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Sample records for age time spent

  1. Depression Common After Time Spent in ICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160482.html Depression Common After Time Spent in ICU About one-third of ICU ... among former ICU patients are three to four times higher than in the general population, according to ...

  2. Time and Money Spent on the Mass Media in an Age of New Communication Technologies: A Market Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogan, Christine L.; Kelly, James D.

    A study surveyed 276 residents of Indianapolis, Indiana to determine how the people might be changing media use and spending habits in a time of growing interest in video cassette recorders (VCRs), backyard satellite dishes, pay-TV, and personal computers. Questions were designed to determine the degree to which people would buy into the new…

  3. How Time Is Spent in Elementary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenshine, Barak V.

    2015-01-01

    The Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study (BTES) provides valuable information on how time is spent in elementary classrooms. Some of the major topics are: the average minutes per day which students spend engaged in reading and math activities, student engagement rates in different settings (that is, teacher-led settings versus seatwork) and…

  4. 5 CFR 551.425 - Time spent receiving medical attention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Time spent receiving medical attention... Relation to Other Activities § 551.425 Time spent receiving medical attention. (a) Time spent waiting for and receiving medical attention for illness or injury shall be considered hours of work if: (1)...

  5. 5 CFR 551.425 - Time spent receiving medical attention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Time spent receiving medical attention... Relation to Other Activities § 551.425 Time spent receiving medical attention. (a) Time spent waiting for and receiving medical attention for illness or injury shall be considered hours of work if: (1)...

  6. 5 CFR 551.425 - Time spent receiving medical attention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Time spent receiving medical attention... Relation to Other Activities § 551.425 Time spent receiving medical attention. (a) Time spent waiting for and receiving medical attention for illness or injury shall be considered hours of work if: (1)...

  7. 5 CFR 551.425 - Time spent receiving medical attention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time spent receiving medical attention... Relation to Other Activities § 551.425 Time spent receiving medical attention. (a) Time spent waiting for and receiving medical attention for illness or injury shall be considered hours of work if: (1)...

  8. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Time spent traveling. 551.422 Section 551.422 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Hours of Work Application of Principles in Relation to Other Activities § 551.422 Time spent traveling....

  9. Adolescent Depression and Time Spent with Parents and Siblings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desha, Laura N.; Nicholson, Jan M.; Ziviani, Jenny M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines adolescent depressive symptoms and the quantity and quality of time spent by adolescents with their parents and siblings. We use measures of the quality of relationships with parents and siblings as proxy indicators for the quality of time spent with these social partners. The study emphasizes the salience of parent…

  10. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of time spent cooking by adults in the 2005 UK Time Use Survey. Cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jean; White, Martin

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to document the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of time spent cooking by adults in the 2005 UK Time-Use Survey. Respondents reported their main activities, in 10 minute slots, throughout one 24 hour period. Activities were coded into 30 pre-defined codes, including 'cooking, washing up'. Four measures of time spent cooking were calculated: any time spent cooking, 30 continuous minutes spent cooking, total time spent cooking, and longest continuous time spent cooking. Socio-demographic correlates were: age, employment, social class, education, and number of adults and children in the household. Analyses were stratified by gender. Data from 4214 participants were included. 85% of women and 60% of men spent any time cooking; 60% of women and 33% of men spent 30 continuous minutes cooking. Amongst women, older age, not being in employment, lower social class, greater education, and living with other adults or children were positively associated with time cooking. Few differences in time spent cooking were seen in men. Socio-economic differences in time spent cooking may have been overstated as a determinant of socio-economic differences in diet, overweight and obesity. Gender was a stronger determinant of time spent cooking than other socio-demographic variables. PMID:26004671

  11. Prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of time spent cooking by adults in the 2005 UK Time Use Survey. Cross-sectional analysis☆

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jean; White, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to document the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of time spent cooking by adults in the 2005 UK Time-Use Survey. Respondents reported their main activities, in 10 minute slots, throughout one 24 hour period. Activities were coded into 30 pre-defined codes, including ‘cooking, washing up’. Four measures of time spent cooking were calculated: any time spent cooking, 30 continuous minutes spent cooking, total time spent cooking, and longest continuous time spent cooking. Socio-demographic correlates were: age, employment, social class, education, and number of adults and children in the household. Analyses were stratified by gender. Data from 4214 participants were included. 85% of women and 60% of men spent any time cooking; 60% of women and 33% of men spent 30 continuous minutes cooking. Amongst women, older age, not being in employment, lower social class, greater education, and living with other adults or children were positively associated with time cooking. Few differences in time spent cooking were seen in men. Socio-economic differences in time spent cooking may have been overstated as a determinant of socio-economic differences in diet, overweight and obesity. Gender was a stronger determinant of time spent cooking than other socio-demographic variables. PMID:26004671

  12. Use of electronic clinical documentation: time spent and team interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vawdrey, David K; Fred, Matthew R; Bostwick, Susan B

    2011-01-01

    Objective To measure the time spent authoring and viewing documentation and to study patterns of usage in healthcare practice. Design Audit logs for an electronic health record were used to calculate rates, and social network analysis was applied to ascertain usage patterns. Subjects comprised all care providers at an urban academic medical center who authored or viewed electronic documentation. Measurement Rate and time of authoring and viewing clinical documentation, and associations among users were measured. Results Users spent 20–103 min per day authoring notes and 7–56 min per day viewing notes, with physicians spending less than 90 min per day total. About 16% of attendings' notes, 8% of residents' notes, and 38% of nurses' notes went unread by other users, and, overall, 16% of notes were never read by anyone. Viewing of notes dropped quickly with the age of the note, but notes were read at a low but measurable rate, even after 2 years. Most healthcare teams (77%) included a nurse, an attending, and a resident, and those three users' groups were the first to write notes during an admission. Limitations The limitations were restriction to a single academic medical center and use of log files without direct observation. Conclusions Care providers spend a significant amount of time viewing and authoring notes. Many notes are never read, and rates of usage vary significantly by author and viewer. While the rate of viewing a note drops quickly with its age, even after 2 years inpatient notes are still viewed. PMID:21292706

  13. Productivity in dental care for children. Factors influencing the time spent delivering dental care.

    PubMed

    Wang, N J

    1994-12-01

    The cost of dental services is related to their productivity. The purpose of the study was to identify factors influencing productivity, measured as time spent providing dental care per child under care, per year, in public dental clinics. The time was expected to vary with characteristics of the patients, the personnel and the clinics. Time spent by dentists and dental hygienists delivering dental care for children aged three to 18 years was obtained from 137 public dental clinics. The data showed substantial variation in productivity between clinics. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the time spent per child was associated with interval between examinations, proportion of male dentists, ratio of dental assistants to dentists, proportion of child treatment time given by dental hygienists and proportion of all treatment time spent on child patients. These variables explained 43 per cent of the variance in the total time spent by dentists and hygienists and 41 per cent of the variance in dentists' time. Individual dentists and hygienists may reduce the mean time spent per child by extending recall intervals. On an administrative level, dentists' time per child may be reduced by employing more dental assistants or dental hygienists and allowing dentists to treat patient groups other than children. It is concluded that productivity in dental care for children in the public dental services may be influenced in several ways, both by clinical and administrative decisions. PMID:7850642

  14. Do Workplace Flexibility Policies Influence Time Spent in Domestic Labor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Mary C.; Estes, Sarah Beth; Glass, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a U.S. midwestern sample of mothers and fathers, the authors examine whether using workplace flexibility policies alters time spent in housework and child care. They hypothesize that an individual's policy use will lead to more time in domestic labor and that his or her spouse's policy use will lead to less time in domestic labor.…

  15. Time Spent Eating and Its Implications for Americans' Energy Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zick, Cathleen D.; Stevens, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    The upward trend in Americans' weight has precipitated research aimed at identifying its underlying causes. In this paper we examine trends in Americans' time spent eating in an attempt to gain a better understanding of Americans' changing eating habits and their predictors. Data used in the analyses come from four national time use surveys…

  16. 5 CFR 551.426 - Time spent in charitable activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Time spent in charitable activities. 551.426 Section 551.426 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Hours of Work Application of Principles...

  17. 5 CFR 551.425 - Time spent receiving medical attention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Time spent receiving medical attention. 551.425 Section 551.425 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Hours of Work Application of Principles...

  18. High-Ability Students' Time Spent outside the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makel, Matthew C.; Li, Yan; Putallaz, Martha; Wai, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This study considered how three groups of academically talented high school students--those who attended an academic summer program (TIP), those who qualified for the program but chose not to attend (QNA), and those who did not qualify (DNQ)--spent time outside the classroom. These groupings differentiated students by ability (QNA vs. DNQ) and…

  19. Time Spent on the Internet and Adolescent Blood Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Johnson, Dayna A.; Peters, Rosalind M.; Burmeister, Charlotte; Joseph, Christine L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Internet use is nearly ubiquitous among adolescents. Growing evidence suggests heavy Internet use negatively impacts health, yet the relationship between time spent on the Internet and adolescent blood pressure (BP) is unknown. We examined the association between Internet use and elevated BP in a racially diverse cross-sectional sample of 331…

  20. Relation between time spent outdoors and exfoliation glaucoma or exfoliation glaucoma suspect

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jae Hee; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relation between time spent outdoors at various life periods and risk of exfoliation glaucoma or exfoliation glaucoma suspect. Design Retrospective cohort study in the United States. Methods Participants (49,033 women in the Nurses Health Study and 20,066 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study) were 60+ years old, free of glaucoma and cataract, reported eye exams and completed questions about time spent outdoors in direct sunlight at mid-day at 3 life periods: high school to age 24 years, age 25-35 years, and age 36-59 years (asked in 2006 in women and 2008 in men). Participants were followed biennially with mailed questionnaires from 1980 (women) / 1986 (men) to 2010. Incident cases (223 women and 38 men) were confirmed with medical records. Cohort-specific multivariable-adjusted rate ratios from Cox proportional hazards models were estimated and pooled with meta-analysis. Results Although no association was observed with greater time spent outdoors in the ages of 25-35 or ages 36-59 years, the pooled multivariable-adjusted rate ratios for ≥11 hours per week spent outdoors in high school to age 24 years compared with ≤5 hours per week was 2.00 (95% confidence interval=1.30, 3.08; p for linear trend=0.001). In women, this association was stronger in those who resided in the southern geographic tier in young adulthood (p for interaction = 0.07). Conclusions Greater time spent outdoors in young adulthood was associated with risk of exfoliation glaucoma or exfoliation glaucoma suspect, supporting an etiologic role of early exposures to climatic factors. PMID:24857689

  1. Time Spent on the Internet and Adolescent Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E; Johnson, Dayna A; Peters, Rosalind M; Burmeister, Charlotte; Joseph, Christine L M

    2015-10-01

    Internet use is nearly ubiquitous among adolescents. Growing evidence suggests heavy Internet use negatively impacts health, yet the relationship between time spent on the Internet and adolescent blood pressure (BP) is unknown. We examined the association between Internet use and elevated BP in a racially diverse cross-sectional sample of 331 healthy adolescents (ages 14-17 years). Heavy Internet use was defined as ≥ 2 hr/day, moderate use as <2 hr/day and ≥ 5 days/week, and light use as < 2 hr/day and ≤ 4 days/week. Elevated BP was defined as systolic or diastolic BP ≥ 90 th percentile. Heavy Internet users had statistically significantly higher odds of elevated BP compared to light Internet users. School nurses can play an important role in preventing high BP through assessment of BP and other health behaviors including Internet use, and health teaching to individuals, student groups, faculty, and parents to increase awareness of the relationship between Internet use and health. PMID:25377931

  2. Time perception and age.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vanessa Fernanda Moreira; Paiva, Gabriel Pina; Prando, Natália; Graça, Carla Renata; Kouyoumdjian, João Aris

    2016-04-01

    Our internal clock system is predominantly dopaminergic, but memory is predominantly cholinergic. Here, we examined the common sensibility encapsulated in the statement: "time goes faster as we get older". Objective To measure a 2 min time interval, counted mentally in subjects of different age groups. Method 233 healthy subjects (129 women) were divided into three age groups: G1, 15-29 years; G2, 30-49 years; and G3, 50-89 years. Subjects were asked to close their eyes and mentally count the passing of 120 s. Results The elapsed times were: G1, mean = 114.9 ± 35 s; G2, mean = 96.0 ± 34.3 s; G3, mean = 86.6 ± 34.9 s. The ANOVA-Bonferroni multiple comparison test showed that G3 and G1 results were significantly different (P < 0.001). Conclusion Mental calculations of 120 s were shortened by an average of 24.6% (28.3 s) in individuals over age 50 years compared to individuals under age 30 years. PMID:27097002

  3. Spent fuel temperature and age determination from the analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopics

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Mark R; Eccleston, George W; Bedell, Jeffrey J; Lockard, Chanelle M

    2009-01-01

    The capability to determine the age (time since irradiation) of spent fuel can be useful for verification and safeguards. While the age of spent fuel can be determined based on measurements of short-lived fission products, these measurements are not routinely done nor generally reported. As an alternative, age can also be determined if the uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopic values are available. Uranium isotopics are not strongly affected by fuel temperature, and bumup is determined from the {sup 235}U and {sup 236}U isotopic values. Age is calculated after estimating the {sup 241}Pu at the end of irradiation while accounting for the fuel temperature, which is determined from {sup 239}Pu or {sup 240}Pu. Burnup and age determinations are calibrated to reactor models that provide uranium and plutonium isotopics over the range of fuel irradiation. The reactor model must contain sufficient fidelity on details of the reactor type, fuel burnup, irradiation history, initial fuel enrichment and fuel temperature to obtain accurate isotopic calculations. If the latter four are unknown, they can be derived from the uranium and plutonium isotopics. Fuel temperature has a significant affect on the production of plutonium isotopics; therefore, one group cross section reactor models, such as ORIGEN, cannot be used for these calculations. Multi-group cross section set codes, such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TRITON code, must be used.

  4. The independent relationship between trouble controlling Facebook use, time spent on the site and distress

    PubMed Central

    Muench, Fredrick; Hayes, Marie; Kuerbis, Alexis; Shao, Sijing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is an emerging literature base on the relationship between maladaptive traits and “addiction” to social networking sites. These studies have operationalized addiction as either spending excessive amounts of time on social networking sites (SNS) or trouble controlling SNS use, but have not assessed the unique contribution of each of these constructs on outcomes in the same models. Moreover, these studies have exclusively been conducted with younger people rather than a heterogeneous sample. This study examined the independent relationship of a brief Facebook addiction scale, time spent on Facebook, and Facebook checking on positive and negative social domains, while controlling for self-esteem and social desirability. Methods Participants were recruited using e-mail, SNS posts and through Amazon’s MTurk system. The sample included 489 respondents ages from 18 to approximately 70, who completed a 10–15 minute survey. Results Results indicate that neither time spent on Facebook nor Facebook checking was significantly associated with either self-esteem, fear of negative social evaluation or social comparison, while SNS addiction symptoms were each independently associated with Facebook usage. Neither time spent on Facebook nor SNS addiction symptoms were associated with positive social relationships. Discussion Overall results suggest that time on SNS and trouble controlling use should be considered independent constructs and that interventions should target underlying loss of control as the primary intervention target above ego syntonic time spent on the site. PMID:26551906

  5. Estimating the time since discharge of spent cartridges: a logical approach for interpreting the evidence.

    PubMed

    Gallidabino, Matteo; Weyermann, Céline; Romolo, Francesco Saverio; Taroni, Franco

    2013-03-01

    Estimating the time since discharge of a spent cartridge or a firearm can be useful in criminal situations involving firearms. The analysis of volatile gunshot residue remaining after shooting using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography (GC) was proposed to meet this objective. However, current interpretative models suffer from several conceptual drawbacks which render them inadequate to assess the evidential value of a given measurement. This paper aims to fill this gap by proposing a logical approach based on the assessment of likelihood ratios. A probabilistic model was thus developed and applied to a hypothetical scenario where alternative hypotheses about the discharge time of a spent cartridge found on a crime scene were forwarded. In order to estimate the parameters required to implement this solution, a non-linear regression model was proposed and applied to real published data. The proposed approach proved to be a valuable method for interpreting aging-related data. PMID:23380061

  6. Achievement as a Function of Time Spent in Learning and Time Needed for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettinger, Maribeth

    1984-01-01

    The causal effects of time spent in learning (TSL) and time needed for learning (TTL) on the reading and spelling achievement of 171 fourth and fifth grade students were investigated. TTL contributed significantly to achievement, and its direct effect was greater than TSL. Results also support a Carroll's learning model. (Author/BS)

  7. Determinants of Children's Use of and Time Spent in Fast-Food and Full-Service Restaurants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Alex; Kubena, Karen S.; Tolle, Glen; Dean, Wesley; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jan, Jie-Sheng; Anding, Jenna

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Identify parental and children's determinants of children's use of and time spent in fast-food (FF) and full-service (FS) restaurants. Design: Analysis of cross-sectional data. Setting: Parents were interviewed by phone; children were interviewed in their homes. Participants: Parents and children ages 9-11 or 13-15 from 312 families…

  8. Time spent sitting during and outside working hours in bus drivers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Mato, Veronica; Yates, Thomas; Stensel, David J.; Biddle, Stuart J.H.; Clemes, Stacy A.

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional pilot study objectively measured sedentary and non-sedentary time in a sample of bus drivers from the East Midlands, United Kingdom. Participants wore an activPAL3 inclinometer for 7 days and completed a daily diary. Driver's blood pressure, heart rate, waist circumference and body composition were measured objectively at the outset. The proportions of time spent sedentary and non-sedentary were calculated during waking hours on workdays and non-workdays and during working-hours and non-working-hours on workdays. 28 (85% of those enrolled into the study) provided valid objective monitoring data (89.3% male, [median ± IQR] age: 45.2 ± 12.8 years, BMI 28.1 ± 5.8 kg/m2). A greater proportion of time was spent sitting on workdays than non-workdays (75% [724 ± 112 min/day] vs. 62% [528 ± 151 min/day]; p < 0.001), and during working-hours than non-working-hours (83% [417 ± 88 min/day] vs. 68% [307 ± 64 min/day]; p < 0.001) on workdays. Drivers spent less than 3% of their overall time stepping. Bus drivers accumulate high levels of sitting time during working-hours and outside working-hours. Interventions are urgently needed in this at-risk group, which should focus on reducing sitting and increasing movement during breaks and increasing physical activity during leisure time to improve cardiovascular health. PMID:26844184

  9. Time spent sitting during and outside working hours in bus drivers: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Varela-Mato, Veronica; Yates, Thomas; Stensel, David J; Biddle, Stuart J H; Clemes, Stacy A

    2016-06-01

    This cross-sectional pilot study objectively measured sedentary and non-sedentary time in a sample of bus drivers from the East Midlands, United Kingdom. Participants wore an activPAL3 inclinometer for 7 days and completed a daily diary. Driver's blood pressure, heart rate, waist circumference and body composition were measured objectively at the outset. The proportions of time spent sedentary and non-sedentary were calculated during waking hours on workdays and non-workdays and during working-hours and non-working-hours on workdays. 28 (85% of those enrolled into the study) provided valid objective monitoring data (89.3% male, [median ± IQR] age: 45.2 ± 12.8 years, BMI 28.1 ± 5.8 kg/m(2)). A greater proportion of time was spent sitting on workdays than non-workdays (75% [724 ± 112 min/day] vs. 62% [528 ± 151 min/day]; p < 0.001), and during working-hours than non-working-hours (83% [417 ± 88 min/day] vs. 68% [307 ± 64 min/day]; p < 0.001) on workdays. Drivers spent less than 3% of their overall time stepping. Bus drivers accumulate high levels of sitting time during working-hours and outside working-hours. Interventions are urgently needed in this at-risk group, which should focus on reducing sitting and increasing movement during breaks and increasing physical activity during leisure time to improve cardiovascular health. PMID:26844184

  10. Teacher Time Spent on Student Health Issues and School Nurse Presence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nina Jean; Hollis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elementary school teacher time spent on student health issues and the relationship to school nurse services was the focus of this 2-year study. A cross-sectional design was used to survey traditional and exceptional (special needs) classroom teachers about the time they spent on health issues and their perception of school nurse presence. The…

  11. The Effect of Time Spent Online on Student Achievement in Online Economics and Finance Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calafiore, Pablo; Damianov, Damian S.

    2011-01-01

    This article studies the determinants of academic achievement in online courses in economics and finance. The authors use the online tracking feature in Blackboard (Campus Edition) to retrieve the real time that each student spent in the course for the entire semester and to analyze the impact of time spent online, prior grade point average (GPA),…

  12. Time Spent on Homework, Mathematics Anxiety and Mathematics Achievement: Evidence from a US Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheema, Jehanzeb R.; Sheridan, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of time spent on homework and mathematics anxiety on mathematics achievement. Data from a nationally representative US sample consisting of 4,978 cases was used to predict mathematics achievement from time spent on homework and mathematics anxiety while controlling for demographic differences such as gender,…

  13. 48 CFR 852.271-72 - Time spent by counselee in counseling process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... counseling process. 852.271-72 Section 852.271-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF... Clauses 852.271-72 Time spent by counselee in counseling process. As prescribed in 871.212, insert the following clause: Time Spent by Counselee in Counseling Process (APR 1984) The contractor agrees that...

  14. Opinions of Teachers and Parents about Time Spent by Students at School, Lesson Hours, Break Times, Holidays and School Terms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gokce, Feyyat

    2012-01-01

    Amount of time spent at school is one of the mostly discussed educational matters. The present study was carried out to put forward the relationship between the time spent at school and learning acquisitions. In the study, 52 parents living in Bursa and 59 teachers were asked for their opinions. According to the data, while nearly half of the…

  15. Could Lots of Time Spent on Social Media Be Tied to Depression?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 157953.html Could Lots of Time Spent on Social Media Be Tied to Depression? Study did not prove ... The more time young adults spend using popular social media, the greater the link to depression, new research ...

  16. Estimation of sensitivity depending on sojourn time and time spent in preclinical state.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongho; Wu, Dongfeng

    2016-04-01

    The probability model for periodic screening was extended to provide statistical inference for sensitivity depending on sojourn time, in which the sensitivity was modeled as a function of time spent in the preclinical state and the sojourn time. The likelihood function with the proposed sensitivity model was then evaluated with simulated data to check its reliability in terms of the mean estimation and the standard error. Simulation results showed that the maximum likelihood estimates of the proposed model have little bias and small standard errors. The extended probability model was further applied to the Johns Hopkins Lung Project data using both maximum likelihood estimation and Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo. PMID:23129110

  17. Traditional Sex Role Development and Amount of Time Spent Watching Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frueh, Terry; McGhee, Paul E.

    1975-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that the amount of time spent watching television would be significantly related to the strength of traditional sex role development. Subjects were 80 kindergarten and elementary school children. (SDH)

  18. Time Spent on Home Food Preparation and Indicators of Healthy Eating

    PubMed Central

    Monsivais, Pablo; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Background The amount of time spent on food preparation and cooking may have implications for diet quality and health. However, little is known about how food-related time use relates to food consumption and spending, either at restaurants or for food consumed at home. Purpose To quantitatively assess the associations among the amount of time habitually spent on food preparation and patterns of self-reported food consumption, food spending, and frequency of restaurant use. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 1,319 adults in a population-based survey conducted in 2008–2009. The sample was stratified into those who spent <1 hour/day, 1–2 hours/day, and >2 hours/day on food preparation and clean-up. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models examined differences between time-use groups. Analyses were conducted in 2011–2013. Results Individuals who spent the least amount of time on food preparation tended to be working adults who placed a high priority on convenience. Greater amount of time spent on food preparation was associated with indicators of higher diet quality, including significantly more frequent intake of vegetables, salads, fruits, and fruit juices. Spending less than 1 hour/day on food preparation was associated with significantly more money spent on food away from home and more frequent use of fast food restaurants compared to those who spent more time on food preparation. Conclusions The findings indicate that time might be an essential ingredient in the production of healthier eating habits among adults. Further research should investigate the determinants of spending time on food preparation. PMID:25245799

  19. Fathers' Involvement with Their Preschool-Age Children: How Fathers Spend Time with Their Children in Different Family Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halme, Nina; Astedt-Kurki, Paivi; Tarkka, Marja-Terttu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how fathers (n = 263) spent time with their preschool-age children and to compare it in different family structures. Data were gathered by structured questionnaires. The instrument included five categories of variables for the time spent: the quantity of time, physical activities, fathers' attitude towards…

  20. Reading-Related Literacy Activities of American Adults: Time Spent, Task Types, and Cognitive Skills Used

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sheida; Chen, Jing; Forsyth, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This article presents data on the types and duration of reading-related activities reported by a volunteer sample of 400 adults (demographically similar to the U.S. adult population age 20 and older in terms of race, ethnicity, education, and working status) in the 2005 Real-World Tasks Study. This diary study revealed that adults spent, on…

  1. Time spent with friends in adolescence relates to less neural sensitivity to later peer rejection

    PubMed Central

    Telzer, Eva H.; Fuligni, Andrew J.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; Eisenberger, Naomi I.

    2012-01-01

    Involvement with friends carries many advantages for adolescents, including protection from the detrimental effects of being rejected by peers. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which friendships may serve their protective role at this age, or the potential benefit of these friendships as adolescents transition to adulthood. As such, this investigation tested whether friend involvement during adolescence related to less neural sensitivity to social threats during young adulthood. Twenty-one adolescents reported the amount of time they spent with friends outside of school using a daily diary. Two years later they underwent an fMRI scan, during which they were ostensibly excluded from an online ball-tossing game by two same-age peers. Findings from region of interest and whole brain analyses revealed that spending more time with friends during adolescence related to less activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula—regions previously linked with negative affect and pain processing—during an experience of peer rejection 2 years later. These findings are consistent with the notion that positive relationships during adolescence may relate to individuals being less sensitive to negative social experiences later on. PMID:21183457

  2. Understanding and Managing Aging of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Facility Components in Wet Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A. Burton

    2007-07-01

    Storage of nuclear fuel after it has been discharged from reactors has become the leading spent fuel management option. Many storage facilities are being required to operate longer than originally anticipated. Aging is a term that has emerged to focus attention on the consequences of extended operation on systems, structures, and components that comprise the storage facilities. The key to mitigation of age-related degradation in storage facilities is to implement effective strategies to understand and manage aging of the facility materials. A systematic approach to preclude serious effects of age-related degradation is addressed in this paper, directed principally to smaller facilities (test and research reactors). The first need is to assess the materials that comprise the facility and the environments that they are subject to. Access to historical data on facility design, fabrication, and operation can facilitate assessment of expected materials performance. Methods to assess the current condition of facility materials are summarized in the paper. Each facility needs an aging management plan to define the scope of the management program, involving identification of the materials that need specific actions to manage age-related degradation. For each material identified, one or more aging management programs are developed and become part of the plan Several national and international organizations have invested in development of comprehensive and systematic approaches to aging management. A method developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is recommended as a concise template to organize measures to effectively manage age-related degradation of storage facility materials, including the scope of inspection, surveillance, and maintenance that is needed to assure successful operation of the facility over its required life. Important to effective aging management is a staff that is alert for evidence of materials degradation and committed to carry out the aging

  3. Development of a novel headspace sorptive extraction method to study the aging of volatile compounds in spent handgun cartridges.

    PubMed

    Gallidabino, M; Romolo, F S; Bylenga, K; Weyermann, C

    2014-05-01

    Estimating the time since the last discharge of firearms and/or spent cartridges may be a useful piece of information in forensic firearm-related cases. The current approach consists of studying the diffusion of selected volatile organic compounds (such as naphthalene) released during the shooting using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). However, this technique works poorly on handgun cartridges because the extracted quantities quickly fall below the limit of detection. In order to find more effective solutions and further investigate the aging of organic gunshot residue after the discharge of handgun cartridges, an extensive study was carried out in this work using a novel approach based on high-capacity headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE). By adopting this technique, for the first time 51 gunshot residue (GSR) volatile organic compounds could be simultaneously detected from fired handgun cartridge cases. Application to aged specimens showed that many of those compounds presented significant and complementary aging profiles. Compound-to-compound ratios were also tested and proved to be beneficial both in reducing the variability of the aging curves and in enlarging the time window useful in a forensic casework perspective. The obtained results were thus particularly promising for the development of a new complete forensic dating methodology. PMID:24684369

  4. Leisure Time Spent Sitting in Relation to Total Mortality in a Prospective Cohort of US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Alpa V.; Bernstein, Leslie; Deka, Anusila; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Campbell, Peter T.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Colditz, Graham A.; Thun, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is attributed in part to reduced physical activity. Evidence supports that reducing time spent sitting, regardless of activity, may improve the metabolic consequences of obesity. Analyses were conducted in a large prospective study of US adults enrolled by the American Cancer Society to examine leisure time spent sitting and physical activity in relation to mortality. Time spent sitting and physical activity were queried by questionnaire on 53,440 men and 69,776 women who were disease free at enrollment. The authors identified 11,307 deaths in men and 7,923 deaths in women during the 14-year follow-up. After adjustment for smoking, body mass index, and other factors, time spent sitting (≥6 vs. <3 hours/day) was associated with mortality in both women (relative risk = 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25, 1.44) and men (relative risk = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.24). Relative risks for sitting (≥6 hours/day) and physical activity (<24.5 metabolic equivalent (MET)-hours/week) combined were 1.94 (95% CI: 1.70, 2.20) for women and 1.48 (95% CI: 1.33, 1.65) for men, compared with those with the least time sitting and most activity. Associations were strongest for cardiovascular disease mortality. The time spent sitting was independently associated with total mortality, regardless of physical activity level. Public health messages should include both being physically active and reducing time spent sitting. PMID:20650954

  5. Among Inpatients, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Severity Is Negatively Associated With Time Spent Walking.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Simon; Vancampfort, Davy; Tiedemann, Anne; Stubbs, Brendon; Steel, Zachary; Ward, Philip B; Berle, David; Sherrington, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity and psychological and functional variables were associated with physical activity (PA) upon admission to an inpatient facility. PTSD symptoms, depression, anxiety and stress, sleep quality, and PA participation were assessed among 76 participants (age, 47.6 ± 11.9 years; 83% male). Backward stepwise regression analyses identified variables independently associated with time spent walking and engaging in moderate-vigorous PA (MVPA). No significant correlations were found between any of the variables and MVPA. Total PTSD symptoms (r = -0.39, p < 0.001), combined symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress (r = -0.31, p < 0.01), and sleep behavior (r = -0.24, p < 0.05) were significantly and negatively associated with total walking time. Total PTSD symptoms were the only significant predictor of walking time (B = -0.03, SE = 0.008, β = -0.4; t = -3.4; p < 0.001). Results indicate that increased PTSD symptoms are associated with lower levels of walking. Results highlight the importance of considering symptoms when designing PA programs for people with PTSD. PMID:26558500

  6. Teacher time spent on student health issues and school nurse presence.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nina Jean; Hollis, Marianne

    2012-06-01

    Elementary school teacher time spent on student health issues and the relationship to school nurse services was the focus of this 2-year study. A cross-sectional design was used to survey traditional and exceptional (special needs) classroom teachers about the time they spent on health issues and their perception of school nurse presence. The school nurses were surveyed regarding the impact of their presence on early releases due to illness. Study findings related to teacher perceptions indicate with school nurse presence there are fewer early releases, increased communication, less time spent on health issues, students with chronic illnesses are safer, and there is a resource available for health information. The data provide the groundwork for discussions to improve the communication of the nurses' schedules, increase teacher confidence in consistent nurse hours at their school and aid the nurse in protecting valuable on-site school hours from other interferences or commitments. PMID:22140140

  7. Carbohydrate intake is associated with time spent in the euglycemic range in patients with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ayano-Takahara, Shiho; Ikeda, Kaori; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Asai, Kanae; Oguri, Yasuo; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Tsuji, Hidemi; Shide, Kenichiro; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Greater glycemic variability and lack of predictability are important issues for patients with type 1 diabetes. Dietary factors are one of the contributors to this variability, but how closely diet is linked to glycemic fluctuation on a daily basis has not been investigated. We examined the association between carbohydrate intake and glycemic excursion in outpatients. Materials and Methods A total of 33 patients with type 1 diabetes were included in the analyses (age 44.5 ± 14.7 years, diabetes duration 15.1 ± 8.3 years, 64% female, 30% using insulin pump, glycated hemoglobin 8.1 ± 1.3%). Time spent in euglycemia (70–180 mg/dL), hyperglycemia (>180 mg/dL) and hypoglycemia (<70 mg/dL) of consecutive 48-h periods of continuous glucose monitoring data were collected together with simultaneous records of dietary intake, insulin dose and physical activity. Correlation analyses and multiple regression analyses were used to evaluate the contribution of carbohydrate intake to time spent in the target glycemic range. Results In multiple regression analyses, carbohydrate intake (β = 0.53, P = 0.001), basal insulin dose per kg per day (β = −0.31, P = 0.034) and diabetes duration (β = 0.30, P = 0.042) were independent predictors of time spent in euglycemia. Carbohydrate intake (β = −0.51, P = 0.001) and insulin pump use (β = −0.34, P = 0.024) were independent predictors of time spent in hyperglycemia. Insulin pump use (β = 0.52, P < 0.001) and bolus insulin dose per kg per day (β = 0.46, P = 0.001) were independent predictors of time spent in hypoglycemia. Conclusions Carbohydrate intake is associated with time spent in euglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:26543542

  8. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... other than that selected by the agency, shall be credited with the lesser of: (1) The actual travel time which is hours of work under this section; or (2) The estimated travel time which would have been... Administration (41 CFR 300-3.1)....

  9. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... other than that selected by the agency, shall be credited with the lesser of: (1) The actual travel time which is hours of work under this section; or (2) The estimated travel time which would have been... Administration (41 CFR 300-3.1)....

  10. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... other than that selected by the agency, shall be credited with the lesser of: (1) The actual travel time which is hours of work under this section; or (2) The estimated travel time which would have been... Administration (41 CFR 300-3.1)....

  11. 5 CFR 551.422 - Time spent traveling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... other than that selected by the agency, shall be credited with the lesser of: (1) The actual travel time which is hours of work under this section; or (2) The estimated travel time which would have been... Administration (41 CFR 300-3.1)....

  12. Determining Spent Nuclear Fuel's Plutonium Content, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time

    SciTech Connect

    Cheatham, Jesse R; Francis, Matthew W

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative is examining nondestructive assay techniques to determine the total plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel. The goal of this research was to develop new techniques that can independently verify the plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly without relying on an operator's declarations. Fundamentally this analysis sought to answer the following questions: (1) do spent fuel assemblies contain unique, identifiable isotopic characteristics as a function of their burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment; (2) how much variation can be seen in spent fuel isotopics from similar and dissimilar reactor power operations; and (3) what isotopes (if any) could be used to determine burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment? To answer these questions, 96,000 ORIGEN cases were run that simulated typical two-cycle operations with burnups ranging from 21,900 to 72,000 MWd/MTU, cooling times from 5 to 25 years, and initial enrichments between 3.5 and 5.0 weight percent. A relative error coefficient was determined to show how numerically close a reference solution has to be to another solution for the two results to be indistinguishable. By looking at the indistinguishable solutions, it can be shown how a precise measurement of spent fuel isotopics can be inconclusive when used in the absence of an operator's declarations. Using this Method of Indistinguishable Solutions (MIS), we evaluated a prominent method of nondestructive analysis - gamma spectroscopy. From this analysis, a new approach is proposed that demonstrates great independent forensic examination potential for spent nuclear fuel by examining both the neutron emissions of Cm-244 and the gamma emissions of Cs-134 and Eu-154.

  13. Maternal employment, acculturation, and time spent in food-related behaviors among Hispanic mothers in the United States. Evidence from the American Time Use Survey.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, Sarah A; Must, Aviva; Peréa, Flavia; Economos, Christina D

    2015-04-01

    Employment is a major factor underlying im/migration patterns. Unfortunately, lower diet quality and higher rates of obesity appear to be unintended consequences of moving to the US. Changes in food preparation practices may be a factor underlying dietary acculturation. The relationships between employment, acculturation, and food-related time use in Hispanic families have received relatively little attention. We used cross-sectional data collected from Hispanic mothers (ages 18-65) with at least one child <13 years old participating in the 2003-2011 American Time Use Survey (n = 3622) to estimate the relationship between employment, acculturation (US-born vs. im/migrant), and time spent in food preparation and family dinner. Regression models were estimated separately for the employed and the non-working and were adjusted for Hispanic origin group, socio-demographic and household characteristics. Working an eight-hour day was associated with spending 38 fewer minutes in food preparation (-38.0 ± SE 4.8, p < 001). Although being US-born was associated with spending fewer minutes in food preparation, this relationship varied by origin group. Acculturation did not appear to modify the relationship between hours worked and time spent in food preparation or family dinner. Mothers who worked late hours spent less time eating the evening meal with their families (-9.8 ± SE 1.3). Although an eight-hour workday was associated with a significant reduction in food preparation time, an unexpected result is that, for working mothers, additional time spent in paid work is not associated with the duration of family dinner later that day. PMID:25451579

  14. 5 CFR 551.424 - Time spent adjusting grievances or performing representational functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Time spent adjusting grievances or performing representational functions. 551.424 Section 551.424 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Hours of...

  15. Cut-Off: How We Spent Our Time in a Residential School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This article documents the ways in which both pupils and care staff spent their time in a residential school for children with physical disabilities and mild learning disabilities in the 1960s. It is told from the perspective of the author, who worked at the school as an assistant housemother, and two of her co-workers who responded to an…

  16. 5 CFR 551.424 - Time spent adjusting grievances or performing representational functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Hours of Work... shall be considered hours of work. (b) “Official time” granted an employee by an agency to perform... hours of work. This includes time spent by an employee performing such functions during regular...

  17. The Relationship between a Counselor's Education and Experience and the Time Spent on Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustig, Dan C.; Strauser, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between perceived percentage of time spent on rehabilitation counseling responsibilities and the possession of an educational degree, certification as a rehabilitation counselor, and years worked for a state or federal vocational rehabilitation agency. A national study was conducted…

  18. 5 CFR 551.423 - Time spent in training or attending a lecture, meeting, or conference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Hours of Work Application of Principles in Relation to Other Activities § 551.423 Time spent in training or attending a... training under the Veterans Recruitment Act (5 CFR part 307) outside regular working hours shall not...

  19. Re-Examining Gender Differences in Video Game Play: Time Spent and Feelings of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlen, Karla R.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that, among children, boys tend to play video games more than girls do. There are several theories addressing this phenomenon, including that stereotypes and lack of opportunity leave girls feeling inadequate with certain types of technology. No research has yet examined the interactive relationships between time spent playing…

  20. Parent Perceptions of Time Spent Meaningfully by Young Adults with Pervasive Support Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossetti, Zachary; Lehr, Donna; Lederer, Leslie; Pelerin, Dana; Huang, Shuoxi

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study that examined how 23 young adults with pervasive support needs and limited functional communication spent their time and how their parents (n = 23) and direct support professionals (DSPs; n = 2) defined meaningfulness in relation to the young adults' experiences. Data were collected through…

  1. Naturally Occurring Changes in Time Spent Watching Television Are Inversely Related to Frequency of Physical Activity during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Birnbaum, Amanda S.; Lytle, Leslie A.

    2006-01-01

    In this longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between changes in time spent watching television and playing video games with frequency of leisure-time physical activity across a 2-year period among adolescent boys and girls (N=4594). Latent growth modelling indicated that a decrease in time spent watching television was associated with…

  2. The effect of food environments on fruit and vegetable intake as modified by time spent at home: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chum, Antony; Farrell, Eddie; Vaivada, Tyler; Labetski, Anna; Selvaratnam, Inthuja; Larsen, Kristian; Pinter, Theresa; O'Campo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is a growing body of research that investigates how the residential neighbourhood context relates to individual diet. However, previous studies ignore participants’ time spent in the residential environment and this may be a problem because time-use studies show that adults’ time-use pattern can significantly vary. To better understand the role of exposure duration, we designed a study to examine ‘time spent at home’ as a moderator to the residential food environment-diet association. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Settings City of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants 2411 adults aged 25–65. Primary outcome measure Frequency of vegetable and fruit intake (VFI) per day. Results To examine how time spent at home may moderate the relationship between residential food environment and VFI, the full sample was split into three equal subgroups—short, medium and long duration spent at home. We detected significant associations between density of food stores in the residential food environment and VFI for subgroups that spend medium and long durations at home (ie, spending a mean of 8.0 and 12.3 h at home, respectively—not including sleep time), but no associations exist for people who spend the lowest amount of time at home (mean=4.7 h). Also, no associations were detected in analyses using the full sample. Conclusions Our study is the first to demonstrate that time spent at home may be an important variable to identify hidden population patterns regarding VFI. Time spent at home can impact the association between the residential food environment and individual VFI. PMID:26044756

  3. Daily time spent indoors in German homes--baseline data for the assessment of indoor exposure of German occupants.

    PubMed

    Brasche, Sabine; Bischof, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive time-activity studies, for use as a basis for estimates of personal exposure, are not readily available in Germany. This analysis of time spent indoors at home is based on data from "Dampness and mould in homes" (2000/ 2001)--a study of about 12,000 persons living in 5530 randomly selected apartments and houses in Germany. The results show the mean times per day people in Germany spend in their homes, classified by gender, age group, building location, city size, region, building type, owner-occupier status, number of people at home, smoking and ventilation habits, moisture emission and ill health factors such as asthma, allergy and number of acute respiratory infections per year. The overall mean time spent at home, 15.7 h per, is in accordance with results from US-American (15.6 h/day) and Canadian (15.8 h/day) human activity surveys carried out in the nineties, as well as being consistent with the German Environmental Survey (1990/92) and a small German study in 1987. PMID:16078638

  4. Breast IMRT Reduces Time Spent with Acute Dermatitis For Women of All Breast Sizes During Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Gary M; Li, Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Chen, Yan; Ma, Charlie C-M; Anderson, Penny R

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To study the time spent with radiation-induced dermatitis during a course of radiation therapy for breast cancer in women treated with conventional or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Materials and methods The study population consisted of 804 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation from 2001 – 2006. All patients were treated with whole-breast radiation followed by a boost to the tumor bed. Whole-breast radiation consisted of conventional wedged photon tangents (n=405) earlier in the study period and mostly of photon IMRT (n=399) in later years. All patients had acute dermatitis graded each week of treatment. Results The breakdown of the cases of maximum acute dermatitis by grade was as follows: 3%, grade 0; 34%, grade 1; 61%, grade 2; and 2%, grade 3. The breakdown of cases of maximum toxicity by technique was as follows: 48%, grade 0/1, and 52%, grade 2/3, for IMRT, and 25%, grade 0/1, and 75%, grade 2/3, for conventional radiation therapy (p<0.0001). IMRT patients spent 82% of weeks during treatment with grade 0/1 dermatitis and 18% with grade 2/3 dermatitis, compared with 29% and 71% of patients, respectively, treated with conventional radiation (p<0.0001). Further, the time spent with grade 2/3 toxicity was decreased in IMRT patients with small (p=0.0015), medium (p<0.0001), and large (p<0.0001) breasts. Conclusions Breast IMRT is associated with both a significant decrease in the time spent during treatment with grade 2/3 dermatitis and in the maximum severity of dermatitis compared with conventional radiation regardless of breast size. PMID:19362779

  5. Labor time spent in foodservice activities in one hospital: a 12-year profile.

    PubMed

    Matthews, M E; Zardain, M V; Mahaffey, M J

    1986-05-01

    Labor minutes per meal equivalent and percentage of time spent in direct work, indirect work, delay time, and total time were determined in an annual study of foodservice workers in a community hospital. Twelve activity sampling studies (from 1973 through 1984) were conducted for 7 days (Monday through Sunday), usually during the second week of February. The conventional foodservice, with the cook/hot-hold method of food production and service, averaged about 10 minutes for direct work, 1 minute for indirect work, 2 minutes for delay time, and 13 total labor minutes per meal equivalent for the 12 years. The data were similar to those of the study in the 1960s, of conventional hospital foodservices, with high productivity, which averaged about 11 minutes for direct work, 1 minute for indirect work, 2 minutes for delay time, and 14 total labor minutes per meal equivalent. Data averaged from the 1973 through 1984 studies compared with the data from the 1960s study showed that transportation, cleaning, and service required the most labor time (total of 58% in this study and total of 62% in the 1960s study). Methods reported in this article may be applied in other foodservices to identify labor time spent in work and delay activities to establish productivity guidelines for a foodservice department. PMID:3700926

  6. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  7. Time Spent Walking and Risk of Diabetes in Japanese Adults: The Japan Public Health Center-Based Prospective Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Kabeya, Yusuke; Goto, Atsushi; Kato, Masayuki; Matsushita, Yumi; Takahashi, Yoshihiko; Isogawa, Akihiro; Inoue, Manami; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Tsugane, Shoichiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between time spent walking and risk of diabetes was investigated in a Japanese population-based cohort. Methods Data from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Diabetes cohort were analyzed. The surveys of diabetes were performed at baseline and at the 5-year follow-up. Time spent walking per day was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire (<30 minutes, 30 minutes to <1 hour, 1 to <2 hours, or ≥2 hours). A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 26 488 adults in the baseline survey. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between time spent walking and the presence of unrecognized diabetes. We then performed a longitudinal analysis that was restricted to 11 101 non-diabetic adults who participated in both the baseline and 5-year surveys. The association between time spent walking and the incidence of diabetes during the 5 years was examined. Results In the cross-sectional analysis, 1058 participants had unrecognized diabetes. Those with time spent walking of <30 minutes per day had increased odds of having diabetes in relation to those with time spent walking of ≥2 hours (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02–1.48). In the longitudinal analysis, 612 participants developed diabetes during the 5 years of follow-up. However, a significant association between time spent walking and the incidence of diabetes was not observed. Conclusions Increased risk of diabetes was implied in those with time spent walking of <30 minutes per day, although the longitudinal analysis failed to show a significant result. PMID:26725285

  8. Time to care? Health of informal older carers and time spent on health related activities: an Australian survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the time spent on specific health related activities by older adult informal carers who assist people with chronic illness. Research has not yet addressed the association between carer health status and their care demands. Such information could inform policy and health system efforts to manage chronic illness. Methods We conducted an Australia wide survey using recall questionnaires to record time use. The study asked how much time is spent on “most days” for the most common activities like taking medication, self-treatment and testing, and how much time in the last month on less common activities like attending a physician or shopping associated with health needs. The survey was mailed to 5,000 members of National Seniors Australia; 2,500 registrants on the National Diabetes Services Scheme; and 3,100 members of the Australian Lung Foundation. A total of 2519 people responded, including 313 people who identified as informal carers. Statistical analysis was undertaken using Stata 11. Standard errors and confidence intervals were derived using bootstrapping techniques within Stata 11. Results Most carers (96.2%) had chronic illness themselves, and those with greater numbers of chronic illnesses were those who faced the greatest overall time demands. The top decile of carers devoted between 8.5 and 10 hours a day to personal and caring health related activities. Informal carers with chronic illness spent more time managing their own health than people with chronic illness who were not informal carers. These carers spent more time on caring for others than on caring for their own health. High levels of caring responsibility were associated with poorer reported carer health. Conclusions Policy and health care services will need to adapt to recognise and reduce the time burden on carers who themselves have chronic illness. More carefully targeted investment in the social infrastructure of formal care would free up carers for other

  9. Narayanaswamy's 1971 aging theory and material time.

    PubMed

    Dyre, Jeppe C

    2015-09-21

    The Bochkov-Kuzovlev nonlinear fluctuation-dissipation theorem is used to derive Narayanaswamy's phenomenological theory of physical aging, in which this highly nonlinear phenomenon is described by a linear material-time convolution integral. A characteristic property of the Narayanaswamy aging description is material-time translational invariance, which is here taken as the basic assumption of the derivation. It is shown that only one possible definition of the material time obeys this invariance, namely, the square of the distance travelled from a configuration of the system far back in time. The paper concludes with suggestions for computer simulations that test for consequences of material-time translational invariance. One of these is the "unique-triangles property" according to which any three points on the system's path form a triangle such that two side lengths determine the third; this is equivalent to the well-known triangular relation for time-autocorrelation functions of aging spin glasses [L. F. Cugliandolo and J. Kurchan, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 27, 5749 (1994)]. The unique-triangles property implies a simple geometric interpretation of out-of-equilibrium time-autocorrelation functions, which extends to aging a previously proposed framework for such functions in equilibrium [J. C. Dyre, e-print arXiv:cond-mat/9712222 (1997)]. PMID:26395719

  10. Narayanaswamy's 1971 aging theory and material time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2015-09-01

    The Bochkov-Kuzovlev nonlinear fluctuation-dissipation theorem is used to derive Narayanaswamy's phenomenological theory of physical aging, in which this highly nonlinear phenomenon is described by a linear material-time convolution integral. A characteristic property of the Narayanaswamy aging description is material-time translational invariance, which is here taken as the basic assumption of the derivation. It is shown that only one possible definition of the material time obeys this invariance, namely, the square of the distance travelled from a configuration of the system far back in time. The paper concludes with suggestions for computer simulations that test for consequences of material-time translational invariance. One of these is the "unique-triangles property" according to which any three points on the system's path form a triangle such that two side lengths determine the third; this is equivalent to the well-known triangular relation for time-autocorrelation functions of aging spin glasses [L. F. Cugliandolo and J. Kurchan, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 27, 5749 (1994)]. The unique-triangles property implies a simple geometric interpretation of out-of-equilibrium time-autocorrelation functions, which extends to aging a previously proposed framework for such functions in equilibrium [J. C. Dyre, e-print arXiv:cond-mat/9712222 (1997)].

  11. Unobtrusive in-home detection of time spent out-of-home with applications to loneliness and physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Daniel; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Pavel, Misha; Hayes, Tamara L.

    2014-01-01

    Loneliness is a common condition in elderly associated with severe health consequences including increased mortality, decreased cognitive function, and poor quality of life. Identifying and assisting lonely individuals is therefore increasingly important—especially in the home setting—as the very nature of loneliness often makes it difficult to detect by traditional methods. One critical component in assessing loneliness unobtrusively is to measure time spent out-of-home, as loneliness often presents with decreased physical activity, decreased motor functioning, and a decline in activities of daily living, all of which may cause decreases in the amount of time spent outside the home. Using passive and unobtrusive in-home sensing technologies, we have developed a methodology for detecting time spent out-of-home based on logistic regression. Our approach was both sensitive (0.939) and specific (0.975) in detecting time out-of-home across over 41,000 epochs of data collected from 4 subjects monitored for at least 30 days each in their own homes. In addition to linking time spent out-of-home to loneliness (r=−0.44, p=0.011) as measured by the UCLA Loneliness Index, we demonstrate its usefulness in other applications such as uncovering general behavioral patterns of elderly and exploring the link between time spent out-of-home and physical activity (r=0.415, p=0.031), as measured by the Berkman Social Disengagement Index. PMID:25192570

  12. Unobtrusive in-home detection of time spent out-of-home with applications to loneliness and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Johanna; Austin, Daniel; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Pavel, Misha; Hayes, Tamara L

    2014-09-01

    Loneliness is a common condition in elderly associated with severe health consequences including increased mortality, decreased cognitive function, and poor quality of life. Identifying and assisting lonely individuals is therefore increasingly important-especially in the home setting-as the very nature of loneliness often makes it difficult to detect by traditional methods. One critical component in assessing loneliness unobtrusively is to measure time spent out-of-home, as loneliness often presents with decreased physical activity, decreased motor functioning, and a decline in activities of daily living, all of which may cause decrease in the amount of time spent outside the home. Using passive and unobtrusive in-home sensing technologies, we have developed a methodology for detecting time spent out-of-home based on logistic regression. Our approach was both sensitive (0.939) and specific (0.975) in detecting time out-of-home across over 41,000 epochs of data collected from four subjects monitored for at least 30 days each in their own homes. In addition to linking time spent out-of-home to loneliness, (r = -0.44, p = 0.011) as measured by the UCLA Loneliness Index, we demonstrate its usefulness in other applications such as uncovering general behavioral patterns of elderly and exploring the link between time spent out-of-home and physical activity ( r = 0.415, p = 0.031), as measured by the Berkman Social Disengagement Index. PMID:25192570

  13. Naturally occurring changes in time spent watching television are inversely related to frequency of physical activity during early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; McAuley, Edward; Birnbaum, Amanda S; Lytle, Leslie A

    2006-02-01

    In this longitudinal study, we examined the relationship between changes in time spent watching television and playing video games with frequency of leisure-time physical activity across a 2-year period among adolescent boys and girls (N=4594). Latent growth modelling indicated that a decrease in time spent watching television was associated with an increase in frequency of leisure-time physical activity. That relationship was strong in magnitude and independent of sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, and the value participants placed on health, appearance, and achievement. Our results encourage the design of interventions that reduce television watching as a possible means of increasing adolescent physical activity. PMID:16338428

  14. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly Renee; Fugate, Michael Lynn; Tobin, Stephen Joesph

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  15. Time Well Spent: Eight Powerful Practices of Successful, Expanded-Time Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Claire; Chan, Roy

    2012-01-01

    This report reshapes the field for expanded-time schools by outlining specific practices that can lead to dramatic increases in student achievement and preparation for success in college and the workforce. This report offers an in-depth examination of 30 expanded-time schools serving high-poverty populations with impressive track records of…

  16. 5 CFR 551.431 - Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-call status. 551.431 Section 551.431 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... § 551.431 Time spent on standby duty or in an on-call status. (a)(1) An employee is on duty, and time... in an on-call status shall not be considered hours of work if: (1) The employee is allowed to leave...

  17. Time spent on health related activities associated with chronic illness: a scoping literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The management of health care, particularly for people with chronic conditions, combines the activities of health professionals, patients, informal carers and social networks that support them. Understanding the non-professional roles in health management requires information about the health related activities (HRA) that are undertaken by patients and informal carers. This understanding allows management planning that incorporates the capacity of patients and informal carers, as well as identifying the particular skills, knowledge and technical support that are necessary. This review was undertaken to identify how much time people with chronic illness and their informal carers spend on HRA. Methods Literature searches of three electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, and PubMed) and two journals (Time and Society, Sociology of Health and Illness) were carried out in 2011 using the following search terms (and derivatives): chronic illness AND time AND consumer OR carer. The search was aimed at finding studies of time spent on HRA. A scoping literature review method was utilised. Results Twenty-two peer reviewed articles published between 1990 and 2010 were included for review. The review identified limited but specific studies about time use by people with a chronic illness and/or their carers. While illness work was seen as demanding, few studies combined inquiry about both defined tasks and defined time use. It also identified methodological issues such as consistency of definition and data collection methods, which remain unresolved. Conclusions While HRA are seen as demanding by people doing them, few studies have measured actual time taken to carry out a comprehensive range of HRA. The results of this review suggest that both patients with chronic illness and informal carers may be spending 2 hours a day or more on HRA. Illnesses such as diabetes may be associated with higher time use. More empirical research is needed to understand the time demands

  18. Aging, Spirituality, and Time: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Black, Helen K.; Hannum, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the concepts of aging, time, spirituality, and future care needs in four randomly selected informants from a group of 54 never-married childless older women. Using data from the Generativity and Lifestyles of Older Women (GLOW) study, we questioned how women’s perceptions of these concepts came together in current older age. We employed cultural theory, (our theoretical framework), ethnography, (our methodological framework), and phenomenology, (our philosophical foundation) to produce a portrait of each woman interviewed. Through a three-session interview process, we elicited the women’s life stories, reasons for childlessness, and topics that emerged as significant to the women, including aging, a sense of time remaining, and spirituality. A key finding was that the context of each woman’s life, both biographical and historical, transpired as a foundation for these concepts. That is, a woman’s “place in time” shaped their experiences of aging, as well as her reasons for childlessness and perceptions of finitude. PMID:26539067

  19. Do Hours Spent Viewing Television at Ages 3 and 4 Predict Vocabulary and Executive Functioning at Age 5?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankson, A. Nayena; O'Brien, Marion; Leerkes, Esther M.; Calkins, Susan D.; Marcovitch, Stuart D.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the impact of television viewing at ages 3 and 4 on vocabulary and at age 5 on executive functioning in the context of home learning environment and parental scaffolding. Children (N = 263) were seen in the lab when they were 3 years old and then again at ages 4 and 5. Parents completed measures assessing child television viewing and…

  20. Geologic time: The age of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, William L.

    1977-01-01

    The Earth is very old 4 1/2 billion years or more according to recent estimates. This vast span of time, called geologic time by earth scientists and believed by some to reach back to the birth of the Solar System, is difficult if not impossible to comprehend in the familiar time units of months and years, or even centuries. How then do scientists reckon geologic time, and why do they believe the Earth is so old? A great part of the secret of the Earth's age is locked up in its rocks, and man's centuries-old search for the key led to the beginning and nourished the growth of geologic science.

  1. Grey Literature Searching for Health Sciences Systematic Reviews: A Prospective Study of Time Spent and Resources Utilized

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Ahlam A.; Ratajeski, Melissa A.; Bertolet, Marnie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify estimates of time taken to search grey literature in support of health sciences systematic reviews and to identify searcher or systematic review characteristics that may impact resource selection or time spent searching. Methods A survey was electronically distributed to searchers embarking on a new systematic review. Characteristics of the searcher and systematic review were collected along with time spent searching and what resources were searched. Time and resources were tabulated and resources were categorized as grey or non-grey. Data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results Out of 81 original respondents, 21% followed through with completion of the surveys in their entirety. The median time spent searching all resources was 471 minutes, and of those a median of 85 minutes were spent searching grey literature. The median number of resources used in a systematic review search was four and the median number of grey literature sources searched was two. The amount of time spent searching was influenced by whether the systematic review was grant funded. Additionally, the number of resources searched was impacted by institution type and whether systematic review training was received. Conclusions This study characterized the amount of time for conducting systematic review searches including searching the grey literature, in addition to the number and types of resources used. This may aid searchers in planning their time, along with providing benchmark information for future studies. This paper contributes by quantifying current grey literature search patterns and associating them with searcher and review characteristics. Further discussion and research into the search approach for grey literature in support of systematic reviews is encouraged. PMID:25914722

  2. Flaw Stability Considering Residual Stress for Aging Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel Multiple-Purpose Canisters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lam, Poh-Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2016-04-28

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of the MPC, the canister is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in the weld or heat affected zone regions under long-term storage conditions. Logic for flaw acceptance is developed should crack-like flaws be detected by Inservice Inspection. The procedure recommended by API 579-1/ASME FFS-1, Fitness-for-Service, is used to calculate the instability crack length or depth by failure assessment diagram. It is demonstrated that the welding residual stress has amore » strong influence on the results.« less

  3. Relationships of Attitudes toward Homework and Time Spent on Homework to Course Outcomes: The Case of Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Charles B.; Wall, Daniel; Tare, Medha; Golonka, Ewa; Vatz, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies of homework in core academic subjects, positive student attitudes toward homework were linked to higher achievement, whereas time spent on homework showed an inconsistent relationship with achievement. This study examined the generalizability of these findings to foreign language learning by analyzing 2,342 adult students'…

  4. Does Time Spent Online Have an Influence on Student Performance? Evidence for a Large Business Studies Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkofingas, Con; Macri, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines, using regression modelling, whether a statistically significant relationship exists between the time spent by a student using the course website and the student's assessment performance for a large third year university business forecasting course. We utilise the online tracking system in Blackboard, a web-based software…

  5. Group-Based Modeling of Time Spent in Structured Activity Trajectories from Middle Childhood into Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated trajectories of time spent in structured activities from middle childhood to early adolescence by using data from the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care. We used latent class growth analyses and identified five trajectories (stable low, increasing high, decreasing low,…

  6. 29 CFR 516.34 - Exemption from overtime pay for time spent by certain employees receiving remedial education...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemption from overtime pay for time spent by certain employees receiving remedial education pursuant to section 7(q) of the Act. 516.34 Section 516.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS RECORDS TO BE KEPT BY EMPLOYERS Records Pertaining...

  7. Energy Beyond Food: Foraging Theory Informs Time Spent in Thermals by a Large Soaring Bird

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Emily L. C.; Lambertucci, Sergio A.; Wilson, Rory P.

    2011-01-01

    Current understanding of how animals search for and exploit food resources is based on microeconomic models. Although widely used to examine feeding, such constructs should inform other energy-harvesting situations where theoretical assumptions are met. In fact, some animals extract non-food forms of energy from the environment, such as birds that soar in updraughts. This study examined whether the gains in potential energy (altitude) followed efficiency-maximising predictions in the world's heaviest soaring bird, the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus). Animal-attached technology was used to record condor flight paths in three-dimensions. Tracks showed that time spent in patchy thermals was broadly consistent with a strategy to maximise the rate of potential energy gain. However, the rate of climb just prior to leaving a thermal increased with thermal strength and exit altitude. This suggests higher rates of energetic gain may not be advantageous where the resulting gain in altitude would lead to a reduction in the ability to search the ground for food. Consequently, soaring behaviour appeared to be modulated by the need to reconcile differing potential energy and food energy distributions. We suggest that foraging constructs may provide insight into the exploitation of non-food energy forms, and that non-food energy distributions may be more important in informing patterns of movement and residency over a range of scales than previously considered. PMID:22087301

  8. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multiple-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic In-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  9. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Poh -Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic in-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  10. Curricular Time for Physical Education? A Controlled Experiment in French Canada Asks How Much Curricular Time Should be Spent on Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A controlled experiment conducted in Canada, the Trois Rivieres regional experiment, investigated the effects of increased physical education instruction on elementary school students. Results indicate that more time can be spent in physical education and that the increased time may result in improvement in other academic areas. (CJ)

  11. Implicit Memory, Age, and Time of Day

    PubMed Central

    May, Cynthia P.; Hasher, Lynn; Foong, Natalie

    2006-01-01

    Memory retrieval can occur by at least two routes: a deliberate one, as when one attempts to retrieve an event or fact, and an unintentional one, as when one’s behavior is triggered by the past without one’s knowledge or awareness. We assessed the efficacy of these retrieval systems as a function of circadian arousal and time of day. Evening-type younger adults and morning-type older adults were tested at either peak (morning for old; evening for young) or off-peak times on implicit and explicit stem completion (Experiment 1) or on implicit category generation (Experiment 2). Results for explicit stem-cued recall replicated better performance for each age group at its peak time. In stark contrast, implicit performance was better at off-peak than at peak times of day, raising the possibility that the processes that serve explicit and implicit retrieval are on different circadian schedules, and highlighting the need to consider individual differences in circadian arousal when assessing either memory system. PMID:15686574

  12. Human mobility and time spent at destination: impact on spatial epidemic spreading.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Chiara; Tizzoni, Michele; Colizza, Vittoria

    2013-12-01

    Host mobility plays a fundamental role in the spatial spread of infectious diseases. Previous theoretical works based on the integration of network theory into the metapopulation framework have shown that the heterogeneities that characterize real mobility networks favor the propagation of epidemics. Nevertheless, the studies conducted so far assumed the mobility process to be either Markovian (in which the memory of the origin of each traveler is lost) or non-Markovian with a fixed traveling time scale (in which individuals travel to a destination and come back at a constant rate). Available statistics however show that the time spent by travelers at destination is characterized by wide fluctuations, ranging from a single day up to several months. Such varying length of stay crucially affects the chance and duration of mixing events among hosts and may therefore have a strong impact on the spread of an emerging disease. Here, we present an analytical and a computational study of epidemic processes on a complex subpopulation network where travelers have memory of their origin and spend a heterogeneously distributed time interval at their destination. Through analytical calculations and numerical simulations we show that the heterogeneity of the length of stay alters the expression of the threshold between local outbreak and global invasion, and, moreover, it changes the epidemic behavior of the system in case of a global outbreak. Additionally, our theoretical framework allows us to study the effect of changes in the traveling behavior in response to the infection, by considering a scenario in which sick individuals do not leave their home location. Finally, we compare the results of our non-Markovian framework with those obtained with a classic Markovian approach and find relevant differences between the two, in the estimate of the epidemic invasion potential, as well as of the timing and the pattern of its spatial spread. These results highlight the importance of

  13. Ageing management program for the Spanish low and intermediate level waste disposal and spent fuel and high-level waste centralised storage facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuloaga, P.; Ordoñez, M.; Andrade, C.; Castellote, M.

    2011-04-01

    The generic design of the centralised spent fuel storage facility was approved by the Spanish Safety Authority in 2006. The planned operational life is 60 years, while the design service life is 100 years. Durability studies and surveillance of the behaviour have been considered from the initial design steps, taking into account the accessibility limitations and temperatures involved. The paper presents an overview of the ageing management program set in support of the Performance Assessment and Safety Review of El Cabril low and intermediate level waste (LILW) disposal facility. Based on the experience gained for LILW, ENRESA has developed a preliminary definition of the Ageing Management Plan for the Centralised Interim Storage Facility of spent Fuel and High Level Waste (HLW), which addresses the behaviour of spent fuel, its retrievability, the confinement system and the reinforced concrete structure. It includes tests plans and surveillance design considerations, based on the El Cabril LILW disposal facility.

  14. The Influence of Time Spent in Outdoor Play on Daily and Aerobic Step Count in Costa Rican Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morera Castro, Maria del Rocio

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of time spent in outdoor play (i.e., on weekday and weekend days) on daily (i.e., average step count) and aerobic step count (i.e., average moderate to vigorous physical activity [MVPA] during the weekdays and weekend days) in fifth grade Costa Rican children. It was hypothesized that: (a)…

  15. Aliens and time in the machine age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brake, Mark; Hook, Neil

    2006-12-01

    The 19th century saw sweeping changes for the development of astrobiology, both in the constituency of empirical science encroaching upon all aspects of life and in the evolution of ideas, with Lyell's Principles of Geology radically raising expectation of the true age of the Earth and the drama of Darwinism questioning biblically literalist accounts of natural history. This paper considers the popular culture spun on the crackling loom of the emergent aspects of astrobiology of the day: Edward Bulwer-Lytton's The Coming Race (1871), which foretold the race of the future, and satirist Samuel Butler's anticipation of machine intelligence, `Darwin Among the Machines', in his Erewhon (1872). Finally, we look at the way Darwin, Huxley and natural selection travelled into space with French astronomer Camille Flammarion's immensely popular Récits de l'infini (Stories of Infinity, 1872), and the social Darwinism of H.G. Wells' The Time Machine (1895) and The War of the Worlds (1898). These works of popular culture presented an effective and inspiring communication of science; their crucial discourse was the reducible gap between the new worlds uncovered by science and exploration and the fantastic strange worlds of the imagination. As such they exemplify a way in which the culture and science of popular astrobiology can be fused.

  16. Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Reduces Time Spent With Acute Dermatitis for Women of All Breast Sizes During Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Gary M. Li Tianyu; Nicolaou, Nicos; Chen Yan; Ma, Charlie C.-M.; Anderson, Penny R.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To study the time spent with radiation-induced dermatitis during a course of radiation therapy for breast cancer in women treated with conventional or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 804 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation from 2001 to 2006. All patients were treated with whole-breast radiation followed by a boost to the tumor bed. Whole-breast radiation consisted of conventional wedged photon tangents (n = 405) earlier in the study period and mostly of photon IMRT (n = 399) in later years. All patients had acute dermatitis graded each week of treatment. Results: The breakdown of the cases of maximum acute dermatitis by grade was as follows: 3%, Grade 0; 34%, Grade 1; 61%, Grade 2; and 2%, Grade 3. The breakdown of cases of maximum toxicity by technique was as follows: 48%, Grade 0/1, and 52%, Grade 2/3, for IMRT; and 25%, Grade 0/1, and 75%, Grade 2/3, for conventional radiation therapy (p < 0.0001). The IMRT patients spent 82% of weeks during treatment with Grade 0/1 dermatitis and 18% with Grade 2/3 dermatitis, compared with 29% and 71% of patients, respectively, treated with conventional radiation (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, the time spent with Grade 2/3 toxicity was decreased in IMRT patients with small (p = 0.0015), medium (p < 0.0001), and large (p < 0.0001) breasts. Conclusions: Breast IMRT is associated with a significant decrease both in the time spent during treatment with Grade 2/3 dermatitis and in the maximum severity of dermatitis compared with that associated with conventional radiation, regardless of breast size.

  17. Time well spent: the duration of foster care and early adult labor market, educational, and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fallesen, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Individuals who spent time in foster care as children fare on average worse than non-placed peers in early adult life. Recent research on the effect of foster care placement on early adult life outcomes provides mixed evidence. Some studies suggest negative effects of foster care placement on early adult outcomes, others find null effects. This study shows that differences in the average duration of foster care stays explain parts of these discordant findings and then test how foster care duration shapes later life outcomes using administrative data on 7220 children. The children experienced different average durations of foster care because of differences in exposure to a reform. Later born cohorts spent on average 3 months longer in foster care than earlier born cohorts. Isolating exogenous variation in duration of foster care, the study finds positive effects of increased duration of foster care on income and labor market participation. PMID:24215947

  18. Combined Effects of Time Spent in Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviors and Sleep on Obesity and Cardio-Metabolic Health Markers: A Novel Compositional Data Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chastin, Sebastien F. M.; Palarea-Albaladejo, Javier; Dontje, Manon L.; Skelton, Dawn A.

    2015-01-01

    The associations between time spent in sleep, sedentary behaviors (SB) and physical activity with health are usually studied without taking into account that time is finite during the day, so time spent in each of these behaviors are codependent. Therefore, little is known about the combined effect of time spent in sleep, SB and physical activity, that together constitute a composite whole, on obesity and cardio-metabolic health markers. Cross-sectional analysis of NHANES 2005–6 cycle on N = 1937 adults, was undertaken using a compositional analysis paradigm, which accounts for this intrinsic codependence. Time spent in SB, light intensity (LIPA) and moderate to vigorous activity (MVPA) was determined from accelerometry and combined with self-reported sleep time to obtain the 24 hour time budget composition. The distribution of time spent in sleep, SB, LIPA and MVPA is significantly associated with BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, plasma glucose, plasma insulin (all p<0.001), and systolic (p<0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.003), but not HDL or LDL. Within the composition, the strongest positive effect is found for the proportion of time spent in MVPA. Strikingly, the effects of MVPA replacing another behavior and of MVPA being displaced by another behavior are asymmetric. For example, re-allocating 10 minutes of SB to MVPA was associated with a lower waist circumference by 0.001% but if 10 minutes of MVPA is displaced by SB this was associated with a 0.84% higher waist circumference. The proportion of time spent in LIPA and SB were detrimentally associated with obesity and cardiovascular disease markers, but the association with SB was stronger. For diabetes risk markers, replacing SB with LIPA was associated with more favorable outcomes. Time spent in MVPA is an important target for intervention and preventing transfer of time from LIPA to SB might lessen the negative effects of physical inactivity. PMID:26461112

  19. Time/motion observations of reactor loading, transportation, and dry unloading of an oversized truck spent-fuel shipment

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, J.C.; Hostick, C.J.; Wakeman, B.H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents actual time/motion data for an oversize truck spent-fuel shipment from its origin, Surry, Virginia to its destination, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These data include the receipt of the empty cask at the reactor, wet-loading the cask, over-the-road or in-transit data, and receipt and dry unloading of the shipping cask at the receiving facility. Occupational doses were recorded at the Surry Power Plant as well as at INEL, and public doses were calculated for the in-transit dose analysis. This shipment was one of a series performed in support of a demonstration and evaluation of dry storage at INEL. The oversized shipment consisted of a TN-8L shipping cask loaded with three 10-yr-old pressurized water reactor assemblies. The total distance traveled was {approx}2800 miles, requiring 62 h including stops. The time required to receive and inspect the empty shipping cask and wet-load and release the shipment at the reactor was {approx}14.1 h, and the time to receive the loaded cask, dry-transfer the spent fuel to the storage cask, and release the empty cask and trailer at the INEL facility was {approx}8.2 h.

  20. Gamma spectrometric characterization of short cooling time nuclear spent fuels using hemispheric CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, A.; Bignan, G.; Szabo, J. L.; Arenas-Carrasco, J.; Arlt, R.; Dubreuil, A.; Esmailpur Kazerouni, K.

    2000-07-01

    After years of cooling, nuclear spent fuel gamma emissions are mainly due to caesium isotopes which are emitters at 605, 662 and 796-801 keV. Extensive work has been done on such fuels using various CdTe or CdZnTe probes. When fuels have to be measured after short cooling time (during NPP outage) the spectrum is much more complex due to the important contributions of niobium and zirconium in the 700 keV range. For the first time in a nuclear power plant, four spent fuels of the Kozloduy VVER reactor no 4 were measured during outage, 37 days after shutdown of the reactor. In such conditions, good resolution is of particular interest, so a 20 mm 3 hemispheric crystal was used with a resolution better than 7 keV at 662 keV. This paper presents the experimental device and analyzes the results which show that CdZnTe commercially available detectors enabled us to perform a semi-quantitative determination of the burn-up after a short cooling time. In addition, it is discussed how a burn-up evolution code (CESAR) coupled to a gamma transport code (MCNP) allows us to predict and interpret the experimental data from CdZnTe detectors. Particularly, bremsstrahlung contribution to the gamma spectra is suggested and modeled. Calculation results indicate a good agreement between this hypothesis and the present measurements.

  1. UNDERSTANDING VARIABILITY IN TIME SPENT IN SELECTED LOCATIONS FOR 7-12 YEAR OLD CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper summarizes a series of analyses of clustered, sequential activity/location data collected by Harvard University for 160 children aged 7-12 in Southern California (Geyh et al., 2000). The main purpose of the paper is to understand intra- and inter-variability in the ti...

  2. A comment on the use of flushing time, residence time, and age as transport time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monsen, N.E.; Cloern, J.E.; Lucas, L.V.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    Applications of transport time scales are pervasive in biological, hydrologic, and geochemical studies yet these times scales are not consistently defined and applied with rigor in the literature. We compare three transport time scales (flushing time, age, and residence time) commonly used to measure the retention of water or scalar quantities transported with water. We identify the underlying assumptions associated with each time scale, describe procedures for computing these time scales in idealized cases, and identify pitfalls when real-world systems deviate from these idealizations. We then apply the time scale definitions to a shallow 378 ha tidal lake to illustrate how deviations between real water bodies and the idealized examples can result from: (1) non-steady flow; (2) spatial variability in bathymetry, circulation, and transport time scales; and (3) tides that introduce complexities not accounted for in the idealized cases. These examples illustrate that no single transport time scale is valid for all time periods, locations, and constituents, and no one time scale describes all transport processes. We encourage aquatic scientists to rigorously define the transport time scale when it is applied, identify the underlying assumptions in the application of that concept, and ask if those assumptions are valid in the application of that approach for computing transport time scales in real systems.

  3. Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment, Burn-up and Cooling Time of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Henzl, Vladimir; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2012-07-13

    An outline of this presentation of what a Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument can do are: (1) Principle of operation of DDA instrument; (2) Determination of initial enrichment (IE) ({sigma} < 5%); (3) Determination of burn up (BU) ({sigma} {approx} 6%); (4) Determination of cooling time (CT) ({sigma} {approx} 20-50%); and (5) DDA instrument as a standalone device. DDA response (fresh fuel vs. spent fuel) is: (1) Fresh fuel => DDA response increases (die-away time is longer) with increasing fissile content; and (2) Spent fuel => DDA response decreases (die-away time is shorter) with higher burn-up (i.e. more neutron absorbers present).

  4. Willingness-to-Pay to Avoid the Time Spent and Discomfort Associated with Screening Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Daniel E.; Russell, Louise B.; Chou, Jon; Pignone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background The screening colonoscopy process requires a considerable amount of time and some discomfort for patients. Objective We sought to use willingness-to-pay (WTP) to value the time required and the discomfort associated with screening colonoscopy. In addition, we aimed to explore some of the differences between and potential uses of the WTP and the human capital methods. Methods Subjects completed a diary recording time and a questionnaire including WTP questions to value the time and discomfort associated with colonoscopy. We also valued the elapsed time reported in the diaries (but not the discomfort) using the human capital method. Results 110 subjects completed the study. Mean WTP to avoid the time and discomfort was $263. Human capital values for elapsed time were greater. Linear regressions showed that WTP was influenced most by the difficulty of the preparation, which added $147 to WTP (p=0.03). Conclusions WTP values to avoid the time and discomfort associated with the screening colonoscopy process were substantially lower than most of the human capital values for elapsed time alone. The human capital method may overestimate the value of time in situations that involve an irregular, episodic series of time intervals, such as preparation for or recovery after colonoscopy. PMID:19725018

  5. Assessment of Body Mass Index, Sugar Sweetened Beverage Intake and Time Spent in Physical Activity of American Indian Children in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Michelle E; Sisson, Susan B; Lora, Karina; Stephens, Lancer D; Copeland, Kenneth C; Caudillo, Cynthia

    2015-08-01

    American Indian (AI) children have a combined overweight and obesity prevalence of 53%. Behaviors that contribute to obesity, such as sugar sweetened beverage (SSB) intake and time spent in physical activity (PA), have been poorly explored in this population. The purpose of this study is to report body mass index (BMI), SSB intake, and time spent in PA of 7-to-13-year-old AI children who reside in rural and urban areas in Oklahoma. Cross-sectional survey study. Self-reported SSB intake in the last month, and time spent in PA were collected via questionnaires. Height and weight were professionally measured. The sample included 124 7-to-13-year-old AI children who attended a diabetes prevention summer camp in 2013. BMI percentile, overweight and obesity prevalence, SSB intake, time spent in PA, and number of participants meeting the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Descriptive characteristics for BMI percentile, overweight and obesity, SSB intake, time spent in PA, and meeting PA recommendations were calculated using means, standard deviations, and frequencies. Independent t test and Chi square analyses were used to test for gender differences. Participants were 10.2 ± 1.5 years old and 57% female. Sixty-three percent were overweight or obese. Children consumed 309 ± 309 kcal/day of SSB and spent 4.4 ± 3.8 h per week in moderate-to-vigorous PA. Approximately 32% met the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. No gender differences were observed. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was higher than previously reported in a similar population, and higher than that of US children in the general population. SSB intake and physical activity levels were also found to be higher in this group than in the general population. PMID:25750107

  6. Nurses' daily life: gender relations from the time spent in hospital1

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Audrey Vidal

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the everyday life of nurses through the sexual work division as well as through interdependence relations and the time in hospital. Method: quanti-qualitative study, based on the Time Use Survey and in Norbert Elias's Configuration Theory of Interdependencies. Daily shifts distribution record, directed by 42 participants - with self-confrontation - by interviews which drew dialogues on subjective aspects of the everyday experiences related to use of time, based on a job at a university hospital. The theoretical intake that founded data analysis was based on concepts of conflicts of interest, power struggles, sexual work division and polychronic-monochronic concepts - whether the work environment demands multitasking nurses or not. Results: time records allowed to observe differences between the groups studied, useful to identify conflicts, tensions, power struggles and gender inequalities in interviewees' everyday affairs that do not only affect physical and mental health, but also their way of life. Conclusion: the analytical path pointed out the need for public policies that promote equity in gender relations, keeping at sight the exercise of plural discourses and tolerant stances capable to respect differences between individual and collective time. PMID:26487146

  7. Age-space-time CAR models in Bayesian disease mapping.

    PubMed

    Goicoa, T; Ugarte, M D; Etxeberria, J; Militino, A F

    2016-06-30

    Mortality counts are usually aggregated over age groups assuming similar effects of both time and region, yet the spatio-temporal evolution of cancer mortality rates may depend on changing age structures. In this paper, mortality rates are analyzed by region, time period and age group, and models including space-time, space-age, and age-time interactions are considered. The integrated nested Laplace approximation method, known as INLA, is adopted for model fitting and inference in order to reduce computing time in comparison with Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) methods. The methodology provides full posterior distributions of the quantities of interest while avoiding complex simulation techniques. The proposed models are used to analyze prostate cancer mortality data in 50 Spanish provinces over the period 1986-2010. The results reveal a decline in mortality since the late 1990s, particularly in the age group [65,70), probably because of the inclusion of the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test and better treatment of early-stage disease. The decline is not clearly observed in the oldest age groups. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26814019

  8. Bullying Behavior, Parents' Work Hours and Early Adolescents' Perceptions of Time Spent with Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie-Mizell, C. Andre; Keil, Jacqueline M.; Laske, Mary Therese; Stewart, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the relationships among bullying behavior, mother's and father's work hours, and early adolescents' perceptions of whether they spend sufficient time with their parents. In cross-sectional models, we find maternal work hours are modestly associated with increases in bullying behavior. However, in more rigorous change…

  9. The Relation between the Time Mothers and Children Spent Together and the Children's Trait Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alegre, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parenting practices have been shown to predict children's emotional intelligence. The time that mothers and children spend in joint activity is an important aspect of the parent-child relationship, and it has been found to be influential in different domains of children's development. However, it has not been investigated in relation…

  10. The Relationship between Students' Small Group Activities, Time Spent on Self-Study, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamp, Rachelle J. A.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; van Berkel, Henk J. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the contributions students make to the problem-based tutorial group process as observed by their peers, self-study time and achievement. To that end, the Maastricht Peer Activity Rating Scale was administered to students participating in Problem-Based Learning tutorial groups.…

  11. Variations in Teachers' Management of and Time Spent on Reading Instruction: Effects on Student Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenthal, Helen; Kirsch, Irwin

    To determine if there was variability in scheduled and engaged time in reading among classrooms and in management style among teachers and to see if these factors accounted for differences on a standardized reading achievement measure, a study was conducted involving 13 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade reading classrooms. Pretest and posttest data…

  12. Does patient time spent viewing computer-tailored colorectal cancer screening materials predict patient-reported discussion of screening with providers?

    PubMed

    Sanders, Mechelle; Fiscella, Kevin; Veazie, Peter; Dolan, James G; Jerant, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    The main aim is to examine whether patients' viewing time on information about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening before a primary care physician (PCP) visit is associated with discussion of screening options during the visit. We analyzed data from a multi-center randomized controlled trial of a tailored interactive multimedia computer program (IMCP) to activate patients to undergo CRC screening, deployed in primary care offices immediately before a visit. We employed usage time information stored in the IMCP to examine the association of patient time spent using the program with patient-reported discussion of screening during the visit, adjusting for previous CRC screening recommendation and reading speed.On average, patients spent 33 minutes on the program. In adjusted analyses, 30 minutes spent using the program was associated with a 41% increase in the odds of the patient having a discussion with their PCP (1.04, 1.59, 95% CI). In a separate analysis of the tailoring modules; the modules encouraging adherence to the tailored screening recommendation and discussion with the patient's PCP yielded significant results. Other predictors of screening discussion included better self-reported physical health and increased patient activation. Time spent on the program predicted greater patient-physician discussion of screening during a linked visit.Usage time information gathered automatically by IMCPs offers promise for objectively assessing patient engagement around a topic and predicting likelihood of discussion between patients and their clinician. PMID:27343254

  13. The Role of Parental Support, Parental Monitoring, and Time Spent with Parents in Adolescent Academic Achievement in Iceland: A Structural Model of Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between parental support, parental monitoring, and time spent with parents and academic achievement among adolescent girls and boys in Iceland, a high-income per-capita Nordic country. The indirect role of school effort is also examined. Data of 7430 9th and 10th graders is analyzed in the study. Structural…

  14. The Influence of Instructional Climates on Time Spent in Management Tasks and Physical Activity of 2nd-Grade Students during Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Samuel W.; Robinson, Leah E.; Webster, E. Kipling; Rudisill, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of two physical education (PE) instructional climates (mastery, performance) on the percentage of time students spent in a) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and b) management tasks during PE in 2nd-grade students. Forty-eight 2nd graders (mastery, n = 23; performance, n = 25)…

  15. An influential factor for external radiation dose estimation for residents after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident-time spent outdoors for residents in Iitate Village.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Yasumura, Seiji; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Sakata, Ritsu; Ozasa, Kotaro; Hayashi, Masayuki; Ohira, Tetsuya; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have been conducted on radiation doses to residents after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Time spent outdoors is an influential factor for external dose estimation. Since little information was available on actual time spent outdoors for residents, different values of average time spent outdoors per day have been used in dose estimation studies on the FDNPP accident. The most conservative value of 24 h was sometimes used, while 2.4 h was adopted for indoor workers in the UNSCEAR 2013 report. Fukushima Medical University has been estimating individual external doses received by residents as a part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey by collecting information on the records of moves and activities (the Basic Survey) after the accident from each resident. In the present study, these records were analyzed to estimate an average time spent outdoors per day. As an example, in Iitate Village, its arithmetic mean was 2.08 h (95% CI: 1.64-2.51) for a total of 170 persons selected from respondents to the Basic Survey. This is a much smaller value than commonly assumed. When 2.08 h is used for the external dose estimation, the dose is about 25% (23-26% when using the above 95% CI) less compared with the dose estimated for the commonly used value of 8 h. PMID:27034103

  16. The Influence of Young Adults' Sex, Gender Role Orientation, Ordinal Position and Time Spent with Infants on Their Knowledge of Infant Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullo, Dominic F; Paludi, Michele A.

    1989-01-01

    Identifies some characteristics of non at-risk prospective parents (239 young adults who were enrolled in introductory psychology classes) which may contribute to more accurate knowledge of infant development. Results are interpreted in terms of subjects' sex, gender role orientation, ordinal position in the family, and amount of time spent with…

  17. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-09-28

    .g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

  18. Narayanaswamy’s 1971 aging theory and material time

    SciTech Connect

    Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2015-09-21

    The Bochkov-Kuzovlev nonlinear fluctuation-dissipation theorem is used to derive Narayanaswamy’s phenomenological theory of physical aging, in which this highly nonlinear phenomenon is described by a linear material-time convolution integral. A characteristic property of the Narayanaswamy aging description is material-time translational invariance, which is here taken as the basic assumption of the derivation. It is shown that only one possible definition of the material time obeys this invariance, namely, the square of the distance travelled from a configuration of the system far back in time. The paper concludes with suggestions for computer simulations that test for consequences of material-time translational invariance. One of these is the “unique-triangles property” according to which any three points on the system’s path form a triangle such that two side lengths determine the third; this is equivalent to the well-known triangular relation for time-autocorrelation functions of aging spin glasses [L. F. Cugliandolo and J. Kurchan, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 27, 5749 (1994)]. The unique-triangles property implies a simple geometric interpretation of out-of-equilibrium time-autocorrelation functions, which extends to aging a previously proposed framework for such functions in equilibrium [J. C. Dyre, e-print arXiv:cond-mat/9712222 (1997)].

  19. Age-dependent changes in central somatosensory conduction time.

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Hedderich, J

    1982-01-01

    Cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials(SEPs) were recorded in 45 normal subjects. Absolute peak latencies and latency differences between the components P7, N9, N11, N13, P17 and N20 were measured. Subjects aged 40-60 years had significantly longer latencies of N13 and N20 than subjects aged 15-39 years. Moreover, statistical analysis revealed a significant prolongation of N9-N13, N11-N13 and N13-N20 transit times in older subjects. Possible connections with known morphological age-related findings are discussed. PMID:6288387

  20. Factors associated with screen time among school-age children in Korea.

    PubMed

    Ham, Ok Kyung; Sung, Kyung Mi; Kim, Hee Kyung

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics with screen time among school-age children in Korea. This study employed a nonexperimental, cross-sectional study design. A total of 370 children attending four elementary schools participated in the study. Self-report method was used, and instruments included screen time (time spent on TV/video/computer/video games), sleep duration, eating behavior, pros and cons of exercise, and exercise self-efficacy. According to the results, 45.7% of the children had screen time of 1-2.9 hr/day and 8.9% had 3 or more hr/day. Increased screen time showed an association with gender (boy), higher body mass index, fast food consumption, higher cons of exercise, having a working mother, and attendance at a school in an inner city area (p < .05). Understanding the factors associated with screen time may provide useful information in the development of health promotion programs aimed at decreasing sedentary behaviors. PMID:23598570

  1. Age-Related Effects on Future Mental Time Travel

    PubMed Central

    Anelli, Filomena; Ciaramelli, Elisa; Arzy, Shahar; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Mental time travel (MTT), the ability to travel mentally back and forward in time in order to reexperience past events and preexperience future events, is crucial in human cognition. As we move along life, MTT may be changed accordingly. However, the relation between re- and preexperiencing along the lifespan is still not clear. Here, young and older adults underwent a psychophysical paradigm assessing two different components of MTT: self-projection, which is the ability to project the self towards a past or a future location of the mental time line, and self-reference, which is the ability to determine whether events are located in the past or future in reference to that given self-location. Aged individuals performed worse in both self-projection to the future and self-reference to future events compared to young individuals. In addition, aging decreased older adults' preference for personal compared to nonpersonal events. These results demonstrate the impact of MTT and self-processing on subjective time processing in healthy aging. Changes in memory functions in aged people may therefore be related not only to memory per se, but also to the relations of memory and self. PMID:27144031

  2. Reactivity and isotopic composition of spent PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) fuel as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time

    SciTech Connect

    Cerne, S.P.; Hermann, O.W.; Westfall, R.M.

    1987-10-01

    This study presents the reactivity loss of spent PWR fuel due to burnup in terms of the infinite lattice multiplications factor, k/sub infinity/. Calculations were performed using the SAS2 and CSAS1 control modules of the SCALE system. The k/sub infinity/ values calculated for all combinations of six enrichments, seven burnups, and five cooling times. The results are presented as a primary function of enrichment in both tabular and graphic form. An equation has been developed to estimate the tabulated values of k/sub infinity/'s by specifying enrichment, cooling time, and burnup. Atom densities for fresh fuel, and spent fuel at cooling times of 2, 10, and 20 years are included. 13 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Scaling in a Continuous Time Model for Biological Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, R. M. C.; Thomas, G. L.

    In this paper, we consider a generalization to the asexual version of Penna model for biological aging, where we take a continuous time limit. The genotype associated to each individual is an interval of real numbers over which Dirac δ-functions are defined, representing genetically programmed diseases to be switched on at defined ages of the individual life. We discuss two different continuous limits for the evolution equation and two different mutation protocols, to be implemented during reproduction. Exact stationary solutions are obtained and scaling properties are discussed.

  4. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-01

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  5. Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-06-06

    Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

  6. Characterization of polymers in the glass transition range: Time-temperature and time-aging time superposition in polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pesce, J.J.; Niemiec, J.M.; Chiang, M.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Here we present time-temperature and time-aging time superposition data for a commercial grade polycarbonate. The data reduction is performed for dynamic-mechanical data obtained in torsion over a range of temperatures from 103.6 to 144.5{degrees}C and aging times to 16 h. For time-temperature superposition the results show the deviation of the sub-T{sub g} response from the WTF equation. Two response regimes are observed: at temperatures far below T{sub g} the log(a{sub T}) is linear in T, followed by a transition towards the WLF behavior as T{sub g} is approached. The temperature at which the behavior changes from a linear dependence of log(aT) on T to the transition-type behavior is found to depend on the aging time. This temperature decreases as aging time increases. The time-aging time response is found to behave in a normal way. At temperatures far below T{sub g} the log(a{sub te}) vs log(t{sub e}) is constant and has a slope somewhat less than unity. However, nearer to T{sub g} the slope decreases and there is a second regime in which the aging virtually ceases. In this polycarbonate, above 136.9{degrees}C, no aging is observed.

  7. The lateral clavicular epiphysis: fusion timing and age estimation.

    PubMed

    Langley, Natalie R

    2016-03-01

    This study utilizes a forensic autopsy sample of twentieth century American Whites (the McCormick Clavicle Collection) to describe the morphology, variation, and fusion timing of the lateral clavicle epiphysis. Clavicles from individuals between 11 and 25 years at the time of death were used to document fusion of the lateral epiphysis (n= 133, 38 females and 95 males). The lateral epiphysis was scored as unfused, fusing, or fused. A linear weighted kappa indicates that this scoring method is highly replicable with almost perfect inter-rater agreement (kappa = 0.849), according to a widely used standard for assessing kappa values. Transition analysis, or probit regression, was employed to quantify fusion timing of the lateral epiphysis. The transition from "unfused" to "fusing" is most likely to occur at 16.5 years in females and 17.5 years in males. The transition from "fusing" to "fused" occurs at age 21 in females and age 20 in males. The earliest age at which fusion began was 15 years (n = 1), but the majority began fusing between 17 and 20 years. Most individuals (98.5 % of the sample) aged >24 years had fused lateral epiphyses. The epiphysis assumes one of two forms: (1) a separate bony flake fusing to the diaphysis or (2) a mound of bone glazing/smoothing over the diaphyseal surface. As socioeconomic status has been cited as the most influential variable on skeletal maturation rates, the fusion ages offered here should not be applied to populations with a socioeconomic status different from the greater US population. PMID:26253853

  8. Multifractal Analysis of Aging and Complexity in Heartbeat Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz D., Alejandro; Almanza V., Victor H.; del Río C., José L.

    2004-09-01

    Recently multifractal analysis has been used intensively in the analysis of physiological time series. In this work we apply the multifractal analysis to the study of heartbeat time series from healthy young subjects and other series obtained from old healthy subjects. We show that this multifractal formalism could be a useful tool to discriminate these two kinds of series. We used the algorithm proposed by Chhabra and Jensen that provides a highly accurate, practical and efficient method for the direct computation of the singularity spectrum. Aging causes loss of multifractality in the heartbeat time series, it means that heartbeat time series of elderly persons are less complex than the time series of young persons. This analysis reveals a new level of complexity characterized by the wide range of necessary exponents to characterize the dynamics of young people.

  9. Age, Time, and Decision Making: From Processing Speed to Global Time Horizons

    PubMed Central

    Löckenhoff, Corinna E.

    2013-01-01

    Time and time perceptions are integral to decision making because any meaningful choice is embedded in a temporal context and requires the evaluation of future preferences and outcomes. The present review examines the influence of chronological age on time perceptions and horizons and discusses implications for decision making across the life span. Time influences and interacts with decision making in multiple ways. Specifically, this review examines the following topic areas: (1) processing speed and decision time, (2) internal clocks and time estimation, (3) mental representations of future time and intertemporal choice, and (4) global time horizons. For each aspect, patterns of age differences and implications for decision strategies and quality are discussed. The conclusion proposes frameworks to integrate different lines of research and identifies promising avenues for future inquiry. PMID:22023567

  10. Time walkers and spatial dynamics of aging information.

    PubMed

    Lizana, L; Rosvall, M; Sneppen, K

    2010-01-29

    The distribution of information is essential for a living system's ability to coordinate and adapt. Random walkers are often used to model this distribution process and, in doing so, one effectively assumes that information maintains its relevance over time. But the value of information in social and biological systems often decays and must continuously be updated. To capture the spatial dynamics of aging information, we introduce time walkers. A time walker moves like a random walker, but interacts with traces left by other walkers, some representing older information, some newer. The traces form a navigable information landscape which we visualize as a river network. We quantify the dynamical properties of time walkers, and the quality of the information left behind, on a two-dimensional lattice. We show that searching in this landscape is superior to random searching. PMID:20366697

  11. Time/motion observations and dose analysis of reactor loading, transportation, and dry unloading of an overweight truck spent fuel shipment

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, C.J.; Lavender, J.C.; Wakeman, B.H.

    1992-04-01

    This document presents observed activity durations and radiation dose analyses for an overweight truck shipment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel from the Surry Power Station in Virginia to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The shipment consisted of a TN-8L shipping cask carrying three 9-year-old PWR spent fuel assemblies. Handling times and dose analyses for at-reactor activities were completed by Virginia Electric and Power Company (Virginia Power) personnel. Observations of in-transit and unloading activities were made by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) personnel, who followed the shipment for approximately 2800 miles and observed cask unloading activities. In-transit dose estimates were calculated using dose rate maps provided by Virginia Power for a fully loaded TN-8L shipping cask. The dose analysis for the cask unloading operations is based on the observations of PNL personnel.

  12. Time and dose assessment of barge shipment and at-reactor handling of a CASTOR V/21 spent fuel storage cask

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, C.J. ); Lavender, J.C. ); Wakeman, B.H. )

    1992-04-01

    This report contains the results of a time/motion analysis and a radiation dose assessment made during the receipt from barge transport and the loading of CAst iron cask for Storage and Transport Of Radioactive material (CASTOR) V/21 storage casks with spent nuclear fuel at the Surry Power Station in Virginia during 1987. The study was a cooperative effort between Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Virginia Electric and Power Company (Virginia Power), and was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Transportation Program Office. In this study, cask handling activities were tracked at the Surry Power Station, tracing the transfer of the empty spent fuel storage cask from an ocean-going vessel to a barge for river transport through the activities required to place the loaded storage cask at an at-reactor storage location.

  13. Application of ALARA principles to shipment of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Greenborg, J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Murphy, D.W. Burnett, R.A.; Lewis, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The public exposure from spent fuel shipment is very low. In view of this low exposure and the perfect safety record for spent fuel shipment, existing systems can be considered satisfactory. On the other hand, occupational exposure reduction merits consideration and technology improvement to decrease dose should concentrate on this exposure. Practices that affect the age of spent fuel in shipment and the number of times the fuel must be shipped prior to disposal have the largest impact. A policy to encourage a 5-year spent fuel cooling period prior to shipment coupled with appropriate cask redesign to accommodate larger loads would be consistent with ALARA and economic principles. And finally, bypassing high population density areas will not in general reduce shipment dose.

  14. [Temporal ambivalences of aging: Individual patterns of time use in conflict between time wealth and time poverty].

    PubMed

    Münch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Throughout their lives people are confronted with different time resources and demands that change continuously up into old age. With the help of a qualitative interview study the narrative constructions of subjective time experiences as well as individual ways of dealing with time in retirement were investigated. In particular the influences of older persons' experience of time within the dimensions of everyday time and life time were analyzed. In addition, the study focused on potential time conflicts between these two dimensions and the question of how older people deal with the ambivalence between everyday time wealth and biographical time poverty in older age. The results of the interviews with 50 retired men and women (aged 56-91 years) in Germany, which were analyzed with "grounded theory" techniques, indicated that time in retirement does not indeed always run smoothly. In particular, the individual perception of increasing biographical time poverty exerts pressure on the arrangement of activities and daily routine in retirement. The resulting time conflicts are reflected in differential patterns of time use through which older persons try to cope with their ambivalent time experiences. PMID:26625848

  15. Time Perspective and Emotion Regulation as Predictors of Age-Related Subjective Passage of Time

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Marc; Rudolph, Tina; Linares Gutierrez, Damisela; Winkler, Isabell

    2015-01-01

    Hardly any empirical work exists concerning the relationship between the intra-individually stable time perspective relating to the past, present, and future and the subjective speed of time passing in everyday life. Moreover, studies consistently show that the subjective passage of time over the period of the last ten years speeds up as we get older. Modulating variables influencing this phenomenon are still unknown. To investigate these two unresolved issues, we conducted an online survey with n = 423 participants ranging in age between 17 and 81 assessing trait time perspective of the past, present, and future, and relating these subscales with a battery of measures pertaining to the subjective passage of time. Moreover, the subjective passage of time as an age-dependent variable was probed in relationship to emotion awareness, appraisal and regulation. Results show how present hedonism is linked with having fewer routines in life and a faster passage of the last week; the past negative perspective is related to time pressure, time expansion and more routine; a pronounced future perspective is related to a general faster passage of time. Importantly, increased emotion regulation and a balanced time perspective are related to a slower passage of the last ten years. These novel findings are discussed within models of time perception and the time perspective. PMID:26694439

  16. Time Perspective and Emotion Regulation as Predictors of Age-Related Subjective Passage of Time.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Marc; Rudolph, Tina; Linares Gutierrez, Damisela; Winkler, Isabell

    2015-12-01

    Hardly any empirical work exists concerning the relationship between the intra-individually stable time perspective relating to the past, present, and future and the subjective speed of time passing in everyday life. Moreover, studies consistently show that the subjective passage of time over the period of the last ten years speeds up as we get older. Modulating variables influencing this phenomenon are still unknown. To investigate these two unresolved issues, we conducted an online survey with n = 423 participants ranging in age between 17 and 81 assessing trait time perspective of the past, present, and future, and relating these subscales with a battery of measures pertaining to the subjective passage of time. Moreover, the subjective passage of time as an age-dependent variable was probed in relationship to emotion awareness, appraisal and regulation. Results show how present hedonism is linked with having fewer routines in life and a faster passage of the last week; the past negative perspective is related to time pressure, time expansion and more routine; a pronounced future perspective is related to a general faster passage of time. Importantly, increased emotion regulation and a balanced time perspective are related to a slower passage of the last ten years. These novel findings are discussed within models of time perception and the time perspective. PMID:26694439

  17. Generalized master equation via aging continuous-time random walks.

    PubMed

    Allegrini, Paolo; Aquino, Gerardo; Grigolini, Paolo; Palatella, Luigi; Rosa, Angelo

    2003-11-01

    We discuss the problem of the equivalence between continuous-time random walk (CTRW) and generalized master equation (GME). The walker, making instantaneous jumps from one site of the lattice to another, resides in each site for extended times. The sojourn times have a distribution density psi(t) that is assumed to be an inverse power law with the power index micro. We assume that the Onsager principle is fulfilled, and we use this assumption to establish a complete equivalence between GME and the Montroll-Weiss CTRW. We prove that this equivalence is confined to the case where psi(t) is an exponential. We argue that is so because the Montroll-Weiss CTRW, as recently proved by Barkai [E. Barkai, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 104101 (2003)], is nonstationary, thereby implying aging, while the Onsager principle is valid only in the case of fully aged systems. The case of a Poisson distribution of sojourn times is the only one with no aging associated to it, and consequently with no need to establish special initial conditions to fulfill the Onsager principle. We consider the case of a dichotomous fluctuation, and we prove that the Onsager principle is fulfilled for any form of regression to equilibrium provided that the stationary condition holds true. We set the stationary condition on both the CTRW and the GME, thereby creating a condition of total equivalence, regardless of the nature of the waiting-time distribution. As a consequence of this procedure we create a GME that is a bona fide master equation, in spite of being non-Markov. We note that the memory kernel of the GME affords information on the interaction between system of interest and its bath. The Poisson case yields a bath with infinitely fast fluctuations. We argue that departing from the Poisson form has the effect of creating a condition of infinite memory and that these results might be useful to shed light on the problem of how to unravel non-Markov quantum master equations. PMID:14682862

  18. A Time-Temperature Transistor - An Application of Aging Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenning, Gregory

    Aging dynamics occur as systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium evolve towards equilibrium. We have produced a magnetic nanoparticle system composed of Co nanoparticles, which self-assemble during Co deposition on Sb. At a particular time in the formation of the nanoparticles, they are encased in a layer of Sb producing a system far from equilibrium. Magnetization vs. temperature measurements as well as Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) indicates that the nanoparticles initially have a large magnetic moment. We observe, as a function of time, an approximately 80% decay in the sample magnetization and an approximately 50% decay in the DC electrical resistivity. MFM suggests that the magnetization decay proceeds from the magnetic nanoparticles losing their net moments possibly due to spin rearrangement. Evidence also suggests that the initial magnetic moments, drive the Sb layer semiconducting. As the net moments of the magnetic nanoparticles decrease, the Sb reverts back to its semi-metal behavior with the accompanying decrease in the electrical resistivity. The magnetization and resistance decays follow the same Arrhenius type behavior. By varying the Co layer thickness, the Arrhenius parameters can be tuned. We have been able to tune the parameters making these materials excellent candidates for sensors for electronically monitoring the age and lifetime of perishable foods.

  19. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-4 - Maximum age conditions and time of participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... more than 5 years before normal retirement age (within the meaning of section 411(a)(8) and § 1.411(a... at such time the employee is less than age 60. The normal retirement age under the plan is age 65...). Example 2. A defined benefit plan provides a normal retirement age of the later of age 65 or completion...

  20. Gender and Age Differences in Hourly and Daily Patterns of Sedentary Time in Older Adults Living in Retirement Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bellettiere, John; Carlson, Jordan A.; Rosenberg, Dori; Singhania, Anant; Natarajan, Loki; Berardi, Vincent; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Sears, Dorothy D.; Moran, Kevin; Crist, Katie; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Total sedentary time varies across population groups with important health consequences. Patterns of sedentary time accumulation may vary and have differential health risks. The purpose of this study is to describe sedentary patterns of older adults living in retirement communities and illustrate gender and age differences in those patterns. Methods Baseline accelerometer data from 307 men and women (mean age = 84±6 years) who wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers for ≥ 4 days as part of a physical activity intervention were classified into bouts of sedentary time (<100 counts per minute). Linear mixed models were used to account for intra-person and site-level clustering. Daily and hourly summaries were examined in mutually non-exclusive bouts of sedentary time that were 1+, 5+, 10+, 20+, 30+, 40+, 50+, 60+, 90+ and 120+ minutes in duration. Variations by time of day, age and gender were explored. Results Men accumulated more sedentary time than women in 1+, 5+, 10+, 20+, 30+, 40+, 50+ and 60+ minute bouts; the largest gender-differences were observed in 10+ and 20+ minute bouts. Age was positively associated with sedentary time, but only in bouts of 10+, 20+, 30+, and 40+ minutes. Women had more daily 1+ minute sedentary bouts than men (71.8 vs. 65.2), indicating they break up sedentary time more often. For men and women, a greater proportion of time was spent being sedentary during later hours of the day than earlier. Gender differences in intra-day sedentary time were observed during morning hours with women accumulating less sedentary time overall and having more 1+ minute bouts. Conclusions Patterns identified using bouts of sedentary time revealed gender and age differences in the way in which sedentary time was accumulated by older adults in retirement communities. Awareness of these patterns can help interventionists better target sedentary time and may aid in the identification of health risks associated with sedentary behavior. Future studies

  1. Circadian regulation of human sleep and age-related changes in its timing, consolidation and EEG characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, D. J.; Duffy, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    The light-entrainable circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus regulates the timing and consolidation of sleep by generating a paradoxical rhythm of sleep propensity; the circadian drive for wakefulness peaks at the end of the day spent awake, ie close to the onset of melatonin secretion at 21.00-22.00 h and the circadian drive for sleep crests shortly before habitual waking-up time. With advancing age, ie after early adulthood, sleep consolidation declines, and time of awakening and the rhythms of body temperature, plasma melatonin and cortisol shift to an earlier clock hour. The variability of the phase relationship between the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms increases, and in old age sleep is more susceptible to internal arousing stimuli associated with circadian misalignment. The propensity to awaken from sleep advances relative to the body temperature nadir in older people, a change that is opposite to the phase delay of awakening relative to internal circadian rhythms associated with morningness in young people. Age-related changes do not appear to be associated with a shortening of the circadian period or a reduction of the circadian drive for wake maintenance. These changes may be related to changes in the sleep process itself, such as reductions in slow-wave sleep and sleep spindles as well as a reduced strength of the circadian signal promoting sleep in the early morning hours. Putative mediators and modulators of circadian sleep regulation are discussed.

  2. Circadian regulation of human sleep and age-related changes in its timing, consolidation and EEG characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dijk, D J; Duffy, J F

    1999-04-01

    The light-entrainable circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus regulates the timing and consolidation of sleep by generating a paradoxical rhythm of sleep propensity; the circadian drive for wakefulness peaks at the end of the day spent awake, ie close to the onset of melatonin secretion at 21.00-22.00 h and the circadian drive for sleep crests shortly before habitual waking-up time. With advancing age, ie after early adulthood, sleep consolidation declines, and time of awakening and the rhythms of body temperature, plasma melatonin and cortisol shift to an earlier clock hour. The variability of the phase relationship between the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms increases, and in old age sleep is more susceptible to internal arousing stimuli associated with circadian misalignment. The propensity to awaken from sleep advances relative to the body temperature nadir in older people, a change that is opposite to the phase delay of awakening relative to internal circadian rhythms associated with morningness in young people. Age-related changes do not appear to be associated with a shortening of the circadian period or a reduction of the circadian drive for wake maintenance. These changes may be related to changes in the sleep process itself, such as reductions in slow-wave sleep and sleep spindles as well as a reduced strength of the circadian signal promoting sleep in the early morning hours. Putative mediators and modulators of circadian sleep regulation are discussed. PMID:10344586

  3. Ageing and ART: a waste of time and money?

    PubMed

    Ng, Ernest Hung Yu; Ho, Pak Chung

    2007-02-01

    In many societies, more and more young women are delaying childbearing until the fourth decade of life. It is well known that fertility is remarkably reduced with increasing age of women in both natural conceptions and assisted reproductive technology (ART). In this chapter, the effect of ageing on the pregnancy rate in ART, and the options available to improve the reproductive outcomes in women of advanced age will be presented after understanding the mechanism of reproductive ageing and the effects of ageing on the reproductive outcomes in normal women. It is important to identify the predictive factors associated with a better treatment outcome. PMID:17049459

  4. Inspection Time and Cognitive Abilities in Twins Aged 7 to 17 Years: Age-Related Changes, Heritability and Genetic Covariance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Caroline J.; Isaacs, Elizabeth B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Rogers, Mary; Lanigan, Julie; Singhal, Atul; Lucas, Alan; Gringras, Paul; Denton, Jane; Deary, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the age-related differences in inspection time and multiple cognitive domains in a group of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins aged 7 to 17 years. Data from 111 twin pairs and 19 singleton siblings were included. We found clear age-related trends towards more efficient visual information processing in older participants. There…

  5. Learning style versus time spent studying and career choice: Which is associated with success in a combined undergraduate anatomy and physiology course?

    PubMed

    Farkas, Gary J; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R

    2016-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n = 492) from the fall semester course completed a survey consisting of the VARK questionnaire, gender, academic year, career plans, and estimated hours spent per week in combined classroom and study time. Seventy-eight percent of students reported spending 15 or fewer hours per week studying. Study time and overall course score correlated significantly for the class as a whole (r = 0.111, P = 0.013), which was mainly due to lecture (r = 0.118, P = 0.009) performance. No significant differences were found among students grouped by learning styles. When corrected for academic year, overall course scores (mean ± SEM) for students planning to enter dentistry, medicine, optometry or pharmacy (79.89 ± 0.88%) were significantly higher than those of students planning to enter physical or occupational therapies (74.53 ± 1.15%; P = 0.033), as well as nurse/physician assistant programs (73.60 ± 1.3%; P = 0.040). Time spent studying was not significantly associated with either learning style or career choice. Our findings suggest that specific career goals and study time, not learning preferences, are associated with better performance among a diverse group of students in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course. However, the extent to which prior academic preparation, cultural norms, and socioeconomic factors influenced these results requires further investigation. PMID:26301828

  6. Effects of post-mortem aging time and type of aging on palatability of low marbled beef loins.

    PubMed

    Lepper-Blilie, A N; Berg, E P; Buchanan, D S; Berg, P T

    2016-02-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the effect of post-mortem aging period (14 to 49days), dry vs. wet (D vs W) type of aging on the palatability of bone-in (BI) beef short loins (n=96) and boneless (BL) strip loins (n=96) possessing United States Department of Agriculture marbling scores between Slight and Small. Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) scores decreased linearly over time (P=0.0001). WBSF was not influenced by aging method or loin type. Aged flavor was higher for DBL than for DBI with WBL and WBI intermediate. Dry aging strip loins increase aged flavor yet did not improve beefy flavor compared to wet aging. Based on objective data and panelist's scores for tenderness, juiciness and aged flavor, a boneless, 28days wet aged strip steak, cooked to 71°C would provide the best combination of eating satisfaction and value. PMID:26551359

  7. Reversal of age-related neural timing delays with training.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Samira; White-Schwoch, Travis; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Kraus, Nina

    2013-03-12

    Neural slowing is commonly noted in older adults, with consequences for sensory, motor, and cognitive domains. One of the deleterious effects of neural slowing is impairment of temporal resolution; older adults, therefore, have reduced ability to process the rapid events that characterize speech, especially in noisy environments. Although hearing aids provide increased audibility, they cannot compensate for deficits in auditory temporal processing. Auditory training may provide a strategy to address these deficits. To that end, we evaluated the effects of auditory-based cognitive training on the temporal precision of subcortical processing of speech in noise. After training, older adults exhibited faster neural timing and experienced gains in memory, speed of processing, and speech-in-noise perception, whereas a matched control group showed no changes. Training was also associated with decreased variability of brainstem response peaks, suggesting a decrease in temporal jitter in response to a speech signal. These results demonstrate that auditory-based cognitive training can partially restore age-related deficits in temporal processing in the brain; this plasticity in turn promotes better cognitive and perceptual skills. PMID:23401541

  8. Reversal of age-related neural timing delays with training

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Samira; White-Schwoch, Travis; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Kraus, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Neural slowing is commonly noted in older adults, with consequences for sensory, motor, and cognitive domains. One of the deleterious effects of neural slowing is impairment of temporal resolution; older adults, therefore, have reduced ability to process the rapid events that characterize speech, especially in noisy environments. Although hearing aids provide increased audibility, they cannot compensate for deficits in auditory temporal processing. Auditory training may provide a strategy to address these deficits. To that end, we evaluated the effects of auditory-based cognitive training on the temporal precision of subcortical processing of speech in noise. After training, older adults exhibited faster neural timing and experienced gains in memory, speed of processing, and speech-in-noise perception, whereas a matched control group showed no changes. Training was also associated with decreased variability of brainstem response peaks, suggesting a decrease in temporal jitter in response to a speech signal. These results demonstrate that auditory-based cognitive training can partially restore age-related deficits in temporal processing in the brain; this plasticity in turn promotes better cognitive and perceptual skills. PMID:23401541

  9. Interpreting the Dependence of Mutation Rates on Age and Time

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ziyue; Wyman, Minyoung J.; Sella, Guy; Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Mutations can originate from the chance misincorporation of nucleotides during DNA replication or from DNA lesions that arise between replication cycles and are not repaired correctly. We introduce a model that relates the source of mutations to their accumulation with cell divisions, providing a framework for understanding how mutation rates depend on sex, age, and cell division rate. We show that the accrual of mutations should track cell divisions not only when mutations are replicative in origin but also when they are non-replicative and repaired efficiently. One implication is that observations from diverse fields that to date have been interpreted as pointing to a replicative origin of most mutations could instead reflect the accumulation of mutations arising from endogenous reactions or exogenous mutagens. We further find that only mutations that arise from inefficiently repaired lesions will accrue according to absolute time; thus, unless life history traits co-vary, the phylogenetic “molecular clock” should not be expected to run steadily across species. PMID:26761240

  10. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  11. Proof of Concept Experiments of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor: An Online, Nondestructive, Near Real-Time Monitor for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2012-04-21

    Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near-real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, a novel approach to safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of {+-} 1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

  12. Association of Environment and Policy Characteristics on Children’s Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity and Time Spent Sedentary in Afterschool Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ajja, Rahma; Clennin, Morgan N.; Weaver, R. Glenn; Moore, Justin B.; Huberty, Jennifer L.; Ward, Dianne S.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Afterschool programs (ASPs) are an important setting in which to promote children’s physical activity. This study examines the association of environmental and policy characteristics on the moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior of children attending ASPs. Methods A total of 1,302 children attending 20 ASPs across South Carolina wore accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X+) for up to 4 non-consecutive days. Policy-level characteristics were evaluated using the Healthy Afterschool Program Index-Physical Activity (HAPI-PA) scale. Physical activity space was measured using a measuring wheel (indoor, ft2) and GIS (outdoor, acres). The structure (free-play or organized) of activity opportunities, was evaluated via direct observation. Time spent in MVPA and sedentary, both indoors and outdoors, was estimated using accelerometry. Results For every 5000ft2 of utilized indoor activity space an additional 2.4 and 3.3 minutes/day of sedentary behavior was observed among boys and girls, respectively. A higher ratio of free-play to organized play was associated with higher indoor sedentary behavior among boys and girls (3.9 minutes/day and 10.0 minutes/day, respectively). For every one acre of outdoor activity space used, an additional 2.7 minutes/day of MVPA was observed for boys. A higher free-play to organized play ratio was associated with higher outdoor MVPA for boys and girls (4.4 and 3.4 minutes/day increase, respectively). Policy characteristics were unrelated to MVPA levels and time spent sedentary. Conclusion Findings indicate that policies and the size of activity space had limited influence on MVPA and sedentary behavior, suggesting that programmatic structure may be a more effective option to improve MVPA levels of children attending ASPs. PMID:25251100

  13. Does Time Matter? Comparing Trajectory Concordance and Covariate Association Using Time-Based and Age-Based Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex R.; Monahan, Kathryn C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Schubert, Carol A.; Mulvey, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    Much criminological research has used longitudinal data to assess change in offending over time. An important feature of some data sources is that they contain cross-sections of different aged individuals followed over successive time periods, thereby potentially conflating age and time. This article compares the substantive conclusions about the…

  14. Aging.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Choon; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2013-09-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  15. Aging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Choon

    2013-01-01

    Aging is initiated based on genetic and environmental factors that operate from the time of birth of organisms. Aging induces physiological phenomena such as reduction of cell counts, deterioration of tissue proteins, tissue atrophy, a decrease of the metabolic rate, reduction of body fluids, and calcium metabolism abnormalities, with final progression onto pathological aging. Despite the efforts from many researchers, the progression and the mechanisms of aging are not clearly understood yet. Therefore, the authors would like to introduce several theories which have gained attentions among the published theories up to date; genetic program theory, wear-and-tear theory, telomere theory, endocrine theory, DNA damage hypothesis, error catastrophe theory, the rate of living theory, mitochondrial theory, and free radical theory. Although there have been many studies that have tried to prevent aging and prolong life, here we introduce a couple of theories which have been proven more or less; food, exercise, and diet restriction. PMID:24653904

  16. Effect of Blade Tenderization, Aging Time and Aging Temperature on Tenderness of Beef Longissimus Lumborum and Gluteus Medius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of blade tenderization, aging time, and aging temperature on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) steaks. Beef strip loins (n = 300) and top sirloin butts (n = 300) were selected from a large beef processor and transported...

  17. Sexuality and Aging: A Timely Addition to the Gerontology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Tanya R.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development and content of a course on sexuality in aging for a gerontology master's program. Topics include physical health, AIDS, gay/lesbian issues, widows/widowers, marriage, ethnic issues, menopause, and impotence. Provides a 33-item bibliography. (SK)

  18. Intermodal transportation of spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, H.K.

    1983-09-01

    Concepts for transportation of spent fuel in rail casks from nuclear power plant sites with no rail service are under consideration by the US Department of Energy in the Commercial Spent Fuel Management program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report identifies and evaluates three alternative systems for intermodal transfer of spent fuel: heavy-haul truck to rail, barge to rail, and barge to heavy-haul truck. This report concludes that, with some modifications and provisions for new equipment, existing rail and marine systems can provide a transportation base for the intermodal transfer of spent fuel to federal interim storage facilities. Some needed land transportation support and loading and unloading equipment does not currently exist. There are insufficient shipping casks available at this time, but the industrial capability to meet projected needs appears adequate.

  19. Off-Stream Watering Systems and Partial Barriers as a Strategy to Maximize Cattle Production and Minimize Time Spent in the Riparian Area

    PubMed Central

    Rawluk, Ashley A.; Crow, Gary; Legesse, Getahun; Veira, Douglas M.; Bullock, Paul R.; González, Luciano A.; Dubois, Melanie; Ominski, Kim H.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The implementation of off-stream waterers (OSW) may reduce the amount of time cattle spend in riparian areas, thus minimizing impacts such as removal of vegetation, soil compaction, and deterioration in water quality. Furthermore, when used with natural barriers as a partial exclusion method, these management strategies may offer a cost-effective alternative to completely excluding cattle via streambank fencing. This study was conducted to determine the impact of OSW and barriers on animal performance and watering behavior. The presence of OSW had no significant effect on cow and calf weights averaged over the grazing season. Although the results were not consistent over the periods and locations, the data provided some indication of the efficacy of the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area. Cattle watered at the OSW when available, but they did not use the OSW exclusively. The observed inconsistency may, in part, be attributed to the environmental conditions present during this field trial. Abstract A study was conducted in 2009 at two locations in Manitoba (Killarney and Souris), Canada to determine the impact of off-stream waterers (OSW) with or without natural barriers on (i) amount of time cattle spent in the 10 m buffer created within the riparian area, referred to as the riparian polygon (RP), (ii) watering location (OSW or stream), and (iii) animal performance measured as weight gain. This study was divided into three 28-day periods over the grazing season. At each location, the pasture—which ranged from 21.0 ha to 39.2 ha in size—was divided into three treatments: no OSW nor barriers (1CONT), OSW with barriers along the stream bank to deter cattle from watering at the stream (2BARR), and OSW without barriers (3NOBARR). Cattle in 2BARR spent less time in the RP in Periods 1 (p = 0.0002), 2 (p = 0.1116), and 3 (p < 0.0001) at the Killarney site compared to cattle in 3NOBARR at the same site. Cattle in 2BARR at the

  20. The Effects of Aging on Time Reproduction in Delayed Free-Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakitin, B.C.; Stern, Y.; Malapani, C.

    2005-01-01

    The experiments presented here demonstrate that normal aging amplifies differences in time production occurring in delayed free-recall testing. Experiment 1 compared the time production ability of two healthy aged groups as well as college-aged participants. During the test session, which followed a 24-h delay and omitted all feedback and examples…

  1. Modeling the Phenotypic Architecture of Autism Symptoms from Time of Diagnosis to Age 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiades, Stelios; Boyle, Michael; Szatmari, Peter; Hanna, Steven; Duku, Eric; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan; Fombonne, Eric; Volden, Joanne; Mirenda, Pat; Smith, Isabel; Roberts, Wendy; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Waddell, Charlotte; Bennett, Teresa; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Thompson, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The latent class structure of autism symptoms from the time of diagnosis to age 6 years was examined in a sample of 280 children with autism spectrum disorder. Factor mixture modeling was performed on 26 algorithm items from the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised at diagnosis (Time 1) and again at age 6 (Time 2). At Time 1, a…

  2. The Cell Cycle: An Activity Using Paper Plates to Represent Time Spent in Phases of the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Yvette D.

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, students are given the opportunity to combine skills in math and geometry for a biology lesson in the cell cycle. Students utilize the data they collect and analyze from an online onion-root-tip activity to create a paper-plate time clock representing a 24-hour cell cycle. By dividing the paper plate into appropriate phases of…

  3. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

    1992-10-15

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems` Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere.

  4. HFIR spent fuel management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

    1992-10-15

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere.

  5. Measuring Space-Time Geometry over the Ages

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, Albert; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Theorists are often told to express things in the 'observational plane'. One can do this for space-time geometry, considering 'visual' observations of matter in our universe by a single observer over time, with no assumptions about isometries, initial conditions, nor any particular relation between matter and geometry, such as Einstein's equations. Using observables as coordinates naturally leads to a parametrization of space-time geometry in terms of other observables, which in turn prescribes an observational program to measure the geometry. Under the assumption of vorticity-free matter flow we describe this observational program, which includes measurements of gravitational lensing, proper motion, and redshift drift. Only 15% of the curvature information can be extracted without long time baseline observations, and this increases to 35% with observations that will take decades. The rest would likely require centuries of observations. The formalism developed is exact, non-perturbative, and more general than the usual cosmological analysis.

  6. MONITORING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING CONDITIONS NON-DESTRUCTIVELY AND IN NEAR-REAL-TIME USING THE MULTI-ISOTOPE PROCESS (MIP) MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Douglas, Matthew; Christensen, Richard; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2010-05-07

    Researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and The Ohio State University are working to develop a system for monitoring spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities on-line, nondestructively, and in near-real-time. This method, known as the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, is based upon the measurement of distribution patterns of a suite of indicator (radioactive) isotopes present within product and waste streams of a nuclear reprocessing facility. Signatures from these indicator isotopes are monitored on-line by gamma spectrometry and compared, in near-real-time, to patterns representing "normal" process conditions using multivariate pattern recognition software. By targeting gamma-emitting indicator isotopes, the MIP Monitor approach is compatible with the use of small, portable, high-resolution gamma detectors that may be easily deployed throughout an existing facility. In addition, utilization of a suite of radio-elements, including ones with multiple oxidation states, increases the likelihood that attempts to divert material via process manipulation would be detected. Proof-of-principle modeling exercises simulating changes in acid strength have been completed and the results are promising. Laboratory testing is currently under way and significant results are available. Recent experimental results, along with an overview of the method are presented.

  7. Modelling of time resolved and long contact time dissolution studies of spent nuclear fuel in 10 mM carbonate solution A comparison between two different models and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Trygve E.; Jonsson, Mats; Merino, Juan

    2008-04-01

    Using two different models, radiation induced dissolution of spent UO 2 fuel has been simulated. One of the models is conventional homogeneous radiolysis simulations where two different geometrical constraints were used and the second model is the recently developed steady-state model. The results of the simulations are compared to each other and to experimental results from spent fuel leaching experiments performed in carbonate containing aqueous solution under Ar-atmosphere. The influence of radiolytically produced H 2 is incorporated (on the basis of a recently suggested mechanism) in both models and this reproduces the experimentally observed inhibition of spent fuel dissolution fairly well. The conventional radiolysis model reproduces the experimental concentrations of the radiolysis products H 2 and O 2 very well while it fails to reproduce the experimental H 2O 2 concentration. The reasons for this are discussed. The general trend in uranium concentration as a function of time is reproduced by both the conventional radiolysis model and the steady-state model. The conventional radiolysis model (in which the radiation dose is homogeneously distributed in the whole liquid volume) underestimates the uranium concentration while the steady-state model, which represents the worst case scenario, overestimates the concentrations to some extent. When applying the conventional radiolysis model, assuming that all the radiation energy is deposited within 40 μm from the fuel surface, the uranium concentrations during the initial part of the experiments are reproduced quantitatively. The differences between the models and the applicability of the models are discussed in some detail.

  8. Age-related differences in predictive response timing in children: evidence from regularly relative to irregularly paced reaction time performance.

    PubMed

    Debrabant, Julie; Gheysen, Freja; Vingerhoets, Guy; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2012-08-01

    Predictive timing refers to the anticipation and precise timing of planned motor responses. This study was performed to investigate children's predictive response timing abilities while accounting for confounding age-related effects of motor speed. Indices of predictive timing were evaluated for their contributions in motor skill proficiency as well. Eighty typically developing children in 4 age groups (5-6, 7-8, 9-10 and 11-12 years) performed a visuomotor reaction time (RT) test. Differences in speed and anticipatory responding at regularly relative to irregularly paced stimuli were evaluated as indices of predictive timing. Also, explicit timing and motor tests (M-ABC-2, VMI tracing, and KTK jumping) were administered. Significant faster responding for regularly versus irregularly paced stimuli was found from the ages of 9-10 years on. Better anticipatory responding behavior for regular in contrast with irregular stimuli was found to be present already at 7-8 years. Overall, predictive timing abilities increased across the 4 age groups. Also, inter-individual differences in the speed indices of predictive timing contributed to predicting VMI tracing and KTK jumping outcomes when controlling for age and overall motor response speed. In conclusion, predictive motor timing abilities increase during age 5 to 12 and correlate with motor skill performance. PMID:22494922

  9. The role of time and time perspective in age-related processes: Introduction to the special issue.

    PubMed

    Fung, Helene H; Isaacowitz, Derek M

    2016-09-01

    There currently appears to be a general consensus on the relationship between time perspective and aging, such that (a) future time is perceived as more limited with age and (b) older people are more present-focused and less future-focused than younger people. At the same time, there are debates about whether these age differences are positively related to well-being and to what extent there are boundary conditions beyond which these age differences would cease to occur. The 8 manuscripts included in this Special Issue attempt to shed light on these debates. In doing so, they refine the dominant theoretical perspective on the topic-socioemotional selectivity theory-and introduce new theoretical perspectives. New measures and methodologies for studying time perspective and aging are also discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27599019

  10. Lake Erie Yellow perch age estimation based on three structures: Precision, processing times, and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, C.S.; Bur, M.T.; Powell, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Yellow perch Perca flavescens support economically important recreational and commercial fisheries in Lake Erie and are intensively managed. Age estimation represents an integral component in the management of Lake Erie yellow perch stocks, as age-structured population models are used to set safe harvest levels on an annual basis. We compared the precision associated with yellow perch (N = 251) age estimates from scales, sagittal otoliths, and anal spine sections and evaluated the time required to process and estimate age from each structure. Three readers of varying experience estimated ages. The precision (mean coefficient of variation) of estimates among readers was 1% for sagittal otoliths, 5-6% for anal spines, and 11-13% for scales. Agreement rates among readers were 94-95% for otoliths, 71-76% for anal spines, and 45-50% for scales. Systematic age estimation differences were evident among scale and anal spine readers; less-experienced readers tended to underestimate ages of yellow perch older than age 4 relative to estimates made by an experienced reader. Mean scale age tended to underestimate ages of age-6 and older fish relative to otolith ages estimated by an experienced reader. Total annual mortality estimates based on scale ages were 20% higher than those based on otolith ages; mortality estimates based on anal spine ages were 4% higher than those based on otolith ages. Otoliths required more removal and preparation time than scales and anal spines, but age estimation time was substantially lower for otoliths than for the other two structures. We suggest the use of otoliths or anal spines for age estimation in yellow perch (regardless of length) from Lake Erie and other systems where precise age estimates are necessary, because age estimation errors resulting from the use of scales could generate incorrect management decisions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  11. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Favalli, Andrea; Vo, D.; Grogan, Brandon R.; Jansson, Peter; Liljenfeldt, Henrik; Mozin, Vladimir; Schwalbach, P.; Sjoland, A.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Trellue, Holly; et al

    2016-02-26

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuelmore » assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. Furthermore, the results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.« less

  12. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  13. A Comparison of Variable Time Compressed Speech and Normal Rate Speech Based on Time Spent and Performance in a Course Taught by Self-Instructional Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Sarah Harvey

    The purpose of this study was to determine with precise measurements of time and carefully constructed posttests whether sighted students in a college course would save time and achieve higher scores when listening to cognitive information using variable time compressors as compared with students listening using normal speed tape recorders. The…

  14. Is It Time Well Spent? The Relationship between Time Management Behaviours, Perceived Effectiveness and Work-Related Morale and Distress in a University Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Hugh; Gardiner, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Despite the high "guru-factor" in time management, few claims have been subjected to empirical investigation. This study tests the claims that people who manage their time well perceive themselves to be more effective and feel less stressed. University staff and students were utilized to investigate the relationship between time management related…

  15. Associations between dietary patterns, physical activity (leisure-time and occupational) and television viewing in middle-aged French adults.

    PubMed

    Charreire, Hélène; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Bertrais, Sandrine; Simon, Chantal; Chaix, Basile; Weber, Christiane; Touvier, Mathilde; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Oppert, Jean-Michel

    2011-03-01

    Diet and physical activity are considered to be major components of a healthy lifestyle. However, few studies have examined in detail the relationships between specific types of physical activity, sedentary behaviour and diet in adults. The objective of the present study was to assess differential relationships between dietary patterns, leisure-time and occupational physical activities and time spent watching television (TV), as an indicator of sedentary behaviour, in middle-aged French subjects. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using data from 1359 participants in the SUpplémentation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants study, who completed a detailed physical activity questionnaire and at least six 24 h dietary records. Sex-specific dietary patterns were derived using factor analysis; their relationships with leisure-time and occupational physical activities and TV viewing were assessed using ANCOVA, after adjustment for age, educational level and smoking status. Three dietary patterns were identified in each sex. After adjustment for potential confounders, leisure-time physical activity was positively associated with a 'healthy' food pattern in both men (P for trend < 0·01) and women (P for trend < 0·03) and negatively associated with an 'alcohol/meat' pattern in men (P for trend < 0·01). TV viewing was positively associated with a 'convenience' pattern in men and with a 'alcohol-appetiser' pattern in women. In conclusion, identification of relationships between dietary patterns, physical activity and sedentary behaviour can enable identification of different types of lifestyle and should help to target at-risk groups in nutrition prevention programmes. PMID:21251337

  16. Gender Transitions in Later Life: The Significance of Time in Queer Aging

    PubMed Central

    Fabbre, Vanessa D.

    2014-01-01

    Concepts of time are ubiquitous in studies of aging. This article integrates an existential perspective on time with a notion of queer time based on the experiences of older transgender persons who contemplate or pursue a gender transition in later life. Interviews were conducted with male-to-female identified persons aged 50 years or older (N=22), along with participant observation at three national transgender conferences (N=170 hours). Interpretive analyses suggest that an awareness of “time left to live” and a feeling of “time served” play a significant role in later life development and help expand gerontological perspectives on time and queer aging. PMID:24798691

  17. Effect of blade tenderization, aging time, and aging temperature on tenderness of beef longissimus lumborum and gluteus medius.

    PubMed

    King, D A; Wheeler, T L; Shackelford, S D; Pfeiffer, K D; Nickelson, R; Koohmaraie, M

    2009-09-01

    Purveyors are concerned about the potential food safety risk of nonintact meat products and are seeking strategies to ensure adequate meat tenderness without blade tenderization. This study was conducted to determine the effects of blade tenderization and time and temperature of aging on beef longissimus lumborum (LL) and gluteus medius (GM) tenderness. Beef strip loins (n = 300) and top sirloin butts (n = 300) were assigned to storage at -0.5 or 3.3 degrees C for 12, 26, or 40 d. Cuts were blade tenderized (BT) or not blade tenderized (NBT) before steak cutting. One 2.54-cm steak from each subprimal was used for slice shear force determination and Western blotting of desmin. Desmin degradation was less (P < 0.05) in LL stored at -0.5 degrees C than LL stored at 3.3 degrees C (57 and 65%, respectively). Aging from 12 to 26 d increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis (50 to 65%) in LL. Regardless of aging time, BT reduced (P < 0.05) LL slice shear force values. Aging time did not affect (P > 0.05) slice shear force values of BT LL steaks (10.4, 9.9, and 9.4 kg for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively), but reduced (P < 0.05) NBT steak slice shear force values (15.1, 13.8, and 12.3 kg for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively). Greater temperature did not affect (P > 0.05) slice shear force values of BT LL steaks (10.2 and 9.6 kg for steaks aged at -0.5 and 3.3 degrees C, respectively), but improved (P < 0.05) slice shear force of NBT LL steaks (15.1 and 12.4, respectively). Aging at 3.3 degrees C increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis in GM steaks (43 and 54% for -0.5 and 3.3 degrees C, respectively). Longer aging times increased (P < 0.05) proteolysis (40, 46, and 60% for 12, 26, and 40 d aging, respectively) in GM steaks. Blade-tenderized GM steaks had dramatically less (P < 0.05) slice shear force values than NBT steaks (13.7 and 19.9 kg, respectively). Raising aging temperature from -0.5 to 3.3 degrees C reduced (17.6 vs. 16.0 kg; P < 0.05) and increasing aging time from 12 d

  18. Age and Time Population Differences: Young Adults, Gen Xers, and Millennials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Lauren A.

    2013-01-01

    Age and Time disparities in young adult research populations are common because young adults are defined by varying age spans; members of Generation X and Millennial generations may both be considered young adults; study years vary, affecting populations; and qualitative methods with limited age/year samples are frequently utilized. The current…

  19. A study on the expulsion of iodine from spent-fuel solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Akira; Ishikawa, Niroh

    1995-02-01

    During dissolution of spent nuclear fuels, some radioiodine remains in spent-fuel solutions. Its expulsion to dissolver off-gas is important to minimize iodine escape to the environment. In our current work, the iodine remaining in spent-fuel solutions varied from 0 to 10% after dissolution of spent PWR-fuel specimens (approximately 3 g each). The amount remaining probably was dependent upon the dissolution time required. The cause is ascribable to the increased nitrous acid concentration that results from NOx generated during dissolution. The presence of nitrous acid was confirmed spectrophotometrically in an NO-HNO{sub 3} system at 100{degrees}C. Experiments examining NOx concentration versus the quantity of iodine in a simulated spent-fuel solution indicate that iodine (I{minus}) in spent fuels is subjected to the following three reactions: (1) oxidation into I{sub 2} by nitric acid, (2) oxidation into I{sub 2} by nitrous acid arising from NOx, and (3) formation of colloidal iodine (AgI, PdI{sub 2}), the major iodine species in a spent-fuel solution. Reaction (2) competes with reaction (3) to control the quantity of iodine remaining in solution. The following two-step expulsion process to remove iodine from a spent-fuel solution was derived from these experiments: Step One - Heat spent-fuel solutions without NOx sparging. When aged colloidal iodine is present, an excess amount of iodate should be added to the solution. Step Two - Sparge the fuel solution with NOx while heating. Effect of this new method was confirmed by use of a spent PWR-fuel solution.

  20. Intermodal transfer of spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K. S.; Weiner, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    As a result of the international standardization of containerized cargo handling in ports around the world, maritime shipment handling is particularly uniform. Thus, handier exposure parameters will be relatively constant for ship-truck and ship-rail transfers at ports throughout the world. Inspectors' doses are expected to vary because of jurisdictional considerations. The results of this study should be applicable to truck-to-rail transfers. A study of the movement of spent fuel casks through ports, including the loading and unloading of containers from cargo vessels, afforded an opportunity to estimate the radiation doses to those individuals handling the spent fuels with doses to the public along subsequent transportation routes of the fuel. A number of states require redundant inspections and for escorts over long distances on highways; thus handlers, inspectors, escort personnel, and others who are not normally classified as radiation workers may sustain doses high enough to warrant concern about occupational safety. This paper addresses the question of radiation safety for these workers. Data were obtained during, observation of the offloading of reactor spent fuel (research reactor spent fuel, in this instance) which included estimates of exposure times and distances for handlers, inspectors and other workers during offloading and overnight storage. Exposure times and distance were also for other workers, including crane operators, scale operators, security personnel and truck drivers. RADTRAN calculational models and parameter values then facilitated estimation of the dose to workers during incident-free ship-to-truck transfer of spent fuel.

  1. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  2. Team Work: Time well Spent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore Johnson, Susan; Reinhorn, Stefanie K.; Simon, Nicole S.

    2016-01-01

    Teachers in high-poverty schools often feel stressed and fatigued. We might expect that if we ask these teachers to take on even more work by meeting regularly in collaborative improvement teams, they will respond with skepticism, even resentment. But in a study of 83 teachers in six outstanding high-poverty schools, these researchers found the…

  3. A Comparison of Variable Time-Compressed Speech and Normal Rate Speech Based on Time Spent and Performance in a Course Taught by Self-Instructional Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Sarah Harvey

    1977-01-01

    College students using variable rate controlled speech compressors as compared with normal speed tape recorders had an average time saving of 32 percent and an average grade increase of 4.2 points on post-test scores. (Author)

  4. Testing Age-Paced Parenting Newsletters up to Age 3: Greater Impact on First-Time Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostergren, Carol S.; Riley, David A.

    2012-01-01

    An age-paced newsletter for parents of toddlers was evaluated. Mothers reported the newsletters were as useful as information from doctors or nurses and more useful than other sources of information. We hypothesized and found that first-time mothers reported the newsletters more useful than experienced mothers--reading more of the newsletters and…

  5. Effect of Blade Tenderization, Aging Time, and Aging Temperature on Tenderness of Beef Longissimus Lumborum and Gluteus Medius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purveyors are concerned about the food safety risk of non-intact meat products and are seeking strategies to ensure adequate meat tenderness without blade tenderization. This study was conducted to determine the effects of blade tenderization and time and temperature of aging on beef longissimus lu...

  6. Associations between Menarcheal Timing and Behavioral Developmental Trajectories for Girls from Age 6 to Age 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRose, Laura M.; Shiyko, Mariya P.; Foster, Holly; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Substantial evidence from cross-sectional and short time-span longitudinal studies exists about negative associations between early pubertal maturation on a number of psychological outcomes. The objective of the present study was to assess the association between early maturation and developmental trajectories of social skills and internalizing…

  7. Influence of evisceration time and carcass ageing conditions on wild venison quality. Preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Soriano, A; Montoro, V; Vicente, J; Sánchez-Migallón, B F; Benítez, S; Utrilla, M C; García Ruiz, A

    2016-04-01

    The influence of common carcass preparation practices of wild red deer on the physicochemical, microbiological and sensory quality of venison was assessed by varying evisceration time and ageing method. Deer were head shot; half were eviscerated 30min and the other half 4h post mortem. In both groups (n=18), 6 carcasses were skinned immediately after evisceration and aged for 24h; 6 were aged unskinned for 24h and 6 were aged unskinned for 72h at 10°C. Ageing method had a significant effect on the sensory quality of venison loin; unskinned ageing was associated with an increase of odour and taste intensity, and higher scores for gamey and sweet/caramel flavours. Carcasses aged for 72h displayed darker and tender meat, but increased aerobic bacterial counts. Evisceration time had less influence on loin quality, although off-flavours were more often detected in deer eviscerated 4h post mortem. PMID:26773970

  8. Subliminal strengthening: improving older individuals' physical function over time with an implicit-age-stereotype intervention.

    PubMed

    Levy, Becca R; Pilver, Corey; Chung, Pil H; Slade, Martin D

    2014-12-01

    Negative age stereotypes that older individuals assimilate from their culture predict detrimental outcomes, including worse physical function. We examined, for the first time, whether positive age stereotypes, presented subliminally across multiple sessions in the community, would lead to improved outcomes. Each of 100 older individuals (age=61-99 years, M=81) was randomly assigned to an implicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, an explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, a combined implicit- and explicit-positive-age-stereotype-intervention group, or a control group. Interventions occurred at four 1-week intervals. The implicit intervention strengthened positive age stereotypes, which strengthened positive self-perceptions of aging, which, in turn, improved physical function. The improvement in these outcomes continued for 3 weeks after the last intervention session. Further, negative age stereotypes and negative self-perceptions of aging were weakened. For all outcomes, the implicit intervention's impact was greater than the explicit intervention's impact. The physical-function effect of the implicit intervention surpassed a previous study's 6-month-exercise-intervention's effect with participants of similar ages. The current study's findings demonstrate the potential of directing implicit processes toward physical-function enhancement over time. PMID:25326508

  9. Age-related differences in time-based prospective memory: The role of time estimation in the clock monitoring strategy.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Sandrine; Baudouin, Alexia; Bouazzaoui, Badiâa; Taconnat, Laurence

    2016-07-01

    Time-based prospective memory (TBPM) is required when it is necessary to remember to perform an action at a specific future point in time. This type of memory has been found to be particularly sensitive to ageing, probably because it requires a self-initiated response at a specific time. In this study, we sought to examine the involvement of temporal processes in the time monitoring strategy, which has been demonstrated to be a decisive factor in TBPM efficiency. We compared the performance of young and older adults in a TBPM task in which they had to press a response button every minute while categorising words. The design allowed participants to monitor time by checking a clock whenever they decided. Participants also completed a classic time-production task and several executive tasks assessing inhibition, updating and shifting processes. Our results confirm an age-related lack of accuracy in prospective memory performance, which seems to be related to a deficient strategic use of time monitoring. This could in turn be partially explained by age-related temporal deficits, as evidenced in the duration production task. These findings suggest that studies designed to investigate the age effect in TBPM tasks should consider the contribution of temporal mechanisms. PMID:26247302

  10. Using prime-time animation to engage students in courses on aging.

    PubMed

    Curch, Lisa M

    2010-01-01

    Prime-time animation is a television genre that frequently reflects on issues that are significant in contemporary society, including aging issues. Using such programs to present aging-related content can be a constructive pedagogical device, offering a means of actively engaging students. This article provides a brief overview of the use of media, popular culture, and prime-time animation in college teaching and addresses specific issues in, as well as examples of, how such programs can be used in college courses, particularly aging courses. The article also reports on a small survey of students who were exposed to such a teaching technique in an undergraduate aging course. Results showed that, in general, students were positive about viewing prime-time animation videos in class and indicated that they found the viewings and associated assignments helpful for learning about concepts and issues in aging. PMID:21108101

  11. Age Differences in Goal Concordance, Time Use, and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yiwei; Lee, Yue-Ting; Pethtel, Olivia L.; Gutowitz, Michael S.; Kirk, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate age differences in goal concordance, time use, and Well-Being. Past research has found that despite age-related decline in life circumstances (e.g., health), the Well-Being of older adults is as high as young adults. The present study used a novel approach to explore the Paradox of…

  12. Do Sources of Cigarettes among Adolescents Vary by Age over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenk, Kathleen M.; Toomey, Traci L.; Shi, Qun; Erickson, Darin J.; Forster, Jean L.

    2014-01-01

    Trends in sources of cigarettes among adolescents were assessed using data from a teen cohort (2000-2006). Five sources--bought from store, got from other teen, stole from others, bought from others, and got from an adult--were measured over time by age. The most common source among all ages was other teens. Fewer teens bought cigarettes from…

  13. Syllable-Timed Speech Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter: A Phase I Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Cheryl; O'Brian, Sue; Harrison, Elisabeth; Onslow, Mark; Packman, Ann; Menzies, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This clinical trial determined the outcomes of a simple syllable-timed speech (STS) treatment for school-age children who stutter. Method: Participants were 10 children, ages 6-11 years, who stutter. Treatment involved training the children and their parents to use STS at near normal speech rates. The technique was practiced in the clinic…

  14. Age of Inhalant First Time Use and Its Association to the Use of Other Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Kele; Chang, G. Andy; Southerland, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Inhalants are the 4th most commonly abused drugs after alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. Although inhalants are often referred as Gateway Drugs this hypothesis is less examined. Using the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data, age of first time inhalant use was compared with the age of onset of other drugs among 6466 inhalant users who…

  15. Real-Time Language Processing in School-Age Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, James W.

    2006-01-01

    Background:School-age children with specific language impairment (SLI) exhibit slower real-time (i.e. immediate) language processing relative to same-age peers and younger, language-matched peers. Results of the few studies that have been done seem to indicate that the slower language processing of children with SLI is due to inefficient…

  16. Using Prime-Time Animation to Engage Students in Courses on Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curch, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Prime-time animation is a television genre that frequently reflects on issues that are significant in contemporary society, including aging issues. Using such programs to present aging-related content can be a constructive pedagogical device, offering a means of actively engaging students. This article provides a brief overview of the use of…

  17. Transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous and autonomous compartmental systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rasmussen, Martin; Hastings, Alan; Smith, Matthew J.; Agusto, Folashade B.; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Jiang, Jiang; Todd-Brown, Katherine E. O.; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ying -Ping; et al

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop a theory for transit times and mean ages for nonautonomous compartmental systems. Using the McKendrick–von Förster equation, we show that the mean ages of mass in a compartmental system satisfy a linear nonautonomous ordinary differential equation that is exponentially stable. We then define a nonautonomous version of transit time as the mean age of mass leaving the compartmental system at a particular time and show that our nonautonomous theory generalises the autonomous case. We apply these results to study a nine-dimensional nonautonomous compartmental system modeling the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a modification of themore » Carnegie–Ames–Stanford approach model, and we demonstrate that the nonautonomous versions of transit time and mean age differ significantly from the autonomous quantities when calculated for that model.« less

  18. In vitro 3-D model based on extending time of culture for studying chronological epidermis aging.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Morgan; Metral, Elodie; Boher, Aurélie; Rousselle, Patricia; Thepot, Amélie; Damour, Odile

    2015-09-01

    Skin aging is a complex phenomenon in which several mechanisms operate simultaneously. Among them, intrinsic aging is a time-dependent process, which leads to gradual skin changes affecting its structure and function such as thinning down of both epidermal and dermal compartments and a flattening and fragility of the dermo-epidermal junction. Today, several approaches have been proposed for the generation of aged skin in vitro, including skin explants from aged donors and three-dimensional skin equivalent treated by aging-inducing chemical compounds or engineered with human cells isolated from aged donors. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new in vitro model of aging based on skin equivalent demonstrating the same phenotypic changes that were observed in chronological aging. By using prolonged culture as a proxy for cellular aging, we extended to 120 days the culture time of a skin equivalent model based on collagen-glycosaminoglycan-chitosan porous polymer and engineered with human skin cells from photo-protected sites of young donors. Morphological, immunohistological and ultrastructural analysis at different time points of the culture allowed characterizing the phenotypic changes observed in our model in comparison to samples of non photo-exposed normal human skin from different ages. We firstly confirmed that long-term cultured skin equivalents are still morphologically consistent and functionally active even after 120 days of culture. However, similar to in vivo chronological skin aging a significant decrease of the epidermis thickness as well as the number of keratinocyte expressing proliferation marker Ki67 are observed in extended culture time skin equivalent. Epidermal differentiation markers loricrin, filaggrin, involucrin and transglutaminase, also strongly decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of basement membrane showed typical features of aged skin such as duplication of lamina densa and alterations of hemidesmosomes. Moreover, the

  19. Ages at a Crime Scene: Simultaneous Estimation of the Time since Deposition and Age of Its Originator.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Juliana; Halámková, Lenka; Brunelle, Erica; Rodrigues, Roselyn; Huynh, Crystal; Halámek, Jan

    2016-06-21

    Blood is a major contributor of evidence in investigations involving violent crimes because of the unique composition of proteins and low molecular weight compounds present in the circulatory system, which often serve as biomarkers in clinical diagnostics. It was recently shown that biomarkers present in blood can also identify characteristics of the originator, such as ethnicity and biological sex. A biocatalytic assay for on-site forensic investigations was developed to simultaneously identify the age range of the blood sample originator and the time since deposition (TSD) of the blood spot. For these two characteristics to be identified, the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a marker commonly used in clinical diagnostics corresponding to old and young originators, were monitored after deposition for up to 48 h to mimic a crime scene setting. ALP was chosen as the biomarker due to its age-dependent nature. The biocatalytic assay was used to determine the age range of the originator using human serum samples. By means of statistical tools for evaluation and the physiological levels of ALP in healthy people, the applicability of this assay in forensic science was shown for the simultaneous determination of the age of the originator and the TSD of the blood spot. The stability of ALP in serum allows for the differentiation between old and young originators up to 2 days after the sample was left under mimicked crime scene conditions. PMID:27212711

  20. Time pressure and coworker support mediate the curvilinear relationship between age and occupational well-being.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Hannes; Jimmieson, Nerina L; Bordia, Prashant

    2014-10-01

    As the proportion of older employees in the workforce is growing, researchers have become increasingly interested in the association between age and occupational well-being. The curvilinear nature of relationships between age and job satisfaction and between age and emotional exhaustion is well-established in the literature, with employees in their late 20s to early 40s generally reporting lower levels of occupational well-being than younger and older employees. However, the mechanisms underlying these curvilinear relationships are so far not well understood due to a lack of studies testing mediation effects. Based on an integration of role theory and research from the adult development and career literatures, this study examined time pressure, work-home conflict, and coworker support as mediators of the relationships between age and job satisfaction and between age and emotional exhaustion. Data came from 771 employees between 17 and 74 years of age in the construction industry. Results showed that employees in their late 20s to early 40s had lower job satisfaction and higher emotional exhaustion than younger and older employees. Time pressure and coworker support fully mediated both the U-shaped relationship between age and job satisfaction and the inversely U-shaped relationship between age and emotional exhaustion. These findings suggest that organizational interventions may help increase the relatively low levels of occupational well-being in certain age groups. PMID:24885685

  1. Effects of real-time thermal aging on graphite/polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, J. F.; Kerr, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a program to evaluate high-temperature advanced composites for use on supersonic cruise transport aircraft, two graphite/polyimide composites have been aged at elevated temperatures for times up to 5.7 years. Work on the first, HT-S/710 graphite/polyimide, was started in 1974. Evaluation of the second polyimide, Celion 6000/LARC-160, began in 1980. Baseline properties are presented, including unnotched and notched tensile data as a function of temperature, compression, flexure, shear, and constant-amplitude fatigue data at R = 0.1 and R = -1. Tensile specimens were aged in ovens where pressure and aging temperatures were controlled for various times up to and including 50,000 hours. Changes in tensile strength were determined and plotted as a function of aging time. The HT-S/710 composite aged at 450 F and 550 F if compared to the Celion 6000/LARC-160 composite aged at 350 F and 450 F. After tensile testing, many of the thermal aging specimens were examined using a scanning electron microscope. Results of these studies are presented, and changes in properties and degradation mechanisms during high-temperature aging are discussed and illustrated using metallographic techniques.

  2. Estimating survival rates with time series of standing age-structure data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, Mark S.; Gogan, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that age-structure data contain useful information for assessing the status and dynamics of wildlife populations. For example, age-specific survival rates can be estimated with just a single sample from the age distribution of a stable, stationary population. For a population that is not stable, age-specific survival rates can be estimated using techniques such as inverse methods that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data. However, estimation of survival rates using these methods typically requires numerical optimization, a relatively long time series of data, and smoothing or other constraints to provide useful estimates. We developed general models for possibly unstable populations that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data to provide explicit maximum likelihood estimators of age-specific survival rates with as few as two years of data. As an example, we applied these methods to estimate survival rates for female bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. This approach provides a simple tool for monitoring survival rates based on age-structure data.

  3. Age-dependent inhibition of pentobarbital sleeping time by ozone in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Canada, A.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Leonard, D.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of age on the metabolism of pentobarbital in mice and rats was investigated following exposure to 0.3 ppm of ozone for 3.75 hr. Young animals were 2.5 months of age and the mature were 18 months. The pentobarbital sleeping time was significantly prolonged following the ozone exposure in both the mice and rats when compared with an air control. No ozone effect on sleeping time was found in the young animals. The results indicate that there may be an age-related sensitivity to the occurrence of ozone-related inhibition of pentobarbital metabolism.

  4. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task.

    PubMed

    Woods, David L; Wyma, John M; Yund, E William; Herron, Timothy J; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18-82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  5. Age-related slowing of response selection and production in a visual choice reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Woods, David L.; Wyma, John M.; Yund, E. William; Herron, Timothy J.; Reed, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with delayed processing in choice reaction time (CRT) tasks, but the processing stages most impacted by aging have not been clearly identified. Here, we analyzed CRT latencies in a computerized serial visual feature-conjunction task. Participants responded to a target letter (probability 40%) by pressing one mouse button, and responded to distractor letters differing either in color, shape, or both features from the target (probabilities 20% each) by pressing the other mouse button. Stimuli were presented randomly to the left and right visual fields and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) were adaptively reduced following correct responses using a staircase procedure. In Experiment 1, we tested 1466 participants who ranged in age from 18 to 65 years. CRT latencies increased significantly with age (r = 0.47, 2.80 ms/year). Central processing time (CPT), isolated by subtracting simple reaction times (SRT) (obtained in a companion experiment performed on the same day) from CRT latencies, accounted for more than 80% of age-related CRT slowing, with most of the remaining increase in latency due to slowed motor responses. Participants were faster and more accurate when the stimulus location was spatially compatible with the mouse button used for responding, and this effect increased slightly with age. Participants took longer to respond to distractors with target color or shape than to distractors with no target features. However, the additional time needed to discriminate the more target-like distractors did not increase with age. In Experiment 2, we replicated the findings of Experiment 1 in a second population of 178 participants (ages 18–82 years). CRT latencies did not differ significantly in the two experiments, and similar effects of age, distractor similarity, and stimulus-response spatial compatibility were found. The results suggest that the age-related slowing in visual CRT latencies is largely due to delays in response selection and

  6. The effects of ageing time on the microstructure and properties of mesoporous silica-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefpour, Mardali; Taherian, Zahra

    2013-02-01

    In this study, a mesoporous silica-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite (MCM-41/HA) was synthesized via sol-gel technique as a drug delivery system. The synthesis of MCM-41/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite was carried out at room temperature. The effect of various ageing time on the nanocomposite properties was studied during synthesis process. 0, 24, 36, and 48 h aging times were chosen. Textural properties and microstructure of the nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Electron Diffraction pattern (ED), and N2 adsorption-desorption. Results showed that ageing process led to HA crystals nucleation and growth on the surface of mesoporous silica. At 48 h of aging time, the surface area and total pore volume increased from 36.2 to 334 m2/g and 0.14-0.7 cm3/g, respectively. In contrast, the average pore diameter considerably decreased from 20.1 nm for (MCM-41/HA)24 to 8.39 nm for (MCM-41/HA)48. Furthermore, it was observed more homogeneous pore distribution with increasing the ageing time. In conclusion, the ageing time play an important role on textural properties of MCM-41/HA nanocomposite which could have a major effect on drug delivery properties such as molecular loading and release kinetics.

  7. Ergodicity breaking, ageing, and confinement in generalized diffusion processes with position and time dependent diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    We study generalized anomalous diffusion processes whose diffusion coefficient D(x, t) ∼ D0|x|αtβ depends on both the position x of the test particle and the process time t. This process thus combines the features of scaled Brownian motion and heterogeneous diffusion parent processes. We compute the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements of this generalized diffusion process. The scaling exponent of the ensemble averaged mean squared displacement is shown to be the product of the critical exponents of the parent processes, and describes both subdiffusive and superdiffusive systems. We quantify the amplitude fluctuations of the time averaged mean squared displacement as function of the length of the time series and the lag time. In particular, we observe a weak ergodicity breaking of this generalized diffusion process: even in the long time limit the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements are strictly disparate. When we start to observe this process some time after its initiation we observe distinct features of ageing. We derive a universal ageing factor for the time averaged mean squared displacement containing all information on the ageing time and the measurement time. External confinement is shown to alter the magnitudes and statistics of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements.

  8. Age of the mother as a risk factor and timing of hypospadias repair according to severity

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Brayfield, Marcos Raymond; Torres, Camille M.; Piñeyro-Ruiz, Coriness; Torres, Naillil

    2016-01-01

    Background & Objectives Hypospadias is characterized by a displacement of the urethral opening in males that can change from the typical position within the glans penis to a subcoronal position (Type I), to anywhere along the ventral shaft (Type II), to penoscrotal, scrotal, or perineal positions (Type III). We and others have previously reported that age of the mother (≥ 40 years old) is a risk factor for having a child with hypospadias, but there is a scarcity of reports on whether such risk is higher for having a child with the mild (Type I) or the more severe forms (Types II and III). In addition, we aimed to assess the timing of hypospadias repair according to severity. Methods Parents of children with hypospadias were interviewed by using a series of questionnaires (n = 128 cases). Severity was confirmed in the clinic and age of the mother was self-reported. Number of surgeries, age of child by the first and the last intervention was also assessed. Ordered logistic regression and the Brant test were employed to calculate risk between mild (Type I) and severe cases (Types II and III), and the assumption of proportional odds, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U Test was used to compare number of surgeries and age by the last repair between mild and severe cases. One-way ANOVA was employed to compare age of the child at the time of first surgery across severities (Types I - III). Results Women ≥ 40 years of age are 3.89 times [95% CI: 1.20-12.64] at a higher risk for having a child with the more severe forms of the condition than younger women. Repair of Type I was accomplished with 1 intervention whereas more severe cases required 1 – 4 (2 ± 0.5) surgical interventions. The timing for hypospadias repair of Type I cases occurred at an average age of 16.2 ± 4.88 months, of Type II cases occurred at an average age of 20.3 ± 8.15 months whereas the average age of the first hypospadias repair among Type III cases was 12.68 ± 2.52 months. Number of surgeries

  9. Federal Expenditures on Elementary-Age Children in 2008 (Ages 6 through 11)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vericker, Tracy C.; Macomber, Jennifer; Isaacs, Julia; Kent, Adam; Bringewatt, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a first-time analysis of the nation's current investments in elementary-age children, defined as children ages 6 through 11. The authors consider over 100 federal programs through which the federal government allocates money to children, and subsequently estimate the amount spent on six- to eleven-year-old children. This…

  10. Effects of blade tenderization, aging method and aging time on meat quality characteristics of Longissimus lumborum steaks from cull Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Obuz, Ersel; Akkaya, Levent; Gök, Veli; Dikeman, Michael E

    2014-03-01

    The effects of blade tenderization (BT), two aging methods (dry (D) and wet (W)), and aging time (2 and 23 d) on tenderness, color, and sensory properties of Longissimus lumborum muscles from 12 cull Holstein cows were evaluated. Dry-aged loins had higher combined trim and aging losses than control (C) for both D- and W-aging, mostly because of excess trim losses. BT steaks had WBSF of 33.13 N while C steaks had WBSF of 41.46 N (P=0.09). Aging decreased WBSF. Blade tenderized steaks had higher cook loss than C steaks. Aging, W-aging, and BT×W-aging improved myofibrillar (sensory) tenderness scores. Aging and/or BT improves sensory panel tenderness cull cow Longissimus lumborum steaks. Aging and blade tenderization combined can increase tenderness and value of Longissimus steaks from cull Holstein cows. PMID:24334044

  11. Development: Ages & Stages--How Children Develop a Sense of Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Carla; Miller, Susan A.; Church, Ellen Booth

    2006-01-01

    This article presents suggestions on how to increase awareness of a sense of time for infants up to age 6. It recommends using children's personal experiences to help them understand time concepts. Individual components of this article include: (1) "I Go Now!"--Birth to 2 (Carla Poole); (2) "Today's My Birthday!"--3 to 4 (Susan A. Miller); and (3)…

  12. Fact Sheet on School-Age Children's Out-of-School Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Beth

    This fact sheet details information on the ways children spend their out-of-school time. The fact sheet includes information on the number of school-age children with working parents; enrolled in before- or after-school programs; and spending time without adult supervision. Also highlighted are the risks to children during out-of-school hours for…

  13. Age Dating Fluvial Sediment Storage Reservoirs to Construct Sediment Waiting Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalak, K.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Benthem, A.; Karwan, D. L.; Mahan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Suspended sediment transport is an important geomorphic process that can often control the transport of nutrients and contaminants. The time a particle spends in storage remains a critical knowledge gap in understanding particle trajectories through landscapes. We dated floodplain deposits in South River, VA, using fallout radionuclides (Pb-210, Cs-137), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and radiocarbon dating to determine sediment ages and construct sediment waiting time distributions. We have a total of 14 age dates in two eroding banks. We combine these age dates with a well-constrained history of mercury concentrations on suspended sediment in the river from an industrial release. Ages from fallout radionuclides document sedimentation from the early 1900s to the present, and agree with the history of mercury contamination. OSL dates span approximately 200 to 17,000 years old. We performed a standard Weibull analysis of nonexceedance to construct a waiting time distribution of floodplain sediment for the South River. The mean waiting time for floodplain sediment is 2930 years, while the median is approximately 710 years. When the floodplain waiting time distribution is combined with the waiting time distribution for in-channel sediment storage (available from previous studies), the mean waiting time shifts to approximately 680 years, suggesting that quantifying sediment waiting times for both channel and floodplain storage is critical in advancing knowledge of particle trajectories through watersheds.

  14. The Relationship of Time Perspective to Age, Gender, and Academic Achievement among Academically Talented Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Zena R.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2006-01-01

    Time perspective is a useful psychological construct associated with educational outcomes (Phalet, Andriessen, & Lens, 2004) and may prove fruitful for research focusing on academically talented adolescents. Thus, the relationship of time perspective to age, gender, and academic achievement was examined among 722 academically talented middle and…

  15. Estimating Black Carbon Aging Time-Scales with a Particle-Resolved Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Nicole; West, Matt; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-01-13

    Understanding the aging process of aerosol particles is important for assessing their chemical reactivity, cloud condensation nuclei activity, radiative properties and health impacts. In this study we investigate the aging of black carbon containing particles in an idealized urban plume using a new approach, the particleresolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC. We present a method to estimate aging time-scales using an aging criterion based on cloud condensation nuclei activation. The results show a separation into a daytime regime where condensation dominates and a nighttime regime where coagulation dominates. For the chosen urban plume scenario, depending on the supersaturation threshold, the values for the aging timescales vary between 0.06 hours and 10 hours during the day, and between 6 hours and 20 hours during the night.

  16. Age-Based Methods to Explore Time-Related Variables in Occupational Epidemiology Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Janice P. Watkins, Edward L. Frome, Donna L. Cragle

    2005-08-31

    Although age is recognized as the strongest predictor of mortality in chronic disease epidemiology, a calendar-based approach is often employed when evaluating time-related variables. An age-based analysis file, created by determining the value of each time-dependent variable for each age that a cohort member is followed, provides a clear definition of age at exposure and allows development of diverse analytic models. To demonstrate methods, the relationship between cancer mortality and external radiation was analyzed with Poisson regression for 14,095 Oak Ridge National Laboratory workers. Based on previous analysis of this cohort, a model with ten-year lagged cumulative radiation doses partitioned by receipt before (dose-young) or after (dose-old) age 45 was examined. Dose-response estimates were similar to calendar-year-based results with elevated risk for dose-old, but not when film badge readings were weekly before 1957. Complementary results showed increasing risk with older hire ages and earlier birth cohorts, since workers hired after age 45 were born before 1915, and dose-young and dose-old were distributed differently by birth cohorts. Risks were generally higher for smokingrelated than non-smoking-related cancers. It was difficult to single out specific variables associated with elevated cancer mortality because of: (1) birth cohort differences in hire age and mortality experience completeness, and (2) time-period differences in working conditions, dose potential, and exposure assessment. This research demonstrated the utility and versatility of the age-based approach.

  17. Force capacity of back extensor muscles in healthy males: effects of age and recovery time.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Eduard; Anders, Christoph; Walther, Mario; Schenk, Philipp; Scholle, Hans-Christoph

    2014-12-01

    To judge a person's maximum trunk extension performance as either age-appropriate or deconditioned is challenging. The current study aimed at determining age and anthropometrically adjusted maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of back extensors considering the number and recovery time between trials. Thirty-one younger (20-30 years) and 33 older (50-60 years) healthy males performed five repetitions of maximal isometric trunk extensions in an upright standing position with randomized recovery times ranging between one to five minutes at one minute intervals. Torque values were normalized according to the individual's upper body mass resulting in upper body torque ratios (UBTR). To evaluate the impact of age, recovery time, and fatigue on UBTR we applied a linear mixed-effects model. Based on surface EMG data muscular fatigue could be excluded for both groups. For all MVC trials, UBTR levels differed significantly between age groups (range of mean values: younger: 2.26-2.28, older: 1.78-1.87, effect size: 1.00) but were independent from recovery time. However, the older males tended to exert higher UBTR values after shorter recovery periods. The study provides normative values of anthropometrically and age-group adjusted maximum back extensor forces. For the investigated groups, only two MVC trials with a recovery time of about one minute seem appropriate. PMID:25102100

  18. Transit times and age distributions for reservoir models represented as nonlinear non-autonomuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Meztler, Holger; Glatt, Anna; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical methods to compute dynamic residence and transit time distributions for non-autonomous systems of pools governed by coupled nonlinear differential equations. Although transit time and age distributions have been used to describe reservoir models for a long time, a closer look to their assumptions reveals two major restrictions of generality in previous studies. First, the systems are assumed to be in equilibrium; and second, the equations under consideration are assumed to be linear. While both these assumptions greatly ease the computation and interpretation of transit time and age distributions they are not applicable to a wide range of problems. Moreover, the transfer of previous results learned from linear systems in steady state to the more complex nonlinear non-autonomous systems that do not even need to have equilibria, can be dangerously misleading. Fortunately the topic of time dependent age and transit time distributions has received some attention recently in hydrology, we aim to compute these distributions for systems of multiple reservoirs. We will discuss how storage selection functions can augment the information represented in an ODE system describing a system of reservoirs. We will present analytical and numerical algorithms and a Monte Carlo simulator to compute solutions for system transit time and age distributions for system-wide storage selection functions including the most simple, but important case of well mixed pools.

  19. Cognitive Aging and Time Perception: Roles of Bayesian Optimization and Degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Martine; Lustig, Cindy; Meck, Warren H

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines the basic psychological and neurobiological processes associated with age-related distortions in timing and time perception in the hundredths of milliseconds-to-minutes range. The difficulty in separating indirect effects of impairments in attention and memory from direct effects on timing mechanisms is addressed. The main premise is that normal aging is commonly associated with increased noise and temporal uncertainty as a result of impairments in attention and memory as well as the possible reduction in the accuracy and precision of a central timing mechanism supported by dopamine-glutamate interactions in cortico-striatal circuits. Pertinent to these findings, potential interventions that may reduce the likelihood of observing age-related declines in timing are discussed. Bayesian optimization models are able to account for the adaptive changes observed in time perception by assuming that older adults are more likely to base their temporal judgments on statistical inferences derived from multiple trials than on a single trial's clock reading, which is more susceptible to distortion. We propose that the timing functions assigned to the age-sensitive fronto-striatal network can be subserved by other neural networks typically associated with finely-tuned perceptuo-motor adjustments, through degeneracy principles (different structures serving a common function). PMID:27242513

  20. Cognitive Aging and Time Perception: Roles of Bayesian Optimization and Degeneracy

    PubMed Central

    Turgeon, Martine; Lustig, Cindy; Meck, Warren H.

    2016-01-01

    This review outlines the basic psychological and neurobiological processes associated with age-related distortions in timing and time perception in the hundredths of milliseconds-to-minutes range. The difficulty in separating indirect effects of impairments in attention and memory from direct effects on timing mechanisms is addressed. The main premise is that normal aging is commonly associated with increased noise and temporal uncertainty as a result of impairments in attention and memory as well as the possible reduction in the accuracy and precision of a central timing mechanism supported by dopamine-glutamate interactions in cortico-striatal circuits. Pertinent to these findings, potential interventions that may reduce the likelihood of observing age-related declines in timing are discussed. Bayesian optimization models are able to account for the adaptive changes observed in time perception by assuming that older adults are more likely to base their temporal judgments on statistical inferences derived from multiple trials than on a single trial’s clock reading, which is more susceptible to distortion. We propose that the timing functions assigned to the age-sensitive fronto-striatal network can be subserved by other neural networks typically associated with finely-tuned perceptuo-motor adjustments, through degeneracy principles (different structures serving a common function). PMID:27242513

  1. Wolf (Canis lupus) generation time and proportion of current breeding females by age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L. David; Barber-Meyer, Shannon M.; Erb, John

    2016-01-01

    Information is sparse about aspects of female wolf (Canis lupus) breeding in the wild, including age of first reproduction, mean age of primiparity, generation time, and proportion of each age that breeds in any given year. We studied these subjects in 86 wolves (113 captures) in the Superior National Forest (SNF), Minnesota (MN), during 1972–2013 where wolves were legally protected for most of the period, and in 159 harvested wolves from throughout MN wolf range during 2012–2014. Breeding status of SNF wolves were assessed via nipple measurements, and wolves from throughout MN wolf range, by placental scars. In the SNF, proportions of currently breeding females (those breeding in the year sampled) ranged from 19% at age 2 to 80% at age 5, and from throughout wolf range, from 33% at age 2 to 100% at age 7. Excluding pups and yearlings, only 33% to 36% of SNF females and 58% of females from throughout MN wolf range bred in any given year. Generation time for SNF wolves was 4.3 years and for MN wolf range, 4.7 years. These findings will be useful in modeling wolf population dynamics and in wolf genetic and dog-domestication studies.

  2. Wolf (Canis lupus) Generation Time and Proportion of Current Breeding Females by Age

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Information is sparse about aspects of female wolf (Canis lupus) breeding in the wild, including age of first reproduction, mean age of primiparity, generation time, and proportion of each age that breeds in any given year. We studied these subjects in 86 wolves (113 captures) in the Superior National Forest (SNF), Minnesota (MN), during 1972–2013 where wolves were legally protected for most of the period, and in 159 harvested wolves from throughout MN wolf range during 2012–2014. Breeding status of SNF wolves were assessed via nipple measurements, and wolves from throughout MN wolf range, by placental scars. In the SNF, proportions of currently breeding females (those breeding in the year sampled) ranged from 19% at age 2 to 80% at age 5, and from throughout wolf range, from 33% at age 2 to 100% at age 7. Excluding pups and yearlings, only 33% to 36% of SNF females and 58% of females from throughout MN wolf range bred in any given year. Generation time for SNF wolves was 4.3 years and for MN wolf range, 4.7 years. These findings will be useful in modeling wolf population dynamics and in wolf genetic and dog-domestication studies. PMID:27258193

  3. Wolf (Canis lupus) Generation Time and Proportion of Current Breeding Females by Age.

    PubMed

    Mech, L David; Barber-Meyer, Shannon M; Erb, John

    2016-01-01

    Information is sparse about aspects of female wolf (Canis lupus) breeding in the wild, including age of first reproduction, mean age of primiparity, generation time, and proportion of each age that breeds in any given year. We studied these subjects in 86 wolves (113 captures) in the Superior National Forest (SNF), Minnesota (MN), during 1972-2013 where wolves were legally protected for most of the period, and in 159 harvested wolves from throughout MN wolf range during 2012-2014. Breeding status of SNF wolves were assessed via nipple measurements, and wolves from throughout MN wolf range, by placental scars. In the SNF, proportions of currently breeding females (those breeding in the year sampled) ranged from 19% at age 2 to 80% at age 5, and from throughout wolf range, from 33% at age 2 to 100% at age 7. Excluding pups and yearlings, only 33% to 36% of SNF females and 58% of females from throughout MN wolf range bred in any given year. Generation time for SNF wolves was 4.3 years and for MN wolf range, 4.7 years. These findings will be useful in modeling wolf population dynamics and in wolf genetic and dog-domestication studies. PMID:27258193

  4. Applying Tep Measurements to Assess the Response of Hastelloy to Long Time Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifergane, S.; Gelbstein, Y.; Dahan, I.; Pinkas, M.; Landau, A.

    2009-03-01

    Hastelloy C-276 service temperature is restricted due to precipitation of the intermetallic compound μ. Time-temperature curves indicate that the highest precipitation rate is obtained at about 870° C. Thermoelectric Power (TEP) measurements were applied to monitor the precipitation kinetics during aging at 870° C. The TEP was found to be well correlated with the amount of μ phase formed during aging and with the reduction in impact energy and ductility. It was demonstrated that TEP measurements could be used to monitor aging of Hastelloy C-276.

  5. Role of Aging and Hippocampus in Time-Place Learning: Link to Episodic-Like Memory?

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C. K.; Gerkema, M. P.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: With time-place learning (TPL), animals link an event with the spatial location and the time of day (TOD). The what–where–when TPL components make the task putatively episodic-like in nature. Animals use an internal sense of time to master TPL, which is circadian system based. Finding indications for a role of the hippocampus and (early) aging-sensitivity in TPL would strengthen the episodic-like memory nature of the paradigm. Methods: Previously, we used C57Bl/6 mice for our TPL research. Here, we used CD1 mice which are less hippocampal-driven and age faster compared to C57Bl/6 mice. To demonstrate the low degree of hippocampal-driven performance in CD1 mice, a cross maze was used. The spontaneous alternation test was used to score spatial working memory in CD1 mice at four different age categories (young (3–6 months), middle-aged (7–11 months), aged (12–18 months) and old (>19 months). TPL performance of middle-aged and aged CD1 mice was tested in a setup with either two or three time points per day (2-arm or 3-arm TPL task). Immunostainings were applied on brains of young and middle-aged C57Bl/6 mice that had successfully mastered the 3-arm TPL task. Results: In contrast to C57Bl/6 mice, middle-aged and aged CD1 mice were less hippocampus-driven and failed to master the 3-arm TPL task. They could, however, master the 2-arm TPL task primarily via an ordinal (non-circadian) timing system. c-Fos, CRY2, vasopressin (AVP), and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) were investigated. We found no differences at the level of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; circadian master clock), whereas CRY2 expression was increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). The most pronounced difference between TPL trained and control mice was found in c-Fos expression in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, a circadian system relay station. Conclusions: These results further indicate a key role of CRY proteins in TPL and confirm the

  6. Evaluation of simulated cross-formational travel times using water age measurements in layered aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papafotiou, Alexandros; Ewing, John; Deeds, Neil; Kreitler, Charlie

    2013-04-01

    The recent hydrologic droughts in the southwestern USA have brought forward the necessity for sustainable management of groundwater that was recharged several thousands of years ago, also known as fossil water, as this resource is not directly rechargeable even through heavy rain events. Groundwater age studies can enable water authorities to map the origins of groundwater, quantify water ages in aquifers and plan sustainable water resource policies on local and regional scales. In this study, numerical groundwater availability models (GAMs) are combined with water age measurements to perform a water age analysis of the Wilcox, Carrizo, Queen City, Sparta, Jackson and Yegua aquifers that span central Texas dipping toward the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The 3D GAMs have initially been calibrated using well data. The water age analysis is carried out using 2D simulations to characterize down dip flow, cross-formational flow in the aquifers and the impact on associated water ages in representative transects extracted from the 3D models, including a discussion on bridging the gap between the 3D hydrogeological system and its simplified 2D representations. A systematic quantification of water age sensitivity to formation hydraulic conductivities and recharge at the aquifer outcrops is performed, whereby travel times in the simulated aquifers are compared to water age measurements obtained from C-14 and Tritium age dating techniques. The analysis therefore delivers the spectrum of water age isolines under consideration of model parameter uncertainty, evaluating the predictive ability of cross-formational water age studies when using 2D transect models.

  7. Cutaneous Resonance Running Time Varies with Age, Body Site and Gender in a Normal Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Man, Wenyan; Fluhr, Joachim W.; Song, Shunpeng; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Background/objectives One phenomenon of skin aging is loss of cutaneous elasticity. Measurement of cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT) is a method to assess skin elasticity. Yet, information regarding directional changes of CRRT associated with age, body sites and gender is not yet available. In the present study, we assessed whether changes in CRRT vary with age, body sites and gender in a normal Chinese population. Methods A Reviscometer was used to measure CRRTs in various directions on the left dorsal hand, the forehead and the left canthus of 806 normal Chinese volunteers, aged 2.5-94 years. Results With aging, CRRTs decreased in all directions on the hand, the forehead, and the canthus. A more dramatic reduction of CRRTs on the forehead and the canthus were observed at both the 2–8 and 3–9 o’clock directions. CRRTs in males aged 11– 20 years old were longer than those in females at some directions on all three body sites. Females between 21 and 40 years old showed longer CRRTs than males in some directions of the hand. There were no gender differences in subjects aged 0–10 (except on the canthus) and over 81 years old. Conclusion CRRTs vary with age, body sites and gender. PMID:21039906

  8. Striking effect of time variation in the estimation of groundwater age in the Wairarapa valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, Karine; Toews, Michael; Daughney, Christopher; Cornaton, Fabien

    2014-05-01

    The Wairarapa Valley exhibits complex interactions between its rivers and shallow aquifers. With agriculture being an essential part of the region the risk of contamination and depletion of groundwater exists. In order to assist with water resource management in the region, we can do predictions with the help of numerical models. Among these predictions, the evaluation of groundwater age is critical for decision making. This project builds on work done by Greater Wellington Regional Council and will focus on the Wairarapa Valley. The aim of this study is to evaluate the age of the groundwater in the Wairarapa region. Investigations have already been done thanks to hydrochemistry. However radiometric age can be misleading in the sense that it does not consider the mixing process in the motion of groundwater particules. Therefore another approach can be considered .This latter is physic based by considering the age as a property that we transport through two main processes: advection at a macroscopic scale and diffusion at a microscopic scale. The determination of the distribution age by this approach has already been done for the Lake Rotorua but in the steady state case (cf Daughney). The unique contribution of the present study is to estimate the changes in groundwater age distribution through time within the region. Indeed transient simulations are needed to explicitly account for seasonally variable rainfall and pumping wells. This affects the simulated flow solution and then the simulated age solution. In order to solve numerically the transport of age distribution we have chosen to use the Time Marching Laplace Transform Galerkin technique which has been developed in a research code by Fabien Cornaton. The obtained results depict that temporal variations in groundwater age are present and have important implication for resource management

  9. Racial disparities in age at time of homicide victimization: a test of the multiple disadvantage model.

    PubMed

    Lo, Celia C; Howell, Rebecca J; Cheng, Tyrone C

    2015-01-01

    This study sought the factors associated with race/ethnicity disparities in the age at which homicide deaths tend to occur. We used the multiple disadvantage model to take race into account as we evaluated associations between age at time of homicide victimization and several social structural, mental health-related, and lifestyle factors. Data were derived from the 1993 National Mortality Followback Survey, a cross-sectional interview study of spouses, next of kin, other relatives, and close friends of individuals 15 years and older who died in the United States in 1993. Our results showed age at time of homicide mortality to be related to the three types of factors; race moderated some of these relationships. In general, being employed, married, and a homeowner appeared associated with reduced victimization while young. The relationship of victimization age and employment was not uniform across racial groups, nor was the relationship of victimization age and marital status uniform across groups. Among Blacks, using mental health services was associated with longer life. Homicide by firearm proved important for our Black and Hispanic subsamples, while among Whites, alcohol's involvement in homicide exerted significant effects. Our results suggest that programs and policies serving the various racial/ethnic groups can alleviate multiple disadvantages relevant in homicide victimization at an early age. PMID:24811288

  10. Ar-Ar Impact Heating Ages of Eucrites and Timing of the LHB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Eucrites and howardites, more than most meteorite types, show extensive impact resetting of their Ar-39-Ar-40 (K-Ar) ages approximately equal to 3.4-4.1 Ga ago, and many specimens show some disturbance of other radiometry chronometers as well. Bogard (1995) argued that this age resetting occurred on Vesta and was produced by the same general population of objects that produced many of the lunar impact basins. The exact nature of the lunar late heavy bombardment (LHB or 'cataclysm') remains controversial, but the timing is similar to the reset ages of eucrites. Neither the beginning nor ending time of the lunar LHB is well constrained. Comparison of Ar-Ar ages of brecciated eucrites with data for the lunar LHB can resolve both the origin of these impactors and the time period over which they were delivered to the inner solar system. This abstract reports some new Ar-Ar age data for eucrites, obtained since the authors' 1995 and 2003 papers.

  11. [The electroluminescence spectra of InGan/GaN blue LEDs during aging time].

    PubMed

    Dai, Shuang; Yu, Tong-Jun; Li, Xing-Bin; Yuan, Gang-Cheng; Lu, Hui-Min

    2014-02-01

    The luminescence spectra of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells light-emitting diodes under low level injection current (<4 mA) during aging process was investigated for the first time. Comparing the electroluminescence (EL) spectra of LEDs before and after aging time it was found that the peak wavelength and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) decreased with stress time and the changes of EL spectrum had two different stages-drastic decrease at the early stress stage and slow decrease later showing the same trend with the output optical power of LEDs, which indicates that the effective polarization electric field of LEDs becomes weak during the aging process and the change has a clear correlation with the increase of the defects in the multiple quantum wells of LEDs. Electrical measurement revealed that junction capacitance (C(j)) under the same junction voltage (V(j) = 1.8 V) and the junction voltage (V(j)) with the same injection current 1 mA calculated by ac small-signal IV method increased along with aging time, which explicates that the carrier density under the same low injection increases as the aging time increases. Analyses indicate that the polarization field in the quantum well is more seriously screened by the increased carriers captured by defects activated during stress time, the weaker effective polarization electric field makes the tilt of the energy band smaller, the energy radiated through the band edge and the density of energy states of the band edge increase which leads to the behaviors of peak wavelength and the FWHM of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells LEDs under low level injection current. PMID:24822394

  12. Effect of chilling method and post-mortem aging time on broiler breast fillet quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of chilling method and post-mortem aging time on broiler breast fillet quality. One hundred-fifty eviscerated broiler carcasses were removed from a commercial processing line prior to chilling and transported to the laboratory. Half of the carcasses we...

  13. Advances in Disentangling Age, Cohort, and Time Effects: No Quadrature of the Circle, but a Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masche, J. Gowert; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2004-01-01

    Based on Schaie's (1965) general developmental model, various data-driven and theory-based approaches to the exploration and disentangling of age, cohort, and time effects on human behavior have emerged. This paper presents and discusses an advancement of data-driven interpretations that stresses parsimony when interpreting the results of…

  14. Age-Related Differences in Reaction Time Task Performance in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselev, Sergey; Espy, Kimberlay Andrews; Sheffield, Tiffany

    2009-01-01

    Performance of reaction time (RT) tasks was investigated in young children and adults to test the hypothesis that age-related differences in processing speed supersede a "global" mechanism and are a function of specific differences in task demands and processing requirements. The sample consisted of 54 4-year-olds, 53 5-year-olds, 59 6-year-olds,…

  15. Effects of Hearing and Aging on Sentence-Level Time-Gated Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molis, Michelle R.; Kampel, Sean D.; McMillan, Garnett P.; Gallun, Frederick J.; Dann, Serena M.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Aging is known to influence temporal processing, but its relationship to speech perception has not been clearly defined. To examine listeners' use of contextual and phonetic information, the Revised Speech Perception in Noise test (R-SPIN) was used to develop a time-gated word (TGW) task. Method: In Experiment 1, R-SPIN sentence lists…

  16. Effects of Aging and Noise on Real-Time Spoken Word Recognition: Evidence from Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-David, Boaz M.; Chambers, Craig G.; Daneman, Meredyth; Pichora-Fuller, M. Kathleen; Reingold, Eyal M.; Schneider, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To use eye tracking to investigate age differences in real-time lexical processing in quiet and in noise in light of the fact that older adults find it more difficult than younger adults to understand conversations in noisy situations. Method: Twenty-four younger and 24 older adults followed spoken instructions referring to depicted…

  17. Age at First Sexual Intercourse and the Timing of Marriage and Childbirth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brent C.; Heaton, Tim B.

    1991-01-01

    Examined effect age of first sexual intercourse has on subsequent timing and sequencing of marriage and having a child using national survey data from 7,969 women. Results indicated early initiation of sexual activity was associated with a relatively slow pace of family formation, but early initiators did catch up with late initiators. (Author/ABL)

  18. Norms of Filial Responsibility for Aging Parents across Time and Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gans, Daphna; Silverstein, Merril

    2006-01-01

    This investigation examined the normative expectation that adult children should be responsible for the care of their aging parents, and how this norm changes over the adult life span, across several decades of historical time, in relation to generational position in families, and between successive generations. Analyses were performed using 4…

  19. Factors Associated with Screen Time among School-Age Children in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Ok Kyung; Sung, Kyung Mi; Kim, Hee Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics with screen time among school-age children in Korea. This study employed a nonexperimental, cross-sectional study design. A total of 370 children attending four elementary schools participated in the study. Self-report…

  20. Effect of Chilling Method and Post-Mortem Aging Time on Broiler Breast Fillet Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of chilling method (dry air or immersion) and post-mortem aging time on broiler breast fillet quality (raw fillet color, raw fillet pH, cook yield and Allo-Kramer shear). One hundred fifty eviscerated broiler carcasses were removed from a commercial p...

  1. Older Age Does Not Affect Healing Time and Functional Outcomes After Fracture Nonunion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, David P.; Shulman, Brandon S.; Karia, Raj; Spitzer, Allison B.; Konda, Sanjit R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Elderly patients are at risk of fracture nonunion, given the potential setting of osteopenia, poorer fracture biology, and comorbid medical conditions. Risk factors predicting fracture nonunion may compromise the success of fracture nonunion surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of patient age on clinical and functional outcome following long bone fracture nonunion surgery. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data identified 288 patients (aged 18-91) who were indicated for long bone nonunion surgery. Two-hundred and seventy-two patients satisfied study inclusion criteria and analyses were performed comparing elderly patients aged ≥65 years (n = 48) with patients <65 years (n = 224) for postoperative wound complications, Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA) functional status, healing, and surgical revision. Regression analyses were performed to look for associations between age, smoking status, and history of previous nonunion surgery with healing and functional outcome. Twelve-month follow-up was obtained on 91.5% (249 of 272) of patients. Results: Despite demographic differences in the aged population, including a predominance of medical comorbidities (P < .01) and osteopenia (P = .02), there was no statistical differences in the healing rate of elderly patients (95.8% vs 95.1%, P = .6) or time to union (6.2 ± 4.1 months vs. 7.2 ± 6.6, P = .3). Rates of postoperative wound complications and surgical revision did not statistically differ. Elderly patients reported similar levels of function up to 12 months after surgery. Regression analyses failed to show any significant association between age and final union or time to union. There was a strong positive association between smoking and history of previous nonunion surgery with time to union. Age was associated (positively) with 12-month SMFA activity score. Conclusions: Smoking and failure of previous surgical

  2. Condition Monitoring of a Thermally Aged HTPB/IPDI Elastomer by NMR CP Recovery Times

    SciTech Connect

    ASSINK,ROGER A.; LANG,DAVID; CELINA,MATHIAS C.

    2000-07-24

    A hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)/isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) elastomer is commonly used as propellant binder material. The thermal degradation of the binder is believed to be an important parameter governing the performance of the propellant. The aging of these binders can be monitored by mechanical property measurements such as modulus or tensile elongation. These techniques, however, are not easily adapted to binder agents that are dispersed throughout a propellant. In this paper the authors investigated solid state NMR relaxation times as a means to predict the mechanical properties of the binder as a function of aging time. {sup 1}H spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times were found to be insensitive to the degree of thermal degradation of the elastomer. Apparently these relaxation times depend on localized motions that are only weakly correlated with mechanical properties. A strong correlation was found between the {sup 13}C cross-polarization (CP) NMR time constant, T{sub cp}, and the tensile elongation at break of the elastomer as a function of aging time. A ramped-amplitude CP experiment was shown to be less sensitive to imperfections in setting critical instrumental parameters for this mobile material.

  3. Timing Issues with Early Childhood Education Programs: How Effect Sizes Vary by Starting Age, Program Duration and Persistence of Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J.; Leak, James A.; Li, Weilin; Magnuson, Katherine; Schindler, Holly; Yoshikawa, Hiro

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper centers around timing associated with early childhood education programs and interventions using meta-analytic methods. At any given assessment age, a child's current age equals starting age, plus duration of program, plus years since program ended. Variability in assessment ages across the studies should enable everyone to…

  4. Mechanical properties improvement of silica aerogel through aging: Role of solvent type, time and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omranpour, H.; Dourbash, A.; Motahari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Effective parameters that enhance mechanical properties during aging were investigated in the present study. Silica aerogels were made from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), water, methanol and NH4F in molar ratio 1:4:8:2×10-3 using a one-step method. Different time, temperature and aging solvents in aging stage were studied. Subsequently, solvent exchange with n-hexane, modification under TMCS solution and ambient pressure drying (APD) were performed for all samples. The aerogels had densities within the range of 0.1 and 0.6 g/cm3. The FTIR, mechanical properties, density and BET results, porosity, pore volume, pore diameter and surface area of the samples, were discussed. The compression properties of the gel increased with the increase in the time and temperature of aging. It was observed that solvents with more polarity improved polymerization, which enhanced the mechanical properties of the related samples. However, the stresses and capillary forces of water during drying were so large that inhibited "spring-back effect" during APD, and consequently a collapsed silica network with higher density was fabricated. In other words, the specific compression strength and modulus declined drastically. For methanol, alcohols inhibit the reactions inconveniently causing more shrinkage. In aging by n-hexane, capillary pressure declined significantly and thereby shrinkage was eliminated and silica aerogels with low bulk densities (0.095 g/cm3), high specific surface areas (600 m2/g), and large pore volumes (2.6 cm3/g) were synthesized.

  5. Effects of Hearing and Aging on Sentence-Level Time-Gated Word Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Molis, Michelle R.; Kampel, Sean D.; McMillan, Garnett P.; Gallun, Frederick J.; Dann, Serena M.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Aging is known to influence temporal processing, but its relationship to speech perception has not been clearly defined. To examine listeners’ use of contextual and phonetic information, the Revised Speech Perception in Noise test (R-SPIN) was used to develop a time-gated word (TGW) task Method In Experiment 1, R-SPIN sentence lists were matched on context, target-word length, and median word segment length necessary for target recognition. In Experiment 2, TGW recognition was assessed in quiet and in noise among adults of various ages with normal hearing to moderate hearing loss. Linear regression models of the minimum word duration necessary for correct identification and identification failure rates were developed. Age and hearing thresholds were modeled as continuous predictors with corrections for correlations among multiple measurements of the same participants. Results While aging and hearing loss both had significant impacts on task performance in the most adverse listening condition (low context, in noise), for most conditions, performance was limited primarily by hearing loss. Conclusion Whereas hearing loss was strongly related to target-word recognition, the effect of aging was only weakly related to task performance. These results have implications for the design and evaluation of studies of hearing and aging. PMID:25815688

  6. Sex, Race, and Age Disparities in the Improvement of Survival for Gastrointestinal Cancer over Time

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jue-feng; Yang, Li-feng; Shen, Yun-zhu; Jia, Hui-xun; Zhu, Ji; Li, Gui-chao; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    There have been notable improvements in survival over the past 2 decades for gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. However, the degree of improvement by age, race, and sex remains unclear. We analyzed data from 9 population-based cancer registries included in the SEER program of the National Cancer Institute (SEER 9) in 1990 to 2009 (n = 288,337). The degree of survival improvement over time by age, race, and sex was longitudinally measured. From 1990 to 2009, improvements in survival were greater for younger age groups. For patients aged 20 to 49 years and diagnosed from 2005 to 2009, adjusted HRs (95% CIs) were 0.74 (95% CI, 0.66–0.83), 0.49 (95% CI, 0.37–0.64), 0.69 (95% CI, 0.65–0.76), 0.62 (95% CI, 0.54–0.69), and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.42–0.76), for cancer of the stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum and anus, respectively, compared with the same age groups of patients diagnosed during 1990 to 1994. Compared with African Americans, whites experienced greater improvement in small intestinal and anal cancer survival. Female anal cancer and regional anal cancer patients experienced no improvement. Our data suggest that different improvement in survival in age, sex and race exists. PMID:27406065

  7. Characteristics of first-time fathers of advanced age: a Norwegian population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The modern phenomenon of delayed parenthood applies not only to women but also to men, but less is known about what characterises men who are expecting their first child at an advanced age. This study investigates the sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviour, health problems, social relationships and timing of pregnancy in older first-time fathers. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted of 14 832 men who were expecting their first child, based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) carried out by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Data were collected in 2005–2008 by means of a questionnaire in gestational week 17–18 of their partner’s pregnancy, and from the Norwegian Medical Birth Register. The distribution of background variables was investigated across the age span of 25 years and above. Men of advanced age (35–39 years) and very advanced age (40 years or more) were compared with men aged 25–34 years by means of bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results The following factors were found to be associated with having the first child at an advanced or very advanced age: being unmarried or non-cohabitant, negative health behaviour (overweight, obesity, smoking, frequent alcohol intake), physical and mental health problems (lower back pain, cardiovascular diseases, high blood pressure, sleeping problems, previous depressive symptoms), few social contacts and dissatisfaction with partner relationship. There were mixed associations for socioeconomic status: several proxy measures of high socioeconomic status (e.g. income >65 000 €, self-employment) were associated with having the first child at an advanced or very advanced age, as were several other proxy measures of low socioeconomic status (e.g. unemployment, low level of education, immigrant background).The odds of the child being conceived after in vitro fertilisation were threefold in men aged 34–39 and fourfold from 40

  8. The impact of age at death on the lag time of radiocarbon values in human bone.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Thomas, Christian; Olson, Jacqueline E

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of modern bomb-pulse radiocarbon in human bone offers data needed to interpret the post-mortem interval in skeletonized human remains recovered from forensic contexts. Radiocarbon analysis of different tissues with distinct rates of remodeling allows proper placement of the values on the modern bomb-curve. However, the lag time between the date of intercept on the curve and the actual death date is largely affected by the age at death. Published data on radiocarbon analysis of individuals of known age at death and death dates indicate that this lag time increases with age until about 60 years. The lag time documented for each decade of life can be used to compensate for this age-related factor and increase the accuracy of interpretation of the death date. While this method could be greatly improved by original research with a larger sample size, this study provides an adequate point from which to launch further investigations into the subject. PMID:25863698

  9. Screen time and sleep among school-aged children and adolescents: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hale, Lauren; Guan, Stanford

    2015-06-01

    We systematically examined and updated the scientific literature on the association between screen time (e.g., television, computers, video games, and mobile devices) and sleep outcomes among school-aged children and adolescents. We reviewed 67 studies published from 1999 to early 2014. We found that screen time is adversely associated with sleep outcomes (primarily shortened duration and delayed timing) in 90% of studies. Some of the results varied by type of screen exposure, age of participant, gender, and day of the week. While the evidence regarding the association between screen time and sleep is consistent, we discuss limitations of the current studies: 1) causal association not confirmed; 2) measurement error (of both screen time exposure and sleep measures); 3) limited data on simultaneous use of multiple screens, characteristics and content of screens used. Youth should be advised to limit or reduce screen time exposure, especially before or during bedtime hours to minimize any harmful effects of screen time on sleep and well-being. Future research should better account for the methodological limitations of the extant studies, and seek to better understand the magnitude and mechanisms of the association. These steps will help the development and implementation of policies or interventions related to screen time among youth. PMID:25193149

  10. Screen Time and Sleep among School-Aged Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Lauren; Guan, Stanford

    2015-01-01

    Summary We systematically examined and updated the scientific literature on the association between screen time (e.g., television, computers, video games, and mobile devices) and sleep outcomes among school-aged children and adolescents. We reviewed 67 studies published from 1999 to early 2014. We found that screen time is adversely associated with sleep outcomes (primarily shortened duration and delayed timing) in 90% of studies. Some of the results varied by type of screen exposure, age of participant, gender, and day of the week. While the evidence regarding the association between screen time and sleep is consistent, we discuss limitations of the current studies: 1.) causal association not confirmed; 2.) measurement error (of both screen time exposure and sleep measures); 3.) limited data on simultaneous use of multiple screens, characteristics and content of screens used. Youth should be advised to limit or reduce screen time exposure, especially before or during bedtime hours to minimize any harmful effects of screen time on sleep and well-being. Future research should better account for the methodological limitations of the extant studies, and seek to better understand the magnitude and mechanisms of the association. These steps will help the development and implementation of policies or interventions related to screen time among youth. PMID:25193149

  11. Effects of subprimal type, quality grade, and aging time on display color of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Garner, C M; Unruh, J A; Hunt, M C; Boyle, E A E; Houser, T A

    2014-10-01

    A factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of two subprimal types (chuck roll and knuckle), two quality grades (Premium Choice and Select), and three vacuum-storage aging times before processing (7, 21, and 42d) ground beef patty display color attributes. Patties from chuck roll and Premium Choice subprimals had brighter red visual color scores, less discoloration, and higher L*, a*, b*, and chroma values than those from knuckle and Select subprimals, respectively. With an increased display time, patties became darker red, more discolored, and had decreased L*, a*, b*, and chroma values. Therefore, aging Premium Choice chuck rolls for less time (fewer than 21d) could maximize display color life. PMID:24880976

  12. The history of bronchial asthma from the ancient times till the Middle Ages.

    PubMed

    Cserháti, E

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to give an overview of the knowledge on asthma through the history of mankind. The text begins with ancient China and it is finished with the medicine of Middle Age. During this time, a lot of theories came and this appeared about the etiology and therapy of the disease. The paper is giving a short description of the changing medical views during this very long period including China, Egypt Greco-roman period, Mesopotamia, the Hebrews, the physicians of India, the pre-Columbian medicine in the America and the Arabic world, and partly the European medicine of the Middle Ages. PMID:16438118

  13. Influence of aging time on porosity, morphology&structure of hexylene-bridged polysilsesouioxane gels.

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D. A.; DeFriend, K. A.; Small, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Hexylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes are hybrid organic-inorganic materials prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane monomer 1. Previous studies showed that high surface area xerogels could be prepared from 2 with base catalyzed polymerizations while non-porous xerogels could be prepared with acidic catalysts. However, these xerogels were obtained from gels that had been aged for two weeks. The object of this study was to ascertain the influences of aging time (3, 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56 days) on the properties of the resulting xerogels.

  14. Age at menarche in Peninsular Malaysia: time trends, ethnic differentials, and association with ages at marriage and at first birth.

    PubMed

    Tan Boon Ann; Othman, R; Butz, W P; Davanzo, J

    1983-12-01

    This study, based on respondent-reported data from the 1976-77 Malaysian Family Life Survey, analyzeed the association between age at menarche and several family-level factors. The data on mean age at menarche for birth cohorts of pre-1929 to post-1955, by ethnic group, indicate substantial declines for Chinese and Indians but virtually no change for Malays. Age at menarche has fallen by 3.25 months/decade for women born in 1926-61. Girls raised in households of higher socioeconomic status tend to experience earlier menarche. In fact, about half of the secular decline in age at menarche is attributable to improvements in socioeconomic level and, to a lesser extent, declines in the proportion of foreign births. In this sample, age at menarche was related to age at 1st marriage and age at 1st birth. Moreover, controlling for age at menarche affects the relationship between demographic and socioeconomic variables on the 1 hand and age at marriage and 1st birth on the other. When ethnicity is controlled, a 1 year delay in menarche is associated with a 3 month delay in age at marriage. When the socioeconomic status and childhood abroad indices are controlled, the coefficient of age at menarche increases by almost 1/3. When ethnicity, birthdate, childhood abroad, and socioeconomic status are controlled, each 1 year delay in menarche is associated, on average, with a 5 month delay in age at marriage. Even when socioeconomic variables are controlled, the relationship between age at menarche and at marriage is much smaller for Chinese women than for Indian or Malay women, perhaps because the average age between these 2 events is greater for Chinese (6.8 years, versus 3.5 years for Malays and 4.6 years for Indians). These findings suggest that studies that look only at the relationship between age at menarche and age at 1st marriage, without controlling for other factors, will underestimate the relationship. In addition, it is noted that the observed trend toward falling age

  15. Incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage: a systematic review with emphasis on region, age, gender and time trends

    PubMed Central

    de Rooij, N K; Linn, F H H; van der Plas, J A; Algra, A; Rinkel, G J E

    2007-01-01

    Background and aim To update our 1996 review on the incidence of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and assess the relation of incidence with region, age, gender and time period. Methods We searched for studies on the incidence of SAH published until October 2005. The overall incidences with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated. We determined the relationship between the incidence of SAH and determinants by means of univariate Poisson regression. Results We included 51 studies (33 new), describing 58 study populations in 21 countries, observing 45 821 896 person‐years. Incidences per 100 000 person‐years were 22.7 (95% CI 21.9 to 23.5) in Japan, 19.7 (18.1 to 21.3) in Finland, 4.2 (3.1 to 5.7) in South and Central America, and 9.1 (8.8 to 9.5) in the other regions. With age category 45–55 years as the reference, incidence ratios increased from 0.10 (0.08 to 0.14) for age groups younger than 25 years to 1.61 (1.24 to 2.07) for age groups older than 85 years. The incidence in women was 1.24 (1.09 to 1.42) times higher than in men; this gender difference started at age 55 years and increased thereafter. Between 1950 and 2005, the incidence decreased by 0.6% (1.3% decrease to 0.1% increase) per year. Conclusions The overall incidence of SAH is approximately 9 per 100 000 person‐years. Rates are higher in Japan and Finland and increase with age. The preponderance of women starts only in the sixth decade. The decline in incidence of SAH over the past 45 years is relatively moderate compared with that for stroke in general. PMID:17470467

  16. Age at the time of sulfonylurea initiation influences treatment outcomes in KCNJ11-related neonatal diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Brian W.; Carmody, David; Tadie, Elizabeth C.; Pastore, Ashley N.; Dickens, Jazzmyne T.; Wroblewski, Kristen E.; Naylor, Rochelle N.; Philipson, Louis H.; Greeley, Siri Atma W.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Individuals with heterozygous activating mutations of the KCNJ11 gene encoding a subunit of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) can usually be treated with oral sulfonylurea (SU) pills in lieu of insulin injections. The aim of this study was to test our hypothesis that younger age at the time of initiation of SU therapy is correlated with lower required doses of SU therapy, shorter transition time and decreased likelihood of requiring additional diabetes medications. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using data on 58 individuals with neonatal diabetes due to KCNJ11mutations identified through the University of Chicago Monogenic Diabetes Registry (http://monogenicdiabetes.uchicago.edu/registry). We assessed the influence of age at initiation of SU therapy on treatment outcomes. Results HbA1c fell from an average of 8.5% (69 mmol/mol) before transition to 6.2% (44 mmol/mol) after SU therapy (p < 0.001). Age of initiation of SU correlated with the dose (mg kg−1 day−1) of SU required at follow-up (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). Similar associations were observed across mutation subtypes. Ten participants required additional glucose-lowering medications and all had initiated SU at age 13 years or older. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions/interpretation Earlier age at initiation of SU treatment is associated with improved response to SU therapy. Declining sensitivity to SU may be due to loss of beta cell mass over time in those treated with insulin. Our data support the need for early genetic diagnosis and appropriate personalised treatment in all cases of neonatal diabetes. PMID:25877689

  17. The timing and precision of action prediction in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Diersch, Nadine; Jones, Alex L; Cross, Emily S

    2016-01-01

    Successful social interactions depend on the ability to anticipate other people's actions. Current conceptualizations of brain function propose that causes of sensory input are inferred through their integration with internal predictions generated in the observer's motor system during action observation. Less is known concerning how action prediction changes with age. Previously we showed that internal action representations are less specific in older compared with younger adults at behavioral and neural levels. Here, we characterize how neural activity varies while healthy older adults aged 56-71 years predict the time-course of an unfolding action as well as the relation to task performance. By using fMRI, brain activity was measured while participants observed partly occluded actions and judged the temporal coherence of the action continuation that was manipulated. We found that neural activity in frontoparietal and occipitotemporal regions increased the more an action continuation was shifted backwards in time. Action continuations that were shifted towards the future preferentially engaged early visual cortices. Increasing age was associated with neural activity that extended from posterior to anterior regions in frontal and superior temporal cortices. Lower sensitivity in action prediction resulted in activity increases in the caudate. These results imply that the neural implementation of predicting actions undergoes similar changes as the neural process of executing actions in older adults. The comparison between internal predictions and sensory input seems to become less precise with age leading to difficulties in anticipating observed actions accurately, possibly due to less specific internal action models. PMID:26503586

  18. Microscopic Origin of the Logarithmic Time Evolution of Aging Processes in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomholt, Michael A.; Lizana, Ludvig; Metzler, Ralf; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2013-05-01

    There exists compelling experimental evidence in numerous systems for logarithmically slow time evolution, yet its full theoretical understanding remains elusive. We here introduce and study a generic transition process in complex systems, based on nonrenewal, aging waiting times. Each state n of the system follows a local clock initiated at t=0. The random time τ between clock ticks follows the waiting time density ψ(τ). Transitions between states occur only at local clock ticks and are hence triggered by the local forward waiting time, rather than by ψ(τ). For power-law forms ψ(τ)≃τ-1-α (0<α<1) we obtain a logarithmic time evolution of the state number ⟨n(t)⟩≃log⁡(t/t0), while for α>2 the process becomes normal in the sense that ⟨n(t)⟩≃t. In the intermediate range 1<α<2 we find the power-law growth ⟨n(t)⟩≃tα-1. Our model provides a universal description for transition dynamics between aging and nonaging states.

  19. Microscopic origin of the logarithmic time evolution of aging processes in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, Michael A; Lizana, Ludvig; Metzler, Ralf; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2013-05-17

    There exists compelling experimental evidence in numerous systems for logarithmically slow time evolution, yet its full theoretical understanding remains elusive. We here introduce and study a generic transition process in complex systems, based on nonrenewal, aging waiting times. Each state n of the system follows a local clock initiated at t = 0. The random time τ between clock ticks follows the waiting time density ψ(τ). Transitions between states occur only at local clock ticks and are hence triggered by the local forward waiting time, rather than by ψ(τ). For power-law forms ψ(τ) ≃ τ(-1-α) (0 < α < 1) we obtain a logarithmic time evolution of the state number ⟨n(t)⟩ ≃ log(t/t(0)), while for α > 2 the process becomes normal in the sense that ⟨n(t)⟩ ≃ t. In the intermediate range 1 < α < 2 we find the power-law growth ⟨n(t)⟩ ≃ t(α-1). Our model provides a universal description for transition dynamics between aging and nonaging states. PMID:25167457

  20. The timing of fault motion in Death Valley from Illite Age Analysis of fault gouge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, E. A.; Haines, S. H.; Van der Pluijm, B.

    2014-12-01

    We constrained the timing of fluid circulation and associated fault motion in the Death Valley region of the US Basin and Range Province from Illite Age Analysis (IAA) of fault gouge at seven Low-Angle Normal Fault (LANF) exposures in the Black Mountains and Panamint Mountains, and in two nearby areas. 40Ar/39Ar ages of neoformed, illitic clay minerals in these fault zones range from 2.8 Ma to 18.6 Ma, preserving asynchronous fault motion across the region that corresponds to an evolving history of crustal block movements during Neogene extensional deformation. From north to south, along the western side of the Panamint Range, the Mosaic Canyon fault yields an authigenic illite age of 16.9±2.9 Ma, the Emigrant fault has ages of less than 10-12 Ma at Tucki Mountain and Wildrose Canyon, and an age of 3.6±0.17 Ma was obtained for the Panamint Front Range LANF at South Park Canyon. Across Death Valley, along the western side of the Black Mountains, Ar ages of clay minerals are 3.2±3.9 Ma, 12.2±0.13 Ma and 2.8±0.45 Ma for the Amargosa Detachment, the Gregory Peak Fault and the Mormon Point Turtleback detachment, respectively. Complementary analysis of the δH composition of neoformed clays shows a primarily meteoric source for the mineralizing fluids in these LANF zones. The ages fall into two geologic timespans, reflecting activity pulses in the Middle Miocene and in the Upper Pliocene. Activity on both of the range front LANFs does not appear to be localized on any single portion of these fault systems. Middle Miocene fault rock ages of neoformed clays were also obtained in the Ruby Mountains (10.5±1.2 Ma) to the north of the Death Valley region and to the south in the Whipple Mountains (14.3±0.19 Ma). The presence of similar, bracketed times of activity indicate that LANFs in the Death Valley region were tectonically linked, while isotopic signatures indicate that faulting pulses involved surface fluid penetration.

  1. Evolution of Microstructure in a Nickel-based Superalloy as a Function of Ageing Time

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Smith, Gregory Scott; Porcar, L.; Liaw, Peter K; Kai, Ji-Jung; Ren, Yang

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation, combining synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, small-angle neutron-scattering, and transmission electron microscopy, has been undertaken to study the microstructure of nanoprecipitates in a nickel-based superalloy. Upon increasing the ageing time during a heat-treatment process, the average size of the precipitates first decreases before changing to a monotonical growth stage. Possible reasons for this observed structural evolution, which is predicted thermodynamically, are suggested.

  2. Age at Time of Initial Sexual Intercourse and Health of Adolescent Girls.

    PubMed

    Lara, Lúcia A S; Abdo, Carmita H N

    2016-10-01

    Adolescence is characterized by marked changes in the body, psychology, and sexual behavior due to increasing production of hormones. In this review we aimed to assess the effect of age at the time of first sexual intercourse (sexarche) on the health of adolescent girls, and identify factors that might protect against early initiation of sexual relations in girls. The PubMed, Lilacs, and Google Scholar databases were searched for clinical trials, comparative studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, cohort studies, multicenter studies, observational studies, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews published up to December 2014 on this theme. The search terms were: "sexual debut," "coitarche," "sexarche," and "young people," "adolescent," "unplanned pregnancy," "adolescent contraception," and "STDs." Data were extracted from 28 studies and 41 references were used to introduce the theme and to support the discussion. Sexarche has been occurring in increasingly younger girls. A young age at sexarche can lead to subsequent risky sexual behavior. Girls who have sexarche when they are 14 years old or younger are less likely to use contraception on this occasion, take more time before they start using contraception in subsequent sexual relations, are more likely to have several sex partners, have a higher risk for depression, have lower self-esteem and more episodes of repentance, and have a higher risk for a sexually transmitted disease and cervical cancer. Girls with low educational, socioeconomic, and cultural status, little parental monitoring, parental separation, and absence of religiosity tend to experience sexarche at a younger age. Adolescent girls who postpone sexarche until they are 16 years old are physically and psychologically healthier than those who have sexarche at a younger age. This suggests that providing adolescent girls with appropriate education about sexual relations might reduce the negative effect of sexual relations at a young age

  3. Prostate Volume Changes Over Time: Results From the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Kettermann, Anna; Carter, H. Ballentine; Ferrucci, Luigi; Metter, E. Jeffrey; Walsh, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose According to a 1944 publication by Swyer benign prostatic hyperplasia develops in some men after age 45 with further prostatic growth whereas in other men prostate size remains stable or decreases with advancing age. Although there is an abundance of literature describing prostatic enlargement in association with benign prostatic hyperplasia, less is known about the phenomenon of prostate atrophy. Materials and Methods In the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging serial pelvic magnetic resonance imaging was performed in men without prostate cancer beginning in 1993. From this population we retrospectively identified 278 men with 2 or more magnetic resonance imaging determined prostate volume measurements to examine differential growth rates in a cohort of community men over time. Results Median age was 58 years and median prostate size was 28 cc at study entry. At a median followup of 4.3 years prostate size increased in 61.9% and remained stable or decreased in 38.1% of men. The median rate of volume change was 0.6 cc per year (range −9.9 to 62.1), corresponding to a median growth rate of 2.5% per year (range −29.2 to 176.4%). During followup 64.6% of men with an initial prostate size less than 40 cc had prostate growth compared to only 50.9% of men with an initial prostate size of 40 cc or greater. Conclusions These results suggest that changes in prostate size are highly variable among aging men. Although benign prostatic hyperplasia is common, a considerable proportion of aging men have a stable or decreasing prostate size. Further research is needed to identify the underlying mechanism for such differences in prostate growth. PMID:19683305

  4. Constraining the Timing of Neoglaciation: Moraine Exposure Ages from Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, S. E.; Miller, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    A long-term Neoglacial cooling trend, beginning ~6 ka, is well documented across the Arctic and correlates with a monotonic decline in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. However, paleoclimate proxy records point to decadal- to millennial-scale variability superimposed on overall cooling. This climate variability is reflected in the fluctuations of Arctic glaciers over the course of several millennia. The most recent Neoglacial advance, the Little Ice Age (LIA; ~1275-1850 AD), was generally more extensive than pre-LIA advances and thus destroyed most evidence of previous advances. As such, the timing and extent of earlier Neoglacial advances are not well constrained. However, several extant glaciers on Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island, are fronted by nested ice-cored moraine sequences in which multiple pre-LIA moraines are preserved. We have generated absolute ages on moraine sequences for Snow Creek and Throne Glaciers using 10Be in moraine boulders. Nine 10Be ages from the two most distal moraine crests at Snow Creek Glacier range from ~1.8 ka to ~5.7 ka, and twelve ages from the two most distal moraine crests at Throne Glacier range from ~1.1 ka to ~4.6 ka. The wide spread of exposure ages in these settings is likely due to the degradation of moraine ice cores and the disturbance of older moraines by younger readvances. Because these processes result in the exposure of new clasts on the moraine post-emplacement, the oldest ages in these datasets likely provide the best estimates for the earliest Neoglacial advances. These data also indicate that in some settings, early Neoglacial alpine glacier advances reached similar extents as their LIA maxima, possibly due to large ice-cored moraines impeding LIA advances. Glacier modeling efforts and complementary lacustrine sediment records will help to unravel the complex Neoglacial history in this region.

  5. Age at reproductive maturity and effect of age and time of day on sex sttraction in the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato psyllid, Bactericera (= Paratrioza) cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a major pest of potato. Studies were conducted to determine the age at which both males and females reach reproductive maturity and the effect of age and time of day on sex attraction. Adult B. cockerelli r...

  6. Television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L; Hamer, M

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the longitudinal association between television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus in an elderly sample of adults in England. Methods Analyses of data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. At baseline (2008), participants reported their television viewing time and physical activity level. Diabetes mellitus was recorded from self-reported physician diagnosis at 2-year follow-up. Associations between television viewing time and combined television viewing time and physical activity level with risk of incident diabetes mellitus at follow-up were examined using adjusted logistic regression models. Results A total of 5964 participants (mean ± sd age 65 ± 9 years at baseline, 44% male) were included in the analyses. There was an association between baseline television viewing time and risk of incident diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up (≥ 6 h/day compared with <2 h/day; odds ratio 4.27, 95% CI 1.69, 10.77), although the association was attenuated to the null in final adjusted models that included BMI. Participants who were inactive/had high television viewing time at baseline were almost twice as likely to have diabetes mellitus at 2-year follow-up than those who were active/had low television viewing time (fully adjusted odds ratio 1.94, 95% CI 1.02, 3.68), although active participants reporting high television viewing were not at risk. Conclusion Interventions to reduce the incidence of diabetes in the elderly that focus on both increasing physical activity and reducing television viewing time might prove useful. PMID:24975987

  7. Spent fuel shortage: Facts booklet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-04-01

    In October 1977, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced a spent nuclear fuel policy where the Government would, under certain conditions, take title of and store spent nuclear fuel from commercial power reactors. The policy is intended to provide spent fuel storage until final disposition is available. The DOE has programs for providing safe, long-term disposal of nuclear waste. The spent fuel storage program is one element of waste management and compliments the disposal program. The costs for spent fuel services are to be fully recovered by the Government from the utilities. This will allow the utilities to confidently consider the costs for disposition of spent fuel in their rate structure. The United States would also store limited amounts of foreign spent fuel to meet nonproliferation objectives. This booklet summarizes information on many aspects of spent fuel storage.

  8. Spent fuel storage. Facts booklet

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    In October 1977, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced a spent nuclear fuel policy where the Government would, under certain conditions, take title to and store spent nuclear fuel from commercial power reactors. The policy is intended to provide spent fuel storage until final disposition is available. DOE has programs for providing safe, long-term disposal of nuclear waste. The spent fuel storage program is one element of waste management and compliments the disposal program. The costs for spent fuel services are to be fully recovered by the Government from the utilities. This will allow the utilities to confidently consider the costs for disposition of spent fuel in their rate structure. The United States would also store limited amounts of foreign spent fuel to meet nonproliferation objectives. This booklet summarizes information on many aspects of spent fuel storage.

  9. Age and Measurement Time-of-Day Effects on Speech Recognition in Noise

    PubMed Central

    Veneman, Carrie E.; Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Matthews, Lois J.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of measurement time of day on speech recognition in noise and the extent to which time-of-day effects differ with age. Older adults tend to have more difficulty understanding speech in noise than younger adults, even when hearing is normal. Two possible contributors to this age difference in speech recognition may be measurement time of day and inhibition. Most younger adults are “evening-type,” showing peak circadian arousal in the evening, whereas most older adults are “morning-type,” with circadian arousal peaking in the morning. Tasks that require inhibition of irrelevant information have been shown to be affected by measurement time of day, with maximum performance attained at one’s peak time of day. We hypothesized that a change in inhibition will be associated with measurement time of day and therefore affect speech recognition in noise, with better performance in the morning for older adults and in the evening for younger adults. Design Fifteen younger, evening-type adults (20–28 years) and fifteen older, morning-type adults with normal hearing (66–78 years) listened to the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) and the Quick Speech in Noise test (QuickSIN) in the morning and evening (peak and off-peak times). Time of day preference was assessed using the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire. Sentences and noise were presented binaurally through insert earphones. During morning and evening sessions, participants solved word association problems within a visual distraction task (VDT), which was used as an estimate of inhibition. After each session, participants rated perceived mental demand of the tasks using a revised version of the NASA Task Load Index. Results Younger adults performed significantly better on the speech-in-noise tasks and rated themselves as requiring significantly less mental demand when tested at their peak (evening) than off-peak (morning) time of day. In contrast

  10. Intraindividual Variability in Basic Reaction Time Predicts Middle-Aged and Older Pilots’ Flight Simulator Performance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Intraindividual variability (IIV) is negatively associated with cognitive test performance and is positively associated with age and some neurological disorders. We aimed to extend these findings to a real-world task, flight simulator performance. We hypothesized that IIV predicts poorer initial flight performance and increased rate of decline in performance among middle-aged and older pilots. Method. Two-hundred and thirty-six pilots (40–69 years) completed annual assessments comprising a cognitive battery and two 75-min simulated flights in a flight simulator. Basic and complex IIV composite variables were created from measures of basic reaction time and shifting and divided attention tasks. Flight simulator performance was characterized by an overall summary score and scores on communication, emergencies, approach, and traffic avoidance components. Results. Although basic IIV did not predict rate of decline in flight performance, it had a negative association with initial performance for most flight measures. After taking into account processing speed, basic IIV explained an additional 8%–12% of the negative age effect on initial flight performance. Discussion. IIV plays an important role in real-world tasks and is another aspect of cognition that underlies age-related differences in cognitive performance. PMID:23052365

  11. IGF-1 Regulates Vertebral Bone Aging Through Sex-Specific and Time-Dependent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ashpole, Nicole M; Herron, Jacquelyn C; Mitschelen, Matthew C; Farley, Julie A; Logan, Sreemathi; Yan, Han; Ungvari, Zoltan; Hodges, Erik L; Csiszar, Anna; Ikeno, Yuji; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Sonntag, William E

    2016-02-01

    Advanced aging is associated with increased risk of bone fracture, especially within the vertebrae, which exhibit significant reductions in trabecular bone structure. Aging is also associated with a reduction in circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). Studies have suggested that the reduction in IGF-1 compromises healthspan, whereas others report that loss of IGF-1 is beneficial because it increases healthspan and lifespan. To date, the effect of decreases in circulating IGF-1 on vertebral bone aging has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we delineate the consequences of a loss of circulating IGF-1 on vertebral bone aging in male and female Igf(f/f) mice. IGF-1 was reduced at multiple specific time points during the mouse lifespan: early in postnatal development (crossing albumin-cyclic recombinase [Cre] mice with Igf(f/f) mice); and in early adulthood and in late adulthood using hepatic-specific viral vectors (AAV8-TBG-Cre). Vertebrae bone structure was analyzed at 27 months of age using micro-computed tomography (μCT) and quantitative bone histomorphometry. Consistent with previous studies, both male and female mice exhibited age-related reductions in vertebral bone structure. In male mice, reduction of circulating IGF-1 induced at any age did not diminish vertebral bone loss. Interestingly, early-life loss of IGF-1 in females resulted in a 67% increase in vertebral bone volume fraction, as well as increased connectivity density and increased trabecular number. The maintenance of bone structure in the early-life IGF-1-deficient females was associated with increased osteoblast surface and an increased ratio of osteoprotegerin/receptor-activator of NF-κB-ligand (RANKL) levels in circulation. Within 3 months of a loss of IGF-1, there was a 2.2-fold increase in insulin receptor expression within the vertebral bones of our female mice, suggesting that local signaling may compensate for the loss of circulating IGF-1. Together, these data

  12. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  13. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  14. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  15. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  16. Characterization of time-dependent component reliability and availability effects due to aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilsmeier, Todd Andrew

    The time-dependent effects of reliability and unavailability that occur due to the component first failure density and due to the maintenance policy are important since: (i) they may substantially deviate from static or average values, (ii) when these time-dependent effects are incorporated into a system, deviations can superimpose creating even greater deviations from static. Characterization of component reliability and unavailability effects due to aging is important for all engineering systems and has not been investigated. A general surveillance/repair policy including its constraints and limitations is defined. Potential dynamic variables under this surveillance/repair policy are identified, and a methodology for determining the most useful of these dynamic variables under this surveillance/repair policy are also developed. Under periodic surveillance and perfect detection/repair, expressions for time-dependent unavailability, failure frequency, and renewal frequency are developed from the general methodology. Under periodic surveillance, time-dependent failure frequency, w(t), unavailability, q(t), and probability of failure within test interval, Wsb{n}(T), are determined for Weibull and linear failure rates with aging threshold time, and normal failure density. These failure densities model component aging in nuclear power plants. The time-dependent variables are plotted and some important features that describe their time-dependent behavior (characteristics) are defined and determined directly from the plots. Using these characteristics, criteria are established to demonstrate the significance of dynamic modeling under periodic surveillance. It is observed that w(t) and q(t) may oscillate to values exceeding 5 times the static values during plant life. Also, dynamic periods may be on the order of years; therefore, dynamic modeling of q(t) and w(t) under periodic surveillance may be necessary. Under periodic surveillance, a simple non-recursive expression

  17. Age-related differences in the neural correlates of remembering time-based intentions.

    PubMed

    Cona, Giorgia; Arcara, Giorgio; Tarantino, Vincenza; Bisiacchi, Patrizia Silvia

    2012-09-01

    The present study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to explore the effect of age on the neural correlates of monitoring processes involved in time-based prospective memory. In both younger and older adults, the addition of a time-based prospective memory task to an ongoing task led to a sustained ERP activity broadly distributed over the scalp. Older adults, however, did not exhibit the slow wave activity observed in younger adults over prefrontal regions, which is considered to be associated with retrieval mode. This finding indicates that age-related decline in intention maintenance might be one source of the impaired prospective memory performance displayed by older adults. An 'anterior shift' in scalp distribution of the P3 was observed in older adults, and was related to lower levels of accuracy in prospective memory performance. This relationship suggests that possible factors responsible for age-related decline in prospective memory performance include the decreased efficiency of executive/frontal functions as well as the reduced amount of resources available for the prospective memory task. PMID:22841994

  18. The Effect of Sex and Age on Small Intestinal Transit Times in Humans.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Monika; Fadda, Hala M

    2016-02-01

    This study utilizes a novel approach of small bowel video capsule endoscopy for investigating the influence of sex and age on small intestinal transit times (SITT) in humans. A total of 81 outpatients undergoing investigations with the small bowel video capsule endoscope (SB-VCE) and meeting inclusion criteria were included in this study. Following an overnight fast, patients swallowed the SB-VCE with a glass of water. SITT were calculated from the first duodenal image to the first cecal image. This study showed that the SB-VCE provides accurate and reliable measurements of SITT under real-life conditions. A large inter-individual variability in SITT was observed, with times ranging from 50 to 460 min. This variability can have implications on drug absorption and bioavailability. The median SITT were 219 min for females and 191 min for males. Although SITT were 28 min longer in females than males, this difference was not found to be statistically significant (p = 0.66). No correlation was found between age and SITT (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.19). Therefore, any drug bioavailability differences of modified release dosage preparations that are observed between adult patient groups of different age or sex are unlikely to be attributable to SITT. PMID:26308649

  19. Age Differences in Goal Concordance, Time Use, and Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiwei; Lee, Yue-Ting; Pethtel, Olivia L; Gutowitz, Michael S; Kirk, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate age differences in goal concordance, time use, and Well-Being. Past research has found that despite age-related decline in life circumstances (e.g., health), the Well-Being of older adults is as high as young adults. The present study used a novel approach to explore the Paradox of Well-Being. One hundred and seventy-seven adults participated in the study. They first generated their three most important personal strivings and rated levels of goal concordance for external, introjected, identified, and intrinsic reasons. Then, they reported their actual and ideal time use in 10 categories of activities in the past 24 hours. Finally, Well-Being was assessed by the Flourishing Scale and the Scale of Positive and Negative Experience (Diener, Wirtz, et al., 2010). Older adults did not differ from young adults in overall Well-Being. However, they held higher levels of goal concordance and were more likely to spend time in spirituality and religion-related activities than young adults. The relationships between goal concordance, time use, and Well-Being were examined separately for young and older adults. Implications were discussed to improve Well-Being for young and older adults. PMID:23667291

  20. Wake Up Time, Light, and Mood in a Population Sample Age 40-64 Years

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Takuro; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Concern that disturbances of sleep and light exposures at night might increase cancer risks have been expressed, but little actual exposure data has been collected. Measurements from a representative population sample were examined to understand the magnitude of in-bed light exposure at night and possible correlates. Methods From 1990 to 1994, a home survey of sleep disorders among adults ages 40-64 was conducted in the City of San Diego California, using stratified representative sampling techniques. Along with questionnaires, sleep logs, and 3-night wrist activity and pulse oximetry measures, bedside illumination was measured with a computer recording system. Questionnaires included the CESD depression scale and a scale of symptoms typical of winter depression. Results Complete data were available from 286 men and women, whose mean in-bed intervals averaged 7 hours and 42 minutes. The mean room illumination during the first part of the night was mean 12.7 lux (median 3.2 lux) and during the last 2 hours in bed averaged 28.7 lux (median 18.9 lux). Nocturnal light exposure was positively correlated with age, male gender, summer season, time in bed, wake-up time, and depressive symptoms. Conclusion Complex bi-directional interactions may take place between sleep disturbances, depression, time in bed, wake-up-time, and in-bed illumination. The most crucial light exposures appear to occur in the last 2 hours in bed, largely after dawn, so daylight exposure may be an important factor. PMID:25866517

  1. Dating of the time of sedimentation using U-Pb ages for paleosol calcite

    SciTech Connect

    Rasbury, E.T.; Hanson, G.N.; Meyers, W.J.

    1997-04-01

    We have sampled paleosol horizons from a continuous core of a rapidly deposited Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian marine shelf section in Texas. USA. The paleosols occur on the tops of shoaling upward cycles and, based on current time constraints, these cycles average 250 ka and cannot represent longer than 400 ka. As the unconformity which is represented by the paleosol can only be a fraction of the time allowed for deposition of the cycle, the age of minerals that form in the paleosol is effectively the time of sedimentation. The uncertainty on the {sup 238}U-{sup 206}Pb age of brown paleosol calcite from one exposure surface is only 1 Ma. Reported uncertainties on Paleozoic boundaries are greater than 10 Ma. Our early results suggest that the marine sedimentary record may be dated to a precision of 1 Ma with U-Pb analyses of carefully selected paleosol calcite. These results have implications for vastly improving time resolution of the rock record. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Interactive vs passive screen time and nighttime sleep duration among school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    Yland, Jennifer; Guan, Stanford; Emanuele, Erin; Hale, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Insufficient sleep among school-aged children is a growing concern, as numerous studies have shown that chronic short sleep duration increases the risk of poor academic performance and specific adverse health outcomes. We examined the association between weekday nighttime sleep duration and 3 types of screen exposure: television, computer use, and video gaming. Methods We used age 9 data from an ethnically diverse national birth cohort study, the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, to assess the association between screen time and sleep duration among 9-year-olds, using screen time data reported by both the child (n = 3269) and by the child's primary caregiver (n= 2770). Results Within the child-reported models, children who watched more than 2 hours of television per day had shorter sleep duration by approximately 11 minutes per night compared to those who watched less than 2 hours of television (β = −0.18; P < .001). Using the caregiver-reported models, both television and computer use were associated with reduced sleep duration. For both child- and parent-reported screen time measures, we did not find statistically significant differences in effect size across various types of screen time. Conclusions Screen time from televisions and computers is associated with reduced sleep duration among 9-year-olds, using 2 sources of estimates of screen time exposure (child and parent reports). No specific type or use of screen time resulted in significantly shorter sleep duration than another, suggesting that caution should be advised against excessive use of all screens. PMID:27540566

  3. Age-Related Effects of Study Time Allocation on Memory Performance in a Verbal and a Spatial Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Lacy E.

    2012-01-01

    Past studies have suggested that study time allocation partially mediates age relations on memory performance in a verbal task. To identify whether this applied to a different material modality, participants ages 20-87 completed a spatial task in addition to a traditional verbal task. In both the verbal and the spatial task, increased age was…

  4. Modelling the Effects of Ageing Time of Starch on the Enzymatic Activity of Three Amylolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Nelson P.; Pastrana Castro, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    The effect of increasing ageing time (t) of starch on the activity of three amylolytic enzymes (Termamyl, San Super, and BAN) was investigated. Although all the enzymatic reactions follow michaelian kinetics, vmax decreased significantly (P < 0.05) and KM increased (although not always significantly) with the increase in t. The conformational changes produced in the starch chains as a consequence of the ageing seemed to affect negatively the diffusivity of the starch to the active site of the enzymes and the release of the reaction products to the medium. A similar effect was observed when the enzymatic reactions were carried out with unaged starches supplemented with different concentrations of gelatine [G]. The inhibition in the amylolytic activities was best mathematically described by using three modified forms of the Michaelis-Menten model, which included a term to consider, respectively, the linear, exponential, and hyperbolic inhibitory effects of t and [G]. PMID:22666116

  5. Quality Saving Mechanisms of Mitochondria during Aging in a Fully Time-Dependent Computational Biophysical Model.

    PubMed

    Mellem, Daniel; Fischer, Frank; Jaspers, Sören; Wenck, Horst; Rübhausen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the energy production of eukaryotic cells. During aging mitochondria run through various processes which change their quality in terms of activity, health and metabolic supply. In recent years, many of these processes such as fission and fusion of mitochondria, mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy consumption have been subject of research. Based on numerous experimental insights, it was possible to qualify mitochondrial behaviour in computational simulations. Here, we present a new biophysical model based on the approach of Figge et al. in 2012. We introduce exponential decay and growth laws for each mitochondrial process to derive its time-dependent probability during the aging of cells. All mitochondrial processes of the original model are mathematically and biophysically redefined and additional processes are implemented: Mitochondrial fission and fusion is separated into a metabolic outer-membrane part and a protein-related inner-membrane part, a quality-dependent threshold for mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is introduced and processes for activity-dependent internal oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial repair mechanisms are newly included. Our findings reveal a decrease of mitochondrial quality and a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network during aging. Additionally, the model discloses a quality increasing mechanism due to the interplay of the mitophagy and biogenesis cycle and the fission and fusion cycle of mitochondria. It is revealed that decreased mitochondrial repair can be a quality saving process in aged cells. Furthermore, the model finds strategies to sustain the quality of the mitochondrial network in cells with high production rates of reactive oxygen species due to large energy demands. Hence, the model adds new insights to biophysical mechanisms of mitochondrial aging and provides novel understandings of the interdependency of mitochondrial processes. PMID:26771181

  6. New U-Pb zircon ages and the duration and division of Devonian time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, R.D.; Bradley, D.C.; Ver Straeten, C.A.; Harris, A.G.; Ebert, J.R.; McCutcheon, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    Newly determined U-Pb zircon ages of volcanic ashes closely tied to biostratigraphic zones are used to revise the Devonian time-scale. They are: 1) 417.6 ?? 1.0 Ma for an ash within the conodont zone of Icriodus woschmidti/I. w. hesperius Lochkovian); 2) 408.3 ?? 1.9 Ma for an ash of early Emsian age correlated with the conodont zones of Po. dehiscens--Lower Po. inversus; 3) 391.4 ?? 1.8 Ma for an ash within the Po. c. costatus Zone and probably within the upper half of the zone (Eifelian); and 4) 381.1 ?? 1.3 Ma for an ash within the range of the Frasnian conodont Palmatolepis punctata (Pa. punctata Zone to Upper Pa. hassi Zone). U-Pb zircon ages for two rhyolites bracketing a palyniferous bed of the pusillites-lepidophyta spore zone, are dated at 363.8 ?? 2.2 Ma and 363 ?? 2.2 Ma and 363.4 ?? 1.8 Ma, respectively, suggesting an age of ~363 Ma for a level within the late Famennian Pa. g. expansa Zone. These data, together with other published zircon ages, suggest that the base and top of the Devonian lie close to 418 Ma and 362 Ma, respectively, thus lengthening the period of ~20% over current estimates. We suggest that the duration of the Middle Devonian (Eifelian and Givitian) is rather brief, perhaps no longer than 11.5 Myr (394 Ma-382.5 Ma), and that the Emsian and Famennian are the longest stages in the period with estimated durations of ~15.5 Myr and 14.5 Myr, respectively.

  7. Timing the second birth: fecundability models for selected race and age groups in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Swanson, D A

    1986-12-01

    This article tests exponential models for fecundability for use in predicting the timing of the second birth in a non-contracepting population, using data from Hawaii for reference. The paper begins with an extensive review of the literature on mathematical models for birth intervals. The most common problem with prior studies is that the reference data are often biased with uncontrolled parameters such as maternal age, abortion history, lactation practice and pregnancy planning. Pertinent bias in the present data is evaluated. The principal tool used here is an exponential distribution, maximum-likelihood method, involving partial differential equations. The model was constructed by subjecting it to 3 steps: 1) it was tested for exponentiality with a Gail-Gastwirth test that does not depend upon an unknown parameter; 2) the reciprocal of the mean second birth interval was calculated for each group that passed the first test; 3) the estimated frequencies were tested against observed by the chi-squared goodness of fit test. The results are tabulated as separate racial groups, combined races, and age groups. Fecundabilities varied widely by age within all races. For all races, rates were .07045, .03423 and .02777 for ages 20-24, 25-29, and 30-34. Thus the results suggest that fecundability rates are largely determined by age related factors associated with coital frequency, rather than by racial or physiological variations. Other factors potentially influencing fecundability in actual data or models are discussed, such as period effects, the "intendedness" of pregnancy, types of non-live birth intervals, lactation, induced and spontaneous abortion, and differences in pre- and post-demographic transition populations. Finally appendices are added discussing cohort size bias, presenting data set documentation and evaluating the length of pregnancy term and post-partum sterility in the data used here. PMID:12268733

  8. Early-age cold conditioning of broilers: effects of timing and temperature.

    PubMed

    Shahir, M H; Dilmagani, S; Tzschentke, B

    2012-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of early-age cold conditioning (CC) on performance, ascites mortality, thyroid hormones status and immune response (leucocytes count) of broiler chickens. 2. A total of 336 chicks at 2 and 3 d of age were exposed to 20 or 25°C (for 3 or 6 h) in a 2 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment, while a control group was kept under normal temperature conditions (30°C). Thereafter, both control and cold conditioned birds were reared under standard conditions until 42 d of age. 3. The results showed that performance (weight gain and feed efficiency) was improved by CC at the end of the rearing period. Carcase traits (breast, thigh and abdominal fat percentage) were not affected by different treatments. Heart weight was lower in cold conditioned birds accompanied with lower ascites mortality. Total leucocyte count was higher in CC birds. Higher concentrations of thyroxin (T(4)) were found in plasma of treated groups, while triiodothyronine (T(3)) to T(4) ratio was decreased. 4. In conclusion, it seems that early age CC improves performance and reduces ascites mortality of broilers through altered thyroid hormones metabolism and leucocyte function. According to the results, the best timing for CC of broilers was 20°C for 6 h at the age of 2 d, and no significant benefit was observed by repeated CC. PMID:23130589

  9. Quality Saving Mechanisms of Mitochondria during Aging in a Fully Time-Dependent Computational Biophysical Model

    PubMed Central

    Mellem, Daniel; Fischer, Frank; Jaspers, Sören; Wenck, Horst; Rübhausen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for the energy production of eukaryotic cells. During aging mitochondria run through various processes which change their quality in terms of activity, health and metabolic supply. In recent years, many of these processes such as fission and fusion of mitochondria, mitophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy consumption have been subject of research. Based on numerous experimental insights, it was possible to qualify mitochondrial behaviour in computational simulations. Here, we present a new biophysical model based on the approach of Figge et al. in 2012. We introduce exponential decay and growth laws for each mitochondrial process to derive its time-dependent probability during the aging of cells. All mitochondrial processes of the original model are mathematically and biophysically redefined and additional processes are implemented: Mitochondrial fission and fusion is separated into a metabolic outer-membrane part and a protein-related inner-membrane part, a quality-dependent threshold for mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis is introduced and processes for activity-dependent internal oxidative stress as well as mitochondrial repair mechanisms are newly included. Our findings reveal a decrease of mitochondrial quality and a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network during aging. Additionally, the model discloses a quality increasing mechanism due to the interplay of the mitophagy and biogenesis cycle and the fission and fusion cycle of mitochondria. It is revealed that decreased mitochondrial repair can be a quality saving process in aged cells. Furthermore, the model finds strategies to sustain the quality of the mitochondrial network in cells with high production rates of reactive oxygen species due to large energy demands. Hence, the model adds new insights to biophysical mechanisms of mitochondrial aging and provides novel understandings of the interdependency of mitochondrial processes. PMID:26771181

  10. Adults’ reports of their earliest memories: Consistency in events, ages, and narrative characteristics over time

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Larkina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Earliest memories have been of interest since the late 1800s, when it was first noted that most adults do not have memories from the first years of life (so-called childhood amnesia). Several characteristics of adults’ earliest memories have been investigated, including emotional content, the perspective from which they are recalled, and vividness. The focus of the present research was a feature of early memories heretofore relatively neglected in the literature, namely, their consistency. Adults reported their earliest memories 2 to 4 times over a 4-year period. Reports of earliest memories were highly consistent in the events identified as the bases for earliest memories, the reported age at the time of the event, and in terms of qualities of the narrative descriptions. These findings imply stability in the boundary that marks the offset of childhood amnesia, as well as in the beginning of a continuous sense of self over time. PMID:24836979

  11. Adults' reports of their earliest memories: consistency in events, ages, and narrative characteristics over time.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Patricia J; Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Larkina, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Earliest memories have been of interest since the late 1800s, when it was first noted that most adults do not have memories from the first years of life (so-called childhood amnesia). Several characteristics of adults' earliest memories have been investigated, including emotional content, the perspective from which they are recalled, and vividness. The focus of the present research was a feature of early memories heretofore relatively neglected in the literature, namely, their consistency. Adults reported their earliest memories 2-4 times over a 4-year period. Reports of earliest memories were highly consistent in the events identified as the bases for earliest memories, the reported age at the time of the event, and in terms of qualities of the narrative descriptions. These findings imply stability in the boundary that marks the offset of childhood amnesia, as well as in the beginning of a continuous sense of self over time. PMID:24836979

  12. Age and Sex of Mice Markedly Affect Survival Times Associated with Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prows, Daniel R.; Gibbons, William J.; Smith, Jessica J.; Pilipenko, Valentina; Martin, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Mortality associated with acute lung injury (ALI) remains substantial, with recent estimates of 35–45% similar to those obtained decades ago. Although evidence for sex-related differences in ALI mortality remains equivocal, death rates differ markedly for age, with more than 3-fold increased mortality in older versus younger patients. Strains of mice also show large differences in ALI mortality. To tease out genetic factors affecting mortality, we established a mouse model of differential hyperoxic ALI (HALI) survival. Separate genetic analyses of backcross and F2 populations generated from sensitive C57BL/6J (B) and resistant 129X1/SvJ (X1) progenitor strains identified two quantitative trait loci (QTLs; Shali1 and Shali2) with strong, equal but opposite, within-strain effects on survival. Congenic lines confirmed these opposing QTL effects, but also retained the low penetrance seen in the 6–12 week X1 control strain. Sorting mice into distinct age groups revealed that ‘age at exposure’ inversely correlated with survival time and explained reduced penetrance of the resistance trait. While B mice were already sensitive by 6 weeks old, X1 mice maintained significant resistance up to 3–4 weeks longer. Reanalysis of F2 data gave analogous age-related findings, and also supported sex-specific linkage for Shali1 and Shali2. Importantly, we have demonstrated in congenic mice that these age effects on survival correspond with B alleles for Shali1 (6-week old mice more sensitive) and Shali2 (10-week old mice more resistant) placed on the X1 background. Further studies revealed significant sex-specific survival differences in subcongenics for both QTLs. Accounting for age and sex markedly improved penetrance of both QTLs, thereby reducing trait variability, refining Shali1 to <8.5Mb, and supporting several sub-QTLs within the Shali2 interval. Together, these congenics will allow age- and sex-specific studies to interrogate myriad subphenotypes affected during ALI

  13. Time-Dependent Behavior of a Graphite/Thermoplastic Composite and the Effects of Stress and Physical Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Experimental studies were performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated time dependent properties of IM7/8320 composite. Isothermal tensile creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers were adapted for testing of the composite material. Time dependent transverse and shear compliance's for an orthotropic plate were found from short term creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-T(8) temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be affected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of temperature and applied stress.

  14. Locus of Control, Social Interdependence, Academic Preparation, Age, Study Time, and the Study Skills of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Craig H.; Slate, John R.; Marini, Irmo

    1995-01-01

    The relationship of students' study skills to their locus of control, social interdependence, academic preparation, age, and study time was studied with 266 college students. Study skills were related to locus of control, age, expected course grade, and study time. The need to address attitudinal and motivational variables in study skills programs…

  15. Antioxidant properties of royal jelly associated with larval age and time of harvest.

    PubMed

    Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yuan-Chang; Shi, Li-Shian; Peng, Chi-Chung

    2008-12-10

    This study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant properties of royal jelly (RJ) collected from larvae of different ages that were transferred in artificial bee queen cells for 24, 48, and 72 h. RJ harvested from the 1 day old larvae 24 h after the graft displayed predominant antioxidant properties, including scavenging activity of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation, and reducing power. Regardless of the initial larval age, lower antioxidant activities were observed in the RJ harvested later than 24 h except for the activity of superoxide dismutase. In addition, higher contents of proteins and polyphenolic compounds were determined in the RJ harvested 24 h than that harvested 48 or 72 h after the graft. It implied that the polyphenolic compounds may be the major component for giving the antioxidant activities in RJ. In summary, the time of harvest and the initial larval age did affect the antioxidant potencies in RJ, and RJ collected 24 h after the larval transfer showed the most substantial antioxidant activities. PMID:19007163

  16. Time dependent behavior of a graphite/thermoplastic composite and the effects of stress and physical aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Two complimentary studies were performed to determine the effects of stress and physical aging on the matrix dominated time dependent properties of IM7/8320 composite. The first of these studies, experimental in nature, used isothermal tensile creep/aging test techniques developed for polymers and adapted them for testing of the composite material. From these tests, the time dependent transverse (S22) and shear (S66) compliance's for an orthotropic plate were found from short term creep compliance measurements at constant, sub-T(sub g) temperatures. These compliance terms were shown to be affected by physical aging. Aging time shift factors and shift rates were found to be a function of temperature and applied stress. The second part of the study relied upon isothermal uniaxial tension tests of IM7/8320 to determine the effects of physical aging on the nonlinear material behavior at elevated temperature. An elastic/viscoplastic constitutive model was used to quantify the effects of aging on the rate-independent plastic and rate-dependent viscoplastic response. Sensitivity of the material constants required by the model to aging time were determined for aging times up to 65 hours. Verification of the analytical model indicated that the effects of prior aging on the nonlinear stress/strain/time data of matrix dominated laminates can be predicted.

  17. Improving artificial forest biomass estimates using afforestation age information from time series Landsat stacks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liangyun; Peng, Dailiang; Wang, Zhihui; Hu, Yong

    2014-11-01

    China maintains the largest artificial forest area in the world. Studying the dynamic variation of forest biomass and carbon stock is important to the sustainable use of forest resources and understanding of the artificial forest carbon budget in China. In this study, we investigated the potential of Landsat time series stacks for aboveground biomass (AGB) estimation in Yulin District, a key region of the Three-North Shelter region of China. Firstly, the afforestation age was successfully retrieved from the Landsat time series stacks in the last 40 years (from 1974 to 2013) and shown to be consistent with the surveyed tree ages, with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) value of 4.32 years and a determination coefficient (R (2)) of 0.824. Then, the AGB regression models were successfully developed by integrating vegetation indices and tree age. The simple ratio vegetation index (SR) is the best candidate of the commonly used vegetation indices for estimating forest AGB, and the forest AGB model was significantly improved using the combination of SR and tree age, with R (2) values from 0.50 to 0.727. Finally, the forest AGB images were mapped at eight epochs from 1985 to 2013 using SR and afforestation age. The total forest AGB in seven counties of Yulin District increased by 20.8 G kg, from 5.8 G kg in 1986 to 26.6 G kg in 2013, a total increase of 360 %. For the persistent forest area since 1974, the forest AGB density increased from 15.72 t/ha in 1986 to 44.53 t/ha in 2013, with an annual rate of about 0.98 t/ha. For the artificial forest planted after 1974, the AGB density increased about 1.03 t/ha a year from 1974 to 2013. The results present a noticeable carbon increment for the planted artificial forest in Yulin District over the last four decades. PMID:25034235

  18. The End Is (Not) Near: Aging, Essentialism, and Future Time Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David; Job, Veronika; Mathias, Maya; Grah, Stephanie; Freund, Alexandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Beliefs about aging influence how we interpret and respond to changes within and around us. Essentialist beliefs about aging are defined as views that link chronological age with inherent and immutable properties underlying aging-related changes. These beliefs may influence the experience of aging-related changes and shape people's outlook of the…

  19. Evidence for age-related changes to temporal attention and memory from the choice time production task

    PubMed Central

    Gooch, Cynthia M.; Stern, Yaakov; Rakitin, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of aging on interval timing was examined using a choice time production task, which required participants to choose a key response based on the location of the stimulus, but to delay responding until after a learned time interval. Experiment 1 varied attentional demands of the response choice portion of the task by varying difficulty of stimulus-response mapping. Choice difficulty affected temporal accuracy equally in both age groups, but older participants’ response latencies were more variable under more difficult response choice conditions. Experiment 2 tested the contribution of long-term memory to differences in choice time production between age groups over 3 days of testing. Direction of errors in time production between the two age groups diverged over the 3 sessions, but variability did not differ. Results from each experiment separately show age-related changes to attention and memory in temporal processing using different measures and manipulations in the same task. PMID:19132578

  20. Campaign 1.7 Pu Aging. Development of Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Venhaus, Thomas J.

    2015-09-09

    The first application of Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) to an aged plutonium surface has resulted in a rich set of surface chemistry data, as well as some unexpected results. FY15 was highlighted by not only the first mapping of hydrogen-containing features within the metal, but also a prove-in series of experiments using the system’s Sieverts Reaction Cell. These experiments involved successfully heating the sample to ~450 oC for nearly 24 hours while the sample was dosed several times with hydrogen, followed by an in situ ToF-SIMS analysis. During this year, the data allowed for better and more consistent identification of the myriad peaks that result from the SIMS sputter process. In collaboration with the AWE (U.K), the system was also fully aligned for sputter depth profiling for future experiments.

  1. Medicare, Ethics, and Reflexive Longevity: Governing Time and Treatment in an Aging Society

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Sharon R.; Fjord, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    The clinical activities that constitute longevity making in the United States are perhaps the quintessential example of a dynamic modern temporality, characterized by the quest for risk reduction, the powerful progress narratives of science and medicine, and the personal responsibility of calculating the worth of more time in relation to medical options and age. This article explores how medicine materializes and problematizes time through a discussion of ethicality—in this case, the form of governance in which scientific evidence, Medicare policy and clinical knowledge and practice organize first, what becomes “thinkable” as the best medicine, and second, how that kind of understanding shapes a telos of living. Using liver disease and liver transplantation in the United States as my example, I explore the influence of Medicare coverage decisions on treatments, clinical standards, and ethical necessity. Reflexive longevity—a relentless future-thinking about life itself—is one feature of this ethicality. PMID:21834359

  2. An anatomy of old-age disability: Time use, affect and experienced utility.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gabriela; Ingenhaag, Michael; Maurer, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Complementing the commonly used concepts of evaluative wellbeing and decision utility, emotional wellbeing and experienced utility are important welfare criteria to assess individuals' subjective wellbeing, especially for valuing health and disability. Yet, almost all empirical evidences on the link between disability and experienced wellbeing come from developed countries. This paper studies the relationship between old-age disability and experienced utility in five low- and middle-income countries. Using data on individual time use and activity-specific affective experiences from an abbreviated version of the Day Reconstruction Method, we document a strong negative association between disability and experienced utility. These differences in experienced utility by disability status are exclusively due to worse activity-specific affective experiences among persons with disabilities. By contrast, disability-related differences in time use provide small compensating effects. Interventions or technologies that facilitate daily life hold most promise to improve experienced utility among persons with disabilities in the developing world. PMID:26496227

  3. Effect of ageing time on mechanical properties of plasticized poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Giuseppe; Cinelli, Patrizia; Anguillesi, Irene; Salvadori, Sara; Coltelli, Maria-Beatrice; Lazzeri, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) based materials were prepared by melt extrusion by using different plasticizers, such as poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEG)s having different molecular weight (400, 1500 and 4000). The plasticizers content was varied in the range 10-20% by weight versus the PHB polymeric matrix. The variation of tensile properties of the different samples was monitored as a function of time of ageing to study the stability of the material. The elastic modulus and tensile strength increased as a function of time, whereas the strain at break decreased. The experimental results were explained by considering both the demixing of the plasticizers and the occurring of secondary crystallization. Moreover the variation in mechanical properties was correlated to the structure and concentration of the different plasticizers employed.

  4. Predicting admissions and time spent in hospital over a decade in a population-based record linkage study: the EPIC-Norfolk cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shabina; Khaw, K T

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify hospital use in a general population over 10 years follow-up and to examine related factors in a general population-based cohort. Design A prospective population-based study of men and women. Setting Norfolk, UK. Participants 11 228 men and 13 786 women aged 40–79 years in 1993–1997 followed between 1999 and 2009. Main outcomes measures Number of hospital admissions and total bed days for individuals over a 10-year follow-up period identified using record linkage; five categories for admissions (from zero to highest ≥7) and hospital bed days (from zero to highest ≥20 nights). Results Over a period of 10 years, 18 179 (72.7%) study participants had at least one admission to hospital, 13.8% with 7 or more admissions and 19.9% with 20 or more nights in hospital. In logistic regression models with outcome ≥7 admissions, low education level OR 1.14 (1.05 to 1.24), age OR per 10-year increase 1.75 (1.67 to 1.82), male sex OR 1.32 (1.22 to 1.42), manual social class 1.22 (1.13 to 1.32), current cigarette smoker OR 1.53 (1.37 to 1.71) and body mass index >30 kg/m² OR 1.41 (1.28 to 1.56) all independently predicted the outcome with p<0.0001. Results were similar for those with ≥20 hospital bed days. A risk score constructed using male sex, manual social class, no educational qualifications; current smoker and body mass index >30 kg/m², estimated percentages of the cohort in the categories of admission numbers and hospital bed days in stratified age bands with twofold to threefold differences in future hospital use between those with high-risk and low-risk scores. Conclusions The future probability of cumulative hospital admissions and bed days appears independently related to a range of simple demographic and behavioural indicators. The strongest of these is increasing age with high body mass index and smoking having similar magnitudes for predicting risk of future hospital usage. PMID:26792216

  5. Simulated Interventions to Ameliorate Age-Related Bone Loss Indicate the Importance of Timing.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Carole J; Gartland, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodeling is the continuous process of bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, in order to maintain homeostasis. The activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts is regulated by a network of signaling pathways, including Wnt, parathyroid hormone (PTH), RANK ligand/osteoprotegrin, and TGF-β, in response to stimuli, such as mechanical loading. During aging there is a gradual loss of bone mass due to dysregulation of signaling pathways. This may be due to a decline in physical activity with age and/or changes in hormones and other signaling molecules. In particular, hormones, such as PTH, have a circadian rhythm, which may be disrupted in aging. Due to the complexity of the molecular and cellular networks involved in bone remodeling, several mathematical models have been proposed to aid understanding of the processes involved. However, to date, there are no models, which explicitly consider the effects of mechanical loading, the circadian rhythm of PTH, and the dynamics of signaling molecules on bone remodeling. Therefore, we have constructed a network model of the system using a modular approach, which will allow further modifications as required in future research. The model was used to simulate the effects of mechanical loading and also the effects of different interventions, such as continuous or intermittent administration of PTH. Our model predicts that the absence of regular mechanical loading and/or an impaired PTH circadian rhythm leads to a gradual decrease in bone mass over time, which can be restored by simulated interventions and that the effectiveness of some interventions may depend on their timing. PMID:27379013

  6. Simulated Interventions to Ameliorate Age-Related Bone Loss Indicate the Importance of Timing

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Carole J.; Gartland, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodeling is the continuous process of bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, in order to maintain homeostasis. The activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts is regulated by a network of signaling pathways, including Wnt, parathyroid hormone (PTH), RANK ligand/osteoprotegrin, and TGF-β, in response to stimuli, such as mechanical loading. During aging there is a gradual loss of bone mass due to dysregulation of signaling pathways. This may be due to a decline in physical activity with age and/or changes in hormones and other signaling molecules. In particular, hormones, such as PTH, have a circadian rhythm, which may be disrupted in aging. Due to the complexity of the molecular and cellular networks involved in bone remodeling, several mathematical models have been proposed to aid understanding of the processes involved. However, to date, there are no models, which explicitly consider the effects of mechanical loading, the circadian rhythm of PTH, and the dynamics of signaling molecules on bone remodeling. Therefore, we have constructed a network model of the system using a modular approach, which will allow further modifications as required in future research. The model was used to simulate the effects of mechanical loading and also the effects of different interventions, such as continuous or intermittent administration of PTH. Our model predicts that the absence of regular mechanical loading and/or an impaired PTH circadian rhythm leads to a gradual decrease in bone mass over time, which can be restored by simulated interventions and that the effectiveness of some interventions may depend on their timing. PMID:27379013

  7. Tear Lacritin Levels by Age, Sex, and Time of Day in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Kyle; Gandia, Natasha C.; Wilburn, Jennifer K.; Bower, Kraig S.; Sia, Rose K.; Ryan, Denise S.; Deaton, Michael L.; Still, Katherine M.; Vassilev, Veronica C.; Laurie, Gordon W.; McKown, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Several small proteomic studies suggest that the prosecretory tear protein lacritin may be selectively downregulated in dry eye syndrome and in blepharitis, yet little information is available about normal baseline levels. This study assessed lacritin levels in tears from healthy individuals and addressed whether they differ according to sex, age, or time of day. Methods. Rabbit antibodies against lacritin N-terminal peptide EDASSDSTGADPAQEAGTS (Pep Lac N-Term) were generated and characterized against human recombinant lacritin and N-65 truncation mutant. Basal tears were collected from 66 healthy individuals ranging in age from 18 to 52 years, and at four times during one 24-hour period from 34 other individuals. Lacritin levels were then analyzed by ELISA and Western blotting. Results. Anti-Pep Lac N-Term bound lacritin, but not truncation mutant N-65 that lacks the N-terminal antigenic site. Tear lacritin levels followed a normal distribution with a mean of 4.2 ± 1.17 ng/100 ng total tear protein. Levels differed little by age or sex, and decreased slightly between 4 and 8 hours in a 24-hour cycle. Tear-blocking effects were minimal, as suggested by spiking of tears with recombinant lacritin. Conclusions. Anti-Pep Lac N-Term–detectable lacritin comprises ∼4.2 ng/100 ng total tear protein in healthy individuals, with no significant differences between males and females or among individuals between 18 and 52 years old. Levels decrease slightly in the late afternoon. These findings provide a baseline for future immunodiagnostic studies of lacritin in dry eye and other ocular diseases. PMID:22918641

  8. Mastering the Concepts of Geologic Time: Novice Students' Understanding of the Principles of Relative Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speta, M.; Reid, L.

    2010-12-01

    Misconceptions can adversely affect students’ mastery of the fundamental geoscience concepts necessary for development of the knowledge base required to become a professional geoscientist. In the fall of 2009, in-class learning assessments were introduced into a large (400 student) undergraduate introductory geoscience course to help students develop expert-like problem solving skills for geologic problems. They were also designed to reveal students’ misconceptions on geoscience concepts in order to help direct the course of instruction. These assessments were based on simple, real-world scenarios that geoscientists encounter in their research. One of these assessments focused on the application of concepts of geologic time. It asked students to give the relative ages of granite, schist and shale based on a sketch of two outcrops, and to describe the reasoning behind their answer. In order to test all of the principles of relative age, the assignment had two possible solutions. A post-course analysis of student responses on these assessments was carried out using a modified constant comparative analysis method to identify common misconceptions. This analysis revealed that 61% of students failed to identify both possible solutions. Furthermore, 55% of students applied the principle of superposition to intrusive igneous and metamorphic rocks, and 18% treated the once connected outcrops as having separate geologic histories. 56% of students could not support their proposed geologic history with appropriate reasoning. These results suggest that the principles of relative geologic time that students had the greatest difficulty with were when to apply the principle of superposition and how to apply the principle of original continuity. Students also had difficulty using the principles of relative age to provide appropriate scientific reasoning for their choices.

  9. Ageing and feature binding in visual working memory: The role of presentation time.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Stephen; Parra, Mario A; Logie, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    A large body of research has clearly demonstrated that healthy ageing is accompanied by an associative memory deficit. Older adults exhibit disproportionately poor performance on memory tasks requiring the retention of associations between items (e.g., pairs of unrelated words). In contrast to this robust deficit, older adults' ability to form and temporarily hold bound representations of an object's surface features, such as colour and shape, appears to be relatively well preserved. However, the findings of one set of experiments suggest that older adults may struggle to form temporary bound representations in visual working memory when given more time to study objects. However, these findings were based on between-participant comparisons across experimental paradigms. The present study directly assesses the role of presentation time in the ability of younger and older adults to bind shape and colour in visual working memory using a within-participant design. We report new evidence that giving older adults longer to study memory objects does not differentially affect their immediate memory for feature combinations relative to individual features. This is in line with a growing body of research suggesting that there is no age-related impairment in immediate memory for colour-shape binding. PMID:25993530

  10. Detrital Zircon U-Pb Age Populations in Time and Space in the Arctic Alaska Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic Alaska Terrane (ATT) occupies the only margin of the Ameriasia Basin whose origin and position since Paleozoic time is incompletely known. To better understand its tectonic history, detrital zircon (DZ) U-Pb ages from about 75 samples of clastic strata were obtained from representative parts of the ATT in northern Alaska. The oldest known strata of the AAT are Neoproterozoic clastic rocks exposed in the northeastern Brooks Range. DZ dating of these rocks show that they contain abundant ~1.8 Ga zircons and subordinate populations that indicate derivation from the northwest part of Laurentia. Upper Neoproterozoic strata in the Brooks Range, in contrast, contain populations dominated by ~600 Ma zircons. The latter ages are similar to those in parts of the ATT outside of northern Alaska, including the Seward Peninsula, Chukotka, and Wrangel Island that are thought to have been derived from the Timanian orogen of northern Baltica. Similar DZ populations have also been obtained from Silurian sandstones of the Lisburne Peninsula, suggesting that much of the western and southern parts of AAT may have formed in or near northern Baltica. A third group of DZ ages were found in deformed clastic rocks that were deposited across large parts of the North Slope in the Silurian and/or Devonian and are also present in parautochthonous settings in the Brooks Range. These rocks typically are dominated by DZ ages of 390-470 Ma, and sometimes contain subordinate non-Laurentian populations of ~1.5 Ga. These DZ ages, the underlying rocks of probable Baltic and Laurentian affinity, and evidence of significant deformation indicate that the ATT may have been constructed by Caledonian tectonism in the Silurian and Devonian. Following Devonian deformation, Mississippian to Triassic platform strata of the Ellesmerian Sequence were deposited on a regional unconformity. DZ ages from these rocks appear to reflect the compositions of the sub-unconformity units and indicate that Timanian

  11. Learning to Eat Vegetables in Early Life: The Role of Timing, Age and Individual Eating Traits

    PubMed Central

    Caton, Samantha J.; Blundell, Pam; Ahern, Sara M.; Nekitsing, Chandani; Olsen, Annemarie; Møller, Per; Hausner, Helene; Remy, Eloïse; Nicklaus, Sophie; Chabanet, Claire; Issanchou, Sylvie; Hetherington, Marion M.

    2014-01-01

    Vegetable intake is generally low among children, who appear to be especially fussy during the pre-school years. Repeated exposure is known to enhance intake of a novel vegetable in early life but individual differences in response to familiarisation have emerged from recent studies. In order to understand the factors which predict different responses to repeated exposure, data from the same experiment conducted in three groups of children from three countries (n = 332) aged 4–38 m (18.9±9.9 m) were combined and modelled. During the intervention period each child was given between 5 and 10 exposures to a novel vegetable (artichoke puree) in one of three versions (basic, sweet or added energy). Intake of basic artichoke puree was measured both before and after the exposure period. Overall, younger children consumed more artichoke than older children. Four distinct patterns of eating behaviour during the exposure period were defined. Most children were “learners” (40%) who increased intake over time. 21% consumed more than 75% of what was offered each time and were labelled “plate-clearers”. 16% were considered “non-eaters” eating less than 10 g by the 5th exposure and the remainder were classified as “others” (23%) since their pattern was highly variable. Age was a significant predictor of eating pattern, with older pre-school children more likely to be non-eaters. Plate-clearers had higher enjoyment of food and lower satiety responsiveness than non-eaters who scored highest on food fussiness. Children in the added energy condition showed the smallest change in intake over time, compared to those in the basic or sweetened artichoke condition. Clearly whilst repeated exposure familiarises children with a novel food, alternative strategies that focus on encouraging initial tastes of the target food might be needed for the fussier and older pre-school children. PMID:24878745

  12. Learning to eat vegetables in early life: the role of timing, age and individual eating traits.

    PubMed

    Caton, Samantha J; Blundell, Pam; Ahern, Sara M; Nekitsing, Chandani; Olsen, Annemarie; Møller, Per; Hausner, Helene; Remy, Eloïse; Nicklaus, Sophie; Chabanet, Claire; Issanchou, Sylvie; Hetherington, Marion M

    2014-01-01

    Vegetable intake is generally low among children, who appear to be especially fussy during the pre-school years. Repeated exposure is known to enhance intake of a novel vegetable in early life but individual differences in response to familiarisation have emerged from recent studies. In order to understand the factors which predict different responses to repeated exposure, data from the same experiment conducted in three groups of children from three countries (n = 332) aged 4-38 m (18.9±9.9 m) were combined and modelled. During the intervention period each child was given between 5 and 10 exposures to a novel vegetable (artichoke puree) in one of three versions (basic, sweet or added energy). Intake of basic artichoke puree was measured both before and after the exposure period. Overall, younger children consumed more artichoke than older children. Four distinct patterns of eating behaviour during the exposure period were defined. Most children were "learners" (40%) who increased intake over time. 21% consumed more than 75% of what was offered each time and were labelled "plate-clearers". 16% were considered "non-eaters" eating less than 10 g by the 5th exposure and the remainder were classified as "others" (23%) since their pattern was highly variable. Age was a significant predictor of eating pattern, with older pre-school children more likely to be non-eaters. Plate-clearers had higher enjoyment of food and lower satiety responsiveness than non-eaters who scored highest on food fussiness. Children in the added energy condition showed the smallest change in intake over time, compared to those in the basic or sweetened artichoke condition. Clearly whilst repeated exposure familiarises children with a novel food, alternative strategies that focus on encouraging initial tastes of the target food might be needed for the fussier and older pre-school children. PMID:24878745

  13. Dynamic attentional modulation of vision across space and time after right hemisphere stroke and in ageing

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Charlotte; Malhotra, Paresh; Deidda, Cristiana; Husain, Masud

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Attention modulates the availability of sensory information to conscious perception. In particular, there is evidence of pathological, spatial constriction of the effective field of vision in patients with right hemisphere damage when a central task exhausts available attentional capacity. In the current study we first examined whether this constriction might be modulated across both space and time in right hemisphere stroke patients without neglect. Then we tested healthy elderly people to determine whether non-pathological ageing also leads to spatiotemporal impairments of vision under conditions of high attention load. Methods Right hemisphere stroke patients completed a task at fixation while attempting to discriminate letters appearing in the periphery. Attentional load of the central task was modulated by increasing task difficulty. Peripheral letters appeared simultaneously with the central task or at different times (stimulus onset asynchronies, SOAs) after it. In a second study healthy elderly volunteers were tested with a modified version of this paradigm. Results Under conditions of high attention load right hemisphere stroke patients have a reduced effective visual field, over a significantly extended ‘attentional blink’, worse for items presented to their left. In the second study, older participants were unable to discriminate otherwise salient items across the visual field (left or right) when their attention capacity was loaded on the central task. This deficit extended temporally, with peripheral discrimination ability not returning to normal for up to 450 msec. Conclusions Dynamically tying up attention resources on a task at fixation can have profound effects in patient populations and in normal ageing. These results demonstrate that items can escape conscious detection across space and time, and can thereby impact significantly on visual perception in these groups. PMID:23245427

  14. Real time studies of Elastic Moduli Pu Aging using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, Boris

    Elastic moduli are fundamental thermodynamic susceptibilities that connect directly to thermodynamics, electronic structure and give important information about mechanical properties. To determine the time evolution of the elastic properties in 239Pu and it Ga alloys, is imperative to study its phase stability and self-irradiation damage process. The most-likely sources of these changes include a) ingrowth of radioactive decay products like He and U, b) the introduction of radiation damage, c) δ-phase instabilities towards α-Pu or to Pu3Ga. The measurement of mechanical resonance frequencies can be made with extreme precision and used to compute the elastic moduli without corrections giving important insight in this problem. Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, we measured the time dependence of the mechanical resonance frequencies of fine-grained polycrystalline δ-phase 239Pu, from 300K up to 480K. At room temperature, the shear modulus shows an increase in time (stiffening), but the bulk modulus decreases (softening). These are the first real-time measurements of room temperature aging of the elastic moduli, and the changes are consistent with elastic moduli measurements performed on 44 year old δ-Pu. As the temperature is increased, the rate of change increases exponentially, with both moduli becoming stiffer with time. For T>420K an abrupt change in the time dependence is observed indicating that the bulk and shear moduli have opposite rates of change. Our measurements provide a basis for ruling out the decomposition of δ-Pu towards α-Pu or Pu3Ga, and indicate a complex defect-related scenario from which we are gathering important clues.

  15. Temperature for Spent Fuel Dry Storage

    1992-07-13

    DATING (Determining Allowable Temperatures in Inert and Nitrogen Gases) calculates allowable initial temperatures for dry storage of light-water-reactor spent fuel and the cumulative damage fraction of Zircaloy cladding for specified initial storage temperature and stress and cooling histories. It is made available to ensure compliance with NUREG 10CFR Part 72, Licensing Requirements for the Storage of Spent Fuel in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Although the program''s principal purpose is to calculate estimatesmore » of allowable temperature limits, estimates for creep strain, annealing fraction, and life fraction as a function of storage time are also provided. Equations for the temperature of spent fuel in inert and nitrogen gas storage are included explicitly in the code; in addition, an option is included for a user-specified cooling history in tabular form, and tables of the temperature and stress dependencies of creep-strain rate and creep-rupture time for Zircaloy at constant temperature and constant stress or constant ratio of stress/modulus can be created. DATING includes the GEAR package for the numerical solution of the rate equations and DPLOT for plotting the time-dependence of the calculated cumulative damage-fraction, creep strain, radiation damage recovery, and temperature decay.« less

  16. Temperature for Spent Fuel Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect

    1992-07-13

    DATING (Determining Allowable Temperatures in Inert and Nitrogen Gases) calculates allowable initial temperatures for dry storage of light-water-reactor spent fuel and the cumulative damage fraction of Zircaloy cladding for specified initial storage temperature and stress and cooling histories. It is made available to ensure compliance with NUREG 10CFR Part 72, Licensing Requirements for the Storage of Spent Fuel in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Although the program''s principal purpose is to calculate estimates of allowable temperature limits, estimates for creep strain, annealing fraction, and life fraction as a function of storage time are also provided. Equations for the temperature of spent fuel in inert and nitrogen gas storage are included explicitly in the code; in addition, an option is included for a user-specified cooling history in tabular form, and tables of the temperature and stress dependencies of creep-strain rate and creep-rupture time for Zircaloy at constant temperature and constant stress or constant ratio of stress/modulus can be created. DATING includes the GEAR package for the numerical solution of the rate equations and DPLOT for plotting the time-dependence of the calculated cumulative damage-fraction, creep strain, radiation damage recovery, and temperature decay.

  17. US Spent (Used) Fuel Status, Management and Likely Directions- 12522

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Leslie J.

    2012-07-01

    As of 2010, the US has accumulated 65,200 MTU (42,300 MTU of PWR's; 23,000 MTU of BWR's) of spent (irradiated or used) fuel from 104 operating commercial nuclear power plants situated at 65 sites in 31 States and from previously shutdown commercial nuclear power plants. Further, the Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for an additional 2458 MTU of DOE-owned defense and non defense spent fuel from naval nuclear power reactors, various non-commercial test reactors and reactor demonstrations. The US has no centralized large spent fuel storage facility for either commercial spent fuel or DOE-owned spent fuel. The 65,200 MTU of US spent fuel is being safely stored by US utilities at numerous reactor sites in (wet) pools or (dry) metal or concrete casks. As of November 2010, the US had 63 'independent spent fuel storage installations' (or ISFSI's) licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission located at 57 sites in 33 states. Over 1400 casks loaded with spent fuel for dry storage are at these licensed ISFSI's; 47 sites are located at commercial reactor sites and 10 are located 'away' from a reactor (AFR's) site. DOE's small fraction of a 2458 MTU spent fuel inventory, which is not commercial spent fuel, is with the exception of 2 MTU, being stored at 4 sites in 4 States. The decades old US policy of a 'once through' fuel cycle with no recycle of spent fuel was set into a state of 'mass confusion or disruption' when the new US President Obama's administration started in early 2010 stopping the only US geologic disposal repository at the Yucca Mountain site in the State of Nevada from being developed and licensed. The practical result is that US nuclear power plant operators will have to continue to be responsible for managing and storing their own spent fuel for an indefinite period of time at many different sites in order to continue to generate electricity because there is no current US government plan, schedule or policy for taking possession of

  18. Learning Style versus Time Spent Studying and Career Choice: Which Is Associated with Success in a Combined Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, Gary J.; Mazurek, Ewa; Marone, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The VARK learning style is a pedagogical focus in health care education. This study examines relationships of course performance vs. VARK learning preference, study time, and career plan among students enrolled in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course at a large urban university. Students (n?=?492) from the fall semester course completed…

  19. The Effects of Positive Verbal Reinforcement on the Time Spent outside the Classroom for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in a Residential Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Christina; Jolivette, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    To more effectively instruct the entire class, teachers of students with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) often choose to send students who display inappropriate behavior out of the room. A multiple baseline across settings was used to evaluate the effects of increasing teacher positive verbal reinforcement on the amount of time 2 students…

  20. Exploring real-time in vivo redox biology of developing and aging Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Back, Patricia; De Vos, Winnok H; Depuydt, Geert G; Matthijssens, Filip; Vanfleteren, Jacques R; Braeckman, Bart P

    2012-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are no longer considered merely toxic by-products of the oxidative metabolism. Tightly controlled concentrations of ROS and fluctuations in redox potential may be important mediators of signaling processes. Understanding the role of ROS and redox status in physiology, stress response, development, and aging requires their nondisruptive, spatiotemporal, real-time quantification in a living organism. We established Caenorhabditis elegans strains bearing the genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors HyPer and Grx1-roGFP2 for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and the glutathione redox potential, respectively. Although, given its transparency and genetic tractability, C. elegans is perfectly suitable as a model organism for such approaches, they have never been tried before in this nematode. We found that H(2)O(2) treatment clearly induces a dose-dependent, reversible response of both biosensors in the living worms. The ratio of oxidized to reduced glutathione decreases during postembryonic development. H(2)O(2) levels increase with age and this effect is delayed when life span is extended by dietary restriction. In young adults, we detected several regions with distinct redox properties that may be linked to their biological function. Our findings demonstrate that genetically encoded biosensors can reveal previously unknown details of in vivo redox biology in multicellular organisms. PMID:22226831

  1. The Dimensionless Age of the Universe: A Riddle for Our Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, Arturo; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the interesting coincidence of cosmology and astrophysics that points toward a dimensionless age of the Universe H 0 t 0 that is close to one. Despite cosmic deceleration for 9 Gyr and acceleration since then, we find H 0 t 0 = 0.96 ± 0.01 for the ΛCDM model that fits SN Ia data from Pan-STARRS, CMB power spectra, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Similarly, astrophysical measures of stellar ages and the Hubble constant derived from redshifts and distances point to H 0 t ˜ 1.0 ± 0.1. The wide range of possible values for H 0 t 0 realized during cosmic evolution means that we live at what appears to be a special time. This “synchronicity problem” is not precisely the same as the usual coincidence problem, because there are combinations of ΩM and ΩΛ for which the usual coincidence problem holds but for which H 0 t 0 is not close to 1.

  2. The Dimensionless Age of the Universe: A Riddle for Our Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avelino, Arturo; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2016-09-01

    We present the interesting coincidence of cosmology and astrophysics that points toward a dimensionless age of the Universe H 0 t 0 that is close to one. Despite cosmic deceleration for 9 Gyr and acceleration since then, we find H 0 t 0 = 0.96 ± 0.01 for the ΛCDM model that fits SN Ia data from Pan-STARRS, CMB power spectra, and baryon acoustic oscillations. Similarly, astrophysical measures of stellar ages and the Hubble constant derived from redshifts and distances point to H 0 t ∼ 1.0 ± 0.1. The wide range of possible values for H 0 t 0 realized during cosmic evolution means that we live at what appears to be a special time. This “synchronicity problem” is not precisely the same as the usual coincidence problem, because there are combinations of ΩM and ΩΛ for which the usual coincidence problem holds but for which H 0 t 0 is not close to 1.

  3. Age differences in emotional responses to daily stress: The role of timing, severity, and global perceived stress

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Stacey B.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Blanchard Fields, Fredda

    2013-01-01

    Research on age differences in emotional responses to daily stress has produced inconsistent findings. Guided by recent theoretical advances in aging theory (Charles, 2010) that emphasize the importance of context for predicting when and how age is related to affective well-being, the current study examined age differences in emotional responses to everyday stressors. The present study examines how three contextual features (e.g., timing of exposure, stressor severity, global perceived stress [GPS]) moderate age differences in emotional experience in an ecological momentary assessment study of adults aged 18–81 (N=190). Results indicated older adults’ negative affect (NA) was less affected by exposure to recent stressors than younger adults, but that there were no age differences in the effects of stressor exposure three to six hours afterward. Higher levels of GPS predicted amplified NA responses to daily stress, and controlling for GPS eliminated age differences in NA responses to stressors. No age differences in NA responses as a function of stressor severity were observed. In contrast, older age was associated with less of a decrease in PA when exposed to recent stressors or with more severe recent stressors. There were no age differences in the effect of previous stressor exposure or severity on PA, nor any interactions between momentary or previous stress and GPS on PA. Together, these results support the notion that chronic stress plays a central role in emotional experience in daily life. Implications of these results for emotion theories of aging are discussed. PMID:24364410

  4. A 'snip' in time: what is the best age to circumcise?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Circumcision is a common procedure, but regional and societal attitudes differ on whether there is a need for a male to be circumcised and, if so, at what age. This is an important issue for many parents, but also pediatricians, other doctors, policy makers, public health authorities, medical bodies, and males themselves. Discussion We show here that infancy is an optimal time for clinical circumcision because an infant's low mobility facilitates the use of local anesthesia, sutures are not required, healing is quick, cosmetic outcome is usually excellent, costs are minimal, and complications are uncommon. The benefits of infant circumcision include prevention of urinary tract infections (a cause of renal scarring), reduction in risk of inflammatory foreskin conditions such as balanoposthitis, foreskin injuries, phimosis and paraphimosis. When the boy later becomes sexually active he has substantial protection against risk of HIV and other viral sexually transmitted infections such as genital herpes and oncogenic human papillomavirus, as well as penile cancer. The risk of cervical cancer in his female partner(s) is also reduced. Circumcision in adolescence or adulthood may evoke a fear of pain, penile damage or reduced sexual pleasure, even though unfounded. Time off work or school will be needed, cost is much greater, as are risks of complications, healing is slower, and stitches or tissue glue must be used. Summary Infant circumcision is safe, simple, convenient and cost-effective. The available evidence strongly supports infancy as the optimal time for circumcision. PMID:22373281

  5. Age-time patterns of radiogenic cancer risk: their nature and likely explanations.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Donald A

    2002-09-01

    It is important for both radiation protection and scientific reasons to understand the age-time patterns of radiation cancer risk. This is surprisingly difficult even for acute exposures and much more so for prolonged exposures. I shall provide current information on this for solid cancers among atomic-bomb survivors, pointing out some of the difficulties in description and interpretation. I shall then take up some stochastic considerations regarding accumulation of mutations, which may help in dealing with these difficulties. These considerations are highly idealised, and their consequences should mainly be used only for guidance rather than as a primary basis for descriptive analyses. They are particularly suitable for this because they provide insights fairly independent of parameter values in the stochastic models involved. PMID:12400964

  6. New 40Ar/39Ar Ages From Southwest Bolivia Refine the Timing of APVC Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, M.; de Silva, S. L.; Jicha, B.; Singer, B.; Jiménez, N.; Ort, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) of the Central Andes has produced prodigious silicic volcanism (at least 11,000 km3 of magma) over the last 10 Ma including some of the largest known ignimbrites on Earth. Despite excellent exposure, little previous work had been conducted on the timing and distribution of ignimbrite volcanism in the Lípez region of southwestern Bolivia, the heart of the APVC. To address this deficiency we have performed ~612 single crystal laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses from 39 pumice and bulk matrix samples collected from the main ignimbrite units within the Lípez region. Geochemistry of pumice and mineral samples, and paleomagnetic data are also being used to correlate individual ignimbrite units. Our new 40Ar/39Ar results establish new or refined eruption ages (with 2σ error) from the Vilama caldera at 8.41±0.02 Ma, Pastos Grandes caldera at 5.45±0.02 and 2.94±0.01 Ma, and Guacha caldera at 5.65±0.01, and 3.57±0.02 Ma. New ages were also determined for eruptions from the Panizos ignimbrite shield (6.86±0.03 Ma), Juvina ignimbrite shield (5.23±0.01 Ma), and the Laguna Colorado ignimbrite shield (2.21±0.05 and 1.95±0.03 Ma). The oldest ignimbrite we have found in the area is 10.33±0.64 Ma, a local unit beneath the Vilama ignimbrite. The youngest units have been identified west of the Guacha caldera with eruption ages of 1.70±0.6 Ma and 0.70±0.01 Ma. These results demonstrate that ignimbrite-producing eruptions in the Lípez region span the age of APVC volcanism previously established, with the largest eruptions occurring from long-lived, cyclic supervolcano caldera systems like Guacha and Pastos Grandes. The aggregate data from the APVC support the hypothesis that the APVC developed predominantly during distinct pulses of massive ignimbrite eruptions at ~8, 6, and 4 Ma and attest to episodic behavior of the magmatic system. Ignimbrites of <1 Ma, the cyclical nature of activity, and the continued geothermal presence and

  7. Application of isotopes to estimate water ages in variable time scales in surface and groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralik, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Water-Isotopes (2H, 3H, 18O) are ideal tracers not only to determine the origin of waters in precipitation, surface water (river + lakes) as well as in groundwater close to the surface and in deep groundwater but also the mean residence time (MRT) in many applied projects as drinking water supply, hydroelectric power plants, road tunnels etc. . Their application has a long history, but must be always evaluated by a feasible hydrogeological concept and/or other isotope and geochemical tracers. In Alpine areas the retention of precipitation in form of snow and ice in the winter half year is indicated by the lowest 18O-values. The snow melt of the highest part of the recharge area is marked by the lowest 18O-values in the river water, but may not coincide with the maximum flow. Time-series of precipitation station in the mountain and on river station indicate the arrival of the peak snow-melt water in the river and in Low-land areas 4-7 month later. Tritium series indicate that MRTs of several Austrian rivers are in the range of 4 - 6 years. The seasonal input variation of in 18O in precipitation and/or river waters can be used to calculate by lumped parameter models MRT of groundwater at a certain well and compare it with lysimeter measurements and transient model simulations. The MRT of the dispersion model is in good agreement with the estimated time calculated by the numerical transport model and the vertical lysimeter measurements. The MRT of spring water was studied by several methods (3H/3He, SF6 and 85Kr) and a long time series of 3H-measurements. The gas tracers are in good agreement in the range of 6-10 year whereas the 3H-series model (dispersion model) indicate ages in the range of 18-23 years. The hydrogeological concept indicate that the precipitation infiltrates in a mountainous karst area, but the transfer into the porous aquifer in the Vienna Basin occurs either through rivers draining away in the basin or through the lateral transport from the karst

  8. Age Differences in Reaction Time and Attention in a National Telephone Sample of Adults: Education, Sex, and Task Complexity Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tun, Patricia A.; Lachman, Margie E.

    2008-01-01

    This study demonstrated effects of age, education, and sex on complex reaction time in a large national sample (N = 3,616) with a wide range in age (32-85) and education. Participants completed speeded auditory tasks (from the MIDUS [Midlife in the U.S.] Stop and Go Switch Task) by telephone. Complexity ranged from a simple repeated task to an…

  9. Effects of Age, Intelligence and Executive Control Function on Saccadic Reaction Time in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haishi, Koichi; Okuzumi, Hideyuki; Kokubun, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    The current research aimed to clarify the influence of age, intelligence and executive control function on the central tendency and intraindividual variability of saccadic reaction time in persons with intellectual disabilities. Participants were 44 persons with intellectual disabilities aged between 13 and 57 years whose IQs were between 14 and…

  10. Longitudinal Reliability of Self-Reported Age at Menarche in Adolescent Girls: Variability across Time and Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorn, Lorah D.; Sontag-Padilla, Lisa M.; Pabst, Stephanie; Tissot, Abbigail; Susman, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Age at menarche is critical in research and clinical settings, yet there is a dearth of studies examining its reliability in adolescents. We examined age at menarche during adolescence, specifically, (a) average method reliability across 3 years, (b) test-retest reliability between time points and methods, (c) intraindividual variability of…

  11. Effects of Aging-Time Reference on the Long Term Behavior of the IM7/K3B Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the time-based shift reference on the long term behavior of the graphite reinforced thermoplastic polyimide composite IM7/K3B at elevated temperature. Creep compliance and the effects of physical aging on the time dependent response was measured for uniaxial loading at several isothermal conditions below the glass transition temperature (T(sub g). Two matrix dominated loading modes, shear and transverse, were investigated in tension and compression. The momentary sequenced creep/aging curves were collapsed through a horizontal (time) shift using the shortest, middle and longest aging time curve as the reference curve. Linear viscoelasticity was used to characterize the creep/recovery behavior and superposition techniques were used to establish the physical aging related material constants. The use of effective time expressions in a laminated plate model allowed for the prediction of long term creep compliance. The effect of using different reference curves with time/aging-time superposition was most sensitive to the physical aging shift rate at lower test temperatures. Depending on the loading mode, the reference curve used can result in a more accurate long term prediction, especially at lower test temperatures.

  12. The Domestication of Artichoke and Cardoon: From Roman Times to the Genomic Age

    PubMed Central

    Sonnante, Gabriella; Pignone, Domenico; Hammer, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Background The history of domestication of artichoke and leafy cardoon is not yet fully understood and when and where it occurred remains unknown. Evidence supports the hypothesis that wild cardoon is the wild progenitor of both these crops. Selection for large, non-spiny heads resulted in artichoke and selection for non-spiny, large stalked tender leaves resulted in leafy cardoon. The two crops differ in their reproductive system: artichoke is mostly vegetatively propagated and perennial, while leafy cardoon is seed propagated and mostly grown as an annual plant. Here, new trends in artichoke cultivation are analysed, while the consequences of these tendencies on the conservation of artichoke genetic resources are highlighted. Scope The historical and artistic records, together with recent literature on genetics and biosystematics, are examined with the aim of achieving a better understanding of the present-day knowledge on the domestication of these two crops. Conclusions Historical, linguistic and artistic records are consistent with genetic and biosystematic data and indicate that the domestication of artichoke and cardoon diverged at different times and in different places. Apparently, artichoke was domesticated in Roman times, possibly in Sicily, and spread by the Arabs during early Middle Ages. The cardoon was probably domesticated in the western Mediterranean in a later period. PMID:17611191

  13. Case histories of West Valley spent fuel shipments: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, NRC/FC initiated a study on institutional issues related to spent fuel shipments originating at the former spent fuel processing facility in West Valley, New York. FC staff viewed the shipment campaigns as a one-time opportunity to document the institutional issues that may arise with a substantial increase in spent fuel shipping activity. NRC subsequently contracted with the Aerospace Corporation for the West Valley Study. This report contains a detailed description of the events which took place prior to and during the spent fuel shipments. The report also contains a discussion of the shipment issues that arose, and presents general findings. Most of the institutional issues discussed in the report do not fall under NRC's transportation authority. The case histories provide a reference to agencies and other institutions that may be involved in future spent fuel shipping campaigns. 130 refs., 7 figs., 19 tabs.

  14. Family Structure and the Timing of Transitions from 70 to 103 Years of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Colleen L.; Troll, Lillian

    1996-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional analysis of 250 white individuals, 70-103 years of age, this article questions whether a vertical family structure is found with increasing age. Findings indicate, among other things, that at least until age 90 the proportion of individuals with a vertical family structure with four generations never exceeds the numbers of…

  15. Time Students Spend Working at Home for School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Petra; Schober, Barbara; Spiel, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents three studies which deal with the time students spend working at home for school. In addition, the paper focuses on the distribution of time investment over the course of a week and on the relationship between academic achievement and time spent working at home for school. In sum, 824 students with an average age of 15 years…

  16. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age

    PubMed Central

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18–39, 40–64, 65 + years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of −0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of −0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81–1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  17. Ngram time series model to predict activity type and energy cost from wrist, hip and ankle accelerometers: implications of age.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kate, Rohit J; Keenan, Kevin G; Welch, Whitney A; Swartz, Ann M

    2015-11-01

    To develop and test time series single site and multi-site placement models, we used wrist, hip and ankle processed accelerometer data to estimate energy cost and type of physical activity in adults. Ninety-nine subjects in three age groups (18-39, 40-64, 65 +  years) performed 11 activities while wearing three triaxial accelereometers: one each on the non-dominant wrist, hip, and ankle. During each activity net oxygen cost (METs) was assessed. The time series of accelerometer signals were represented in terms of uniformly discretized values called bins. Support Vector Machine was used for activity classification with bins and every pair of bins used as features. Bagged decision tree regression was used for net metabolic cost prediction. To evaluate model performance we employed the jackknife leave-one-out cross validation method. Single accelerometer and multi-accelerometer site model estimates across and within age group revealed similar accuracy, with a bias range of -0.03 to 0.01 METs, bias percent of -0.8 to 0.3%, and a rMSE range of 0.81-1.04 METs. Multi-site accelerometer location models improved activity type classification over single site location models from a low of 69.3% to a maximum of 92.8% accuracy. For each accelerometer site location model, or combined site location model, percent accuracy classification decreased as a function of age group, or when young age groups models were generalized to older age groups. Specific age group models on average performed better than when all age groups were combined. A time series computation show promising results for predicting energy cost and activity type. Differences in prediction across age group, a lack of generalizability across age groups, and that age group specific models perform better than when all ages are combined needs to be considered as analytic calibration procedures to detect energy cost and type are further developed. PMID:26449155

  18. Macro-level Age Norms for the Timing of Sexual Initiation and Adolescents’ Early Sexual Initiation in 17 European Countries

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; de Looze, Margaretha; Ma, Ping; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Farhat, Tilda; ter Bogt, Tom F. M.; Ehlinger, Virginie; Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse; Currie, Candace; Godeau, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between country-level age norms for sexual initiation timing and early sexual initiation (ESI) among adolescent boys and girls. Methods Nationally-representative data from 17 countries that participated in the 2006/07 European Social Survey (ESS-3, n=33,092) and the 2005/06 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children Study (HBSC, n=27,702) were analyzed. Age norms were measured as the average country-level response to an item asking the age at which ESS respondents believed someone is too young to have sexual intercourse. HBSC respondents (aged 14-16) self-reported age at sexual initiation which we defined as early (<15 years) or not (≥15 years or no initiation). Control variables included age, family affluence, perceived socioeconomic status, family living arrangement, substance use, school attachment, and country-level legal age of consent. Multivariable three-level logistic models with random intercepts were run separately by sex. Results In multivariable analyses, higher overall age norms were associated with reduced likelihood of ESI among girls (AOR 0.60, 95% CI 0.45-0.79); associations with ESI were stronger for parent cohort (ages 31-65) norms (AOR 0.37, 95% CI 0.23-0.58) than for peer cohort (ages 15-20) norms (AOR 0.60, 95% CI 0.49-0.74). For boys, overall norms were also significantly negatively associated with ESI (AOR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-0.99), as were parent cohort norms (AOR 0.66, 95% CI 0.45-0.96). Peer cohort norms were not significantly related to boys’ ESI. Conclusion Macro-level cultural norms may impact adolescents’ sexual initiation timing. Research exploring the sexual health outcomes of early initiators in countries with contrasting age norms is warranted. PMID:24508092

  19. DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel program plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has produced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for many years as part of its various missions and programs. The historical process for managing this SNF was to reprocess it whereby valuable material such as uranium or plutonium was chemically separated from the wastes. These fuels were not intended for long-term storage. As the need for uranium and plutonium decreased, it became necessary to store the SNF for extended lengths of time. This necessity resulted from a 1992 DOE decision to discontinue reprocessing SNF to recover strategic materials (although limited processing of SNF to meet repository acceptance criteria remains under consideration, no plutonium or uranium extraction for other uses is planned). Both the facilities used for storage, and the fuel itself, began experiencing aging from this extended storage. New efforts are now necessary to assure suitable fuel and facility management until long-term decisions for spent fuel disposition are made and implemented. The Program Plan consists of 14 sections as follows: Sections 2--6 describe objectives, management, the work plan, the work breakdown structure, and the responsibility assignment matrix. Sections 7--9 describe the program summary schedules, site logic diagram, SNF Program resource and support requirements. Sections 10--14 present various supplemental management requirements and quality assurance guidelines.

  20. Urban neighbourhood unemployment history and depressive symptoms over time among late middle age and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wight, Richard G; Aneshensel, Carol S; Barrett, Christopher; Ko, Michelle; Chodosh, Joshua; Karlamangla, Arun S

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about how a neighbourhood’s unemployment history may set the stage for depressive symptomatology. This study examines the effects of urban neighbourhood unemployment history on current depressive symptoms and subsequent symptom trajectories among residentially stable late middle age and older adults. Contingent effects between neighbourhood unemployment and individual-level employment status (ie, cross-level interactions) are also assessed. Methods Individual-level survey data are from four waves (2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006) of the original cohort of the nationally representative US Health and Retirement Study. Neighbourhoods are operationalised with US Census tracts for which historical average proportion unemployed between 1990 and 2000 and change in proportion unemployed between 1990 and 2000 are used to characterise the neighbourhood’s unemployment history. Hierarchical linear regressions estimate three-level (time, individual and neighbourhood) growth models. Results Symptoms in 2000 are highest among those residing in neighbourhoods characterised by high historical average unemployment beginning in 1990 and increasing unemployment between 1990 and 2000, net of a wide range of socio-demographic controls including individual-level employment status. These neighbourhood unemployment effects are not contingent upon individual-level employment status in 2000. 6-year trajectories of depressive symptoms decrease over time on average but are not significantly influenced by the neighbourhood’s unemployment history. Conclusions Given the current US recession, future studies that do not consider historical employment conditions may underestimate the mental health impact of urban neighbourhood context. The findings suggest that exposure to neighbourhood unemployment earlier in life may be consequential to mental health later in life. PMID:22918896

  1. Chill-coma recovery time, age and sex determine lipid profiles in Ceratitis capitata tissues.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana Mercedes; Fagali, Natalia Soledad; Rabossi, Alejandro; Catalá, Ángel; Quesada-Allué, Luis Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The remodeling of membrane composition by changes in phospholipid head groups and fatty acids (FA) degree of unsaturation has been associated with the maintenance of membrane homeostasis under stress conditions. Overall lipid levels and the composition of cuticle lipids also influence insect stress resistance and tissue protection. In a previous study, we demonstrated differences in survival, behavior and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene expression between subgroups of Ceratitis capitata flies that had a reversible recovery from chill-coma and those that developed chilling-injury. Here, we analyzed lipid profiles from comparable subgroups of 15 and 30-day-old flies separated according to their recovery time after a chill-coma treatment. Neutral and polar lipid classes of chill-coma subgroups were separated by thin layer chromatography and quantified by densitometry. FA composition of polar lipids of chill-coma subgroups and non-stressed flies was evaluated using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Higher amounts of neutral lipids such as triglycerides, diacylglycerol, wax esters, sterol esters and free esters were found in male flies that recovered faster from chill-coma compared to slower flies. A multivariate analysis revealed changes in patterns of storage and cuticle lipids among subgroups both in males and females. FA unsaturation increased after cold exposure, and was higher in thorax of slower subgroups compared to faster subgroups. The changes in neutral lipid patterns and FA composition depended on recovery time, sex, age and body-part, and were not specifically associated with the development of chilling-injury. An analysis of phospholipid classes showed that the phosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidylcholine ratio (PC/LPC) was significantly higher, or showed a tendency, in subgroups that may have developed chilling-injury compared to those with a reversible recovery from coma. PMID:26868723

  2. Nest survival patterns in Eurasian Bittern: effect of nest age, time and habitat variables

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Determining the key factors affecting the reproductive success of nesting birds is crucial in order to better understand the population dynamics of endangered species and to introduce effective conservation programmes for them. Inhabiting a variety of wetland habitats, aquatic birds actively select safe nesting sites so as to protect their nests against predators. The main aim of the present work was to assess the effect of temporal and habitat variables on the daily nest survival rate of Eurasian Bitterns colonizing semi–natural fishpond habitat in eastern Poland. MARK software was used for the modelling. Eurasian Bittern nests were most vulnerable to depredation at the beginning of the breeding season. This was probably because the reedbed vegetation at this time was not yet dense enough to effectively conceal the nests. There was a positive relationship between nest age and the daily survival rate. Two of the habitat variables analysed were of the greatest significance: water depth and vegetation density. In the Eurasian Bittern population studied here, nests built over deep water and in dense vegetation had the best chances of survival. The results of this work may be useful in the preparation of plans for the conservation and management of populations of this rare and endangered species. Conservation and restoration efforts that attempt to maintain high water levels will be especially beneficial to this avian species that is dependent on wetland ecosystems for breeding. PMID:27350897

  3. Nest survival patterns in Eurasian Bittern: effect of nest age, time and habitat variables.

    PubMed

    Polak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the key factors affecting the reproductive success of nesting birds is crucial in order to better understand the population dynamics of endangered species and to introduce effective conservation programmes for them. Inhabiting a variety of wetland habitats, aquatic birds actively select safe nesting sites so as to protect their nests against predators. The main aim of the present work was to assess the effect of temporal and habitat variables on the daily nest survival rate of Eurasian Bitterns colonizing semi-natural fishpond habitat in eastern Poland. MARK software was used for the modelling. Eurasian Bittern nests were most vulnerable to depredation at the beginning of the breeding season. This was probably because the reedbed vegetation at this time was not yet dense enough to effectively conceal the nests. There was a positive relationship between nest age and the daily survival rate. Two of the habitat variables analysed were of the greatest significance: water depth and vegetation density. In the Eurasian Bittern population studied here, nests built over deep water and in dense vegetation had the best chances of survival. The results of this work may be useful in the preparation of plans for the conservation and management of populations of this rare and endangered species. Conservation and restoration efforts that attempt to maintain high water levels will be especially beneficial to this avian species that is dependent on wetland ecosystems for breeding. PMID:27350897

  4. Impact of aging on the dynamics of memory retrieval: A time-course analysis.

    PubMed

    Oztekin, Ilke; Güngör, Nur Zeynep; Badre, David

    2012-08-01

    The response-signal speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) procedure was used to provide an in-depth investigation of the impact of aging on the dynamics of short-term memory retrieval. Young and older adults studied sequentially presented 3-item lists, immediately followed by a recognition probe. Analyses of composite list and serial position SAT functions found no differences in overall accuracy, but indicated slower retrieval speed for older adults. Analysis of false alarms to recent negatives (lures from the previous study list) revealed no differences in the timing or magnitude of early false alarms that are thought to reflect familiarity-based judgments. However, onset and accrual of recollective processing required for resolving interference was slower for older adults. These findings suggest that older adults have a selective impairment on controlled and recollective retrieval operations, and further specify this impairment to arise primarily from delayed onset of cognitive control potentially coupled with reduced availability of recollective information. PMID:23049160

  5. Early discrimination of Atlantic salmon smolt age: Time course of the relative effectiveness of body size and shape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearlstein, J.H.; Letcher, B.H.; Obedzinski, M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test the relative effectiveness of morphological measurements and body size in predicting the smolt age of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and to determine the time course of body size and shape differences between smolt ages. Analyses were conducted on age-0 to age-2 fish that were stocked as fry in the West Brook, Massachusetts and on laboratory-raised age-0 to age-1 fish. Using both body size and shape, we could partition the age-0 fish collected during fall into future early or late smolts, although the predictive ability of body shape was somewhat weaker than that of body size, especially in the laboratory. Classification success averaged 81% (size) and 79% (shape) in the field and 85% (size) and 73% (shape) in the laboratory. Despite differences in smolt age between the field and the laboratory, the relative timing of growth rate differences between future early and late smolts was similar in the field and the laboratory and peaked at 50-60% of development from fry to smolt. While body shape differed between early and late smolts well before smoltification, it did not improve classification based on size alone.

  6. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  7. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  8. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  9. 5 CFR 831.672 - Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... institution is above the high school level, the certification must be signed by the president or chancellor... full-time school attendance. 831.672 Section 831.672 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Annuities § 831.672 Annuity for a child age 18 to 22 during full-time school attendance. (a)...

  10. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

  11. Age differences in emotional responses to daily stress: the role of timing, severity, and global perceived stress.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stacey B; Sliwinski, Martin J; Blanchard-Fields, Fredda

    2013-12-01

    Research on age differences in emotional responses to daily stress has produced inconsistent findings. Guided by recent theoretical advances in aging theory (S. T. Charles, 2010, Strength and vulnerability integration: A model of emotional well-being across adulthood, Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 136, pp. 1068-1091) that emphasize the importance of context for predicting when and how age is related to affective well-being, the current study examined age differences in emotional responses to everyday stressors. The present study examined how three contextual features (e.g., timing of exposure, stressor severity, global perceived stress [GPS]) moderate age differences in emotional experience in an ecological momentary assessment study of adults (N = 190) aged 18-81 years. Results indicated that older adults' negative affect (NA) was less affected by exposure to recent stressors than younger adults, but that there were no age differences in the effects of stressor exposure 3-6 hr afterward. Higher levels of GPS predicted amplified NA responses to daily stress, and controlling for GPS eliminated age differences in NA responses to stressors. No age differences in NA responses as a function of stressor severity were observed. In contrast, older age was associated with less of a decrease in PA when exposed to recent stressors or with more severe recent stressors. There were no age differences in the effect of previous stressor exposure or severity on PA, or any interactions between momentary or previous stress and GPS on PA. Together, these results support the notion that chronic stress plays a central role in emotional experience in daily life. We discuss the implications of these results for emotion theories of aging. PMID:24364410

  12. Nuclear Forensics Attributing the Source of Spent Fuel Used in an RDD Event

    SciTech Connect

    M.R. Scott

    2005-06-01

    An RDD attack against the U.S. is something America needs to prepare against. If such an event occurs the ability to quickly identify the source of the radiological material used in an RDD would aid investigators in identifying the perpetrators. Spent fuel is one of the most dangerous possible radiological sources for an RDD. In this work, a forensics methodology was developed and implemented to attribute spent fuel to a source reactor. The specific attributes determined are the spent fuel burnup, age from discharge, reactor type, and initial fuel enrichment. It is shown that by analyzing the post-event material, these attributes can be determined with enough accuracy to be useful for investigators. The burnup can be found within a 5% accuracy, enrichment with a 2% accuracy, and age with a 10% accuracy. Reactor type can be determined if specific nuclides are measured. The methodology developed was implemented into a code call NEMASYS. NEMASYS is easy to use and it takes a minimum amount of time to learn its basic functions. It will process data within a few minutes and provide detailed information about the results and conclusions.

  13. Effect of postmortem aging time on tumbling marination performance of broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous data demonstrated that water-holding capacity (WHC), as measured by the salt-induced water uptake method, increases with aging up to 24 h postmortem in early-deboned chicken breast fillets (pectoralis major). Therefore, it was hypothesized that 24 h postmortem aging may enhance marination ...

  14. Older Men's Lay Definitions of Successful Aging over Time: The Manitoba Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Robert B.; Swift, Audrey U.; Bayomi, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of "successful aging" has become widely accepted in gerontology, yet continues to have no common underlying definition. Researchers have increasingly looked to older individuals for their lay definitions of successful aging. The present analysis is based on responses to five questionnaires administered to surviving participants of the…

  15. Age for Enrolling in Full-Time Childcare: A Qualitative Study of Parent and Caregiver Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Undheim, Anne Mari; Drugli, May Britt

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the views of parents and caregivers on the optimal age for enrolment in childcare. The sample consisted of 41 parents of children aged 18 months or less who were in childcare (22 boys and 19 girls), and 34 of their caregivers. Parents and caregivers were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. Both…

  16. No Time to Waste: An Action Agenda for School-Age Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligson, Michelle; Fink, Dale Borman

    This book for persons interested in setting up high quality school-age child care (SACC) programs: (1) provides background information and a rationale; (2) describes a collaborative model of program development; (3) discusses program funding and resources; (4) considers approaches to recognizing high quality school-age child care; and (5) offers…

  17. When Timing Is Everything: Age of First-Language Acquisition Effects on Second-Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayberry, Rachel I.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper summarizes three experiments that investigate the effects of age of acquisition on first-language (L1) acquisition in relation to second-language (L2) outcome. The experiments use the unique acquisition situations of childhood deafness and sign language. The key factors controlled across the studies are age of L1 acquisition, the…

  18. The Load and Time Dependence of Chemical Bonding-Induced Frictional Ageing of Silica at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, K.; Gosvami, N. N.; Goldsby, D. L.; Carpick, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are empirical relationships that describe the frictional behavior of rocks and other materials in experiments, and reproduce a variety of observed natural behavior when employed in earthquake models. A pervasive observation from rock friction experiments is the linear increase of static friction with the log of contact time, or 'ageing'. Ageing is usually attributed to an increase in real area of contact associated with asperity creep. However, recent atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrate that ageing of nanoscale silica-silica contacts is due to progressive formation of interfacial chemical bonds in the absence of plastic deformation, in a manner consistent with the multi-contact ageing behavior of rocks [Li et al., 2011]. To further investigate chemical bonding-induced ageing, we explored the influence of normal load (and thus contact normal stress) and contact time on ageing. Experiments that mimic slide-hold-slide rock friction experiments were conducted in the AFM for contact loads and hold times ranging from 23 to 393 nN and 0.1 to 100 s, respectively, all in humid air (~50% RH) at room temperature. Experiments were conducted by sequentially sliding the AFM tip on the sample at a velocity V of 0.5 μm/s, setting V to zero and holding the tip stationary for a given time, and finally resuming sliding at 0.5 μm/s to yield a peak value of friction followed by a drop to the sliding friction value. Chemical bonding-induced ageing, as measured by the peak friction minus the sliding friction, increases approximately linearly with the product of normal load and the log of the hold time. Theoretical studies of the roles of reaction energy barriers in nanoscale ageing indicate that frictional ageing depends on the total number of reaction sites and the hold time [Liu & Szlufarska, 2012]. We combine chemical kinetics analyses with contact mechanics models to explain our results, and develop a new approach for curve

  19. Bioinformatics analysis of time-series genes profiling to explore key genes affected by age in fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Shen, Hao; Xie, Jingjing; Zhou, Qiang; Chen, Yu; Lu, Hua

    2014-06-01

    The present study was aimed to explore possible key genes and bioprocess affected by age during fracture healing. GSE589, GSE592 and GSE1371 were downloaded from gene expression omnibus database. The time-series genes of three age levels rats were firstly identified with hclust function in R. Then functional and pathway enrichment analysis for selected time-series genes were performed. Finally, the VennDiagram package of R language was used to screen overlapping n time-series genes. The expression changes of time-series genes in the rats of three age levels were classified into two types: one was higher expressed at 0 day, decreased at 3 day to 2 week, and increased from 4 to 6 week; the other was the opposite. Functional and pathways enrichment analysis showed that 12 time-series genes of adult and old rats were significantly involved in ECM-receptor interaction pathway. The expression changes of 11 genes were consistent with time axis, 10 genes were up-regulated at 3 days after fracture, and increased slowly in 6 week, while Itga2b was down-regulated. The functions of 106 overlapping genes were all associated with growth and development of bone after fracture. The key genes in ECM-receptor interaction pathway including Spp1, Ibsp, Tnn and Col3a1 have been reported to be related to fracture in literatures. The difference during fracture healing in three age levels rats is mainly related to age. The Spp1, Ibsp, Tnn and Col3a1 are possible potential age-related genes and ECM-receptor interaction pathway is the potential age-related process during fracture healing. PMID:24627361

  20. Effectiveness of Surgical Release in Patients With Neglected Congenital Muscular Torticollis According to Age at the Time of Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyung-Jay; Ahn, Ah-Reum; Park, Eun-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the correlation between change in spinal deformities after surgical release and age at the time of surgery, and the effectiveness of surgical release in patients with neglected congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). Methods This was a retrospective study of 46 subjects with neglected CMT who had undergone surgical release at age ≥5 years at a tertiary medical center between January 2009 and January 2014. Spinal deformities were measured on anteroposterior plain radiographs of the cervical and whole spine, both preoperatively and postoperatively, to assess 3 parameters: cervicomandibular angle (CMA), lateral shift (LS), and Cobb angle (CA). We analyzed the change in spinal deformities after surgical release in consideration of age at the time of surgery. Results The median age at the time of surgery was 12.87 years. All 3 parameters showed significant improvement after surgical release (median values, pre- to post-surgery: CMA, 12.13° to 4.02°; LS, 18.13 mm to 13.55 mm; CA, 6.10° to 4.80°; all p<0.05). There was no significant correlation between age at the time of surgery and change in CMA (R=0.145, p=0.341) and LS (R=0.103, p=0.608). However, CA showed significant improvement with increasing age (R=0.150, p=0.046). Conclusion We assessed the correlation between change in spinal deformities after surgical release and age at the time of surgery. We found that that surgical release is effective for spinal deformities, even in older patients. These findings enhance our understanding of the effectiveness and timing of surgical release in patients with neglected CMT. PMID:26949667

  1. Aging in Place: Evolution of a Research Topic Whose Time Has Come

    PubMed Central

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha; Steinman, Bernard A.; Liebig, Phoebe S.; Pynoos, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, policy makers and professionals who provide services to older adults with chronic conditions and impairments have placed greater emphasis on conceptualizing aging in place as an attainable and worthwhile goal. Little is known, however, of the changes in how this concept has evolved in aging research. To track trends in aging in place, we examined scholarly articles published from 1980 to 2010 that included the concept in eleven academic gerontology journals. We report an increase in the absolute number and proportion of aging-in-place manuscripts published during this period, with marked growth in the 2000s. Topics related to the environment and services were the most commonly examined during 2000–2010 (35% and 31%, resp.), with a substantial increase in manuscripts pertaining to technology and health/functioning. This underscores the increase in diversity of topics that surround the concept of aging-in-place literature in gerontological research. PMID:22175020

  2. Opportunities to increase the productivity of spent fuel shipping casks in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Winsor, G.H.; Faletti, D.W.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1980-03-01

    Trends indicate that future transportation requirements for spent fuel will be different from those anticipated when the current generation of casks and vehicles was designed. Increased storage capacity at most reactors will increase the average post irradiation age of the spent fuel to be transported. A scenario is presented which shows the 18 casks currently available should be sufficient until approximately 1983. Beyond this time, it appears that an adequate transportation system can be maintained by acquiring, as needed, casks of current designs and new casks currently under development. Spent fuel transportation requirements in the post-1990 period can be met by a new generation of casks specifically designed to transport long-cooled fuel. In terms of the number of casks needed, productivity may be increased by 19% if rail cask turnaround time is reduced to 4 days from the current range of 6.5 to 8.5 days. Productivity defined as payloads per cask year could be increased 62% if the turnaround time for legal weight truck casks were reduced from 12 hours to 4 hours. On a similar basis, overweight truck casks show a 28% increase in productivity.

  3. Physical Activity of Preschool-Aged Latino Children in Farmworker Families

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Suerken, Cynthia K.; Zapata Roblyer, Martha I.; Trejo, Grisel; Arcury, Thomas A.; Ip, Edward H.; Lang, Wei; Quandt, Sara A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe time spent in sedentary and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) by children in Latino farmworker families; and delineate sources of variation in sedentary and MVPA. Method Data were from mother-child dyads (N = 248) in Latino farmworker households in North Carolina. Physical activity was assessed using accelerometers; mothers described their children’s characteristics and their physical and social environments. Results Children spent 6.2 hours/day sedentary (Median=369 minutes), and 6.0 minutes/day in MVPA. Children in Head Start spent more time sedentary, whereas children living where dogs roam freely were less sedentary. Children whose mothers limited screen time spent 2 more minutes in MVPA. Conclusions Preschool-aged Latino children in farmworker families are sedentary, engaging in very little MVPA. PMID:24933141

  4. Sleep timing and quantity in ecological and family context: a nationally representative time-diary study.

    PubMed

    Adam, Emma K; Snell, Emily K; Pendry, Patricia

    2007-03-01

    Associations between demographic characteristics, school schedules, activity choices, family functioning, and sleep behaviors were estimated using nationally representative time-diary data from 2,454 children (ages 5.5 to 11.9 years) and adolescents (ages 12.0 to 19.1 years). For weekdays, African American adolescents, Asian children, and those with earlier school start times and longer travel times to school reported fewer sleep hours. More time spent watching television (for children), doing homework (for adolescents), and engaging in religious activities predicted fewer hours, whereas a longer time spent on meals predicted greater hours of weekday sleep. For younger children, greater parental warmth predicted more hours of weekday sleep, whereas for adolescents, stricter household rules were protective. On weekends, African American adolescents and Hispanic children slept less, and there were strong effects of activity choices including time spent on television, computer and videogames, sports, religious activities, socializing, and employment. In accounting for age-related decreases in sleep hours from childhood to adolescence, earlier school start times, greater hours of homework, greater paid employment, less time spent on meals, and fewer household rules were all significant mediators. PMID:17371105

  5. Aging and Tennis Playing in a Coincidence-Timing Task with an Accelerating Object: The Role of Visuomotor Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobjois, Regis; Benguigui, Nicolas; Bertsch, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether playing a specific ball sport, such as tennis, could maintain the coincidence-timing (CT) performance of older adults at a similar level to that of younger ones. To address this question, tennis players and nonplayers of three different age ranges (ages 20-30, 60-70, and 70-80 years)…

  6. Timely Access to Quality Health Care Among Georgia Children Ages 4 to 17 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ogbuanu, Chinelo; Goodman, David A.; Kahn, Katherine; Long, Cherie; Noggle, Brendan; Bagchi, Suparna; Barradas, Danielle; Castrucci, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We examined factors associated with children's access to quality health care, a major concern in Georgia, identified through the 2010 Title V Needs Assessment. Data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health were merged with the 2008 Area Resource File and Health Resources and Services Administration medically under-served area variable, and restricted to Georgia children ages 4–17 years (N = 1,397). The study outcome, access to quality health care was derived from access to care (timely utilization of preventive medical care in the previous 12 months) and quality of care (compassionate/culturally effective/family-centered care). Andersen's behavioral model of health services utilization guided independent variable selection. Analyses included Chi-square tests and multinomial logit regressions. In our study population, 32.8 % reported access to higher quality care, 24.8 % reported access to moderate quality care, 22.8 % reported access to lower quality care, and 19.6 % reported having no access. Factors positively associated with having access to higher/moderate versus lower quality care include having a usual source of care (USC) (adjusted odds ratio, AOR:3.27; 95 % confidence interval, 95 % CI 1.15–9.26), and special health care needs (AOR:2.68; 95 % CI 1.42–5.05). Lower odds of access to higher/moderate versus lower quality care were observed for non-Hispanic Black (AOR:0.31; 95 % CI 0.18–0.53) and Hispanic (AOR:0.20; 95 % CI 0.08–0.50) children compared with non-Hispanic White children and for children with all other forms of insurance coverage compared with children with continuous-adequate-private insurance. Ensuring that children have continuous, adequate insurance coverage and a USC may positively affect their access to quality health care in Georgia. PMID:23054451

  7. Dual Task Performance in Normal Aging: A Comparison of Choice Reaction Time Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Vaportzis, Eleftheria; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Stout, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined dual task performance in 28 younger (18–30 years) and 28 older (>60 years) adults using two sets of choice reaction time (RT) tasks paired with digit tasks. Set one paired simple choice RT with digit forward; set two paired complex choice RT with digit backward. Each task within each set had easy and hard conditions. For the simple choice RT, participants viewed single letters and pressed a specified keyboard key if the letter was X or Z or a different key for other letters (easy). For the hard condition, there were 4 target letters (X, Z, O, Y). Digit forward consisted of 4 (easy) or 5 (hard) digits. For the complex choice RT, participants viewed 4×4 matrices of Xs and Os, and indicated whether four Xs (easy) or four Xs or four Os (hard) appeared in a row. Digit backward consisted of 3 (easy) or 4 (hard) digits. Within each set, participants performed every possible combination of tasks. We found that in the simple choice RT tasks older adults were significantly slower than, but as accurate as younger adults. In the complex choice RT tasks, older adults were significantly less accurate, but as fast as younger adults. For both age groups and both dual task sets, RT decreased and error rates increased with greater task difficulty. Older adults had greater dual task costs for error rates in the simple choice RT, whereas in the complex choice RT, it was the younger group that had greater dual task costs. Findings suggest that younger and older adults may adopt differential behavioral strategies depending on complexity and difficulty of dual tasks. PMID:23555937

  8. Soluble phosphorus removal through adsorption on spent alum sludge.

    PubMed

    Georgantas, D A; Matsis, V M; Grigoropoulou, H P

    2006-10-01

    In the present study freshly precipitated spent alum sludge [15-75 mg Al l(-1)] and alum [3-15 mg Al l(-1)] were tested and compared for their efficiency to remove phosphorus in synthetic wastewater [10mg P l(-1), 25 degrees C, pH=6] and it was proven that pure alum is much more efficient at phosphorus removal than the spent alum sludge. The effect of the pH on phosphorus removal efficiency was studied and it was proven that maximum orthophosphate removal is achieved in pH values 5-6 in both cases, alum and spent alum sludge, although alum is efficient in a wider pH range (4-7). The effect of aging [up to two months at 25 degrees C] on the efficiency of the spent sludge to remove phosphorus in synthetic wastewater was studied and it was proven that this efficiency is decreased through aging (up to 20% for 2 months aging). X-ray diffraction was used in order to examine whether this decrease is caused by changes in the structure of adsorbent and a mechanism was proposed to explain the above changes. Kinetics was investigated in the case of fresh and aged spent alum sludge and the pseudo-second-order chemisorption rate equation fits satisfactorily the experimental data [k: 0.286-1.048 g mmol(-1) min(-1), at 23-26 degrees C]. Finally, equilibrium was studied for fresh and aged spent alum sludge and the Freundlich isotherm fitted best the experimental data suggesting heterogeneous sorption [K(F)=14.4-19.7, N: 0.13-0.200]. PMID:17144257

  9. Quantifying risk over the life course - latency, age-related susceptibility, and other time-varying exposure metrics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Molin; Liao, Xiaomei; Laden, Francine; Spiegelman, Donna

    2016-06-15

    Identification of the latency period and age-related susceptibility, if any, is an important aspect of assessing risks of environmental, nutritional, and occupational exposures. We consider estimation and inference for latency and age-related susceptibility in relative risk and excess risk models. We focus on likelihood-based methods for point and interval estimation of the latency period and age-related windows of susceptibility coupled with several commonly considered exposure metrics. The method is illustrated in a study of the timing of the effects of constituents of air pollution on mortality in the Nurses' Health Study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26750582

  10. Assessment of spent fuel cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.

    1997-02-01

    The paper presents the methodology, the findings, and the conclusions of a study that was done by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) on loss of spent fuel pool cooling. The study involved an examination of spent fuel pool designs, operating experience, operating practices, and procedures. AEOD`s work was augmented in the area of statistics and probabilistic risk assessment by experts from the Idaho Nuclear Engineering Laboratory. Operating experience was integrated into a probabilistic risk assessment to gain insight on the risks from spent fuel pools.

  11. Relative Age Effects in Mathematics and Reading: Investigating the Generalizability across Students, Time and Classes.

    PubMed

    Thoren, Katharina; Heinig, Elisa; Brunner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A child's age in comparison to the age of her or his classmates (relative age) has been found to be an influential factor on academic achievement, particularly but not exclusively at the beginning of formal schooling. However, few studies have focused on the generalizability of relative age effects. To close this gap, the present study analyzes the generalizability across students with and without immigrant backgrounds, across three student cohorts that entered school under a changing law of school enrollment, and across classes. To this end, we capitalized on representative large-scale data sets from three student cohorts attending public schools in Berlin, the capital of Germany. We analyzed the data using a multilevel framework. Our results for the overall student sample indicate relative age effects for reading and mathematics in favor of the relatively older students in Grade 2 that become somewhat smaller in size in Grade 3. By Grade 8, relative age effects had vanished in reading and had even reversed in favor of the relatively young in mathematics. Furthermore, relative age effects were not found to be systematically different among students with and without immigrant backgrounds, student cohorts, or across classes. Taken together, these results empirically underscore the broad generalizability of the findings as found for the overall student population and replicate the pattern of findings on relative effects as identified by the majority of previous studies. PMID:27242593

  12. Relative Age Effects in Mathematics and Reading: Investigating the Generalizability across Students, Time and Classes

    PubMed Central

    Thoren, Katharina; Heinig, Elisa; Brunner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A child's age in comparison to the age of her or his classmates (relative age) has been found to be an influential factor on academic achievement, particularly but not exclusively at the beginning of formal schooling. However, few studies have focused on the generalizability of relative age effects. To close this gap, the present study analyzes the generalizability across students with and without immigrant backgrounds, across three student cohorts that entered school under a changing law of school enrollment, and across classes. To this end, we capitalized on representative large-scale data sets from three student cohorts attending public schools in Berlin, the capital of Germany. We analyzed the data using a multilevel framework. Our results for the overall student sample indicate relative age effects for reading and mathematics in favor of the relatively older students in Grade 2 that become somewhat smaller in size in Grade 3. By Grade 8, relative age effects had vanished in reading and had even reversed in favor of the relatively young in mathematics. Furthermore, relative age effects were not found to be systematically different among students with and without immigrant backgrounds, student cohorts, or across classes. Taken together, these results empirically underscore the broad generalizability of the findings as found for the overall student population and replicate the pattern of findings on relative effects as identified by the majority of previous studies. PMID:27242593

  13. Unmasking the 'elderly mystique': Why it is time to make the personal political in ageing research.

    PubMed

    Carney, Gemma M; Gray, Mia

    2015-12-01

    This article uses feminist scholarship to investigate 'the elderly mystique'-which contends that the potential of old age is masked by a set of false beliefs about ageing (i.e. ageism) which permeate social, economic, and political life (Cohen, 1988). The article presents a theoretical model which explores the extent to which institutionalised ageism shapes the trajectory of life after 60.(1) The hypothesis underpinning the model is simple: The challenge for ageing societies is not the average age of a given population, but rather, how age is used to structure economic, social and political life. An inter-disciplinary framework is used to examine how biological facts about ageing are used to segregate older from younger people, giving older people the status of 'other'; economically through retirement, politically through assumptions about 'the grey vote,' and socially through ageist stereotyping in the media and through denial and ridicule of the sexuality of older people. Each domain is informed by the achievements of feminist theory and research on sexism and how its successes and failures can inform critical investigations of ageism. The paper recognises the role of ageism in de-politicising the lived experience of ageing. The paper concludes that feminist scholarship, particularly work by feminists in their seventies, eighties, and nineties, has much to offer in terms of re-framing gerontology as an emancipatory project for current and future cohorts of older people. PMID:26568222

  14. Time- and age-dependent effects of serotonin on gasping and autoresuscitation in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianping; Magnusson, Jennifer; Karsenty, Gerard; Cummings, Kevin J

    2013-06-15

    The role of brain stem serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in autoresuscitation in neonatal life is unclear. We hypothesized that a specific loss of 5-HT would compromise gasping and autoresuscitation mainly in the second postnatal week and that acute restoration of 5-HT would reverse the defects. We exposed postnatal day (P)4-5, P8-9, and P11-12 tryptophan-hydroxylase-2 knockout (TPH2(-/-)) and wild-type littermates (WT) to 10 episodes of anoxia (97% N2, 3% CO2), measuring survival, gasp latency, gasp frequency (fB), and the time required to restore eupnea and heart rate. We also tested P8-9 TPH2(-/-) mice after restoring 5-HT with a single injection of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) 1-2 h before testing or with multiple injections beginning 24 h before testing. At P4-5 and P8-9, but not at P11-12, gasp latency and the recovery of eupnea were delayed ~2- to 3-fold in TPH2(-/-) pups compared with WT (P < 0.001). At all ages, TPH2(-/-) pups displayed reduced gasp fB (~20-30%; P < 0.001) and delayed heart rate recovery (~60%; P = 0.002) compared with WT littermates. TPH2(-/-) survival was reduced compared with WT (P < 0.001), especially at P8-9 and P11-12 (P = 0.004). Whereas 1-2 h of 5-HTP treatment improved the gasp latency and fB of P8-9 TPH2(-/-) pups, improved cardiorespiratory recovery and survival required 24 h of treatment. Our data suggest that 5-HT operates over a long time span (24 h) to improve survival during episodic severe hypoxia. Early in development (P4-9), 5-HT is critical for both respiratory and cardiovascular components of autoresuscitation; later (P11-12), it is critical mainly for cardiovascular components. Nevertheless, the effect of 5-HT deficiency on survival is most striking from P8 to P12. PMID:23558391

  15. Dissociations between procedural and episodic memory: effects of time and aging.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D B; Brown, A S; Murphy, D R

    1990-06-01

    The issue of multiple memory systems is explored. Young and older adults (mean ages = 20 and 71, respectively) named pictures and were tested immediately, 1, 7, or 21 days later. Episodic memory (recognition) for pictures was significantly lower in older relative to young adults and declined systematically across all retention intervals in both age groups. In contrast, procedural memory (repetition priming in picture naming) revealed no reliable age differences. In both age groups, priming declined within the first 24 hr, but unlike recognition, there was no further decrement from 1 to 21 days. There were also within-subject dissociations: The magnitude of priming was equivalent for remembered and forgotten items, and the relation between recognition and priming across intervals was nonmonotic, revealing a reversed association. The findings were interpreted within a multiple-memory-systems framework. PMID:2378692

  16. Time preference and its relationship with age, health, and survival probability

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Li-Wei; Szrek, Helena; Pereira, Nuno Sousa; Pauly, Mark V.

    2009-01-01

    Although theories from economics and evolutionary biology predict that one's age, health, and survival probability should be associated with one's subjective discount rate (SDR), few studies have empirically tested for these links. Our study analyzes in detail how the SDR is related to age, health, and survival probability, by surveying a sample of individuals in townships around Durban, South Africa. In contrast to previous studies, we find that age is not significantly related to the SDR, but both physical health and survival expectations have a U-shaped relationship with the SDR. Individuals in very poor health have high discount rates, and those in very good health also have high discount rates. Similarly, those with expected survival probability on the extremes have high discount rates. Therefore, health and survival probability, and not age, seem to be predictors of one's SDR in an area of the world with high morbidity and mortality. PMID:20376300

  17. Cross-Sectional Analysis of Time-Dependent Data: Mean-Induced Association in Age-Heterogeneous Samples and an Alternative Method Based on Sequential Narrow Age-Cohort Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Scott M.; Flaherty, Brian P.; Hoffman, Lesa

    2006-01-01

    The effect of time-related mean differences on estimates of association in cross-sectional studies has not been widely recognized in developmental and aging research. Cross-sectional studies of samples varying in age have found moderate to high levels of shared age-related variance among diverse age-related measures. These findings may be…

  18. Effect of Aging Time on Physicochemical Meat Quality and Sensory Property of Hanwoo Bull Beef.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soohyun; Kang, Sun Moon; Seong, Pilnam; Kang, Geunho; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Jinhyung; Lee, Seounghwan; Kim, Sidong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the meat quality and sensory properties of 12 major cuts from 10 Hanwoo bulls (25-32 mon of age) after they were aged at 2℃ for 0, 7, 14, and 21 d. Protein content (%) was between 19.17 and 22.50%. Intramuscular fat content ranged from 2.79 to 8.39%. The collagen content of the chuck roll, chuck tender, and short plate muscles was higher (1.97-2.04%) than that of the striploin muscles (1.48%) (p<0.05). CIE lightness (L*) values increased with an increase in aging days for tenderloin, loin, chuck roll, oyster blade, short plate, top sirloin, and eye of round muscles (p<0.05). Most muscles, except the short plate, showed no significant changes in redness CIE (a*) and yellowness (b*) color values during aging. The tenderloin, loin, and striploin showed significantly higher water holding capacity (58.60-62.06%) than that of chuck roll and short plate (53.86-57.07%) muscles (p<0.05). The Warner-Bratzler shear force values of most muscles decreased significantly as the aging period increased (p<0.05), exception the tenderloin. The chuck tender muscles showed the highest cooking loss, whereas tenderloin muscle showed the lowest (p<0.05). The tenderloin muscle had the longest sarcomere length (SL) (3.67-3.86 μm) and the bottom round muscle had the shortest SL (2.21-2.35 μm) (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, tenderness and overall-likeness scores of most muscles increased with increase in aging days. The tenderloin and oyster blade showed relatively higher tenderness and overall-likeness values than did the other muscles during the aging period. No significant differences were noted in juiciness and flavor-likeness scores among muscles and aging days. PMID:27499666

  19. Effect of Aging Time on Physicochemical Meat Quality and Sensory Property of Hanwoo Bull Beef

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seounghwan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the meat quality and sensory properties of 12 major cuts from 10 Hanwoo bulls (25-32 mon of age) after they were aged at 2℃ for 0, 7, 14, and 21 d. Protein content (%) was between 19.17 and 22.50%. Intramuscular fat content ranged from 2.79 to 8.39%. The collagen content of the chuck roll, chuck tender, and short plate muscles was higher (1.97-2.04%) than that of the striploin muscles (1.48%) (p<0.05). CIE lightness (L*) values increased with an increase in aging days for tenderloin, loin, chuck roll, oyster blade, short plate, top sirloin, and eye of round muscles (p<0.05). Most muscles, except the short plate, showed no significant changes in redness CIE (a*) and yellowness (b*) color values during aging. The tenderloin, loin, and striploin showed significantly higher water holding capacity (58.60-62.06%) than that of chuck roll and short plate (53.86-57.07%) muscles (p<0.05). The Warner-Bratzler shear force values of most muscles decreased significantly as the aging period increased (p<0.05), exception the tenderloin. The chuck tender muscles showed the highest cooking loss, whereas tenderloin muscle showed the lowest (p<0.05). The tenderloin muscle had the longest sarcomere length (SL) (3.67-3.86 μm) and the bottom round muscle had the shortest SL (2.21-2.35 μm) (p<0.05). In the sensory evaluation, tenderness and overall-likeness scores of most muscles increased with increase in aging days. The tenderloin and oyster blade showed relatively higher tenderness and overall-likeness values than did the other muscles during the aging period. No significant differences were noted in juiciness and flavor-likeness scores among muscles and aging days. PMID:27499666

  20. Age-related vulnerability to diencephalic amnesia produced by thiamine deficiency: the role of time of insult.

    PubMed

    Pitkin, Shane R; Savage, Lisa M

    2004-01-01

    Age is a risk factor for the development of many neurological disorders, including alcohol-related neurological disorders. A rodent model of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS), acute pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD), produces diencephalic damage and impairments of memory similar to what is seen in WKS patients. Advanced age increases the vulnerability to the cascade of acute and some chronic neurological events caused by PTD treatment. Interactions between PTD treatment and age at the time of treatment (3, 10, or 21 months), in addition to the effects of an increased recovery period, were examined relative to spatial memory impairment and neuropathology in Fischer 344 rats. Although acute neurological disturbances and medial thalamic brain lesions were more prevalent in middle-aged and senescent rats exposed to PTD treatment, relative to young rats, behavioral data did not support the view that PTD and aging have synergistic effects. In addition, both advanced age and PTD treatment result in a loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, though there was no interaction. Despite the fact that no convincing evidence was found for an effect of extended recovery time on neuropathology measures, young rats given an extensive recovery period displayed less working memory impairment. In summary, these data provide evidence for an increased susceptibility of the aged rat to the acute neurological consequences and diencephalic pathology associated with PTD treatment and indicated a similar vulnerability of the middle-aged rat. However, the synergistic interaction between aging and PTD treatment in thalamic tissue loss did not express behaviorally. PMID:14684251

  1. Body mass index in adolescent anorexia nervosa patients in relation to age, time point and site of admission.

    PubMed

    Bühren, Katharina; von Ribbeck, Linda; Schwarte, Reinhild; Egberts, Karin; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Fleischhaker, Christian; Wewetzer, Christoph; Kennes, Lieven N; Dempfle, Astrid; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate

    2013-07-01

    Body mass index (BMI) at admission is an important predictor of outcome in adolescent eating disorders. However, few studies have investigated BMI at admission, its changes in recent years, or modifying factors, such as duration of illness and age at onset in different geographical regions. Thus, this study aimed to investigate changes in BMI at admission over the past decade in one clinic, the differences in BMI between various treatment sites and the influence of duration of illness before admission and age at admission. Our sample consisted of 158 adolescent female patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) admitted between 2001 and 2009 to a major university hospital and 169 adolescent female patients recruited in a multicenter study between 2007 and 2010. We assessed the differences between departments in different regions of Germany in the multi-site sample. Changes over time in age-adjusted BMI and age at admission as well as modifying factors for age-adjusted BMI at admission, such as age at admission and duration of illness, were assessed in a representative local sample. There were no significant differences between departments in different regions of Germany. Over the course of the local study, there was a small but significant increase in the age-adjusted BMI score and absolute BMI at admission. In addition, there was a positive association between year of admission and age at admission. Older adolescents with AN had a lower age-adjusted BMI score and a longer duration of illness at the time of admission. The BMI at admission, which is one of the most important predictors of outcome in AN, has increased slightly during the past 10 years. Education strategies for parents and professionals should continue to be improved to further shorten the duration of illness before admission, especially for older adolescents. PMID:23392754

  2. A Neurogenic Perspective of Sarcopenia: Time Course Study of Sciatic Nerves From Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vidya S; White, Zoe; McMahon, Chris D; Hodgetts, Stuart I; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Shavlakadze, Tea; Harvey, Alan R; Grounds, Miranda D

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the neural basis for age-related sarcopenia, we quantified morphologic and molecular changes within sciatic nerves of aging male and female C57BL/6J mice aged between 3 and 27 months using immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Protein analyses by immunoblotting of nerves of male mice aged 4, 15, 18, 22, and 24 months showed increased levels of heavy chain SMI-32-positive neurofilaments, vimentin, tau5, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and p62 by 18-22 months. Similar protein increases were seen in 26-month-old compared with 3-month-old female mice. Immunostaining of longitudinal sections of old (27-month-old) male sciatic nerves revealed intense staining for tau5 and p62 that was increased compared with that at 3 months, but there were decreased numbers of axon profiles stained for ChAT or isolectin B4 (motor and sensory axons, respectively). Ultrastructural analysis revealed electron-dense aggregates within axons in peripheral nerves of old male mice; the proportion of axons that contained aggregates more than doubled between 15 and 27 months. Overall, the observed age-related accumulation of many proteins from about 18 months of age onward suggests impaired mechanisms for axonal transport and protein turnover. These peripheral nerve changes may contribute to the morphological and functional muscle deficits associated with sarcopenia. PMID:27030741

  3. Active Interrogation for Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Dougan, Arden

    2015-11-05

    The DDA instrument for nuclear safeguards is a fast, non-destructive assay, active neutron interrogation technique using an external 14 MeV DT neutron generator for characterization and verification of spent nuclear fuel assemblies.

  4. Social–Cognitive Predictors of Low-Income Parents’ Restriction of Screen Time Among Preschool-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Lampard, Amy M.; Jurkowski, Janine M.; Davison, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Parents’ rules regarding child television, DVD, video game, and computer use (screen time) have been associated with lower screen use in children. This study aimed to identify modifiable correlates of this behavior by examining social–cognitive predictors of parents’ restriction of child screen time. Low-income parents (N = 147) of preschool-aged children (2–6 years) completed self-administered questionnaires examining parent and child screen time, parent restriction of screen time, self-efficacy to restrict screen time, and beliefs about screen time. Structural equation modeling results indicated that greater self-efficacy to restrict screen time (β = .29, p = .016) and greater perceived importance of restricting child screen use (β = .55, p < .001) were associated with greater restriction of child screen use, after controlling for parent screen time. Family-based interventions that consider broader attitudinal factors around child screen time may be necessary to engage parents in restricting screen use. PMID:23239766

  5. Time-dependent dysregulation of autophagy: Implications in aging and mitochondrial homeostasis in the kidney proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Kimura, Tomonori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Namba, Tomoko; Matsuda, Jun; Minami, Satoshi; Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Matsui, Isao; Kitamura, Harumi; Matsusaka, Taiji; Niimura, Fumio; Yanagita, Motoko; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy plays an essential role in cellular homeostasis through the quality control of proteins and organelles. Although a time-dependent decline in autophagic activity is believed to be involved in the aging process, the issue remains controversial. We previously demonstrated that autophagy maintains proximal tubular cell homeostasis and protects against kidney injury. Here, we extend that study and examine how autophagy is involved in kidney aging. Unexpectedly, the basal autophagic activity was higher in the aged kidney than that in young kidney; short-term cessation of autophagy in tamoxifen-inducible proximal tubule-specific autophagy-deficient mice increased the accumulation of SQSTM1/p62- and ubiquitin-positive aggregates in the aged kidney. By contrast, autophagic flux in response to metabolic stress was blunted with aging, as demonstrated by the observation that transgenic mice expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B fusion construct, showed a drastic increase of GFP-positive puncta in response to starvation in young mice compared to a slight increase observed in aged mice. Finally, proximal tubule-specific autophagy-deficient mice at 24 mo of age exhibited a significant deterioration in kidney function and fibrosis concomitant with mitochondrial dysfunction as well as mitochondrial DNA abnormalities and nuclear DNA damage, all of which are hallmark characteristics of cellular senescence. These results suggest that age-dependent high basal autophagy plays a crucial role in counteracting kidney aging through mitochondrial quality control. Furthermore, a reduced capacity for upregulation of autophagic flux in response to metabolic stress may be associated with age-related kidney diseases. PMID:26986194

  6. Transportation of spent MTR fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Raisonnier, D.

    1997-08-01

    This paper gives an overview of the various aspects of MTR spent fuel transportation and provides in particular information about the on-going shipment of 4 spent fuel casks to the United States. Transnucleaire is a transport and Engineering Company created in 1963 at the request of the French Atomic Energy Commission. The company followed the growth of the world nuclear industry and has now six subsidiaries and affiliated companies established in countries with major nuclear programs.

  7. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins - 12210

    SciTech Connect

    Braehler, Georg; Slametschka, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    Organic ion exchangers (IEX) play a major and increasing role in the reactor coolant and other water purification processes. During their operation time they receive significant amounts of radioactivity, making their disposal, together with their organic nature, as medium active waste challenging. Processes applied so far do not eliminate the organic matter, which is unwanted in disposal facilities, or, if high temperatures are applied, raise problems with volatile radionuclides. NUKEM Technologies offers their well introduces process for the destruction of spent solvent (TBP), the pebble bed pyrolysis, now for the treatment of spent IEX (and other problematic waste), with the following benefits: the pyrolysis product is free of organic matter, and the operation temperature with approx. 500 deg. C keeps Cs radionuclides completely in the solid residue. (authors)

  8. Age-related changes in attentional selection: quality of task set or degradation of task set across time?

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jonathan D; Balota, David A

    2013-09-01

    The present study explores the nature of attentional selection in younger and older adults. Following R. De Jong, E. Berendsen, and R. Cools (1999, Acta Psychologica, Vol. 101, pp. 379-394), we manipulated the response to stimulus interval (RSI) in two attentional selection paradigms to examine if there are age-related differences in the quality of task set and/or the maintenance of task set across time. In Experiment 1, we found that the interference effect in a spatial interference task was (a) overall larger in older adults compared with younger adults, and (b) smaller at the short RSI (200 ms) compared with the long RSI (2000 ms), and (c) not associated with an interaction between age and RSI. The second experiment explored the same variables in a Stroop color interference paradigm. Again, older adults produced a disproportionately larger interference effect than younger adults, the interference effect was smaller at the short RSI compared with the long RSI, and there was no evidence of an interaction between age and RSI. In both experiments, the larger interference effect could not be attributed to age-related general slowing and there was evidence from Vincentile analyses of increasing interference and age effects at the slower response latencies. These results indicate that attentional selection deficits in these two experiments were due to a breakdown in the quality of the task set as opposed to age-related differences in the maintenance of the task set across time. PMID:23834491

  9. Examining Small Intestinal Transit Time as a Function of Age: Is There Evidence to Support Age-Dependent Differences among Children?

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Anil R; Edginton, Andrea N

    2016-07-01

    The small intestine represents the region where the majority of drug and nutrient absorption transpires. Among adults, small intestinal transit kinetics is well delineated; however, the applicability of these values toward children remains unclear. This article serves to examine the relationship between age and mean small intestinal transit time (SITT) based on the available literature. In addition, the influence of alterations in intestinal transit time was explored among children using a model-based approach. Primary literature sources depicting SITT from children to adults were ascertained via the PubMed database. Data were limited to subjects without pathologies that could influence intestinal motility. Random-effect meta-regression models with between-study variability were employed to assess the influence of age on SITT. Three separate models with age as a linear or higher-order (i.e., second- and third-order polynomial) regressor were implemented to assess for the potential of both linear and curvilinear relationships. Examination of the influence of altered intestinal transit kinetics on the absorption of a sustained release theophylline preparation was explored among children between 8 and 14 years using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Age was not found to be a significant modulator of small intestinal transit within either the linear or higher-order polynomial meta-regression models. PBPK simulations indicated a lack of influence of variations in SITT on the absorption of theophylline from the examined sustained release formulation in older children. Based on the current literature, there is no evidence to suggest that mean SITT differs between children and adults. PMID:26977099

  10. Atmospheric Aging of Semi-volatile Pesticides: Real Time Monitoring of Cypermethrin Photo- oxidation Using FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Dobuwski, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Pesticides are highly toxic compounds that unlike other pollutants are intentionally introduced, in large quantities, to the environment. The vast majority of them are applied to agricultural lands, but they are also widely used in urban areas as herbicides, insecticides and fungicides. Pesticides may be promoted into the atmosphere during their application via drift of aerosols, as well as by volatilization or dust erosion from treated surfaces after application. In the atmosphere, semi-volatile pesticides may remain as pure aerosols or become adsorbed upon background aerosols or surfaces. During transport or as deposited thin films, they undergo chemical degradation processes due to interaction with atmospheric oxidants and/or solar radiation. Although previous studies indicate that a major portion of applied pesticides wind up in the atmosphere, this is the medium about which we know the least regarding pesticides' fate. Quantitative data regarding aging processes of these hazard air pollutants are important in order to asses their environmental fate and impact. The present study investigates the heterogeneous reaction of thin film of cypermethrin, a common used insecticide, with atmospheric ozone and UV radiation. The reactions are monitored in real time using novel apparatus that combines ATR/FTIR and Long-path IR gas cell for examining the condensed and gas phases, respectively. The obtained data, including oxidation rate constants and photochemical quantum yields, are used to determine atmospheric lifetime of cypermethrin and its probability to reach non-target regions. Kinetic results from the oxidation of cypermethrin with different concentrations of ozone show that its atmospheric half-life time, with regard to ozone, is in the same order of magnitude as other known degradation processes in the soil and water compartments. Also is shown that some of the condensed phase products are more water soluble than the parent molecule, hence having higher potential

  11. Influence of plastic deformation and prolonged ageing time on microstructure of a Haynes 242 alloy.

    PubMed

    Dymek, S; Wróbel, M; Dollar, M; Blicharski, M

    2006-10-01

    The material used in this study was a commercial HAYNES alloy 242 with a nominal composition of Ni-25% Mo-8% Cr (in wt.%). In the standard heat treatment, the 242 alloy is annealed at a temperature between 1065 and 1095 degrees C and then water quenched. The ageing treatment is carried out at 650 degrees C for 24 h in order to develop the long-range-order strengthening. The alloy in the conventionally aged condition was additionally cold rolled to 50% reduction in thickness and subsequently subjected to prolonged ageing at 650 degrees C for 4000 h. The enhanced diffusion resulted in the decomposition of the Ni(2)(Mo,Cr) metastable phase into the stable Ni(3)Mo-based phase. The presence of the new stable phase increased the yield and tensile strengths but deteriorated the ductility of the alloy at both room and 650 degrees C temperatures. PMID:17100898

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  13. Effects of Age, Sex and Syllable Number on Voice Onset Time: Evidence from Children's Voiceless Aspirated Stops.

    PubMed

    Yu, Vickie Y; De Nil, Luc F; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2015-06-01

    Voice onset time (VOT) is a temporal acoustic parameter that reflects motor speech coordination skills. This study investigated the patterns of age and sex differences across development of voice onset time in a group of 70 English-speaking children, ranging in age from 4.1 to 18.4 years, and 12 young adults. The effect of the number of syllables on VOT patterns was also examined. Speech samples were elicited by producing syllables /pa/ and /pataka/. Results supported previous findings showing that younger children produce longer VOT values with higher levels of variability. Markedly higher VOT values and increased variability were found for boys at ages between 8 and 11 years, confirming sex differences in VOT patterns and patterns of variability. In addition, all participants consistently produced shorter VOT with higher variability for multisyllables than monosyllables, indicating an effect of syllable number. Possible explanations for these findings and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:26677640

  14. Effects of age, sex and syllable structure on voice onset time: Evidence from children’s voiceless aspirated stops

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vickie Y.; De Nil, Luc F.; Pang, Elizabeth W.

    2016-01-01

    Voice onset time (VOT) is a temporal acoustic parameter that reflects motor speech coordination skills. This study investigated the patterns of age and sex differences across development of voice onset time in a group of 70 English-speaking children ranging in age from 4.1 to 18.4 years and 12 young adults. The effect of the number of syllables on VOT patterns was also examined. Speech samples were elicited by producing syllables /pa/ and /pataka/. Results supported previous findings showing that younger children produce longer VOT values with higher levels of variability. Markedly higher VOT values and increased variability were found for boys at ages between 8 to 11 years, confirming sex differences in VOT patterns and patterns of variability. In addition, all participants consistently produced shorter VOT with higher variability for multisyllables than monosyllables, indicating an effect of syllable number. Possible explanations for these findings and clinical implications were discussed. PMID:26677640

  15. Timing and Structure of Glacial Fluctuations at the end of the Last Ice Age in SW Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, M. R.; Moreno, P. I.; Villa-Martínez, R. P.; Kubik, P. W.

    2006-12-01

    In the mid to high southern latitudes much of the controversy regarding synchrony or bipolar asynchrony has centered on late glacial time, especially in South America as it is one of the few land masses south of 45°S, outside Antarctica. To help resolve this controversy, and in general understand this important time interval, we studied in detail the timing, structure, and relative amplitude of climate changes during the late glacial period at 50°S in SW Patagonia. We combined two independent dating approaches including cosmogenic dating of moraines and radiocarbon of lake sediment cores, in addition to paleoecologic studies of key sections. We measured the 10Be concentrations in erratics from maximum and retreat glacial deposits from the Lago Nordenskjöld and Río Paine ice lobes. The 10Be ages from the two areas indicate a maximum extent prior to ~13 ka (4 ages), followed by slightly less extensive but sustained ice until ~12-11±1 ka. Excluding ages from deposits clearly related to retreat, the mean 10Be age for the two lobes falls between 13-12 ka, and the maximum ages from the two areas are 14.3±1.1 and 13.8±1.8 ka, respectively. This timing agrees well with minimum 14C ages for glacial geomorphic features associated with the maximum and retreat ice positions. We interpret the onset of organic sedimentation in the area occupied by a former ice-dammed lake at 12.6 cal ka as the closest minimum age for ice recession from the maximum ice extent. The pollen data indicate extreme cold conditions between 14.8-12.5 ka, slight amelioration between 12.5-10.9 ka, followed by warming in the early Holocene Period. We conclude that 1) a major cold reversal took place in SW Patagonia overlapping in time with the Antarctic Cold Reversal and 2) ice retreated slowly but lingered close to the maximum position throughout Younger Dryas time until ~10.7±0.9 ka under cold and, possibly, wet conditions. We speculate that southern latitude air- ocean dynamics, such as that of

  16. Mental Time Travel into the Past and the Future in Healthy Aged Adults: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viard, Armelle; Chetelat, Gael; Lebreton, Karine; Desgranges, Beatrice; Landeau, Brigitte; de La Sayette, Vincent; Eustache, Francis; Piolino, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Remembering the past and envisioning the future rely on episodic memory which enables mental time travel. Studies in young adults indicate that past and future thinking share common cognitive and neural underpinnings. No imaging data is yet available in healthy aged subjects. Using fMRI, we scanned older subjects while they remembered personal…

  17. Calibrating the Lower Cretaceous Time Scale with U-Pb Zircon Ages from the Great Valley Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokawa, A.; Coleman, D. S.; Bralower, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    U-Pb dating of zircons from the Great Valley Group in northern California provides an opportunity to improve the resolution and reliability of the Early Cretaceous Time Scale and enhance its global range and applicability. Well established calcareous nannofossil and macrofossil biostratigraphy, enabled by good preservation, allows for the Great Valley Group to be anchored within the global Geologic Time Scale. Interlayered bentonites contain zircon, which when analyzed via U-Pb ID-TIMS can yield high precision ages. Our understanding of Early Cretaceous events - such as the Cretaceous Normal Polarity Super-Chron and oceanic anoxic events - will be improved by a refined time scale, particularly since the Early Cretaceous is one of the periods most lacking in high-precision radiometric points in the entire Mesozoic. Prior to this study, no U-Pb zircon analyses from the Great Valley Group involved the thermal annealing-chemical abrasion technique. Here, two new TA-CA ID-TIMS U-Pb zircon ages from the McCarty Creek section of the Great Valley Group are presented. The first bentonite is lower Valanginian, from an interval that cannot be biostratigraphically distinguished between NK-3 (Calcicalathina oblongata) and NK-4 (Cruciellipsis cuvillieri) nannofossil biozones, and four concordant dates yield an age of 137.22±0.098Ma. This age corroborates the GTS2008 lower Valanginian boundary age of 140.2Ma, and calls into question previously published Great Valley Group late Berriasian ages: 136.9±0.3Ma for a bentonite from the Stony Creek section, and 137.1±0.6Ma for a bentonite from the Grindstone Creek section. These ages appear to be too young, perhaps as a result of lead loss - the effects of which can be vastly minimized by chemical abrasion. Very preliminary results of re-dating the same aforementioned Grindstone Creek horizon yield an older age of 138.4Ma. The second bentonite is lower Aptian (Chiastozygus litterarius (NK-6) biozone) and three concordant dates yield

  18. A Curriculum on Aging in Our Schools: Its Time Has Come.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Sally

    The paper discusses some of the available curricula on the aging, their goals, their shared characteristics, and some outcomes of the curricula. Appearing in several formats for grades K-12 classroom use and including texts, videos, and workbooks, the curricula are presented as activities that may be integrated with other prescribed content. Each…

  19. Stroke: 'time is brain' after stroke, regardless of age and severity.

    PubMed

    Audebert, Heinrich J; Sobesky, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Two recent studies highlight the importance of prompt, coordinated intervention after stroke. A meta-analysis confirms that intravenous thrombolysis is effective within 4.5 h of onset, irrespective of age (below or above 80 years) and stroke severity. Another study demonstrates successful reorganization of care through centralization of stroke services in England. PMID:25330727

  20. Relationship between Age and Timely Placement of Vascular Access in Incident Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Harford, Rubette; Clark, Mary Jo; Norris, Keith C.; Yan, Guofen

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Placement of an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) prior to initiating dialysis can affect clinical outcomes for patients who subsequently initiate chronic hemodialysis treatments. Age-related variation in receipt of a functioning AVF prior to initiating dialysis is not well known. The purpose of this study was to examine age-related rates in use of AVF at the first outpatient dialysis treatment among U.S. incident patients on hemodialysis. Findings Among 526,145 identified, the use of AVF at the first outpatient dialysis treatment was lower in the youngest (<55 year) and oldest (≥80 year) vs. both 55–66 year and 67–79 year age groups. These findings persisted after adjusting for demographics, lifestyle behavior, employment and insurance status, physical/functional conditions, and comorbid conditions. Conclusions The presence of a functioning AVF at initial dialysis treatment varies by age. Modifying healthcare policy and/or expanding the role of the renal nurse practitioner should be considered to address this issue. PMID:25802137

  1. Language and Ageing--Exploring Propositional Density in Written Language--Stability over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Elizabeth; Craig, Hugh; Ferguson, Alison; Colyvas, Kim

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the stability of propositional density (PD) in written texts, as this aspect of language shows promise as an indicator and as a predictor of language decline with ageing. This descriptive longitudinal study analysed written texts obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health in which participants were…

  2. Another Look at Plagiarism in the Digital Age: Is It Time to Turn in My Badge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Benie B.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about plagiarism in the digital age and how plagiarism challenges teachers in their relationship with students. With a growing body of digital commentary and the looming dominance of electronic writing, current professional consensus in the plagiarism dilemma appears dubious and the slope gets more slippery every…

  3. Self-Paced Study Time as a Cue for Recall Predictions across School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann-Biencourt, Anja; Lockl, Kathrin; Schneider, Wolfgang; Ackerman, Rakefet; Koriat, Asher

    2010-01-01

    Recent work on metacognition indicates that monitoring is sometimes based itself on the feedback from control operations. Evidence for this pattern has not only been shown in adults but also in elementary schoolchildren. To explore whether this finding can be generalized to a wide range of age groups, 160 participants from first to eighth grade…

  4. Impact of Aging on the Dynamics of Memory Retrieval: A Time-Course Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oztekin, Ilke; Gungor, Nur Zeynep; Badre, David

    2012-01-01

    The response-signal speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) procedure was used to provide an in-depth investigation of the impact of aging on the dynamics of short-term memory retrieval. Young and older adults studied sequentially presented 3-item lists, immediately followed by a recognition probe. Analyses of composite list and serial position SAT…

  5. Age, Dose, and Time-Dependency of Plasma and Tissue Distribution of Deltamethrine in Immature Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The major objective of this project was to characterize the systemic disposition of the pyrethroid, deltamethrin (DLT), in immature rats, with emphasis on the age-dependence of target organ (brain) dosimetry. Postnatal day (PND) 10, 21, and 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0...

  6. Cognitive Abilities Explaining Age-Related Changes in Time Perception of Short and Long Durations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelanti, Pierre S.; Droit-Volet, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated how the development of cognitive abilities explains the age-related changes in temporal judgment over short and long duration ranges from 0.5 to 30 s. Children (5- and 9-year-olds) as well as adults were given a temporal bisection task with four different duration ranges: a duration range shorter than 1 s, two…

  7. Multivariate Analyses and Classification of Inertial Sensor Data to Identify Aging Effects on the Timed-Up-and-Go Test

    PubMed Central

    Vervoort, Danique; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Kosse, Nienke; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Many tests can crudely quantify age-related mobility decrease but instrumented versions of mobility tests could increase their specificity and sensitivity. The Timed-up-and-Go (TUG) test includes several elements that people use in daily life. The test has different transition phases: rise from a chair, walk, 180° turn, walk back, turn, and sit-down on a chair. For this reason the TUG is an often used test to evaluate in a standardized way possible decline in balance and walking ability due to age and or pathology. Using inertial sensors, qualitative information about the performance of the sub-phases can provide more specific information about a decline in balance and walking ability. The first aim of our study was to identify variables extracted from the instrumented timed-up-and-go (iTUG) that most effectively distinguished performance differences across age (age 18–75). Second, we determined the discriminative ability of those identified variables to classify a younger (age 18–45) and older age group (age 46–75). From healthy adults (n = 59), trunk accelerations and angular velocities were recorded during iTUG performance. iTUG phases were detected with wavelet-analysis. Using a Partial Least Square (PLS) model, from the 72-iTUG variables calculated across phases, those that explained most of the covariance between variables and age were extracted. Subsequently, a PLS-discriminant analysis (DA) assessed classification power of the identified iTUG variables to discriminate the age groups. 27 variables, related to turning, walking and the stand-to-sit movement explained 71% of the variation in age. The PLS-DA with these 27 variables showed a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 85%. Based on this model, the iTUG can accurately distinguish young and older adults. Such data can serve as a reference for pathological aging with respect to a widely used mobility test. Mobility tests like the TUG supplemented with smart technology could be used in clinical

  8. Multivariate Analyses and Classification of Inertial Sensor Data to Identify Aging Effects on the Timed-Up-and-Go Test.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, Danique; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Kosse, Nienke; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Lamoth, Claudine J C

    2016-01-01

    Many tests can crudely quantify age-related mobility decrease but instrumented versions of mobility tests could increase their specificity and sensitivity. The Timed-up-and-Go (TUG) test includes several elements that people use in daily life. The test has different transition phases: rise from a chair, walk, 180° turn, walk back, turn, and sit-down on a chair. For this reason the TUG is an often used test to evaluate in a standardized way possible decline in balance and walking ability due to age and or pathology. Using inertial sensors, qualitative information about the performance of the sub-phases can provide more specific information about a decline in balance and walking ability. The first aim of our study was to identify variables extracted from the instrumented timed-up-and-go (iTUG) that most effectively distinguished performance differences across age (age 18-75). Second, we determined the discriminative ability of those identified variables to classify a younger (age 18-45) and older age group (age 46-75). From healthy adults (n = 59), trunk accelerations and angular velocities were recorded during iTUG performance. iTUG phases were detected with wavelet-analysis. Using a Partial Least Square (PLS) model, from the 72-iTUG variables calculated across phases, those that explained most of the covariance between variables and age were extracted. Subsequently, a PLS-discriminant analysis (DA) assessed classification power of the identified iTUG variables to discriminate the age groups. 27 variables, related to turning, walking and the stand-to-sit movement explained 71% of the variation in age. The PLS-DA with these 27 variables showed a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 85%. Based on this model, the iTUG can accurately distinguish young and older adults. Such data can serve as a reference for pathological aging with respect to a widely used mobility test. Mobility tests like the TUG supplemented with smart technology could be used in clinical practice

  9. A drug-induced accelerated senescence (DIAS) is a possibility to study aging in time lapse.

    PubMed

    Alili, Lirija; Diekmann, Johanna; Giesen, Melanie; Holtkötter, Olaf; Brenneisen, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Currently, the oxidative stress (or free radical) theory of aging is the most popular explanation of how aging occurs at the molecular level. Accordingly, a stress-induced senescence-like phenotype of human dermal fibroblasts can be induced in vitro by the exposure of human diploid fibroblasts to subcytotoxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. However, several biomarkers of replicative senescence e.g. cell cycle arrest and enlarged morphology are abrogated 14 days after treatment, indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather acts as a trigger for short-term senescence (1-3 days) than being responsible for the maintenance of the senescence-like phenotype. Further, DNA-damaging factors are discussed resulting in a permanent senescent cell type. To induce long-term premature senescence and to understand the molecular alterations occurring during the aging process, we analyzed mitomycin C (MMC) as an alkylating DNA-damaging agent and ROS producer. Human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), used as model for skin aging, were exposed to non-cytotoxic concentrations of MMC and analyzed for potential markers of cellular aging, for example enlarged morphology, activity of senescence-associated-ß-galactosidase, cell cycle arrest, increased ROS production and MMP1-activity, which are well-documented for HDF in replicative senescence. Our data show that mitomycin C treatment results in a drug-induced accelerated senescence (DIAS) with long-term expression of senescence markers, demonstrating that a combination of different susceptibility factors, here ROS and DNA alkylation, are necessary to induce a permanent senescent cell type. PMID:24833306

  10. Effect of Helium Accumulation on the Spent Fuel Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, Cecile; Piron, Jean-Paul; Stout, Ray

    2007-07-01

    In a nuclear spent fuel repository, the aqueous rapid release of radio-activity from exposed spent fuel surfaces will depend on the pellet microstructure at the arrival time of water into the disposal container. Research performed on spent fuel evolution in a closed system has shown that the evolution of microstructure under disposal conditions should be governed by the cumulated {alpha}-decay damage and the subsequent helium behavior. The evolution of fission gas bubble characteristics under repository conditions has to be assessed. In UO{sub 2} fuels with a burnup of 47.5 GWd/t, the pressure in fission gas bubbles, including the pressure increase from {alpha}-decay helium atoms, is not expected to reach the critical bubble pressure that will cause failure, thus micro-cracking in UO{sub 2} spent fuel grains is not expected. (authors)

  11. The STEP model: Characterizing simultaneous time effects on practice for flight simulator performance among middle-aged and older pilots.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Quinn; Taylor, Joy; Noda, Art; Yesavage, Jerome; Lazzeroni, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the possible effects of the number of practice sessions (practice) and time between practice sessions (interval) among middle-aged and older adults in real-world tasks has important implications for skill maintenance. Prior training and cognitive ability may impact practice and interval effects on real-world tasks. In this study, we took advantage of existing practice data from 5 simulated flights among 263 middle-aged and older pilots with varying levels of flight expertise (defined by U.S. Federal Aviation Administration proficiency ratings). We developed a new Simultaneous Time Effects on Practice (STEP) model: (a) to model the simultaneous effects of practice and interval on performance of the 5 flights, and (b) to examine the effects of selected covariates (i.e., age, flight expertise, and 3 composite measures of cognitive ability). The STEP model demonstrated consistent positive practice effects, negative interval effects, and predicted covariate effects. Age negatively moderated the beneficial effects of practice. Additionally, cognitive processing speed and intraindividual variability (IIV) in processing speed moderated the benefits of practice and/or the negative influence of interval for particular flight performance measures. Expertise did not interact with practice or interval. Results indicated that practice and interval effects occur in simulated flight tasks. However, processing speed and IIV may influence these effects, even among high-functioning adults. Results have implications for the design and assessment of training interventions targeted at middle-aged and older adults for complex real-world tasks. PMID:26280383

  12. Age and physical activity effects on reaction time and digit symbol substitution performance in cognitively active adults.

    PubMed

    Lupinacci, N S; Rikli, R E; Jones, C J; Ross, D

    1993-06-01

    University professors (N = 56), divided into two age groups (< 50 years and > 50 years) and two physical activity level groups (high and low), were tested on three tasks requiring increasingly complex cognitive processing--simple reaction time (SRT), choice reaction time (CRT), and on a digit symbol substitution test (DSST). A significant main effect for exercise, with high active subjects performing better than low active subjects, was found for SRT (p < .001) and CRT (p < .01) but not for DSST (p < .09). Significant main effects for age, with younger subjects performing better than older subjects, were found on DSST (p < .01) and CRT (p < .05) but not for SRT (p < .09). The observation that the effect of age was more pronounced with increasing task complexity is consistent with previous research. However, the tendency for exercise effects to decrease with increasing task complexity is not consistent with former findings, suggesting that perhaps the controlled high level of cognitive activity of subjects in this study may have offset the usual effects of exercise on information processing speed. No significant Age x Activity Level interactions were found on any of the dependent raw score data. However, compared to normative scores of the population at large, there was a slight increase in DSST percentile ranks with age for the older aerobically active professors, whereas a decrease occurred for the inactive subjects. PMID:8341837

  13. Throwing Pattern: Changes in Timing of Joint Lag According to Age between and within Skill Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Accomplished throwers conserve angular momentum when distal joints of the throwing arm reach peak velocity at a later time than their proximal neighbors. The result is an increase in velocity of the most distal segment--the hand. Past research indicates that skill level varies by the number of joints experiencing distal timing lag (time to peak…

  14. Survival Benefit From Kidney Transplantation Using Kidneys From Deceased Donors Aged ≥75 Years: A Time-Dependent Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sáez, M J; Arcos, E; Comas, J; Crespo, M; Lloveras, J; Pascual, J

    2016-09-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease have longer survival after kidney transplantation than they would by remaining on dialysis; however, outcome with kidneys from donors aged ≥75 years and the survival of recipients of these organs compared with their dialysis counterparts with the same probability of obtaining an organ is unknown. In a longitudinal mortality study, 2040 patients on dialysis were placed on a waiting list, and 389 of them received a first transplant from a deceased donor aged ≥75 years. The adjusted risk of death and survival were calculated by non-proportional hazards analysis with being transplanted as a time-dependent effect. Projected years of life since placement on the waiting list was almost twofold higher for transplanted patients. Nonproportional adjusted risk of death after transplantation was 0.44 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.32; p < 0.001) in comparison with those that remained on dialysis. Stratifying by age, adjusted hazard ratios for death were 0.17 (95% CI 0.47-0.06; p = 0.001) for those aged <65 years, 0.56 (95% CI 0.92-0.34; p = 0.022) for those aged 65-69 years and 0.82 (95% CI 1.28-0.52; p = 0.389) for those aged ≥70 years. Although kidney transplantation from elderly deceased donors is associated with reduced graft survival, transplanted patients have lower mortality than those remaining on dialysis. PMID:27004984

  15. Spent Fuel Working Group Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    O`Toole, T.

    1993-11-01

    The Department of Energy is storing large amounts of spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials (herein referred to as RINM). In the past, the Department reprocessed RINM to recover plutonium, tritium, and other isotopes. However, the Department has ceased or is phasing out reprocessing operations. As a consequence, Department facilities designed, constructed, and operated to store RINM for relatively short periods of time now store RINM, pending decisions on the disposition of these materials. The extended use of the facilities, combined with their known degradation and that of their stored materials, has led to uncertainties about safety. To ensure that extended storage is safe (i.e., that protection exists for workers, the public, and the environment), the conditions of these storage facilities had to be assessed. The compelling need for such an assessment led to the Secretary`s initiative on spent fuel, which is the subject of this report. This report comprises three volumes: Volume I; Summary Results of the Spent Fuel Working Group Evaluation; Volume II, Working Group Assessment Team Reports and Protocol; Volume III; Operating Contractor Site Team Reports. This volume presents the overall results of the Working Group`s Evaluation. The group assessed 66 facilities spread across 11 sites. It identified: (1) facilities that should be considered for priority attention. (2) programmatic issues to be considered in decision making about interim storage plans and (3) specific vulnerabilities for some of these facilities.

  16. Effects of aging time and temperature of Fe-1wt.%Cu on magnetic Barkhausen noise and FORC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Muad; Cao, Yue; Edwards, Danny J.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Johnson, Bradley R.; McCloy, John S.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN), hysteresis measurements, first order reversal curves (FORC), Vickers microhardness, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analyses were performed on Fe-1wt.%Cu (Fe-Cu) samples isothermally aged at 700°C for 0.5 - 25 hours to obtain samples with different sized Cu precipitates and dislocation structures. Fe-Cu is used to simulate the thermal and irradiation-induced defects in copper-containing nuclear reactor materials such as cooling system pipes and pressure vessel materials. The sample series showed an initial increase followed by a decrease in hardness and coercivity with aging time, which is explained by Cu precipitates formation and growth as observed by TEM measurements. Further, the MBN envelope showed a continuous decrease in its magnitude and the appearance of a second peak with aging. Also, FORC diagrams showed multiple peaks whose intensity and location changed for different aging time. The changes in FORC diagrams are attributed to combined changes of the magnetic behavior due to Cu precipitate characteristics and dislocation structure. A second series of samples aged at 850°C, which is above the solid solution temperature of Fe-Cu, was studied to isolate the effects of dislocations. These samples showed a continuous decrease in MBN amplitude with aging time although the coercivity and hardness did not change significantly. The decrease of MBN amplitude and the appearance of the second MBN envelope peak are attributed to the changes in dislocation density and structure. This study shows that the effect of dislocations on MBN and FORC of Fe-Cu materials can vary significantly and should be considered in interpreting magnetic signatures.

  17. High precision thorium-230 ages of corals and the timing of sea level fluctuations in the late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Mass spectrometric techniques for the measurement of {sup 230}Th and {sup 234}U have been developed. These techniques have made it possible to reduce the analytical errors in {sup 230}Th dating of corals using very small samples (10{sup 7} to 10{sup 10} atoms). The time range over which useful data on corals can now be obtained ranges from 15 to 500,000 years. For young corals, this approach may be preferable to {sup 14}C dating. The precision with which the age of a coral can not be determined makes it possible to determine the timing of sea level fluctuations in the late Quaternary. Analyses of a number of corals that grew during the last interglacial period yield ages of 122 to 130 ky. The ages coincide with or slightly postdate the summer solar insolation high at 65{degree}N latitude, which occurred 128 ky ago. This supports the idea that changes in Pleistocene climate can be the result of orbital forcing. Coral ages may allow us to resolve the ages of individual coseismic uplift events and thereby date prehistoric earthquakes. This possibility has been examined at two localities, northwest Santo Island and north Malekula Island, Vanuatu. The {sup 230}Th growth dates of the surfaces of adjacent emerged coral heads, collected from the same elevation on northwest Santo Island, were, within analytical error, identical (A.D. 1866 {plus minus} 4 and A.D. 1864 {plus minus} 4). This indicates that the corals died at the same time and is consistent with the idea that they were killed by coseismic uplift. Similar adjacent coral heads on north Malekula Island yielded {sup 230}Th growth dates of A.D. 1729 {plus minus} 3 and A.D. 1718 {plus minus} 5. The ages are similar but analytically distinguishable. The difference may be due to erosion of the outer, younger, portion of the latter coral head.

  18. Going for the gusto: competing for the first time at age 65.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Jessica Brooke; Kluge, Mary Ann

    2013-07-01

    Older adults are often viewed by society more for what they cannot do than for what they are capable of achieving. This intrinsic case study examined the formation of a women's 65+ volleyball team at a university for the purpose of better understanding what it was like for older women to learn a new sport and what meaning participating in competitive sport had for those who had not previously been considered athletic. Qualitative methods explored each participant's experiences through a focus group, individual interviews, observational notes, and written reflections. Resulting team member themes included going for the gusto, belonging to a team, and support from the university. This program is a potential model to engage nonathletic older adults in sport, while forging a new and positive aging framework for aging athletes. PMID:23006436

  19. Impacts of age-dependent tree sensitivity and dating approaches on dendrogeomorphic time series of landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šilhán, Karel; Stoffel, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Different approaches and thresholds have been utilized in the past to date landslides with growth ring series of disturbed trees. Past work was mostly based on conifer species because of their well-defined ring boundaries and the easy identification of compression wood after stem tilting. More recently, work has been expanded to include broad-leaved trees, which are thought to produce less and less evident reactions after landsliding. This contribution reviews recent progress made in dendrogeomorphic landslide analysis and introduces a new approach in which landslides are dated via ring eccentricity formed after tilting. We compare results of this new and the more conventional approaches. In addition, the paper also addresses tree sensitivity to landslide disturbance as a function of tree age and trunk diameter using 119 common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and 39 Crimean pine (Pinus nigra ssp. pallasiana) trees growing on two landslide bodies. The landslide events reconstructed with the classical approach (reaction wood) also appear as events in the eccentricity analysis, but the inclusion of eccentricity clearly allowed for more (162%) landslides to be detected in the tree-ring series. With respect to tree sensitivity, conifers and broad-leaved trees show the strongest reactions to landslides at ages comprised between 40 and 60 years, with a second phase of increased sensitivity in P. nigra at ages of ca. 120-130 years. These phases of highest sensitivities correspond with trunk diameters at breast height of 6-8 and 18-22 cm, respectively (P. nigra). This study thus calls for the inclusion of eccentricity analyses in future landslide reconstructions as well as for the selection of trees belonging to different age and diameter classes to allow for a well-balanced and more complete reconstruction of past events.

  20. Breaking the barriers of time and space: the dawning of the great age of librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Plutchak, T. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This lecture, reflecting on future roles, posits the potential dawning of a “great age of librarians,” if librarians make the conceptual shift of focusing on their own skills and activities rather than on their libraries. Discussion: In the digital age, physical libraries are becoming less relevant to the communities that they serve. Librarians, however, are more necessary than ever in helping members of their communities navigate the increasingly complex information space. To meet their social responsibilities requires that librarians seek new roles and recognize that their most important activities will take place outside of the physical library. Conclusion: A great age of librarians is possible, but not guaranteed. We are at the very beginning of the development of a digital culture that parallels the print culture that has been dominant for five hundred years. Innovative and creative librarians have the potential to shape the development of that culture in ways that will truly serve the needs of their communities. PMID:22272154

  1. Age-related differences in the neural correlates of trial-to-trial variations of reaction time.

    PubMed

    Adleman, Nancy E; Chen, Gang; Reynolds, Richard C; Frackman, Anna; Razdan, Varun; Weissman, Daniel H; Pine, Daniel S; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    Intra-subject variation in reaction time (ISVRT) is a developmentally-important phenomenon that decreases from childhood through young adulthood in parallel with the development of executive functions and networks. Prior work has shown a significant association between trial-by-trial variations in reaction time (RT) and trial-by-trial variations in brain activity as measured by the blood-oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) response in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. It remains unclear, however, whether such "RT-BOLD" relationships vary with age. Here, we determined whether such trial-by-trial relationships vary with age in a cross-sectional design. We observed an association between age and RT-BOLD relationships in 11 clusters located in visual/occipital regions, frontal and parietal association cortex, precentral/postcentral gyrus, and thalamus. Some of these relationships were negative, reflecting increased BOLD associated with decreased RT, manifesting around the time of stimulus presentation and positive several seconds later. Critically for present purposes, all RT-BOLD relationships increased with age. Thus, RT-BOLD relationships may reflect robust, measurable changes in the brain-behavior relationship across development. PMID:27239972

  2. Real-Time Observations of Secondary Aerosol Formation and Aging from Different Emission Sources and Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, A. M.; Palm, B. B.; Hayes, P. L.; Day, D. A.; Cubison, M.; Brune, W. H.; Hu, W.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Bon, D.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J.; Kuster, W.; De Gouw, J. A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    To investigate atmospheric processing of direct urban and wildfire emissions, we deployed a photochemical flow reactor (Potential Aerosol Mass, PAM) with submicron aerosol size and chemical composition measurements during FLAME-3, a biomass-burning study at USDA Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, MT, and CalNex, a field study investigating the nexus of air quality and climate change at a receptor site in the LA-Basin at Pasadena, CA. The reactor produces OH concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than in ambient air, achieving equivalent aging of ~2 weeks in 5 minutes of processing. The OH exposure (OHexp) was stepped every 20 min in both field studies. Results show the value of this approach as a tool for in-situ evaluation of changes in OA concentration and composition due to photochemical processing. In FLAME-3, the average OA enhancement factor was 1.42 × 0.36 of the initial POA. Reactive VOCs, such as toluene, monoterpenes, and acetaldehyde, decreased with increased OHexp; however, formic acid, acetone, and some unidentified OVOCs increased after significant exposure. Net SOA formation in the photochemical reactor increased with OHexp, typically peaking around 3 days of equivalent atmospheric photochemical age (OHexp ~3.9e11 molecules cm-3 s), then leveling off at higher exposures. Unlike other studies, no decrease in OA is observed at high exposure, likely due to lower max OHexp in this study due to very high OH reactivity. The amount of additional OA mass added from aging is positively correlated with initial POA concentration, but not with the total VOC concentration or the concentration of known SOA precursors. The mass of SOA formed often exceeded the mass of the known VOC precursors, indicating the likely importance of primary semivolatile/intermediate volatility species, and possibly of unidentified VOCs as SOA precursors in biomass burning smoke. Results from CalNex show enhancement of OA and inorganic aerosol from gas-phase precursors

  3. GNS spent fuel cask experience

    SciTech Connect

    Weh, R. )

    1993-05-01

    The Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH (GNS), which is owned by German utilities, is responsible for the management of spent fuel and nuclear waste on behalf of the German utilities operating nuclear power plants. This paper describes the spent reactor fuel and waste shipping and/or storage casks that GNS manufacturers for nuclear facilities in Germany, and worldwide. So far more than 30 different casks have been produced in quantities ranging from one to several hundred of each type. GNS participates in the German Support Program to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in developing verification procedures for dry storage casks containing spent fuel. This activity is also summarized.

  4. Blaming the aged victim: the politics of scapegoating in times of fiscal conservatism.

    PubMed

    Minkler, M

    1983-01-01

    The ideology and process of victim blaming have undergone profound changes as a consequence of recent sociopolitical developments. This paper examines a newer and more pernicious form of victim blaming, with particular attention to the ways it has been directed at the elderly in American society. Several contexts are presented within which we may view recent budget cuts affecting the elderly in order to analyze the scapegoating of the aged as a primary "cause" of the fiscal crisis. These contexts include the cyclical nature of social problems, which expand or contract in accordance with the dominant needs of the economy; the "fiscal crisis mentality"; the philosophy and tactics of decentralization; and the Reagan Administration's move toward an "ideological definition of reality." Each of these contexts is seen as fitting within the overarching context of the current economic crisis and the intensified class conflict and related outcomes which it has generated. Unlike the victim blaming of the 1960s and early 70s, which defined "the elderly" as a social problem and devised solutions (e.g. expanded Social Security benefits, Medicare and Medicaid) for dealing with that problem, the victim blaming of the 1980s is seen as defining these earlier "solutions" as part of the problem. Not only are the aged problematic, but ameliorative programs are seen as "busting the federal budget" and in need of dismantling and/or shifting to other levels of government and the private sector. Education grounded in political-economic analyses of the "aging problem," aimed in part at overcoming structurally induced divisiveness among oppressed groups, is suggested as an important deterrent to the increased polarization which the current fiscal crisis mentality has nurtured. PMID:6832872

  5. Diverse Family Types and Out-of-School Learning Time of Young School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ono, Hiromi; Sanders, James

    2010-01-01

    Sources of differentials in out-of-school learning time between children in first marriage biological parent families and children in six nontraditional family types are identified. Analyses of time diaries reveal that children in four of the six nontraditional family types spend fewer minutes learning than do children in first marriage biological…

  6. Developmental time and age-specific life tables for Lygus lineolaris (Heteroptera: Miridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developmental times and survivorship of tarnished plant bug (TPB) nymphs, Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), and longevity and reproduction of adult tarnished plant bug adults reared on green beans were studied at multiple constant temperatures. The developmental time for each life stage and th...

  7. Effects of Age and Task Load on Drivers’ Response Accuracy and Reaction Time When Responding to Traffic Lights

    PubMed Central

    Salvia, Emilie; Petit, Claire; Champely, Stéphane; Chomette, René; Di Rienzo, Franck; Collet, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Due to population aging, elderly drivers represent an increasing proportion of car drivers. Yet, how aging alters sensorimotor functions and impacts driving safety remains poorly understood. This paper aimed at assessing to which extent elderly drivers are sensitive to various task loads and how this affects the reaction time (RT) in a driving context. Old and middle-aged people completed RT tasks which reproduced cognitive demands encountered while driving. Participants had to detect and respond to traffic lights or traffic light arrows as quickly as possible, under three experimental conditions of incremental difficulty. In both groups, we hypothesized that decision-making would be impacted by the number of cues to be processed. The first test was a simple measure of RT. The second and third tests were choice RT tasks requiring the processing of 3 and 5 cues, respectively. Responses were collected within a 2 s time-window. Otherwise, the trial was considered a no-response. In both groups, the data revealed that RT, error rate (incorrect answers), and no-response rate increased along with task difficulty. However, the middle-aged group outperformed the elderly group. The RT difference between the two groups increased drastically along with task difficulty. In the third test, the rate of no-response suggested that elderly drivers needed more than 2 s to process complex information and respond accurately. Both prolonged RT and increased no-response rate, especially for difficult tasks, might attest an impairment of cognitive abilities in relation to aging. Accordingly, casual driving conditions for young drivers may be particularly complex and stressful for elderly people who should thus be informed about the effects of normal aging upon driving. PMID:27462266

  8. Effects of Timing, Sex, and Age on Site-Specific Gastrointestinal Permeability Testing in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    McOmber, Mark E.; Ou, Ching-Nan; Shulman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objectives Measurement of gastrointestinal (GI) permeability is used commonly in research and often clinically. Despite its utility, little is known about sugar excretion timeframes or the potential effects of age and gender in GI permeability testing. We sought to determine the timeframes of sugar excretion and the potential effects of age and gender on urinary recovery of the sugars. Methods Healthy adults (n=17) and children (n=15) fasted four hours after the evening meal and then ingested a solution of sucrose, lactulose, mannitol, and sucralose. Urine was collected at 30, 60, and 90 minutes after ingestion and then each time the subjects voided over the next 24 hr. Each urine void was collected separately. Results Median age for the adults was 47.5 yr. (range 21-57 yr.) and for children 10 yr. (5-17). There were no differences between children and adults in mean percent dose of sugar recovered. The time of peak urinary recovery of the sugars was generally similar between children and adults. Sucrose urinary recovery declined with age (P = 0.008; r2 = 0.19) unrelated to gender. Lactulose and sucralose urinary recovery declined with age in females (P = 0.05, r2 = 0.24 and P = 0.011, r2 = 0.41, respectively) but not in males. Conclusions Overall, sugar urinary recovery is comparable in children and adults. Specific sugar urinary recovery may change as a function of age and/or gender. These results need to be taken into account when planning and interpreting GI permeability studies. PMID:20081547

  9. Determinants of times of appearance of radium-induced osteosarcomas in humans: age at appearance and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbings, J.H.; Lucas, H.F.

    1983-01-01

    Determinants of time-until-tumor for osteosarcoma in US radium cases have been reevaluated. Classically, a minimum induction period (latency period) of about five years has been recognized, but not an expression period. Lack of long induction periods at igh doses has been ascribed to scarcity of subjects at risk. Recent experiments have suggested that induction periods are directly lengthened as doses decrease. Reanalyses of time-until-tumor data for 57 measured female osteosarcoma cases exposed to /sup 226/Ra and /or /sup 228/Ra support new interpretations: time-until-tumor for osteosarcomas is best described by age at tumor appearance, not by induction period; age at diagnosis increases as estimated initial radium intake decreases; and, there exists an expression period which can be truncated at the low end by the minimum induction period (or by age at exposure). The downturn in sarcoma incidence at very high doses is describable as the truncation of the expression period on its early side by the minimum induction period. These results depend strongly on the assumption of homogeneity of time-until-tumor processes in diial workers and in iatrogenic radium exposure cases.

  10. WHO TAKES CARE OF WHOM IN THE U.S.? EVIDENCE FROM MATRICES OF TIME TRANSFERS BY AGE AND SEX

    PubMed Central

    Dukhovnov, Denys; Zagheni, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Non-monetary intergenerational transfers of time, such as informal care time transfers, represent a largely unknown, yet pivotal component of the support system in a country. In this article, we offer estimates of time transfers, by age and sex, related to informal childcare and adult care in the United States. We developed methods to extract both intra-household and inter-household time transfers from the American Time Use Survey (2011–2013) and the recently-added Eldercare Roster. We then summarized the results in matrices of time flows by age and sex for the general U.S. population, as well as for the so-called “sandwich generation.” We observed that most time transfers flow downwards from parents to young children. Grandmothers spend more time with newborn grandchildren than grandfathers, who, on the other hand, spend more time with slightly older grandchildren. The time produced by the sandwich generation is directed towards a more diverse population spectrum, including substantial intra-generational transfers to spouses. Estimates of time produced and consumed by the population with various demographic characteristics establish a foundation for extrapolating the degree to which the demand for care services will be met in the years to come. Extrapolation based on our findings reveals a steady rise in demand, relative to supply, of informal care lasting decades into the future. This projection indicates that, to maintain current levels of care, our society will have to either rely more heavily on the market or on an increased effort of caregivers. PMID:26508807

  11. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  12. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  13. Phonological profile of Spanish-Catalan children with specific language impairment at age 4: are there any changes over time?

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Mediavilla, Eva; Serra-Raventós, Miquel

    2006-01-01

    The phonology of a group of Spanish-Catalan children with specific language impairment (SLI, n = 5), who had been analysed at age 3;10, is now analysed at age 4;09 and compared with two control groups: an age-matched control (n = 5) and a language level control (measured using the mean length of utterance by words; n = 5). The children with SLI continue to show a delay in the acquisition of segments, syllabic structures and in the use of the simplification processes, but not in word structures, compared with their age-matched controls. Children with SLI also display significant differences compared with their language level controls, but not in the same areas as observed at age 3: the differences are now in nasals and liquids at the segmental level, and in CCV, CVC and other complex structures at the syllabic level. There are also some simplification processes that seem to be more prevalent in these children than in their language level controls: absence of trill, cluster reductions and consonant deletions. The results enable us to interpret SLI as more than a delayed development and to show the differences in the profiles over time. PMID:17108698

  14. The Circadian Timing System: A Recent Addition in the Physiological Mechanisms Underlying Pathological and Aging Processes

    PubMed Central

    Arellanes-Licea, Elvira; Caldelas, Ivette; De Ita-Pérez, Dalia; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Experimental findings and clinical observations have strengthened the association between physio-pathologic aspects of several diseases, as well as aging process, with the occurrence and control of circadian rhythms. The circadian system is composed by a principal pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC) which is in coordination with a number of peripheral circadian oscillators. Many pathological entities such as metabolic syndrome, cancer and cardiovascular events are strongly connected with a disruptive condition of the circadian cycle. Inadequate circadian physiology can be elicited by genetic defects (mutations in clock genes or circadian control genes) or physiological deficiencies (desynchronization between SCN and peripheral oscillators). In this review, we focus on the most recent experimental findings regarding molecular defects in the molecular circadian clock and the altered coordination in the circadian system that are related with clinical conditions such as metabolic diseases, cancer predisposition and physiological deficiencies associated to jet-lag and shiftwork schedules. Implications in the aging process will be also reviewed. PMID:25489492

  15. The effect of age and microstructural white matter integrity on lap time variation and fast-paced walking speed.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Resnick, Susan M; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Shardell, Michelle D; Landman, Bennett A; Venkatraman, Vijay K; Gonzalez, Christopher E; Studenski, Stephanie A

    2016-09-01

    Macrostructural white matter damage (WMD) is associated with less uniform and slower walking in older adults. The effect of age and subclinical microstructural WM degeneration (a potentially earlier phase of WM ischemic damage) on walking patterns and speed is less clear. This study examines the effect of age on the associations of regional microstructural WM integrity with walking variability and speed, independent of macrostructural WMD. This study involved 493 participants (n = 51 young; n = 209 young-old; n = 233 old-old) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. All completed a 400-meter walk test and underwent a concurrent brain MRI with diffusion tensor imaging. Microstructural WM integrity was measured as fractional anisotropy (FA). Walking variability was measured as trend-adjusted variation in time over ten 40-meter laps (lap time variation, LTV). Fast-paced walking speed was assessed as mean lap time (MLT). Multiple linear regression models of FA predicting LTV and MLT were adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and WM hyperintensities. Independent of WM hyperintensities, lower FA in the body of the corpus callosum was associated with higher LTV and longer MLT only in the young-old. Lower FA in superior longitudinal, inferior fronto-occipital, and uncinate fasciculi, the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and the anterior corona radiate was associated with longer MLT only in the young-old. While macrostructural WMD is known to predict more variable and slower walking in older adults, microstructural WM disruption is independently associated with more variable and slower fast-paced walking only in the young-old. Disrupted regional WM integrity may be a subclinical contributor to abnormal walking at an earlier phase of aging. PMID:26399234

  16. Survival analysis of time to uptake of modern contraceptives among sexually active women of reproductive age in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adebowale, Ayo Stephen; Morhason-Bello, ImranOludare

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the timing of modern contraceptive uptake among married and never-married women in Nigeria. Design A retrospective cross-sectional study. Data and method We used nationally representative 2013 Demographic and Health Survey data in Nigeria. Modern contraceptive uptake time was measured as the period between first sexual intercourse and first use of a modern contraceptive. Non-users of modern contraceptives were censored on the date of the survey. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were used to determine the rate of uptake. A Cox proportional-hazards model was used to determine variables influencing the uptake at 5% significance level. Participants A total of 33 223 sexually active women of reproductive age. Outcome measure Time of uptake of a modern contraceptive after first sexual intercourse. Results The median modern contraceptive uptake time was 4 years in never-married and 14 years among ever-married women. Significant differences in modern contraceptive uptake existed in respondents’ age, location, education and wealth status. Never-married women were about three times more likely to use a modern contraceptive than ever-married women (aHR=3.24 (95% CI 2.82 to 3.65)). Women with higher education were six times more likely to use a modern contraceptive than those without education (aHR=6.18 (95% CI 5.15 to 7.42)). Conclusions The rate of modern contraceptive uptake is low, and timing of contraceptive uptake during or after first sexual intercourse differed according to marital status. Age and number of children ever born influenced modern contraceptive uptake among the never-married women, but religion and place of residence were associated with the probability of modern contraceptive uptake among ever-married women. PMID:26671948

  17. GeoSystems: Probing Climate and Linked Systems of Earth's Deep-Time Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soreghan, G. S.

    2004-12-01

    GeoSystems is a developing community-based initiative that focuses on the importance of the deep-time perspective for understanding the complexities of Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and surficial lithosphere using climate as the focus. Earth's climate operates on a continuum of temporal, spatial and parametric scales. The deep-time geologic record preserves the results of multiple large-scale experiments in climate and broader environmental change, many of which are far more extreme than those archived in instrumental, historical, or Quaternary records, but are potentially repeatable on human time scales. Indeed, aspects of our modern climate are now returning to a state last known from "deep" time. Understanding the ranges, rates, and processes responsible for these "alternative Earth" extremes in global systems behavior is critical for developing a holistic knowledge of our planet's climate system and constraining predictions of future scenarios. Processes such as extinction and evolution of species, orogenic and magmatic events, sea-level change, and the like operate over a variety of time scales and are complexly entwined with climatic trends, many of which also operate over a variety of time scales and must be viewed within the context of the deep-time perspective. Recent research on Earth's climate and linked systems behavior in deep time is shattering previous preconceptions and interpretations by reconstructing, with increasing rigor and resolution, key parameters such as atmospheric CO2, sea-surface temperatures, rates and modes of ocean circulation, ocean state (anoxia, nutrient status, biological productivity), winds, seasonality, and even diurnal terrestrial temperatures from records dating from millions of years in the past. Beyond this, these same records are simultaneously teaching us how the climate system interacted with Earth's biosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere in ways previously unimagined.

  18. Phase-field-crystal modeling of glass-forming liquids: Spanning time scales during vitrification, aging, and deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Joel; Grant, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Two essential elements required to generate a glass transition within phase-field-crystal (PFC) models are outlined based on observed freezing behaviors in various models of this class. The central dynamic features of glass formation in simple binary liquids are qualitatively reproduced across 12 orders of magnitude in time by applying a physically motivated time scaling to previous PFC simulation results. New aspects of the equilibrium phase behavior of the same binary model system are also outlined, aging behavior is explored in the moderate and deeply supercooled regimes, and aging exponents are extracted. General features of the elastic and plastic responses of amorphous and crystalline PFC solids under deformation are also compared and contrasted.

  19. “Is There Life on Dialysis?”: Time and Aging in a Clinically Sustained Existence

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Ann J.; Shim, Janet K.; Kaufman, Sharon R.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, in the United States, lives are being extended at ever-older ages through the implementation of routine medical procedures such as renal dialysis. This paper discusses the lives and experiences of a number of individuals 70 years of age and older at two dialysis units in California. It considers what kind of life it is that is being sustained and prolonged in these units, the meanings of the time gained through (and lost to) dialysis for older people, and the relationship of “normal” life outside the units to an exceptional state on the inside that some patients see as not-quite-life. Highlighting the unique dimensions of gerontological time on chronic life support, the article PMID:16249136

  20. Phase-field-crystal modeling of glass-forming liquids: spanning time scales during vitrification, aging, and deformation.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joel; Grant, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Two essential elements required to generate a glass transition within phase-field-crystal (PFC) models are outlined based on observed freezing behaviors in various models of this class. The central dynamic features of glass formation in simple binary liquids are qualitatively reproduced across 12 orders of magnitude in time by applying a physically motivated time scaling to previous PFC simulation results. New aspects of the equilibrium phase behavior of the same binary model system are also outlined, aging behavior is explored in the moderate and deeply supercooled regimes, and aging exponents are extracted. General features of the elastic and plastic responses of amorphous and crystalline PFC solids under deformation are also compared and contrasted. PMID:25019772

  1. Anthropometry and leisure activities of some Dunedin children aged 11 to 13, 1976 and 1984.

    PubMed

    Randolph, P M; Beck, D J; Thomson, M E; Spears, G F

    1987-10-14

    A study of weight, skinfold thickness and leisure-time activities of a group of Dunedin children aged 11 to 13, conducted in 1976, was repeated in 1984. Both weight and skinfold thickness were materially lower in the 1984 study, the difference being particularly marked in the girls. Both boys and girls spent significantly more time playing sport on Saturday in 1984 than in 1976 and twice as many walked or rode a bicycle to school. The time spent watching television was a little less in 1984; playing videogames is much more common among boys than girls. PMID:3452115

  2. Time reproduction performance is associated with age and working memory in high-functioning youth with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Laurie A; Shih, Vivian H; Colich, Natalie L; Sugar, Catherine A; Bearden, Carrie E; Dapretto, Mirella

    2015-02-01

    Impaired temporal processing has historically been viewed as a hallmark feature of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Recent evidence suggests temporal processing deficits may also be characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, little is known about the factors that impact temporal processing in children with ASD. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of co-morbid attention problems, working memory (WM), age, and their interactions, on time reproduction in youth with and without ASD. Twenty-seven high-functioning individuals with ASD and 25 demographically comparable typically developing individuals (ages 9-17; 85% male) were assessed on measures of time reproduction, auditory WM, and inattention/hyperactivity. The time reproduction task required depression of a computer key to mimic interval durations of 4, 8, 12, 16, or 20 sec. Mixed effects regression analyses were used to model accuracy and variability of time reproduction as functions of diagnostic group, interval duration, age, WM, and inattention/hyperactivity. A significant group by age interaction was detected for accuracy, with the deficit in the ASD group being greater in younger children. There was a significant group by WM interaction for consistency, with the effects of poor WM on performance consistency being more pronounced in youth with ASD. All participants tended to underestimate longer interval durations and to be less consistent for shorter interval durations; these effects appeared more pronounced in those who were younger or who had poorer WM performance. Inattention/hyperactivity symptoms in the ASD group were not related to either accuracy or consistency. This study highlights the potential value of temporal processing as an intermediate trait of relevance to multiple neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25078724

  3. The evolutionary dynamics of timing of maternal immunity: evaluating the role of age-specific mortality.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, C J E; Jones, J H

    2015-02-01

    If a female survives an infection, she can transfer antibodies against that particular pathogen to any future offspring she produces. The resulting protection of offspring for a period after their birth is termed maternal immunity. Because infection in newborns is associated with high mortality, the duration of this protection is expected to be under strong selection. Evolutionary modelling structured around a trade-off between fertility and duration of maternal immunity has indicated selection for longer duration of maternal immunity for hosts with longer lifespans. Here, we use a new modelling framework to extend this analysis to consider characteristics of pathogens (and hosts) in further detail. Importantly, given the challenges in characterizing trade-offs linked to immune function empirically, our model makes no assumptions about costs of longer lasting maternal immunity. Rather, a key component of this analysis is variation in mortality over age. We found that the optimal duration of maternal immunity is shaped by the shifting balance of the burden of infection between young and old individuals. As age of infection depends on characteristics of both the host and the pathogen, both affect the evolution of duration of maternal immunity. Our analysis provides additional support for selection for longer duration of maternal immunity in long-lived hosts, even in the absence of explicit costs linked to duration of maternal immunity. Further, the scope of our results provides explanations for exceptions to the general correlation between duration of maternal immunity and lifespan, as we found that both pathogen characteristics and trans-generational effects can lead to important shifts in fitness linked to maternal immunity. Finally, our analysis points to new directions for quantifying the trade-offs that drive the development of the immune system. PMID:25611057

  4. The associations of objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time with cognitive functions in school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Syväoja, Heidi J; Tammelin, Tuija H; Ahonen, Timo; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kantomaa, Marko T

    2014-01-01

    Low levels of physical activity among children have raised concerns over the effects of a physically inactive lifestyle, not only on physical health but also on cognitive prerequisites of learning. This study examined how objectively measured and self-reported physical activity and sedentary behavior are associated with cognitive functions in school-aged children. The study population consisted of 224 children from five schools in the Jyväskylä school district in Finland (mean age 12.2 years; 56% girls), who participated in the study in the spring of 2011. Physical activity and sedentary time were measured objectively for seven consecutive days using the ActiGraph GT1M/GT3X accelerometer. Self-reported moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and screen time were evaluated with the questions used in the "WHO Health Behavior in School-aged Children" study. Cognitive functions including visual memory, executive functions and attention were evaluated with a computerized Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery by using five different tests. Structural equation modeling was applied to examine how objectively measured and self-reported MVPA and sedentary behavior were associated with cognitive functions. High levels of objectively measured MVPA were associated with good performance in the reaction time test. High levels of objectively measured sedentary time were associated with good performance in the sustained attention test. Objectively measured MVPA and sedentary time were not associated with other measures of cognitive functions. High amount of self-reported computer/video game play was associated with weaker performance in working memory test, whereas high amount of computer use was associated with weaker performance in test measuring shifting and flexibility of attention. Self-reported physical activity and total screen time were not associated with any measures of cognitive functions. The results of the present study propose that physical

  5. The Associations of Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Time with Cognitive Functions in School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Syväoja, Heidi J.; Tammelin, Tuija H.; Ahonen, Timo; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kantomaa, Marko T.

    2014-01-01

    Low levels of physical activity among children have raised concerns over the effects of a physically inactive lifestyle, not only on physical health but also on cognitive prerequisites of learning. This study examined how objectively measured and self-reported physical activity and sedentary behavior are associated with cognitive functions in school-aged children. The study population consisted of 224 children from five schools in the Jyväskylä school district in Finland (mean age 12.2 years; 56% girls), who participated in the study in the spring of 2011. Physical activity and sedentary time were measured objectively for seven consecutive days using the ActiGraph GT1M/GT3X accelerometer. Self-reported moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and screen time were evaluated with the questions used in the “WHO Health Behavior in School-aged Children” study. Cognitive functions including visual memory, executive functions and attention were evaluated with a computerized Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery by using five different tests. Structural equation modeling was applied to examine how objectively measured and self-reported MVPA and sedentary behavior were associated with cognitive functions. High levels of objectively measured MVPA were associated with good performance in the reaction time test. High levels of objectively measured sedentary time were associated with good performance in the sustained attention test. Objectively measured MVPA and sedentary time were not associated with other measures of cognitive functions. High amount of self-reported computer/video game play was associated with weaker performance in working memory test, whereas high amount of computer use was associated with weaker performance in test measuring shifting and flexibility of attention. Self-reported physical activity and total screen time were not associated with any measures of cognitive functions. The results of the present study propose that physical

  6. Time Trends in Self-Rated Health and Disability in Older Spanish People: Differences by Gender and Age

    PubMed Central

    GIRON, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Background: To analyse time trends in self-rated health in older people by gender and age and examine disability in the time trends of self-rated health. Methods: The data used come from the Spanish National Health Surveys conducted in 2001, 2003, 2006 and 2011–12. Samples of adults aged 16 yr and older were selected. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association between age, gender, socio-economic status, marital status, disability and self-rated health across period study. Results: Women exhibited lower (higher) prevalence of good self-rated health (disability) compared to men. The multivariate analysis for time trends found that good self-rated health increased from 2001 to 2012. Overall, variables associated with a lower likelihood of good self-rated health were: being married or living with a partner, lower educational level, and disability. Conclusion: Trends of good self-rated health differ by gender according to socio-demographic factors and the prevalence of disability. PMID:27141490

  7. Time Outdoors and Physical Activity as Predictors of Incident Myopia in Childhood: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Northstone, Kate; McMahon, George; Ness, Andy R.; Deere, Kevin; Mattocks, Calum; Pourcain, Beate St; Williams, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Time spent in “sports/outdoor activity” has shown a negative association with incident myopia during childhood. We investigated the association of incident myopia with time spent outdoors and physical activity separately. Methods. Participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) were assessed by noncycloplegic autorefraction at ages 7, 10, 11, 12, and 15 years, and classified as myopic (≤−1 diopters) or as emmetropic/hyperopic (≥−0.25 diopters) at each visit (N = 4,837–7,747). Physical activity at age 11 years was measured objectively using an accelerometer, worn for 1 week. Time spent outdoors was assessed via a parental questionnaire administered when children were aged 8–9 years. Variables associated with incident myopia were examined using Cox regression. Results. In analyses using all available data, both time spent outdoors and physical activity were associated with incident myopia, with time outdoors having the larger effect. The results were similar for analyses restricted to children classified as either nonmyopic or emmetropic/hyperopic at age 11 years. Thus, for children nonmyopic at age 11, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval, CI) for incident myopia was 0.66 (0.47–0.93) for a high versus low amount of time spent outdoors, and 0.87 (0.76–0.99) per unit standard deviation above average increase in moderate/vigorous physical activity. Conclusion. Time spent outdoors was predictive of incident myopia independently of physical activity level. The greater association observed for time outdoors suggests that the previously reported link between “sports/outdoor activity” and incident myopia is due mainly to its capture of information relating to time outdoors rather than physical activity. PMID:22491403

  8. Time is no healer: increasing restoration age does not lead to improved benthic invertebrate communities in restored river reaches.

    PubMed

    Leps, Moritz; Sundermann, Andrea; Tonkin, Jonathan D; Lorenz, Armin W; Haase, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Evidence for successful restoration of riverine communities is scarce, particularly for benthic invertebrates. Among the multitude of reasons discussed so far for the lack of observed effects is too short of a time span between implementation and monitoring. Yet, studies that explicitly focus on the importance of restoration age are rare. We present a comprehensive study based on 44 river restoration projects in Germany, focusing on standardized benthic invertebrate sampling. A broad gradient ranging from 1 to 25years in restoration age was available. In contrast to clear improvements in habitat heterogeneity, benthic community responses to restoration were inconsistent when compared to control sections. Taxon richness increased in response to restoration, but abundance, diversity and various assessment metrics did not respond clearly. Restoration age was a poor predictor of community composition and community change, as no significant linear responses could be detected using 34 metrics. Moreover, only 5 out of 34 tested metrics showed non-linear shifts at restoration ages of 2 to 3years. This might be interpreted as an indication of a post-restoration disturbance followed by a re-establishment of pre-restoration conditions. BIO-ENV analysis and fourth-corner modeling underlined the low importance of restoration age, but revealed high importance of catchment-scale characteristics (e.g., ecoregion, catchment size and land use) in controlling community composition and community change. Overall, a lack of time for community development did not appear to be the ultimate reason for impaired benthic invertebrate communities. Instead, catchment-scale characteristics override the effectiveness of restoration. To enhance the ecological success of future river restoration projects, we recommend improving water quality conditions and catchment-scale processes (e.g., connectivity and hydrodynamics) in addition to restoring local habitat structure. PMID:27046138

  9. Joint Analyses of Longitudinal and Time-to-Event Data in Research on Aging: Implications for Predicting Health and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Arbeev, Konstantin G.; Akushevich, Igor; Kulminski, Alexander M.; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V.; Yashin, Anatoliy I.

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal data on aging, health, and longevity provide a wealth of information to investigate different aspects of the processes of aging and development of diseases leading to death. Statistical methods aimed at analyses of time-to-event data jointly with longitudinal measurements became known as the “joint models” (JM). An important point to consider in analyses of such data in the context of studies on aging, health, and longevity is how to incorporate knowledge and theories about mechanisms and regularities of aging-related changes that accumulate in the research field into respective analytic approaches. In the absence of specific observations of longitudinal dynamics of relevant biomarkers manifesting such mechanisms and regularities, traditional approaches have a rather limited utility to estimate respective parameters that can be meaningfully interpreted from the biological point of view. A conceptual analytic framework for these purposes, the stochastic process model of aging (SPM), has been recently developed in the biodemographic literature. It incorporates available knowledge about mechanisms of aging-related changes, which may be hidden in the individual longitudinal trajectories of physiological variables and this allows for analyzing their indirect impact on risks of diseases and death. Despite, essentially, serving similar purposes, JM and SPM developed in parallel in different disciplines with very limited cross-referencing. Although there were several publications separately reviewing these two approaches, there were no publications presenting both these approaches in some detail. Here, we overview both approaches jointly and provide some new modifications of SPM. We discuss the use of stochastic processes to capture biological variation and heterogeneity in longitudinal patterns and important and promising (but still largely underused) applications of JM and SPM to predictions of individual and population mortality and health

  10. Analysis and assessment of Madeira wine ageing over an extended time period through GC-MS and chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana C; Reis, Marco S; Saraiva, Pedro M; Marques, José C

    2010-02-15

    Wine is one of the world's higher value agricultural products. The present work is centred on Madeira wine, a fine and prestigious example among Portuguese liqueur wines,with the main goal to deepen our understanding of relevant phenomena going on during the winemaking process, in particular during ageing of "Malmsey" Madeira wine. In this paper we present the results obtained from the chemical characterization of how its aroma composition evolves during ageing, and the development of a robust framework for analyzing the identity of aged Madeira wines. An extended ageing period was considered, covering a time frame of twenty years, from which several samples were analyzed in terms of their aromatic composition. The multivariate structure of this chemical information was then processed through multivariate statistical feature extraction techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), in order to identify the relevant patterns corresponding to trends associated with wine ageing. Classification methodologies for age prediction were developed, using data from the lower dimensional sub-spaces obtained after projecting the original data to the latent variable spaces provided by PCA or PLS-DA. Finally, the performance for each classification methodology developed was evaluated according to their error rates using cross-validation methodologies (Leave-One-Out and k-fold Monte Carlo). Results obtained so far show that quite interesting classification performances can indeed be achieved, despite the natural variability present in wine products. These results also provide solid bases which can be used to build up available frameworks which assist quality monitoring and identity assurance tasks. PMID:20103138

  11. Force-Time Parameters and Physical Growth of Boys Ages 6 to 12 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeple, J.; Massey, B.

    1976-01-01

    Results of research on the influence of body size and composition on peak force and maximal rate of static strength exertion as measured from force-time curves indicates that rate of force production is somewhat independent of peak force, yet influenced by body size and composition, as is peak force. (MB)

  12. Moult Strategies Affect Age Differences in Autumn Migration Timing in East Mediterranean Migratory Passerines

    PubMed Central

    Kiat, Yosef; Izhaki, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Adult passerines renew their flight feathers at least once every year. This complete moult occurs either in the breeding areas, just after breeding (summer moult), or, in some long-distance migratory species, at the non-breeding areas, after arrival to the southern wintering area at the end of autumn migration (winter moult). The aim of this study was to relate moult strategies with the DMD, the difference in median migration date, through Israel, between juveniles and adults. Our data on autumn migration timing in juveniles and adults was based on ringing data of 49,125 individuals belonging to 23 passerine species that breed in Europe and Western Asia and migrate through Israel. We found that DMD was associated with moult timing. In all species that perform a winter moult, adults preceded juveniles during autumn. Among migrants who perform a summer moult, we found evidence of both migration timing patterns: juveniles preceding adults or adults preceding juveniles. In addition, in summer moulters, we found a significant, positive correlation between mean breeding latitude and DMD. Although previous studies described that moult duration and extent can be affected by migration, we suggest that moult strategies affect both migration timing and migration strategy. These two moult strategies (summer or winter moult) also represent two unique migration strategies. Our findings highlight the evolutionary interplay between moult and migration strategies. PMID:26797292

  13. Moult Strategies Affect Age Differences in Autumn Migration Timing in East Mediterranean Migratory Passerines.

    PubMed

    Kiat, Yosef; Izhaki, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Adult passerines renew their flight feathers at least once every year. This complete moult occurs either in the breeding areas, just after breeding (summer moult), or, in some long-distance migratory species, at the non-breeding areas, after arrival to the southern wintering area at the end of autumn migration (winter moult). The aim of this study was to relate moult strategies with the DMD, the difference in median migration date, through Israel, between juveniles and adults. Our data on autumn migration timing in juveniles and adults was based on ringing data of 49,125 individuals belonging to 23 passerine species that breed in Europe and Western Asia and migrate through Israel. We found that DMD was associated with moult timing. In all species that perform a winter moult, adults preceded juveniles during autumn. Among migrants who perform a summer moult, we found evidence of both migration timing patterns: juveniles preceding adults or adults preceding juveniles. In addition, in summer moulters, we found a significant, positive correlation between mean breeding latitude and DMD. Although previous studies described that moult duration and extent can be affected by migration, we suggest that moult strategies affect both migration timing and migration strategy. These two moult strategies (summer or winter moult) also represent two unique migration strategies. Our findings highlight the evolutionary interplay between moult and migration strategies. PMID:26797292

  14. Restructuring of a Peat in Interaction with Multivalent Cations: Effect of Cation Type and Aging Time

    PubMed Central

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al3+, Ca2+ or Na+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h) and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for Ca

  15. The Cosmological Dark Age and High-throughput Real-time Computing (LEDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Kocz, J.; Barsdell, B. R.; Clark, M. A.; LEDA Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    One of the great challenges of cosmology today is tracing the thermal history of the Universe from Global Recombination to Reionization, a few hundred thousand to one billion years after the Big Bang. The Large Aperture Experiment to Detect the Dark Ages (LEDA) now under construction targets the period about 100 million years after the Big Bang, for which there is little data on which to base models of even fundamental processes during this 'cornerstone' era, when the first Dark Matter halos, stars, and black holes formed. LEDA is unique among radio instruments in its deployment of a 512-input 100 MHz correlator. Running at O(100) TFlop/s and O(200) Gb/s, it draws about 11 kW and fits inside a single rack. Processing relies on off-the-shelf FPGA and GPU hardware joined by a 10/40gE fabric. The modular and highly parallel design can readily scale to O(100) PFlop/s, supporting larger array concepts.

  16. Cesarean section, gestational age, and transient tachypnea of the newborn: timing is the key.

    PubMed

    Riskin, Arieh; Abend-Weinger, Marta; Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit; Kugelman, Amir; Bader, David

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors and to characterize infants with transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN). A total of 67 newborns with TTN, born at gestational age (GA)>or=35 weeks, were studied. Newborns delivered before and after each study case served as controls. Mean GA was lower and cesarean section (CS) rate was higher in the TTN group (38.2+/-2.3 versus 39.5+/-1.4 weeks, p<0.001; 50.7% versus 22.4%, p<0.001). GA<38 weeks was found to be associated with increased risk for TTN in infants delivered by elective CS. TTN was associated with significant morbidities and longer hospital stay (7.2+/-5.6 versus 2.9+/-1.4 days; p<0.001). Delivery by CS and younger GA are risk factors for TTN. Although TTN is a self-limited disease, it is associated with significant morbidities. Scheduling elective CS at GA of not less than 38 weeks may decrease the frequency of TTN. PMID:16215925

  17. Linseed oil presents different patterns of oxidation in real-time and accelerated aging assays.

    PubMed

    Douny, Caroline; Razanakolona, Rina; Ribonnet, Laurence; Milet, Jérôme; Baeten, Vincent; Rogez, Hervé; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed at verifying if the hypothesis that one day at 60°C is equivalent to one month at 20°C could be confirmed during linseed oil aging for 6months at 20°C and 6days at 60°C using the "Schaal oven stability test". Tests were conducted with linseed oil supplemented or not with myricetin or butyl-hydroxytoluene as antioxidants. Oxidation was evaluated with the peroxide and p-anisidine values, as well as the content in conjugated dienes and aldehydes. All four indicators of oxidation showed very different kinetic behaviors at 20 and 60°C. The hypothesis is thus not verified for linseed oil, supplemented or not with antioxidant. In the control oil, the conjugated dienes and the peroxide value observed were respectively of 41.8±0.8 Absorbance Unit (AU)/g oil and 254.3±5.8meq.O2/kg oil after 6months at 20°C. These values were of 18.2±1.3AU/g oil and 65.2±20.3meq.O2/kg after 6days at 60°C. PMID:27132830

  18. Groundwater age, life expectancy and transit time distributions in advective dispersive systems; 2. Reservoir theory for sub-drainage basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaton, F.; Perrochet, P.

    2006-09-01

    Groundwater age and life expectancy probability density functions (pdf) have been defined, and solved in a general three-dimensional context by means of forward and backward advection-dispersion equations [Cornaton F, Perrochet P. Groundwater age, life expectancy and transit time distributions in advective-dispersive systems; 1. Generalized reservoir theory. Adv Water Res (xxxx)]. The discharge and recharge zones transit time pdfs were then derived by applying the reservoir theory (RT) to the global system, thus considering as ensemble the union of all inlet boundaries on one hand, and the union of all outlet boundaries on the other hand. The main advantages in using the RT to calculate the transit time pdf is that the outlet boundary geometry does not represent a computational limiting factor (e.g. outlets of small sizes), since the methodology is based on the integration over the entire domain of each age, or life expectancy, occurrence. In the present paper, we extend the applicability of the RT to sub-drainage basins of groundwater reservoirs by treating the reservoir flow systems as compartments which transfer the water fluxes to a particular discharge zone, and inside which mixing and dispersion processes can take place. Drainage basins are defined by the field of probability of exit at outlet. In this way, we make the RT applicable to each sub-drainage system of an aquifer of arbitrary complexity and configuration. The case of the well-head protection problem is taken as illustrative example, and sensitivity analysis of the effect of pore velocity variations on the simulated ages is carried out.

  19. Apparent inferiority of first-time breeders in the kittiwake: The role of heterogeneity among age classes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cam, E.; Monnat, J.-Y.

    2000-01-01

    1. Many studies have provided evidence that first-time breeders have a lower survival, a lower probability of success, or of breeding, in the following year. Hypotheses based on reproductive costs have often been proposed to explain this. However, because of the intrinsic relationship between age and experience, the apparent inferiority of first-time breeders at the population level may result from selection, and experience may not influence performance within each individual. In this paper we address the question of phenotypic correlations between fitness components. This addresses differences in individual quality, a prerequisite for a selection process to occur. We also test the hypothesis of an influence of experience on these components while taking age and reproductive success into account: two factors likely to play a key role in a selection process. 2. Using data from a long-term study on the kittiwake, we found that first-time breeders have a lower probability of success, a lower survival and a lower probability of breeding in the next year than experienced breeders. However, neither experienced nor inexperienced breeders have a lower survival or a lower probability of breeding in the following year than birds that skipped a breeding opportunity. This suggests heterogeneity in quality among individuals. 3. Failed birds have a lower survival and a lower probability of breeding in the following year regardless of experience. This can be interpreted in the light of the selection hypothesis. The inferiority of inexperienced breeders may be linked to a higher proportion of lower-quality individuals in younger age classes. When age and breeding success are controlled for, there is no evidence of an influence of experience on survival or future breeding probability. 4. Using data from individuals whose reproductive life lasted the same number of years, we investigated the influence of experience on reproductive performance within individuals. There is no strong

  20. The HIV Care Cascade Measured Over Time and by Age, Sex, and Race in a Large National Integrated Care System.

    PubMed

    Horberg, Michael Alan; Hurley, Leo Bartemeier; Klein, Daniel Benjamin; Towner, William James; Kadlecik, Peter; Antoniskis, Diana; Mogyoros, Miguel; Brachman, Philip Sigmund; Remmers, Carol Louise; Gambatese, Rebecca Claire; Blank, Jackie; Ellis, Courtney Georgiana; Silverberg, Michael Jonah

    2015-11-01

    HIV care cascades can evaluate programmatic success over time. However, methodologies for estimating cascade stages vary, and few have evaluated differences by demographic subgroups. We examined cascade performance over time and by age, sex, and race/ethnicity in Kaiser Permanente, providing HIV care in eight US states and Washington, DC. We created cascades for HIV+ members' age ≥13 for 2010-2012. We measured "linkage" (a visit/CD4 within 90 days of being diagnosed for new patients; ≥1 medical visit/year if established); "retention" (≥2 medical visits ≥60 days apart); filled ART (filled ≥3 months of combination ART); and viral suppression (HIV RNA <200 copies/mL last measured in year). The cascades were stratified by calendar year, sex, age, and race/ethnicity. We found men had statistically (p < 0.05) higher percent linkage, filled ART, and viral suppression for 2010 and 2011 but not for 2012. Women had significantly greater retention for all years. Annually, older age was associated (p < 0.05) with retention, filled ART, and viral suppression but not linkage. Latinos had greater (p < 0.05) retention than whites or blacks in all years, with similar retention comparing blacks and whites. Filled ART and viral suppression was increased (p < 0.05) for whites compared with all racial/ethnic groups in all years. Cascade methodology requiring success at upstream stages before measuring success at later stages (i.e., "dependent" methodology) underreported performance by up to 20% compared with evaluating each stage separately ("independent"). Thus, care results improved over time, but significant differences exist by patient demographics. Specifically, retention efforts should be targeted toward younger patients and blacks; women, blacks, and Latinos require greater ART prescribing. PMID:26505968

  1. Timing of Complementary Food Introduction and Age at Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes: the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary STUDY (SNAS)

    PubMed Central

    Crume, Tessa L.; Crandell, Jamie; Norris, Jill M.; Dabelea, Dana; Fangman, Mary T.; Pettitt, David J.; Dolan, Lawrence; Rodriguez, Beatriz L.; O'Connor, Rebecca; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The association between timing of complementary food introduction and age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was investigated among 1077 children in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study. Age at diagnosis was 5-month earlier for children introduced to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in the first 12 months of life compared to those who were not (9.0 ± 0.2 vs. 9.5 ± 0.1; p=0.02), independent of HLA-risk status. Analyses stratified by HLA-risk status found that children with a high risk HLA genotype had an earlier age at diagnosis if they were introduced to fruit juice in the first year of life (mean age of diagnosis=9.3 ± 0.1, 9.1 ± 0.1 and 9.6 ± 0.2 for introduction at ≤ 6 months, between 7 and 11 months, and ≤12 months, respectively; p=0.04). Introduction of SSB in the first year of life may accelerate onset of type 1 diabetes independent of HLA-risk status. PMID:25117987

  2. Timing of complementary food introduction and age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes: the SEARCH nutrition ancillary study (SNAS).

    PubMed

    Crume, T L; Crandell, J; Norris, J M; Dabelea, D; Fangman, M T; Pettitt, D J; Dolan, L; Rodriguez, B L; O'Connor, R; Mayer-Davis, E J

    2014-11-01

    The association between timing of complementary food introduction and age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was investigated among 1077 children in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study. Age at diagnosis was 5 months earlier for children introduced to sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in the first 12 months of life compared with those who were not (9.0±0.2 vs 9.5±0.1; P=0.02) independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) risk status. Analyses stratified by HLA risk status found that children with a high-risk HLA genotype had an earlier age at diagnosis if they were introduced to fruit juice in the first year of life (mean age at diagnosis=9.3±0.1, 9.1±0.1 and 9.6±0.2 for introduction at ⩽6 months, between 7 and 11 months and ⩾12 months, respectively; P=0.04). Introduction of SSB in the first year of life may accelerate the onset of type 1 diabetes independent of HLA risk status. PMID:25117987

  3. 40Ar/39Ar impact ages and time-temperature argon diffusion history of the Bunburra Rockhole anomalous basaltic achondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Benedix, Gretchen; Eroglu, Ela.; Bland, Phil. A.; Bouvier, Audrey.

    2014-09-01

    The Bunburra Rockhole meteorite is a brecciated anomalous basaltic achondrite containing coarse-, medium- and fine-grained lithologies. Petrographic observations constrain the limited shock pressure to between ca. 10 GPa and 20 GPa. In this study, we carried out nine 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on distinct single-grain fragments extracted from the coarse and fine lithologies. We obtained six plateau ages and three mini-plateau ages. These ages fall into two internally concordant populations with mean ages of 3640 ± 21 Ma (n = 7; P = 0.53) and 3544 ± 26 Ma (n = 2; P = 0.54), respectively. Based on these results, additional 40Ar/39Ar data of fusion crust fragments, argon diffusion modelling, and petrographic observations, we conclude that the principal components of the Bunburra Rockhole basaltic achondrite are from a melt rock formed at ∼3.64 Ga by a medium to large impact event. The data imply that this impact generated high enough energy to completely melt the basaltic target rock and reset the Ar systematics, but only partially reset the Pb-Pb age. We also conclude that a complete 40Ar∗ resetting of pyroxene and plagioclase at this time could not have been achieved at solid-state conditions. Comparison with a terrestrial analog (Lonar crater) shows that the time-temperature conditions required to melt basaltic target rocks upon impact are relatively easy to achieve. Ar data also suggest that a second medium-size impact event occurred on a neighbouring part of the same target rock at ∼3.54 Ga. Concordant low-temperature step ages of the nine aliquots suggest that, at ∼3.42 Ga, a third smaller impact excavated parts of the ∼3.64 Ga and ∼3.54 Ga melt rocks and brought the fragments together. The lack of significant impact activity after 3.5 Ga, as recorded by the Bunburra Rockhole suggests that (1) either the meteorite was ejected in a small secondary parent body where it resided untouched by large impacts, or (2) it was covered by a porous heat

  4. Oviposition time, flock age, and egg position in clutch in relation to brown eggshell color in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Samiullah, S; Roberts, J; Chousalkar, K

    2016-09-01

    In Australia and other parts of the world, table eggs with uniform brown eggshell color are well regarded by consumers. Brown eggshell color has been positively correlated with certain egg characteristics such as shell strength and egg specific gravity, along with specific antibacterial functions. In the current study, the effect of hen oviposition time, flock age, and egg position in-clutch on the intensity of brown eggshell color was studied in commercial laying hens. The collected eggs were processed to measure egg weight, shell reflectivity, shell color (L*a*b*), quantification of protoporphyrin IX (PP IX), and shell thickness. Hen oviposition time had a statistically significant effect (P < 0.05) on egg weight, L*a*b*, amount of PP IX, and shell thickness. L* increased from 59.72 in the first half hour after lights on to 61.67 6 hours later, and PP IX per gram of eggshell decreased from 1.32×10(-7) mM to 1.26×10(-7) mM. Flock age had a significant effect on egg weight, L*a*b*, shell reflectivity, PP IX, and shell thickness. The mean egg weight increased from 55.4 g at 25 wk of flock age to 63.3 g at 75 wk of flock age. PP IX per gram of eggshell was 1.45×10(-7) mM at 25 wk and declined to 1.31×10(-7) mM at 75 wk of flock age. Individual hen clutch length was highly variable, ranging from 22 to 123 eggs in a single clutch. Egg position in a clutch had a significant effect on all egg quality variables measured; however, the R(2) values for each variable measured were low. The eggshell color declined to a greater extent with increasing position in a clutch for long clutches compared with short and medium clutches. In conclusion, hen oviposition time affected brown eggshell color with darker brown eggs laid early in the d and lighter colored brown eggs laid later in the morning. The intensity of brown color decreased with flock age, and egg position in-clutch had relatively little effect on brown eggshell color. PMID:27333974

  5. [What about the mental time travel and age-related effects?].

    PubMed

    Coste, Cécile; Navarro, Béatrice; Abram, Maria; Duval, Céline; Picard, Laurence; Piolino, Pascale

    2012-03-01

    According to Tulving, episodic memory allows humans to travel mentally through subjective time into either the past or the future, this ability being at the origin of adaptation, organization and planning of future behavior. The main aim of this review is to present a state of art of episodic mental time travel and a lifespan perspective from children to elderly people. We examine the numerous similarities between remembering the past and envisioning the future which have been highlighted in cognitive, neuroimaging, and neuropsychological studies. We also present studies that have given evidence that remembering the past and imagining the future differ somewhat. We focus on demonstrating that hippocampal dysfunction is associated with disturbances in the recall of episodic autobiographical details in past memories, but also in the imagining of episodic detailed future events. More specifically, we discuss that the future seems to involve higher semantic processes mediated by the inferior frontal and lateral temporal gyri. We propose that the study of mental travel in personal time could be undertaken in line with the distinction between the memory of (episodic) experiences and (semantic) personal knowledge of one's life, which constitutes a major part of the self and constraints what we have been, what we are now, and what we might yet become. PMID:22414404

  6. The Effects of Dinner-to-Bed Time and Post-Dinner Walk on Gastric Cancer Across Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Le; Zhang, Xi; Lu, Jun; Dai, Jia-Xi; Lin, Ren-Qin; Tian, Fang-Xi; Liang, Bing; Guo, Yi-Nan; Luo, Hui-Yu; Li, Ni; Fang, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Ruo-Hua; Huang, Chang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer (GC) remains a major killer throughout the world. Despite the dramatic decrease in GC over the last century, its etiology has not yet been well characterized. This study investigated the possible independent and combined effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk on the risk for GC across different age groups. A population-based, case–control study was conducted in southeast China, including 452 patients with GC and 465 age-, race-, and gender-matched controls. A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect information on demographic characteristics, dinner-to-bed time, post-dinner walk, and other behavioral factors. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate the effects of the dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk as well as their joint effect on the risk for GC across different age groups. Individuals with dinner-to-bed time <3 hours were more prone to have GC (P < 0.001), and the shorter the dinner-to-bed time was, the higher was the risk for GC (Ptrend < 0.001). Post-dinner nonwalk was associated with a 2.9-fold increased risk for GC compared with post-dinner walk (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.942, 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs] = 2.072–4.179). The interaction effect of dinner-to-bed time and post-dinner walk on GC risk was detected (AOR = 1.862, 95% CIs = 1.584–3.885, synergy index [SI] = 2.654, 95% CIs = 2.27–3.912). Participants with dinner-to-bed time <3 hours who did not walk after dinner were 7.4 times likely to suffer from GC (AOR = 7.401, 95% CIs = 4.523–13.16) than those with dinner-to-bed time ≥4 hours who took such walk. The risk of GC due to dinner-to-bed time <3 hours, post-dinner nonwalk and their interaction was positively correlated with age. The strongest risk was observed among people ≥70 years old, but the effects were not significant for people ≤55 years old. Dinner-to-bed time <3 hours and post-dinner nonwalk are

  7. Digital Games for Young Children Ages Three to Six: From Research to Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Debra A.; Fisk, Maria Chesley; Biely, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Young children ages 3 to 6 play a wide range of digital games, which are now available on large screens, handheld screens, electronic learning systems, and electronic toys, and their time spent with games is growing. This article examines effects of digital games and how they could be designed to best serve children's needs. A small body of…

  8. Preschool and school age activities: comparison of urban and suburban populations.

    PubMed

    Damore, Dorothy T

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare urban and suburban preschool and school age activities. A prospective survey using a convenience sample was conducted at one urban and one suburban primary care pediatric office. Questionnaires were completed for 66 urban preschool children, 70 suburban preschool children, 57 urban school age children and 61 suburban school age children during the school year. Also, questionniaires were completed for 63 suburban school age children during the summer. The suburban preschool children spent more time outdoors, were read to more frequently, visited the library more frequently and more often attended summer camp. The suburban school age children spent more time outdoors, more frequently participated in a community sport league and more often attended summer camp. The urban school age children watched more television or videos. During the summer, suburban school age children spent more time outdoors, while during the school year, suburban school age children used the library more frequently. Important differences exist between the activities of urban and suburban children in two practices in the New York metropolitan area. Pediatricians caring for urban children may have an important opportunity to promote participation in sports and educational activities. PMID:12027270

  9. Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of 1990–2003 Incidence Time Trends of Childhood Diabetes in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Graziella; Maule, Milena; Merletti, Franco; Novelli, Giulia; Falorni, Alberto; Iannilli, Antonio; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Altobelli, Emma; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe; Piffer, Silvano; Pozzilli, Paolo; Iafusco, Dario; Songini, Marco; Roncarolo, Federico; Toni, Sonia; Carle, Flavia; Cherubini, Valentino

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate age-period-cohort effects on the temporal trend of type 1 diabetes in children age 0–14 years in Italian registries. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This report is based on 5,180 incident cases in the period 1990–2003 from the Registry for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Italy (RIDI). Multilevel (random intercept) Poisson regression models were used to model the effects of sex, age, calendar time, and birth cohorts on temporal trends, taking into account the registry-level variance component. RESULTS The incidence rate was 12.26 per 100,000 person-years and significantly higher in boys (13.13 [95% CI 12.66–13.62]) than in girls (11.35 [10.90–11.82]). Large geographical variations in incidence within Italy were evident; incidence was highest in Sardinia, intermediate in Central-Southern Italy, and high in Northern Italy, particularly in the Trento Province, where the incidence rate was 18.67 per 100,000 person-years. An increasing temporal trend was evident (2.94% per year [95% CI 2.22–3.67]). With respect to the calendar period 1990–1992, the incidence rates increased linearly by 15, 27, 35, and 40% in the following time periods (P for trend < 0.001). With respect to the 1987–1993 birth cohort, the incidence rate ratio increased approximately linearly from 0.63 (95% CI 0.54–0.73) in the 1975–1981 cohort to 1.38 (1.06–1.80) in the 1999–2003 cohort. The best model, however, included sex, age, and a linear time trend (drift). CONCLUSIONS Large geographical variations and an increasing temporal trend in diabetes incidence are evident among type 1 diabetic children in Italy. Age-period-cohort analysis shows that the variation over time has a linear component that cannot be ascribed to either the calendar period or the birth cohort. PMID:20566665

  10. Atmospheric residence times from transpiration and evaporation to precipitation: An age-weighted regional evaporation tagging approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jianhui; Knoche, Hans Richard; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-06-01

    The atmospheric water residence time is a fundamental descriptor that provides information on the timescales of evaporation and precipitation. In this study, a regional climate model-based evaporation tagging algorithm is extended with an age tracer approach to calculate moisture residence times, defined as time between the original evaporation and the returning of water masses to the land surface as precipitation. Our case study addresses how long this time is for the transpired and for the direct evaporated moisture. Our study region is the Poyang Lake region in Southeast China, the largest freshwater lake in the country. We perform simulations covering the period from October 2004 to December 2005. In 2005, 11% of direct evaporated water (10% of transpired water) precipitates locally. Direct evaporated water accounts for 64% and transpired water for 36% of the total tagged moisture with a mean age of around 36 h for both. Considering precipitation, a large proportion (69%) originates from direct evaporated water with a mean atmospheric residence time of 6.6 h and a smaller amount from transpired water with a longer residence time of 10.7 h. Modulated by the East Asian monsoon, the variation of the meteorological conditions, the magnitude of the partitioned moisture, and the corresponding residence time patterns change seasonally and spatially and reveal the different fate of transpired and direct evaporated water in the atmospheric hydrological cycle. We conclude that our methodological approach has the potential to be used for addressing how timescales of the hydrological cycle changes regionally under global warming.

  11. Changes in time-segment specific physical activity between ages 10 and 14 years: A longitudinal observational study

    PubMed Central

    Brooke, Hannah L.; Atkin, Andrew J.; Corder, Kirsten; Ekelund, Ulf; van Sluijs, Esther M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Describe (1) time-segment specific changes in physical activity (PA) into adolescence, (2) differences in change in PA between specific time-segments (weekdays–weekends, in-school–out-of-school, out-of-school–weekends, lesson-time–lunch-time), and (3) associations of change in time-segment specific with overall PA. Design Longitudinal observational study (4-year follow-up). Methods Children from the SPEEDY study (n = 769, 42% boys) had PA measured by accelerometer for at least three days at ages 10.2 ± 0.3, 11.2 ± 0.3 and 14.3 ± 0.3 years. Changes in moderate-to-vigorous PA (ΔMVPA, minutes ≥2000 counts/minute [cpm]) and total PA (ΔTPA, average cpm) during weekdays, weekends, in-school, out-of-school, lesson-times and lunch-times, were tested using three level (age, individual, school) mixed-effects linear regression. Differences in ΔMVPA/ΔTPA between time-segments were tested using time-segment × age interaction terms. Associations of four-year time-segment specific ΔMVPA/ΔTPA with four-year overall ΔMVPA/ΔTPA were tested using two level (time-segment specific ΔMVPA/ΔTPA, school) mixed-effects linear regression. Results MVPA and TPA declined in all time-segments, except lesson-time MVPA. Annual ΔMVPA and, for boys only, ΔTPA was greater on weekends than weekdays (beta ± SE for interaction term: boys, −3.53 ± 0.83 min, −29.64 ± 7.64 cpm; girls, −2.20 ± 0.64 min) and out-of-school (boys, −4.36 ± 0.79 min, −19.36 ± 8.46 cpm; girls, −2.44 ± 0.63 min). ΔMVPA and ΔTPA during lunch-time was greater than during lesson-time (boys, −0.96 ± 0.20 min, −36.43 ± 6.55 cpm; girls, −0.90 ± 0.13 min, −38.72 ± 4.40 cpm). ΔTPA was greater out-of-school than in-school (boys, −19.89 ± 6.71 cpm; girls, −18.46 ± 6.51 cpm). For all time-segments, four-year ΔMVPA/ΔTPA was positively associated with four-year overall ΔMVPA/ΔTPA (all p < 0.042), except for girl

  12. Spent fuel data for waste storage programs

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, E M

    1980-09-01

    Data on LWR spent fuel were compiled for dissemination to participants in DOE-sponsored waste storage programs. Included are mechanical descriptions of the existing major types of LWR fuel assemblies, spent LWR fuel fission product inventories and decay heat data, and inventories of LWR spent fuel currently in storage, with projections of future quantities.

  13. Application of spent fuel treatment technology to plutonium immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    McPheeters, C.C; Ackerman, J.P.; Gay, E.C., Johnson, G.K.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of the electrometallurgical treatment technology being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is to convert certain spent nuclear fuels into waste forms that are suitable for disposal in a geological repository for nuclear waste. The spent fuels of interest are those that cannot be safely stored for a long time in their current condition, and those that cannot be qualified for repository disposal. This paper explores the possibility of applying this electrometallurgical treatment technology to immobilization of surplus fissile materials, primarily plutonium. Immobilization of surplus fissile materials by electrometallurgical treatment could be done in the same facilities, at the same time. and in the same equipment as the proposed treatment of the present inventory of spent nuclear fuel. The cost and schedule savings of this simultaneous treatment scheme would be significant.

  14. Status of spent-fuel shipping cask development

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, I.K.; Hinschberger, T.S.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the Cask Systems Development Program is to develop a variety of cask systems that can safely and economically transport commercial spent fuel and high-level waste from the generating sites to a federal geologic repository or monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This paper is limited to a discussion of the status of from-reactor spent-fuel cask development; future cask development plans include MRS-to-repository casks, specialty casks for nonstandard spent fuel and nonfuel materials, and defense high-level waste casks. Spent-fuel casks must be available in the late 1990s to support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) shipments from utilities. DOE-Idaho, with the support of EG G Idaho, Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, and selected cask developing contractors, has been assigned the responsibility for developing a new generation of cask systems. Four categories of spent fuel casks were initially proposed: (1) legal weight truck (LWT) casks (2) overweight truck (OWT) casks (3) rail/barge (R/B) casks (4) dual purpose (DP) storage/transport casks. Casks are being designed for reduced occupational radiation exposure at the receiving facility by facilitating the use of remote handling equipment. Automation of remote handling systems may be used to reduce cask turnaround time. Reducing turnaround time promotes reduced radiation exposure to occupational workers and improves cask utilization efficiency.

  15. Does intraspecific competition facilitate age separation in timing of southward migration in waders?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minias, Piotr; Kaczmarek, Krzysztof; Włodarczyk, Radosław; Janiszewski, Tomasz

    2014-07-01

    In many Palaearctic wader species there is a clear separation in the timing of adult and juvenile southward migration. This phenomenon is traditionally explained by the selection on adults to depart early from breeding grounds and necessity of juveniles to prepare longer for migration. In this study we hypothesize that late departure from natal grounds may also be adaptive for juveniles, as it allows them to avoid intensified interference competition at stopover sites with adult, usually more dominant conspecifics. To test this hypothesis we analysed long-term data on stopover behaviour of juvenile wood sandpipers (Tringa glareola) staying at a central Polish stopover site under varying levels of competition from adult birds. The results clearly indicated that juveniles were highly disadvantaged by the simultaneous presence of adults at the same staging site, as under intense competition from older conspecifics they refuelled more slowly and attained lower fat reserves. It was also found that juveniles which were forced to compete with adults left the site quickly and possibly searched for more favourable staging places. All these imply that delayed departure from natal grounds may be adaptive for juvenile waders, allowing them to mismatch the timing of their first migration with the peak of adult passage and, thus, reduce the negative consequences of intraspecific competition during migration.

  16. Effect of arm position and foot placement on the five times sit-to-stand test completion times of female adults older than 50 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shamay S.M.; Kwong, Patrick W.H.; Chau, Michael S.P.; Luk, Isaac C.Y.; Wan, Sam S.; Fong, Shirley S.M.

    2015-01-01

    The five times-sit-to stand test (FTSTS) is a clinical test which is commonly used to assessed the functional muscle strength of the lower limbs of older adults. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of different arm positions and foot placements on the FTSTS completion times of older female adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine healthy female subjects, aged 63.1±5.3 years participated in this cross-sectional study. The times required to complete the FTSTS with 3 different arm positions (hands on thighs, arms crossed over chest, and an augmented arm position with the arms extended forward) and 2 foot placements (neutral and posterior) were recorded. The interaction effect and main effect of arm positions and foot placements were examined using a 3 (arm position) × 2 (foot placement) two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). [Results] There was no interaction effect among the 3 arm positions in the 2 foot placements. A significant main effect was identified for foot placement, but not arm position. Posterior foot placement led to a shorter FTSTS time compared to that of normal foot placement. [Conclusion] With the same arm position, FTSTS completion times with posterior foot placement tended to be shorter. Therefore, the standard foot placement should be used for FTSTS administration. PMID:26180314

  17. The effect of in-office waiting time on physician visit frequency among working-age adults.

    PubMed

    Tak, Hyo Jung; Hougham, Gavin W; Ruhnke, Atsuko; Ruhnke, Gregory W

    2014-10-01

    Disparities in unmet health care demand resulting from socioeconomic, racial, and financial factors have received a great deal of attention in the United States. However, out-of-pocket costs alone do not fully reflect the total opportunity cost that patients must consider as they seek medical attention. While there is an extensive literature on the price elasticity of demand for health care, empirical evidence regarding the effect of waiting time on utilization is sparse. Using the nationally representative 2003 Community Tracking Study Household Survey, the most recent iteration containing respondents' physician office visit frequency and estimated in-office waiting time in the United States (N = 23,484), we investigated the association between waiting time and calculated time cost with the number of physician visits among a sample of working-age adults. To avoid the bias that literature suggests would result from excluding respondents with zero physician visits, we imputed waiting time for the essential inclusion of such individuals. On average, respondents visited physician offices 3.55 times, during which time they waited 28.7 min. The estimates from a negative binomial model indicated that a doubling of waiting time was associated with a 7.7 percent decrease (p-value < 0.001) in physician visit frequency. For women and unemployed respondents, who visited physicians more frequently, the decrease was even larger, suggesting a stronger response to greater waiting times. We believe this finding reflects the discretionary nature of incremental visits in these groups, and a consequent lower perceived marginal benefit of additional visits. The results suggest that in-office waiting time may have a substantial influence on patients' propensity to seek medical attention. Although there is a belief that expansions in health insurance coverage increase health care utilization by reducing financial barriers to access, our results suggest that unintended consequences

  18. Chronic disease and sitting time in middle-aged Australian males: findings from the 45 and Up Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to females, males experience a range of health inequities including higher rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Although sitting time is emerging as a distinct risk factor for chronic disease, research on the association of sitting time and chronic disease in middle-aged Australian males is limited. Methods A sample of 63,048 males aged 45-64 years was drawn from the baseline dataset of the 45 and Up Study – a longitudinal cohort study on healthy ageing with 267,153 participants from across New South Wales, Australia’s most populous state. Baseline data on self-reported chronic disease (heart disease, cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, combined chronic diseases), sitting time, physical activity (Active Australia Survey), and a range of covariates were used for cross-sectional analyses. Crude (OR), partially and fully adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using binary logistic regression. Results Compared to those sitting <4 hours/day, participants reporting 4 to <6, 6 to <8, and ≥8 hours were significantly more likely to report ever having any chronic disease (AOR 1.06, 95% CI 1.00 – 1.12, p = 0.050; AOR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03 – 1.16, p = 0.003; AOR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03 – 1.15, p = 0.002, respectively). Participants who reported 6 to <8 hours and ≥8 hours of sitting were also significantly more likely to report ever having diabetes than those reporting <4 hours/day (AOR 1.15, 95% CI 1.03 – 1.28, p = 0.016; AOR 1.21, 95% CI 1.09 – 1.33, p <0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our findings suggest that higher volumes of sitting time are significantly associated with diabetes and overall chronic disease, independent of physical activity and other potentially confounding factors. Prospective studies using valid and reliable measures into domain-specific sitting time in middle-aged males are required to understand and explain the direction of these relationships. PMID:23394382

  19. Poor mobility in hospitalized adults of all ages.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Alison M; McRae, Prue; McHugh, Kirstie; Griffin, Lauren; Hitchen, Andrew; Walker, James; Cruickshank, Mark; Morris, Norman R; Kuys, Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    Low levels of activity in hospital inpatients contribute to functional decline. Previous studies have shown low levels of activity in older inpatients, but few have investigated younger inpatients (aged <65 years). This observational study measured activity in older (aged ≥65 years) and younger hospital inpatients on 3 wards (medical, surgical, oncology) in a major teaching hospital in Brisbane, Australia, as part of a quality-improvement intervention to enhance mobility. Using structured behavioral mapping protocols, participants were observed for 2-minute intervals throughout 4, 4-hour daytime observation periods. The proportion of time spent at different activity levels was calculated for each participant, and time spent standing, walking or wheeling was compared between age group and wards. There were 3272 observations collected on 132 participants (median, 30 per patient; range, 9-35). The most time was spent lying in bed (mean 57%), with 9% standing or walking. There were significant differences among wards, but no difference between older and younger subgroups. Low mobility is common in adult inpatients of all ages. Behavioral mapping provided measures suitable for use in quality improvement. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:289-291. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26797978

  20. The Effect of Age on Attention Level: A Comparison of Two Age Groups.

    PubMed

    Lufi, Dubi; Segev, Shahar; Blum, Adi; Rosen, Tal; Haimov, Iris

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, a computerized test was used to compare the attention level of a group of healthy older participants aged 75 with that of a group of students aged 31. The second part of the study examined only the older participants and sought to discover how three measures of lifestyle were related to measures of attention. The results showed that the young group performed better on measures of attention. No differences between the two age groups were found on measures of impulsivity and on four measures of sustained attention. A discriminant function analysis found that reaction time and standard deviation of reaction time can explain 87.50% of the variance in both groups. The older participants' answers to the lifestyle questions showed that variables of attention correlated significantly with time spent watching television and reading. The results indicate that attention level declines with age; however, no decline was observed on measures of impulsivity and sustained attention. PMID:26537543

  1. Mental time travel into the past and the future in healthy aged adults: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Viard, Armelle; Chételat, Gaël; Lebreton, Karine; Desgranges, Béatrice; Landeau, Brigitte; de La Sayette, Vincent; Eustache, Francis; Piolino, Pascale

    2011-02-01

    Remembering the past and envisioning the future rely on episodic memory which enables mental time travel. Studies in young adults indicate that past and future thinking share common cognitive and neural underpinnings. No imaging data is yet available in healthy aged subjects. Using fMRI, we scanned older subjects while they remembered personal events (PP: last 12 months) or envisioned future plans (FP: next 12 months). Behaviorally, both time-periods were comparable in terms of visual search strategy, emotion, frequency of rehearsal and recency of the last evocation. However, PP were more episodic, engaged a higher state of autonoetic consciousness and mental visual images were clearer and more numerous than FP. Neuroimaging results revealed a common network of activation (posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus) reflecting the use of similar cognitive processes. Furthermore, the episodic nature of PP depended on hippocampal and visuo-spatial activations (occipital and angular gyri), while, for FP, it depended on the inferior frontal and lateral temporal gyri, involved in semantic memory retrieval. The common neural network and behavior suggests that healthy aged subjects thought about their future prospects in the past. The contribution of retrospective thinking into the future that engages the same network as the one recruited when remembering the past is discussed. Within this network, differential recruitment of specific areas highlights the episodic distinction between past and future mental time travel. PMID:21093970

  2. Effects of spermatozoa-oviductal cell coincubation time and oviductal cell age on spermatozoa-oviduct interactions.

    PubMed

    Aldarmahi, Ahmed; Elliott, Sarah; Russell, Jean; Fazeli, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    The oviduct plays a crucial role in sperm storage, maintenance of sperm viability and sperm transport to the site of fertilisation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of oviductal cell culture passage number, oviductal cell age and spermatozoa-oviduct coincubation times on gene expression in oviductal cells. Immortalised oviductal epithelial cells (OPEC) obtained from two different cell passages (36 and 57) were subcultured three times with and without spermatozoa for 24 h (control group). In a second study, OPEC were cocultured with spermatozoa for different time intervals (0, 4, 12 and 24 h). Expression of adrenomedullin (ADM), heat shock 70 kDa protein 8 (HSPA8) and prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) in OPEC was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The expression of ADM and HSPA8 was decreased significantly in OPEC cells from Passage 57, particularly in the later subculture group. These effects on HSPA8, but not ADM, expression in OPEC were further altered after coculture with spermatozoa for 24 h. We also demonstrated that spermatozoa-oviduct coculture for 12 and 24 h resulted in significantly higher expression of ADM, HSPA8 and PGES in OPEC. Overall, the data suggest that the OPEC lose some of their properties as a result of oviductal cell aging and that there are spermatozoa-oviduct interactions leading to increased oviductal cell gene expression. PMID:23551866

  3. Analysis of the Effect of Time, Temperature, and Fuel Age on Helium Release from 238-Plutonium Dioxide Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Ruhkamp, Joseph D.

    2005-02-01

    The compound 238-plutonium dioxide has been employed over the last several decades as the fuel of choice in fabricating nuclear powered thermal to electrical converters. The alpha decay of 238-plutonium results in the generation of helium ions as a function of time. While the quantity of helium formed within the fuel can be easily calculated, its diffusion and/or release mechanism as a function of time, temperature, fuel quantity and age needs to be characterized. Within the scope of this paper the principle interest centers on determining the expected quantity of helium that will be released from solid 238-plutonium dioxide fuel forms enclosed within a primary containment vessel (PCV) under Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) as described in 10 CFR 71.73(4). Once the quantity of helium released during HAC has been determined, the partial pressure increase due to the helium release can be calculated for a given shipping configuration. This partial pressure increase due to helium release during HAC for a selected shipping configuration can then be used to determine if the structural integrity of the package will be maintained or compromised during HAC. However, it is important to recognize that helium release is not a function of a particular shipping package, but as shall be demonstrated is a function of time, temperature, and fuel quantity and age.

  4. Analysis of the Effect of Time, Temperature, and Fuel Age on Helium Release from 238-Plutonium Dioxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Barklay, Chadwick D.; Kramer, Daniel P.; Ruhkamp, Joseph D.

    2005-02-06

    The compound 238-plutonium dioxide has been employed over the last several decades as the fuel of choice in fabricating nuclear powered thermal to electrical converters. The alpha decay of 238-plutonium results in the generation of helium ions as a function of time. While the quantity of helium formed within the fuel can be easily calculated, its diffusion and/or release mechanism as a function of time, temperature, fuel quantity and age needs to be characterized. Within the scope of this paper the principle interest centers on determining the expected quantity of helium that will be released from solid 238-plutonium dioxide fuel forms enclosed within a primary containment vessel (PCV) under Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) as described in 10 CFR 71.73(4). Once the quantity of helium released during HAC has been determined, the partial pressure increase due to the helium release can be calculated for a given shipping configuration. This partial pressure increase due to helium release during HAC for a selected shipping configuration can then be used to determine if the structural integrity of the package will be maintained or compromised during HAC. However, it is important to recognize that helium release is not a function of a particular shipping package, but as shall be demonstrated is a function of time, temperature, and fuel quantity and age.

  5. Evaluating the Aging of Multiple Emulsions Using Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Yukihiro; Uchimura, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to measurements of multiple emulsions with no pretreatment; a method for the quantitative evaluation of aging was proposed. We prepared water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsions containing toluene and m-phenylenediamine. The samples were measured immediately following both preparation and after having been stirred for 24 h. Time profiles of the peak areas for each analyte species were obtained, and several intense spikes for toluene could be detected from each sample after stirring, which suggests that the concentration of toluene in the middle phase had increased during stirring. On the other hand, in the case of a W/O/W multiple emulsion containing phenol and m-phenylenediamine, spikes for m-phenylenediamine, rather than phenol, were detected after stirring. In the present study, the time-profile data were converted into a scatter plot in order to quantitatively evaluate the aging. As a result, the ratio of the plots where strong signal intensities of toluene were detected increased from 8.4% before stirring to 33.2% after stirring for 24 h. The present method could be a powerful tool for evaluating multiple emulsions, such as studies on the kinetics of the encapsulation and release of active ingredients. PMID:27396662

  6. Pathfinders in oncology from ancient times to the end of the Middle Ages.

    PubMed

    Hajdu, Steven I

    2016-06-01

    This commentary highlights the onset and progression of the diagnosis and treatment of cancer from ancient times to the 15th century. During the preparation of this synoptic review of the lives and contributions to oncology of 7 ancient physicians, it became clear that despite separation by centuries, ethnicity, and religion, they had many things in common. For example, with the exception of Chauliac, all were born into wealthy families, had an excellent education in the liberal arts and sciences, and were mentored by outstanding teachers. After they became physicians, they traveled extensively, were polyglots, were sponsored by influential individuals, had inquisitive minds, searched for the true nature of diseases, and were proud to share the results of their observations with others. Except for Galen, all of them were kind and well-mannered individuals. They cared with sincere dedication for the poor and those who had untreatable disease, including cancer. Although their understanding of cancer was limited, they were deeply concerned about the neglect and hopelessness of cancer patients. They were aware of their shortcomings in offering effective treatment beyond the surgical excision of early cancers. For advanced cancers, they had nothing to give beyond palliative care with herbals and minerals. All physicians who care for cancer patients owe these pioneer physicians, whatever their shortcomings, an inexpressible debt for their attempts to cure cancer. Cancer 2016;122:1638-46. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:26970504

  7. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  8. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  9. Spent-fuel storage requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    Spent fuel storage requirements, as projected through the year 2000 for U.S. LWRs, were calculated using information supplied by the utilities reflecting plant status as of December 31, 1981. Projections through the year 2000 combined fuel discharge projections of the utilities with the assumed discharges of typical reactors required to meet the nuclear capacity of 165 GWe projected by the Energy Information Administration for the year 2000. Three cases were developed and are summarized. A reference case, or maximum at-reactor capacity case, assumes that all reactor storage pools are increased to their maximum capacities as estimated by the utilities for spent fuel storage utilizing currently licensed technologies. The reference case assumes no transshipments between pools except as current licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This case identifies an initial requirement for 13 MTU of additional storage in 1984, and a cumulative requirement for 14,490 MTU additional storage in the year 2000.

  10. Bayesian Inference for Time Trends in Parameter Values: Case Study for the Ageing PSA Network of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Dana L. Kelly; Albert Malkhasyan

    2010-06-01

    There is a nearly ubiquitous assumption in PSA that parameter values are at least piecewise-constant in time. As a result, Bayesian inference tends to incorporate many years of plant operation, over which there have been significant changes in plant operational and maintenance practices, plant management, etc. These changes can cause significant changes in parameter values over time; however, failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework can mask these changes. Failure to question the assumption of constant parameter values, and failure to perform Bayesian inference in the proper time-dependent framework were noted as important issues in NUREG/CR-6813, performed for the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in 2003. That report noted that “industry lacks tools to perform time-trend analysis with Bayesian updating.” This paper describes an application of time-dependent Bayesian inference methods developed for the European Commission Ageing PSA Network. These methods utilize open-source software, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling. The paper also illustrates the development of a generic prior distribution, which incorporates multiple sources of generic data via weighting factors that address differences in key influences, such as vendor, component boundaries, conditions of the operating environment, etc.

  11. Exercise Time: Gender Differences in the Effects of Marriage, Parenthood, and Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomaguchi, Kei M.; Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2004-01-01

    Using data from a supplement to the 1995 National Health Interview Survey, this article examines the relationship among three major work and family roles - marriage, parenthood, and employment - and time spent on exercise among American men and women ages 18 to 64 N=13,496. As the time availability perspective suggests, work and family roles…

  12. Spent fuel integrity during transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, C.W.; Jacobson, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies.

  13. Spent fuel receipt scenarios study

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, L.B.; Montan, D.N.; Revelli, M.A.

    1990-09-01

    This study reports on the results of an assignment from the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management to evaluate of the effects of different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel on the potential performance of the waste packages in the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository. The initial evaluations were performed and an interim letter report was prepared during the fall of 1988. Subsequently, the scope of work was expanded and additional analyses were conducted in 1989. This report combines the results of the two phases of the activity. This study is a part of a broader effort to investigate the options available to the DOE and the nuclear utilities for selection of spent fuel for acceptance into the Federal Waste Management System for disposal. Each major element of the system has evaluated the effects of various options on its own operations, with the objective of providing the basis for performing system-wide trade-offs and determining an optimum acceptance scenario. Therefore, this study considers different scenarios for receipt of spent fuel by the repository only from the narrow perspective of their effect on the very-near-field temperatures in the repository following permanent closure. This report is organized into three main sections. The balance of this section is devoted to a statement of the study objective, a summary of the assumptions. The second section of the report contains a discussion of the major elements of the study. The third section summarizes the results of the study and draws some conclusions from them. The appendices include copies of the waste acceptance schedule and the existing and projected spent fuel inventory that were used in the study. 10 refs., 27 figs.

  14. Effect of time-evolving age and convergence rate of the subducting plate on the Cenozoic adakites and boninites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Mi; Lee, Changyeol

    2014-12-01

    Partial melting of subducting oceanic crust expressed as high-Mg volcanic rocks such as adakites and boninites has been actively studied for decades, and Lee and King (2010) reported that time-evolving subduction parameters such as the age and the subduction rate of the converging oceanic plate play important roles in transient partial melting of the subducting oceanic crust (e.g., Aleutians). However, few subduction model experiments have considered time-evolving subduction parameters, posing problems for studies of transient partial melting of subducting oceanic crust in many subduction zones. Therefore, we constructed two-dimensional kinematic-dynamic subduction models for the Izu-Bonin, Mariana, Northeast Japan, Kuril, Tonga, Java-Sunda, and Aleutian subduction zones that account for the last 50 Myr of their evolution. The models include the time-evolving age and convergence rate of the incoming oceanic plate, so the effect of time-evolving subduction parameters on transient partial melting of oceanic crust can be evaluated. Our model calculations revealed that adakites and boninites in the Izu-Bonin and Aleutian subduction zones resulted from transient partial melting of oceanic crust. However, the steady-state subduction model using current subduction parameters did not produce any partial melting of oceanic crust in the aforementioned subduction zones, indicating that time-evolving subduction parameters are crucial for modeling transient eruption of adakites and boninites. Our model calculations confirm that other geological processes such as forearc extension, back-arc opening, mantle plumes and ridge subduction are required for partial melting of the oceanic crust in the Mariana, Northeast Japan, Tonga, and southeastern Java-Sunda subduction zones.

  15. Factors associated with herd-level PRRSV infection and age-time to seroconversion in farrow-to-finish herds.

    PubMed

    Fablet, C; Marois-Créhan, C; Grasland, B; Simon, G; Rose, N

    2016-08-30

    Factors associated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection were investigated in 109 herds. Serums from four batches of pigs (4, 10, 16 and 22 weeks, 15 pigs/batch) were tested by ELISA for PRRSV antibodies. Infection by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp), Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, H1N1 and H1N2 swine influenza A viruses (swIAV) and PCV2 were detected by specific serological or PCR tests. Data related to herd characteristics, biosecurity, management housing and climatic conditions were collected during a herd visit. Factors associated with the herd's PRRSV seropositive status were identified by logistic regression. Large herd size, the lack of disinsectisation in the gestation facilities, on-farm semen collection, a short time-period for gilt quarantine and a low temperature setpoint for the ventilation controller in the fattening room significantly increased the odds of a herd being seropositive for PRRSV. Infection by Mhp and H1N2 swIAV were associated with a PRRSV seropositive status. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify the factors associated with the age-time to seroconversion in infected herds. Joint housing for the gilts and sows when lactating, a large nursery pen, a small number of pens per fattening room and lack of all-in all-out management in the fattening section significantly reduced the age-time to seroconversion. A small range of temperatures controlling ventilation rate in the nursery room was also associated with time to PRRSV seroconversion. Infection by Mhp and a high PCV2 infection pressure were associated with a shorter time to seroconversion. Biosecurity measures minimising the risk of introducing PRRSV into the herd, management practices reducing contacts between animals from different batches and within batches and favourable climatic conditions should be implemented to better control PRRSV infection. PMID:27527759

  16. Landscape history and land-use dependent soil erosion in central Bosnia from the Bronze Age to Medieval Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Steffen; Enters, Dirk; Bittmann, Felix

    2010-05-01

    The inland areas of the northwestern Balkan peninsula and in particular of Bosnia and Herzegovina are poor in natural archives suitable for the reconstruction of past environmental changes and vegetation history. Consequently, palaeoenvironmental analyses are scarce with only three palynological studies available dating back to 1973, 1956 and 1934. Central Bosnia, however, is rich in archaeological heritage, featuring numerous prehistoric settlement sites along the river Bosna starting in the early Neolithic. This generates the need for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions to support and complement recent archaeological research in this area. Here we present results from a 450 cm gyttja-peat sequence from Seoce Jezero, a small mire located at 600 m NN on a plateau above a tributary of the river Bosna 30 km northwest of Sarajevo (central Bosnia). Fourteen AMS C-14 dates provide a robust time-depth-relationship which covers natural and anthropogenic environmental changes at Seoce Jezero from the Bronze Age to early Medieval Times. Pollen, macrofossil and geochemical analyses of 167 samples produce a high resolution record of land-use and vegetation change up to a half-decadal time scale. The palaeoenvironmental record starts ca. 1800 BC (3750 cal. BP) and reveals an initially relatively undisturbed landscape dominated by Fagus- and Quercus-Carpinus woodland. Anthropogenic influence is clearly visible from 1400 BC (3350 cal. BP) onwards and comprises woodland clearances, pasturing and crop cultivation. Pollen analyses confirm several consecutive phases of different land-use character and intensity. Phases of high land-use pressure culminated at the transition Bronze Age/Iron Age (1100 BC), the late Iron Age (400 BC), late Roman times (AD 300) and from AD 700 onwards. In between, stages of forest regeneration could be detected, most pronounced in the period between 70 BC and AD 150 (2020-1800 cal. BP), when anthropogenic influence virtually ceased. Whereas land use in

  17. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Program. HTGR Spent Fuel Treatment Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The spent fuel treatment (SFT) program plan addresses spent fuel volume reduction, packaging, storage, transportation, fuel recovery, and disposal to meet the needs of the HTGR Lead Plant and follow-on plants. In the near term, fuel refabrication will be addressed by following developments in fresh fuel fabrication and will be developed in the long term as decisions on the alternatives dictate. The formulation of this revised program plan considered the implications of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) which, for the first time, established a definitive national policy for management and disposal of nuclear wastes. Although the primary intent of the program is to address technical issues, the divergence between commercial and government interests, which arises as a result of certain provisions of the NWPA, must be addressed in the economic assessment of technically feasible alternative paths in the management of spent HTGR fuel and waste. This new SFT program plan also incorporates a significant cooperative research and development program between the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany. The major objective of this international program is to reduce costs by avoiding duplicate efforts.

  18. Criticality of spent reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The storage capacity of spent reactor fuel pools can be greatly increased by consolidation. In this process, the fuel rods are removed from reactor fuel assemblies and are stored in close-packed arrays in a canister or skeleton. An earlier study examined criticality consideration for consolidation of Westinghouse fuel, assumed to be fresh, in canisters at the Millstone-2 spent-fuel pool and in the General Electric IF-300 shipping cask. The conclusions were that the fuel rods in the canister are so deficient in water that they are adequately subcritical, both in normal and in off-normal conditions. One potential accident, the water spill event, remained unresolved in the earlier study. A methodology is developed here for spent-fuel criticality and is applied to the water spill event. The methodology utilizes LEOPARD to compute few-group cross sections for the diffusion code PDQ7, which then is used to compute reactivity. These codes give results for fresh fuel that are in good agreement with KENO IV-NITAWL Monte Carlo results, which themselves are in good agreement with continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations. These methodologies are in reasonable agreement with critical measurements for undepleted fuel.

  19. Age-specific vibrissae growth rates: a tool for determining the timing of ecologically important events in Steller sea lions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rea, L.D.; Christ, A.M.; Hayden, A.B.; Stegall, V.K.; Farley, S.D.; Stricker, Craig A.; Mellish, J.E.; Maniscalco, J.M.; Waite, J.N.; Burkanov, V.N.; Pitcher, K.W.

    2015-01-01

    Steller sea lions (SSL; Eumetopias jubatus) grow their vibrissae continually, providing a multiyear record suitable for ecological and physiological studies based on stable isotopes. An accurate age-specific vibrissae growth rate is essential for registering a chronology along the length of the record, and for interpreting the timing of ecologically important events. We utilized four methods to estimate the growth rate of vibrissae in fetal, rookery pup, young-of-the-year (YOY), yearling, subadult, and adult SSL. The majority of vibrissae were collected from SSL live-captured in Alaska and Russia between 2000 and 2013 (n = 1,115), however, vibrissae were also collected from six adult SSL found dead on haul-outs and rookeries during field excursions to increase the sample size of this underrepresented age group. Growth rates of vibrissae were generally slower in adult (0.44 ± 0.15 cm/mo) and subadult (0.61 ± 0.10 cm/mo) SSL than in YOY (0.87 ± 0.28 cm/mo) and fetal (0.73 ± 0.05 cm/mo) animals, but there was high individual variability in these growth rates within each age group. Some variability in vibrissae growth rates was attributed to the somatic growth rate of YOY sea lions between capture events (P = 0.014, r2 = 0.206, n = 29).

  20. Timing of expression of the core clock gene Bmal1 influences its effects on aging and survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guangrui; Chen, Lihong; Grant, Gregory R.; Paschos, Georgios; Song, Wen-Liang; Musiek, Erik S.; Lee, Vivian; McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Grosser, Tilo; Cotsarelis, George; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    The absence of Bmal1, a core clock gene, results in a loss of circadian rhythms, an acceleration of aging, and a shortened life span in mice. To address the importance of circadian rhythms in the aging process, we generated conditional Bmal1 knockout mice that lacked the BMAL1 protein during adult life and found that wild-type circadian variations in wheel-running activity, heart rate, and blood pressure were abolished. Ocular abnormalities and brain astrogliosis were conserved irrespective of the timing of Bmal1 deletion. However, life span, fertility, body weight, blood glucose levels, and age-dependent arthropathy - which are altered in standard Bmal1 knockout mice - remained unaltered, while atherosclerosis and hair growth improved, in the conditional adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, despite abolition of clock function. Hepatic RNA-Seq revealed that expression of oscillatory genes was dampened in the adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, while overall gene expression was largely unchanged. Thus, many phenotypes in conventional Bmal1 knockout mice, hitherto attributed to disruption of circadian rhythms, reflect the loss of properties of BMAL1 that are independent of its role in the clock. These findings prompt re-evaluation of the systemic consequences of disruption of the molecular clock. PMID:26843191