). Halite deformed and recrystallized, and also crystallized in veins within mudrocks. We interpret high overpressure of the pore fluid to have significantly contributed to fracturing of the mudrock. By use of the temperature-independent subgrain-size piezometer for halite, the paleo-differential stress was calculated at ca. 2.5 MPa in Altaussee and ca. 4.5 MPa in Berchtesgaden. These paleo-stresses allow estimate temperatures at ca. 150°C and ca. 110°C, also implying very high strain rates (10-9 to 10-10 s-1; Leitner et al., 2011). The orientation of the foliation, the halite mineral lineation and other structures of rock salt are consistent within each deposit. The mapped mesoscale structures relate to the surroundings of the salt bodies. White fibers

  20. Direct burial and vault emplacement data quality comparison at Dotson Ranch, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B. C.; Aderhold, K.; Anderson, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Parker, T.; Miller, P. E.; Slad, G. W.; Reusch, A.

    2013-12-01

    noise levels are similar at all sensors and are likely due to cultural activity and temperature fluctuations. The conclusion from this study is that the shallow vault emplacement method does not provide significant improvement in data quality compared to direct burial emplacement method. Further experiments are underway in a less noisy environment at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska.

  1. Impaired defense of core temperature in aged humans during mild cold stress.

    PubMed

    Degroot, David W; Kenney, W Larry

    2007-01-01

    Aged humans often exhibit an impaired defense of core temperature during cold stress. However, research documenting this response has typically used small subject samples and strong cold stimuli. The purpose of this study was to determine the responses of young and older subjects, matched for anthropometric characteristics, during mild cold stress. Thirty-six young (YS; 23 +/- 1 years, range 18-30) and 46 older (OS; 71 +/- 1 years, range 65-89) subjects underwent a slow transient cold air exposure from a thermoneutral baseline, during which esophageal (T(es)) and mean skin temperatures (T(sk)), O(2) consumption, and skin blood flow (SkBF; laser-Doppler flowmetry) were measured. Cold exposure was terminated at the onset of visible sustained shivering. Net metabolic heat production (M(net)), heat debt, predicted change in midregion temperature (DeltaT(mid)), and tissue insulation (I(t)) were calculated. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as laser-Doppler flux/mean arterial pressure and expressed as percent change from baseline (DeltaCVC(%base)). There were no baseline group differences for T(es), but OS M(net) was lower (OS: 38.0 +/- 1.1; YS: 41.9 +/- 1.1 W . m(-2), P < 0.05). T(es) was well maintained in YS but fell progressively in OS (P < 0.01 for all timepoints after 35 min). The skin vasoconstrictor response to mild cold stress was attenuated in OS (42 +/- 3 vs. 53 +/- 4 DeltaCVC(%base), P < 0.01). There were no group differences for T(sk) or I(t), while M(net) remained lower in OS (P < 0.05). The DeltaT(mid) did not account for the drop in T(es) in OS. Healthy aged humans failed to maintain T(es); however, the mechanisms underlying this response are not clear.

  2. Effect of different aging temperatures prior to freezing on meat quality attributes of frozen/thawed lamb loins.

    PubMed

    Choe, Ju-Hui; Stuart, Adam; Kim, Yuan H Brad

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different aging temperatures prior to freezing on quality attributes of frozen/thawed lamb loins. The loins (M. longissimus lumborum; n=32) were randomly allocated to one of the four different aging/freezing treatments: aged only (-1.5°C for 14 days) and aged (-1.5°C for 14 days, 3°C for 8 days, or 7°C for 8days) then frozen/thawed loins. The loins aged at elevated temperatures (3°C or 7°C) for 8 days had equivalent shear force, protein degradation and purge loss values compared to the loins aged at -1.5°C for 14 days (P>0.05). However, significantly higher drip loss and less color stability were observed in the loins with increasing aging temperatures compared to the loins aged at -1.5°C. These results suggest that application of elevated aging temperatures could shorten required aging periods prior to freezing, while not adversely affecting tenderness and purge loss of frozen/thawed meat.

  3. Age and altitude tolerance in rats - Temperature, plasma enzymes, and corticosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Altland, P.D.; Rattner, B.A.

    1981-02-01

    The influence of age on altitude tolerance in rats is investigated on the basis of changes in body weight and temperature, plasma enzyme levels and corticosterone concentration as indicators of condition. Immature (24-34 days), young adult (130-140 days) and old (600-625 days) rats were exposed to simulated altitudes from 6096 to 8230 m for four hours, and plasma activities of aspartate amino transferase (AsAT), fructose diphosphate aldolase (FDA), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase were determined, along with body weight and temperature and corticosterone. A critical survival threshold of 8230 m is obtained for the immature rats, while mortality was observed in some young adult and old rats at 7620 m, indicating the greater altitude tolerance of the immature animals. The degree of hypothermia and corticosterone elevation induced by altitude exposure in immature rats, but not young adult or old rats, is found to be directly related to the severity of hypoxia. Plasma enzyme activities are found to be relatively unchanged in immature rats, but AsAT and LDH activities in old rats, as well as FDA in young adults, were elevated at the critical survival threshold. Results thus indicate the usefulness of body temperature and plasma corticosterone in determining the altitude tolerance of immature rats, and enzyme activities for tolerance assessment in young adult and old rats.

  4. A re-evaluation of geological timescale benchmarks and temperature sensitivity of fission-track annealing in apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijendijk, Elco; Andriessen, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Current models of the temperature sensitivity of fission track annealing in apatites have been calibrated using fission track data from boreholes, with the assumption that these samples are currently at maximum burial depth and temperatures. The most detailed data-set comes from boreholes located in the Otway basin, Australia. However, several lines of evidence suggest that these samples are not at their maximum burial depth and temperature and consequently the cooling temperature of the apatite fission track thermochronometer would then be higher than previously assumed. Significant late Cenozoic exhumation in the Otway Basin was suggested by earlier studies that document a major late-Miocene erosional unconformity, folding and trusting of underlying sediments and elevated strandlines along the coast. In addition, anomalously young apatite (U-Th)/He ages in several boreholes in the basin suggest that the basin's sediments have been exhumed and cooled in the late Cenozoic. We explore the effects of late Cenozoic exhumation on fission track data in the Otway basin using a 1D model of burial and thermal history. We show that simulating several 100s of meters of exhumation in the basin results in significant misfit between current annealing models and observed fission track data. The additional exhumation reconciles the Otway basin data with a second detailed fission track dataset from boreholes in Southern Texas with a well-constrained thermal and burial history. We combine vitrinite reflectance data and U-Th/He data from the Otway basin to recalibrate the burial history of the Otway basin. Subsequently we combine the new thermal history of the Otway basin with the Southern Texas dataset to recalibrate the fission track annealing algorithm. The results suggest that fission-track annealing in apatites is underestimated by approximately 20°C by current annealing models, with significant implications for studies that use apatite fission track thermochronology to

  5. Effect of aging temperature on phase decomposition and mechanical properties in cast duplex stainless steels

    DOE PAGES

    Mburu, Sarah; Kolli, R. Prakash; Perea, Daniel E.; ...

    2017-03-06

    The microstructure and mechanical properties in unaged and thermally aged (at 280 °C, 320 °C, 360 °C, and 400 °C to 4300 h) CF–3 and CF–8 cast duplex stainless steels (CDSS) are investigated. The unaged CF–8 steel has Cr-rich M23C6 carbides located at the δ–ferrite/γ–austenite heterophase interfaces that were not observed in the CF–3 steel and this corresponds to a difference in mechanical properties. Both unaged steels exhibit incipient spinodal decomposition into Fe-rich α–domains and Cr-rich α’–domains. During aging, spinodal decomposition progresses and the mean wavelength (MW) and mean amplitude (MA) of the compositional fluctuations increase as a function ofmore » aging temperature. Additionally, G–phase precipitates form between the spinodal decomposition domains in CF–3 at 360 °C and 400 °C and in CF–8 at 400 °C. Finally, the microstructural evolution is correlated to changes in mechanical properties.« less

  6. Revisiting Field Burial by Accretion onto Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan

    2017-09-01

    The surface magnetic field strength of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) is found to be about 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of garden variety radio pulsars (with a spin of {˜ }0.5-5 s and B{˜ }10^{12} G). The exact mechanism of the apparent reduction of field strength in MSPs is still a subject of debate. One of the proposed mechanisms is burial of the surface magnetic field under matter accreted from a companion. In this article we review the recent work on magnetic confinement of accreted matter on neutron stars poles. We present the solutions of the magneto-static equations with a more accurate equation of state of the magnetically confined plasma and discuss its implications for the field burial mechanism.

  7. Influence of age on the temperature of the anterior segment of the eye. Measurements by infrared thermometry.

    PubMed

    Aliò, J; Padron, M

    1982-01-01

    The absolute temperatures of five characteristic points of the orbito-ocular thermogram were studied by means of infrared thermometry in a group of 96 normal subjects, randomly selected between ages from 15 days to 80 years. Significant differences were found between older and younger age groups concerning absolute temperatures of the centre of the cornea, limbus, sclera and outer canthus. Inner canthus temperature showed very little variation with age, being the most constant thermometric point of the five selected for study. Mean absolute temperatures of the anterior segment of the eye and outer canthus measured by infrared thermometry significantly decreased with age. To the best of our knowledge this finding has not been previously reported.

  8. Late burial diagenesis driven by thermal degradation of hydrocarbons and thermochemical sulfate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, E.; Moore, C.H.; Sassen, R.

    1988-01-01

    Deeply buried (6 km) upper Smackover grainstones exhibit a complex physical and chemical diagenetic history, starting shortly after burial and continuing to the present. Paragenesis prior to crude oil migration is represented by early marine cementation and post-compaction complexly zoned calcite followed by saddle dolomite, anhydrite, and highly luminescent calcite cements. Oxygen isotopic compositions are thought to indicate precipitation temperatures of 40/sup 0/ - 80/sup 0/C prior to hydrocarbon migration. Carbon isotopic compositions of pre-hydrocarbon migration carbonates remain constant, but carbonate oxygen becomes isotopically lighter. Although crude oil migration initially retarded chemical diagenesis, this process resumed during subsequent deeper burial as a consequence of thermal cracking of crude oil to form gas-condensate, abundant solid bitumen, and ultimately methane and nonhydrocarbon gases. Thermochemical sulfate reduction and hydrocarbon oxidation generated hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide resulting in precipitation of metal sulfides (pyrite, sphalerite, and galena), replacement of anhydrite by calcite, and late precipitation of calcite whose highly negative carbon isotopic composition indicates a significant contribution of carbon from thermal oxidation of hydrocarbons.

  9. Clay Mineralogy and Organic Carbon Burial in Proterozoic Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, N. J.; Johnston, D. T.; Mushegian, A.; Rothman, D. H.; Knoll, A. H.

    2008-12-01

    Pedogenic, or soil-derived, clay minerals have long been implicated in the efficiency of organic matter (OM) burial and coincident accumulation of atmospheric oxygen. As diagenesis and metamorphism obscure pedogenic clays in many Precambrian rocks, clay mineralogy and its role in OM burial through much of geologic time remains incompletely understood. In this study we analyzed the mineralogy and total organic carbon (TOC) of a number of organic rich shales deposited in Late Archean to Early Cambrian sedimentary basins. Across all samples, diagenetic transformation of pre-existing smectite minerals has led to the predominance of glauconite and the diagenetic 1M and 1Md illite polytypes, which, collectively, can be thought of as "proto-smectite". The correlations between TOC and illite crystallinity suggest that OM burial and preservation in the Proterozoic proceeded by the physical aggregation of OM and pedogenic clays upon deposition. This association, in turn, led to the interference of OM with the illitization process, resulting in the ubiquitous relationship between high surface area (or, finely crystalline) material and high TOC. This interpretation is consistent with suggestions that the preservation of OM after burial proceeds by physical exclusion, with mineral surfaces effectively isolating OM from enzymatic breakdown. Together, it appears that the deposition of pedogenic clays has remained broadly constant over Proterozoic time and into the Early Cambrian, which is incompatible with the hypothesis that late Neoproterozoic oxygenation was influenced by increases in pedogenic clay production. As no clear temporal relationship exists between clays and OM, Precambrian oxygenation was likely controlled by other mechanisms.

  10. Low-Level Burial Grounds Waste Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    2000-03-02

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage and/or disposal at the Low-Level Burial Grounds which are located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.

  11. Enhanced Site Characterization of the 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2001-09-25

    This report describes the results obtained from deployment of the Enhanced Site Characterization System (ESCS) at the Hanford Site's 618-4 Burial Ground. The objective of this deployment was to use advanced geostatistical methods to integrate and interpret geophysical and ground truth data, to map the physical types of waste materials present in unexcavated portions of the burial ground. One issue of particularly interest was the number of drums (containing depleted uranium metal shavings or uranium-oxide powder) remaining in the burial ground and still requiring removal.Fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (ART), a neural network classification method, was used to cluster the study area into 3 classes based on their geophysical signatures. Multivariate statistical analyses and discriminant function analysis (DFA) indicated that the drum area as well as a second area (the SW anomaly) had similar geophysical signatures that were different from the rest of the burial ground. Further analysis of the drum area suggested that as many as 770 drums to 850 drums may remain in that area. Similarities between the geophysical signatures of the drum area and the SW anomaly suggested that excavation of the SW anomaly area also proceed with caution.Deployment of the ESCS technology was successful in integrating multiple geophysical variables and grouping these observations into clusters that are relevant for planning further excavation of the buried ground. However, the success of the technology could not be fully evaluated because reliable ground truth data were not available to enable calibration of the different geophysical signatures against actual waste types.

  12. Scour and Burial Mechanics of Objects in the Nearshore

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    equilibrium bottom profiles in response to seasonal changes in wave climate and accretion /erosion waves spawned by fluxes of sediment into the littoral...waves cause erosion of the bar-berm portion of the profile, exposing mines close to shore, and accretion of the shorerise profile, causing burial of... North Quincy Street Arlington VA 22217-5000 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ONR 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY

  13. Effects of Finish Cooling Temperature on Tensile Properties After Thermal Aging of Strain-Based API X60 Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Sunghak; Ro, Yunjo; Lee, Chang Sun; Hwang, Byoungchul

    2015-09-01

    Two types of strain-based American Petroleum Institute (API) X60 linepipe steels were fabricated at two finish cooling temperatures, 673 K and 723 K (400 °C and 450 °C), and the effects of the finish cooling temperatures on the tensile properties after thermal aging were investigated. The strain-based API X60 linepipe steels consisted mainly of polygonal ferrite (PF) or quasi-polygonal ferrite and the volume fraction of acicular ferrite increased with the increasing finish cooling temperature. In contrast, the volume fractions of bainitic ferrite (BF) and secondary phases decreased. The tensile properties before and after thermal aging at 473 K and 523 K (200 °C and 250 °C) were measured. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and yield ratio increased with the increasing thermal aging temperature. The strain hardening rate in the steel fabricated at the higher finish cooling temperature decreased rapidly after thermal aging, probably due to the Cottrell atmosphere, whereas the strain hardening rate in the steel fabricated at the lower finish cooling temperature changed slightly after thermal aging. The uniform elongation and total elongation decreased with increasing thermal aging temperature, probably due to the interactions between carbon atoms and dislocations. The uniform elongation decreased rapidly with the decreasing volume fractions of BF and martensite and secondary phases. The yield ratio increased with the increasing thermal aging temperature, whereas the strain hardening exponent decreased. The strain hardening exponent of PL steel decreased rapidly after thermal aging because of the large number of mobile dislocations between PF and BF or martensite or secondary phases.

  14. Investigation of a Medieval Pilgrim Burial Excavated from the Leprosarium of St Mary Magdalen Winchester, UK.

    PubMed

    Roffey, Simon; Tucker, Katie; Filipek-Ogden, Kori; Montgomery, Janet; Cameron, Jamie; O'Connell, Tamsin; Evans, Jane; Marter, Phil; Taylor, G Michael

    2017-01-01

    We have examined the remains of a Pilgrim burial from St Mary Magdalen, Winchester. The individual was a young adult male, aged around 18-25 years at the time of death. Radiocarbon dating showed the remains dated to the late 11th-early 12th centuries, a time when pilgrimages were at their height in Europe. Several lines of evidence in connection with the burial suggested this was an individual of some means and prestige. Although buried within the leprosarium cemetery, the skeleton showed only minimal skeletal evidence for leprosy, which was confined to the bones of the feet and legs. Nonetheless, molecular testing of several skeletal elements, including uninvolved bones all showed robust evidence of DNA from Mycobacterium leprae, consistent with the lepromatous or multibacillary form of the disease. We infer that in life, this individual almost certainly suffered with multiple soft tissue lesions. Genotyping of the M.leprae strain showed this belonged to the 2F lineage, today associated with cases from South-Central and Western Asia. During osteological examination it was noted that the cranium and facial features displayed atypical morphology for northern European populations. Subsequently, geochemical isotopic analyses carried out on tooth enamel indicated that this individual was indeed not local to the Winchester region, although it was not possible to be more specific about their geographic origin.

  15. Investigation of a Medieval Pilgrim Burial Excavated from the Leprosarium of St Mary Magdalen Winchester, UK

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Katie; Filipek-Ogden, Kori; Montgomery, Janet; Cameron, Jamie; O’Connell, Tamsin; Evans, Jane; Marter, Phil; Taylor, G. Michael

    2017-01-01

    We have examined the remains of a Pilgrim burial from St Mary Magdalen, Winchester. The individual was a young adult male, aged around 18–25 years at the time of death. Radiocarbon dating showed the remains dated to the late 11th–early 12th centuries, a time when pilgrimages were at their height in Europe. Several lines of evidence in connection with the burial suggested this was an individual of some means and prestige. Although buried within the leprosarium cemetery, the skeleton showed only minimal skeletal evidence for leprosy, which was confined to the bones of the feet and legs. Nonetheless, molecular testing of several skeletal elements, including uninvolved bones all showed robust evidence of DNA from Mycobacterium leprae, consistent with the lepromatous or multibacillary form of the disease. We infer that in life, this individual almost certainly suffered with multiple soft tissue lesions. Genotyping of the M.leprae strain showed this belonged to the 2F lineage, today associated with cases from South-Central and Western Asia. During osteological examination it was noted that the cranium and facial features displayed atypical morphology for northern European populations. Subsequently, geochemical isotopic analyses carried out on tooth enamel indicated that this individual was indeed not local to the Winchester region, although it was not possible to be more specific about their geographic origin. PMID:28125649

  16. Ground resistance influences lizard burial in dry and wet sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Sarah; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Many terrestrial animals move within soil in which water content can vary, and little is known about how water content affects locomotor performance. To investigate the effect of water content on burial, we created controlled dry and wet substrates. We used 0.3 mm glass particles and varied water content W, the mass of water to mass of dry loosely packed sand. Drag force on a submerged 1.6 cm diameter rod increased by a factor of 4 as W increased from 0 to 0.03, after which force increases were small. Drag force in wet media periodically fluctuated with time and corresponded with surface fracturing. We characterized how W affected burial performance and strategy of a generalist burrower, the ocellated skink lizard (Chalcides ocellatus). High speed x-ray imaging was used to measure head, body and limb kinematics in substrates with W= 0 and W= 0.03. In both states during burial the body was maintained in a curved posture and the animal moved using a start-stop motion. During movement, the head oscillated and the forelimb on the convex side of the body was used to push the animal forward. Both speed and angular excursion of the head oscillation decreased in the W= 0.03 state. The differences in locomotion were attributed to the changing resistance force within the media.

  17. Undulation frequency affects burial performance in living and model flatfishes.

    PubMed

    McKee, Amberle; MacDonald, Ian; Farina, Stacy C; Summers, Adam P

    2016-04-01

    Flatfishes bury themselves under a thin layer of sand to hide from predators or to ambush prey. We investigated the role of undulation frequency of the body in burial in five species of flatfishes (Isopsetta isolepis, Lepidopsetta bilineata, Hippoglossoides elassodon, Parophrys vetulus, and Psettichthys melanostictus). High-speed videos show that undulations begin cranially and pass caudally while burying, as in forward swimming in many other fishes. The flatfishes also flick the posterior edge of their dorsal and anal fins during burial, which may increase the total surface area covered by substrate. We built a simple physical model - a flexible, oval silicone plate with a motorized, variable-speed actuator - to isolate the effect of undulation frequency on burial. In both the model and actuated dead flatfish, increased undulation frequency resulted in an increase in the area of sand coverage. Complete coverage required an undulation frequency of no more than 10Hz for our models, and that was also sufficient for live flatfishes. The model shows that undulation is sufficient to bury the animal, but live flatfishes showed a superior ability to bury, which we attribute to the action of the median fins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Episodic burial metamorphism in the Andes—A viable model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevins, R. E.; Robinson, D.; Aguirre, L.; Vergara, M.

    2003-08-01

    Burial metamorphism of regional extent throughout Mesozoic to Cenozoic sequences in the Andean Mountain belt has been attributed previously to a unique model of metamorphic development, involving episodic ˜40 m.y. cycles of extensional basin formation, burial, metamorphism, and then exhumation. A main premise of this model is that breaks in metamorphic grade occur at major stratigraphic unconformities, so marking successive metamorphic cycles. This model is tested in a Mesozoic Cenozoic sequence east of Santiago, where three metamorphic episodes have been reported on the basis of sharp breaks in metamorphic grade at two main unconformities. In metabasites from this area, reaction progress in mafic phyllosilicates shows a continuum across the sequence without breaks at the unconformities. There are differences in mineral assemblages between the various stratigraphic units, from which contrasting subgreenschist facies can be recognized. However, consideration of the controls on mineral paragenesis at subgreenschist facies conditions demonstrates that these different facies cannot be used as evidence of sharp breaks in metamorphic grade at unconformities, as has been reported in many previous publications. Thus, metamorphic breaks within this Andean section cannot be confirmed. Accordingly, models of Andean burial metamorphism linked to episodic tectonic cycles throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic appear unfounded.

  19. Organic carbon burial rates in the Baltic Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winogradow, A.; Pempkowiak, J.

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies indicate the important role of the marine environment in the circulation of CO2. This is due to the occurrence of the so called "biological pump" mechanism. A special role in this process is played by the shelf seas. The paper presents estimates of organic carbon burial rates in the Baltic Sea sediments. Quantification of the burial rate required the determination of organic carbon accumulation rate to the Baltic sediments and the carbon return flux from sediments to the water column. Results of both sediment and mass accumulation rates as well as profiles of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were used. Sediment accumulation rates were based on 210Pb method validated by 137Cs measurements and ranged from 66 g m-2 yr-1 to 744 g m-2 yr-1 as regards mass accumulation rates and from 0.07 cm yr-1 to 0.25 cm yr-1 as regards linear accumulation rates. Carbon deposition to the Baltic sediments amounts to 1.955 ± 0.585 Tg m-2 yr-1, while 0.759 ± 0.020 g m-2 yr-1 of carbon returns from sediments to the water column. Thus the organic carbon burial rate in the Baltic Sea sediments is equal to 1.197 ± 0.584 Tg C m-2 yr-1.

  20. Self-burial mechanics of hygroscopically active awns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wonjong; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the mechanics of self-burial of some plant seeds whose morphologies respond to humidity change of the surroundings. The seeds of Pelargonium species have hygroscopically active awns that play a critical role in the dispersal from the parent plant and burial in soil. While the awn uncoils to a linear shape in a highly humid condition, it recoils to a helical shape when dry. The rotation is driven by the structure of the cell walls that are comprised of cellulose microfibers aligned in a tilted helix. During uncoiling of the awn, the revolving tail generates thrust to burrow into soil, so that the seed is self-buried. We present the direct observation of the self-burial of the seed with the thrust into a soft substrate being measured at the same time. The elastica theory allows us to rationalize this botanical digging mechanics using the structural deformations of the hygroexpansive tissues. This work was supported by the Sogang University Research Grant of 2013 (201310009.01) and the National Research Foundation of Korea (grant no. 2012-008023).

  1. Self-burial mechanics of hygroscopically responsive awns.

    PubMed

    Jung, Wonjong; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the mechanics of self-burial of some plant seeds whose morphologies respond to environmental changes in humidity. The seeds of Erodium and Pelargonium have hygroscopically responsive awns that play a critical role in their self-burial into soil. The awn, coiled in a dry state, uncoils to stretch linearly under highly humid condition because of a tilted arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in one of the layers of the awn's bilayered structure. By measuring the mechanical characteristics of the awns of Pelargonium carnosum, we find that the extensional force of the awn can be aptly modeled by the theory of elasticity for a coiled spring. We further show that although the resistance to the seed-head penetrating relatively coarse soils without spinning is large enough to block the digging seed, the rotation of the seed greatly reduces the soil's resistance down to a level the awn can easily overcome. Our mechanical analysis reveals that the self-burial of the seed is a sophisticated outcome of the helically coiled configuration of the awn.

  2. Antiquity of man in America indicated by radiometric dates on the Yuha burial site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Merriam, R.; Childers, W.M.; Protsch, R.

    1976-01-01

    MUCH evidence suggests that man was present in the Western Hemisphere before 12,000 yr ago, but the case has remained less than conclusive 1. In some situations, the geological age of the site is reasonably well established but the association or nature of the artefacts is questionable2,3. In other cases, museum specimens of human bones dated by radiocarbon analysis of collagen lack desirable information concerning site location, geology, and stratigraphy even though the accuracy of their absolute ages seems valid4-6. We report here the results of radiometric dates of the Yuha burial site from Imperial County, California, for which the geology and stratigraphy have been documented and reported in detail7. ?? 1976 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. Effects of Operating Temperatures and Accelerated Environmental Ageing on the Mechanical Properties of a Glass-Vinylester Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasztorny, M.; Nycz, D. B.; Romanowski, R. K.; Gotowicki, P.; Kiczko, A.; Rudnik, D.

    2017-07-01

    Experimental identification of the mechanical properties of a selected glass-vinylester structural composite is developed, performed, and analysed taking into account accelerated environmental ageing and three operating temperatures (-20, 20, and 55°C) corresponding to the operating temperature range for composite footbridges in the Central Europe. The main constituents of the composite fabricated using infusion technology are a bidirectional balanced stitched E-glass fabric and a flame retardant, vinylester resin. After homogenization, the composite reinforced with one fabric forms a single lamina and is modeled as a linear elastic-brittle orthotropic material. Full sets of material constants were identified for the initial and aged composites at the selected operating temperatures. The accelerated environmental ageing of the composite was performed on 4-layer symmetric laminate platelets protected with a 300-mm-thick gelcoat layer, using an ageing chamber and a relevant ageing programme. A comparative analysis was carried out in order to determine the effects of operating temperature and accelerated environmental ageing on the material constants of the GFRP composite. It is found that the composite tested can be modeled as a linear elastic-brittle orthotropic material to the level of 20% of its strength in each strength test. The impact of the accelerated environmental ageing and operating temperature in the range from -20 to 55°C on the elastic/strength/ultimate strain constants of the selected E-glass/vinylester composite can be significant and different for individual constants.

  4. K-Ca ages of authigenic sediments: examples from Paleozoic glauconite and applications to low-temperature thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, M. Robinson; Ducea, Mihai N.

    2011-11-01

    K-Ca ages of Cambrian glauconites from the Llano uplift, central Texas, were determined in order to re-evaluate the ability of the K-Ca system to constrain the timing of deposition of sedimentary packages. All of the K-Ca ages presented here were found to be younger than their stratigraphic ages. In addition to being too young, the K-Ca ages are also highly variable, ranging in age from Silurian to Permian. The oldest subset of glauconite ages are in agreement with previously published Rb-Sr ages from the same outcrop and provide further evidence for there having been a post-depositional thermal or recrystallization event that reset both the Rb-Sr and K-Ca systems. The range of younger glauconite K-Ca ages is similar to the distribution of available apatite fission track ages for the Llano basement. K-Ca ages are interpreted as thermochronologic data reflecting partial retention of Ca in thermally fluctuating basin conditions. Estimates of the closure temperature of Ca in glauconite are found to be 60-90°C for cooling rates of ~0.5-1°C/My. The K-Ca system is potentially useful as a low-temperature thermochronometer with closure temperatures <100°C for glauconite.

  5. Thallium-isotopic compositions of euxinic sediments as a proxy for global manganese-oxide burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Jeremy D.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Horner, Tristan J.; Ostrander, Chadlin M.; Peterson, Larry C.

    2017-09-01

    Thallium (Tl) isotopes are a new and potentially powerful paleoredox proxy that may track bottom water oxygen conditions based on the global burial flux of manganese oxides. Thallium has a residence time of ∼20 thousand years, which is longer than the ocean mixing time, and it has been inferred that modern oxic seawater is conservative with respect to both concentration and isotopes. Marine sources of Tl have nearly identical isotopic values. Therefore, the Tl sinks, adsorption onto manganese oxides and low temperature oceanic crust alteration (the dominant seawater output), are the primary controls of the seawater isotopic composition. For relatively short-term, ∼million years, redox events it is reasonable to assume that the dominant mechanism that alters the Tl isotopic composition of seawater is associated with manganese oxide burial because large variability in low temperature ocean crust alteration is controlled by long-term, multi-million years, average ocean crust production rates. This study presents new Tl isotope data for an open ocean transect in the South Atlantic, and depth transects for two euxinic basins (anoxic and free sulfide in the water column), the Cariaco Basin and Black Sea. The Tl isotopic signature of open ocean seawater in the South Atlantic was found to be homogeneous with ε205Tl = -6.0 ± 0.3 (±2 SD, n = 41) while oxic waters from Cariaco and the Black Sea are -5.6 and -2.2, respectively. Combined with existing data from the Pacific and Arctic Oceans, our Atlantic data establish the conservatism of Tl isotopes in the global ocean. In contrast, partially- and predominantly-restricted basins reveal Tl isotope differences that vary between open-ocean (-6) and continental material (-2) ε205Tl, scaling with the degree of restriction. Regardless of the differences between basins, Tl is quantitatively removed from their euxinic waters below the chemocline. The burial of Tl in euxinic sediments is estimated to be an order of magnitude

  6. Engineering study - alternatives for SHMS high temperature/moisture gas sample conditioners for the aging waste facility

    SciTech Connect

    THOMPSON, J.F.

    1999-06-02

    The Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems have been experiencing high temperature/moisture problems with gas samples from the Aging Waste Tanks. These moist hot gas samples have stopped the operation of the SHMS units on tanks AZ-101, AZ-102, and AY-102. This study looks at alternatives for gas sample conditioners for the Aging Waste Facility.

  7. Multibeam observations of mine burial near Clearwater, FL, including comparisons to predictions of wave-induced burial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfson, M.L.; Naar, D.F.; Howd, P.A.; Locker, S.D.; Donahue, B.T.; Friedrichs, Carl T.; Trembanis, A.C.; Richardson, M.D.; Wever, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    A Kongsberg Simrad EM 3000 multibeam sonar (Kongsberg Simrad, Kongsberg, Norway) was used to conduct a set of six repeat high-resolution bathymetric surveys west of Indian Rocks Beach (IRB), just to the south of Clearwater, FL, between January and March 2003, to observe in situ scour and burial of instrumented inert mines and mine-like cylinders. Three closely located study sites were chosen: two fine-sand sites, a shallow one located in ??? 13 m of water depth and a deep site located in ???14 m of water depth; and a coarse-sand site in ???13 m. Results from these surveys indicate that mines deployed in fine sand are nearly buried within two months of deployment (i.e., they sunk 74.5% or more below the ambient seafloor depth). Mines deployed in coarse sand showed a lesser amount of scour, burying until they present roughly the same hydrodynamic roughness as the surrounding rippled bedforms. These data were also used to test the validity of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS, Gloucester Point, VA) 2-D burial model. The model worked well in areas of fine sand, sufficiently predicting burial over the course of the experiment. In the area of coarse sand, the model greatly overpredicted the amount of burial. This is believed to be due to the presence of rippled bedforms around the mines, which affect local bottom morphodynamics and are not accounted for in the model, an issue currently being addressed by the modelers. This paper focuses specifically on two instrumented mines: an acoustic mine located in fine sand and an optical instrumented mine located in coarse sand. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  8. Dynamics of Sandwaves under Combined Wave - Current Forcing and Mine Burial Processes, and RIVET I and Mine Burial Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    the mine burial project has been documented in previous annual reports. Preparation of new side-looking multibeam bedform imaging sonars and mine...Instrumentation for Plume, Sediment and Bed Dynamics in Energetic Coastal Environments: A Multibeam Sidescan Sonar and Portable Turbulance Profiler”) is a...support of optical measurements of particle dynamics (Environmental Optics ), and integrating the pcADPs on Geyer’s MAST (Physical Oceanography). The

  9. Room temperature aging of Narmco 5208 carbon-epoxy prepreg. I. Physicochemical characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, K.C.; Noel, D.; Hechler, J.J.; Chouliotis, A.; Overbury, K.C. )

    1989-06-01

    Data are presented on physicochemical tests carried out on room-temperature aged samples of a commercially available carbon-epoxy composite prepreg system. The analytical methods used included Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy, reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), high-speed RPLC, high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry, and pyrolysis/gas chromatography. All data indicated significant changes in these samples due to aging, with the most sensitive indices being those of FTIR and RPLC procedures. Results indicate that the number of unreacted epoxy groups decreased steadily at a rate of 0.34 percent per day, based on the initial amount, and the number of free amine-hardener molecules decreased at a rate of 1.05 percent per day. The amount of initial epoxy-amine reaction product increased significantly over the first 30 days, but then declined, due to further reactions of these to give higher-molecular-weight products. 23 refs.

  10. Lithium plating in a commercial lithium-ion battery - A low-temperature aging study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzl, Mathias; Kasper, Michael; Danzer, Michael A.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of metallic lithium on the negative graphite electrode in a lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery, also known as lithium plating, leads to severe performance degradation and may also affect the cell safety. This study is focused on the nondestructive characterization of the aging behavior during long-term cycling at plating conditions, i.e. low temperature and high charge rate. A commercial graphite/LiFePO4 Li-ion battery is investigated in order to elucidate the aging effects of lithium plating for real-world purposes. It is shown that lithium plating can be observed as a loss of cyclable lithium which affects the capacity balance of the electrodes. In this way, lithium plating counteracts its own occurrence during prolonged cycling. The capacity losses due to lithium plating are therefore decreasing at higher cycle numbers and the capacity retention curve exhibits an inflection point. It is further shown that the observed capacity fade is partly reversible. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) reveals a significant increase of the ohmic cell resistance due to electrolyte consumption during surface film formation on the plated lithium. Additional cell opening provides important quantitative information regarding the thickness of the lithium layer and the corresponding mass of the plated lithium.

  11. Burial Duration and Frequency Influences Resilience of Differing Propagule Types in a Subtidal Seagrass, Posidonia australis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation that leads to periodic, and often prolonged, burial events is becoming more common on the world’s coastlines as human populations expand and create urbanised marine environments. Different seagrass species react differently to sediment burial but many species in the southern hemisphere are yet to be examined. How seagrasses react to burial has restoration implications. There is a need to critically assess seagrass transplant propagule responses to periodic (pulse) and prolonged (press) burial events before selecting the most appropriate species, transplant propagule, and transplant site. In my study, mesocosm experiments, coupled with field measurements were used to assess how sexual (seedlings) and vegetative (sprigs) propagules of Posidonia australis responded to pulse and press burial events. Seedlings were highly susceptible to burial (both pulse and press), with no survival at the end of the experimental period. In contrast, rhizome growth in vegetative propagules was stimulated by pulse burial, although press burial events resulted in mortality. The implication for Posidonia australis restoration efforts in areas where burial is periodic, was that vegetative propagules are optimal transplant units, in comparison to seedlings. Press burial however, renders a transplant site sub-optimal for both seedling and sprig transplants. PMID:27526020

  12. Burial Duration and Frequency Influences Resilience of Differing Propagule Types in a Subtidal Seagrass, Posidonia australis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Marnie L

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation that leads to periodic, and often prolonged, burial events is becoming more common on the world's coastlines as human populations expand and create urbanised marine environments. Different seagrass species react differently to sediment burial but many species in the southern hemisphere are yet to be examined. How seagrasses react to burial has restoration implications. There is a need to critically assess seagrass transplant propagule responses to periodic (pulse) and prolonged (press) burial events before selecting the most appropriate species, transplant propagule, and transplant site. In my study, mesocosm experiments, coupled with field measurements were used to assess how sexual (seedlings) and vegetative (sprigs) propagules of Posidonia australis responded to pulse and press burial events. Seedlings were highly susceptible to burial (both pulse and press), with no survival at the end of the experimental period. In contrast, rhizome growth in vegetative propagules was stimulated by pulse burial, although press burial events resulted in mortality. The implication for Posidonia australis restoration efforts in areas where burial is periodic, was that vegetative propagules are optimal transplant units, in comparison to seedlings. Press burial however, renders a transplant site sub-optimal for both seedling and sprig transplants.

  13. Effects of surfactants and aging time on solidification of rice bran oil at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Nukit, Natchanok; Setwipattanachai, Prasert; Chaiseri, Siree; Hongsprabhas, Parichat

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the roles of rice mono- and diacylglycerol (rice MDG) and commercial MDG on solid structure formation of rice bran oil (RBO) and RBO-anhydrous milk fat (AMF) blends after the crystallized blends were aged at 5°C for 12 or 24 h and stored at 30°C for 12 or 24 h. The rice MDG was prepared using a pilot-scale molecular distillation (MD) unit to evaporate out the free fatty acids from deodorizer distillate (DD) at 120, 140 and 160°C at 0.1 Pa. It was found that increasing the distillation temperature during MD process from 120°C to 140°C resulted in higher contents of rice MDG and γ-oryzanol in the unevaporated fraction (UMD) compared to those in DD. Although UMD increased solid fat content in RBO-UMD blend, it could not stabilize the solid fat phase in the RBO-UMD or RBO-AMFUMD oleogel at 30°C storage. In the presence of UMD, RBO-AMF-UMD blends remained in a liquid state although it contained a high content (38.54%) of saturated fatty acids. On the other hand, with the addition of commercial MDG rich in palmitic acid, RBO-MDG and RBO-AMF-MDG blends were able to retain the volume of solid fat phase in the oleogels provided that the RBO-MDG and RBO-AMF-MDG oleogels were aged at 5°C for at least 12 h. This study implicated that the presence of 1% MDG surfactant having different acyl chains from the major fatty acids in the bulk oil phase, as well as aging regime, could be used to assist solid structure forming process of RBO and RBO-AMF oleogels.

  14. The assessment of the age of scleractinian coral species (Anthozoa: Scleractinia) based on the temperature ranges of their habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Os'kina, N. S.; Keller, N. B.; Nikolaev, S. D.

    2010-12-01

    Until now, the age of deep-water scleractinians was determined based only on rare finds of these corals in terrestrial sequences, which constitute <10% of their known diversity. Inasmuch as most of the non-zooxanthellate coral species dwell in the ocean beyond the shelf zone (up to the abyssal depths) and their fossil remains are missing from terrestrial sections, we propose a new approach to the assessment of their age based on paleoecological features: the seawater temperatures in the geological past and the habitat temperature ranges established for 53 coral species. The study confirmed our previous assumption concerning the very young age of the deep-water fauna.

  15. High-temperature creep with physical and chemical aging, and associated viscoelastic constitutive equations of polyimide-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Skontorp, A.; Wang, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    The high-temperature creep with physical and chemical aging of a polyimide-matrix composite has been studied with a combined experimental and analytical micromechanics approach. High-temperature aging and creep experiments are carried out to determine the effects of aging on both a neat polyimide (Avimid-N) resin and polyimide-matrix composite. The effect of aging on the polyimide resin is found to be in the form of a volume reduction and a small change in its glass- transition temperature. For both the neat polyimide resin and its composite, aging strains have been distinguished from total high-temperature strains and, thus, true mechanical creep strains can be properly determined. A micromechanics model based on the recently developed homogenization theory is used to study the viscoelastic effective constitutive equations of the composite. The effect of aging-induced property change is taken into account implicitly, through the input neat resin data in the formulation. Comparisons are made between the homogenization predictions and the experimentally obtained effective properties, and good agreement is observed. In the long-term high-temperature creep, it has been found that the complexities associated with the composite microstructural inhomogeneities and imperfection may lead to some discrepancies between the predictions and the experimental results.

  16. Constraining multi-stage exposure-burial scenarios for boulders preserved beneath cold-based glacial ice in Thule, northwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-04-01

    Boulders and landscapes preserved beneath cold-based, non-erosive glacial ice violate assumptions associated with simple cosmogenic exposure dating. In such a setting, simple single isotope exposure ages over-estimate the latest period of surface exposure; hence, alternate approaches are required to constrain the multi-stage exposure/burial histories of such samples. Here, we report 28 paired analyses of 10Be and 26Al in boulder samples from Thule, northwest Greenland. We use numerical models of exposure and burial as well as Monte Carlo simulations to constrain glacial chronology and infer process in this Arctic region dominated by cold-based ice. We investigate three specific cases that can arise with paired nuclide data: (1) exposure ages that are coeval with deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with constant exposure; (2) exposure ages that pre-date deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with burial following initial exposure; and (3) exposure ages that pre-date deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with constant exposure. Most glacially-transported boulders in Thule have complex histories; some were exposed for tens of thousands of years and buried for at least hundreds of thousands of years, while others underwent only limited burial. These boulders were probably recycled through different generations of till over multiple glacial/interglacial cycles, likely experiencing partial or complete shielding during interglacial periods due to rotation or shallow burial by sediments. Our work demonstrates that the landscape in Thule, like many high-latitude landscapes, was shaped over long time durations and multiple glacial and interglacial periods throughout the Quaternary.

  17. The Combined Influence of Molecular Weight and Temperature on the Aging and Viscoelastic Response of a Glassy Thermoplastic Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Lee M.; Whitley, Karen S.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of molecular weight on the viscoelastic performance of an advanced polymer (LaRC-SI) was investigated through the use of creep compliance tests. Testing consisted of short-term isothermal creep and recovery with the creep segments performed under constant load. The tests were conducted at three temperatures below the glass transition temperature of five materials of different molecular weight. Through the use of time-aging-time superposition procedures, the material constants, material master curves and aging-related parameters were evaluated at each temperature for a given molecular weight. The time-temperature superposition technique helped to describe the effect of temperature on the timescale of the viscoelastic response of each molecular weight. It was shown that the low molecular weight materials have higher creep compliance and creep rate, and are more sensitive to temperature than the high molecular weight materials. Furthermore, a critical molecular weight transition was observed to occur at a weight-average molecular weight of M (bar) (sub w) 25000 g/mol below which, the temperature sensitivity of the time-temperature superposition shift factor increases rapidly. The short-term creep compliance data were used in association with Struik's effective time theory to predict the long-term creep compliance behavior for the different molecular weights. At long timescales, physical aging serves to significantly decrease the creep compliance and creep rate of all the materials tested.

  18. Time interval between volcanism and burial metamorphism and rate of basin subsidence in a Cretaceous Andean extensional setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, L.; Féraud, G.; Morata, D.; Vergara, M.; Robinson, D.

    1999-11-01

    40Ar/ 39Ar ages were obtained from basaltic flows belonging to a 9-km-thick sequence generated in an extensional ensialic setting of an arc/back-arc basin type during the Early Cretaceous and presently exposed along the Coastal Range of central Chile. The basalts have been affected by very low- to low-grade burial metamorphism, mostly under prehnite-pumpellyite facies. Age values obtained from primary (volcanic) and secondary (metamorphic) minerals permit to quantify the time interval between volcanism and burial metamorphism. A plateau age of 119±1.2 Ma from primary plagioclase represents the best estimation of the age of the volcanism, whereas adularia, in low-variance assemblages contained in amygdules, gave a plateau age of 93.1±0.3 Ma which is interpreted as the age of the metamorphism. Considering the P- T conditions estimated for this metamorphic event, the c. 25 Ma time interval between volcanic emplacement and prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism, the rate of basin subsidence in this extensional geodynamic setting would be comprised in the interval 150-180 m/Ma.

  19. Experimental assessment of critical anthropogenic sediment burial in eelgrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Munkes, Britta; Schubert, Philipp R; Karez, Rolf; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2015-11-15

    Seagrass meadows, one of the world's most important and productive coastal habitats, are threatened by a range of anthropogenic actions. Burial of seagrass plants due to coastal activities is one important anthropogenic pressure leading to the decline of local populations. In our study, we assessed the response of eelgrass Zostera marina to sediment burial from physiological, morphological, and population parameters. In a full factorial field experiment, burial level (5-20cm) and burial duration (4-16weeks) were manipulated. Negative effects were visible even at the lowest burial level (5cm) and shortest duration (4weeks), with increasing effects over time and burial level. Buried seagrasses showed higher shoot mortality, delayed growth and flowering and lower carbohydrate storage. The observed effects will likely have an impact on next year's survival of buried plants. Our results have implications for the management of this important coastal plant.

  20. Late burial diagenesis of Niagaran (Middle Silurian) pinnacle reefs in Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cercone, K.R.; Lohmann, K.C. )

    1987-02-01

    Core samples from Middle Silurian pinnacle reefs in northern Michigan exhibit a regionally consistent assemblage of late diagenetic phases including geopetal diagenetic sediment, disseminated pyrite, pyrobitumen, rhombic dolomite cement, and equant calcite spar. High (> 80{degree}C) fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and inclusions of Silurian-sourced oil in these diagenetic phases indicate that they formed between the Mississippian and Jurassic, when pinnacle reefs resided in the deep subsurface. Fluid inclusion salinities and stable carbon/oxygen isotopic ratios suggest that late diagenetic carbonates did not precipitate from connate fluids but from basinal brines that were conducted to pinnacle reefs by two regional carbonate aquifers. These data confirm that late burial diagenesis can affect carbonate rocks residing in high-salinity, low-permeability fluid environments. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The influence of burial heating on the (U-Th)/He system in apatite: Grand Canyon case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Matthew; Shuster, David L.

    2014-07-01

    Thermochronological data can constrain the cooling paths of rocks exhumed through the uppermost 1-2 km of earth's crust, and have thus been pivotal in illuminating topographic development over timescales >0.1 Ma. However, in some cases, different methods have led to conflicting conclusions about timing of valley-scale exhumation. Here, we investigate the case of Western Grand Canyon, USA, where different thermochronological datasets have been interpreted to record very different timings of canyon incision (∼70 Ma versus ∼5 Ma). We present a method to assess key assumptions in these constraints and demonstrate that burial heating conditions of basement rocks in the Mesozoic can result in incomplete annealing of radiation damage in apatite. In turn, this has a dramatic effect on the temperature sensitivity of the apatite (U-Th)/He system and its ability to record post-burial exhumation. The possibility of incomplete annealing resolves the apparent conflict in time-temperature paths inferred over the last 70 Ma, although it requires temperatures during burial that are lower than predicted by apatite fission track data. A refinement of parameters that prescribe the kinetics of damage annealing and related control on 4He diffusivity in apatite would account for this discrepancy, specifically if alpha recoil damage anneals at a lower rate than fission tracks at a given temperature. These effects will be important for any application of the apatite (U-Th)/He system in geologic settings that experienced prolonged residence (>10 Ma) between 50-150 °C; the approaches developed here provide means to assess these effects.

  2. Calorie restriction lowers body temperature in rhesus monkeys, consistent with a postulated anti-aging mechanism in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, M A; Baer, D J; Rumpler, W V; Weindruch, R; Ingram, D K; Tilmont, E M; Cutler, R G; Roth, G S

    1996-01-01

    Many studies of caloric restriction (CR) in rodents and lower animals indicate that this nutritional manipulation retards aging processes, as evidenced by increased longevity, reduced pathology, and maintenance of physiological function in a more youthful state. The anti-aging effects of CR are believed to relate, at least in part, to changes in energy metabolism. We are attempting to determine whether similar effects occur in response to CR in nonhuman primates. Core (rectal) body temperature decreased progressively with age from 2 to 30 years in rhesus monkeys fed ad lib (controls) and is reduced by approximately 0.5 degrees C in age-matched monkeys subjected to 6 years of a 30% reduction in caloric intake. A short-term (1 month) 30% restriction of 2.5-year-old monkeys lowered subcutaneous body temperature by 1.0 degrees C. Indirect calorimetry showed that 24-hr energy expenditure was reduced by approximately 24% during short-term CR. The temporal association between reduced body temperature and energy expenditure suggests that reductions in body temperature relate to the induction of an energy conservation mechanism during CR. These reductions in body temperature and energy expenditure are consistent with findings in rodent studies in which aging rate was retarded by CR, now strengthening the possibility that CR may exert beneficial effects in primates analogous to those observed in rodents. PMID:8633033

  3. Influence of temperature, strain rate and thermal aging on the structure/property behavior of uranium 6 wt% Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, C. M.; Gray, G. T., III; Chen, S. R.; Field, R. D.; Korzekwa, D. R.; Hixson, R. S.; Lopez, M. F.

    2006-08-01

    A rigorous experimentation and validation program is being undertaken to create constitutive models that elucidate the fundamental mechanisms controlling plasticity in uranium-6 wt.% niobium alloys (U-6Nb). These models should accurately predict high-strain-rate large-strain plasticity, damage evolution and failure. The goal is a physically-based constitutive model that captures 1) an understanding of how strain rate, temperature, and aging affects the mechanical response of a material, and 2) an understanding of the operative deformation mechanisms. The stress-strain response of U-6Nb has been studied as a function of temperature, strain-rate, and thermal aging. U-6Nb specimens in a solution-treated and quenched condition (ST/Q) and after subsequent aging at 473K for 2 hours were studied. The constitutive behavior was evaluated over the range of strain rates from quasi-static (0.001 sec - 1) to dynamic (˜ 2000 sec - 1) and temperatures ranging from 77 to 773K. The yield stress of U-6Nb was exhibited pronounced temperature sensitivity. The strain hardening rate is seen to be less sensitive to strain rate and temperature beyond plastic strains of 0.10. The yield strength of the aged material is less significantly affected by temperature and the work hardening rate shows adiabatic heating at lower strain rates (1/s).

  4. Associations between Changes in City and Address Specific Temperature and QT Interval - The VA Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amar J.; Kloog, Itai; Zanobetti, Antonella; Coull, Brent A.; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel; Schwartz, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Background The underlying mechanisms of the association between ambient temperature and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are not well understood, particularly for daily temperature variability. We evaluated if daily mean temperature and standard deviation of temperature was associated with heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc) duration, a marker of ventricular repolarization in a prospective cohort of older men. Methods This longitudinal analysis included 487 older men participating in the VA Normative Aging Study with up to three visits between 2000–2008 (n = 743). We analyzed associations between QTc and moving averages (1–7, 14, 21, and 28 days) of the 24-hour mean and standard deviation of temperature as measured from a local weather monitor, and the 24-hour mean temperature estimated from a spatiotemporal prediction model, in time-varying linear mixed-effect regression. Effect modification by season, diabetes, coronary heart disease, obesity, and age was also evaluated. Results Higher mean temperature as measured from the local monitor, and estimated from the prediction model, was associated with longer QTc at moving averages of 21 and 28 days. Increased 24-hr standard deviation of temperature was associated with longer QTc at moving averages from 4 and up to 28 days; a 1.9°C interquartile range increase in 4-day moving average standard deviation of temperature was associated with a 2.8 msec (95%CI: 0.4, 5.2) longer QTc. Associations between 24-hr standard deviation of temperature and QTc were stronger in colder months, and in participants with diabetes and coronary heart disease. Conclusion/Significance In this sample of older men, elevated mean temperature was associated with longer QTc, and increased variability of temperature was associated with longer QTc, particularly during colder months and among individuals with diabetes and coronary heart disease. These findings may offer insight of an important underlying mechanism of temperature

  5. Low temperature aging mechanism identification and lithium deposition in a large format lithium iron phosphate battery for different charge profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Minggao; Chu, Zhengyu; Lu, Languang; Li, Jianqiu; Han, Xuebing; Feng, Xuning; Liu, Guangming

    2015-07-01

    Charging procedures at low temperatures severely shorten the cycle life of lithium ion batteries due to lithium deposition on the negative electrode. In this paper, cycle life tests are conducted to reveal the influence of the charging current rate and the cut-off voltage limit on the aging mechanisms of a large format LiFePO4 battery at a low temperature (-10 °C). The capacity degradation rates accelerate rapidly after the charging current reaches 0.25 C or the cut-off voltage reaches 3.55 V. Therefore the scheduled current and voltage during low-temperature charging should be reconsidered to avoid capacity degradation. Lithium deposition contributes to low-temperature aging mechanisms, as something needle-like which might be deposited lithium is observed on the surface of the negative electrode after disassembling the aged battery cell. To confirm our explanation, incremental capacity analysis (ICA) is performed to identify the characteristics of the lithium deposition induced battery aging mechanisms. Furthermore, the aging mechanism is quantified using a mechanistic model, whose parameters are estimated with the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO). The loss of reversible lithium originating from secondary SEI formation and dead lithium is confirmed as the cause of the aging.

  6. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-B-1, 105-B Solid Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2008-01-21

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action, sampling activities, and compliance criteria for the 118-B-1, 105-B Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-B Reactor and P-10 Tritium Separation Project and also received waste from the 105-N Reactor. The burial ground received reactor hardware, process piping and tubing, fuel spacers, glassware, electrical components, tritium process wastes, soft wastes and other miscellaneous debris.

  7. Sediment burial stimulates the growth and propagule production of Spartina alterniflora Loisel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zifa; An, Shuqing; Zhao, Congjiao; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Changfang; Zhi, Yingbiao; Li, Hongli

    2008-03-01

    Spartina alterniflora Loisel., an extensively invasive species on the Chinese coast, is a focus of increasing management concern due to its high expansion rate in estuaries and tidal zone, and the significant damage it causes to native ecosystems. In order to understand the processes and mechanisms of invasion of S. alterniflora in China, the impact of three sediment types (sand, sand-loam mixture and loam) and five buried patterns (unburied, 50% burial of initial plant height, 75% burial of initial plant height, complete burial and repeated burial) on the growth of seedlings or ramets was investigated. Results showed that each of the three factors (sediment types, burial pattern and plant materials) and interactions between/among them, significantly affected height and clonal growth, and biomass accumulation and allocation. Plant height, total biomass and number of new vegetative propagules significantly increased with progressive burial treatments. However, the complete burial treatment resulted in the death of all plant materials, and the maximum values of three parameters were found in the 50% burial or repeated burial treatments. Plant responses were determined by the instantaneous thickness of sediment of each time burial rather than by the total quantity of repeated burial. The growth of S. alterniflora was not shown to be dependent on specific types of sediment in sedimentation environment. In contrast to the unburied control, the proportion of primary tillers produced directly from initial individuals and the ratio between the aboveground and belowground biomass were greater under burial treatments. Seedlings produced more new vegetative propagules than vegetative offspring in all experimental treatments, and the former were apt to produce ramets from rhizomes rather than primary tillers. It is concluded that under various sedimentation environments, the clonal spread efficiency of seedlings was higher than that of vegetative offspring, and there is a

  8. Precipitation data for burial grounds 5 and 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, 1976-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.; Beatty, J.S.; Benjamin, Pamela K.; Tranum, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    As part of a hydrogeologic investigation, precipitation data were collected at two stations, one each in Burial Grounds 5 and 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee. Daily, monthly, and annual values are reported herein for the period from January 1976 through December 1980. During this period, annual values ranged from about 25 percent above to about 25 percent below the calculated mean of 51.96 inches at Burial Ground 5 and 49.60 inches at Burial Ground 6. (USGS)

  9. C-14 and temperature variation around and after AD 775 - after the Dark Age Grand Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, Ralph; Neuhäuser, Dagmar L.

    2016-04-01

    We have compiled an extensive catalog of aurora observations from the Far and Near East as well as Europe for the time from AD 550 to 845. From historic observations of aurorae and sunspots as well as the C-14 and Be-10 data, we can date the end of the Dark Age grand minimum to about AD 690; we see strong activity after this period. We can fix the solar activity Schwabe cycle maxima and minima in the 7th and 8th centuries.. The strong 14-C increase in data with 1-yr time resolution in the AD 770s (e.g. Miyake et al. 2012) is still a matter of debate, e.g. a solar super-flare. In the last three millennia, there were two more strong rapid rises in 14-C - around BC 671 and AD 1795. All three 14-C variations are embedded in similar evolution of solar activity, as we can show with various solar activity proxies; secular evolution of solar wind plays an important role. The rises of 14-C - within a few years each - can be explained by a sudden strong decrease in solar modulation potential leading to increased radioisotope production. The strong rises around AD 775 and 1795 are due to three effects: (i) very strong activity in the previous cycles (i.e. very low 14-C level), (ii) the declining phase of a very strong Schwabe cycle, and (iii) a phase of very weak activity after the strong 14-C rise - very short and/or weak cycle(s) like the suddenly starting Dalton minimum. In addition to arXiv:1503.01581 and arXiv:1508.06745, we also discuss the temperature depression and new quasi-annual 10-Be data. If a temperature depression right after AD 775 for a few decades can be confirmed, this would be fully consistent with our suggestion: reduced solar activity since AD 775 (for a few decades like in the Dalton minimum). Otherwise, one would not expect such a temperature depression after a solar super-flare.

  10. Neutron Diffraction of Aqueous Tetramethylammonium Chloride (TMA) Solutions and TMA Intercalated Swelling Clays Under Burial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R.; Howard, C. A.; Greenwell, C.; Youngs, T.; Soper, A. K.; Skipper, N. T.

    2014-12-01

    There is a need for the improvement and optimisation of clay swelling inhibitors for the enhancement of oil and gas exploration. The hydration region of both ions and the possibility of ion pairing in 1 molar aqueous solution of clay swelling inhibitor, tetramethylammonium chloride (TMACl), in D2O, under elevated hydrostatic-pressures and temperatures has been determined with unprecedented detail using a combination of neutron diffraction and small-angle scattering in conjunction with hydrogen/deuterium isotopic labeling. The O-H correlation function (H-bonds) for the water in the 1.0M solution is measured and compared with that for pure D2O. Also investigated is the effect of burial conditions on the d-spacing of TMA-intercalated vermiculite. Contrary to expectations, no aggregation of TMA ions due to hydrophobic interactions is observed, nor are any ionic pairs of TMA+ and Cl- at these burial conditions. The data revealed a more ordered water-water structure with the addition of TMACl from bulk D2O. There is no change in the hydration structure measured at the applied elevated conditions. This is in remarkable contrast to pure water at the same conditions which is well known to be compressible. The dry d-spacing of the TMA-exchanged Eucatex vermiculite is measured at 13.66 Å which increases to 14.03 Å with the addition of D2O. Beyond this, there is no change in d-spacing with increasing pressure and temperature indicating the strength of the TMA ions binding to the clay interlayers and therefore its performance as a clay-swelling inhibitor.

  11. Biomass burial and storage to reduce atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, N.

    2012-04-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a theoretical carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC/y, but probably 1-3 GtC/y can be realized in practice. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other environmental concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from forest industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be 14/tCO2 (50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The low cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is possible because the technique uses the natural process of photosynthesis to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe, and can be stopped at any time, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  12. Interactive effects of biochar ageing in soils related to feedstock, pyrolysis temperature, and historic charcoal production.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitkötter, Julian; Marschner, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Biochar is suggested for soil amelioration and carbon sequestration, based on its assumed role as the key factor for the long-term fertility of Terra preta soils. Several studies have shown that certain biochar properties can undergo changes through ageing processes, especially regarding charge characteristics. However, only a few studies determined the changes of different biochars under the same incubation conditions and in different soils. The objective of this study was to characterize the changes of pine chip (PC)- and corn digestate (CD)-derived biochars pyrolyzed at 400 or 600 °C during 100 days of laboratory incubation in a historical kiln soil and an adjacent control soil. Separation between soil and biochar was ensured by using mesh bags. Especially, changes in charge characteristics depended on initial biochar properties affected by feedstock and pyrolysis temperature and on soil properties affected by historic charcoal production. While the cation exchange capacity (CEC) markedly increased for both CD biochars during incubation, PC biochars showed no or only slight increases in CEC. Corresponding to the changes in CEC, ageing of biochars also increased the amount of acid functional groups with increases being in average about 2-fold higher in CD biochars than in PC biochars. Further and in contrast to other studies, the surface areas of biochars increased during ageing, likely due to ash leaching and degradation of tar residues. Changes in CEC and surface acidity of CD biochars were more pronounced after incubation in the control soil, while surface area increase was higher in the kiln soil. Since the two acidic forest soils used in this this study did not greatly differ in physical or chemical properties, the main process for inducing these differences in the buried biochar most likely is related to the differences in dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Although the kiln soil contained about 50% more soil organic carbon due to the presence of charcoal

  13. Identification of metallic objects with various sizes and burial depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezgin, Mehmet; Kaplan, Gülay; Deniz, Sencer M.; Bahadırlar, Yıldırım; İçoğlu, Oğuz

    2009-05-01

    In this study, identification of the different metallic objects with various burial depths was considered. Metal Detector (MD) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) were used to obtain metallic content and dielectric characteristic of the buried objects. Discriminative features were determined and calculated for data set. Six features were selected for metal detector and one for Ground Penetrating Radar. Twenty classification algorithms were examined to obtain the best classification method, for this data set. A Meta learner algorithm completed the classification process with 100% performance.

  14. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during and after closure

  15. Geologic setting of the low-level burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, K.A.; Jaeger, G.K.; Slate, J.L.; Swett, K.J.; Mercer, R.B.

    1994-10-13

    This report describes the regional and site specific geology of the Hanford Sites low-level burial grounds in the 200 East and West Areas. The report incorporates data from boreholes across the entire 200 Areas, integrating the geology of this area into a single framework. Geologic cross-sections, isopach maps, and structure contour maps of all major geological units from the top of the Columbia River Basalt Group to the surface are included. The physical properties and characteristics of the major suprabasalt sedimentary units also are discussed.

  16. Progressive chemical modification of clastic sediments with burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, C. D.

    1987-03-01

    The porosity of clastic sediments at deposition varies very approximately between about 45% (sands) and 85% (muds). With burial, consolidation takes place as pore water is progressively eliminated. It would be misleading, however, to attribute alterations in sediment bulk properties to physical processes alone. Very significant mineralogical changes occur and these start soon after burial, especially in mudrocks. Striking heterogeneities such as thin, laterally continuous cemented horizons or discrete concretions are commonly introduced. These shallow burial processes are predominently the result of microbial activity. Thermodynamically unstable mixtures of organic matter and various oxidants [dissolved oxygen, sulphate, nitrate, particulate Fe(III) and Mn(IV)] provide both substrate and energy source for a variety of different microbial ecosystems. Mineralogical consequences include both leaching and the precipitation of carbonate, sulphide, phosphate and silica cements. The type and extent of mineral modification depends strongly on depositional environment variables such as rate of sedimentation and water composition. At greater depths, large scale modification of detrital clay minerals (particularly the smectite-I/S-illite transformation) takes place. Recent work of various kinds, however, has demonstrated that these changes may not be solid state transformations: clay mineral dissolution, transport and precipitation occur much more widely than was formerly supposed. In sandstones, authigenic precipitation of clay minerals from pore solution is much more obviouis. Systematic patterns of precipitation, alteration and replacement have been documented in many sedimentary basins. Porosity and permeability are reduced by cementation and, sometimes, enhanced by mineral dissolution. Whereas the general nature of these chemical reactions is fairly well understood, it is not yet possible to predict with certainty the scale or distribution of mineralogical consequences

  17. Relationship between plant traits and resistance to burial by marly sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burylo, M.; Rey, F.; Dutoit, T.

    2009-04-01

    In marly lands of the French Southern Alps, harsh soil erosion results in sediment movements during intensive rainfall events. Plants can be submitted to sediment burial in their early stages of development and their protective function may be reduced. In a context of land restoration, it is important to know species resistance to environmental disturbances and to be able to predict it, in particular from plant traits (height, biomass, sugar and starch accumulation). However, few studies about woody species tolerance to burial by sediment have been carried out. Seedlings of five woody species were buried in marly sediment at three different depths in pot experiment during eight weeks: no burial (control), partial burial (50% stem height) and complete burial (100% stem height). Height through time, biomass and survival rates were measured to assess species resistance to burial. Results show that among the five species, only one (Acer campestre) survived complete burial. All plants survived partial burial, but there were significant differences in height and biomass between buried plants and control, and significant differences between species responses. Three different responses to disturbance were identified: negative (Hippophae rhamnoides, Ononis fruticosa), neutral (Robinia pseudo acacia, Pinus nigra) and positive (Acer campestre). Results finally suggest that species resistance to burial by marly sediment is related to sugar accumulation in plant stems.

  18. Burial Level Change Defines a High Energetic Relevance for Protein Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; He, Ying; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces defined through atomic contact or solvent accessibility change are widely adopted in structural biology studies. But, these definitions cannot precisely capture energetically important regions at protein interfaces. The burial depth of an atom in a protein is related to the atom's energy. This work investigates how closely the change in burial level of an atom/residue upon complexation is related to the binding. Burial level change is different from burial level itself. An atom deeply buried in a monomer with a high burial level may not change its burial level after an interaction and it may have little burial level change. We hypothesize that an interface is a region of residues all undergoing burial level changes after interaction. By this definition, an interface can be decomposed into an onion-like structure according to the burial level change extent. We found that our defined interfaces cover energetically important residues more precisely, and that the binding free energy of an interface is distributed progressively from the outermost layer to the core. These observations are used to predict binding hot spots. Our approach's F-measure performance on a benchmark dataset of alanine mutagenesis residues is much superior or similar to those by complicated energy modeling or machine learning approaches.

  19. Relationship of age and body mass index to skin temperature and skin perfusion in primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Giurgea, Georgiana-Aura; Mlekusch, Wolfgang; Charwat-Resl, Silvia; Mueller, Markus; Hammer, Alexandra; Gschwandtner, Michael E; Koppensteiner, Renate; Schlager, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship of age and body mass index (BMI) to skin temperature and perfusion in patients with primary Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) compared with controls. Patients with RP as well as age- and sex-matched controls underwent external cold provocation by exposure to 20 °C water for 1 minute. Before and after cold provocation, skin temperature and skin perfusion were measured. Twenty-six patients with RP (20 women and 6 men; median age 41.9 years) and 22 controls (17 women and 5 men; median age 42.9 years) were studied. In RP patients, cold exposure led to a median change in skin temperature of -7% (interquartile range [IQR] -13.1, -4.1) and to a median change in skin perfusion of -26.4% (IQR -36.2, 2.9). In controls, skin temperature changed by -15.7% (IQR -18.3, -11.6) and skin perfusion by -33% (IQR -53.3, -1.1) upon cold exposure. In patients with RP, age and BMI were related to skin temperature (for age, r = 0.683, P < 0.0001; for BMI r = 0.657, P < 0.0001) and skin perfusion (for age, r = 0.595, P = 0.002; for BMI, r = 0.653, P < 0.0001), while no association was found in controls. The cold-induced decrease in skin temperature was inversely related to age (r = -0.518, P = 0.003) and BMI (r = -0.662, P < 0.0001) in patients with RP; correlations were not observed in controls. The cold-induced change in skin perfusion was not related to age or BMI in either group. The cold-induced decrease in skin temperature is related to age and BMI in patients with RP but not in controls. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathophysiology of digital ischemia in primary RP. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Common and distinct responses in phytohormone and vitamin E changes during seed burial and dormancy in Xyris bialata and X. peregrina.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Q S; Giorni, V T; Müller, M; Munné-Bosch, S

    2012-03-01

    Temperature and humidity are the main factors influencing seed viability, dormancy and longevity of buried seeds. Unfortunately, very little is known about such processes in species of tropical regions, where temperature does not show major seasonal variations. The extent to which germination capacity, phytohormones and vitamin E levels were altered after burial of seeds of Xyris bialata and X. peregrina (Xyridaceae), two species endemic to rupestrian fields of Brazil, was examined. After 2 months of burial, seed germination capacity remained constant, which is associated with decreases in ABA and IAA content in both species. During this period, zeatin levels also decreased in X. bialata, but not in X. peregrina, the latter showing much lower levels of ABA. During the summer (rainy season), seeds of both species experienced a progressive, but severe, decrease in germination capacity, which reversed at the end of the winter (dry season), thus suggesting secondary dormancy. This dormancy appeared to be caused by drastic decreases in GAs, rather than increases in ABA. Levels of GA(4) decreased to non-detectable values during dormancy in both species. Furthermore, zeatin levels decreased in X. bialata but not in X.peregrina during this period. Both species accumulated γ-tocopherol as the major vitamin E form, and levels of this antioxidant remained constant or even increased during seed burial; however, X. bialata seeds showed a significant decrease in α-tocopherol during seed burial and dormancy. It is concluded that in X. peregrina and X. bialata, (i) burial causes significant changes in the phytohormone levels of seeds; (ii) secondary dormancy is induced in seeds; (iii) a GA(4) decrease, rather than an ABA increase, seems to be involved in the induction of secondary dormancy; and (iv) reductions in α-tocopherol in buried seeds are not necessarily indicative of reduced germination capacity.

  1. Thermoregulation responses of broiler chickens to humidity at different ambient temperatures. I. One week of age.

    PubMed

    Lin, H; Zhang, H F; Jiao, H C; Zhao, T; Sui, S J; Gu, X H; Zhang, Z Y; Buyse, J; Decuypere, E

    2005-08-01

    Three trials were conducted to investigate the effect of RH (35, 60, and 85%) on thermoregulation of 1-wk-old broiler chickens at different temperatures (35, 30, and 25 degrees C). The response to humidity in rectal temperature and plumage temperature at the back and breast within 24 h after exposure were recorded at 5 time points (1,4,8,16, and 24 h). Humidity affected the thermoregulation of 1-wk-old broiler chickens by redistributing heat within the body at high, low, and thermoneutral temperatures. The redistribution of heat resulted in decreased rectal temperature and increased peripheral temperature, which were, respectively, beneficial and unfavorable at high and low temperatures. These results suggested that feedback effects of surface temperature on core temperature also exist in poultry, as already observed in mammals, and could be induced not only by changed ambient temperature but also by the changes in humidity at high temperature. The disturbance of thermal equilibrium could not be established solely by changes in RT, but rather core and surface temperatures had to be considered. The daily rhythms in rectal and surface temperatures were affected by humidity.

  2. Organic Carbon Burial Rates in Mangrove Soils Along Florida's Coast from Tampa Bay to Biscayne National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoak, J. M.; Breithaupt, J. L.; Moyer, R. P.; Sanders, C. J.; Proctor, M. R.; Jacobs, J. A.; Chappel, A. R.; Comparetto, K. R.

    2016-12-01

    Mangrove forests provide a range of valuable ecosystem services including sequestering organic carbon (OC) in their soils at rates much greater on a per area basis than those found in other types of forests. This restricts a large quantity of OC to a relatively small area along tropical and sub-tropical coastal margins, where dramatic climate-driven impacts are expected. Hence this small yet highly-vulnerable area will have a disproportionally large impact on global carbon cycling. One of the fundamental climate-related questions in mangrove systems is whether their soils will continue to function as a globally significant OC sink or become a source as previously buried OC is oxidized and returned to the atmosphere. While changes to precipitation, temperature, cyclone activity, etc. may influence this sink capacity, it is accelerating sea-level rise (SLR) that is of greatest immediate concern because if mangrove peat formation fails to keep pace then all ecosystem services, including carbon burial, will collapse. Mangroves that receive minimal terrigenous sediments (such as those in South Florida) are largely dependent on the rate of OC accumulation as a key contributor to accretion. To investigate these processes, we measured OC burial and accretion rates over the last 100 years (via 210Pb dating) from sites in Tampa Bay, Charlotte Harbor, Ten Thousand Islands, Everglades National Park, Biscayne National Park, and the Lower Florida Keys. The mean 100-year burial rate over all sites is 119 ± 33 (SD) g m-2 yr-1 which is lower than the global mean. Mean accretion rates were found to match (within error) the relatively modest average SLR over the last 100 years, but rates may not have kept pace with the substantially higher SLR in the last decade. This investigation contributes to establishing regional-scale Blue Carbon budgets, and examines how OC burial in mangroves has changed over the last 100 years. This improved understanding of past mangrove OC burial response

  3. A burial cave in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    West, Dixie; Lefèvre, Christine; Corbett, Debra; Crockford, Susan

    2003-01-01

    During the 1998 field season, the Western Aleutians Archaeological and Paleobiological Project (WAAPP) team located a cave in the Near Islands, Alaska. Near the entrance of the cave, the team identified work areas and sleeping/sitting areas surrounded by cultural debris and animal bones. Human burials were found in the cave interior. In 2000, with permission from The Aleut Corporation, archaeologists revisited the site. Current research suggests three distinct occupations or uses for this cave. Aleuts buried their dead in shallow graves at the rear of the cave circa 1,200 to 800 years ago. Aleuts used the front of the cave as a temporary hunting camp as early as 390 years ago. Finally, Japanese and American military debris and graffiti reveal that the cave was visited during and after World War II. Russian trappers may have also taken shelter there 150 to 200 years ago. This is the first report of Aleut cave burials west of the Delarof Islands in the central Aleutians.

  4. The Application of GPR in Florida for Detecting Forensic Burials

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Koppenjan; J. J. Schultz; S. Ono; H. Lee

    2003-01-01

    A study was performed at the University of Florida to measure ground penetrating radar(GPR) performance for detecting forensic burials. In controlled scenarios, 24 burials were constructed with pig cadavers. Two soils were utilized to represent two of the most common soil orders in Florida: an Entisol and an Ultisol. Graves were monitored on a monthly basis for time periods up to 21 months with grid data acquired with pulsed and swept-frequency GPR systems incorporating several different frequency antennas. A small subset of the graves was excavated to assess decomposition and relate to the GPR images during the test. The grave anomalies in the GPR depth profiles became less distinctive over time due to body decomposition and settling of the disturbed soil (backfill) as it compacted. Soil type was a major factor. Grave anomalies became more difficult to recognize over time for deep targets that were within clay. Forensic targets that were in sandy soil were recognized for the duration of this study. Time elapsed imagery will be presented to elucidate the changes, or lack thereof, of grave anomalies over the duration of this study. Further analysis was performed using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) reconstruction of images in 2-D and 3-D.

  5. Burial increases seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wijayratne, Upekala C.; Pyke, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Premise of the study: Seed longevity and persistence in soil seed banks may be especially important for population persistence in ecosystems where opportunities for seedling establishment and disturbance are unpredictable. The fire regime, an important driver of population dynamics in sagebrush steppe ecosystems, has been altered by exotic annual grass invasion. Soil seed banks may play an active role in postfire recovery of the foundation shrub Artemisia tridentata, yet conditions under which seeds persist are largely unknown. Methods: We investigated seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata subspecies in situ by retrieving seed bags that were placed at varying depths over a 2 yr period. We also sampled naturally dispersed seeds in litter and soil immediately after seed dispersal and before flowering in subsequent seasons to estimate seed persistence. Key results: After 24 mo, seeds buried at least 3 cm below the soil surface retained 30–40% viability whereas viability of seeds on the surface and under litter declined to 0 and Artemisia tridentata has the potential to form a short-term soil seed bank that persists longer than has been commonly assumed, and that burial is necessary for seed longevity. Use of seeding techniques that promote burial of some seeds to aid in formation of a soil seed bank may increase restoration potential.

  6. Burial increases seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) subspecies.

    PubMed

    Wijayratne, Upekala C; Pyke, David A

    2012-03-01

    Seed longevity and persistence in soil seed banks may be especially important for population persistence in ecosystems where opportunities for seedling establishment and disturbance are unpredictable. The fire regime, an important driver of population dynamics in sagebrush steppe ecosystems, has been altered by exotic annual grass invasion. Soil seed banks may play an active role in postfire recovery of the foundation shrub Artemisia tridentata, yet conditions under which seeds persist are largely unknown. We investigated seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata subspecies in situ by retrieving seed bags that were placed at varying depths over a 2 yr period. We also sampled naturally dispersed seeds in litter and soil immediately after seed dispersal and before flowering in subsequent seasons to estimate seed persistence. After 24 mo, seeds buried at least 3 cm below the soil surface retained 30-40% viability whereas viability of seeds on the surface and under litter declined to 0 and < 11%, respectively. The density of naturally dispersed seeds in the seed bank was highly heterogeneous both spatially and temporally, and attrition varied significantly by region. Our study suggests that Artemisia tridentata has the potential to form a short-term soil seed bank that persists longer than has been commonly assumed, and that burial is necessary for seed longevity. Use of seeding techniques that promote burial of some seeds to aid in formation of a soil seed bank may increase restoration potential.

  7. A clandestine burial in Costa Rica: prospection and excavation.

    PubMed

    Congram, Derek R

    2008-07-01

    This case report describes the search for a clandestine grave in Costa Rica for which the police sought the assistance of an archaeologist. An anonymous informant suggested that the victim had been kidnapped and murdered, placed in a shallow grave in the woods, then covered with lime and cement. A search of the area to detect conventional signs of burial (e.g., slumping, different plant growth) resulted in excavation of unrelated features of past disturbance. Different aspects of the grave including the deposition of cement powder over the body prevented its initial discovery. Improvisation of conventional archaeological excavation methods and use of police familiar with archaeological excavation resulted in the location of the grave and exhumation of the victim without loss of important contextual evidence that supported testimony on the cause of death. The taphonomic effects of high-lying ground water and lime in the tropical burial environment are briefly discussed. Recommendations such as the construction of a temporary sump to lower the ground water level in the grave during excavation are made to assist in similar investigations in the future.

  8. Equation for compaction of paleosols due to burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Nathan D.; Retallack, Gregory J.

    2001-03-01

    Existing empirically derived compaction curves for marine sediments fail to estimate the compaction of paleosols, flood-plain sediments, and peats as indicated by deformation of clastic dikes, dinosaur footprints, and sandstone paleochannels. Yet compaction estimates are vital to reconstructing paleoclimate and geochemical profiles of paleosols, to modeling sediment accumulation rates of nonmarine rocks, and to tectonic flexural modeling of molasse facies. This paper presents a compaction equation and physically derived constants that make geologically realistic estimates of compaction of paleosols and other nonmarine sediments. A protocol for the application of the equation is suggested that would allow the following equation to solve for burial compaction (C as a fraction of original thickness) given depth of burial (D in km) as: C = -Si/[(F0/ eDk) - 1]. This equation can be applied to nonmarine sedimentary rocks or paleosols given appropriate empirical data on the physical constants in the equation, such as initial solidity (Si), initial porosity (F0), and the corresponding curve-fitting constant (k). Data on physical constants useful for this equation are compiled here for a range of paleosol and nonmarine sediment types.

  9. Genetic research at a fivefold children's burial from medieval Berlin.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Jessica; Melisch, Claudia; Powers, Natasha; Geppert, Maria; Zander, Judith; Purps, Josephine; Spors, Birgit; Nagy, Marion

    2015-03-01

    Berlin originated from the two twin cities Berlin and Cölln, which both were founded at the beginning of the 13th century. However the real date of their foundation as well as the origin of the first settlers is still unknown. On the Berlin site the historic city center is still visible in the Nikolaiviertel, but the medieval origin of Cölln disappeared almost completely. In 2007 a large scale excavation, which comprised an area of about 1700m(2) of the historical center of the St. Peters church, recovers the remains of Cölln's first citizens and span a period of 500 years of medieval population. Here we present the first genetic analysis of a fivefold children's burial from excavations in Berlin. The genetic data unveiled next to ancestry and eye color data also the kinship and the gender of the five individuals. Together with the archeological context the new gained information help to shed more light on the possible reasons for this burial.

  10. Phanerozoic burial and unroofing history of the western Slave craton and Wopmay orogen from apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Alexis K.; Flowers, Rebecca M.; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2009-06-01

    Low temperature thermochronometry of cratonic regions can illuminate relationships among burial and unroofing patterns, surface subsidence and uplift, and lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions. The Slave craton, initially stabilized by the development of a thick lithospheric mantle root in late Archean time, is an excellent location in which to examine these connections. Although the Slave craton currently lacks Phanerozoic cover, Phanerozoic sedimentary xenoliths entrained in ca. 610 to 45 Ma kimberlites indicate that the region underwent a more dynamic history of burial and unroofing than widely recognized. We report new apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry data along a southeast to northwest transect from the interior of the Slave craton into the adjacent Paleoproterozoic Wopmay orogen to resolve the region's depositional and denudational history. Six samples from the western Slave craton and three samples from Wopmay orogen yield mean dates from 296 ± 41 Ma to 212 ± 39 Ma. Individual apatite dates are broadly uniform over a wide span of apatite [eU], and this pattern can be used to more tightly restrict the spectrum of viable temperature-time paths that can explain the dataset. When coupled with geologic and stratigraphic information, temperature-time simulations of the thermochronometry results suggest complete He loss from the apatites at minimum peak temperatures of ~ 88 °C in Devonian-Pennsylvanian time, cooling to near-surface conditions by the Early Cretaceous, followed by reheating to ≤ 72 °C during Cretaceous-Early Tertiary time. Consideration of modern and ancient geotherm constraints implies ≥ 3.3 km of burial during the first Phanerozoic heating phase, with an ancillary phase of reburial in late Mesozoic-Cenozoic time. The uniformity of the apatite (U-Th)/He dates indicates that the rocks encompassed by our > 250 km-long sample transect experienced similar Phanerozoic thermal histories. Despite the distinctly different lithospheric

  11. The burial of organic carbon over the last 10 kyr by the Waipaoa River, New Zealand sedimentary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, N. E.; Childress, L. B.; Fournillier, K. M.; Leithold, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Small mountainous rivers (SMRs), most of which are located along active margins, play a unique role in marine and global carbon cycles. SMRs drain only ~20% of land, but deliver approximately 40% of the fluvial sediment to the global ocean. Unlike large passive margin systems in which riverine organic carbon (OC) is efficiently incinerated on continental shelves, SMR-dominated shelves are highly effective in the burial and preservation of OC. This is the result of the rapid, episodic delivery of OC derived from terrestrial vegetation, aged soil organic matter, and sedimentary rock OC. Most of our understanding concerning the carbon cycling dynamics of SMR systems is derived from modern, heavily anthropogenically impacted environments however. The nature and fluxes of OC prior to land use change is poorly documented. Erosion and depositional patterns associated with SMRs are affected by several large-scale forcing mechanisms, primarily climate and tectonics. To investigate the effect of natural and anthropogenic forcing on the geochemical record of a SMR we use the Waipaoa River, New Zealand. The Waipaoa River is a system of interest due to its large current sediment yield (6800 tons km-2 yr-1) and extensive characterization. Continental shelf cores collected offshore of the Waipaoa by the MATACORE group aboard the R/V Marion Dufresne extend to 10 kyr BP, and records climatic transitions with tectonic overprints in the region. The OC burial flux ranged from ~15-20 kg C m-2 kyr-1 at the location of one shelf core (MD 3007) approximately 3.5-10 kyr before present. This corresponds to a period of relatively rapid shoreline progradation. OC accumulation decreased to ~4-6 kg C m-2 kyr-1 after 3.5 kyr BP. Anthropogenic deforestation has caused OC burial fluxes to rebound to beyond the 3.5-10 kyr levels. Organic geochemical proxies, including δ13C, δ15N, and lignin phenols, indicate a depositional site that is dominated by riverine input. The proxies do not correlate

  12. Monumental megalithic burial and rock art tell a new story about the Levant Intermediate Bronze “Dark Ages”

    PubMed Central

    Barash, Alon; Eisenberg-Degen, Davida; Grosman, Leore; Oron, Maya; Berger, Uri

    2017-01-01

    The Intermediate Bronze Age (IB) in the Southern Levant (ca. 2350–2000 BCE) is known as the “Dark Ages,” following the collapse of Early Bronze urban society and predating the establishment of the Middle Bronze cities. The absence of significant settlements and monumental building has led to the reconstruction of IB social organization as that of nomadic, tribal society inhabiting rural villages with no central governmental system. Excavation in the Shamir Dolmen Field (comprising over 400 dolmens) on the western foothills of the Golan Heights was carried out following the discovery of rock art engravings on the ceiling of the central chamber inside one of the largest dolmens ever recorded in the Levant. Excavation of this multi-chambered dolmen, covered by a basalt capstone weighing some 50 tons, revealed a secondary multi-burial (of both adults and children) rarely described in a dolmen context in the Golan. Engraved into the rock ceiling above the multi-burial is a panel of 14 forms composed of a vertical line and downturned arc motif. 3D-scanning by structured-light technology was used to sharpen the forms and revealed the technique employed to create them. Building of the Shamir dolmens required a tremendous amount of labor, architectural mastery, and complex socio-economic organization well beyond the capacity of small, rural nomadic groups. The monumental megalithic burial of the Shamir dolmens indicates a hierarchical, complex, non-urban governmental system. This new evidence supports a growing body of recent criticism stemming from new discoveries and approaches that calls for rethinking our views of the Levantine IB “Dark Ages.” PMID:28253312

  13. Tympanic Membrane Temperature and Emotional Dispositions in Preschool-Aged Children: A Methodological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnar, Megan R.; Donzella, Bonny

    2004-01-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) temperature asymmetry has been proposed as a phenotypic marker of vulnerability to negative emotionality in children. Little is known about the stability of TM temperatures or how readily one can obtain a reliable index of the phenotype. TM temperatures were collected from 3- to 5-year-old children (N=73) over 5 months…

  14. Tympanic Membrane Temperature and Emotional Dispositions in Preschool-Aged Children: A Methodological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnar, Megan R.; Donzella, Bonny

    2004-01-01

    Tympanic membrane (TM) temperature asymmetry has been proposed as a phenotypic marker of vulnerability to negative emotionality in children. Little is known about the stability of TM temperatures or how readily one can obtain a reliable index of the phenotype. TM temperatures were collected from 3- to 5-year-old children (N=73) over 5 months…

  15. Thawing of permafrost may disturb historic cattle burial grounds in East Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Revich, Boris A.; Podolnaya, Marina A.

    2011-01-01

    Climate warming in the Arctic may increase the risk of zoonoses due to expansion of vector habitats, improved chances of vector survival during winter, and permafrost degradation. Monitoring of soil temperatures at Siberian cryology control stations since 1970 showed correlations between air temperatures and the depth of permafrost layer that thawed during summer season. Between 1900s and 1980s, the temperature of surface layer of permafrost increased by 2–4°C; and a further increase of 3°C is expected. Frequent outbreaks of anthrax caused death of 1.5 million deer in Russian North between 1897 and 1925. Anthrax among people or cattle has been reported in 29,000 settlements of the Russian North, including more than 200 Yakutia settlements, which are located near the burial grounds of cattle that died from anthrax. Statistically significant positive trends in annual average temperatures were established in 8 out of 17 administrative districts of Yakutia for which sufficient meteorological data were available. At present, it is not known whether further warming of the permafrost will lead to the release of viable anthrax organisms. Nevertheless, we suggest that it would be prudent to undertake careful monitoring of permafrost conditions in all areas where an anthrax outbreak had occurred in the past. PMID:22114567

  16. Thawing of permafrost may disturb historic cattle burial grounds in East Siberia.

    PubMed

    Revich, Boris A; Podolnaya, Marina A

    2011-01-01

    Climate warming in the Arctic may increase the risk of zoonoses due to expansion of vector habitats, improved chances of vector survival during winter, and permafrost degradation. Monitoring of soil temperatures at Siberian cryology control stations since 1970 showed correlations between air temperatures and the depth of permafrost layer that thawed during summer season. Between 1900s and 1980s, the temperature of surface layer of permafrost increased by 2-4°C; and a further increase of 3°C is expected. Frequent outbreaks of anthrax caused death of 1.5 million deer in Russian North between 1897 and 1925. Anthrax among people or cattle has been reported in 29,000 settlements of the Russian North, including more than 200 Yakutia settlements, which are located near the burial grounds of cattle that died from anthrax. Statistically significant positive trends in annual average temperatures were established in 8 out of 17 administrative districts of Yakutia for which sufficient meteorological data were available. At present, it is not known whether further warming of the permafrost will lead to the release of viable anthrax organisms. Nevertheless, we suggest that it would be prudent to undertake careful monitoring of permafrost conditions in all areas where an anthrax outbreak had occurred in the past.

  17. The effect of low temperature aging on the mechanical property & phase stability of Y-TZP ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Tae; Yang, Jae-Ho; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2009-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Recently Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) has been introduced due to superior flexural strength and fracture toughness compared to other dental ceramic systems. Although zirconia has outstanding mechanical properties, the phenomenon of decrease in the life-time of zirconia resulted from degradation in flexural strength after low temperature aging has been reported. PURPOSE The objective of this study was to investigate degradation of flexural strength of Y-TZP ceramics after various low temperature aging treatments and to evaluate the phase stability and micro-structural change after aging by using X-ray diffraction analysis and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). MATERIAL AND METHODS Y-TZP blocks of Vita In-Ceram YZ (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Germany) were prepared in 40 mm (length) × 4 mm (width) × 3 mm (height) samples. Specimens were artificially aged in distilled water by heat-treatment at a temperature of 75, 100, 125, 150, 175, 200, and 225℃ for 10 hours, in order to induce the phase transformation at the surface. To measure the mechanical property, the specimens were subjected to a four-point bending test using a universal testing machine (Instron model 3365; Instron, Canton, Mass, USA). In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis (DMAX 2500; Rigaku, Tokyo, Japan) and SEM (Hitachi s4700; Jeol Ltd, Tokyo, Japan) were performed to estimate the phase transformation. The statistical analysis was done using SAS 9.1.3 (SAS institute, USA). The flexural strength data of the experimental groups were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and to detect statistically significant differences (α= .05). RESULTS The mean flexural strength of sintered Vita In-Ceram YZ without autoclaving was 798 MPa. When applied aging temperature at below 125℃ for 10 hours, the flexural strength of Vita In-Ceram YZ increased up to 1,161 MPa. However, at above 150℃, the flexural strength started to decrease. Although low

  18. Is older colder or colder older? The association of age with body temperature in 18,630 individuals.

    PubMed

    Waalen, Jill; Buxbaum, Joel N

    2011-05-01

    In animal studies, caloric restriction resulting in increased longevity is associated with a reduction in body temperature, which is strain specific and likely under genetic control. Small studies in humans have suggested that temperatures may be lower among elderly populations, usually attributed to loss of thermoregulation. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 18,630 white adults aged 20-98 years (mean 58.3 years) who underwent oral temperature measurement as part of a standardized health appraisal at a large U.S. health maintenance organization. Overall, women had higher mean temperatures (97.5 ± 1.2°F) than men (97.2 ± 1.1°F; p < .0001). Mean temperature decreased with age, with a difference of 0.3°F between oldest and youngest groups after controlling for sex, body mass index, and white blood cell count. The results are consistent with low body temperature as a biomarker for longevity. Prospective studies are needed to confirm whether this represents a survival advantage associated with lifetime low steady state temperature.

  19. Low-temperature atmospheric plasma increases the expression of anti-aging genes of skin cells without causing cellular damages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Hae; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Jae-Koo; Hong, Jin-woo; Kim, Gyoo-cheon

    2013-03-01

    Efforts to employ various types of plasma in the field of skin care have increased consistently because it can regulate many biochemical reactions that are normally unaffected by light-based therapy. One method for skin rejuvenation adopted a high-temperature plasma generator to remove skin epithelial cells. In this case, the catalyzing effects of the plasma were rarely used due to the high temperature. Hence, the benefits of the plasma were not magnified. Recently, many types of low-temperature plasma devices have been developed for medical applications but their detailed functions and working mechanisms are unclear. The present study examined the effect of low-temperature microwave plasma on skin cells. Treatment with low-temperature plasma increased the expression of anti-aging genes in skin cells, including collagen, fibronectin and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, the plasma treatment did not cause cell death, but only induced slight cell growth arrest at the G2 phase. Although the cells treated with low-temperature plasma showed moderate growth arrest, there were no signs of thermal or genetic damage of skin cells. Overall, this low-temperature microwave plasma device induces the expressions of some anti-aging-related genes in skin cells without causing damage.

  20. Is Older Colder or Colder Older? The Association of Age With Body Temperature in 18,630 Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Joel N.

    2011-01-01

    In animal studies, caloric restriction resulting in increased longevity is associated with a reduction in body temperature, which is strain specific and likely under genetic control. Small studies in humans have suggested that temperatures may be lower among elderly populations, usually attributed to loss of thermoregulation. We analyzed cross-sectional data from 18,630 white adults aged 20–98 years (mean 58.3 years) who underwent oral temperature measurement as part of a standardized health appraisal at a large U.S. health maintenance organization. Overall, women had higher mean temperatures (97.5 ± 1.2°F) than men (97.2 ± 1.1°F; p < .0001). Mean temperature decreased with age, with a difference of 0.3°F between oldest and youngest groups after controlling for sex, body mass index, and white blood cell count. The results are consistent with low body temperature as a biomarker for longevity. Prospective studies are needed to confirm whether this represents a survival advantage associated with lifetime low steady state temperature. PMID:21324956

  1. Effects of the aging temperature and stress relaxation conditions on γ‧ precipitation in Inconel X-750

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jeong Won; Seong, Baek Seok; Jeong, Hi Won; Choi, Yoon Suk; Kang, Namhyun

    2015-02-01

    Inconel X-750 is a Ni-based precipitation-hardened superalloy typically used in springs designed for high-temperature applications such as the hold-down springs in nuclear power plants. γ‧ is a major precipitate in X-750 alloys which affects the strength, creep resistance, and stress relaxation properties of the spring. In this study, a solution-treated X-750 wire coiled into a spring was used that was aged at various temperatures and submitted to stress relaxation tests with and without loading. Small angle neutron scattering was employed to quantify the size and volume fraction of γ‧ phase in the springs as a function of the aging temperature and the application of a load during stress relaxation. The volume fraction of γ‧ precipitates increased in the specimen aged at 732 °C following stress relaxation at 500 °C for 300 h. However, the mean size of the precipitates in the samples was not affected by stress relaxation. The specimen aged at the lower temperature (620 °C) contained a smaller γ‧ volume fraction and gained a smaller fraction of γ‧ during stress relaxation compared with the sample aged at the higher temperature (732 °C). The smaller increase in the γ‧ volume fraction for the sample aged at 620 °C was associated with a larger increase in the M23C6 secondary carbide content during relaxation. The Cr depletion zone around the secondary carbides raises the solubility of γ‧ thereby decreasing the volume fraction of γ‧ precipitates in Inconel X-750. In terms of stress relaxation, a larger increase in the γ‧ volume fraction was measured with loading rather than without. This is probably associated with the dislocation accumulation generated under loading that facilitate the nucleation and growth of heterogeneous γ‧ phase due to enhanced diffusion.

  2. Study of Aging-Induced Degradation of Fracture Resistance of Alloy 617 Toward High-Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Aditya Narayan; Moitra, A.; Bhaskar, Pragna; Sasikala, G.; Dasgupta, Arup; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    For the Alloy 617, the effect of aging on the fracture energy degradation has been investigated after aging for different time periods at 1023 K (750 °C). A sharp reduction in impact energy (by 55 pct vis-à-vis the as-received material) after 1000 hours of aging, as evaluated from room-temperature Charpy impact tests, has been observed. Further aging up to 10,000 hours has led to a degradation of fracture energy up to 78 pct. Fractographic examinations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have revealed a change in fracture mode from fibrous-ductile for the un-aged material to intergranular mode for the aged one. The extent of intergranular fracture increases with the increasing aging time, indicating a tendency of the material to undergo grain boundary embrittlement over long-term aging. Analysis of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs along with selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns for the samples aged at 10,000 hours revealed finely dispersed γ' precipitates of size 30 to 40 nm, rich in Al and Ti, along with extensive precipitation of M23C6 at the grain boundaries. In addition, the presence of Ni3Si of size in the range of 110 to 120 nm also has been noticed. The extensive precipitation of M23C6 at the grain boundaries have been considered as a major reason for aging-induced embrittlement of this material.

  3. Effects of temperature and food quality on age and size at maturity in ectotherms: an experimental test with Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Bror; Jonsson, Nina; Finstad, Anders G

    2013-01-01

    The reaction norm between growth rate, age and size at maturity in ectotherms is widely debated in ecological literature. It has been proposed that the effect depends on whether growth is affected by food quality or temperature (called the Berrigan-Charnov puzzle). The present experiment tested this for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). We enhanced growth rates by increasing temperature and ratio of lipids to proteins in the food for groups of Atlantic salmon. Both treatments gave higher percentages of early mature and therefore smaller adults in contrast to the proposed Berrigan-Charnov puzzle. There was a difference between sexes in that males could attain maturity 1 year younger than females when reared under similar environmental conditions. Males that matured during the first year in sea water were smaller than similar aged immature males. The probability of that Atlantic salmon attained maturity for the first time during their second year in sea increased with growth rate during the preceding winter and if fed a high-lipid diet. Increased summer temperature exhibited no additional effect. Similar aged fish reared at elevated temperature and fed high-lipid diet attained maturity at a larger body mass and exhibited higher mass-length-ratios than those reared at natural temperature and fed a low-lipid diet, indicating that structural growth has priority over lipid deposits. Increased growth rate before the onset of maturation, whether this is owing to enhanced lipid content in food or increased water temperature, decreased age and therefore size at maturity. Enhanced lipid relative to protein content in food, but not temperature, had an additive positive effect on early maturation probability, likely due to increased amounts of reserve energy. These results may be general for ectotherm organisms. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2012 British Ecological Society.

  4. Morphogenetic evolution of the Têt river valley (eastern Pyrenees) using 10Be/21Ne cosmogenic burial dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartégou, Amandine; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier L.; Calvet, Marc; Zimmermann, Laurent; Tibari, Bouchaïb; Hez, Gabriel; Gunnell, Yanni; Aumaitre, Georges; Keddadouche, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The rates and chronologies of valley incision are closely modulated by the tectonic uplift of active mountain ranges and were controlled by repeated climate changes during the Quaternary. The continental collision between the Iberian and Eurasian plates induced a double vergence orogen, the Pyrenees, which has been considered as a mature mountain range in spite of significant seismicity (e.g. Chevrot et al., 2011) and evidence of neotectonics (e.g. Goula et al., 1999). Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that the range may have never reached a steady state (Ford et al., in press). One option for resolving this controversy is to quantify the incision rates since the Miocene by reconstructing the vertical movement of geometric markers such as fluvial terraces. However, the few available ages from the Pyrenean terrace systems do not exceed the middle Pleistocene. Thus, to enlarge the time span of this dataset, we studied alluvium-filled horizontal epiphreatic passages in limestone karstic networks. Such landforms are used as substitutes of fluvial terraces because they represent former valley floors (e.g. Palmer, 2007; Audra et al., 2013). They record the transient position of former local base levels during the process of valley deepening. The Têt river valley (southern Pyrenees) was studied near the Villefranche-de-Conflent limestone gorge where 8 cave levels have been recognized over a vertical height of 600 meters. Given that 26Al/10Be cosmogenic burial dating in this setting was limited to the last ~5 Ma (Calvet et al., 2015), here we used the cosmogenic 10Be/21Ne method in order to restore a more complete chronology of valley incision (e.g. Balco & Shuster, 2009; McPhilipps et al., 2016). Burial age results for alluvial deposits from 12 caves document incision rates since the Langhian (~14 Ma). Preliminary results indicate a history of valley deepening in successive stages. The data show a regular incision rate of 70-80 mm/a from the Langhian to the Messinian

  5. Time-capsule concretions: Unlocking burial diagenetic processes in the Mancos Shale using carbonate clumped isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Annabel; John, Cédric M.; Mozley, Peter S.; Smalley, P. C.; Muggeridge, Ann H.

    2014-05-01

    Septarian carbonate concretions contain carbonate precipitated during progressive growth of the concretion and subsequent fracture-filling. As such, they have been used to track variations in δ13C and δ18O of pore waters during diagenesis and to define diagenetic zones in clastic rocks. However, the δ18O value of the carbonate is dependent on precipitation temperature and the δ18O value of the pore fluid from which it precipitated. Interpretations must assume one of these parameters, both of which are highly variable through time in diagenetic settings. Carbonate clumped isotopes of the cement can provide independent estimates of temperature of precipitation, allowing the pore-water δ18O to be back-calculated. Here, we use this technique on carbonate concretions and fracture fills of the Upper Cretaceous Prairie Canyon Member, Mancos Shale, Colorado. We sampled concretions from two permeable horizons separated by a 5 m shale layer, with one permeable horizon containing concretions with septarian fractures. We show cores precipitated at cooler temperatures (31 °C, ˜660 m burial depth) than the rims (68 °C (˜1980 m burial depth) and relate that to the δ13Ccarbonate values to suggest the concretion core precipitated in the methanogenic zone, with increasing input from thermogenically produced CO2. The two concretion-bearing horizons have different back-calculated δ18Oporewater values (mean -2.65‰ and 1.13‰ VSMOW) for cements formed at the same temperature and similar δ13C values, suggesting the shale layer present between the two horizons acted as a barrier to fluid mixing. Additionally, the δ18Ocarbonate of the septarian fractures (-13.8‰ VPBD) are due to precipitation at high temperatures (102 to 115 °C) from a fluid with a mean δ18Oporewater of 0.32‰ (VSMOW). Therefore, we can tie in the cementation history of the formation to temporal and spatial variations in δ18Oporewater.

  6. Experimental simulation of chemomechanical processes during deep burial diagenesis of carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neveux, L.; Grgic, D.; Carpentier, C.; Pironon, J.; Truche, L.; Girard, J. P.

    2014-02-01

    Chemomechanical processes involved in the deep burial diagenesis of carbonate petroleum reservoirs are still poorly understood. To better understand these processes and explain how porosity and permeability can be preserved at the great depth of DBRs (deeply buried reservoirs), we developed an experimental device allowing both the simulation of high-pressure/stresses/temperature conditions (80°C, 60 MPa of confining pressure, and differential stress up to 40 MPa) of DBR and the circulation of different fluids in rock samples. We tested (triaxial multistep creep tests) four core samples of a cemented limestone and analyzed creep deformations, fluids chemistry, and petrographical and petrophysical properties of samples. Different flow conditions (no flow and flow through) and chemical compositions (natural meteoric water with and without phosphate ions) were considered. Our study showed that the precipitation of calcite on free pore walls of micrites blocks the microporosity between micrite crystals, thus rendering the microporosity inaccessible to fluids. Hence, the connected porosity decreased strongly after experimentation. This is due to the PSC (pressure solution creep) which is the main process implied in the porosity reduction of a carbonate rock during deep burial. The preservation of macropores during PSC allows the preservation of permeability. In addition, calcite solubility is positively dependent on mechanical parameters (axial compaction and axial stress), thus suggesting that calcite can precipitate during decompression of deep basinal fluids, resulting in changes in porosity. A comparison of experimental results with theoretical calculations showed that the integration of the PSC process into calculation databases would greatly improve the modeling of DBR.

  7. Combined inhibitory effects of low temperature and N-acetyl-l-cysteine on the postovulatory aging of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Cui, Long-Bo

    2016-04-01

    The postovulatory aging of oocytes eventually affects the development of oocytes and embryos. Oxidative stress is known to accelerate the onset of apoptosis in oocytes and influence their capacity for fertilisation. This study aimed to reveal the roles of temperature and the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine in preventing the aging of postovulatory mouse oocytes. First, newly ovulated mouse oocytes were cultured at various temperature and time combinations in HCZB medium with varying concentrations of N-acetyl-l-cysteine to assess signs of aging and developmental potential. When cultured in HCZB with 300 μM N-acetyl-l-cysteine at different temperature and incubation time combinations (namely 25°C for 12 h, 15°C for 24 h and 5°C for 12 h), the increase in the susceptibility of oocytes to activating stimuli was efficiently prevented, and the developmental potential was maintained following Sr2+ activation or in vitro fertilisation. After incubation at either 15°C for 36 h or 5°C for 24 h, oocytes that had decreased blastocyst rates displayed unrecoverable abnormal cortical granule distribution together with decreased BCL2 levels, total glutathione concentrations and glutathione/glutathione disulphide (GSH/GSSG) ratios. In conclusion, postovulatory oocyte aging could be effectively inhibited by appropriate N-acetyl-l-cysteine addition at low temperatures. In addition, a simple method for the temporary culture of mature oocytes was established.

  8. 618-10 Burial Ground Trench Remediation and 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground Nonintrusive Characterization of Vertical Pipe Units Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, J. W.

    2012-06-28

    A “lessons learned” is a noteworthy practice or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat application, or an adverse work practice/experience that is captured and shared to avoid reoccurrence. This document provides the lessons learned identified by the 618-10 Burial Ground trench remediation and the 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground nonintrusive characterization of the vertical pipe units (VPUs).

  9. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the body...

  10. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the body...

  11. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the body...

  12. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the body...

  13. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the body...

  14. Messrs. Dinkins, Rangel, and Savage in Colloquy on the African Burial Ground: A Companion Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodnight, G. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Expands the symbolic resources of the African Burial Ground through a dialogical reading of an essay in the same issue of this journal which offers a rhetorical examination of the controversy surrounding the African Burial Ground. Argues that, post-critique, controversies may be recuperated to recover an expanded sense of coalitional engagement,…

  15. Effects of Urban Stream Burial on Organic Matter Dynamics and Reach Scale Nitrate Retention

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial suppresses the capacity of streams to retain nitrate (NO3-) by eliminating primar...

  16. Effects of urban stream burial on organic matter dynamics and reach scale nitrate retention - final

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial suppresses the capacity of streams to retain nitrate (NO3 −) by eliminating primar...

  17. Effects of Urban Stream Burial on Organic Matter Dynamics and Reach Scale Nitrate Retention

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial suppresses the capacity of streams to retain nitrate (NO3-) by eliminating primar...

  18. Technical data summary: Plan for closure of the 643-G burial ground

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J R

    1987-08-17

    This report involves the actions of closing the 643-G burial ground which involves waste removal, stabilization, and capping. Remedial action involves the removing of the transuranic waste and closing of the grid wells. The closure cap for the burial site will consist of native soil, clay, and gravel. This will assure long-term physical and chemical stability. (MB)

  19. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

    2007-07-25

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

  20. 76 FR 61148 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes) Activity... information technology. Title: Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes, VA Form 21-2008....

  1. Burial affects the biogeochemistry of headwater streams in a midwestern US metropolitan area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban basins. Urban stream burial has only recently been recognized by ecologists and little research has addressed the extent to whi...

  2. Messrs. Dinkins, Rangel, and Savage in Colloquy on the African Burial Ground: A Companion Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodnight, G. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Expands the symbolic resources of the African Burial Ground through a dialogical reading of an essay in the same issue of this journal which offers a rhetorical examination of the controversy surrounding the African Burial Ground. Argues that, post-critique, controversies may be recuperated to recover an expanded sense of coalitional engagement,…

  3. Burial affects the biogeochemistry of headwater streams in a midwestern US metropolitan area - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban basins. Urban stream burial has only recently been recognized by ecologists as a regional environmental impact and little resea...

  4. Burial affects the biogeochemistry of headwater streams in a midwestern US metropolitan area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban basins. Urban stream burial has only recently been recognized by ecologists and little research has addressed the extent to whi...

  5. 76 FR 31683 - Proposed Information Collection (NCA PreNeed Burial Evaluation) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (NCA PreNeed Burial Evaluation) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: NCA PreNeed Burial...

  6. Effects of urban stream burial on organic matter dynamics and reach scale nitrate retention - final

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial suppresses the capacity of streams to retain nitrate (NO3 −) by eliminating primar...

  7. CH4 and CO2 production relative to carbon burial in wetlands undergoing sediment loss and accretion in coastal Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaisas, N. A.; Maiti, K.; Rivera-Monroy, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    The coastal Louisiana region encompasses the largest deltaic system at the mouth of the Mississippi River, in the Gulf of Mexico, and includes the largest wetlands area in the United States. Given the critical functional role of coastal wetlands in carbon (C) storage and sequestration it is essential to assess the potential role of wetlands and adjacent tidal channels as sources (via CH4 and CO2 production) and sinks of carbon (via burial) along hydrological gradients. Such information is necessary to construct and constrain landscape-level C budgets. We investigate C burial and CO2 and CH4 emissions in two distinct sediment deposition environments undergoing land loss (Barataria Bay) and land formation (Wax Delta) in coastal Louisiana. Sediment cores (depth, 20 cm) were sampled at both sites along tidal channels, ridges and low elevation marshes during spring (March 10oC), early summer (May 20oC) and late summer (August 30oC) to evaluate seasonal and spatial scale variability in CH4 and CO2 production. CH4 production ranged from 0.003 to 20.8 moles/m2/day and differences were correlated to location, ambient temperature, dissolved O2 concentration in the overlying water and core sediment redox conditions. Seasonal CH4 fluxes into overlying water were significantly higher in the spring compared to the summer season. The CO2 fluxes ranged from 0.42 to 214 moles/m2/day and also showed higher fluxes at colder temperature ( 10 o C). These net fluxes will provide valuable information to evaluate the ratio of greenhouse gas production to carbon burial at two contrasting estuarine environments undergoing both loss and net gain of wetland area in coastal Louisiana.

  8. Martensite aging effect in a Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} high temperature shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W.; Otsuka, Kazuhiro

    1999-11-19

    Ti-Pd alloy system is one of the potential high temperature shape memory alloys due to its high martensitic transformation temperatures. Thus, many researches including shape memory characteristics, martensitic transformations and mechanical behavior of the alloys have been done in recent yeas. However, martensite aging effect in the alloy, which is an important issue as to the stability of martensite at high temperature, has not been reported yet. Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} transforms from B2 parent phase to B19 martensite upon cooling, and M{sub s} is 823 K (25) and T{sub m} is 1,673 K (26). Thus M{sub s}/T{sub m} ratio of the alloy is about 0.49, and the alloy may show strong martensite aging effect according to the above proposal. It is now of interest to examine whether the Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} alloy show martensite aging effect. As will be shown, the Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50} alloy indeed shows the aging effect, as expected; however, the aging effect of this alloy exhibits a unique feature, which is not found in other shape memory alloys.

  9. Synthesis of praseodymium hydroxide (Pr(OH)3) and praseodymium oxide (Pr6O11) nanorods via room temperature aging.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Aaron

    2013-02-15

    In this study, room-temperature aging has been investigated as an alternative to high-temperature hydrothermal processing for manufacturing Pr(OH)(3) nanorods. It was found that a simple process consisting of precipitation, washing, and room-temperature aging results in the formation of Pr(OH)(3) nanorods that are structurally different to those synthesized by hydrothermal processing. Rather than single crystals, the nanorods were found to consist of crystals viewed down the [12¯10] and [11¯00] axes sharing a common [0001] growth direction. Subsequent calcination yielded Pr(6)O(11) nanorods consisting of cubic crystals viewed down the [11¯0] and [11¯2¯] directions. The constituent crystals shared a common [110] direction parallel with the longitudinal rod axis.

  10. The effects of physical aging at elevated temperatures on the viscoelastic creep on IM7/K3B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Physical aging at elevated temperature of the advanced composite IM7/K3B was investigated through the use of creep compliance tests. Testing consisted of short term isothermal, creep/recovery with the creep segments performed at constant load. The matrix dominated transverse tensile and in-plane shear behavior were measured at temperatures ranging from 200 to 230 C. Through the use of time based shifting procedures, the aging shift factors, shift rates and momentary master curve parameters were found at each temperature. These material parameters were used as input to a predictive methodology, which was based upon effective time theory and linear viscoelasticity combined with classical lamination theory. Long term creep compliance test data was compared to predictions to verify the method. The model was then used to predict the long term creep behavior for several general laminates.

  11. Oxygen in egg masses: interactive effects of temperature, age, and egg-mass morphology on oxygen supply to embryos.

    PubMed

    Moran, Amy L; Woods, H Arthur

    2007-02-01

    Embryos of many marine invertebrates are encased in gelatinous masses for part or all of development. Because gel and intervening embryos retard oxygen flux, such a life-history mode profoundly affects partial pressures of metabolic gases surrounding embryos. However, little is known about relationships between egg-mass structure and the opportunities and constraints imposed on structure by metabolic gas transport. We examined the effects of four factors (temperature, embryo age, embryo density and egg-mass size) on the metabolism of egg masses using both natural egg masses of a nudibranch and artificial egg masses made from sand dollar embryos and low-melting point agarose. Both temperature and embryo age strongly affected metabolic rates of nudibranch embryos. For embryos of a given age (stage), rates of oxygen consumption roughly doubled between 12 and 21 degrees C; from early cleavage to the veliger stage, consumption rose two- to fourfold, depending on temperature. Oxygen profiles in egg masses showed that advanced embryonic age, and to a lesser extent high temperature, both led to steeper oxygen gradients into egg masses. Egg masses containing advanced embryos at 21 degrees C had very low central oxygen levels. Small-diameter artificial masses (2 mm diameter) had virtually no internal oxygen gradients regardless of embryo density or temperature, while medium (4 mm) and large diameter (10 mm) artificial masses had oxygen profiles that depended strongly and interactively on embryo density and temperature. Together, our data on natural and artificial egg masses suggest that (i) multiple factors have strong effects on metabolic rate; (ii) rates of oxygen transport are relatively invariant with temperature in simple, artificial systems but may vary more strongly with temperature in natural egg masses; and (iii) the four factors--temperature, embryo age, embryo density and egg-mass size--interact in important ways bearing on egg mass design. A simple mathematical

  12. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  13. Leaf-age effects on temperature responses of photosynthesis and respiration of an alpine oak, Quercus aquifolioides, in southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haoran; Xu, Ming; Pan, Hongli; Yu, Xiubo

    2015-11-01

    Temperature responses and sensitivity of photosynthesis (A(n_)T) and respiration for leaves at different ages are crucial to modeling ecosystem carbon (C) cycles and productivity of evergreen forests. Understanding the mechanisms and processes of temperature sensitivity may further shed lights on temperature acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration with leaf aging. The current study examined temperature responses of photosynthesis and respiration of young leaves (YLs) (fully expanded in current growth season) and old leaves (OLs) (fully expanded in last growth season) of Quercus aquifolioides Rehder and E.H. Wilson in an alpine oak forest, southwestern China. Temperature responses of dark respiration (R(dark)), net assimilation (A(n)), maximal velocity of carboxylation (V(cmax)) and maximum rate of electron transport (J(max)) were significantly different between the two leaf ages. Those differences implied different temperature response parameters should be used for leaves of different ages in modeling vegetation productivity and ecosystem C cycles in Q. aquifolioides forests and other evergreen forests. We found that RuBP carboxylation determined the downward shift of A(n_)T in OLs, while RuBP regeneration and the balance between Rubisco carboxylation and RuBP regeneration made little contribution. Sensitivity of stomatal conductance to vapor pressure deficit changed in OLs and compensated part of the downward shift. We also found that OLs of Q. aquifolioides had lower An due to lower stomatal conductance, higher stomatal conductance limitation and deactivation of the biochemical processes. In addition, the balance between R(dark) and A(n) changed between OLs and YLs, which was represented by a higher R(dark)/A(n) ratio for OLs.

  14. The effects of strain rate and temperature on commercial acrylic artist paints aged one year to decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Eric W. S.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Young, Christina R. T.; Learner, Thomas J. S.

    2015-11-01

    Acrylic artist paints are viscoelastic composites containing a high molecular weight copolymer, pigment and a variety of additives. The glass transition temperature of the latex binder is typically slightly below ambient conditions, giving mechanical properties that are strongly dependent on strain rate and temperature. In previous work, the viscoelastic behaviour of custom-formulated latex artist paints was reported for films with known volume fractions of pigment using data from uniaxial tensile tests at different strain rates and temperatures. Secant Young's modulus and failure strain master curves were constructed for each film through time-temperature superposition, allowing predictions beyond the experimental timescale at a selected reference temperature. A similar analysis is now presented for a small set of commercial artist paints tested at ages of 1 and 27 years. Experimental shift factor values are reported with fits to the Arrhenius, WLF and Vogel Fulcher equations, along with a comparison with published data for acrylic polymers. The tensile results highlight a spectrum of properties that acrylic paints may exhibit—brittle glass to hyperelastic—depending on the conditions during deformation. Strong similarities are shown between products from different manufacturers, and the findings suggest a high degree of stability with age. A method for predicting failure as a function of strain rate and temperature is also presented, and the methodology gives a framework for investigating other artist materials and the factors influencing their mechanical properties.

  15. Development and Application of a Paleomagnetic/Geochemical Method for Constraining the Timing of Burial Diagenetic and Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, Richard D.; Engel, Michael H.

    2005-03-10

    Studies of diagenesis caused by fluid migration or other events are commonly hindered by a lack of temporal control. Our results to date demonstrate that a paleomagnetic/geochemical approach can be used to date fluid migration as well as burial diagenetic events. Our principal working hypothesis is that burial diagenetic processes (e.g., maturation of organic-rich sediments and clay diagenesis) and the migration of fluids can trigger the authigenesis of magnetic mineral phases. The ages of these events can be constrained by comparing chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) to independently established Apparent Polar Wander Paths. While geochemical (e.g. stable isotope and organic analyses) and petrographic studies provide important clues for establishing these relationships, the ultimate test of this hypothesis requires the application of independent dating methods to verify the paleomagnetic ages. Towards this end, we have used K-Ar dating of illitization as an alternative method for constraining the ages of magnetic mineral phases in our field areas.

  16. Biosecurity procedures for the environmental management of carcasses burial sites in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geon-Ha; Pramanik, Sudipta

    2016-12-01

    Avian influenza and foot-and-mouth disease are two main contagious pathogenic viral disease which are responsible for the massive burials of livestock in Korea since burial is the primary measure to control these outbreaks. Biosecurity is a set of preventive measures designed to prevent the risk of spreading of these infectious diseases. The main objective of this paper is to discuss about the requirements of biosecurity and develop protocol outlines for environmental management of burial sites in Korea. Current practice prescribes to minimize the potential for on-farm pollution and the spread of the infectious diseases. Specific biosecurity procedures such as proper assessment of leachate quality, safe handling and disposal of leachate, adequate leachate pollution monitoring, necessary seasonal management of burial site, and appropriate sterilization process must be carried out to prevent the indirect transmission of pathogens from the burial sites. Policy makers should acquire robust knowledge of biosecurity for establishing more effective future legislation for carcasses disposal in Korea.

  17. Evidence supporting an intentional Neandertal burial at La Chapelle-aux-Saints

    PubMed Central

    Rendu, William; Beauval, Cédric; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Balzeau, Antoine; Bismuth, Thierry; Bourguignon, Laurence; Delfour, Géraldine; Faivre, Jean-Philippe; Lacrampe-Cuyaubère, François; Tavormina, Carlotta; Todisco, Dominique; Turq, Alain; Maureille, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The bouffia Bonneval at La Chapelle-aux-Saints is well known for the discovery of the first secure Neandertal burial in the early 20th century. However, the intentionality of the burial remains an issue of some debate. Here, we present the results of a 12-y fieldwork project, along with a taphonomic analysis of the human remains, designed to assess the funerary context of the La Chapelle-aux-Saints Neandertal. We have established the anthropogenic nature of the burial pit and underlined the taphonomic evidence of a rapid burial of the body. These multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis of an intentional burial. Finally, the discovery of skeletal elements belonging to the original La Chapelle aux Saints 1 individual, two additional young individuals, and a second adult in the bouffia Bonneval highlights a more complex site-formation history than previously proposed. PMID:24344286

  18. Burial patterns during times of armed conflict in Cyprus in the 1960s and 1970s.

    PubMed

    Mikellide, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The island of Cyprus experienced two periods of intercommunal conflict during which c. 2000 individuals went missing. The Committee on Missing Persons in Cyprus began a program of exhumations in 2005, through which more than 185 burial sites pertaining to the two periods of conflict have been identified and excavated. The aim of this study was twofold: (i) to present a classification of the main types of clandestine burial and (ii) to test the hypothesis that the nature of conflict influences the mode of interment. Burials can be divided into "public burials" and "concealed burials," based on the possible motives of those involved in the interment and then subdivided into smaller categories based on similarities in archeological context. A comparison of results from the two periods of conflict reveals that there are statistical differences (p < 0.005), which indicate that the mode of interment may reflect the nature, character, and atmosphere of conflict.

  19. Evidence supporting an intentional Neandertal burial at La Chapelle-aux-Saints.

    PubMed

    Rendu, William; Beauval, Cédric; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Balzeau, Antoine; Bismuth, Thierry; Bourguignon, Laurence; Delfour, Géraldine; Faivre, Jean-Philippe; Lacrampe-Cuyaubère, François; Tavormina, Carlotta; Todisco, Dominique; Turq, Alain; Maureille, Bruno

    2014-01-07

    The bouffia Bonneval at La Chapelle-aux-Saints is well known for the discovery of the first secure Neandertal burial in the early 20th century. However, the intentionality of the burial remains an issue of some debate. Here, we present the results of a 12-y fieldwork project, along with a taphonomic analysis of the human remains, designed to assess the funerary context of the La Chapelle-aux-Saints Neandertal. We have established the anthropogenic nature of the burial pit and underlined the taphonomic evidence of a rapid burial of the body. These multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis of an intentional burial. Finally, the discovery of skeletal elements belonging to the original La Chapelle aux Saints 1 individual, two additional young individuals, and a second adult in the bouffia Bonneval highlights a more complex site-formation history than previously proposed.

  20. Early-type Galaxy Archeology: Ages, Abundance Ratios, and Effective Temperatures from Full-spectrum Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie; Graves, Genevieve J.; van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2014-01-01

    The stellar populations of galaxies hold vital clues to their formation histories. In this paper we present results based on modeling stacked spectra of early-type galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of velocity dispersion, σ, from 90 km s-1 to 300 km s-1. The spectra are of extremely high quality, with typical signal-to-noise ratio of 1000 Å-1, and a wavelength coverage of 4000 Å -8800 Å. Our population synthesis model includes variation in 16 elements from C to Ba, a two-component star formation history, the shift in effective temperature, Δ T eff, of the stars with respect to a solar metallicity isochrone, and the stellar initial mass function, among other parameters. In our approach we fit the full optical spectra rather than a select number of spectral indices and are able to, for the first time, measure the abundances of the elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, and Ni from the integrated light of distant galaxies. Our main results are as follows: (1) light-weighted stellar ages range from 6-12 Gyr from low to high σ (2) [Fe/H] varies by less than 0.1 dex across the entire sample; (3) Mg closely tracks O, and both increase from ≈0.0 at low σ to ~0.25 at high σ Si and Ti show a shallower rise with σ, and Ca tracks Fe rather than O; (4) the iron peak elements V, Cr, Mn, and Ni track Fe, while Co tracks O, suggesting that Co forms primarily in massive stars; (5) C and N track O over the full sample and [C/Fe] and [N/Fe] exceed 0.2 at high σ and (6) the variation in Δ T eff with total metallicity closely follows theoretical predictions based on stellar evolution theory. This last result is significant because it implies that we are robustly solving not only for the detailed abundance patterns but also the detailed temperature distributions (i.e., isochrones) of the stars in these galaxies. A variety of tests reveal that the systematic uncertainties in our measurements are probably 0.05 dex or less. Our derived [Mg/Fe] and [O