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Sample records for age-appropriately vaccinated children

  1. Immunization Milestones: A More Comprehensive Picture of Age-Appropriate Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Steve G.; Kurosky, Samantha K.; Young, Collette M.; Gallia, Charles A.; Arbor, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    A challenge facing immunization registries is developing measures of childhood immunization coverage that contain more information for setting policy than present vaccine series up-to-date (UTD) rates. This study combined milestone analysis with provider encounter data to determine when children either do not receive indicated immunizations during medical encounters or fail to visit providers. Milestone analysis measures immunization status at key times between birth and age 2, when recommended immunizations first become late. The immunization status of a large population of children in the Oregon ALERT immunization registry and in the Oregon Health Plan was tracked across milestone ages. Findings indicate that the majority of children went back and forth with regard to having complete age-appropriate immunizations over time. We also found that immunization UTD rates when used alone are biased towards relating non-UTD status to a lack of visits to providers, instead of to provider visits on which recommended immunizations are not given. PMID:20508852

  2. The availability and age-appropriateness of medicines authorized for children in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Riet-Nales, Diana A; de Jager, Karin E; Schobben, Alfred FAM; Egberts, Toine CG; Rademaker, Carin MA

    2011-01-01

    AIM To study the number of medicines and active chemical entities that are authorized and commercially available for children in the Netherlands and to evaluate the age-appropriateness of the available paediatric medicines. METHODS The availability of paediatric medicines and active chemical entities was studied with the help of a Dutch medicines database and the Summary of Product Characteristics. Medicines were categorized with respect to their route of administration, type of oral dosage form and therapeutic category. The age-appropriateness was assessed on three aspects: dose capability, suitability of the dosage form and inclusion of potentially harmful excipients. RESULTS Three thousand five hundred and forty-two paediatric medicines containing 703 different active chemical entities were identified. This equalled half of all the medicines and chemical entities available for human use. The percentage of paediatric medicines increased with age and varied for the route of administration from 22% (dermal) to 81% (inhalation) and for the therapeutic category from 11% (uro-genital, sex hormones) to 89% (anti-parasites). The appropriateness of the paediatric medicines with respect to their authorization status, dose capability and dosage form increased with age from 27–88%. Fifty-two percent of all oral paediatric liquid formulations contained a potentially harmful excipient. CONCLUSION This study confirms the limited availability of paediatric medicines for a broad range of therapeutic areas and shows that paediatric medicines may not be age-appropriate, even if authorized. While confirming the need for a legislative incentive, the results also provide baseline information for an estimation of the effect of the European Paediatric Regulation in the near future. PMID:21477143

  3. The Voice of the Child in Social Work Assessments: Age-Appropriate Communication with Children

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Lisa; Dolan, Pat

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a child-centred method for engaging with children involved in the child protection and welfare system. One of the primary arguments underpinning this research is that social workers need to be skilled communicators to engage with children about deeply personal and painful issues. There is a wide range of research that maintains play is the language of children and the most effective way to learn about children is through their play. Considering this, the overarching aim of this study was to investigate the role of play skills in supporting communication between children and social workers during child protection and welfare assessments. The data collection was designed to establish the thoughts and/or experiences of participants in relation to a Play Skills Training (PST) programme designed by the authors. The key findings of the study reveal that the majority of social work participants rate the use of play skills in social work assessments as a key factor to effective engagement with children. Of particular importance, these messages address how social work services can ensure in a child-centred manner that the voice of children is heard and represented in all assessments of their well-being and future care options. PMID:27559222

  4. The Effects of an Age-appropriate Intervention on Young Children's Understanding of Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joanne M.; Affleck, Gillian

    1999-01-01

    Investigates 4- and 7-year-olds' understanding of biological inheritance of physical characteristics for cows and horses. Explores the effects of an intervention technique to improve children's understanding of inheritance. Reveals significant age differences in judgments and explanations of inheritance. No significant improvements resulted from…

  5. Access to age-appropriate essential medicines: a retrospective survey of compounding of medicines for children in hospitals in Nigeria and implications for policy development.

    PubMed

    Orubu, Ebiowei Samuel F; Okwelogu, Chinyere; Opanuga, Olabisi; Nunn, Tony; Tuleu, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    Policies to improve access to medicines for children in Nigeria do not include compounding as a source of medicines. Compounding is often applied as a last resort in health institutions to provide age-appropriate formulations usually for oral use in young children; but it bears some risk. Some countries have adopted policies aimed at reducing the risk based on available data. There is not much data for Nigeria. This retrospective study examined compounding records from January to December 2011 in a sample of seven hospitals to describe what medicines for oral use were commonly compounded in Nigeria. It then determined if these medicines were commercially available in forms suitable for use in children in selected countries-the United Kingdom, United States and India. The study found that out of 2845 items compounded, over 65% were medicines for cardiovascular conditions, diarrhoea or tuberculosis. The main reason (96%, n = 2399) for compounding was the unavailability of age-appropriate formulations. Medicines were almost all compounded using simple syrup, vitamin C or vitamin B syrups as suspending vehicles. Final products were all oral liquids. Comprehensive stability testing was not reported for the products. Almost all of the commonly compounded medicines were found to be commercially available in dosage forms suitable for use in children in the selected countries. These medicines were all listed in the World Health Organization Essential Medicines List for children as well as in the current edition of the Essential Medicines List of Nigeria. The fact that they were compounded highlights the need for improved access to age-appropriate dosage forms for children in Nigeria. The study recommends policy expansion through a three-pronged approach to improving access: increased supply through facilitated importation/accelerated product registration, or in-country manufacturing; rational drug use including therapeutic substitution, and establishment of a national

  6. Are PDAs Pedagogically Feasible for Young Children? Examining the Age-Appropriateness of Handhelds in a Kindergarten Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Young Mi; Mullen, Laurie; Stuve, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    The frequency and form of computing for children are still open to definition at the classroom level. There are three major classifications of general-purpose computers to consider: desktops, laptops and handhelds (PDAs). However, despite the final commercial realization of a "computer" teachers should consider the physiological and cognitive…

  7. Age-appropriate and acceptable paediatric dosage forms: Insights into end-user perceptions, preferences and practices from the Children's Acceptability of Oral Formulations (CALF) Study.

    PubMed

    Ranmal, Sejal R; Cram, Anne; Tuleu, Catherine

    2016-11-30

    A lack of evidence to guide the design of age-appropriate and acceptable dosage forms has been a longstanding knowledge gap in paediatric formulation development. The Children's Acceptability of Oral Formulations (CALF) study captured end-user perceptions and practices with a focus on solid oral dosage forms, namely tablets, capsules, chewables, orodispersibles, multiparticulates (administered with food) and mini-tablets (administered directly into the mouth). A rigorous development and testing phase produced age-adapted questionnaires as measurement tools with strong evidence of validity and reliability. Overall, 590 school children and adolescents, and 428 adult caregivers were surveyed across hospitals and various community settings. Attitudes towards dosage forms primarily differed based on age and prior use. Positive attitudes to tablets and capsules increased with age until around 14 years. Preference was seen for chewable and orodispersible preparations across ages, while multiparticulates were seemingly less favourable. Overall, 59.6% of school children reported willingness to take 10mm diameter tablets, although only 32.1% of caregivers perceived this size to be suitable. While not to be taken as prescriptive guidance, the results of this study provide some evidence towards rational dosage form design, as well as methodological approaches to help design tools for further evaluation of acceptability within paediatric studies.

  8. Test Anxiety: Age Appropriate Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, David B.; Driscoll, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The presentation covers information on test anxiety reduction strategies from over thirty years of experience with clients of a variety of ages. Dr. Ross is from the College of Lake County. Dr. Driscoll is a private practitioner and Director of the American Test Anxieties Association. The purpose is to address age appropriate test anxiety…

  9. Recommendations for age-appropriate education of children and adolescents with diabetes and their parents in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Martin, Delphine; Lange, Karin; Sima, Alexandra; Kownatka, Dagmar; Skovlund, Søren; Danne, Thomas; Robert, Jean-Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Education is the keystone of diabetes care, and structured self-management education is the key to a successful outcome. Existing guidelines provide comprehensive guidance on the various aspects of education and offer general and organizational principles of education, detailed curricula at different ages and stages of diabetes, and recommendations on models, methods, and tools to attain educative objectives. The International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes guidelines give the most elaborate and detailed descriptions and recommendations on the practice of education, which other national guidelines address on specific aspects of education and care. The aim of the work package on education developed by Better Control in Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes in the European Union: Working to Create Centers of Reference (SWEET) project was not to generate new guidelines but to evaluate how the existing guidelines were implemented in some pediatric diabetes reference centers. The SWEET members have completed a questionnaire that elaborates on the many aspects of delivery of education. This survey highlights a profound diversity of practices across centers in Europe, in terms of organization as well as the practices and the content of initial and continuing education. A toolbox is being developed within SWEET to facilitate exchanges on all aspects of education and to establish a process of validation of materials, tools, written structured age-adjusted programs, and evaluation procedures for the education of children and adolescents with diabetes.

  10. Guidance for Assessment of Poliovirus Vaccination Status and Vaccination of Children Who Have Received Poliovirus Vaccine Outside the United States.

    PubMed

    Marin, Mona; Patel, Manisha; Oberste, Steve; Pallansch, Mark A

    2017-01-13

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly resolved to eradicate poliomyelitis (polio). Since then, wild poliovirus (WPV) cases have declined by >99.9%, from an estimated 350,000 cases of polio each year to 74 cases in two countries in 2015 (1). This decrease was achieved primarily through the use of trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV), which contains types 1, 2, and 3 live, attenuated polioviruses. Since 2000, the United States has exclusively used inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), which contains all three poliovirus types (2,3). In 2013, the World Health Organization (WHO) set a target of a polio-free world by 2018 (4). Of the three WPV types, type 2 was declared eradicated in September 2015. To remove the risk for infection with circulating type 2 vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPV), which can lead to paralysis similar to that caused by WPV, all OPV-using countries simultaneously switched in April 2016 from tOPV to bivalent OPV (bOPV), which contains only types 1 and 3 polioviruses (5). This report summarizes current Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for poliovirus vaccination and provides CDC guidance, in the context of the switch from tOPV to bOPV, regarding assessment of vaccination status and vaccination of children who might have received poliovirus vaccine outside the United States, to ensure that children living in the United States (including immigrants and refugees) are protected against all three poliovirus types. This guidance is not new policy and does not change the recommendations of ACIP for poliovirus vaccination in the United States. Children living in the United States who might have received poliovirus vaccination outside the United States should meet ACIP recommendations for poliovirus vaccination, which require protection against all three poliovirus types by age-appropriate vaccination with IPV or tOPV. In the absence of vaccination records indicating receipt of these vaccines, only vaccination or

  11. For Parents: Vaccines for Your Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC For Parents: Vaccines for Your Children Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Vaccines Prevent Review the 16 diseases prevented by vaccines recommended for children and teens. Records & Requirements Learn about immunization records ...

  12. Children, the Flu, and the Flu Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Newsletters Children, the Flu, and the Flu Vaccine Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... an additional B virus. What kinds of flu vaccines are available for children? Influenza vaccine options for ...

  13. Update on vaccination guidelines for allergic children.

    PubMed

    Kelso, John M

    2009-11-01

    Children with allergic or atopic diseases require immunization just like non-atopic children. However, vaccination of such children requires some special considerations and precautions. Children may be allergic to specific vaccine constituents such as gelatin or egg. Children who have suffered an apparent allergic reaction to a vaccine should be evaluated by an allergist to determine the culprit allergen and to make recommendations regarding future vaccination. In rare circumstances, certain vaccines may cause acute exacerbations of allergic diseases, but the contention that vaccination causes allergic disease is not substantiated by any available evidence.

  14. Travelers' Health: Vaccine Recommendations for Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safely with Infants & Children Chapter 7 - Travel & Breastfeeding Vaccine Recommendations for Infants & Children Michelle S. Weinberg Vaccinating children ... to order and fill out the ICVP. Other Vaccines Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus is ...

  15. Unbiased Average Age-Appropriate Atlases for Pediatric Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fonov, Vladimir; Evans, Alan C.; Botteron, Kelly; Almli, C. Robert; McKinstry, Robert C.; Collins, D. Louis

    2010-01-01

    Spatial normalization, registration, and segmentation techniques for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) often use a target or template volume to facilitate processing, take advantage of prior information, and define a common coordinate system for analysis. In the neuroimaging literature, the MNI305 Talairach-like coordinate system is often used as a standard template. However, when studying pediatric populations, variation from the adult brain makes the MNI305 suboptimal for processing brain images of children. Morphological changes occurring during development render the use of age-appropriate templates desirable to reduce potential errors and minimize bias during processing of pediatric data. This paper presents the methods used to create unbiased, age-appropriate MRI atlas templates for pediatric studies that represent the average anatomy for the age range of 4.5–18.5 years, while maintaining a high level of anatomical detail and contrast. The creation of anatomical T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted templates for specific developmentally important age-ranges, used data derived from the largest epidemiological, representative (healthy and normal) sample of the U.S. population, where each subject was carefully screened for medical and psychiatric factors and characterized using established neuropsychological and behavioral assessments. . Use of these age-specific templates was evaluated by computing average tissue maps for gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid for each specific age range, and by conducting an exemplar voxel-wise deformation-based morphometry study using 66 young (4.5–6.9 years) participants to demonstrate the benefits of using the age-appropriate templates. The public availability of these atlases/templates will facilitate analysis of pediatric MRI data and enable comparison of results between studies in a common standardized space specific to pediatric research. PMID:20656036

  16. Barriers to Vaccinating Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orenstein, Walter A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of vaccinations in preventing disease, preschool children, particularly in the inner cities, are not being adequately immunized. Inadequate clinic staff and hours, inconvenient locations, prohibitive policies, and missed opportunities within the health care system may contribute to this problem. Suggests policy changes…

  17. Gut microbiota in children vaccinated with rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    García-López, Rodrigo; Pérez-Brocal, Vicente; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Moya, Andrés

    2012-12-01

    To assess the effect that the rotavirus vaccine RotaTeq may have on the gut microbiota, this study searched for differences in intestinal bacterial composition between vaccinated and unvaccinated children. Bacterial diversity in fecal samples was evaluated by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and taxonomic analyses using bioinformatics tools. No evidence of such differences was observed.

  18. Vaccination coverage and its determinants among migrant children in Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Guangdong province attracted more than 31 million migrants in 2010. But few studies were performed to estimate the complete and age-appropriate immunization coverage and determine risk factors of migrant children. Methods 1610 migrant children aged 12–59 months from 70 villages were interviewed in Guangdong. Demographic characteristics, primary caregiver’s knowledge and attitude toward immunization, and child’s immunization history were obtained. UTD and age-appropriate immunization rates for the following five vaccines and the overall series (1:3:3:3:1 immunization series) were assessed: one dose of BCG, three doses of DTP, OPV and HepB, one dose of MCV. Risk factors for not being UTD for the 1:3:3:3:1 immunization series were explored. Results For each antigen, the UTD immunization rate was above 71%, but the age-appropriate immunization rates for BCG, HepB, OPV, DPT and MCV were only 47.8%, 45.1%, 47.1%, 46.8% and 37.2%, respectively. The 1st dose was most likely to be delayed within them. For the 1:3:3:3:1 immunization series, the UTD immunization rate and age-appropriate immunization rate were 64.9% and 12.4% respectively. Several factors as below were significantly associated with UTD immunization. The primary caregiver’s determinants were their occupation, knowledge and attitude toward immunization. The child’s determinants were sex, Hukou, birth place, residential buildings and family income. Conclusions Alarmingly low immunization coverage of migrant children should be closely monitored by NIISS. Primary caregiver and child’s determinants should be considered when taking measures. Strategies to strengthen active out-reach activities and health education for primary caregivers needed to be developed to improve their immunization coverage. PMID:24568184

  19. Varicella vaccination in children with atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Kienast, Antonia K; Kreth, Hans W; Höger, Peter H

    2007-10-01

    Chickenpox in children may be complicated by local or systemic bacterial infections. Group A streptococci and S. aureus are the predominant pathogens. Children with atopic dermatitis are particularly prone to bacterial superinfection. After the introduction of universal varicella vaccination in the USA ten years ago, the number of serious bacterial soft tissue infections in children dropped significantly. Since 2004, the VZV immunization has also been included in the routine German series.Many children with atopic dermatitis have not been immunized because of concerns on the part of parents or physicians. Recent studies demonstrated the safety and efficacy of VZV vaccination in children with atopic dermatitis who appear to benefit particularly from this vaccination.

  20. Mixing of diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccines in a population of children in managed care

    PubMed Central

    Masseria, Cristina; Buikema, Ami R; Liu, Fang; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy

    2015-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends administering diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccines to children at 2, 4, 6, 15–18 months, and 4–6 y of age; preferably with the same-brand vaccine for the whole series. We estimated age-appropriate DTaP dose completion and the proportion of children receiving a “mixed” DTaP vaccination series (ie, including DTaP vaccines from ≥2 brands) across the 3 milestones. Commercially-insured children born between 01/01/2003 and 04/30/2011 were identified from United States health insurance claims data and assigned to ≥1 of 3 study cohorts based on the duration of continuous health plan enrollment: 1) birth to <8 months; 2) birth to <20 months; 3) birth to <7 years. Dose completion and brand mixing of the first 3, first 4 or all 5 doses were measured in the respective cohorts. Administered DTaP vaccinations were identified in claims data and classified by brand (based on vaccine components and manufacturer). The analysis included children who received ≥2 DTaP vaccinations and had known brand information for all doses. Age-appropriate dose completion was 77% with 3 doses (<8 months cohort), 71% with 4 doses (<20 months cohort), and 85% with 5 doses (<7 years cohort). Mixed DTaP series were received by 4.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.6%-4.7%) in the <8 months cohort, 29.0% (95% CI: 28.6%–29.4%) in the <20 months cohort, and 39.0% (95% CI: 34.5, 43.6) in the <7 years cohort. DTaP mixing was just 4.7% for the first 3 doses but subsequently increased with the number of administered doses. PMID:25714800

  1. Pediatric Biopharmaceutical Classification System: Using Age-Appropriate Initial Gastric Volume.

    PubMed

    Shawahna, Ramzi

    2016-05-01

    Development of optimized pediatric formulations for oral administration can be challenging, time consuming, and financially intensive process. Since its inception, the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) has facilitated the development of oral drug formulations destined for adults. At least theoretically, the BCS principles are applied also to pediatrics. A comprehensive age-appropriate BCS has not been fully developed. The objective of this work was to provisionally classify oral drugs listed on the latest World Health Organization's Essential Medicines List for Children into an age-appropriate BCS. A total of 38 orally administered drugs were included in this classification. Dose numbers were calculated using age-appropriate initial gastric volume for neonates, 6-month-old infants, and children aging 1 year through adulthood. Using age-appropriate initial gastric volume and British National Formulary age-specific dosing recommendations in the calculation of dose numbers, the solubility classes shifted from low to high in pediatric subpopulations of 12 years and older for amoxicillin, 5 years, 12 years and older for cephalexin, 9 years and older for chloramphenicol, 3-4 years, 9-11 and 15 years and older for diazepam, 18 years and older (adult) for doxycycline and erythromycin, 8 years and older for phenobarbital, 10 years and older for prednisolone, and 15 years and older for trimethoprim. Pediatric biopharmaceutics are not fully understood where several knowledge gaps have been recently emphasized. The current biowaiver criteria are not suitable for safe application in all pediatric populations.

  2. Factors that affect voluntary vaccination of children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shono, Aiko; Kondo, Masahide

    2015-03-10

    Some important vaccinations are not included in the routine childhood immunization schedule in Japan. Voluntary vaccinations are usually paid as an out-of-pocket expense. Low voluntary vaccination coverage rates and high target disease incidence are assumed to be a consequence of voluntary vaccination. Therefore, this study aimed to explore factors associated with voluntary vaccination patterns in children. We conducted an online survey of 1243 mothers from a registered survey panel who had at least one child 2 months to <3 years of age. The voluntary vaccination mainly correlated positively with annual household income and mothers' positive opinions about voluntary vaccinations, but negatively with number of children. Financial support, especially for low income households and households with more than one child, may motivate parents to vaccinate their children. Communication is also an important issue. More opportunities for education and information about voluntary vaccinations should be provided to mothers without distinguishing between voluntary and routine vaccination.

  3. Off the grid: vaccinations among homeschooled children.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Donya; Caplan, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    To protect public health, states require that parents have their children immunized before they are permitted to attend public or private school. But for homeschooled children, the rules vary. With the spectacular growth in the number of homeschooled students, it is becoming more difficult to reach these youth to ensure that they are immunized at all. These children are frequently unvaccinated, leaving them open to infection with diseases that are all but stamped out in the United States with immunization requirements. States should encourage parents to get their homeschooled students vaccinated through enacting the same laws as those used for public school students. This could be done by enforcing current laws through neglect petitions or by requiring that children be immunized before participating in school sponsored programs. As most states require some filing to allow parents to homeschool their children, it would be easy to enact laws requiring that homeschooled children be immunized or exempted before completing registration.

  4. The safety of influenza vaccines in children: An Institute for Vaccine Safety white paper.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Neal A; Talaat, Kawsar R; Greenbaum, Adena; Mensah, Eric; Dudley, Matthew Z; Proveaux, Tina; Salmon, Daniel A

    2015-12-30

    Most influenza vaccines are generally safe, but influenza vaccines can cause rare serious adverse events. Some adverse events, such as fever and febrile seizures, are more common in children than adults. There can be differences in the safety of vaccines in different populations due to underlying differences in genetic predisposition to the adverse event. Live attenuated vaccines have not been studied adequately in children under 2 years of age to determine the risks of adverse events; more studies are needed to address this and several other priority safety issues with all influenza vaccines in children. All vaccines intended for use in children require safety testing in the target age group, especially in young children. Safety of one influenza vaccine in children should not be extrapolated to assumed safety of all influenza vaccines in children. The low rates of adverse events from influenza vaccines should not be a deterrent to the use of influenza vaccines because of the overwhelming evidence of the burden of disease due to influenza in children.

  5. BCG vaccination of children against leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, L. M.; Garbajosa, Gallego; Uemura, K.; Engler, V.; Domínguez, V. Martínez; Paredes, L.; Sundaresan, T.; Koch, G.; Matejka, M.

    1970-01-01

    The use of BCG vaccine in the prevention of leprosy has been one of the most important subjects of investigation in the field of leprology in the last 25 years. The action of the vaccine was for many years investigated by determining its effect on the lepromin reaction. Field studies were later considered essential to determine whether BCG vaccination would be useful to leprosy contacts, to the child population probably exposed to infection, or to persons persistently lepromin-negative. The interest of the World Health Organization in this matter began in 1952 and, following the recommendations of certain advisory committees, it was decided to institute a field trial in Singu township in Burma. The main purpose of the investigation was to observe, in a highly endemic area, the protective effect, if any, of BCG vaccine against leprosy in the child population not exposed to Mycobacterium leprae at home but possibly exposed to the infection elsewhere. Field operations began at the end of August 1964 and the preliminary findings obtained up to the end of June 1968 relate to 3 annual re-examinations. So far, from the material studied, it appears that, under the conditions prevailing in Singu township, no significant effect of BCG vaccine can be seen within a period of 3 years. When children in both trial groups are followed-up for much longer periods, mainly children aged 0-4 years at intake, it is possible that a significant difference may emerge. However, to be operationally desirable, a merely significant difference is not enough; the protective effect of BCG should be substantial to warrant its large-scale use as an immunization procedure against leprosy. PMID:4246110

  6. Age-Appropriate Ecology: Are You Practicing It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shantal, Raquel

    1998-01-01

    Presents ways that early childhood educators can use classroom activities and routines to portray values related to ecology and to teach children respect for the planet. Describes strategies such as recycling materials, opening a milk and juice bar where children could purchase drinks rather than use small juice boxes, using cloth napkins, and…

  7. Measles Virus Infection Among Vaccinated and Unvaccinated Children in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji, Johnson A.; Olusola, Babatunde A.; Motayo, Babatunde O.; Akintunde, Grace B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated measles infection in vaccinated and unvaccinated children presenting with fever and maculopapular rash during measles outbreaks in the southern and western states of Nigeria. Measles, an acute viral illness caused by a virus in the family Paramyxoviridae, is a vaccine-preventable disease. Measles outbreak is common in Nigeria, despite the national immunization program. Children presenting with symptoms of measles infection in general hospitals and health centers in the states of southern and western Nigeria were recruited for this study. Vaccination history, clinical details, and 5 mL of blood were obtained from the children. Their sera samples were screened for specific immunoglobulin M antibodies to measles virus. Of 234 children tested (124 [53.2%] female), 133 (56.8%) had previously been vaccinated against measles virus, while 93 (39.7%) had not been vaccinated. Vaccination information for eight children could not be retrieved. One hundred and forty-three (62.4%) had measles IgM antibodies. Of these, 79 (55.3%) had been vaccinated for measles, while 65 (44.7%) had not. Despite the ongoing vaccination program in Nigeria, a high number of children are still being infected with measles, despite their vaccination status. Therefore, there is need to identify the reason for the low level of vaccine protection. PMID:26102341

  8. Protection of young children from influenza through universal vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Senatore, Laura; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a very common disease among infants and young children, with a considerable clinical and socioeconomic impact. A significant number of health authorities presently recommend universal influenza vaccination for the pediatric population, but a large number of European health authorities is still reluctant to include influenza vaccination in their national vaccination programs. The reasons for this reluctance include the fact that the protection offered by the currently available vaccines is considered poor. This review shows that although future research could lead to an increase in the immunogenicity and potential efficacy of influenza vaccines, the available vaccines, even with their limits, assure sufficient protection in most subjects aged ≥ 6 months, thus reducing the total burden of influenza in young children and justifying the recommendation for the universal vaccination of the whole pediatric population. For younger subjects, the vaccination of their mother during pregnancy represents an efficacious strategy. PMID:26090704

  9. Immune response to measles vaccine in Peruvian children.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-López, N. L.; Vaisberg, A.; Kanashiro, R.; Hernández, H.; Ward, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the immune response in Peruvian children following measles vaccination. METHODS: Fifty-five Peruvian children received Schwarz measles vaccine (about 10(3) plaque forming units) at about 9 months of age. Blood samples were taken before vaccination, then twice after vaccination: one sample at between 1 and 4 weeks after vaccination and the final sample 3 months post vaccination for evaluation of immune cell phenotype and lymphoproliferative responses to measles and non-measles antigens. Measles-specific antibodies were measured by plaque reduction neutralization. FINDINGS: The humoral response developed rapidly after vaccination; only 4 of the 55 children (7%) had plaque reduction neutralization titres <200 mlU/ml 3 months after vaccination. However, only 8 out of 35 children tested (23%) had lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens 3-4 weeks after vaccination. Children with poor lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens had readily detectable lymphoproliferative responses to other antigens. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed diffuse immune system activation at the time of vaccination in most children. The capacity to mount a lymphoproliferative response to measles antigens was associated with expression of CD45RO on CD4+ T-cells. CONCLUSION: The 55 Peruvian children had excellent antibody responses after measles vaccination, but only 23% (8 out of 35) generated detectable lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens (compared with 55-67% in children in the industrialized world). This difference may contribute to the less than uniform success of measles vaccination programmes in the developing world. PMID:11731811

  10. Response to the varicella vaccine in children with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quien, R M; Kaiser, B A; Deforest, A; Polinsky, M S; Fisher, M; Baluarte, H J

    1997-11-01

    Varicella vaccine was administered to seven children with corticosteroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome. Immunization was not associated with any significant reactions or with increased frequency of relapse. The antibody response was, however, variable and a second dose was necessary before seroconversion was achieved in four patients. The findings indicate that immunization with varicella vaccine is safe in children with nephrotic syndrome in remission, but that a two-dose vaccine schedule should be considered.

  11. Quadracel: Vaccination Against Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, and Poliomyelitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Juan F.; Smith, Lillian L.; Parke, Crystal K.; Brown, Jamal A.; LaFrance, Justin M.; Clark, Patricia K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vaccinations in school-aged children are required by state and local law to maintain high vaccination coverage rates, as well as low rates of vaccine-preventable diseases. Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis are childhood diseases that can be life threatening; poliomyelitis, another childhood disease, can be disabling. In turn, vaccinations were developed to provide protection against these diseases. Today, several vaccinations are recommended for children, including but not limited to diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) and poliomyelitis (IPV). DTaP requires five doses, and IPV requires four. Quadracel (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed and inactivated poliovirus vaccine, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.) is a new vaccination developed to condense the last dose of both DTaP and IPV so they do not have to be given separately, thus reducing the total number of vaccinations required. Discussion: The Quadracel vaccine is an option for use in children who are completing the DTaP and IPV series. In a randomized, controlled, phase 3, pivotal trial, Quadracel proved to be as efficacious and safe as Daptacel (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.) and IPOL (poliovirus vaccine inactivated, Sanofi Pasteur Inc.), given separately, to children between the ages of 4 and 6 years. Conclusion: Quadracel should be recommended to parents who have children between the ages of 4 and 6 years who meet the necessary administration criteria and need to finalize their DTaP and IPV series. Quadracel’s administration in the vaccination series replaces one additional injection, which may benefit children who are afraid of receiving shots and parents who need to schedule one less doctor’s appointment. PMID:27069343

  12. Vaccination coverage with seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines in children in France, 2009-2010 season.

    PubMed

    Weil-Olivier, Catherine; Lina, Bruno

    2011-09-16

    For a number of years now, GEIG, the Groupement d'Expertise et d'Information sur la Grippe (Influenza Expertise and Information Group) has conducted surveys to monitor seasonal trivalent vaccine uptake in France in adults. During the H1N1 pandemic in 2009, this survey was conducted to determine vaccination uptake for both pandemic and seasonal vaccines. An additional specific questionnaire was used to collect data on vaccination in children under 15 years of age. This additional study was carried out because pandemic vaccination (PV) was offered to the French population and children were listed as a priority target group by the national health authorities, whereas seasonal trivalent inactivated vaccines (TIV) are not recommended in children in France. Overall, we collected 2443 questionnaires on children, including children with underlying conditions (9.2%) for whom TIV vaccination was recommended. Overall, 17.9% of children (438/2443) received at least one shot of PV, compared to 3.4% (83/2443) who received at least one shot of TIV. PV uptake was statistically different between non at-risk and at-risk children (366/2218 [16.5%] vs. 71/225 [31.8%], p<0.0001). This difference was even more significant in the subgroup of children with severe underlying diseases (42.7%, p<0.0001). This confirms that despite the low overall PV uptake in the French population (9%), the specific recommendation for PV for children increased vaccine uptake in this specific population, suggesting that the disease burden of influenza in children is recognised by both practitioners and parents. The next few years will tell us whether TIV uptake in children increases as a consequence of the specific recommendations made for children during the 2009 pandemic wave, or whether it will return to the very low level of 3.4% observed before the pandemic.

  13. Vaccination in children with allergy to non active vaccine components.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Fabrizio; Bottau, Paolo; Caimmi, Silvia; Crisafulli, Giuseppe; Lucia, Liotti; Peroni, Diego; Saretta, Francesca; Vernich, Mario; Povesi Dascola, Carlotta; Caffarelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Childhood immunisation is one of the greatest public health successes of the last century. Vaccines contain an active component (the antigen) which induces the immune response. They may also contain additional components such as preservatives, additives, adjuvants and traces of other substances. This review provides information about risks of hypersensitivity reactions to components of vaccines. Furthermore, recommendations to avoid or reduce reactions to vaccine components have been detailed.

  14. Casting off vaccine supply charity -- the pace quickens. CVI goal: quality vaccines for all children.

    PubMed

    1995-10-01

    Several proposals are offered for production of high-quality vaccines within developing countries. The World Health Organization's Vaccine Supply and Quality (VSQ) team from the Global Program for Vaccines and Immunization (GPV) visited 10 countries (Bangladesh, Brazil, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Iran, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, and South Africa) out of 14 priority countries (China, Russia, Thailand, and Vietnam were not visited) producing vaccines and found only two with a quality control system that was acceptable. Vaccine-producing countries are urged to consider the full costs of production that include necessary infrastructure, an independent national control authority and laboratory, manufacturers with managerial autonomy, and manufacturers with good management, a qualified staff, and adequate technology. UNICEF has urged both private and public sectors to combine forces in bringing down the price of new vaccines for distribution to a very large market. Some imaginative proposals were made by some manufacturers for vaccine production and supply for a range of less traditional vaccines. The Director of the Massachusetts Public Health Biologic Laboratories proposed the formation of a consortium of vaccine manufacturers who would support public health priorities for market-affordable, simple vaccines against the major childhood diseases. The aim would be international validation of high-quality local vaccine production in developing countries, ease of research collaboration, improvement in information exchange between countries, and structured assistance. Lack of political commitment has been blamed for poor quality local production. A small cooperative effort among some Latin American countries, the Pan American Association's Regional Vaccine System for Latin America (SIREVA), is backed by the Children's Vaccine Initiative. SIREVA is a consortium of manufacturers in Brazil, Chile, and Mexico that plans joint development of some vaccines. Donor assistance is

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae nasopharyngeal carriage in children attending day-care centers in the central region of Portugal, in the era of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fernanda; Nunes, Sónia; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Lemos, Luís; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2009-12-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine became available in Portugal in 2001. Although not included in the national immunization program, vaccination coverage is high (over 60%). We studied for the first time the rates of nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage of pneumococci, antibiotic resistance patterns and serotypes among children attending day-care centers (DCCs) in Coimbra, a city in the Central Region of Portugal. Between January and February 2007, a cross-sectional study was conducted among children aged 6 months to 6 years attending eight DCCs. NP swabs were obtained from 507 children: 76.7% had received at least one dose of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and 64.3% were age-appropriately vaccinated. The global pneumococcal carriage rate was 61.3%. Colonization proportions varied with age and number of children attending each DCC. Serotyping revealed that 20.7% of the pneumococci were vaccine types (VTs), 70.8% were non-VTs, and 8.5% were nontypeable. Serotype 19F was the second most frequent serotype being detected in 10.5% of the samples. While global NP carriage was not associated with vaccination status, non-VTs were predominant among vaccinated children, who had significantly lower prevalence of VT. Of all isolates, 15.7% had penicillin minimum inhibitory concentrations that ranged between 0.12 and 2 microg/ml. The proportion of resistant strains was significantly higher among VT and unvaccinated children. In conclusion, the rates of vaccination and prevalence of pneumococcal NP were high. Rates of antimicrobial resistance were similar to those found in studies conducted in Oeiras and Lisbon. This study is a platform for future surveillance activities.

  16. Immune reconstitution and vaccination outcome in HIV-1 infected children

    PubMed Central

    Cagigi, Alberto; Cotugno, Nicola; Giaquinto, Carlo; Nicolosi, Luciana; Bernardi, Stefania; Rossi, Paolo; Douagi, Iyadh; Palma, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Current evidence on routine immunization of HIV-1 infected children point out the need for a special vaccine schedule in this population. However, optimal strategies for identifying individuals susceptible to infections, and then offering them sustained protection through appropriate immunization schedule, both in terms of timing and number of vaccine doses, still remain to be elucidated. Understanding the degree of immune recovery after HAART initiation is important in guiding administration of routine vaccination in HIV-1 infected children. Although quantitative measures (e.g., CD4+ T-cell counts and immunoglobulin levels) are frequently performed to evaluate immune parameters, these measures do not fully mirror functional immune recovery. Here, we will review the status of single mandatory and recommended vaccines for HIV-1 infected children in relation to immune recovery after HAART initiation with the aim of identifying new means to help design personalized vaccine schedules for this population. PMID:22906931

  17. Immunization of newborn children with living oral trivalent poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    CAMPILLO-SAINZ, C; ORNELAS HERNANDEZ, A; DE MUCHA MACIAS, J; NAVA, S E

    1962-09-01

    Campillo-Sainz, C. (Instituto Nacional de Virología de la S.S.A., México, D.F.), A. Ornelas Hernandez, J. de Mucha Macías, and S. E. Nava. Immunization of newborn children with living oral trivalent poliovirus vaccine. J. Bacteriol. 84:446-450. 1962.-The serological response to one dose of living oral trivalent polio-virus vaccine was compared in two groups of children, 49 vaccinated at birth and 44 vaccinated at the age of 4 months. Of those vaccinated at birth, 44 (90%) responded to the vaccine strains of type 1 and type 3 and 30 (61%) to the type 2 strain. Of those vaccinated at 4 months of age; 64% responded to type 1, 52% to type 2, and 82% to type 3. The difference between the responses of the two groups, which for type 1 is significant, may result from the interference of other enteric viruses in the 4-month-old children. A second dose of vaccine, administered to the children vaccinated at birth when they reached the age of 4 months, increased the over-all immunological response to 100% for types 1 and 3 and 96% for type 2, and showed that no immunological tolerance had been developed. The vaccine produced no undesirable effects in any of the children, and no paralytic poliomyelitis occurred among them. The observation of other investigators, that a high titer of maternal antibody inhibits immunological response to vaccination, was confirmed, but breast feeding apparently had no unfavorable effect on response.

  18. Parental perspectives on vaccinating children against sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Mays, Rose M; Sturm, Lynne A; Zimet, Gregory D

    2004-04-01

    Several vaccines for sexually transmitted infections (STI) are presently in development and the eventual availability of such vaccines is expected to result in the prevention of a significant number of burdensome conditions. Young adolescents are presumed to be likely targets for these vaccines since adolescents' risk for STI increases as they age and become sexually active. It is unclear, however, to what extent parents will agree to having adolescents receive STI vaccines. Inasmuch as acceptance is the foundation for effective immunization programs, an understanding of parental perspectives about this issue is required to inform future STI vaccine program strategies. This paper presents findings from a qualitative study that used in-depth interviews to elicit attitudes from 34 parents about accepting vaccines for genital herpes, human immunodeficiency virus, human papillomavirus and gonorrhea for their children (aged 8-17). Data were collected from parents bringing their children for care at an urban clinic and a suburban private office. Content analysis of the responses revealed that most parents (>70%) approved the administration of all four of the STI vaccines proposed. Parents' reasons for acceptance included wanting to protect their children, being concerned about specific disease characteristics, and previous experience with the infections. Parents who declined the vaccines did so primarily because they perceived their children to be at low risk for the infections or they had low concern about features of the diseases. Most parents thought they should be the decision-maker regarding children receiving an STI vaccine. Results from this study will be used to plan subsequent investigations of the determinants of STI vaccine acceptance by parents.

  19. [Immunization for children travelling to the tropics: neglected vaccines].

    PubMed

    Imbert, P; Guérin, N; Sorge, F

    2008-06-01

    Each year hundreds of thousands of children leave France to travel to developing countries where they are exposed to infectious agents that can be prevented by vaccination. During the child's pre-travel check-up, practitioners should check that all mandatory immunizations are up-to-date and provide advice on relevant vaccines in function of the epidemiological situation at the chosen destination. However various factors hinder full compliance with this approach and some vaccines are underused. Underused vaccines are referred to as neglected vaccines. In the French vaccination schedule three vaccinations can be considered as neglected. The first is the hepatitis B vaccine that has a low coverage level in France due to strong reluctance to its use despite the fact that the virus is widespread in tropical areas. The second is pneumococcal vaccine that should be administered to all infants less than 2 years of age, especially for travel to areas where pneumonia and meningitis are frequent. The third is BCG vaccine that is now at greater risk of being neglected in child travellers because its use has been downgraded from a general requirement to a recommendation only for children at risk. A serious limitation on the use of travel vaccinations is cost that can lead families to neglect some infectious risk such as hepatitis A that is a major risk for child travellers as well as for their relatives during or after the trip and typhoid fever that is essentially an imported disease. Rabies vaccine is also underused due to its cost and to poor understanding of the risk by many practitioners and families. The purpose of this article is to underline the need to improve information and access to vaccines that are all too often neglected in child travellers.

  20. The Children's Vaccine Initiative and vaccine supply: the role of the public sector.

    PubMed

    van Noort, R B

    1992-01-01

    'Children represent the most vulnerable segment of every society--and they are our present and future. Good health, especially of children, promotes personal and national development. Scientific progress, matched with improved capacities of all countries to immunize their children, provides an unparalleled opportunity to save additional lives and prevent additional millions of disabilities annually through a Children's Vaccine Initiative.' (The Netherlands Minister for Development Co-operation.)

  1. [Pneumococcal vaccine: protection of adults and reduction of antibiotic resistence by vaccination of children with a conjugated vaccine].

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W

    2011-06-01

    Pneumococcal infections (pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis, meningitis) are common and usually involve toddlers, immunocompromised and the elderly. Main reservoir of pneumococci is the nasopharyngeal zone of healthy carriers, especially of toddlers. Currently, two types of pneumococcal vaccines are in clinical use, which induce production of antibodies against capsular polysaccharides. The older vaccine consists of pure capsular polysaccharides. It induces a limited immunity, because polysaccharides are poor antigens that stimulate mainly B-cells. In children under two years of age this vaccine is not used, because it does not induce a sufficient immunologic response, presumably because of the immaturity of their immune system. In 2000, a vaccination program with a novel pneumococcal vaccine was launched in the USA. This vaccine contains capsular polysaccharides, that are conjugated with a highly immunogenic protein. It induces both a T cell and B cell response that results in specific humoral and mucosal immunity. U.S. data demonstrate, that serotypes covered by the conjugated vaccine can be reduced in the whole population by vaccination of children being the main reservoir of pneumococci. This so called ,,herd protection" results in a decrease in invasive pneumococcal diseases in vaccinees and non-vaccinees as well as in a reduction of antibiotic resistance rates by reducing resistant pneumococcal cones.

  2. Vaccination coverage of children with rare genetic diseases and attitudes of their parents toward vaccines.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Cerutti, Marta; Milani, Donatella; Menni, Francesca; Principi, Nicola

    2016-03-03

    Despite the fact that the achievement of appropriate immunization coverage for routine vaccines is a priority for health authorities worldwide, vaccination delays or missed opportunities for immunization are common in children with chronic diseases. The main aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate immunization coverage and the timeliness of vaccination in children suffering from 3 different rare genetic diseases: Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS), Sotos syndrome (SS), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). A total of 57 children with genetic diseases (15 with RSTS, 14 children with SS, and 28 with BWS) and 57 healthy controls with similar characteristics were enrolled. The coverage of all the recommended vaccines in children with genetic syndromes was significantly lower than that observed in healthy controls (p < 0.05 for all the comparisons). However, when vaccinated, all of the patients, independent of the genetic syndrome from which they suffer, were administered the primary series and the booster doses at a similar time to healthy controls. In comparison with parents of healthy controls, parents of children with genetic diseases were found to more frequently have negative attitudes toward vaccination (p < 0.05 for all the comparisons), mainly for fear of the emergence of adverse events or deterioration of the underlying disease. This study shows that vaccination coverage is poor in pediatric patients with RSTS, BWS, and SS and significantly lower than that observed in healthy children. These results highlight the need for educational programs specifically aimed at both parents and pediatricians to increase immunization coverage in children with these rare genetic diseases.

  3. Hypothesis: conjugate vaccines may predispose children to autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Richmand, Brian J

    2011-12-01

    The first conjugate vaccine was approved for use in the US in 1988 to protect infants and young children against the capsular bacteria Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Since its introduction in the US, this vaccine has been approved in most developed countries, including Denmark and Israel where the vaccine was added to their national vaccine programs in 1993 and 1994, respectively. There have been marked increases in the reported prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) among children in the US beginning with birth cohorts in the late 1980s and in Denmark and Israel starting approximately 4-5 years later. Although these increases may partly reflect ascertainment biases, an exogenous trigger could explain a significant portion of the reported increases in ASDs. It is hypothesized here that the introduction of the Hib conjugate vaccine in the US in 1988 and its subsequent introduction in Denmark and Israel could explain a substantial portion of the initial increases in ASDs in those countries. The continuation of the trend toward increased rates of ASDs could be further explained by increased usage of the vaccine, a change in 1990 in the recommended age of vaccination in the US from 15 to 2 months, increased immunogenicity of the vaccine through changes in its carrier protein, and the subsequent introduction of the conjugate vaccine for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although conjugate vaccines have been highly effective in protecting infants and young children from the significant morbidity and mortality caused by Hib and S. pneumoniae, the potential effects of conjugate vaccines on neural development merit close examination. Conjugate vaccines fundamentally change the manner in which the immune systems of infants and young children function by deviating their immune responses to the targeted carbohydrate antigens from a state of hypo-responsiveness to a robust B2 B cell mediated response. This period of hypo-responsiveness to carbohydrate antigens coincides

  4. Economic benefits of inactivated influenza vaccines in the prevention of seasonal influenza in children

    PubMed Central

    Salleras, Luis; Navas, Encarna; Torner, Nuria; Prat, Andreu A.; Garrido, Patricio; Soldevila, Núria; Domínguez, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review published studies that evaluated the efficiency of inactivated influenza vaccination in preventing seasonal influenza in children. The vaccine evaluated was the influenza-inactivated vaccine in 10 studies and the virosomal inactivated vaccine in 3 studies. The results show that yearly vaccination of children with the inactivated influenza vaccine saves money from the societal and family perspectives but not from the public or private provider perspective. When vaccination does not save money, the cost-effectiveness ratios were very acceptable. It can be concluded, that inactivated influenza vaccination of children is a very efficient intervention. PMID:23295894

  5. Vaccination status of tribal mothers and their under five children.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M; Banerjee, M; Rahman, M; Akhter, F U

    2006-01-01

    A study was done to find out the vaccination status of the tribal mothers and their under 5 children in some selected villages of Durgapur upazila under Netrakona district. It was a cross sectional study in which 92 tribal mothers and 91 under 5 children were included. The study was carried out in 4 different tribal villages under Netrakona district from February to June 2001. According to National EPI schedule, it was revealed that 58.2% of the children were fully vaccinated, 26.4% incompletely and 15.4% not vaccinated. The individual vaccine coverage was 84.6% for BCG, 68.1% for OPV and DPT, 58.2% for Measles. Considering the literacy, most of the respondents (78.3%) were illiterate and 21.7% had some basic education. None of the mother completed 5 doses of TT coverage. The individual TT coverage was found 78.3% for TT(1), 67.4% for TT(2), 17.4% for TT(3) and 1.1% for TT(4). This study observed that the vaccination status in the tribal children was satisfactory in relation to National coverage, but the vaccination status of the tribal mothers was not satisfactory in our national context.

  6. Vaccines for Children: Reexamination of Program Goals and Implementation Needed to Ensure Vaccination. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Program Evaluation and Methodology Div.

    This report presents: (1) a review of the evidence that vaccine cost has prevented children from being immunized on time; (2) an evaluation of the implementation of the Vaccines For Children (VFC) program, including whether this program, as implemented, is likely to meet the needs of the under-immunized children; and (3) some options for improving…

  7. IgG responses after booster vaccination with different pertussis vaccines in Dutch children 4 years of age: effect of vaccine antigen content.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Lotte H; Berbers, Guy A M; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2009-11-05

    Since whooping cough is reemerging in the Netherlands from 1996 onwards, several changes in the national immunization program have been implemented regarding the pertussis vaccinations. The aim of this study is to investigate IgG responses in whole cell (wP) and acellular (aP) pertussis vaccine primed children following revaccination with different pertussis booster vaccines at 4 years of age. IgG levels to pertussis toxin (Pt), filamentous heamagglutin (FHA), pertactin (Prn) and fimbriae type 2 and 3 (Fim2/3) and avidities of Pt and Prn antibodies were measured using a multiplex immunoassay. Before and after the booster we found significantly higher IgG levels to Pt, FHA and Prn in aP compared to wP primed children. In all children a booster vaccination with a pertussis vaccine containing a high antigen dose (Infanrix) induced higher IgG responses compared to a low antigen dose containing vaccine (Triaxis). Avidities of Pt- and Prn-antibodies before and after booster vaccination were significantly higher in aP than in wP primed children. This study shows that a booster vaccine with high pertussis antigen concentrations induces higher antibody levels than a low antigen containing vaccine. In children primed with the Dutch DTwP-IPV-Hib vaccine we suggest to administer a booster vaccine containing high pertussis antigens to optimize IgG responses. The pertussis vaccination history has to be taken into account in decisions on changes in pertussis vaccination policy.

  8. Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children 1 and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor Routine Recommendations for Pneumococcal Conjugate ... X X X X X 1 For PCV13 vaccination of healthy children, see “Recommen- dations for Pneumococcal ...

  9. Vanishing vaccinations: why are so many Americans opting out of vaccinating their children?

    PubMed

    Calandrillo, Steve P

    2004-01-01

    Vaccinations against life-threatening diseases are one of the greatest public health achievements in history. Literally millions of premature deaths have been prevented, and countless more children have been saved from disfiguring illness. While vaccinations carry unavoidable risks, the medical, social and economic benefits they confer have led all fifty states to enact compulsory childhood vaccination laws to stop the spread of preventable diseases. Today, however, vaccines are becoming a victim of their success--many individuals have never witnessed the debilitating diseases that vaccines protect against, allowing complacency toward immunization requirements to build. Antivaccination sentiment is growing fast in the United States, in large part due to the controversial and hotly disputed link between immunizations and autism. The internet worsens fears regarding vaccination safety, as at least a dozen websites publish alarming information about the risks of vaccines. Increasing numbers of parents are refusing immunizations for their children and seeking legally sanctioned exemptions instead, apparently fearing vaccines more than the underlying diseases that they protect against. A variety of factors are at play: religious and philosophical beliefs, freedom and individualism, misinformation about risk, and overperception of risk. State legislatures and health departments now face a difficult challenge: respecting individual rights and freedoms while also safeguarding the public welfare. Nearly all states allow vaccination exemptions for religious reasons and a growing number provide "philosophical" opt-outs as well. However, in all but a handful of jurisdictions, neither objection is seriously documented or verified. Often, the law requires a parent to do no more than simply check a box indicating she does not wish her child to receive immunizations. The problem is exacerbated by financial incentives schools have to encourage students to opt out of vaccinations

  10. Mumps, measles and rubella vaccination in children with PFAPA syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraszewska-G Omba, Barbara; Matkowska-Kocjan, Agnieszka; Mi Kiewicz, Katarzyna; Szyma Ska-Toczek, Zofia; Wójcik, Marta; Bany, Dorota; Szenborn, Leszek

    2016-11-21

    There is no published data regarding immunologic response to vaccinations in children with PFAPA syndrome (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis). The aim of this study was to evaluate mumps, measles and rubella immunity in children with PFAPA. 31 children with PFAPA syndrome and 22 healthy children (control group - CG) were recruited to the study. All children were previously vaccinated with one dose of MMR vaccine according to the Polish obligatory vaccination schedule. The patients from both groups were evaluated for anti-measles, anti-mumps and anti-rubella IgG antibodies concentrations (ELISA tests; the reference values for protective antibody levels were 150IU/L, 16RU/L and 11IU/ml respectively). The percentage of patients with protective antibodies levels was as follows: measles - 93.55% of PFAPA and 95.45% of CG patients (p=0.77); mumps - 74.19% of PFAPA and 95.45% of CG patients (p=0.02); rubella - 80.65% of PFAPA and 90.9% of CG patients (p=0.30).

  11. Response to measles-mumps-rubella vaccine in children on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Schulman, S L; Deforest, A; Kaiser, B A; Polinsky, M S; Baluarte, H J

    1992-03-01

    Ten children receiving maintenance dialysis were immunized with the standard dose of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine between 15 and 33 months of age. Immune responses to vaccination were determined using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for measles, mumps, and rubella viruses. Eight children responded to measles vaccine, 5 to mumps vaccine, 8 to rubella vaccine, and only 3 children to all three vaccines, compared with a seroconversion rate of over 90% to all three vaccines in healthy children (P less than 0.0001). We contend that the relatively poor immunocompetence of our dialysis patients explains their less than optimal vaccine response and suggest that children vaccinated while undergoing dialysis be tested to confirm serological evidence of immunity.

  12. Combining hepatitis A and B vaccination in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, P; Van der Wielen, M

    2001-03-21

    Hepatitis A and B are common infections worldwide and their severity is related to the individual's age upon initial infection. Furthermore, when hepatitis B infection occurs in infants, the risk of becoming a chronic carrier is 90%. For hepatitis A, the lower incidence of disease arising from an improvement in living conditions leaves a greater number of children, adolescents and young adults susceptible to residual circulating virus. Consequently, initial infection occurs later in life when clinical illness is more frequent and the rate of morbidity and mortality higher. Although both viruses differ greatly, including their modes of transmission, the overlap in their epidemiology warrants the combination of hepatitis A and B vaccination. The immune response elicited by the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine following a three-dose schedule compares well with the anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) and anti-hepatitis B sero-responses obtained with monovalent vaccines. In addition, it was shown that the seroprotection rate for anti-hepatitis B increased more rapidly with the administration of the combined vaccine, with values of more than 80% within 1 month after the first two doses (schedule, 0, 1 and 6 months). Currently, according to the World Health Organization recommendations, more than 116 countries are vaccinating their infants and/or adolescents against hepatitis B. Recently, several countries were considering or have decided to begin mass vaccination against HAV (more than fifteen states in the US, Spain (Catalonia), Italy (Puglia)). For these countries, the combination of hepatitis A and B antigens in one single vaccine offers the following advantages: fewer injections for protection against two infections, better compliance, lower implementation costs, and fewer missed vaccination opportunities. Further simplification of the schedule, by reducing the number of doses, would improve the compliance rate as well as being more convenient for the vaccinee. This

  13. [Pneumococcal vaccines in children: an update].

    PubMed

    Potin, Marcela

    2014-08-01

    Conjugated pneumococal vaccines had a notable impact on prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in vacccinated and non vaccinated (herd immunity) populations. In Chile a 10 valent conjugated vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in the Nacional Immunization Program (NIP) in 2011, initially in a 3+1 schedule at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age, and since 2012 in a 2+1 schedule (2, 4 and 12 months). In prematures schedule 3+1 was maintained. No catch up or high risk groups vaccination strategies were used. The inclusion of PCV10 has reduced the rates of IPD; 66% in infants less than 12 months old and a 60% in 12-24 months old. After 3 years of the introduction of PCV10, no herd immunity has been seen. Serotype replacement shows an increase of ST 3 but not ST19A. Surveillance shows that another vaccine with 13 serotypes (PCV13) would cover an additional 5 to 10% of cases. The nule herd immunity and more extense coverage of PCV13, suggests that NIP should switch from PCV10 to PCV13.

  14. Parental views on vaccine safety and future vaccinations of children who experienced an adverse event following routine or seasonal influenza vaccination in 2010.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Adriana; Gold, Michael; Marshall, Helen; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Watson, Maureen; Baghurst, Peter

    2012-05-01

    To assess parental vaccine safety views and future vaccination decisions after an adverse event following immunization (AEFI) experienced by their child. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted of parents of children aged 0-7 y, identified in AEFI reports submitted to the South Australian Immunization Section, Department Health. The reports included childhood National Immunization Program (NIP), seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Interviews were conducted following a national suspension of the 2010 seasonal trivalent influenza (STIV) vaccine. Parental attitudes toward vaccine safety, reasons for reporting the AEFI and impact on future vaccination intent were assessed. Of 179 parents interviewed, 88% were confident in the safety of vaccines in general. Parents reporting an AEFI to the STIV were more likely to state the event had influenced future vaccination decisions than the NIP vaccine reporters (65% vs 14%, p < 0.001), with 63% stating refusal or hesitance to re-vaccinate their children against influenza. Media reports of the 2010 STIV program suspension was the most common reason for reporting an AEFI for parents of children who received an influenza vaccination. The AEFI experience did not impact on parental decision to continue with routine childhood NIP schedules, regardless of whether children received influenza or NIP vaccines. In contrast, most parents whose child experienced an AEFI to the 2010 STIV stated decreased confidence in the safety of influenza vaccines, which is likely to have impacted on the uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination in 2011. Addressing influenza vaccine safety concerns to promote influenza vaccination in the community is required.

  15. Persistence of T-cell immune response induced by two acellular pertussis vaccines in children five years after primary vaccination.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Carollo, Maria; Bianco, Manuela; Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Villani, Alberto; Tozzi, Alberto E; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M

    2016-01-01

    The resurgence of pertussis suggests the need for greater efforts to understand the long-lasting protective responses induced by vaccination. In this paper we dissect the persistence of T memory responses induced by primary vaccination with two different acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines, hexavalent Hexavac® vaccine (Hexavac) (Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and Infanrix hexa® (Infanrix) (Glaxo-SmithKline Biologicals). We evaluated magnitude and duration of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin (PT) by measuring T-cell proliferation, cytokines (IL-2 and IFNγ) production and memory subsets in two groups of children 5 years after primary vaccination. Some of the enrolled children received only primary vaccination, while others had the pre-school boost dose. Positive T-cell responses to PT were detected in 36% of children. Percentage of responsive children, T-cell proliferation and CD4IL-2+ cells were significantly higher in the children primed with Hexavac than in those who received Infanrix vaccine. No major effects of the boost on PT-specific proliferation were observed. Overall, our data documented a persistence of T-cell memory against PT in a minor fraction of children 5 years after primary vaccination. The different responses induced by Hexavac and Infanrix vaccine could rely on differences in PT inactivation process or excipients/adjuvants formulations.

  16. Varicella vaccination coverage of children under two years of age in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Since July 2004, routine varicella vaccination is recommended by the German Standing Vaccination Committee in Germany. Health Insurance Funds started to cover vaccination costs at different time points between 2004 and 2006 in the Federal States. Nationwide representative data on vaccination coverage against varicella of children under two years of age are not available. We aimed to determine varicella vaccination coverage in statutory health insured children under two years of age in twelve German Federal States using data from associations of statutory health insurance physicians (ASHIPs), in order to investigate the acceptance of the recommended routine varicella vaccination programme. Methods We analysed data on varicella vaccination from 13 of 17 ASHIPs of the years 2004 to 2007. The study population consisted of all statutory health insured children under two years of age born in 2004 (cohort 2004) or 2005 (cohort 2005) in one of the studied regions. Vaccination coverage was determined by the number of children vaccinated under 2 years of age within the study population. Results Varicella vaccination coverage of children under two years of age with either one dose of the monovalent varicella vaccine or two doses of the measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccine increased from 34% (cohort 2004) to 51% (cohort 2005) in the studied regions (p < 0.001). More than half of the vaccinated children of cohort 2004 and two third of cohort 2005 were immunised at the recommended age 11 to 14 months. The level of vaccination coverage of cohort 2004 was significantly associated with the delay in introduction of cost coverage since the recommendation of varicella vaccination (p < 0.001). Conclusions Our study shows increasing varicella vaccination coverage of young children, indicating a growing acceptance of the routine varicella vaccination programme by the parents and physicians. We recommend further monitoring of vaccination coverage using data from

  17. Youth as Design Partners: Age-Appropriate Websites for Middle and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Anthony S.; Smith, Kathelene McCarty; Sun, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of using best practices identified in previous studies in designing age-appropriate websites for middle and high school youth. Utilizing a mixed-method approach, 31 middle and 22 high school youth took part in six focus groups across four states. Participants were introduced to a website specifically designed for…

  18. Vaccination Coverage Cluster Surveys in Middle Dreib – Akkar, Lebanon: Comparison of Vaccination Coverage in Children Aged 12-59 Months Pre- and Post-Vaccination Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Assaad, Ramia; Rebeschini, Arianna; Hamadeh, Randa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the high proportion of refugee population throughout Lebanon and continuous population movement, it is sensible to believe that, in particular vulnerable areas, vaccination coverage may not be at an optimal level. Therefore, we assessed the vaccination coverage in children under 5 in a district of the Akkar governorate before and after a vaccination campaign. During the vaccination campaign, conducted in August 2015, 2,509 children were vaccinated. Materials and Methods We conducted a pre- and post-vaccination campaign coverage surveys adapting the WHO EPI cluster survey to the Lebanese MoPH vaccination calendar. Percentages of coverage for each dose of each vaccine were calculated for both surveys. Factors associated with complete vaccination were explored. Results Comparing the pre- with the post-campaign surveys, coverage for polio vaccine increased from 51.9% to 84.3%, for Pentavalent from 49.0% to 71.9%, for MMR from 36.2% to 61.0%, while the percentage of children with fully updated vaccination calendar increased from 32.9% to 53.8%. While Lebanese children were found to be better covered for some antigens compared to Syrians at the first survey, this difference disappeared at the post-campaign survey. Awareness and logistic obstacles were the primary reported causes of not complete vaccination in both surveys. Discussion Vaccination campaigns remain a quick and effective approach to increase vaccination coverage in crisis-affected areas. However, campaigns cannot be considered as a replacement of routine vaccination services to maintain a good level of coverage. PMID:27992470

  19. 76 FR 34994 - Vaccine To Protect Children From Anthrax-Public Engagement Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Vaccine To Protect Children From Anthrax--Public Engagement Workshop AGENCY: Office of... Biodefense Science Board's (NBSB) Anthrax Vaccine (AV) Working Group (WG) will hold a public engagement workshop on July 7, 2011, to discuss vaccine to protect children from anthrax. This meeting is open to...

  20. [Chemoprophylaxis and vaccine for prevention of bacterial meningitis in children].

    PubMed

    Bourrillon, Antoine; Bingen, Edouard

    2004-05-15

    Given the devastating nature of Neisseria meningitidis disease and emergence of resistant strains prevention through chemoprophylaxis and meningococcal vaccine remains the best approach to control this serious infection. Chemoprophylaxis may limited strictly to the contact subjects. Polysaccharide meningococcal serogroups A, C, Y and W135 should be given less than 10 days to patients with prolonged contact with the index case. Meningococcal C conjugate vaccine constitutes an additional advantage in the prevention of meningococcal meningitis in children < 2 years. High Haemophilus serotype B coverage level led to near-disappearance of H. influenzae serotype b meningitis but chemoprophylaxis remains indicated.

  1. Should healthy children be vaccinated against influenza? A consensus report of the Summits of Independent European Vaccination Experts.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Terho; Booy, Robert; Campins, Magda; Finn, Adam; Olcén, Per; Peltola, Heikki; Rodrigo, Carlos; Schmitt, Heinz-Josef; Schumacher, Fabian; Teo, Stephen; Weil-Olivier, Catherine

    2006-04-01

    Influenza is often regarded as an illness of the elderly portion of the population because most of the excess mortality associated with influenza epidemics occurs in that age group. However, evidence derived from a large number of clinical studies carried out in different countries and various settings has clearly demonstrated that the burden of influenza is also substantial in children. The attack rates of influenza during annual epidemics are consistently highest in children, and young children are hospitalized for influenza-related illnesses at rates comparable to those for adults with high-risk conditions. Especially among children younger than 3 years of age, influenza frequently predisposes the patient to bacterial complications such as acute otitis media. Children also serve as the main transmitters of influenza in the community. A safe and effective vaccine against influenza has been available for decades, but the vaccine is rarely used even for children with high-risk conditions. Despite several existing problems related to influenza vaccination of children, the current evidence indicates that the advantages of vaccinating young children would clearly outweigh the disadvantages. Considering the total burden of influenza in children, children younger than 3 years of age should be regarded as a high-risk group for influenza, analogously with the age-based definition of high risk among persons 65 years of age or older. Annual influenza vaccination should be recommended to all children from 6 months to 3 years of age.

  2. Impact of rotavirus vaccination on coverage and timing of pentavalent vaccination – Experience from 2 Latin American countries

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, A.; Pessler, F.; Akmatov, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the coverage and timing of rotavirus vaccination and the impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on coverage and timing of the pentavalent vaccine. We used data from the Demographic and Health Surveys in Honduras (2011/2012) and Peru (2012). The samples were divided into 2 subcohorts: children born before and after the introduction of rotavirus vaccine. We compared coverage and timing of the pentavalent vaccine in the aforementioned subcohorts. Coverage with the first and second doses of rotavirus vaccination was 95% (95% confidence intervals: 93–97%) and 91% (89–95%) in Honduras and 79% (77–82%) and 72% (69–75%) in Peru, respectively. Coverage increased in both countries over the years. The proportion of children vaccinated according to age-appropriate vaccination schedules varied between 67% (second dose of rotavirus vaccinations in Peru) and 89% (first dose of rotavirus vaccination in Honduras). Coverage with the first and second doses of pentavalent vaccination remained constant over the years in Honduras, while in Peru there was a significant increase in coverage over the years (p for trend, <0.0001). In both countries, timing of pentavalent vaccination was better in post-rota-cohorts than in pre-rota-cohorts. Since its introduction, coverage of rotavirus vaccination has improved over time in both countries. An introduction of rotavirus vaccination in both countries appears to have improved the coverage and timing of other similarly scheduled vaccinations. PMID:26833132

  3. [Seasonal influenza vaccination in children and adolescents. Recommendations of the CAV-AEP for the campaign].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Arístegui Fernández, J; Ruiz-Contreras, J; Alvarez García, F J; Merino Moína, M; González-Hachero, J; Corretger Rauet, J M; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Ortigosa del Castillo, L; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Barrio Corrales, F

    2012-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics establishes annual recommendations on influenza vaccination in childhood before the onset of influenza season. Routine influenza vaccination is particularly beneficial when the strategy is aimed at children older than 6 months of age with high-risk conditions and their home contacts. The recommendation of influenza vaccination in health workers with children is also emphasized.

  4. Reactogenicity of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in young children: Pronounced reactions by previous successive vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Chika; Fujieda, Megumi; Fukushima, Wakaba; Ohfuji, Satoko; Kondo, Kyoko; Maeda, Akiko; Nakano, Takashi; Kaji, Masaro; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-07-09

    In order to assess factors associated with reactogenicity of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) among young children, data on 1538 vaccinees aged 0-5 years in a previous vaccine effectiveness study were analyzed. The most frequent reaction was redness (19%), followed by induration, swelling, itching, and pain (6-12%); there were no serious adverse events. For some local reactions, multivariate analyses indicated associations of younger age, preschool attendance, presence of siblings, and allergy with lower risk, and use of thinner needles with higher risk. Most notably, administration of one or more IIV3 vaccines during the previous 3 seasons was positively associated with each local reaction (adjusted odds ratios: 3.6-5.4). For subjects aged ≥3 years, prior successive annual vaccinations were associated with substantially increased local reactions, with clear dose-response relationships (P for trend: <0.001 for each); for example, an 9.8-fold greater risk of swelling following three successive annual vaccinations before the study season.

  5. Vaccine-Derived NSP2 Segment in Rotaviruses from Vaccinated Children with Gastroenteritis in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemón; Rippinger, Christine M.; Svensson, Lennart; Patton, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) vaccination programs have been established in several countries using the human-attenuated G1P[8] monovalent vaccine Rotarix™ (GlaxoSmithKline) and/or the human-bovine reassortant G1, G2, G3, G4, P[8] pentavalent vaccine RotaTeq™ (Merck). The efficacy of both vaccines is high (~90%) in developed countries, but can be remarkably lower in developing countries. For example, a vaccine efficacy against severe diarrhea of only 58% was observed in a 2007–2009 Nicaraguan study using RotaTeq. To gain insight into the significant level of vaccine failure in this country, we sequenced the genomes of RVs recovered from vaccinated Nicaraguan children with gastroenteritis. The results revealed that all had genotype specificities typical for human RVs (11 G1P[8], 1 G3P[8]) and that the sequences and antigenic epitopes of the outer capsid proteins (VP4 and VP7) of these viruses were similar to those reported for RVs isolated elsewhere in the world. As expected, nine of the G1P[8] viruses and the single G3P[8] virus had genome constellations typical of human G1P[8] and G3P[8] RVs: G1/3-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. However, two of the G1P[8] viruses had atypical constellations, G1-P[8]-I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N2-T1-E1-H1, due to the presence of a genotype-2 NSP2 (N2) gene. The sequence of the N2 NSP2 gene was identical to the bovine N2 NSP2 gene of RotaTeq, indicating that the two atypical viruses originated via reassortment of human G1P[8] RVs with RotaTeq viruses. Together, our data suggest that the high level of vaccine failure in Nicaraguan is probably not due to antigenic drift of commonly circulating virus strains nor the emergence of new antigenetically distinct virus strains. Furthermore, our data suggests that the widespread use of the RotaTeq vaccine has led to the introduction of vaccine genes into circulating human RVs. PMID:22487061

  6. Use of mobile phones for improving vaccination coverage among children living in rural hard-to-reach areas and urban streets of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jasim; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Horng, Lily; Labrique, Alain; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Zeller, Kelsey; Chowdhury, Mridul; Larson, Charles P; Bishai, David; Alam, Nurul

    2016-01-04

    In Bangladesh, full vaccination rates among children living in rural hard-to-reach areas and urban streets are low. We conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post study of a 12-month mobile phone intervention to improve vaccination among 0-11 months old children in rural hard-to-reach and urban street dweller areas. Software named "mTika" was employed within the existing public health system to electronically register each child's birth and remind mothers about upcoming vaccination dates with text messages. Android smart phones with mTika were provided to all health assistants/vaccinators and supervisors in intervention areas, while mothers used plain cell phones already owned by themselves or their families. Pre and post-intervention vaccination coverage was surveyed in intervention and control areas. Among children over 298 days old, full vaccination coverage actually decreased in control areas--rural baseline 65.9% to endline 55.2% and urban baseline 44.5% to endline 33.9%--while increasing in intervention areas from rural baseline 58.9% to endline 76*8%, difference +18.8% (95% CI 5.7-31.9) and urban baseline 40.7% to endline 57.1%, difference +16.5% (95% CI 3.9-29.0). Difference-in-difference (DID) estimates were +29.5% for rural intervention versus control areas and +27.1% for urban areas for full vaccination in children over 298 days old, and logistic regression adjusting for maternal education, mobile phone ownership, and sex of child showed intervention effect odds ratio (OR) of 3.8 (95% CI 1.5-9.2) in rural areas and 3.0 (95% CI 1.4-6.4) in urban areas. Among all age groups, intervention effects on age-appropriate vaccination coverage were positive: DIDs +13.1-30.5% and ORs 2.5-4.6 (p<0.001 in all comparisons). Qualitative data showed the intervention was well-accepted. Our study demonstrated that a mobile phone intervention can improve vaccination coverage in rural hard-to-reach and urban street dweller communities in Bangladesh. This small-scale successful

  7. [Age-appropriate communication and screening for exploratory behaviour during adolescence].

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Ch

    2007-02-01

    Age-appropriate communication style is a core condition in order to screen successfully for exploratory behaviours during adolescence. To offer the adolescent patient to see the doctor alone for some time and to provide assurance of confidentiality even with regard to their parents enhances the doctor-patient relationship and enables the communication about personal issues such as the consumption of psychoactive substances and other potentially harmful behaviours. In order to assure confidentiality even with regard to the adolescent's parents, an evaluation of the adolescent patient's rights for minor consent as well as the potential risk for self-harm and / or homicide has to be performed. Age-appropriate communication that includes conversation about psychoactive drugs and other harmful behaviours has the potential to improve the adolescents' health substantially.

  8. Mumps outbreak in vaccinated children in Gipuzkoa (Basque Country), Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Montes, M.; Cilla, G.; Artieda, J.; Vicente, D.; Basterretxea, M.

    2002-01-01

    A mumps outbreak occurred in a group of vaccinated children aged 3-4 years in San Sebastián (Gipuzkoa, Basque Country, Spain) in 2000 during the same period as a revaccination campaign against measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) was performed. The clinical cases were confirmed by viral culture, detection of viral RNA and/or specific IgM. Eighty-eight percent of the children had been vaccinated with the Rubini strain and the remainder with the Jeryl-Lynn strain. The attack rate was 47.9% (35 cases in 73 school-attending children of this age). The outbreak was caused by an H genotype strain of mumps virus which was circulating at the same time as a D genotype strain that caused sporadic cases. By sequencing the small hydrophobic (SH) gene, the strains of the clinical cases were identified as wild-type mumps virus with heterologous genotypes in comparison to the vaccine strains used in our area. PMID:12558338

  9. Parents' willingness to get human papillomavirus vaccination for their adolescent children at a pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Calo, William A; Gilkey, Melissa B; Shah, Parth; Marciniak, Macary W; Brewer, Noel T

    2017-02-07

    Pharmacies are promising alternative settings for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination because of their accessibility and existing infrastructure for vaccine delivery. We sought to examine parents' willingness to get HPV vaccination for their children at pharmacies. In 2014, we conducted a national, online survey of 1255 parents of 11- to 17-year-old adolescents in the United States. Parents reported whether they would be willing to get HPV vaccine for their children at a pharmacy. We used multivariable logistic regression to model willingness for getting HPV vaccinations in pharmacies. Overall, 29% of parents would be willing to get HPV vaccine for their children at a pharmacy. Parental willingness was associated with believing that pharmacists are skilled at administering vaccines (OR=2.05, 95% CI:1.68-2.51), HPV vaccine was at least as important as other adolescent vaccines (OR=1.48, 95% CI:1.10-1.98), and getting vaccines in pharmacies would give children more opportunities to get health care (OR=2.17, 95% CI:1.63-2.89). Parental willingness was also more common among parents of adolescents ages 13-17 or who had already initiated the HPV vaccine series. Parents most often indicated that they would like to learn about HPV vaccination in pharmacies from their children's doctor (37%). Offering HPV vaccine in pharmacies may increase uptake as a meaningful number of parents would get the vaccine for their children in these settings. Physician referrals for completing the HPV vaccine series may serve as an important source for increasing awareness of and demand for adolescent vaccination services in pharmacies.

  10. Vaccine recommendations for children and youth for the 2015/2016 influenza season

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Paediatric Society continues to encourage annual influenza vaccination for ALL children and youth ≥6 months of age. Recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization for the 2015/2016 influenza season include some important changes: Children and adolescents with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders were added to the list of individuals considered to be at high risk for severe influenza.Quadrivalent influenza vaccines are recommended preferentially over trivalent vaccines for use in children and youth.An adjuvanted trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is now available for use in children six to 23 months of age. PMID:26526862

  11. The Cost of Universal Influenza Vaccination of Children in Pediatric Practices

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Szilagyi, Peter G.; Schaffer, Stanley J.; Humiston, Sharon G.; Rand, Cynthia M.; Albertin, Christina S.; Vincelli, Phyllis; Blumkin, Aaron K.; Shone, Laura P.; Coleman, Margaret S.

    2010-01-01

    Context Although all children 6 months to 18 years are now recommended to receive influenza vaccine, the total direct and indirect costs for pediatric practices of delivering childhood influenza vaccination are unknown. Objective To estimate nationally-representative pediatric practices’ costs of providing influenza vaccination during the 2006–2007 season, and to simulate the costs pediatric practices might incur when implementing universal influenza vaccination for US children 6 months to 18 years. Design and Setting We surveyed a stratified, random sample of New York State pediatric practices (n=91) to obtain information from physicians and office managers about all practice resources associated with provision of influenza vaccination. We estimated vaccination costs for two practice sizes (small, large) and three geographic areas (urban, suburban, rural). We adjusted these data to obtain national estimates. Main Outcome Measure(s) Total practice cost for providing one influenza vaccine (2006 dollars) to children 6 months to 18 years. Results Among all respondents, the median total cost per vaccination was $28.62 (range $18.67 (25th percentile) to $45.28 (75th percentile)). The median component costs were: (1) clinical personnel/labor- $2.01, (2) non-clinical personnel/labor- $7.96, and (3) all other (overhead) costs- $10.43. Vaccine purchase costs averaged $8.22. Smaller practices and urban practices had higher costs than larger or suburban practices. Assuming that vaccine administration reimbursement for all Vaccine For Children program (VFC) eligible children is the current Medicaid median of $8.40, the financial loss across all US pediatric practices through delivering VFC vaccines would be $98 million if only one-third of children received influenza vaccine. Conclusion The total cost for pediatric practices to provide influenza vaccination is high, varies by practice characteristics, and exceeds average VFC reimbursement. Many pediatric practices may face

  12. Associations between health communication behaviors, neighborhood social capital, vaccine knowledge, and parents' H1N1 vaccination of their children.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo; Lin, Leesa; Viswanath, K

    2013-10-01

    During the H1N1 pandemic in 2009-10, the vaccination behavior of parents played a critical role in preventing and containing the spread of the disease and the subsequent health outcomes among children. Several studies have examined the relationship between parents' health communication behaviors and vaccinations for children in general. Little is known, however, about the link between parents' health communication behaviors and the vaccination of their children against the H1N1 virus, and their level of vaccine-related knowledge. We drew on a national survey among parents with at least one child less than 18 years of age (n=639) to investigate Parents' H1N1-related health communication behaviors including sources of information, media exposure, information-seeking behaviors, H1N1-related knowledge, and neighborhood social capital, as well as the H1N1 vaccination rates of their children. Findings showed that there is a significant association between the degree at which parents obtained H1N1 vaccination for their children and health communication variables: watching the national television news and actively seeking H1N1 information. And this association was moderated by the extent of the parents' H1N1-related knowledge. In addition, the parents' degree of neighborhood social capital mediated the association between H1N1 knowledge of the parents and H1N1 vaccination acceptance for their children. We found, compared to those with a low-level of neighborhood social capital, parents who have a high-level of neighborhood social capital are more likely to vaccinate their children. These findings suggest that it is necessary to design a strategic health communication campaign segmented by parent health communication behaviors.

  13. Antibody persistence up to 5 years after vaccination of toddlers and children between 12 months and 10 years of age with a quadrivalent meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Vesikari, Timo; Forsten, Aino; Bianco, Veronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    We studied the persistence of serum bactericidal antibody using rabbit and human complement (rSBA/hSBA, cut-offs 1:8) 5 y after a single dose of meningococcal serogroups A, C, W, Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) compared with age-appropriate control vaccines in toddlers and children (NCT00427908). Children were previously randomized (3:1) to receive either MenACWY-TT or control vaccine (MenC-CRM197 in 1-<2 y olds; MenACWY-polysaccharide vaccine [Men-PS] in 2-<11 y olds). Subjects with rSBA-MenC titers <1:8 at any time point were revaccinated with MenC conjugate vaccine and discontinued from the study. A repeated measurement statistical model assessed potential selection effects due to drop-outs. At year 5 in MenACWY-TT-vaccinated-toddlers for serogroups A, C, W, and Y respectively, percentages with rSBA titers ≥1:8 were 73.5%, 77.6%, 34.7%, and 42.9%, hSBA ≥1:8 were 35.6%, 91.7%, 82.6% and 80.0%. For MenC-CRM197 recipients, 63.6% had persisting rSBA-MenC titers ≥1:8 and 90.9% had hSBA-MenC ≥1:8 (not significantly different versus MenACWY-TT for either assay: exploratory analyses). In 2-<11 y olds rSBA titers ≥1:8 in MenACWY-TT-vaccinees were 90.8%, 90.8%, 78.6%, and 78.6% and 15.4%, 100%, 0.0%, 7.7% in Men-PS-vaccinees (significantly different for serogroups A, W and Y, exploratory analyses). Serogroups A, W and Y rSBA GMTs were ≥ 26-fold higher in MenACWY-TT-vaccinees. As expected, GMTs modeled at year 5 to assess the impact of subject drop out (mainly for revaccination), appeared lower for serogroup C. No vaccine-related SAEs were reported. Antibody persistence was observed for all serogroups up to 5 y after MenACWY-TT vaccination.

  14. Prevention of meningococcal serogroup B infections in children: a protein-based vaccine induces immunologic memory.

    PubMed

    de Kleijn, E D; de Groot, R; Lafeber, A B; Labadie, J; van Limpt, C J; Visser, J; Berbers, G A; van Alphen, L; Rümke, H C

    2001-07-01

    Immunologic memory against meningococci was studied in 177 children (100 children were 10-11 years old and 77 were 5-6 years old) 2.5 years after vaccination with hexavalent meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine or hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine. Children were revaccinated with monovalent P1.7(h),4 meningococcal OMV vaccine. Serum bactericidal antibodies (SBAs) were measured before revaccination and after 4-6 weeks. A minimum 4-fold increase in SBAs against serosubtype P1.7(h),4 was detected in 48.5% of the children after hexavalent meningococcal vaccine and in 8.9% after HepB vaccine. Of the initial responders given hexavalent meningococcal vaccine, 78% had > or =4-fold increase in SBAs against strain P1.4. Thus, immunologic memory is present in toddlers and school-aged children previously given 3 hexavalent meningococcal vaccinations. Booster vaccination with monovalent P1.7(h),4 meningococcal OMV vaccine induces a significant increase in SBAs against serosubtype P1.7(h),4 and cross-reactivity against other serosubtypes in the hexavalent vaccine.

  15. Influenza vaccine concurrently administered with a combination measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine to young children.

    PubMed

    Lum, Lucy Chai See; Borja-Tabora, Charissa Fay; Breiman, Robert F; Vesikari, Timo; Sablan, Benjamin P; Chay, Oh Moh; Tantracheewathorn, Taweewong; Schmitt, Heinz-Josef; Lau, Yu-Lung; Bowonkiratikachorn, Piyaporn; Tam, John S; Lee, Bee Wah; Tan, Kah Kee; Pejcz, Jerzy; Cha, Sungho; Gutierrez-Brito, Maricruz; Kaltenis, Petras; Vertruyen, Andre; Czajka, Hanna; Bojarskas, Jurgis; Brooks, W Abdullah; Cheng, Sheau-Mei; Rappaport, Ruth; Baker, Sherryl; Gruber, William C; Forrest, Bruce D

    2010-02-10

    Children aged 11 to <24 months received 2 intranasal doses of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) or placebo, 35+/-7 days apart. Dose 1 was administered concomitantly with a combined measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (Priorix). Seroresponses to measles and mumps were similar between groups. Compared with placebo, response rates to rubella in LAIV+Priorix recipients were statistically lower at a 15 IU/mL threshold (83.9% vs 78.0%) and the prespecified noninferiority criteria were not met. In a post hoc analysis using an alternate widely accepted threshold of 10 IU/mL, the noninferiority criteria were met (93.4% vs 89.8%). Concomitant administration with Priorix did not affect the overall influenza protection rate of LAIV (78.4% and 63.8% against antigenically similar influenza strains and any strain, respectively).

  16. [A virological description of serous meningitis in children immunized with vaccine against epidemic parotitis].

    PubMed

    Goleva, O V; Kharit, S M; Cherniaeva, T V; Aksenov, O A; Davidkin, I; Kolyshkin, V M

    2004-01-01

    The morbidity structure was analyzed in children vaccinated against epidemic parotitis in 1993-2002. Eight children (4 with serous meningitis and 4 with lesions of the salivary glands) underwent virologic and immunologic examinations. The molecular typing of the SH-gene fragment of the parotitis virus showed the process in 7 cases to be provoked by the vaccination strain. Presumedly, progressing vaccine-associated meningitis inhibits antibody formation. The total incidence of vaccine-associated meningitis was shown, according to Saint Petersburg data, to be not high, which testifies to a low reactogenicity of the Russian vaccine strain.

  17. The moral case for the routine vaccination of children in developed and developing countries.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Angus

    2011-06-01

    In developed countries some parents have decided not to provide routine vaccinations for their children, while in many developing countries there are inadequate rates of vaccination for various reasons. The consequences for children, and members of the community in which they live, can be significant and even tragic. Although some parents may worry that vaccines will harm their child, there is a broader moral case for vaccination that parents and policy makers should consider. This case has four components: benefits and harms, best interests, community benefits, and justice. This moral case should be central to deliberations about vaccination by parents and policy makers.

  18. Mandatory influenza vaccination programs for health care personnel in NACHRI-associated children's hospitals vs. non-children's hospitals.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Phoebe; Davis, Matthew M

    2012-06-01

    We conducted a national study of children's hospitals and neighboring general medical-surgical hospitals to examine their employee vaccination policies. Survey questions addressed health care personnel (HCP) influenza vaccination policies for the 2009-2010 (seasonal, H1N1) and 2010-2011 (H1N1 + seasonal = combined) influenza seasons at each hospital, assessment of primary objectives behind hospitals' influenza vaccination policies, and information about influenza vaccination policies for inpatient children. We conducted standard univariate and bivariate statistical analyses. The study sample included 136 hospitals: 71 children's hospitals (response rate = 59%) and 65 matched non-children's hospitals (39%). Children's hospitals were significantly more likely than non-children's institutions to have mandatory H1N1 influenza vaccination policies for their HCP in 2009-10 (27% vs. 13%, p = 0.03). There were no differences in HCP influenza vaccination policies otherwise: 25% in both groups with mandatory seasonal vaccination programs in 2009-10, and 19% in both groups with mandatory combined influenza programs in 2010-11. Children's hospitals were significantly more likely to have policies in place strongly encouraging inpatient children to have influenza vaccination than were non-children's hospitals (47% vs 5%; p < 0.001). Among children's and non-children's hospitals alike, the primary intentions of HCP influenza vaccination policies were to reduce transmission of influenza from employees to patients (89% overall) and to reduce transmission of influenza from patients to employees (70%). This study--the first known national assessment of hospitals' policies regarding influenza--suggests that HCP mandatory vaccination is uncommon, even in child-focused hospitals where the patient population is known to be at disproportionately high risk for complications from the illness.

  19. Usage of quadrivalent influenza vaccine among children in the United States, 2013-14.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Loren; Pabst, Laura J; Zhu, Liping; Chaves, Sandra S

    2015-11-27

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for everyone ≥ 6 months in the U.S. During the 2013-14 influenza season, in addition to trivalent influenza vaccines, quadrivalent vaccines were available, protecting against two influenza A and two influenza B viruses. We analyzed 1,976,443 immunization records from six sentinel sites to compare influenza vaccine usage among children age 6 months-18 years. A total of 983,401 (49.8%) influenza vaccine doses administered were trivalent and 920,333 (46.6%) were quadrivalent (unknown type: 72,709). Quadrivalent vaccine administration varied by age and was least frequent among those <2 years of age.

  20. Free vaccine programs to cocoon high-risk infants and children against influenza and pertussis.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Cottrill, Judith A; Phillipi, Carrie A; Dolan, Susan A; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Win, Amy; Siegel, Jane

    2012-11-01

    An adult immunization strategy called "cocooning" is a relatively new concept, referring to immunizing close contacts of infants and high-risk children, thereby limiting pathogen exposure. This report explores the adoption of free vaccine programs in US children's hospitals and shares our own institutions' experiences in implementing free vaccine programs for close contacts of our patients.

  1. Factors associated with delayed measles vaccination among children in Shenzhen, China: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiyan; Xiong, Yongzhen; Tang, Hao; Chen, Baoli; Ni, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    A delay in the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) may contribute to outbreaks of measles, resulting in a high age-specific incidence in infants <1 y of age. To determine the factors associated with delayed MCV1 vaccinations, we used data from the China Information Management System for Immunization Programming. Additionally, the parents/guardians of 430 children whose MCV1 vaccinations were delayed, as well as the parents/guardians of 424 children who received timely vaccinations, were surveyed by telephone. Children were less likely to receive timely MCV1 vaccinations if they belonged to an immigrant group, were male, had poor health status, had a father whose occupation e.g., a manager, had a history of delays in other Expanded Programs on Immunization (EPI) vaccinations, had parents who did not believe vaccinations were important for their children, and experienced shorter travel times to and longer waiting times in EPI clinics. The children of mothers whose occupational status (technician) were more likely to receive timely MCV1 vaccinations. The timeliness of MCV1 vaccinations should be considered as an additional indicator of the quality of vaccination programs. PMID:25668667

  2. Factors associated with delayed measles vaccination among children in Shenzhen, China: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiyan; Xiong, Yongzhen; Tang, Hao; Chen, Baoli; Ni, Jindong

    2014-01-01

    A delay in the first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) may contribute to outbreaks of measles, resulting in a high age-specific incidence in infants<1 y of age. To determine the factors associated with delayed MCV1 vaccinations, we used data from the China Information Management System for Immunization Programming. Additionally, the parents/guardians of 430 children whose MCV1 vaccinations were delayed, as well as the parents/guardians of 424 children who received timely vaccinations, were surveyed by telephone. Children were less likely to receive timely MCV1 vaccinations if they belonged to an immigrant group, were male, had poor health status, had a father whose occupation e.g., a manager, had a history of delays in other Expanded Programs on Immunization (EPI) vaccinations, had parents who did not believe vaccinations were important for their children, and experienced shorter travel times to and longer waiting times in EPI clinics. The children of mothers whose occupational status (technician) were more likely to receive timely MCV1 vaccinations. The timeliness of MCV1 vaccinations should be considered as an additional indicator of the quality of vaccination programs.

  3. Immune response to 1 and 2 dose regimens of measles vaccine in Pakistani children.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hamidah; Akram, Dure Samin; Chandir, Subhash; Khan, Aamir J; Memon, Ashraf; Halsey, Neal A

    2013-12-01

    Measles is a significant problem in Pakistan despite vaccine coverage rates reported at 80%. The purpose of this study was to determine the serologic response in children after one dose of measles vaccine at 9 mo versus two doses at 9 and 15 mo of age. From March through December 2006, children were enrolled from immunization clinics and squatter settlements in Karachi. Blood samples were taken from children in Group A at 9-10 mo of age prior to measles vaccine and 8 to 11 weeks later; from children in Group B at 16-17 mo of age after receiving 2 doses of measles vaccine; and from children in Group C who had received at least one dose of measles vaccine by 5 y of age. After the first dose of measles vaccine, 107/147 (73%) of children in Group A were seropositive, 157/180 (87%) of children in Group B were seropositive after two doses and 126/200 (63%) of children in Group C were seropositive at 5 y of age. The post-vaccination geometric mean antibody concentrations were higher in females than males in groups A (irrespective of pre-vaccination antibody levels) and B. The serologic response to one and two doses of measles vaccine was lower in children in Karachi than has been reported in many other countries. Two doses of vaccine were significantly better than one dose. An in-depth investigation is needed to determine the reason for the lower-than-expected protection rates. Differences in immunogenicity between genders need to be further studied. Recent introduction of supplemental measles vaccine doses should help control measles in Pakistan.

  4. Educating parents about the vaccination status of their children: A user-centered mobile application.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Lea; Conrad, Tim; Hoppe, Christian; Obermeier, Patrick; Chen, Xi; Karsch, Katharina; Muehlhans, Susann; Tief, Franziska; Boettcher, Sindy; Diedrich, Sabine; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Rath, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Parents are often uncertain about the vaccination status of their children. In times of vaccine hesitancy, vaccination programs could benefit from active patient participation. The Vaccination App (VAccApp) was developed by the Vienna Vaccine Safety Initiative, enabling parents to learn about the vaccination status of their children, including 25 different routine, special indication and travel vaccines listed in the WHO Immunization Certificate of Vaccination (WHO-ICV). Between 2012 and 2014, the VAccApp was validated in a hospital-based quality management program in Berlin, Germany, in collaboration with the Robert Koch Institute. Parents of 178 children were asked to transfer the immunization data of their children from the WHO-ICV into the VAccApp. The respective WHO-ICV was photocopied for independent, professional data entry (gold standard). Demonstrating the status quo in vaccine information reporting, a Recall Group of 278 parents underwent structured interviews for verbal immunization histories, without the respective WHO-ICV. Only 9% of the Recall Group were able to provide a complete vaccination status; on average 39% of the questions were answered correctly. Using the WHO-ICV with the help of the VAccApp resulted in 62% of parents providing a complete vaccination status; on average 95% of the questions were answered correctly. After using the VAccApp, parents were more likely to remember key aspects of the vaccination history. User-friendly mobile applications empower parents to take a closer look at the vaccination record, thereby taking an active role in providing accurate vaccination histories. Parents may become motivated to ask informed questions and to keep vaccinations up-to-date.

  5. Efficacy and effectiveness of live attenuated influenza vaccine in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Coelingh, Kathleen; Olajide, Ifedapo Rosemary; MacDonald, Peter; Yogev, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of high efficacy of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) from randomized controlled trials is strong for children 2-6 years of age, but fewer data exist for older school-age children. We reviewed the published data on efficacy and effectiveness of LAIV in children ≥5 years. QUOSA (Elsevier database) was searched for articles published from January 1990 to June 2014 that included 'FluMist', 'LAIV', 'CAIV', 'cold adapted influenza vaccine', 'live attenuated influenza vaccine', 'live attenuated cold adapted' or 'flu mist'. Studies evaluated included randomized controlled trials, effectiveness and indirect protection studies. This review demonstrates that LAIV has considerable efficacy and effectiveness in school-age children.

  6. Antibody persistence after two vaccinations with either FSME-IMMUN® Junior or ENCEPUR® Children followed by third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN® Junior.

    PubMed

    Prymula, Roman; Pöllabauer, Eva Maria; Pavlova, Borislava G; Löw-Baselli, Alexandra; Fritsch, Sandor; Angermayr, Rudolf; Geisberger, Alexander; Barrett, P Noel; Ehrlich, Hartmut J

    2012-06-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccination strategies to induce optimal seroprotection in children are under constant evaluation. This multi-center, randomized, controlled, phase III clinical study examined antibody persistence in children aged 1-11 y following two prospectively administered doses of either the FSME-IMMUN® Junior or Encepur Children® vaccines, as well as investigating the immunogenicity, safety and vaccine interchangeability of a third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN(®) Junior. A high level of antibody persistence was observed in all subjects 6 mo after the first of two vaccinations with either pediatric TBE vaccine. Based on both immunological tests and viral antigens used, slightly higher seropositivity rates and higher GMCs /GMTs were found in children vaccinated with FSME-IMMUN® Junior compared with those who received Encepur® Children. Seropositivity rates across all age strata combined six months after the first vaccination with FSME-IMMUN® 0.25 mL Junior were 95.1% as determined by Immunozym ELISA, 93.2% as determined by Enzygnost ELISA and 95.3% as determined by NT; compared with 62.6%, 80.5% and 91.0% respectively after vaccination with Encepur® Children. A third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN(®) Junior induced 100% seropositivity in both study groups and was well tolerated as demonstrated by the low rates of systemic and injection site reactions. Subjects who received either FSME-IMMUN Junior® or Encepur(®) Children vaccine for the first two vaccinations and FSME-IMMUN Junior® for the third showed a comparably strong immune response regardless of the previous TBE vaccine administered, demonstrating that two vaccinations with Encepur® Children can successfully be followed by a third vaccination with FSME-IMMUN Junior®.

  7. Long-term impact of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination on nasopharyngeal carriage in children previously vaccinated with various pneumococcal conjugate vaccine regimes.

    PubMed

    Boelsen, Laura K; Dunne, Eileen M; Lamb, Karen E; Bright, Kathryn; Cheung, Yin Bun; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Russell, Fiona M; Mulholland, E Kim; Licciardi, Paul V; Satzke, Catherine

    2015-10-13

    Previously, the Fiji Pneumococcal Project (FiPP) evaluated reduced dose immunization schedules that incorporated pneumococcal protein conjugate and/or polysaccharide vaccine (PCV7 and 23vPPV, respectively). Immune hyporesponsiveness was observed in children vaccinated with 23vPPV at 12 months of age compared with children who did not receive 23vPPV. Here we assess the long-term impact of 23vPPV vaccination on nasopharyngeal carriage rates and densities of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella catarrhalis. Nasopharyngeal swabs (n=194) were obtained from healthy children who participated in FiPP (now aged 5-7 years). S. pneumoniae were isolated and identified by standard culture-based methods, and serotyped using latex agglutination and the Quellung reaction. Carriage rates and densities of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, S. aureus and M. catarrhalis were determined using real-time quantitative PCR. There were no differences in the rate or density of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae or M. catarrhalis carriage by PCV7 dose or 23vPPV vaccination in the vaccinated participants overall. However, differences were observed between the two main ethnic groups: Fijian children of Indian descent (Indo-Fijian) were less likely to carry S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis, and there was evidence of a higher carriage rate of S. aureus compared with indigenous Fijian (iTaukei) children. Polysaccharide vaccination appeared to have effects that varied between ethnic groups, with 23vPPV vaccination associated with a higher carriage rate of S. aureus in iTaukei children, while there was a lower carriage rate of S. pneumoniae associated with 23vPPV vaccination in Indo-Fijian children. Overall, polysaccharide vaccination had no long-term impact on pneumococcal carriage, but may have impacted on S. aureus carriage and have varying effects in ethnic groups, suggesting current WHO vaccine schedule recommendations against the use of 23v

  8. [Aluminium allergy and granulomas induced by vaccinations for children].

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie Ø; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2015-04-27

    Vaccination with aluminium-adsorbed vaccines can induce aluminium allergy with persistent itching subcutaneous nodules at the injection site – vaccination granulomas. In this article we give an overview of childhood aluminium-adsorbed vaccines available in Denmark. Through literature studies we examine the incidence, the symptoms and the prognosis for the vaccination granulomas and the allergy. Finally we discuss the status in Denmark.

  9. Live Attenuated and Inactivated Influenza Vaccines in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Haynes, Brenda C.; Hoen, Anne G.; Khalenkov, Alexey M.; Housman, Molly L.; Brown, Eric P.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Treanor, John J.; Luke, Catherine J.; Subbarao, Kanta; Wright, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) and inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) are available for children. Local and systemic immunity induced by LAIV followed a month later by LAIV and IIV followed by LAIV were investigated with virus recovery after LAIV doses as surrogates for protection against influenza on natural exposure. Methods. Fifteen children received IIV followed by LAIV, 13 an initial dose of LAIV, and 11 a second dose of LAIV. The studies were done during autumn 2009 and autumn 2010 with the same seasonal vaccine (A/California/07/09 [H1N1], A/Perth/16/09 [H3N2], B/Brisbane/60/08). Results. Twenty-eight of 39 possible influenza viral strains were recovered after the initial dose of LAIV. When LAIV followed IIV, 21 of 45 viral strains were identified. When compared to primary LAIV infection, the decreased frequency of shedding with the IIV-LAIV schedule was significant (P = .023). With LAIV-LAIV, the fewest viral strains were recovered (3/33)—numbers significantly lower (P < .001) than shedding after initial LAIV and after IIV-LAIV (P < .001). Serum hemagglutination inhibition antibody responses were more frequent after IIV than LAIV (P = .02). In contrast, more mucosal immunoglobulin A responses were seen with LAIV. Conclusions. LAIV priming induces greater inhibition of virus recovery on LAIV challenge than IIV priming. The correlate(s) of protection are the subject of ongoing analysis. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01246999. PMID:25165161

  10. Determinants of influenza vaccination among young children in an inner-city community.

    PubMed

    Uwemedimo, Omolara T; Findley, Sally E; Andres, Raquel; Irigoyen, Matilde; Stockwell, Melissa S

    2012-06-01

    Few studies have examined potential factors that contribute to low influenza vaccination rates among minority children. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of early childhood influenza vaccination among young black and Latino children, living in inner-city neighborhoods, and examine the effects of child, caregiver and health system factors. Secondary data analysis was performed using a survey about medical home experiences conducted from May 2007-June 2008. The study sample was limited to children ≥6 months in any influenza season prior to the 2006-2007 influenza season. Bivariate analyses and multivariable logistic regression tested associations between influenza vaccination receipt and socio-demographic and health system characteristics. One-third of children received an influenza vaccination by the end of 2006-2007 season, while only 11% received a vaccination within their first season of eligibility. Black children were more likely than Latino children to have been vaccinated (50% vs. 31%, P<0.01) during their first few eligible seasons. Children whose mothers were older, proficient in English, and frequent users of healthcare were more likely to obtain vaccination. Child attendance at healthcare settings with immunization reminder systems was also positively correlated with influenza vaccination. Our findings suggest that initial vaccination receipt among minority children from inner-city communities might be improved by expanded influenza promotion activities targeting younger mothers or those with limited English proficiency. Strategies to increase the frequency of child's actual contact with the medical home, such as reminder systems, may be useful in improving uptake of influenza vaccination among inner-city, minority children.

  11. Pneumococcal Meningitis Vaccine Breakthroughs and Failures After Routine 7-Valent and 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination in Children in France.

    PubMed

    Godot, Cécile; Levy, Corinne; Varon, Emmanuelle; Picard, Capucine; Madhi, Fouad; Cohen, Robert

    2015-10-01

    We collected cases of pneumococcal meningitis vaccine breakthrough (VBT) and vaccine failure (VF) from 2003 to 2013 after the implementation of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in France. VBT accounted for 3.2% of the cases (PCV7 era: 24 of 943, PCV13 era: 15 of 290) and VF 0.6% (PCV7 era: 6 of 943, PCV13 era: 2 of 290). VBT and VF are rare and occur in most cases in children younger than 2 years. The serotype 19F was the most frequent cause even after the introduction of PCV13.

  12. Nonspecific effects of vaccines and the reduction of mortality in children.

    PubMed

    Shann, Frank

    2013-02-01

    There is now strong evidence that vaccines have substantial nonspecific (heterologous) effects in children in high-mortality regions. The hypothesis states that, until a different vaccine is given: (1) live vaccines induce a protective nonspecific immune response, whereas inactivate vaccines cause a harmful nonspecific immune response; (2) Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine approximately halves mortality from infections other than tuberculosis; (3) provided vitamin A was not given at birth, measles vaccine approximately halves mortality from infections other than measles (this effect may be stronger if the child still has maternal antibody); and (4) whole-cell diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine increases mortality from infections other than diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (this effect is stronger in girls than boys). These observations suggest that minor modifications to the routine immunization schedule could reduce child mortality by at least 30%, and they have important implications for the design of randomized trials of vaccines in high-mortality regions.

  13. Potential Cost-Effectiveness of an Influenza Vaccination Program Offering Microneedle Patch for Vaccine Delivery in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Carlos; Jiang, Minghuan; You, Joyce H. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The influenza vaccine coverage rate of children is low in Hong Kong. Microneedle patches (MNPs) is a technology under development for painless delivery of vaccines. This study aimed to examine the potential clinical outcomes and direct medical costs of an influenza program offering MNP vaccine to children who have declined intramuscular (IM) vaccine in Hong Kong. Methods A decision model was designed to compare potential outcomes between IM vaccine program and a program offering MNP vaccine to those declined IM vaccine (IM/MNP program) in a hypothetical cohort of children over one-year time horizon. The model outcomes included direct medical cost, influenza infection rate, mortality rate, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) loss. Model inputs were retrieved from published literature. Sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the robustness of model results. Results In base-case analysis, IM/MNP program was more costly per child (USD19.13 versus USD13.69; USD1 = HKD7.8) with lower influenza infection rate (98.9 versus 124.8 per 1,000 children), hospitalization rate (0.83 versus 1.05 per 1,000 children) and influenza-related mortality rate (0.00042 versus 0.00052 per 1,000 children) when compared to IM program. The incremental cost per QALY saved (ICER) of IM/MNP program versus IM program was 27,200 USD/QALY. Using gross domestic product (GDP) per capita of Hong Kong (USD40,594) as threshold of willingness-to-pay (WTP) per QALY, one-way sensitivity analysis found ICER of IM/MNP to exceed WTP when duration of illness in outpatient setting was <5.7 days or cost per MNP vaccine was >1.39-time of IM vaccine cost. In 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations, IM/MNP program was the preferred option in 57.28% and 91.68% of the time, using 1x and 3x GDP per capita as WTP threshold, respectively. Conclusion Acceptance of IM/MNP program as the preferred program was subject to the WTP threshold, duration of illness in outpatient settings, and cost of MNP vaccine. PMID

  14. Vaccine-related beliefs and practices of parents of children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Bazzano, Alicia; Zeldin, Ari; Schuster, Erica; Barrett, Christopher; Lehrer, Danise

    2012-05-01

    Although the assertion of a link between vaccines and autism has been scientifically rejected, the theory continues to be popular and may influence the attitudes of parents of children with autism spectrum disorders. The authors sought to assess how often parents change or discontinue their child's vaccine schedule after autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and whether beliefs about the etiology of autism affect their decision to do so. The authors surveyed 197 (43%) of 460 eligible parents of children under 18 years of age with autism spectrum disorders who were enrolled in a state-funded agency that provides services to those with developmental disabilities in western Los Angeles County. Half of the parents discontinued or changed vaccination practices, and this was associated with a belief that vaccines contributed to autism spectrum disorders, indicating a potential subset of undervaccinated children. Educational tools should be designed to assist physicians when talking to parents of children with autism spectrum disorders about vaccination.

  15. Predicting Age-Appropriate Pharmacokinetics of Six Volatile Organic Compounds in the Rat Utilizing Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models to incorporate age-appropriate physiological and chemical-specific parameters was utilized to predict changes in internal dosimetry for six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) across different ages of rats.

  16. Effectiveness of trivalent influenza vaccine among children in two consecutive seasons in a community in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tsubasa; Ono, Yasuhiko; Maeda, Hidenori; Tsujimoto, Yoshiki; Shobugawa, Yugo; Dapat, Clyde; Hassan, Mohd Rohaizat; Yokota, Chihiro; Kondo, Hiroki; Dapat, Isolde C; Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is considered the single most important medical intervention for the prevention of influenza. The dose of trivalent influenza vaccine in children was increased almost double since 2011/12 season in Japan. We estimated the influenza vaccine effectiveness for children 1-11 years of age using rapid test kits in Isahaya City, involving 28,884 children-years, over two consecutive influenza seasons (2011/12 and 2012/13). Children were divided into two groups, vaccinated and unvaccinated, according to their vaccination record, which was obtained from an influenza registration program organized by the Isahaya Medical Association for all pediatric facilities in the city. There were 14,562 and 14,282 children aged from 1-11 years in the city in 2011 and 2012 respectively. In the 2011/12 season, the overall vaccine effectiveness in children from 1-11 years of age, against influenza A and B were 23% [95% confidence interval (CI): 14%-31%] and 20% [95% CI: 8%-31%], respectively. In the 2012/13 season, vaccine effectiveness against influenza A and B was 13% (95% CI: 4%-20%) and 9% (95% CI: -4%-21%), respectively. The vaccine effectiveness was estimated using the rapid diagnosis test kits. Age-stratified estimation showed that vaccine effectiveness was superior in younger children over both seasons and for both virus types. In conclusion, the trivalent influenza vaccine has a significant protective effect for children 1-11 years of age against influenza A and B infection in the 2011/12 season and against influenza A infection in the 2012/13 season in a community in Japan.

  17. [Consensus document by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the advisory committee on vaccines of the Spanish Paediatrics Association on vaccination in immunocompromised children].

    PubMed

    Mellado Peña, M J; Moreno-Pérez, D; Ruíz Contreras, J; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination in immunocompromised infants, children and adolescents is a major aspect in the follow-up of this complex pathology in specific Paediatric Units. Vaccination is also an important prevention tool, as this can, to a certain extent, determine the morbidity and mortality in these patients. This consensus document was jointly prepared by Working Groups of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Paediatric Association, who are usually involved in updating the management of vaccinations in immunocompromised children, and reflects their opinions. The consensus specifically summarises indications for vaccination in the following special paediatric populations: Solid organ and haematopoietic transplant-recipients; primary immunodeficiency; asplenic children; non-previously transplanted immunocompromised patients; chronically ill patients; HIV-infected children and also the vaccines recommended for immunodeficient children who travel.

  18. Parents' preferences for seasonal influenza vaccine for their children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shono, Aiko; Kondo, Masahide

    2014-09-03

    In Japan, trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is the only approved influenza vaccine. It is typically administrated by hypodermic injection, and children under 13 years of age are recommended to be vaccinated two times during each winter season. Live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is administered by a thimerosal-free nasal spray. If LAIV is approved in the future in Japan, parents will have an alternative type of influenza vaccine for their children. This study investigated parents' preference for the type of seasonal influenza vaccine for their children if alternatives are available. The marginal willingness to pay for vaccine benefits was also evaluated. We conducted a discrete choice experiment, a quantitative approach that is often used in healthcare studies, in January 2013. Respondents were recruited from a registered online survey panel, and parents with at least one child under 13 years of age were offered questionnaires. This study showed that for seasonal influenza vaccines for their children, parents are more likely to value safety, including thimerosal-free vaccines and those with a lower risk of adverse events, instead of avoiding the momentary pain from an injection. If LAIV is released in Japan, the fact that it is thimerosal-free could be an advantage. However, for parents to choose LAIV, they would need to accept the slightly higher risk of minor adverse events from LAIV.

  19. Age-appropriate infant and young child feeding practices are associated with child nutrition in India: insights from nationally representative data.

    PubMed

    Menon, Purnima; Bamezai, Apurva; Subandoro, Ali; Ayoya, Mohamed Ag; Aguayo, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Age-appropriate infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices are critical to child nutrition. The objective of this paper was to examine the associations between age-appropriate IYCF practices and child nutrition outcomes in India using data from ∼18 463 children of 0-23.9 months old from India's National Family Health Survey, 2005-06-3. The outcome measures were child height-for-age z-score (HAZ), weight-for-age z-score (WAZ), weight-for-height z-score, stunting, underweight and wasting. Linear and logistic regression analyses were used, accounting for the clustered survey data. Regression models were adjusted for child, maternal, and household characteristics, and state and urban/rural residence. The analyses indicate that in India suboptimal IYCF practices are associated with poor nutrition outcomes in children. Early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding were not associated with any of the nutrition outcomes considered. Not consuming any solid or semi-solid foods at 6-8.9 months was associated with being underweight (P < 0.05). The diet diversity score and achieving minimum diet diversity (≥4 food groups) for children 6-23 months of age were most strongly and significantly associated with HAZ, WAZ, stunting and underweight (P < 0.05). Maternal characteristics were also strongly associated with child undernutrition. In summary, poor IYCF practices, particularly poor complementary foods and feeding practices, are associated with poor child nutrition outcomes in India, particularly linear growth.

  20. Effectiveness of Varicella Vaccination Program in Preventing Laboratory-Confirmed Cases in Children in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Hwa; Choe, Young June; Cho, Sung Il; Kang, Cho Ryok; Bang, Ji Hwan; Oh, Myoung Don; Lee, Jong Koo

    2016-12-01

    A universal one-dose varicella vaccination program was introduced in 2005 in Republic of Korea. However, the incidence of varicella in Korea has tripled over the last decade. We conducted a community based 1:1 matched case-control study to assess the effectiveness of one MAV strain-based vaccine and three Oka strain-based vaccines licensed for use in Korea. All cases were children in Seoul, Korea with varicella who were reported to the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System in Seoul during 2013. The controls were age-matched children with mumps or scarlet fever but no history of varicella. We included 537 cases and 537 controls. The overall effectiveness of one dose of varicella vaccination was 13% (95% confidence interval [CI], -17.3-35.6). Of the four licensed varicella vaccines, only one was highly effective (88.9%; 95% CI, 52.1-97.4). The vaccine effectiveness for the other vaccines were 71.4% (95% CI, -37.5-94.1), -5% (95% CI, -61.9-31.9), and -100% (95% CI, -700-50.0). The overall effectiveness of vaccination was 75.8% (95% CI, 22.8-92.4) in the first year after vaccination and decreased thereafter; the effectiveness became -7.2% (95% CI, -130.9-59.2) in the fourth year after vaccination. Further studies are warranted to investigate reduced effectiveness of varicella vaccines in Korea.

  1. An assessment of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Shigella vaccine candidates for infants and children.

    PubMed

    Walker, Richard I

    2015-02-18

    Despite improvements to water quality, sanitation, and the implementation of current prevention and treatment interventions, diarrhea remains a major cause of illness and death, especially among children less than five years of age in the developing world. Rotavirus vaccines have already begun making a real impact on diarrhea, but several more enteric vaccines will be necessary to achieve broader reductions of illness and death. Among the many causes of diarrheal disease, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and Shigella are the two most important bacterial pathogens for which there are no currently licensed vaccines. Vaccines against these two pathogens could greatly reduce the impact of disease caused by these infections. This review describes the approaches to ETEC and Shigella vaccines that are currently under development, including a range of both cellular and subunit approaches for each pathogen. In addition, the review discusses strategies for maximizing the potential benefit of these vaccines, which includes the feasibility of co-administration, consolidation, and combination of vaccine candidates, as well as issues related to effective administration of enteric vaccines to infants. Recent impact studies indicate that ETEC and Shigella vaccines could significantly benefit global public health. Either vaccine, particularly if they could be combined together or with another enteric vaccine, would be an extremely valuable tool for saving lives and promoting the health of infants and children in the developing world, as well as potentially providing protection to travelers and military personnel visiting endemic areas.

  2. [Recommendations for making decisions when parents refuse to vaccinate their children: ethical analysis].

    PubMed

    Riaño Galán, I; Martínez González, C; Sánchez Jacob, M

    2013-07-01

    Vaccinating children is the most effective primary prevention activity and many lives have been saved due to vaccines. Anti-vaccine movements have spread doubts about the safety and effectiveness of childhood vaccines, leading to some parents refusing to vaccinate their children. This refusal raises a conflict of values between the right of parents to the upbringing of their children according to their beliefs and justice, putting the immunity of the group at risk. In Spain, the law protects this ability for parents to decide not to comply with the official vaccine program. Pediatricians play an essential role in a parent's decision, and must provide accurate information about vaccination. It is necessary to explore The values of the parents, their concerns need to be empathetically examined, in order to reach an agreement. Respect for freedom does not exempt us from using discussion and persuasion to achieve attitudes and healthy choices for children. Our commitment to responsability promotion is essential for maintaining high vaccination levels that protect the health of children.

  3. Normal and diseased personal eye modeling using age-appropriate lens parameters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Ling; Shi, L.; Lewis, J. W. L.; Wang, M.

    2012-01-01

    Personalized eye modeling of normal and diseased eye conditions is attractive due to the recent availability of detailed ocular measurements in clinic environments and the promise of its medical and industrial applications. In the customized modeling, the optical properties of the crystalline lens including the gradient refractive index, the lens bio-geometry and orientation are typically assigned with average lens parameters from literature since typically they are not clinically available. Although, through the optical optimization by assigning lens parameters as variables, the clinical measured wavefront aberration can be achieved, the optimized lens biometry and orientation often end up at edges of the statistical distribution. Without an effective validation of these models today, the fidelity of the final lens (and therefore the model) remains questionable. To develop a more reliable customized model without detailed lens information, we incorporate age-appropriate lens parameters as the initial condition of optical optimization. A biconic lens optimization was first performed to provide a correct lens profile for accurate lower order aberration and then followed by the wavefront optimization. Clinical subjects were selected from all ages with both normal and diseased corneal and refractive conditions. 19 ammetropic eyes ( + 4D to −11D), and 16 keratoconus eyes (mild to moderate with cylinder 0.25 to 6D) were modeled. Age- and gender-corrected refractive index was evaluated. Final models attained the lens shapes comparable to the statistical distribution in their age. PMID:22714237

  4. Safety and effectiveness of MF-59 adjuvanted influenza vaccines in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven

    2015-06-08

    The squalene oil-in-water emulsion MF-59 adjuvant was developed initially to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in populations such as children and adults with known suboptimal response. Developed in the 1990s, it was initially licensed in Europe for use in seasonal influenza vaccine in the elderly. Since that time, both Avian and p2009H1N1 vaccines have also been developed. Overall, more than 30,000 individuals have participated in clinical trials of MF-59 adjuvanted vaccine and more than 160 million doses of licensed vaccine have been administered. Safety and effectiveness data from clinical trials and observation studies attest to the safety of MF-59 and to its ability to enhance the effectiveness of influenza vaccines in children and the elderly.

  5. The evidence for using conjugate vaccines to protect HIV-infected children against pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Sandra J; O'Brien, Katherine L; Janoff, Edward N; Cotton, Mark F; Musoke, Philippa; Coovadia, Hoosen; Levine, Orin S

    2008-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) are a potentially useful complement to existing treatment strategies in HIV-infected children, for whom pneumococcal infections are common and serious. This Review summarises available data on the burden of pneumococcal disease and the safety and efficacy of PCVs in HIV-infected children. The data demonstrate that children with HIV have significantly increased risk of pneumococcal disease compared with uninfected children; the serotypes included in currently licensed or near-licensure conjugate vaccines include most serotypes that cause invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in HIV-infected children and adults; PCVs provide substantial protection against IPD and clinical pneumonia when given to HIV-infected infants; and HIV-infected adults gain an indirect benefit when children in the community are vaccinated. PCV should be considered as an important intervention for improving the lives of HIV-infected children.

  6. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  7. Polymorphisms in key innate immune genes and their effects on measles vaccine responses and vaccine failure in children from Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Holly D; Hayden, Catherine M; Khoo, Siew-Kim; Naniche, Denise; Mandomando, Inacio M; Zhang, Guicheng; Richmond, Peter; Le Souëf, Peter N

    2012-09-21

    Despite an effective vaccine, measles remains a major health problem globally, particularly in developing countries. More than 30% of children show primary vaccine failure and therefore remain vulnerable to measles. Genetic variation in key innate pathogen recognition receptors, such as the measles cell entry receptors CD46 and SLAM, measles attachment receptor DC-SIGN, the antiviral toll-like receptors (TLR)3, TLR7 and TLR8, and the cytosolic antiviral receptor RIG-I, may significantly affect measles IgG antibody responses. Measles is still highly prevalent in developing countries such as those in Africa however there is no previous data on the effect of these innate immune genes in a resident African population. Polymorphisms (n=29) in the candidate genes were genotyped in a cohort of vaccinated children (n=238) aged 6 months-14 years from Mozambique, Africa who either had vaccine failure and contracted measles (cases; n=66) or controls (n=172). Contrasting previous associations with measles responses in Caucasians and/or strong evidence for candidacy, we found little indication that these key innate immune genes affect measles IgG responses in our cohort of Mozambican children. We did however identify that CD46 and TLR8 variants may be involved in the occurrence of measles vaccine failure. This study highlights the importance of genetic studies in resident, non-Caucasian populations, from areas where determining the factors that may affect measles control is of a high priority.

  8. Persistence of antibody and immunologic memory in children immunized with hepatitis B vaccine at birth.

    PubMed

    Seto, Dexter; West, David J; Ioli, Virginia A

    2002-08-01

    Forty-two healthy children immunized with a course of hepatitis B vaccine beginning at birth were tested at 6 years of age for persistence of anti-hepatitis B antibody (anti-HBs) and then given a booster dose of vaccine. Although nearly one-half had become seronegative, all retained robust immunologic memory and rapidly regained a protective anti-HBs titer of at least 10 mIU/ml after booster vaccination.

  9. Reaching more children with vaccines in developing countries: key challenges of innovation and delivery.

    PubMed

    Popova, Olga; Ibarra de Palacios, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    As we reach the deadline for the United Nations fourth Millennium Development Goal to reduce child mortality, many inequalities in vaccine access still exist, particularly for children in developing countries. Here we discuss some of the barriers to vaccine access in these countries, as well as some of the innovative approaches that could address these. Finally, we discuss the need to create a global environment conducive to innovation directed at low-resource settings, aimed to ultimately increase vaccine coverage.

  10. Risk of aseptic meningitis after measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine in UK children.

    PubMed

    Miller, E; Goldacre, M; Pugh, S; Colville, A; Farrington, P; Flower, A; Nash, J; MacFarlane, L; Tettmar, R

    1993-04-17

    Cases of aseptic meningitis associated with measles/mumps/rubella vaccine were sought in thirteen UK health districts following a reported cluster in Nottingham which suggested a risk of 1 in 4000 doses, substantially higher than previous estimates based on cases reported by paediatricians (4 per million). Cases were ascertained by obtaining vaccination records of children with aseptic meningitis diagnosed from cerebrospinal fluid samples submitted to Public Health Laboratories or discharged from hospital with a diagnosis of viral meningitis. Both methods identified vaccination 15-35 days before onset as a significant risk factor and therefore indicative of a causal association. With both, half the aseptic meningitis cases identified in children aged 12-24 months were vaccine-associated with onset 15-35 days after vaccine. The study confirmed that the true risk was substantially higher than suggested by case reports from paediatricians, probably about 1 in 11,000 doses. However, the possibility that the aseptic meningitis induced by vaccination was largely asymptomatic and a chance laboratory finding in children investigated for other clinical conditions, particularly febrile convulsions, could not be excluded. Comparison of national reports of virus-positive mumps meningitis cases before and after the introduction of this vaccine indicated that the risk from wild mumps was about 4-fold higher than from vaccine. Altogether, 28 vaccine-associated cases were identified, all in recipients of vaccines containing the Urabe mumps strain. The absence of cases in recipients of vaccine containing the Jeryl Lynn strain, despite its 14% market share, suggested a higher risk from Urabe vaccine. A prospective adverse event surveillance system using the study methods is currently being established to assess the risk, if any, from the Jeryl Lynn strain which is now the only mumps vaccine used in the UK.

  11. Parents’ Recall and Reflections on Experiences Related to HPV Vaccination for their Children

    PubMed Central

    Niccolai, Linda M.; Hansen, Caitlin E.; Credle, Marisol; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage remains suboptimal in the United States. We conducted in-depth interviews with parents of adolescents from an urban primary care center serving a low-income minority population to describe their experiences. We identified the following themes: (a) parents of unvaccinated children generally had not discussed the vaccine with providers and had low awareness; (b) among unaware parents, provision of brief information generally resulted in positive comments about the vaccine; (c) vaccine was typically not requested by parents but rather offered by providers; (d) strength of the recommendations from providers varied, and vaccine was sometimes presented as optional or low-priority; (e) parents had low awareness of the 3-dose regimen and poor recall about completion; and (f) limited understanding of why boys should be vaccinated. More than seven years after introduction of HPV vaccine, there is substantial room for improving the way it is recommended and discussed by providers. PMID:25779984

  12. Quantifying benefits and risks of vaccinating Australian children aged six months to four years with trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine in 2010.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H; Carcione, D; Dowse, G; Effler, P

    2010-09-16

    Australian and New Zealand health authorities identified seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines manufactured by CSL Biotherapies as the probable cause of increased febrile convulsions in children under five within 24 hours of vaccination and recommended against their use in this age group. We quantified the benefit-risk profile of the CSL vaccines using the number needed to vaccinate and suggest they might have caused two to three hospital admissions due to febrile convulsions for every hospital admission due to influenza prevented.

  13. Correlates of 2009 H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Acceptability among Parents and Their Adolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Julia E.; Gargano, Lisa M.; Sales, Jessica M.; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M.; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Hughes, James M.

    2011-01-01

    School-aged children were a priority group for receipt of the pandemic (2009) H1N1 influenza vaccine. Both parental and adolescent attitudes likely influence vaccination behaviors. Data were collected from surveys distributed to middle- and high-school students and their parents in two counties in rural Georgia. Multivariable logistic regression…

  14. Vaccine-Related Beliefs and Practices of Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzano, Alicia; Zeldin, Ari; Schuster, Erica; Barrett, Christopher; Lehrer, Danise

    2012-01-01

    Although the assertion of a link between vaccines and autism has been scientifically rejected, the theory continues to be popular and may influence the attitudes of parents of children with autism spectrum disorders. The authors sought to assess how often parents change or discontinue their child's vaccine schedule after autism spectrum disorder…

  15. Analysis of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake among Children and Adolescents with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Chia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M.; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the seasonal influenza vaccination rate and to examine its determinants for children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) living in the community. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to analyze the data on seasonal influenza vaccination rate among 1055 ID individuals between the ages…

  16. Universal Hepatitis B Vaccination Coverage in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping

    2010-01-01

    There is little information of hepatitis B vaccination coverage for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). The present paper aims to examine the completed hepatitis B vaccination coverage rate and its determinants of children and adolescents with ID in Taiwan. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey, with the entire response participants was…

  17. Comparative assessment of immunization coverage of migrant children between national immunization program vaccines and non-national immunization program vaccines in East China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Luo, Shuying; Tang, Xuewen; Lou, Linqiao; Chen, Yaping; Guo, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the disparities in immunization coverage between National Immunization Program (NIP) vaccines and non-NIP vaccines in Yiwu and to identify potential determinants. A face-to-face interview-based questionnaire survey among 423 migrant children born from 1 June 2010 to 31 May 2013 was conducted. Immunization coverage was estimated according to the vaccines scheduled at different age, the birth cohorts, and socio- demographic characteristics. Single-level logistic regression analysis was applied to identify the determinants of coverage of non-NIP vaccines. We found that NIP vaccines recorded higher immunization coverage compared with non-NIP vaccines (87.9100%- vs 0%-74.8%). Among the non-NIP vaccines, varicella vaccine (VarV) recorded the highest coverage of 85.4%, which was introduced in 1998; while 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine(PCV7) recorded the lowest coverage of 0% for primary series, which was introduced recently. Lower coverage rate of non-NIP vaccines was significantly associated with more siblings in household, shorter duration of living in the surveyed areas, lower family income, mother with a job, mother with poor awareness of vaccination, and mother with lower education level. We found the immunization coverage rate of non-NIP vaccines was significant lower than that of NIP vaccines. Expansion of NIP to include non-NIP vaccines can provide better protection against the vaccine preventable diseases through increased immunization coverage.

  18. Comparative assessment of immunization coverage of migrant children between national immunization program vaccines and non-national immunization program vaccines in East China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu; Luo, Shuying; Tang, Xuewen; Lou, Linqiao; Chen, Yaping; Guo, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the disparities in immunization coverage between National Immunization Program (NIP) vaccines and non-NIP vaccines in Yiwu and to identify potential determinants. A face-to-face interview-based questionnaire survey among 423 migrant children born from 1 June 2010 to 31 May 2013 was conducted. Immunization coverage was estimated according to the vaccines scheduled at different age, the birth cohorts, and socio- demographic characteristics. Single-level logistic regression analysis was applied to identify the determinants of coverage of non-NIP vaccines. We found that NIP vaccines recorded higher immunization coverage compared with non-NIP vaccines (87.9100%– vs 0%-74.8%). Among the non-NIP vaccines, varicella vaccine (VarV) recorded the highest coverage of 85.4%, which was introduced in 1998; while 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine(PCV7) recorded the lowest coverage of 0% for primary series, which was introduced recently. Lower coverage rate of non-NIP vaccines was significantly associated with more siblings in household, shorter duration of living in the surveyed areas, lower family income, mother with a job, mother with poor awareness of vaccination, and mother with lower education level. We found the immunization coverage rate of non-NIP vaccines was significant lower than that of NIP vaccines. Expansion of NIP to include non-NIP vaccines can provide better protection against the vaccine preventable diseases through increased immunization coverage. PMID:25760670

  19. [Evaluation of the response to vaccination against poliomyelitis and measles in malnourished children in Morocco].

    PubMed

    Caidi, H; Bennis, I F; Mouan, N; El Aouad, R

    2004-01-01

    We made a comparative survey of the poliovirus antibodies (anti-poliovirus type 1, anti-poliovirus type 2 and anti-poliovirus type 3) and the measles antibodies in malnourished but completely vaccinated children (37) and control children (34). The age range was 10 months to 5 years. Immunization in children with protein-energy malnutrition was low for both vaccines. Seroprevalence rates of the polio 1, polio 2, polio 3 antibodies and the measles antibodies in the control group were 94.1%, 97.1%, 91.2% and 82.4% respectively. In malnourished children the respective rates were in some cases significantly lower being: 40.5% (P = 0.001), 59.5% (P = 0.001), 40.5% and 35.1%. Malnutrition is a major determinant of the humoral response to oral polio and measles vaccines and must be given due consideration to prevent vaccination failure.

  20. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage and risk factors associated with incomplete vaccination of children born to hepatitis B surface antigen-positive mothers, Denmark, 2006 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Kunoee, Asja; Nielsen, Jens; Cowan, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In Denmark, universal screening of pregnant women for hepatitis B has been in place since November 2005, with the first two years as a trial period with enhanced surveillance. It is unknown what the change to universal screening without enhanced surveillance has meant for vaccination coverage among children born to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive mothers and what risk factors exist for incomplete vaccination. This retrospective cohort study included 699 children of mothers positive for HBsAg. Information on vaccination and risk factors was collected from central registers. In total, 93% (651/699) of the children were vaccinated within 48 hours of birth, with considerable variation between birthplaces. Only 64% (306/475) of the children had received all four vaccinations through their general practitioner (GP) at the age of two years, and 10% (47/475) of the children had received no hepatitis B vaccinations at all. Enhanced surveillance was correlated positively with coverage of birth vaccination but not with coverage at the GP. No or few prenatal examinations were a risk factor for incomplete vaccination at the GP. Maternity wards and GPs are encouraged to revise their vaccination procedures and routines for pregnant women, mothers with chronic HBV infection and their children.

  1. Vaccine receipt and vaccine card availability among children of the apostolic faith: analysis from the 2010-2011 Zimbabwe demographic and health survey

    PubMed Central

    Kriss, Jennifer Lara; Goodson, James; Machekanyanga, Zorodzai; Shibeshi, Messeret Eshetu; Daniel, Fussum; Masresha, Balcha; Kaiser, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Vaccine hesitancy and refusal continue to be a global challenge to reaching immunization targets, especially among those in traditional or fundamentalist religions. The apostolic faith in Zimbabwe has been historically associated with objection to most medical interventions, including immunization. Methods We conducted a descriptive analysis of socio-demographic characteristics and vaccine coverage among apostolic and non-apostolic adults aged 15-49 years and children aged 12-23 months using the Demographic and Health Survey conducted in Zimbabwe during 2010-2011. We used logistic regression models to estimate associations between the apostolic religion and receipt of all four basic childhood vaccinations in the Expanded Program on Immunization, receipt of no vaccinations, and availability of child vaccination card. Results Among children aged 12-23 months, 64% had received all doses of the four basic vaccinations, and 12% had received none of the recommended vaccines. A vaccination card was available for 68% of children. There was no significant association between Apostolic faith and completion of all basic vaccinations (aOR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.69-1.17), but apostolic children were almost twice as likely to have received no basic vaccinations (aOR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.22-2.77) than non-Apostolic children, and they were 32% less likely to have a vaccination card that was available and seen by the interviewer (aOR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.52-0.89). Conclusion Disparities in childhood vaccination coverage and availability of vaccination cards persist for apostolic in Zimbabwe. Continued collaboration with apostolic leaders and additional research to better understand vaccine hesitancy and refine interventions and messaging strategies are needed. PMID:27642388

  2. [The relationship between MMR vaccination level and the number of new cases of autism in children].

    PubMed

    Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Kiełtyka, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    The MMR vaccination coverage in Malopolskie voivodeship improved rapidly and finally reached a high level during last years. The number of new cases of autism spectrum disorders in children during that time revealed a slightly rising but not significant trend, while the number of childhood autism were stable. Ecological study showed no correlation between MMR vaccination and an increased risk of childhood autism and autism spectrum disorders in children.

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of an inactivated trivalent split influenza virus vaccine in young children with recurrent wheezing.

    PubMed

    Bae, E Young; Choi, Ui Yoon; Kwon, Hyo Jin; Jeong, Dae Chul; Rhim, Jung Woo; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Kyung Il; Kang, Jin Han

    2013-06-01

    Influenza virus vaccination is recommended for children, but so far, active vaccination has not been achieved because most parents lack knowledge of vaccine safety and many doctors are reluctant to administer vaccine due to concerns that steroids might alter immunogenicity. The aim of this study was to compare the immunogenicity and safety of inactivated trivalent split influenza virus vaccine between children with recurrent wheezing and healthy children of the same age group. Sixty-eight healthy children and 62 children with recurrent wheezing took part in this study. Seroconversion rates, seroprotection rates, geometric mean titers (GMTs), and geometric mean titer ratios (GMTRs) were measured by a hemagglutination inhibition assay for the assessment of immunogenicity. Solicited and unsolicited local and systemic adverse events were measured for the assessment of safety. Regarding immunogenicity, the seroconversion and seroprotection rates showed no difference overall between healthy children and children with recurrent wheezing. Also, no difference was observed between steroid-treated and nontreated groups with recurrent wheezing. Generally, the GMTs after vaccination were higher in the one-dose vaccination groups for healthy children and children with recurrent wheezing, but the GMTRs revealed different results according to strain in the two groups. Regarding safety, solicited local and systemic adverse events showed no differences between healthy children and children with recurrent wheezing. This study demonstrates that inactivated split influenza virus vaccine is able to induce protective immune responses in healthy children, as observed in previous studies, as well as in children with recurrent wheezing who require frequent steroid treatment.

  4. Indirect Effects of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines in National Immunization Programs for Children on Adult Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was developed to overcome the limitations of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, which produces poor immunogenicity in infants younger than 2 years. As many countries have included PCVs in national immunization programs for children, the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by vaccine type Streptococcus pneumoniae has declined markedly, not only among the vaccinated pediatric population, but also among unvaccinated adults. In this review, we present a concise overview of the indirect effects of mass pediatric PCV immunization on unvaccinated adults. PMID:28032483

  5. SAFETY OF A CRM197-CONJUGATED HAEMOPHILUS INFLUENZAE TYPE B VACCINE IN KOREAN CHILDREN.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyoyoung; Bock, Hans; Guadagno, Alana; Costantini, Marco; Baehner, Frank; Kim, Yeon Ho; Ahn, Seung In; Son, Ki Hyuk; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2015-07-01

    Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a major cause of meningitis and pneumonia with high morbidity and mortality rates in young children. The introduction of effective and well-tolerated conjugate Hib vaccines, has nearly eradicated this disease in many countries. We investigated the safety of the Hib PRP-CRM197 vaccine in a multi-center post-marketing surveillance (PMS) study. Korean children (N = 764) aged 1-33 months were enrolled when receiving a routine primary immunization or a booster vaccine with Hib PRP-CRM197 and solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were recorded using a diary card for 7 and 28 days after each vaccination, respectively. In this study, AEs were reported by 66% of subjects but were generally mild, with 42% of subjects reporting solicited AEs and 46% reporting unsolicited AEs. Among the unsolicited AEs, 98% were determined to be unrelated to the study vaccine. The studied Hib PRP-CRM197 vaccine was well tolerated by the study group and found to have a similar safety profile to that reported in other clinical studies. This vaccine is suitable for routine immunization against Hib disease among Korean children. AEs due to this vaccine will continue to be monitored.

  6. Vaccinations, response, and controls before and after intestinal transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Demir, Z; Frange, P; Lacaille, F

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination is an effective strategy to decrease infections in transplant recipients. Children after intestinal transplantation carry a high risk of infection due to increased immunosuppression. In a series of 22 children after intestinal transplantation, we studied the vaccination schedules and the antibodies against vaccine-preventable diseases before transplantation, and at one and five yr after transplantation. We reviewed whether the vaccination schedules were complete, and we analysed the factors that may influence serological immunity and the incidence of disease in patients with deficient immunity. All patients completed the recommended vaccination schedules for DTaP-IPV and HBV. After transplantation, the negative antibodies against vaccine-preventable diseases were mostly related to an antirejection therapy: for DTaP-IPV: four of four patients with no antibody had been treated for rejection, for HBV: two of five, HAV: three of four, MMR: three of seven, and VZV: three of four. A post-transplantation varicella infection was followed by acute rejection, with probability for a relationship between both events. We observed 50% of varicella cases in unvaccinated children, highlighting the importance of pretransplant vaccination. Waning immunogenicity mediated by antibodies against vaccine-preventable disease after transplantation indicated a need for boosters. The recommendations should be regularly enforced, as the reliance on routine immunizations schedules is not adequate in immunocompromised patients.

  7. [Characteristics of the clinical and immunologic safety of inactivated influenza vaccines in children undergoing multiple immunizations].

    PubMed

    Vasil'eva, R I; Merkur'eva, L A; Iatsenko, V G; Vasil'eva, A M; Shvager, M M

    1988-11-01

    In a strictly controlled epidemiological trial on 12,643 school children aged 11-14 years the reactogenic properties and safety of killed influenza chromatographic vaccine under the conditions of multiple immunization were studied. A single immunization dose of the vaccine (0.2 ml) contained the hemagglutinins of influenza viruses A/Philippines/82 (H3N3) and A/Kiev/59/79 (H1N1), 3.5 micrograms each. The preparation was introduced by means of a jet injector. The vaccine was shown to be clinically and immunologically safe under the conditions of the regular multiple immunization of children over the period of 4 years.

  8. Persistence of antibodies in 4-8 year old Austrian children after vaccination with hexavalent DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib and MMR vaccines.

    PubMed

    Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Fischmeister, Gustav; Grac, Ana; Rendi-Wagner, Pamela; Kundi, Michael; Mohsenzadeh-Rabbani, Afsaneh; Moritz, Katharina; Fenninger, Beate; Jarisch, Reinhart; Jasinska, Joanna; Holzmann, Heidemarie; Wiedermann, Ursula; Kollaritsch, Herwig

    2011-07-18

    To determine the proficiency of the Austrian childhood vaccination schedule to induce long lasting seroprotection against vaccine preventable diseases a seroepidemiological study in 348 children between four and eight years of age was conducted. Antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, measles, mumps and rubella antigens were assessed in children, who had been vaccinated with hexavalent DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib vaccines at three, four, five months and in the second year of life and/or MMR vaccines in the second year of life at least once, but mostly twice. High seroprotection rates (SPRs) were detected for tetanus (96%) and measles (90%). SPRs regarding diphtheria and mumps were 81% and 72%, respectively. Rubella-SPRs were 68% in females and 58% in males. Hepatitis B-antibody levels ≥10 mIU/mL were present in 52%; antibodies against pertussis were detected in 27% of the children. SPRs for measles and rubella depended on the interval since last vaccination; mumps-antibodies were significantly lower after one MMR-vaccination only. Antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis depended on the interval since last vaccination while HBs-antibodies did not. The low levels of antibodies 1-7 years after vaccination against pertussis, rubella and mumps after only one vaccination should be considered when recommending new vaccination schedules.

  9. Waning of vaccine-induced immunity to measles in kidney transplanted children.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Salvatore; Santilli, Veronica; Cotugno, Nicola; Concato, Carlo; Manno, Emma Concetta; Nocentini, Giulia; Macchiarulo, Giulia; Cancrini, Caterina; Finocchi, Andrea; Guzzo, Isabella; Dello Strologo, Luca; Palma, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients who undergo immunosuppression after transplantation. Data on immune responses and long-term maintenance after vaccinations in such population are still limited.We cross-sectionally evaluated the maintenance of immune response to measles vaccine in kidney transplanted children on immunosuppressive therapy. Measles-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and B-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot were performed in 74 kidney transplant patients (Tps) and in 23 healthy controls (HCs) previously vaccinated and tested for humoral protection against measles. The quality of measles antibody response was measured by avidity test. B-cell phenotype, investigated via flow cytometry, was further correlated to the ability of Tps to maintain protective humoral responses to measles over time.We observed the loss of vaccine-induced immunity against measles in 19% of Tps. Nonseroprotected children showed signs of impaired B-cell distribution as well as immune senescence and lower antibody avidity. We further reported as time elapsed between vaccination and transplantation, as well as the vaccine administration during dialysis are clinical factors affecting the maintenance of the immune memory response against measles.Tps present both quantitative and qualitative alterations in the maintenance of protective immunity to measles vaccine. Prospective studies are needed to optimize the vaccination schedules in kidney transplant recipients in order to increase the immunization coverage over time in this population.

  10. Message Framing, Perceived Susceptibility, and Intentions to Vaccinate Children Against HPV Among African American Parents.

    PubMed

    Nan, Xiaoli; Madden, Kelly; Richards, Adam; Holt, Cheryl; Wang, Min Qi; Tracy, Kate

    2016-07-01

    This research examines the interaction effect of message framing (gain vs. loss) and perceived susceptibility (i.e., perceived likelihood that one's child is at risk of contracting HPV) on African American parents' intentions to vaccinate their children against HPV. Results of an experiment (N = 193) in which parents were exposed to either a gain-framed or loss-framed message about HPV vaccination revealed a significant interaction between message framing and perceived susceptibility when parents were required to pay for the vaccine. The specific pattern of interaction suggested that parents who perceived their children to be at high risk of contracting HPV were more persuaded by the gain-framed message, whereas those who believed their children to be at low risk of contracting HPV were more persuaded by the loss-framed message. Implications of the findings for HPV vaccination messaging are discussed.

  11. [Lack of association between MMR vaccination and the incidence of autism in children: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Kiełtyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    The matched case-control study has been undertook to investigate whether measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine may be casually associated with autism in children. Cases were children to 14-year old with diagnosis of core autism or atypical autism. Controls were matched on age, sex and general practice. The 96 cases and 192 controls were included. The study provides strong evidence against association of autism with both MMR and a single measles individual vaccine. Additionally children vaccinated with MMR, regardless of age of vaccination (to 18th, 24th and 36th month of life), had risk equal half of that of single measles vaccinated (for vaccinated to 18th month OR=0.41 95%PU: 0.20-0.85). Our findings confirm that MMR vaccination is not associated with an increased risk of autism in children.

  12. Age-Appropriateness: Enabler or Barrier to a Good Life for People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Sheridan

    2010-01-01

    The principle of age-appropriateness is widespread throughout government policy and nongovernment practice guidelines, but the exact meaning of the term is rarely defined. It is commonly assumed to mean activities and approaches commensurate with an individual's chronological age. Dress, furnishing, object selection, and the style of interactions,…

  13. Three Students with Developmental Disabilities Learn to Operate an iPod to Access Age-Appropriate Entertainment Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagohara, Debora M.

    2011-01-01

    Students with developmental disabilities may not have the necessary skills or the same opportunities to access multimedia-based leisure materials as their typical peers. Portable multimedia devices such as the iPod Touch[R] may provide them with a useful tool for accessing age-appropriate leisure material. The present study examined the…

  14. National, State, and Selected Local Area Vaccination Coverage Among Children Aged 19-35 Months - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Hill, Holly A; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Yankey, David; Singleton, James A; Kolasa, Maureen

    2015-08-28

    The reduction in morbidity and mortality associated with vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States has been described as one of the 10 greatest public health achievements of the first decade of the 21st century. A recent analysis concluded that routine childhood vaccination will prevent 322 million cases of disease and about 732,000 early deaths among children born during 1994-2013, for a net societal cost savings of $1.38 trillion. The National Immunization Survey (NIS) has monitored vaccination coverage among U.S. children aged 19-35 months since 1994. This report presents national, regional, state, and selected local area vaccination coverage estimates for children born from January 2011 through May 2013, based on data from the 2014 NIS. For most vaccinations, there was no significant change in coverage between 2013 and 2014. The exception was hepatitis A vaccine (HepA), for which increases were observed in coverage with both ≥1 and ≥2 doses. As in previous years, <1% of children received no vaccinations. National coverage estimates indicate that the Healthy People 2020 target* of 90% was met for ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine (93.3%), ≥1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) (91.5%), ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) (91.6%), and ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine (91.0%). Coverage was below target for ≥4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine (DTaP), the full series of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, hepatitis B (HepB) birth dose,† ≥4 doses pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), ≥2 doses of HepA, the full series of rotavirus vaccine, and the combined vaccine series.§ Examination of coverage by child's race/ethnicity revealed lower estimated coverage among non-Hispanic black children compared with non-Hispanic white children for several vaccinations, including DTaP, the full series of Hib, PCV, rotavirus vaccine, and the combined series. Children from households classified as below the

  15. Vaccine-related adverse events in Cuban children, 1999-2008.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Belkys M; Concepción, Damarys; Galindo, Miguel A; Pérez, Antonio; Saiz, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cuba has implemented an effective National Immunization Program since 1962. The schedule, administered primarily to children, comprises 11 vaccines (8 domestically produced) protecting against 13 diseases. In 1999 Cuba launched a national vaccine adverse event surveillance system to monitor and assess the safety of the immunization program, its vaccination procedures and the products administered. OBJECTIVES Describe adverse events following vaccination reported in children aged <16 years in Cuba from 1999 through 2008. METHODS A retrospective descriptive study was conducted of adverse events following vaccination reported from January 1999 through December 2008. Variables used: year, number of adverse events, province, type of vaccine, type and severity of adverse events (common minor, rare, severe), vaccination program errors, number of deaths, and final results of investigations of severe events. Percentages and rates per dose administered were calculated. Adverse event rates were calculated per 100,000 doses administered and by percentages of individual effects among events reported. RESULTS A total of 45,237,532 vaccine doses were administered, and 26,159 vaccine-associated adverse events were reported (overall rate: 57.8 per 100,000 doses). The group aged 0-5 years reported the highest rate of vaccine-associated adverse events (82/100,000 doses). The DTwP vaccine exhibited the highest rate of adverse events. Common minor events were: fever (17,538), reactions at injection site (4470) and systemic side effects (2422). Rare events (by WHO definition) reported were: persistent crying (2666), hypotonic-hyporesponsive episodes (3), encephalopathy (2) and febrile seizures (112). Severe events included: anaphylaxis (2), respiratory distress (1), multiple organ failure (1), sudden death (1), vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (2), toxic shock syndrome (3), and sepsis (1). The 10 deaths and 3 cases of disability were investigated by an expert

  16. Psychological Interventions for Vaccine Injections in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, Kathryn A.; Taddio, Anna; McMurtry, C. Meghan; Noel, Melanie; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Shah, Vibhuti

    2015-01-01

    Background: This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of psychological interventions for reducing vaccination pain and related outcomes in children and adolescents. Design/Methods: Database searches identified relevant randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Data were extracted and pooled using established methods. Pain, fear, and distress were considered critically important outcomes. Results: Twenty-two studies were included; 2 included adolescents. Findings showed no benefit of false suggestion (n=240) for pain (standardized mean difference [SMD] −0.21 [−0.47, 0.05]) or distress (SMD −0.28 [−0.59, 0.11]), or for use of repeated reassurance (n=82) for pain (SMD −0.18 [−0.92, 0.56]), fear (SMD −0.18 [−0.71, 0.36]), or distress (SMD 0.10 [−0.33, 0.54]). Verbal distraction (n=46) showed reduced distress (SMD −1.22 [−1.87, −0.58]), but not reduced pain (SMD −0.27 [−1.02, 0.47]). Similarly, video distraction (n=328) showed reduced distress (SMD −0.58 [−0.82, −0.34]), but not reduced pain (SMD −0.88 [−1.78, 0.02]) or fear (SMD 0.08 [−0.25, 0.41]). Music distraction demonstrated reduced pain when used with children (n=417) (SMD −0.45 [−0.71, −0.18]), but not with adolescents (n=118) (SMD −0.04 [−0.42, 0.34]). Breathing with a toy (n=368) showed benefit for pain (SMD −0.49 [−0.85, −0.13]), but not fear (SMD −0.60 [−1.22, 0.02]); whereas breathing without a toy (n=136) showed no benefit for pain (SMD −0.27 [−0.61, 0.07]) or fear (SMD −0.36 [−0.86, 0.15]). There was no benefit for a breathing intervention (cough) in children and adolescents (n=136) for pain (SMD −0.17 [−0.41, 0.07]). Conclusions: Psychological interventions with some evidence of benefit in children include: verbal distraction, video distraction, music distraction, and breathing with a toy. PMID:26348163

  17. Evaluation of Temporal Association Between Vaccinations and Retinal Hemorrhage in Children

    PubMed Central

    Binenbaum, Gil; Christian, Cindy W.; Guttmann, Katy; Huang, Jiayan; Ying, Gui-shuang; Forbes, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Vaccinations have been proposed as a cause of retinal hemorrhage in children, primarily as part of a defense strategy in high-stakes abusive head trauma cases. If vaccination injections cause retinal hemorrhage, this consideration would affect the evaluation of children for suspected child abuse. Objectives To describe the prevalence and causes of retinal hemorrhage among infants and young children in an outpatient ophthalmology clinic and to test the hypothesis that, if vaccination injections cause retinal hemorrhage, then retinal hemorrhage would be seen frequently and be temporally associated with immunization. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study between June 1, 2009, and August 30, 2012, at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia pediatric ophthalmology clinics among 5177 children 1 to 23 months old undergoing a dilated fundus examination as an outpatient for any reason. Children with intraocular surgery or active retinal neovascularization were excluded from the study. Main outcomes and Measures The prevalence and causes of retinal hemorrhage, as well as the temporal association between vaccination injection within 7, 14, or 21 days preceding examination and retinal hemorrhage. Results Among 7675 outpatient fundus examinations, 9 of 5177 children had retinal hemorrhage for a prevalence of 0.17% (95% CI, 0.09%-0.33%). All 9 had abusive head trauma diagnosable with nonocular findings. Among a subset of 2210 children who had complete immunization records and underwent 3425 fundoscopic examinations, 163 children had an eye examination within 7 days of vaccination, 323 within 14 days, and 494 within 21 days. No children had retinal hemorrhage within 7 days of vaccination, 1 child had hemorrhage within 14 days, and no additional child had hemorrhage within 21 days. There was no temporal association between vaccination injection and retinal hemorrhage in the prior 7 days (P > .99), 14 days (P = .33), or 21 days (P = .46

  18. [Epidemiological characteristics of children aged 1-4 years without timely birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine vaccination in China, 2014].

    PubMed

    Wang, F Z; Zhang, G M; Shen, L P; Liu, J H; Zheng, H; Wang, F; Miao, N; Sun, X J; Liang, X F; Cui, F Q

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To evaluate the epidemiological characteristics of the children aged 1-4 years without timely birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB(1)) vaccination. Methods: Based on the data from 160 disease surveillance points in 31 provinces of China, two-stage cluster random sampling was used to select the target population aged 1-4 years. A standard questionnaire was used to collect the information about the birth date, gender, ethnic group, place of birth, HepB immunization history of the children selected. A blood sample (3 ml) was taken from each subject for HBsAg testing. SAS software (Version 9.4) was used in our study. We analyzed the age, gender, ethnic group, area specific distributions of the children aged 1-4 years without timely HepB(1) vaccination and the influencing factors, and the relationship between the HepB(1) vaccination time and HBsAg prevalence rate. Results: A total of 12 587 children aged 1-4 years were analyzed and the non-timely HepB(1) vaccination rate was 10.12%. The place of birth, ethnic group, urban/rural area, eastern/central/western area, age were the main influencing factor of the non-timely HepB(1) vaccination. The non-timely HepB(1) vaccination rate was higher in 3-4 years old children (11.13%) than in 1-2 years old children (8.97%), in rural area (12.05%) than in urban area (8.19%), in western area (13.41%) than in central area (9.27%) and eastern area (7.72%), in minority ethnic group (18.06%) than in Han ethnic group (8.77%) and in children born outside hospital (57.66%) than in children born in hospital (9.27%). The HBsAg prevalence rate among 1-4 years children was 0.31%. The HBsAg prevalence rate of the children with timely HepB(1) vaccination (0.25%) was lower than that of the children without timely HepB(1) vaccination (0.89%). Conclusions: In China, the HBsAg prevalence rate among 1-4 years children with HepB vaccination decreased to <0.5% and the timely HepB(1) vaccination rate reached to 90%. We should strengthen the

  19. Experience with pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (conjugated to CRM197 carrier protein) in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Durando, P; Faust, S N; Fletcher, M; Krizova, P; Torres, A; Welte, T

    2013-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae-related infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in people of all ages worldwide. Pneumococcal vaccine development started in 1911 with a whole cell vaccine and more recently multivalent plain polysaccharide and polysaccharide conjugate vaccines have been developed. The recent vaccines rely on capsular polysaccharide antigens to induce serotype-specific immune responses. We summarize here the presentations on pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine (conjugated to CRM197 carrier protein) given during the integrated symposium organized and funded by Pfizer International Operations during the 22nd European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) 31 March to 3 April 2012, London, UK. A dramatic reduction in the incidence of invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) due to vaccine serotypes (VST-IPD) has been reported since the introduction of a hepta-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). An indirect (herd) effect has been demonstrated to be associated with PCV7 infant vaccination programmes, with many studies reporting reductions in VST-IPD in populations that are not eligible for PCV7 vaccination. Since 2010, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) has been introduced into national immunization programmes and results from early surveillance suggest that this vaccine also has an impact on the serotypes unique to PCV13, as well as continuing to protect against the PCV7 serotypes. Data from a passive surveillance system in Europe in 2009, for instance, showed that the highest incidence of IPD remains in those aged >65 years and in children <5 years. PCV13 has now been licensed for vaccination of adults >50 years based on safety and immunogenicity data; an efficacy trial is being conducted. Regardless of previous pneumococcal vaccination status, if the use of 23-valent polysaccharide is considered appropriate, it is recommended to give PCV13 first. Novel immunization strategies remain

  20. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  1. "Snow on My Eyelashes": Language Awareness through Age-Appropriate Poetry Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elster, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Rhymes and poems can be a natural starting point for young children as they experience the world and learn to understand spoken, written, and visual languages. Poetry contains highly patterned, predictable language that has unique potential to promote memorable and pleasurable experiences in preschool, kindergarten, and primary classrooms. As…

  2. Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in preventing severe gastroenteritis in young children according to socioeconomic status

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Virginie; Généreux, Mélissa; Gagneur, Arnaud; Petit, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2011, the monovalent rotavirus vaccine was introduced into a universal immunization program in Quebec (Canada). This retrospective cohort study assessed vaccine effectiveness (VE) in preventing acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) hospitalizations among children <3 y living in the Quebec Eastern Townships region according to socioeconomic status (SES). Data were gathered from a tertiary hospital database paired with a regional immunization registry. Three cohorts of children were followed: (1) vaccinated children born in post-universal vaccination period (2011–2013, n = 5,033), (2) unvaccinated children born in post-universal vaccination period (n = 1,239), and (3) unvaccinated children born in pre-universal vaccination period (2008–2010, n = 6,436). In each cohort, AGE and RVGE hospitalizations were identified during equivalent follow-up periods to calculate VE globally and according to neighborhood-level SES. Using multivariable logistic regression, adjusted odds ratios (OR) were computed to obtain VE (1-OR). Adjusted VE of 2 doses was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37%–77%) and 94% (95%CI: 52%–99%) in preventing AGE and RVGE hospitalization, respectively. Stratified analyses according to SES showed that children living in neighborhoods with higher rates of low-income families had significantly lower VE against AGE hospitalizations compared to neighborhoods with lower rates of low-income families (30% vs. 78%, p = 0.027). Our results suggest that the rotavirus vaccine is highly effective in preventing severe gastroenteritis in young children, particularly among the most well-off. SES seems to influence rotavirus VE, even in a high-income country like Canada. Further studies are needed to determine factors related to lower rotavirus VE among socioeconomically disadvantaged groups. PMID:27367155

  3. Parental perspectives on influenza vaccination of children with chronic medical conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chyongchiou J.; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Ko, Feng-Shou; Raymund, Mahlon; Hoberman, Alejandro; Kearney, Diana H.; Block, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minorities and those living in the inner city have a higher respiratory disease burden than other groups. Yet, influenza vaccination rates among all children with chronic medical conditions remain low. METHODS: Parents of 2-13-year-old children with high-risk medical conditions from health centers in low-income urban neighborhoods completed a mailed survey. Immunization status from medical records was used to calculate validity measures. Survey data are presented for those whose vaccination status was concordant between parental report and the medical record (n=183). RESULTS: Parent-reported influenza vaccination versus medical record review showed 84.9% sensitivity, 68.7% specificity, 49.1% positive predictive value and 92.7% negative predictive value, with a kappa of 0.43. Vaccination rate was 30.6%. Medical record-verified influenza vaccination was associated with parental beliefs that the doctor recommends a flu shot (OR, 40.9; 95% Cl, 9.0-184.9) and that relatives recommend a flu shot (OR, 4.3; 95% Cl, 1.7-10.5), and was less likely if the parent believed that the child will get the flu if a household member is infected (OR, 0.2; 95% Cl, 0.1-0.6). CONCLUSIONS: The message that influenza vaccination is important to protect children with chronic medical conditions may be relayed through physician recommendation or a relative's suggestion and may be more effective if it addresses vaccine efficacy issues. PMID:16708499

  4. Impaired cellular immune response to diphtheria and tetanus vaccines in children after thoracic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Urschel, Simon; Rieck, Birgit D; Birnbaum, Julia; Dalla Pozza, Robert; Rieber, Nikolaus; Januszewska, Katarzyna; Fuchs, Alexandra; West, Lori J; Netz, Heinrich; Belohradsky, Bernd H

    2011-05-01

    Safety and immunogenicity of diphtheria and tetanus booster vaccination were evaluated in 28 children after thoracic transplantation. Adverse events were documented in a patient diary. Blood was collected prior to and four wk after vaccination. Specific antibody concentrations were measured by ELISA. Lymphocytes were investigated for expression of activation markers (CD25, HLA-DR) by flow cytometry and proliferation assays with and without stimulation. Post-vaccination antibody titers were higher than prevaccination (p < 0.001), with more patients having protective antibody levels against diphtheria (p < 0.02) and tetanus (p < 0.001). There was no increased proliferation in non-stimulated or stimulated cultures after vaccination. The number of T-lymphocytes activated by the vaccination antigens was similar pre- and post-vaccination, whereas HLA-DR-expression on stimulated and non-stimulated CD4(+) T-cells increased significantly. Increase in antibodies was negatively correlated with tacrolimus dose, and impaired cellular immunity was associated with higher tacrolimus dose and steroid use. Adverse events were similar to the general population; serious adverse events and rejection did not occur. Vaccination with inactivated vaccines can be performed safely in immunosuppressed children after thoracic transplantation and induces protective antibody levels in the majority of patients. Impaired induction of specific cellular immunity is correlated with intensity of immunosuppression and may explain reduced sustainability of antibodies.

  5. Strategies for Implementing School-Located Influenza Vaccination of Children: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, John; Hull, Harry F.; Rousculp, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends influenza vaccinations for all children 6 months to 18 years of age, which includes school-aged children. Influenza immunization programs may benefit schools by reducing absenteeism. Methods: A systematic literature review of PubMed, PsychLit, and Dissertation Abstracts…

  6. Immunogenicity and safety of a monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine in 15 month-6-year-old German children. Monovalent Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Study Group.

    PubMed

    Stehr, K; Heininger, U; Uhlenbusch, R; Angersbach, P; Hackell, J; Eckhardt, T

    1995-03-01

    Immunization against pertussis has been re-recommended for healthy children in Germany in 1991. In addition the former restriction of immunizing only in the first 2 years of life was abolished. In children born before 1991 immunization rates against pertussis were 15% or less. With the new recommendations physicians are now faced with an increasing demand of parents for catch-up vaccinations in these children. Since they were immunized against diphtheria and tetanus previously monovalent pertussis vaccines are needed for this indication. Therefore a monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine was studied in 249 German children 15 months to 6 years of age. Three doses were administered at 6-10 week intervals. Reactogenicity and antibody responses against the vaccine antigens pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), 69-kd antigen (pertactin) and fimbriae-2 (agglutinogen) were investigated. Local and systemic reactions were minimal in frequency and severity. Antibody responses against all vaccine antigens were pronounced with 93%-100% of vaccinees demonstrating at least four fold titre rises above pre-immunization after the third dose. These findings indicate that this monovalent, multicomponent acellular pertussis vaccine with excellent immunogenicity and low reactogenicity is an appropriate candidate for closing immunization gaps in older children in countries with previously low vaccination rates against pertussis. Based on the results of this study the monovalent acellular pertussis vaccine was licensed in Germany in January 1994.

  7. Rotavirus Vaccination Coverage among Children Aged 2-59 Months: A Report from Guangzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Wang, Ming; Xu, Jianxiong; Zhang, Chunhuan; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Wei; Fu, Chuanxi

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to estimate the Lanzhou lamb rotavirus (LLR) vaccination coverage (VC) and timeliness among children aged 2 to 59 months in Guangzhou, China. Methods An electronic system-based VC survey was conducted using stratified cluster random sampling. Results We reported an overall Lanzhou lamb rotavirus vaccine coverage of 25.3% among children aged 2-59 months (2-8 months, 2.6%) in Guangzhou, China. Conclusion Great efforts should be taken to increase LLR VC in eligible children in Guangzhou, China. PMID:23840828

  8. Compared effectiveness of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children with the 13-valent vaccine in adults.

    PubMed

    Gaillat, J

    2013-06-01

    13-valent-pneumococcal conjugated vaccine was recently approved in the USA and Europe for adults 50 years of age or more. But this approval was followed by recommendations limiting its use to immunocompromised and asplenic patients. The extension of indications to adults was based on the well-demonstrated clinical effectiveness in infants less than 2 years of age, and on a better immune response either quantitatively or qualitatively with conjugated vaccines compared to the immunogenicity of plain polysaccharide vaccines. Nevertheless, the issue was to know whether results observed with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children are reproducible in adults with the 13-valent. The answer was given by comparing the epidemiological and physiopathological data, and the immunological response of the two populations. Very few clinical effectiveness studies in adults are available. We had for aim to assess these various issues in infants and adults. A lot of questions remain, such as the unknown impact of serotype replacement with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine on the clinical epidemiology and emergent Streptococcus pneumoniae pathogenicity, while waiting for the CAPITA study results expected in 2014.

  9. Effectiveness of Varicella Vaccination Program in Preventing Laboratory-Confirmed Cases in Children in Seoul, Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A universal one-dose varicella vaccination program was introduced in 2005 in Republic of Korea. However, the incidence of varicella in Korea has tripled over the last decade. We conducted a community based 1:1 matched case-control study to assess the effectiveness of one MAV strain-based vaccine and three Oka strain-based vaccines licensed for use in Korea. All cases were children in Seoul, Korea with varicella who were reported to the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System in Seoul during 2013. The controls were age-matched children with mumps or scarlet fever but no history of varicella. We included 537 cases and 537 controls. The overall effectiveness of one dose of varicella vaccination was 13% (95% confidence interval [CI], −17.3–35.6). Of the four licensed varicella vaccines, only one was highly effective (88.9%; 95% CI, 52.1–97.4). The vaccine effectiveness for the other vaccines were 71.4% (95% CI, −37.5–94.1), −5% (95% CI, −61.9–31.9), and −100% (95% CI, −700–50.0). The overall effectiveness of vaccination was 75.8% (95% CI, 22.8–92.4) in the first year after vaccination and decreased thereafter; the effectiveness became −7.2% (95% CI, −130.9–59.2) in the fourth year after vaccination. Further studies are warranted to investigate reduced effectiveness of varicella vaccines in Korea. PMID:27822926

  10. Employment and Socioeconomic Factors Associated With Children's Up-to-Date Vaccination Status.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiwei; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Hill, Holly A; Yankey, David

    2017-04-01

    This study examined whether additional information on parents' employment and household characteristics would help explain the differences in children's up-to-date (UTD) vaccination status using the 2008 National Immunization Survey and its associated Socioeconomic Status Module. After controlling for basic sociodemographic factors in multivariable analyses, parent's work schedules and ease of taking time off from work were not associated with UTD vaccination status among 19- to 35-month-old children. We also conducted a stratified analysis to test the heterogeneous effects of the factors among children at 3 age-restricted maternal education levels and found the benefit of paid sick leave had a significant association only among families where the mother had a college degree. Families who had moved since the child's birth, especially if the mother had high school or lower education, were less likely to have children UTD on the vaccine series.

  11. Effective influenza vaccines for children: a critical unmet medical need and a public health priority.

    PubMed

    Banzhoff, Angelika; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2012-03-01

    Seasonal influenza causes clinical illness and hospitalization in all age groups; however, conventional inactivated vaccines have only limited efficacy in young children. MF59(®), an oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant, has been used since the 1990s to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in the elderly, a population with waning immune function due to immunosenescence. Clinical trials now provide information to support a favorable immunogenicity and safety profile of MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine in young children. Published data indicate that Fluad(®), a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine with MF59, was immunogenic and well tolerated in young children, with a benefit/risk ratio that supports routine clinical use. A recent clinical trial also shows that Fluad provides high efficacy against PCR-confirmed influenza. Based on the results of clinical studies in children, the use of MF59-adjuvanted vaccine offers the potential to enhance efficacy and make vaccination a viable prevention and control strategy in this population.

  12. EV71 vaccine, an invaluable gift for children.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-10-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major pathogen for severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Development of vaccines against EV71 would be the most effective approach to prevent the EV71 outbreak. Research and development (R&D) of EV71 vaccine was carried out in several Asian countries. Currently three companies in mainland China have completed Phase III clinical trials of inactivated EV71 whole-virus vaccines, whereas the other two companies have completed Phase I clinical trials separately in Taiwan and in Singapore. Results from those clinical trials have indicated high safety and immunogenicity of EV71 vaccine. Protective efficacies were over 90% on EV71-associated HFMD and over 80% on other EV71-associated diseases. In this paper, we summarize the results from three EV71 vaccine Phase III clinical trials and discuss the challenges of incorporating EV71 vaccine into Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in countries with EV71 epidemics.

  13. EV71 vaccine, an invaluable gift for children

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major pathogen for severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Development of vaccines against EV71 would be the most effective approach to prevent the EV71 outbreak. Research and development (R&D) of EV71 vaccine was carried out in several Asian countries. Currently three companies in mainland China have completed Phase III clinical trials of inactivated EV71 whole-virus vaccines, whereas the other two companies have completed Phase I clinical trials separately in Taiwan and in Singapore. Results from those clinical trials have indicated high safety and immunogenicity of EV71 vaccine. Protective efficacies were over 90% on EV71-associated HFMD and over 80% on other EV71-associated diseases. In this paper, we summarize the results from three EV71 vaccine Phase III clinical trials and discuss the challenges of incorporating EV71 vaccine into Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in countries with EV71 epidemics. PMID:25505956

  14. Long term persistence of inflammation in children vaccinated with Salmonella conjugate vaccine is associated with augmented Th9-Th17 cytokine.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Chinnasamy; Kevinkumar, Vijayakumar; Aravindhan, Vivekanandhan

    2017-03-01

    Vaccine induced serum cytokines not only serves as a biomarker of immunity but also serves as a reliable measure of inflammation. Long term persistence of inflammation can lead to metabolic derangement. Towards this end, in the present study, we measured levels of cytokines along with hormones (insulin, leptin and adiponectin) in children who have been vaccinated with Salmonella typhi Vi conjugate vaccine, 30months after vaccination. Vaccinated children showed a unique cytokine profile with suppressed Th1-Th2 and increased Th9-Th17 cytokines indicating immune polarization which was associated with decreased serum adiponectin (but not insulin or leptin) levels. The study gains major importance since it is a longitudinal study which reports vaccine induced long term persistence of inflammation for the first time in the high risk ethnic population.

  15. Public acceptance and willingness to hepatitis a vaccination in children aged 7-18 years in Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kong, Kyoung Ae; Yoon, Seo Hee; Cho, Su Jin; Kim, Han Wool; Kim, Kyung-Hyo

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis A can cause serious illness among adolescents and adults with low vaccination coverage. Even though hepatitis A vaccine is one of the strong candidates for Korean national immunization program, adolescents aged older than 12 yr would not benefit. Our purpose was to assess the willingness and analyze the correlates of Korean mothers for hepatitis A (HepA) vaccination to develop strategies for HepA vaccination. A national telephone survey on 800 mothers with children aged 7-18 yr was conducted with random-digit dialing method. Sixty-two percent and 92% of the mothers reported that they were willing to HepA vaccination at current cost and at half of the current cost, respectively. However, at current cost, only 79% wished to vaccinate their child in an epidemic and 32% wished to vaccinate promptly. Having two or more children, not having future plans to send the child overseas, and low family income were significantly associated with not willing to HepA vaccination. Low perception of the susceptibility for hepatitis A and perception of the current cost as barrier increased the odds of unwillingness to vaccination at current cost and to prompt vaccination. The mothers' willingness to HepA vaccination for the children aged 7-18 yr in Korea was not very high at current cost and associated socioeconomic status and health-belief. Targeted intervention or strategies are needed to increase the HepA vaccination rate among children in Korea.

  16. Attitudes Regarding HPV Vaccinations of Children among Mothers with Adolescent Daughters in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study, carried out before the beginning of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations as a National Immunization Program (NIP) in Korea in 2016, is to assess the ranges of perceptions and personal experience and their influences on attitudes regarding HPV vaccinations of children, among mothers of adolescent (9–14 years of age) daughters in Korea. From November 2015 to February 2016, we distributed a written questionnaire to mothers who had daughters aged 9–14 years. The questionnaire consisted of several questions, related to knowledge of HPV, personal experiences of HPV vaccination, and attitudes toward HPV vaccinations of their adolescent daughters. Of the 260 questionnaires distributed, 140 participants returned answered ones. And although only 51% of participants were aware that cervical cancer is highly related with HPV infection, 70% said they were willing to vaccinate their daughters, showing that awareness does not coincide with intention to vaccinate. Among the participants showing negative attitudes, 50% were concerned about the vaccination side effects. The more the participants’ pre-knowledge about HPV infection, and about the relationship of HPV to cervical cancer, the more positive their attitudes (P = 0.002, P < 0.001). Our study showed that, as the level of education rose, the proportion of mothers with negative attitudes toward vaccinating their adolescent daughters rose as well. Thus, the provision of correct education by health care providers and accurate information through active advertising may play an important role in increasing the vaccination rate among adolescent girls in Korea. PMID:27914142

  17. Factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity to an OMV meningococcal B vaccine in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Jackson, Catherine; Stewart, Joanna; Coster, Gregor; Turner, Nikki; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Lennon, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Pain on vaccine injection and subsequent site reactions of pain and swelling may influence confidence in vaccines and their uptake. This study aimed to identify factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity following administration of a strain specific meningococcal B outer membrane vesicle vaccine. A retrospective analysis of data was conducted from a phase II single center randomized observer-blind study that evaluated the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of this vaccine in 2 cohorts of healthy 8 to 12 y old children. Vaccine administration technique was observed by an unblinded team member and the vaccine administrator instructed on standardized administration. Participants kept a daily diary to record local reactions (erythema, induration and swelling) and pain for 7 d following receipt of the vaccine. Explanatory variables were cohort, vaccine, age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, atopic history, history of frequent infections, history of drug reactions, pain on injection, vaccinator, school population socioeconomic status, serum bactericidal antibody titer against the vaccine strain NZ98/254, and total IgG. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted using ordinal logistic regression for factors relating to pain on injection and reactogenicity. Perceived pain on injection was related to vaccine formulation, vaccine administrator and ethnicity. Reactogenicity outcomes varied with ethnicity and vaccine administrator. Maintaining community and parental confidence in vaccine safety without drawing attention to differences between individuals and groups is likely to become increasingly difficult. Vaccine administration technique alone has the potential to significantly reduce pain experienced on injection and local vaccine reactions. PMID:25905795

  18. Factors associated with vaccination coverage in children < 5 years in Angola.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Manuel Falcão Saturnino de; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze vaccination coverage and factors associated with a complete immunization scheme in children < 5 years old. METHODS This cross-sectional household census survey evaluated 1,209 children < 5 years old living in Bom Jesus, Angola, in 2010. Data were obtained from interviews, questionnaires, child immunization histories, and maternal health histories. The statistical analysis used generalized linear models, in which the dependent variable followed a binary distribution (vaccinated, unvaccinated) and the association function was logarithmic and had the children's individual, familial, and socioeconomic factors as independent variables. RESULTS Vaccination coverage was 37.0%, higher in children < 1 year (55.0%) and heterogeneous across neighborhoods; 52.0% of children of both sexes had no immunization records. The prevalence rate of vaccination significantly varied according to child age, mother's level of education, family size, ownership of household appliances, and destination of domestic waste. CONCLUSIONS Vulnerable groups with vaccination coverage below recommended levels continue to be present. Some factors indicate inequalities that represent barriers to full immunization, indicating the need to implement more equitable policies. The knowledge of these factors contributes to planning immunization promotion measures that focus on the most vulnerable groups.

  19. MMR vaccination status of children exempted from school-entry immunization mandates

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Karthik; Omer, Saad B.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Levy, Michael Z.; Salmon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Child immunizations are one of the most successful public health interventions of the past century. Still, parental vaccine hesitancy is widespread and increasing. One manifestation of this are rising rates of nonmedical or “personal beliefs” exemptions (PBEs) from school-entry immunization mandates. Exemptions have been shown to be associated with increased risk of disease outbreak, but the strength of this association depends critically on the true vaccination status of exempted children, which has not been assessed. OBJECTIVE To estimate the true measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination status of children with PBEs. METHODS We use administrative data collected by the California Department of Public Health in 2009 and imputation to estimate the MMR vaccination status of children with PBEs under varying scenarios. RESULTS Results from 2009 surveillance data indicate MMR1/MMR2 coverage of 18–47% among children with PBEs at typical schools and 11–34% among children with PBEs at schools with high PBE rates. Imputation scenarios point to much higher coverage (64–92% for MMR1 and 25–58% for MMR2 at typical schools; 49–90% for MMR1 and 16–63% for MMR2 at high PBE schools) but still below levels needed to maintain herd immunity against measles. CONCLUSIONS These coverage estimates suggest that prior analyses of the relative risk of measles associated with vaccine refusal underestimate that risk by an order of magnitude of 2–10 times. PMID:26431991

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (IMOJEV®) in children.

    PubMed

    Chokephaibulkit, K; Houillon, G; Feroldi, E; Bouckenooghe, A

    2016-01-01

    JE-CV (IMOJEV®, Sanofi Pasteur, France) is a live attenuated virus vaccine constructed by inserting coding sequences of the prM and E structural proteins of the Japanese encephalitis SA14-14-2 virus into the genome of yellow fever 17D virus. Primary immunization with JE-CV requires a single dose of the vaccine. This article reviews clinical trials of JE-CV in children aged up to 6 years conducted in countries across South-East Asia. Strong and persistent antibody responses were observed after single primary and booster doses, with 97% of children seroprotected up to five years after booster vaccination. Models of long-term antibody persistence predict a median duration of protection of approximately 30 years after a booster dose. The safety and reactogenicity profiles of JE-CV primary and booster doses are comparable to other widely used childhood vaccines.

  1. Safety of the trivalent, cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T) in children.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Pedro A

    2002-04-01

    The trivalent, cold-adapted influenza vaccine (CAIV-T, FluMist, Aviron, Mountain View, CA) is a live attenuated influenza virus vaccine that is administered by nasal spray. CAIV-T is efficacious in preventing influenza virus infection. The vaccine was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration for licensure in healthy children and adults. Universal immunization is being considered in children, and an effective vaccine with minimal adverse reactions is thus required. The published studies on the safety of CAIV-T in children reviewed in this article were clinical trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) conducted in children from 1975 to 1991, clinical trials from 1991 to 1993 sponsored by a cooperative agreement between NIH and Wyeth-Ayerst Research, and clinical trials from 1995 to the present sponsored by a cooperative agreement between NIH and Aviron. Safety assessments included the occurrence of: 1) specific influenza-like symptoms, unexpected symptoms, and use of medications within the first 10 days after vaccination; 2) acute illness and use of medication within 11 to 42 days postvaccination; 3) serious adverse events and rare events within 42 days after vaccination; 4) healthcare utilization within 14 days after vaccination; and 5) acute respiratory symptoms with annual sequential vaccine doses. CAIV-T was safe and well-tolerated. Transient, mild respiratory symptoms were observed in a minority (10%-15%) of children and primarily with the first CAIV-T dose. Vomiting and abdominal pain occurred in fewer than 2 percent of CAIV-T recipients. The gastrointestinal symptoms were mild and of short duration. An excess of illness or use of medication was not observed after the 10th day of vaccination. Sequential annual doses of CAIV-T were well-tolerated and not associated with increased reactogenicity. CAIV-T did not cause an increase in healthcare utilization. Thus CAIV-T is safe in healthy children and should complement the use of inactivated

  2. A further study on measles vaccination in Nigerian children*

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickse, R. G.; Montefiore, D.; Sherman, P. M.; Sofoluwe, G. O.

    1965-01-01

    Measles is a serious disease in Nigeria, causing severe morbidity and appreciable mortality; it occurs almost exclusively in the pre-school child with a peak incidence in the second year of life. A safe measles vaccine would be of inestimable value both in that country and in other areas where the disease constitutes a grave menace. Studies using vaccines of the Enders Edmonston B type have shown that while these are efficient immunizing agents, severe reactions are too frequent to permit of their wide general use. In the quest for safer vaccines, and in accordance with the recommendations of a WHO Scientific Group, a field trial was undertaken in Western Nigeria in May 1964 to make direct comparisons of the antigenicity and reaction rates of three further-attenuated measles vaccines (Schwarz, Beckenham 20 and Beckenham 20/2) and Enders Edmonston B vaccine plus gamma-globulin. A control group was also included. Analysis of the clinical responses demonstrated that reactions were similar, and of minimal severity, in all vaccine groups. Neutralizing antibody responses showed that all the vaccines used were effective immunizing agents. From the point of view of ease of administration and expense, however, further-attenuated vaccines seem preferable to Enders Edmonston B administered with gamma-globulin. PMID:5294305

  3. Effect of media use on mothers' vaccination of their children in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo; Lin, Leesa; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2015-05-21

    While several studies have examined the crucial role that parents' vaccination behaviors play in reducing disease spread and severity among children, few have evaluated the connection between parents' media use and their decision on whether or not to vaccinate their child, specifically in relation to the BCG (Bacillus Calmetter Guerin), DPT (Diptheria, Pertussis, Tetanus) polio, and measles vaccines. Media channels are a critical source of health information for parents, which is especially true in Sub-Saharan Africa, as there is often a dearth of local healthcare providers. The aim of this paper is to investigate the role that media use plays in a mothers' choice to vaccinate their infant children in sub-Saharan Africa, specifically focusing on whether media use is associated with socioeconomic status (SES) and a mothers' vaccination of their children. Cross-sectional data from the Demographic Health Surveys of 13 sub-Saharan countries (2004-2010) were pooled. A multivariate Poisson regression of 151,209 women was used to calculate adjusted relative ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the associations among SES, media use, and immunization. Education and wealth were found to be strongly and positively associated with vaccine-uptake behaviors. The effects of media use (radio and television) were found to be associated with the relationships between SES and vaccine uptake. However, it did not reduce the impact of SES on vaccination. These findings indicate that mass media may be an important tool for future efforts to reduce the health discrepancies between children from high- and low-socioeconomic backgrounds. Going forward, immunization strategies should include communication plans that will address and mitigate potential immunization disparities among parents of different SES backgrounds.

  4. Vaccination coverage by race/ethnicity and poverty level among children aged 19-35 months -- United States, 1996.

    PubMed

    1997-10-17

    The Childhood Immunization Initiative (CII), implemented in 1993, is an intensive program to increase vaccination coverage among preschool-aged children and to reduce or eliminate vaccine-preventable diseases. In 1996, national coverage goals were achieved for 2-year-old children for the most critical doses of each routinely recommended vaccine. Disparities in vaccination coverage have been documented previously among different racial/ethnic groups. This report presents findings from CDC's National Immunization Survey (NIS), which document progress toward achieving the 1996 CII vaccination coverage goals by racial/ethnic group and by level of poverty. The findings indicate that, for each of five racial/ethnic groups, most of the national CII vaccination coverage goals were met and that, based on poverty level, all the goals were met for children living at or above the poverty level, and two of the five goals were met for children living below the poverty level.

  5. Antibody Response from Whole-Cell Pertussis Vaccine Immunized Brazilian Children against Different Strains of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Alexandre; Pietro Pereira, Aparecida S.; Silva, Célio Lopes; de Melo Rocha, Gutemberg; Lebrun, Ivo; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo A.; Tambourgi, Denise V.

    2010-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is a gram-negative bacillus that causes the highly contagious disease known as pertussis or whooping cough. Antibody response in children may vary depending on the vaccination schedule and the product used. In this study, we have analyzed the antibody response of cellular pertussis vaccinated children against B. pertussis strains and their virulence factors, such as pertussis toxin, pertactin, and filamentous hemagglutinin. After the completion of the immunization process, according to the Brazilian vaccination program, children serum samples were collected at different periods of time, and tested for the presence of specific antibodies and antigenic cross-reactivity. Results obtained show that children immunized with three doses of the Brazilian whole-cell pertussis vaccine present high levels of serum antibodies capable of recognizing the majority of the components present in vaccinal and non-vaccinal B. pertussis strains and their virulence factors for at least 2 years after the completion of the immunization procedure. PMID:20348518

  6. Does Measles Vaccination Reduce the Risk of Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) and Diarrhea in Children: A Multi-Country Study?

    PubMed Central

    Bawankule, Rahul; Singh, Abhishek; Kumar, Kaushalendra; Shetye, Sadanand

    2017-01-01

    Background Pneumonia and diarrhea occur either as complications or secondary infections in measles affected children. So, the integrated Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD) by WHO and UNICEF includes measles vaccination as preventive measure in children. The objective of the study is to examine the effect of measles vaccination on Acute Respiratory Infection (ARI) and diarrhea in children in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan. Methods We analyzed data from the most recent rounds of Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in the selected countries. We included children age 12–59 months in the analysis. We used multivariable binary logistic regression to examine the effect of measles vaccination on ARI and diarrhea in children. We also estimated Vaccination Effectiveness (VE). Findings More than 60 percent of the children age 12–59 months were given measles vaccine before the survey in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, India and Pakistan. Children who were given the measles vaccine were less likely to suffer from ARI than unvaccinated children in India and Pakistan. Children who were given the measles vaccine had a lower risk of diarrhea than those who did not receive it in all the selected countries except Ethiopia. Measles vaccination was associated with reduction in ARI cases by 15–30 percent in India and Pakistan, and diarrhea cases by 12–22 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Nigeria and Pakistan. Conclusion The receipt of the measles vaccine was associated with decrease in ARI and diarrhea in children. The immunization program must ensure that each child gets the recommended doses of measles vaccine at the appropriate age. The measles vaccination should be given more attention as a preventive intervention under the Global Action Plan for Pneumonia and Diarrhea (GAPPD) in all low and middle-income countries. PMID:28076428

  7. Laboratory tests on the effectiveness of oral vaccination of young children against typhoid and paratyphoid A and B

    PubMed Central

    Vlădoianu, I. R.; Dimache, G.; Antohi, S.; Vlădoianu, Constanța; Zarma, Ortansa

    1965-01-01

    In Romania, pre-school children are excluded from subcutaneous inoculation with typhoid and paratyphoid A and B vaccine. The authors have therefore investigated the possibility of giving them an oral vaccine. Laboratory tests were carried out on 30 children from 3 to 7 years of age. Samples of blood serum were collected before and after vaccination and subsequently tested for (1) seroprotection in chick embryos, (2) seroprotection in white mice, (3) titration of the agglutinating antibodies, and (4) electrophoretic pattern. The results obtained showed that the oral administration of the vaccine can, under the conditions used in the test, afford a considerable degree of protection to young children. PMID:14290078

  8. Humoral and cellular immune responses to influenza vaccination in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    WONG-CHEW, ROSA MARÍA; FRÍAS, MARGARITA NAVA; GARCÍA-LEÓN, MIGUEL LEONARDO; ARRIAGA-PIZANO, LOURDES; SANSON, AURORA MEDINA; LOPEZ-MACÍAS, CONSTANTINO; ISIBASI, ARMANDO; SANTOS-PRECIADO, JOSÉ IGNACIO

    2012-01-01

    The immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer is controversial. The objective of this study was to characterize the cellular and humoral immune responses to an influenza vaccine in children with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy. In this study, children with cancer, who were not previously immunized, received an influenza vaccine via intramuscular injection. Blood samples were obtained prior to and at 4 weeks after immunization. Antibodies were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Cell-mediated immunity was measured by specific lymphoproliferation with 3H-thymidine incorporation and by measuring cell frequencies following staining with monoclonal antibodies (CD8, CD4, CD19, CD45RA and CD27) using flow cytometry following incubation with the influenza antigen for 5 days. Geometric mean titers (GMT), mean counts per minute (cpm), cell frequencies prior to and following vaccination and percentage patient responses were compared using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric U and Chi-square tests; where p<0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant result. A total of 56 children were included. Their mean age was 6.64±3.61 years. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was diagnosed in 75, solid tumors in 23 and lymphoma in 2% of the children. Subjects with titers ≥40 hemagglutination units (HU) increased from 43% prior to vaccination to 73% following vaccination (p=0.01), whereas the GMT increased from 31.35 [95% confidence interval (CI), 29–111] to 143.45 HU (95% CI, 284–640) following vaccination (p<0.001). An increase in CD45RA expression in CD8+ T cells was observed following vaccination (p=0.01). An increase in CD27 expression was observed in the CD4/8-negative cell population stimulated with the influenza antigen following vaccination (p<0.05). No serious adverse effects were observed. An increase in the seropositivity rate and GMT values following influenza vaccination were also observed. Influenza

  9. Influenza vaccination coverage rate in children: reasons for a failure and how to go forward.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Catherine Weil

    2012-01-01

    Based on an increasingly extensive literature expressing the large interest in the field, this paper gives an overview of different aspects of influenza prevention in children. It relies on paradoxes. First, the heaviest part of the burden is well demonstrated in the youngest infants by numerous epidemiological data elsewhere. On the contrary, with older children, the prevention by influenza vaccines is more efficacious-without notable side effects. Second, the available TIV vaccines are 60 years old and the requests of registration and regulation of vaccines have evolved. There is a specific need in children: it is time to re-discuss the pragmatic utilization of influenza vaccines (full dose in the youngest patient? More flexibility regarding the interval between the two required doses in vaccine-naïve children), and to change from a compassionate use to a targeted research and adapted vaccines considering the limits of TIV in the youngest children. Third, influenza virus transmission is the highest in children in semi-close communities (day-care centers, schools), diffusing to households and more largely to the population. A restricted policy on high risk groups (roughly 10% in a pediatric population, all medical conditions including asthma, for whom influenza vaccine coverage is a 15-75% range) is far below the estimated threshold of 45% coverage rate to limit the virus circulation by an indirect impact during seasonal epidemics. Fourth, public health decisions in the vaccination field are usually taken from top to bottom. The pandemic A/H1N1 has toughly demonstrated that "forgetting" about the perception and expectations of the public and the parents nearly created conflicts and at least a strong resistance impeding the quality of a program worked on for a long time ahead. Fifth, and not the least, HCPs are pivotal in influenza vaccination mostly trusted by the parents. Too often, they are not backed by a national and clear support and they need to reinforce

  10. Measles Vaccination Coverage among Latino Children Aged 12 to 59 Months in Los Angeles County: A Household Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Donnell P.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines the results of a household survey of measles vaccination coverage among Hispanic American children aged 12 to 59 months. Between 81 percent and 91 percent of the children have been vaccinated, a percentage insufficient to stop the high rate of measles transmission within this population. Recommends that public health efforts be focused on…

  11. DTPw-HB and Hib primary and booster vaccination: combined versus separate administration to Latin American children.

    PubMed

    Santos, José Ignacio; Martin, Amando; De Leon, Tirza; Rivera, Luis; Gaitán, Maria Elisa García; Del Rio, Carlos; Oselka, Gabriel; Cervantes, Yolanda; Rubio, Pilar; Clemens, Sue Ann Costa; de Mendonça, João Silva

    2002-03-15

    This multicentre study was designed to establish the reactogenicity and immunogenicity profiles of primary and booster vaccination with diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis whole-cell-hepatitis B/Haemophilus influenzae type-b (DTPw-HB/Hib) administered as either a syringe mix or as separate injections in 400 Latin American children. Both vaccine regimens were equally well tolerated and elicited post-primary excellent seropositivity rates at or close to 100% for all five component antigens. With regard to HB, 100% of subjects in the combined vaccination group, and 98.8% subjects in the separate injection vaccination group reached seroprotective antibody concentrations (>or=10 mIU/ml) 1 month after the primary vaccination course. Equally high anti-PRP antibody concentrations were reached 1 month after vaccination, with 100% of seroprotected subjects in the combined vaccination group (antibody concentrations >or=0.15 microg/ml), against 99.4% in the separate injection vaccination group. Seroprotective anti-HBs and anti-PRP antibody concentration levels persisted approximately 1 year after the primary vaccination course, just prior to booster vaccination. Finally, a significant increase of all antibody concentrations could be observed after the booster vaccination, since all but one subject in the separate injection vaccination group had protective levels of anti-HBs and anti-PRP antibodies 1 month after the booster dose. These results suggest that the combination of DTPw-HB and Hib vaccines provides an effective means for increasing vaccine coverage in childhood vaccination programmes.

  12. Are we ready to abrogate compulsory vaccinations for children?

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Domenico; Tafuri, Silvio; Fortunato, Francesca; Cozza, Vanessa; Germinario, Cinzia A; Prato, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, polio and hepatitis B is compulsory for infants countrywide, except in Veneto region where since 2007 Health Authorities have experimented the suspension of mandatory vaccination. In light of the recent discussion on the potential abrogation in other regions, we explored the opinion of family pediatricians who play a crucial role in promoting immunization programmes in Italy. In November 2009, we interviewed by phone the family pediatricians working in Puglia region using a standardised, ad hoc and piloted questionnaire. Of the 596 contacted, 502 (84.2%) completed the questionnaire (54% female, median age = 52 y). Among the respondents, 72 (14.3%) would agree on the hypothesis of abrogation. This judgment was associated with having a good opinion on the level of awareness of the importance of vaccinations in the general public (OR = 6.6; 95% CI: 3.6-12.1) and having the perception of adequate organization of Vaccination Services in supporting the abrogation (OR = 3.6; 95% CI: 1.7-5.9). Family pediatricians appeared really sceptical about the abrogation of compulsory vaccination that could be hypothesized only increasing public awareness, communication skills and capability of Vaccination Services personnel in offering vaccinations.

  13. Factors associated with vaccination coverage in children < 5 years in Angola

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Manuel Falcão Saturnino; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi; Rocha, Juan Stuardo Yazlle

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze vaccination coverage and factors associated with a complete immunization scheme in children < 5 years old. METHODS This cross-sectional household census survey evaluated 1,209 children < 5 years old living in Bom Jesus, Angola, in 2010. Data were obtained from interviews, questionnaires, child immunization histories, and maternal health histories. The statistical analysis used generalized linear models, in which the dependent variable followed a binary distribution (vaccinated, unvaccinated) and the association function was logarithmic and had the children’s individual, familial, and socioeconomic factors as independent variables. RESULTS Vaccination coverage was 37.0%, higher in children < 1 year (55.0%) and heterogeneous across neighborhoods; 52.0% of children of both sexes had no immunization records. The prevalence rate of vaccination significantly varied according to child age, mother’s level of education, family size, ownership of household appliances, and destination of domestic waste. CONCLUSIONS Vulnerable groups with vaccination coverage below recommended levels continue to be present. Some factors indicate inequalities that represent barriers to full immunization, indicating the need to implement more equitable policies. The knowledge of these factors contributes to planning immunization promotion measures that focus on the most vulnerable groups. PMID:26039393

  14. Neuronal Antibodies in Children with or without Narcolepsy following H1N1-AS03 Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Thebault, Simon; Waters, Patrick; Snape, Matthew D; Cottrell, Dominic; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Huutoniemi, Anne; Partinen, Markku; Pollard, Andrew J; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by deficiency of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin. An autoimmune basis is suspected, but no specific antibodies, either causative or as biomarkers, have been identified. However, the AS03 adjuvanted split virion H1N1 (H1N1-AS03) vaccine, created to protect against the 2009 Pandemic, has been implicated as a trigger of narcolepsy particularly in children. Sera and CSFs from 13 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated patients (12 children, 1 young adult) with type 1 narcolepsy were tested for autoantibodies to known neuronal antigens including the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), both associated with encephalopathies that include disordered sleep, to rodent brain tissue including the lateral hypothalamus, and to live hippocampal neurons in culture. When sufficient sample was available, CSF levels of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were measured. Sera from 44 H1N1-ASO3-vaccinated children without narcolepsy were also examined. None of these patients' CSFs or sera was positive for NMDAR or CASPR2 antibodies or binding to neurons; 4/13 sera bound to orexin-neurons in rat brain tissue, but also to other neurons. MCH levels were a marginally raised (n = 8; p = 0.054) in orexin-deficient narcolepsy patients compared with orexin-normal children (n = 6). In the 44 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated healthy children, there was no rise in total IgG levels or in CASPR2 or NMDAR antibodies three weeks following vaccination. In conclusion, there were no narcolepsy-specific autoantibodies identified in type 1 narcolepsy sera or CSFs, and no evidence for a general increase in immune reactivity following H1N1-AS03 vaccination in the healthy children. Antibodies to other neuronal specific membrane targets, with their potential for directing use of immunotherapies, are still an important goal for future research.

  15. Does vaccination ensure protection? Assessing diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels in a population of healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek; Kałużna, Ewelina; Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Michalak, Michał; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vaccination effectiveness is proven when the disease does not develop after a patient is exposed to the pathogen. In the case of rare diseases, vaccination effectiveness is assessed by monitoring specific antibody levels in the population. Such recurrent analyses allow the evaluation of vaccination programs. The primary schedule of diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations is similar in various countries, with differences mainly in the number and timing of booster doses. The aim of the study was to assess diphtheria and tetanus antibody concentrations in a population of healthy children. Diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels were analyzed in a group of 324 children aged 18 to 180 months. All children were vaccinated in accordance with the Polish vaccination schedule. Specific antibody concentrations greater than 0.1 IU/mL were considered protective against tetanus or diphtheria. Levels above 1.0 were considered to ensure long-term protection. Protective levels of diphtheria antibodies were found in 229 patients (70.46%), and of tetanus in 306 patients (94.15%). Statistically significant differences were found in tetanus antibody levels in different age groups. Mean concentrations and the percentage of children with high tetanus antibody titers increased with age. No similar correlation was found for diphtheria antibodies. High diphtheria antibody levels co-occurred in 72% of the children with high tetanus antibody levels; 95% of the children with low tetanus antibody levels had low levels of diphtheria antibodies. The percentage of children with protective diphtheria antibody levels is lower than that in the case of tetanus antibodies, both in Poland and abroad, but the high proportion of children without diphtheria protection in Poland is an exception. This is all the more puzzling when taking into account that Polish children are administered a total of 5 doses containing a high concentration of diphtheria toxoid, at intervals shorter than 5 years. The

  16. Antibody Persistence in Young Children 5 Years after Vaccination with a Combined Haemophilus influenzae Type b-Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Conjugate Vaccine Coadministered with Diphtheria-Tetanus-Acellular Pertussis-Based and Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tejedor, Juan Carlos; Brzostek, Jerzy; Konior, Ryszard; Grunert, Detlef; Kolhe, Devayani; Baine, Yaela; Van Der Wielen, Marie

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated antibody persistence in children up to 5 years after administration of a combined Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)-Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (MenC)-tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine coadministered with a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. This is the follow-up study of a randomized trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT00334334/00463437) in which healthy children were vaccinated (primary vaccinations at 2, 4, and 6 months of age and booster vaccination at 11 to 18 months of age) with Hib-MenC-TT or a control MenC conjugate vaccine, coadministered with diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa)-based combination vaccines (DTPa/Hib for control groups) and a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine [PHiD-CV] or 7-valent cross-reacting material 197 [CRM197] conjugate vaccine [7vCRM]). MenC antibody titers were measured with a serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay using rabbit complement (i.e., rabbit SBA [rSBA]), and antibodies against Hib polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody persistence up to 5 years after booster vaccination is reported for 530 children ∼6 years of age. The percentages of children with seroprotective rSBA-MenC titers were between 24.2% and 40.1% in all groups approximately 5 years after booster vaccination. More than 98.5% of children in each group retained seroprotective anti-PRP concentrations. No vaccine-related serious adverse events and no events related to a lack of vaccine efficacy were reported. Approximately 5 years after booster vaccination, the majority of children retained seroprotective anti-PRP antibody concentrations. The percentage of children retaining seroprotective rSBA-MenC titers was low (≤40%), suggesting that a significant proportion of children may be unprotected against MenC disease. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under

  17. Antibody Persistence in Young Children 5 Years after Vaccination with a Combined Haemophilus influenzae Type b-Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Conjugate Vaccine Coadministered with Diphtheria-Tetanus-Acellular Pertussis-Based and Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Tejedor, Juan Carlos; Brzostek, Jerzy; Konior, Ryszard; Grunert, Detlef; Kolhe, Devayani; Baine, Yaela

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated antibody persistence in children up to 5 years after administration of a combined Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)-Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C (MenC)-tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine coadministered with a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. This is the follow-up study of a randomized trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT00334334/00463437) in which healthy children were vaccinated (primary vaccinations at 2, 4, and 6 months of age and booster vaccination at 11 to 18 months of age) with Hib-MenC-TT or a control MenC conjugate vaccine, coadministered with diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa)-based combination vaccines (DTPa/Hib for control groups) and a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine [PHiD-CV] or 7-valent cross-reacting material 197 [CRM197] conjugate vaccine [7vCRM]). MenC antibody titers were measured with a serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assay using rabbit complement (i.e., rabbit SBA [rSBA]), and antibodies against Hib polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody persistence up to 5 years after booster vaccination is reported for 530 children ∼6 years of age. The percentages of children with seroprotective rSBA-MenC titers were between 24.2% and 40.1% in all groups approximately 5 years after booster vaccination. More than 98.5% of children in each group retained seroprotective anti-PRP concentrations. No vaccine-related serious adverse events and no events related to a lack of vaccine efficacy were reported. Approximately 5 years after booster vaccination, the majority of children retained seroprotective anti-PRP antibody concentrations. The percentage of children retaining seroprotective rSBA-MenC titers was low (≤40%), suggesting that a significant proportion of children may be unprotected against MenC disease. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under

  18. Detection of antinuclear and antilaminin antibodies in autistic children who received thimerosal-containing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijendra K; Rivas, Wyatt H

    2004-01-01

    Autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder, may involve autoimmune pathogenesis. Since mercury is potentially a risk factor for autoimmunity, we conducted a study of mercury-induced antinuclear and antilaminin antibodies in autistic and normal children who had been pre-administered with thimerosal-containing vaccines. Laboratory analysis by different immunoassays showed that the serum level of these two autoimmune markers did not significantly differ between autistic and normal children. This finding suggests that the mercury as in thimerosal-containing vaccines is likely not related to autoimmune phenomenon in autism.

  19. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children.

    PubMed

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-04-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3-5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination.

  20. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children

    PubMed Central

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles–mumps–rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3–5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination. PMID:27195118

  1. Vaccination coverage among children in Germany estimated by analysis of health insurance claims data

    PubMed Central

    Rieck, Thorsten; Feig, Marcel; Eckmanns, Tim; Benzler, Justus; Siedler, Anette; Wichmann, Ole

    2014-01-01

    In Germany, the national routine childhood immunization schedule comprises 12 vaccinations. Primary immunizations should be completed by 24 mo of age. However, nationwide monitoring of vaccination coverage (VC) is performed only at school entry. We utilized health insurance claims data covering ~85% of the total population with the objectives to (1) assess VC of all recommended childhood vaccinations in birth-cohorts 2004–2009, (2) analyze cross-sectional (at 24 and 36 mo) and longitudinal trends, and (3) validate the method internally and externally. Counting vaccine doses in a retrospective cohort fashion, we assembled individual vaccination histories and summarized VC to nationwide figures. For most long-established vaccinations, VC at 24 mo was at moderate levels (~73–80%) and increased slightly across birth-cohorts. One dose measles VC was high (94%), but low (69%) for the second dose. VC with a full course of recently introduced varicella, pneumococcal, and meningococcal C vaccines increased across birth-cohorts from below 10% above 60%, 70%, and 80%, respectively. At 36 mo, VC had increased further by up to 15 percentage points depending on vaccination. Longitudinal analysis suggested a continued VC increase until school entry. Validation of VC figures with primary data showed an overall good agreement. In conclusion, analysis of health insurance claims data allows for the estimation of VC among children in Germany considering completeness and timeliness of vaccination series. This approach provides valid nationwide VC figures for all currently recommended pediatric vaccinations and fills the information gap between early infancy and late assessment at school entry. PMID:24192604

  2. Why children are not vaccinated: a review of the grey literature.

    PubMed

    Favin, Michael; Steinglass, Robert; Fields, Rebecca; Banerjee, Kaushik; Sawhney, Monika

    2012-12-01

    In collaboration with WHO, IMMUNIZATION basics analyzed 126 documents from the global grey literature to identify reasons why eligible children had incomplete or no vaccinations. The main reasons for under-vaccination were related to immunization services and to parental knowledge and attitudes. The most frequently cited factors were: access to services, health staff attitudes and practices, reliability of services, false contraindications, parents' practical knowledge of vaccination, fear of side effects, conflicting priorities and parental beliefs. Some family demographic characteristics were strong, but underlying, risk factors for under-vaccination. Studies must be well designed to capture a complete picture of the simultaneous causes of under-vaccination and to avoid biased results. Although the grey literature contains studies of varying quality, it includes many well-designed studies. Every immunization program should strive to provide quality services that are accessible, convenient, reliable, friendly, affordable and acceptable, and should solicit feedback from families and community leaders. Every program should monitor missed and under-vaccinated children and assess and address the causes. Although global reviews, such as this one, can play a useful role in identifying key questions for local study, local enquiry and follow-up remain essential.

  3. Children, the Flu and the Flu Vaccine. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Flu is more dangerous than the common cold for children. Each year, flu places a large burden on the health and well-being of children and families. Children commonly need medical care because of influenza, especially before they turn 5 years old. Each year an average of 20,000 children under the age of 5 are hospitalized because of influenza…

  4. Randomized trials to study the nonspecific effects of vaccines in children in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Shann, Frank; Nohynek, Hanna; Scott, J Anthony; Hesseling, Anneke; Flanagan, Katie L

    2010-05-01

    The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) has led to large reductions in morbidity and mortality among children in low-income countries. However, the basic EPI schedule may no longer be optimal because of changes in vaccines, programs, and epidemiologic circumstances. In addition, evidence has accumulated that some EPI vaccines may have nonspecific effects that increase or decrease mortality from subsequent infections with other unrelated organisms. There is therefore a need for randomized trials to evaluate the effects of alternative EPI schedules on all-cause mortality, as well as vaccine efficacy against the target diseases. We have reviewed the available literature on the nonspecific effects of vaccines on mortality, and compiled a list of potential trials that might address this issue. We have then ranked the trials based on the potential importance of the results and the ethical and practical considerations. Trials of early BCG vaccination in low-birth-weight babies, early measles vaccination, and altered timing of DTP vaccination all have a high priority.

  5. [Post-traumatic torticollis in a schoolchild: fracture, congenital anomaly or age-appropriate radiological findings of the atlas?].

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, M; Garcia, P; Fries, P; Heinzmann, J; Pohlemann, T; Pizanis, A

    2010-03-01

    We describe the case of a 6-year-old girl with post-traumatic torticollis after falling on her head. The suspected fractures of the dens axis and/or atlas were ruled out after performing CT and MRI examinations as well as dynamic fluoroscopy. Radiological findings showed no further instability but there was a congenital non-fusion of the posterior arch and an age-appropriate non-fused anterior arch of the atlas. In addition to discoligamental injuries and fractures, congenital anomalies and normal variants of the immature anatomy of the cervical spine should also be considered in the diagnosis of the pediatric cervical spine after trauma.

  6. Report of five children with Guillain-Barré syndrome following a nationwide oral polio vaccine campaign in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Anlar, O; Tombul, T; Arslan, S; Akdeniz, H; Caksen, H; Gundem, A; Akbayram, S

    2003-12-01

    Five children with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), following a national oral polio vaccination campaign to eradicate disease, are reported. Clinical examination, cerebrospinal fluid and electromyographic findings conformed to the classical description of GBS. Four of them received therapeutic dose of intravenous immunoglobulin G. Two children succumbed to the disease. It was observed that the number of cases of GBS in children increased during the period of the oral polio vaccination campaign in Turkey, suggesting a causal relationship.

  7. Immune response to influenza vaccine in children with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying; Jacobson, Denise L.; Ashworth, Lori A.; Grand, Richard J.; Meyer, Anthony L.; McNeal, Monica M.; Gregas, Matt C.; Burchett, Sandra K.; Bousvaros, Athos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) frequently receive immunosuppressive therapy. The immune response in these patients to vaccines has not been well studied. We conducted a prospective, open label study to evaluate the serologic response to influenza vaccine in children with IBD. METHODS Serum was obtained from 146 children and young adults with IBD (96 CD, 47 UC, 3 IC) for baseline influenza titer, immediately followed by immunization with trivalent [A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 (H1N1), A/Wisconsin/67/2005 (H3N2), and B/Malaysia/2506/2004 (B)] inactivated influenza vaccine. Subjects returned for repeat titers 3-9 weeks later. Seroprotection against each influenza strain was defined as hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titer ≥40. Patients were categorized as non-immunosuppressed [(NIS), aminosalicylates only, antibiotics only, or no therapy] or immunosuppressed [(IS), any immunosuppressive agent]. IS patients were further subcategorized as: (1) tacrolimus; (2) TNF-alpha inhibitor; (3) immunomodulator; and (4) corticosteroids only. RESULTS More patients were seroprotected against strains A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 than B strain (p<0.02), regardless of immunosuppression status. The proportion seroprotected and geometric mean titers at post-vaccination were similar between NIS and IS groups for all three strains. Subanalysis of patients not seroprotected at baseline showed that those receiving anti-TNF therapy were less likely seroprotected against strain B (14%) compared to patients in the NIS group (39%, p=0.025). There were no serious vaccine-associated adverse events. CONCLUSION Influenza vaccination produces a high prevalence of seroprotection in IBD patients, particularly against A strains. The vaccine is well tolerated. Routine influenza vaccination in IBD patients is recommended, irrespective of whether patients receive immunosuppressive medications. PMID:19174786

  8. School-Based Influenza Vaccination: Parents’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Candace; Russell, Margaret L.; MacDonald, Judy; Collins, Ramona; Frank, Christine J.; Davis, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. Purpose We explored parents’ perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. Participants Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. Findings Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV), Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support), families (e.g. convenience), the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities), the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness) and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles). Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized), families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions) and the education sector (loss of instructional time). Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. Conclusions Parents perceived advantages and

  9. Immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine in overweight and obese children.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Giavoli, Claudia; Trombetta, Claudia; Bianchini, Sonia; Montinaro, Valentina; Spada, Anna; Montomoli, Emanuele; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-02

    Obesity may be a risk factor for increased hospitalization and deaths from infections due to respiratory pathogens. Additionally, obese patients appear to have impaired immunity after some vaccinations. To evaluate the immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of an inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) in overweight and obese children, 28 overweight/obese pediatric patients and 23 healthy normal weight controls aged 3-14 years received a dose of TIV. Four weeks after vaccine administration, significantly higher seroprotection rates against the A/H1N1 strain were observed among overweight/obese children compared with normal weight controls (p<0.05). Four months after vaccination, similar or slightly higher seroconversion and seroprotection rates against the A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 strains were detected in overweight/obese than in normal weight children, whereas significantly higher rates of seroconversion and seroprotection against the B strain were found in overweight/obese patients than in normal weight controls (p<0.05 for seroconversion and seroprotection). Geometric mean titers (GMTs) and fold increase against B strains were significantly higher in overweight/obese patients than in normal weight controls 4 months after vaccine administration (p<0.01 for GMT values and p<0.05 for fold increase). The frequency of local and systemic reactions was similar between the groups, and there were no serious adverse events. The results of this study indicate that in overweight and obese children, antibody response to TIV administration is similar or slightly higher than that evidenced in normal weight subjects of similar age and this situation persists for at least 4 months after vaccine administration in the presence of a favorable safety profile.

  10. Assessment of Immunization to Hepatitis B Vaccine among Children under Five Years in Rural Areas of Taiz, Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sonboli, Najla A.; Alkumaim, Fawzi A.; Alsayaad, Nader S.; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed S.; Higazi, Tarig B.; Elagib, Atif A.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection poses a major health problem worldwide. approximately 1 million deaths annually due to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Objectives. This study was conducted to determine the coverage rate of HBV vaccine and assess the vaccine protective response among children under five years old in rural areas of Yemen. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to December 2015 in four districts of countryside Yemen. The target population was children aged from 6 to 59 months. 227 children were enrolled in the study. Questionnaire was used to collect of data. Serum samples were tested for anti-HBs antibodies by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Anti-HBs level ≥ 10 IU/L was considered a protective response to the vaccine. Results. The coverage rate of HBV vaccine among children was 87.3%. A total of 143 (72.2%) children responded to the vaccine with anti-HBs level ≥ 10 IU/L, while 55 (27.8%) of the children had nonprotective anti-HBs levels of <10 IU/L (P = 0.003). Conclusion. This study revealed a good coverage rate of HBV vaccine in rural areas but the protective rate against HBV infection was moderate. A considerable proportion of vaccinated children should be considered for either revaccination or booster doses. PMID:28367327

  11. Nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage of children attending day care centers in Korea: comparison between children immunized with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and non-immunized.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Hyo; Hong, Jung Yun; Lee, Hyunju; Kwak, Ga Young; Nam, Chan Hee; Lee, Soo Young; Oh, Eunsang; Yu, Jigui; Nahm, Moon H; Kang, Jin Han

    2011-02-01

    To confirm the effect of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7), pneumococcal nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage was compared between vaccinated (3 + 1 doses PCV7) and non-vaccinated children. Vaccinated subjects were recruited from highly vaccinated regions (≥ 60%), Seoul and Incheon whereas control subjects were recruited from Jeju Island where vaccination rates are low (< 15%). NP swabs were obtained from 400 children aged 18-59 months. Serotype and antibiotic susceptibility was analyzed. Pneumococcal carriage rate was 18.0% (36/200) and 31.5% (63/200) for the vaccinated and control group, respectively. Among those vaccinated, 41.7% (15/36) of the serotypes were vaccine-related type (VRT: 6A, 6C, 19A) with the most common serotype 6C. The next common type was non-typable/non-capsule 30.6% (11/36) followed by non-vaccine type 16.7% (6/36) and vaccine type (VT) serotypes were found in only 11.1% (4/36). In contrast, 52.4% (33/63) of the isolates in the control group were VT. Resistance rates for penicillin and erythromycin were lower in the vaccine group (vaccine vs control; penicillin 45.2% vs 71.4%, erythromycin 74.2% vs 90.5%, P < 0.05). Multi-drug resistance was also lower in vaccinated subjects (vaccine vs control; 45.2% vs 69.8%, P < 0.05). PCV7 reduces carriage in VT which leads to replacement of pneumococci by antibiotic susceptible VRT or non-vaccine type strains.

  12. Factors influencing vaccination uptake. Workshop report. Current Australian research on the behavioural, social and demographic factors influencing immunisation, Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children, Sydney, March 1998.

    PubMed

    Forrest, J M; Burgess, M A; McIntyre, P B

    2000-03-16

    Current Australian research on factors influencing vaccination was discussed at a workshop held at the Royal Alexandra Hospital for Children, Sydney, in March 1998, sponsored by the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases (NCIRS). The application of decision making theory to vaccination behaviour, the expectations and experiences of mothers, and reasons why parents fail to vaccinate their children were considered. Mothers' perceptions of the risks of vaccines, preferences of parents and providers for the mode of vaccine delivery, and community and social factors were all found to be part of the framework within which vaccination is accepted in Australia. Consumer considerations, media influences and overseas comparisons were discussed.

  13. T-cell responses before and after the fifth consecutive acellular pertussis vaccination in 4-year-old Dutch children.

    PubMed

    Schure, Rose-Minke; Hendrikx, Lotte H; de Rond, Lia G H; Oztürk, Kemal; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2012-11-01

    Immunization with acellular pertussis vaccine (aP) induces higher specific antibody levels and fewer adverse reactions than does immunization with the whole-cell vaccine (wP). However, antibody levels in infants induced by both types of pertussis vaccines wane already after 1 year. Therefore, long-term T-cell responses upon vaccination might play a role in protection against pertussis. In a cross-sectional study (ISRCTN65428640), we investigated T-helper (Th) cell immune responses in wP- or aP-vaccinated children before and after an aP low-dose or high-dose preschool booster at 4 years of age in The Netherlands. T cells were stimulated with pertussis vaccine antigens. The numbers of gamma interferon-producing cells and Th1, Th2, Th17, and interleukin-10 (IL-10) cytokine concentrations were determined. In addition, pertussis-specific IgE levels were measured in plasma. Children being vaccinated with aP vaccinations at 2, 3, 4, and 11 months of age still showed higher pertussis-specific T-cell responses at 4 years of age than did wP-vaccinated children. These T-cell responses failed to show a typical increase in cytokine production after a fifth aP vaccination but remained high after a low-dose booster and seemed to decline even after a high-dose booster. Importantly, elevated IgE levels were induced after this booster vaccination. In contrast, wP-vaccinated children had only low prebooster T-cell responses, and these children showed a clear postbooster T-cell memory response even after a low-dose booster vaccine. Four high-dose aP vaccinations in infancy induce high T-cell responses still present even 3 years after vaccination and enhanced IgE responses after preschool booster vaccination. Therefore, studies of changes in vaccine dosage, timing of pertussis (booster) vaccinations, and the possible association with local side effects are necessary.

  14. Effect of age on the risk of Fever and seizures following immunization with measles-containing vaccines in children.

    PubMed

    Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Fireman, Bruce; Lewis, Edwin; Nordin, James; Naleway, Allison; Jacobsen, Steven J; Jackson, Lisa A; Tse, Alison; Belongia, Edward A; Hambidge, Simon J; Weintraub, Eric; Baxter, Roger; Klein, Nicola P

    2013-12-01

    IMPORTANCE The first dose of live attenuated measles-containing vaccines is associated with an increased risk of febrile seizures 7 to 10 days following immunization among 12- to 23-month-old children. The combination measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccine is associated with a 2-fold increased risk of febrile seizures 7 to 10 days following immunization compared with the separately administered measles, mumps, and rubella and varicella vaccines. It is unknown whether the magnitude of these increased risks depends on age at immunization. OBJECTIVE To examine the potential modifying effect of age on the risk of fever and seizures following immunization with measles-containing vaccines. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study at 8 Vaccine Safety Datalink sites of a total of 840,348 children 12 to 23 months of age who had received a measles-containing vaccine from 2001 through 2011. EXPOSURES Any measles-containing vaccines and measles-containing vaccines by type. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Fever and seizure events occurring during a 42-day postimmunization observation period. RESULTS In the analysis of any measles-containing vaccines, the increased risk of seizures during the 7- to 10-day risk interval, using the remainder of the observation period as the control interval, was significantly greater among older children (relative risk, 6.5; 95% CI, 5.3-8.1; attributable risk, 9.5 excess cases per 10,000 doses; 95% CI, 7.6-11.5) than among younger children (relative risk, 3.4; 95% CI, 3.0-3.9; attributable risk = 4.0 excess cases per 10,000 doses; 95% CI, 3.4-4.6). The relative risk of postimmunization fever was significantly greater among older children than among younger children; however, its attributable risk was not. In the analysis of vaccine type, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccine was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of fever and 2-fold increase in the risk of seizures compared with measles, mumps, and

  15. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Associated with Drugs and Vaccines in Children: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Raucci, Umberto; Rossi, Rossella; Da Cas, Roberto; Rafaniello, Concita; Mores, Nadia; Bersani, Giulia; Reale, Antonino; Pirozzi, Nicola; Menniti-Ippolito, Francesca; Traversa, Giuseppe; in Drug and Children, Italian Multicenter Study Group for Vaccine Safety

    2013-01-01

    Objective Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) is one of the most severe muco-cutaneous diseases and its occurrence is often attributed to drug use. The aim of the present study is to quantify the risk of SJS in association with drug and vaccine use in children. Methods A multicenter surveillance of children hospitalized through the emergency departments for acute conditions of interest is currently ongoing in Italy. Cases with a diagnosis of SJS were retrieved from all admissions. Parents were interviewed on child’s use of drugs and vaccines preceding the onset of symptoms that led to the hospitalization. We compared the use of drugs and vaccines in cases with the corresponding use in a control group of children hospitalized for acute neurological conditions. Results Twenty-nine children with a diagnosis of SJS and 1,362 with neurological disorders were hospitalized between 1st November 1999 and 31st October 2012. Cases were more frequently exposed to drugs (79% vs 58% in the control group; adjusted OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.0–6.1). Anticonvulsants presented the highest adjusted OR: 26.8 (95% CI 8.4–86.0). Significantly elevated risks were also estimated for antibiotics use (adjusted OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.5–7.2), corticosteroids (adjusted OR 4.2; 95% CI 1.8–9.9) and paracetamol (adjusted OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.5–6.9). No increased risk was estimated for vaccines (adjusted OR: 0.9; 95% CI 0.3–2.8). Discussion Our study provides additional evidence on the etiologic role of drugs and vaccines in the occurrence of SJS in children. PMID:23874553

  16. Safety and Immune Responses in Children After Concurrent or Sequential 2009 H1N1 and 2009–2010 Seasonal Trivalent Influenza Vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Sharon E.; Bernstein, David I.; Gerber, Michael A.; Keyserling, Harry L.; Munoz, Flor M.; Winokur, Patricia L.; Turley, Christine B.; Rupp, Richard E.; Hill, Heather; Wolff, Mark; Noah, Diana L.; Ross, Allison C.; Cress, Gretchen; Belshe, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Administering 2 separate vaccines for seasonal and pandemic influenza was necessary in 2009. Therefore, we conducted a randomized trial of monovalent 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine (2009 H1N1 vaccine) and seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV; split virion) given sequentially or concurrently in previously vaccinated children. Methods. Children randomized to 4 study groups and stratified by age received 1 dose of seasonal TIV and 2 doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine in 1 of 4 combinations. Injections were given at 21-day intervals and serum samples for hemagglutination inhibition antibody responses were obtained prior to and 21 days after each vaccination. Reactogenicity and adverse events were monitored. Results. All combinations of vaccines were safe in the 531 children enrolled. Generally, 1 dose of 2009 H1N1 vaccine and 1 dose of TIV, regardless of sequence or concurrency of administration, was immunogenic in children ≥10 years of age; children <10 years of age required 2 doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine. Conclusions. Vaccines were generally well tolerated. The immune responses to 2009 H1N1 vaccine were adequate regardless of the sequence of vaccination in all age groups but the sequence affected titers to TIV antigens. Two doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine were required to achieve a protective immune response in children <10 years of age. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00943202. PMID:22802432

  17. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    PubMed

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a leading cause of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis in young children world-wide with over half a million children dying annually from pneumococcal disease.  Some children are prone to repeated episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) because of an underlying predisposing disease. Recurrent IPD (rIPD) is a rarity and published reports on rIPD are limited by having few children included, selected groups of patients or short follow-up periods. Deficiencies in the innate or adaptive immune system have been described in children with rIPD, but the frequency of immunodeficiency among such patients is unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to examine paediatric cases of laboratory-confirmed rIPD, over a 33-year period in Denmark, to determine risk factors and study aspects of the immunological background for this problem in children. In October 2007, a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented in the Danish infant immunization programme. An additional aim of the thesis was to examine the impact of vaccination on a population level, following the first three years of general PCV7 vaccination in Denmark. The thesis consists of three papers, which are all directly or indirectly based on data retrieved from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry. This registry is nationwide and dates back to 1938. The registry contains data from all laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in Denmark and is continually updated for national surveillance. In Paper 1, we conducted a 33-year retrospective nationwide study of paediatric rIPD. By using data from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry combined with clinical data from hospital records, we could describe one of the largest known cohorts of children (n:59) with rIPD . We covered epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of this clinical entity. Of all children experiencing rIPD, 47% had a known predisposing underlying disease at the time of

  18. Genotype analysis of ORF 62 identifies varicella-zoster virus infections caused by a vaccine strain in children.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Byung Ok; Lee, Hoan Jong; Kang, Hyun Mi; Oh, Chi Eun; Choi, Eun Hwa

    2017-02-15

    This study was performed to differentiate vaccine-type strains from wild-type strains and determine the genotype of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in 51 Korean children. A sequencing analysis of ORF 62 identified two cases of herpes zoster caused by the vaccine-type virus, without a previous history of varicella, 22 months and 5 months after VZV vaccination. The wild-type strain was identified in the remaining children. A genotype analysis of ORF 22 amino acids revealed genotype J in all children except one. Genotype E was identified in an infant with varicella imported from Egypt.

  19. Acute diarrhoea in a community cohort of children who received an oral rotavirus vaccine in Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Sarah Cristina Fontes; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Kirby, Andrew; Barreto, Isis Pinheiro; Souza, Liane Desiderio de; Oliveira, Oderlan Carvalho; Correia, Jailson de Barros; Dove, Winifred; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Cuevas, Luis E

    2011-05-01

    Rotavirus is an important cause of childhood diarrhoea. A monovalent rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix®) was introduced into the Immunization Program of Brazil in 2006. In this study, we describe the incidence and burden of disease of rotavirus diarrhoea in two cohorts of children (vaccinated and unvaccinated). We followed two groups of 250 children under one year old, who were enrolled in December 2006 from a low-income residential area in Northeast Brazil. The children were monitored every two weeks for two years. Stool samples from children with diarrhoea were examined for the presence of rotavirus. Rotaviruses were genotyped using real time-polymerase chain reaction. The mean numbers of all-cause diarrhoea episodes/child (adjusted for age) in the first year were 0.87 and 0.84, in vaccinated and unvaccinated children, respectively. During the second year, the number of episodes/child decreased to 0.52 and 0.42. Only 16 (4.9%) of 330 stool samples were rotavirus-positive (10 vaccinated and 6 unvaccinated children) and only P[4]G2 rotaviruses were identified. All-cause diarrhoea episodes were more severe in unvaccinated children in the first year of age (p < 0.05), while vaccinated children had more severe episodes 18 months after vaccination. Rotavirus diarrhoea incidence was very low in both groups.

  20. Mothers and vaccination: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Angelillo, I. F.; Ricciardi, G.; Rossi, P.; Pantisano, P.; Langiano, E.; Pavia, M.

    1999-01-01

    The study evaluates knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of mothers regarding the immunization of 841 infants who attended public kindergarten in Cassino and Crotone, Italy. Overall, 57.8% of mothers were aware about all four mandatory vaccinations for infants (poliomyelitis, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis B). The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that this knowledge was significantly greater among mothers with a higher education level and among those who were older at the time of the child's birth. Respondents' attitudes towards the utility of vaccinations for preventing infectious diseases were very favourable. Almost all children (94.4%) were vaccinated with all three doses of diphtheria-tetanus (DT), oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), and hepatitis B. The proportion of children vaccinated who received all three doses of OPV, DT or diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP), and hepatitis B vaccines within 1 month of becoming age-eligible ranged from 56.6% for the third dose of hepatitis B to 95.7% for the first dose of OPV. Results of the regression analysis performed on the responses of mothers who had adhered to the schedule for all mandatory vaccinations indicated that birth order significantly predicted vaccination nonadherence, since children who had at least one older sibling in the household were significantly less likely to be age-appropriately vaccinated. The coverage for the optional vaccines was only 22.5% and 31% for measles-mumps-rubella and for all three doses against pertussis, respectively. Education programmes promoting paediatric immunization, accessibility, and follow-up should be targeted to the entire population. PMID:10212512

  1. A genomics-based approach to assessment of vaccine safety and immunogenicity in children.

    PubMed

    White, Olivia J; McKenna, Katherine L; Bosco, Anthony; H J van den Biggelaar, Anita; Richmond, Peter; Holt, Patrick G

    2012-02-27

    Immune responses to vaccines in infants and young children are typically Th2-biased, giving rise to concerns regarding potential atopy-like side effects, and antagonism of Th1-associated sterilising immunity. Conventional immunological methodology has limited capacity to effectively address these problems because of the inherent complexity of the immune responses involved. In the present study, we sought to develop an unbiased systems biology approach to elucidate superficially similar Th2-associated responses to paediatric vaccines and allergens, and to differentiate between them via gene coexpression network analysis. We demonstrate below that in immune responses to the diptheria/acellular pertussis/tetanus and pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines, potentially antagonistic Th1-/IFN-associated and Th2-associated gene networks coexist in an apparent state of dynamic equilibrium, whereas in Th2-dominant allergen-specific responses of atopics the Th1 and IFN networks are respectively disrupted and downregulated. Capacity to detect and interpret these covert differences between responses to vaccines and allergens relies on the use of sophisticated algorithms that underpin coexpression network analysis, which identify genes that function co-ordinately in complex pathways. This methodology has significant potential to identify covert interactions between inflammatory pathways triggered by vaccination, and as such may be a useful tool in prediction of vaccine safety/efficacy.

  2. Change in hepatitis A epidemiology after vaccinating high risk children in Taiwan, 1995-2008.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Tsung-Pei; Liu, Cheng-Chung; Huang, Ji-Jia; Tsai, Kun-Ju; Chang, Hsiu-Fang

    2011-04-05

    Taiwan started to immunize children in 30 indigenous townships against hepatitis A since June 1995. The program was further expanded to 19 non-indigenous townships with higher incidence or increased risk of epidemic in 1997-2002, covering 2% of total population. Annual incidence of hepatitis A decreased from 2.96 in 1995 (baseline period) to 0.90/100,000 in 2003-2008 (vaccination period). The incidence in vaccinated townships and unvaccinated townships declined 98.3% (49.66-0.86/100,000) and 52.6% (1.90-0.90/100,000). In 2003-2008, incidence doubled in people aged >=30 years, mostly in unvaccinated townships (0.42-0.92). During 2003-2008, travel to endemic countries was the most commonly reported risk factor (13.5%). First dose vaccine coverage was 78.8% in 1994-2005 birth cohort. Taiwan's experience demonstrates the great, long-term efficacy of hepatitis A vaccine in disease control in vaccinated townships, and out-of-cohort effect in unvaccinated townships. Further reduction can be achieved by improving vaccination coverage of adults at risk.

  3. PneumococcaL meningitis in french children before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Levy, Corinne; Varon, Emmanuelle; Bingen, Edouard; Lécuyer, Aurélie; Boucherat, Michel; Cohen, Robert

    2011-02-01

    In France, despite a high rate of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine coverage, the number of cases of pneumococcal meningitis in children did not decline significantly between 2001–2002 (n = 264) and 2007–2008 (n = 244). A decline was observed among children < 2 years old (185 [70.1%] to 134 [54.9%] cases; P = 0.0004), but was counterbalanced by an increase among children ≥ 2 years old (79 [29.9%] to 110 [45.1%] cases). Mean age increased significantly, from 2.3 (median 0.8) to 3.8 (median 1.5) years. After pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 7 implementation, a wide diversity of serotypes implicated in pneumococcalmeningitis was observed; serotypes 19A and 7F were the most frequent.

  4. Earlier infantile immune maturation is related to higher DTP vaccine responses in children

    PubMed Central

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There are large inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in children. We sought to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and/or adaptive immune maturation were related to diphtheria–tetanus–pertussis (DTP) vaccine-specific antibody levels at 18 months of age. In the prospective FARMFLORA birth-cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with DTP vaccine at 3, 5 and 12 months of age. DTP vaccine-induced antibody levels were measured in plasma at 18 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3–5 days, 4, 18 and 36 months and at 8 years of age were analyzed for total CD4+ T- and B-cell counts, proportions of naïve and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells by flow cytometry. Multivariate factor analysis was used to examine associations between immune variables and vaccine responses. The most apparent multivariate pattern was that higher anti-DTP antibody titers at 18 months of age were associated with lower infantile total counts of T and B cells in the blood. Furthermore, lower infantile total T- and B-cell blood counts were associated with higher proportions of circulating CD45RO+ memory T cells and to lower proportions of α4β7+ naïve T cells later in childhood. The multivariate findings were corroborated in univariate correlation analyses. Sex, delivery mode and dairy farm exposure were unrelated to the magnitude of DTP-specific antibody responses. Our results thus suggest that children with a more mature/activated infantile adaptive immunity respond with higher vaccine-induced anti-DTP antibody levels at 18 months of age. PMID:27217956

  5. Earlier infantile immune maturation is related to higher DTP vaccine responses in children.

    PubMed

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-03-01

    There are large inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in children. We sought to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and/or adaptive immune maturation were related to diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine-specific antibody levels at 18 months of age. In the prospective FARMFLORA birth-cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with DTP vaccine at 3, 5 and 12 months of age. DTP vaccine-induced antibody levels were measured in plasma at 18 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3-5 days, 4, 18 and 36 months and at 8 years of age were analyzed for total CD4(+) T- and B-cell counts, proportions of naïve and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells by flow cytometry. Multivariate factor analysis was used to examine associations between immune variables and vaccine responses. The most apparent multivariate pattern was that higher anti-DTP antibody titers at 18 months of age were associated with lower infantile total counts of T and B cells in the blood. Furthermore, lower infantile total T- and B-cell blood counts were associated with higher proportions of circulating CD45RO(+) memory T cells and to lower proportions of α4β7(+) naïve T cells later in childhood. The multivariate findings were corroborated in univariate correlation analyses. Sex, delivery mode and dairy farm exposure were unrelated to the magnitude of DTP-specific antibody responses. Our results thus suggest that children with a more mature/activated infantile adaptive immunity respond with higher vaccine-induced anti-DTP antibody levels at 18 months of age.

  6. Study of the safety and immunogenicity of the synthetic malaria SPf66 vaccine in children aged 1-14 years.

    PubMed

    Patarroyo, G; Franco, L; Amador, R; Murillo, L A; Rocha, C L; Rojas, M; Patarroyo, M E

    1992-01-01

    Safety and immunogenicity tests of the SPf66 malaria vaccine have been carried out on a population of children, aged 1 to 14 years, in the town of Tumaco, Colombia. Adverse reactions measured after each vaccination were local and minimal, and observed in only a small percentage of the vaccinated children. One year later, no delayed reaction was evident. The majority of the child population developed high antibody titres against SPf66 and the degree of response did not vary with age. These induced antibodies recognize the native parasite proteins, in particular the molecules from which the amino acid sequence of this vaccine was deduced. These studies demonstrate that the SPf66 vaccine is safe and highly immunogenic for use in children greater than 1 year old.

  7. Differential T- and B-cell responses to pertussis in acellular vaccine-primed versus whole-cell vaccine-primed children 2 years after preschool acellular booster vaccination.

    PubMed

    Schure, Rose-Minke; Hendrikx, Lotte H; de Rond, Lia G H; Oztürk, Kemal; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated long-term cellular and humoral immunity against pertussis after booster vaccination of 4-year-old children who had been vaccinated at 2, 3, 4, and 11 months of age with either whole-cell pertussis (wP) or acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine. Immune responses were evaluated until 2 years after the preschool booster aP vaccination. In a cross-sectional study (registered trial no. ISRCTN65428640), blood samples were taken from wP- and aP-primed children prebooster and 1 month and 2 years postbooster. Pertussis vaccine antigen-specific IgG levels, antibody avidities, and IgG subclasses, as well as T-cell cytokine levels, were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassays. The numbers of pertussis-specific memory B cells and gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing T cells were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays. Even 2 years after booster vaccination, memory B cells were still present and higher levels of pertussis-specific antibodies than prebooster were found in aP-primed children and, to a lesser degree, also in wP-primed children. The antibodies consisted mainly of the IgG1 subclass but also showed an increased IgG4 portion, primarily in the aP-primed children. The antibody avidity indices for pertussis toxin and pertactin in aP-primed children were already high prebooster and remained stable at 2 years, whereas those in wP-primed children increased. All measured prebooster T-cell responses in aP-primed children were already high and remained at similar levels or even decreased during the 2 years after booster vaccination, whereas those in wP-primed children increased. Since the Dutch wP vaccine has been replaced by aP vaccines, the induction of B-cell and T-cell memory immune responses has been enhanced, but antibody levels still wane after five aP vaccinations. Based on these long-term immune responses, the Dutch pertussis vaccination schedule can be optimized, and we discuss here several options.

  8. Differential T- and B-Cell Responses to Pertussis in Acellular Vaccine-Primed versus Whole-Cell Vaccine-Primed Children 2 Years after Preschool Acellular Booster Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Schure, Rose-Minke; Hendrikx, Lotte H.; de Rond, Lia G. H.; Öztürk, Kemal; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated long-term cellular and humoral immunity against pertussis after booster vaccination of 4-year-old children who had been vaccinated at 2, 3, 4, and 11 months of age with either whole-cell pertussis (wP) or acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine. Immune responses were evaluated until 2 years after the preschool booster aP vaccination. In a cross-sectional study (registered trial no. ISRCTN65428640), blood samples were taken from wP- and aP-primed children prebooster and 1 month and 2 years postbooster. Pertussis vaccine antigen-specific IgG levels, antibody avidities, and IgG subclasses, as well as T-cell cytokine levels, were measured by fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassays. The numbers of pertussis-specific memory B cells and gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing T cells were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assays. Even 2 years after booster vaccination, memory B cells were still present and higher levels of pertussis-specific antibodies than prebooster were found in aP-primed children and, to a lesser degree, also in wP-primed children. The antibodies consisted mainly of the IgG1 subclass but also showed an increased IgG4 portion, primarily in the aP-primed children. The antibody avidity indices for pertussis toxin and pertactin in aP-primed children were already high prebooster and remained stable at 2 years, whereas those in wP-primed children increased. All measured prebooster T-cell responses in aP-primed children were already high and remained at similar levels or even decreased during the 2 years after booster vaccination, whereas those in wP-primed children increased. Since the Dutch wP vaccine has been replaced by aP vaccines, the induction of B-cell and T-cell memory immune responses has been enhanced, but antibody levels still wane after five aP vaccinations. Based on these long-term immune responses, the Dutch pertussis vaccination schedule can be optimized, and we discuss here several options. PMID:23825195

  9. Enhancing Children against Unhealthy Behaviors—An Ethical and Policy Assessment of Using a Nicotine Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Ori; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; McBride, Colleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Health behaviors such as tobacco use contribute significantly to poor health. It is widely recognized that efforts to prevent poor health outcomes should begin in early childhood. Biomedical enhancements, such as a nicotine vaccine, are now emerging and have potential to be used for primary prevention of common diseases. In anticipation of such enhancements, it is important that we begin to consider the ethical and policy appropriateness of their use with children. The main ethical concerns raised by enhancing children relate to their impact on children’s well-being and autonomy. These concerns are significant, however they do not appear to apply in the case of the nicotine vaccine; indeed the vaccine could even further these goals for children. Nevertheless, concerns about broadly applying this enhancement may be more challenging. The vaccine may be less cost-effective than alternative public efforts to prevent tobacco use, utilizing it could distract from addressing the foundational causes of smoking and it might not be publically acceptable. Empirical research about these concerns is needed to ascertain their likelihood and impact as well as how they could be minimized. This research could help determine whether behavior-related enhancements hold promise for improving children’s health. PMID:23864909

  10. Outbreak-related mumps vaccine effectiveness among a cohort of children and of young adults in Germany 2011.

    PubMed

    Takla, Anja; Böhmer, Merle M; Klinc, Christina; Kurz, Norbert; Schaffer, Alice; Stich, Heribert; Stöcker, Petra; Wichmann, Ole; Koch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Mumps outbreaks in populations with high 2-dose vaccination coverage and among young adults are increasingly reported. However, data on the duration of vaccine-induced protection conferred by mumps vaccines are scarce. As part of a supra-regional outbreak in Germany 2010/11, we conducted two retrospective cohort studies in a primary school and among adult ice hockey teams to determine mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE). Via questionnaires we collected information on demography, clinical manifestations, and reviewed vaccination cards. We estimated VE as 1-RR, RR being the rate ratio of disease among two-times or one-time mumps-vaccinated compared with unvaccinated persons. The response rate was 92.6% (100/108--children cohort) and 91.7% (44/48--adult cohort). Fourteen cases were identified in the children and 6 in the adult cohort. In the children cohort (mean age: 9 y), 2-dose VE was 91.9% (95% CI 81.0-96.5%). In the adult cohort (mean age: 26 y), no cases occurred among the 13 2-times vaccinated, while 1-dose VE was 50.0% (95% CI -9.4-87.1%). Average time since last vaccination showed no significant difference for cases and non-cases, but cases were younger at age of last mumps vaccination (children cohort: 2 vs. 3 y, P=0.04; adult cohort: 1 vs. 4 y, P=0.03). We did not observe signs of waning immunity in the children cohort. Due to the small sample size VE in the adult cohort should be interpreted with caution. Given the estimated VE, very high 2-dose vaccination coverage is required to prevent future outbreaks. Intervention efforts to increase coverage must especially target young adults who received<2 vaccinations during childhood.

  11. A qualitative study investigating knowledge and attitudes regarding human papillomavirus (HPV) and the HPV vaccine among parents of immunosuppressed children.

    PubMed

    Seale, Holly; Trung, Linda; Mackie, Fiona E; Kennedy, Sean E; Boros, Christina; Marshall, Helen; Tidswell, Jane; Shaw, Peter J; Montgomery, Kay; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2012-11-19

    Barriers influencing the willingness of parents to vaccinate immunocompetent children include a lack of knowledge about human papillomavirus (HPV) and low perception of risk regarding their child's acquisition of HPV infection. However, it cannot be assumed that the facilitators and barriers of HPV vaccination are the same for parents/guardians of children who are immunocompromised, or who have chronic medical conditions. This study aimed to document the knowledge and attitudes of parents/guardians of immunosuppressed children and adolescents towards HPV infection and the vaccine. A study using qualitative methods which incorporated 27 semi-structured interviews was undertaken with parents/guardians of immunosuppressed children vaccinated against HPV at three hospitals in two states of Australia. Thematic analysis revealed that while participants acknowledged that they had heard of HPV, they did not have a strong sense of what it actually was. The level of concern held about their child acquiring an HPV infection (prior to vaccination) ranged from 'not at all' to 'extremely'. Some believed that their child was at increased risk of developing a severe HPV-related illness because of their underlying condition. The participants supported their child receiving the HPV vaccine, as they did not want to take a risk with a disease that may cause their child to return to hospital for treatment. The majority had little apprehension about the use of the HPV vaccine but expressed some concern that potential adverse effects would be more severe for immunosuppressed children. However, they stressed their belief in the safety of the vaccine and their trust in the child's health team. Our study results show that parents of children with impaired immunity would benefit from further information about the safety of the vaccine and about the important role of the vaccine for boys as well as girls.

  12. Impact of the pneumococcal 10-valent vaccine on reducing hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia in children

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Sandra Rodrigues; de Mello, Luane Marques; da Silva, Anderson Soares; Nunes, Altacílio Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe and analyze the occurrence of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia in children before and after the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine implementation into the National Immunization Program. Methods: This is an ecological study that includes records of children younger than one year old, vaccinated and not vaccinated with the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine in the periods pre- and post-inclusion of the vaccine in the National Immunization Program in the area covered by the Regional Health Superintendence of Alfenas, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Vaccination was considered as the exposure factor and hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia as the endpoint, using secondary annual data by municipality. The prevalence ratio and its 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were used to verify the association between variables. The Z test was used to calculate the difference between proportions. Results: Considering the 26 municipalities of the Regional Health Superintendence of Alfenas, there was a significant reduction in hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia in children younger than one year of age, with prevalence ratio (PR)=0.81 (95%CI: 0.74-0.89; p<0.05), indicating a 19% lower prevalence of hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia in the post-vaccination period. Conclusions: The results suggest the effectiveness of the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine in preventing severe cases of community-acquired pneumonia in children younger than one year of age. PMID:27108092

  13. Risk Factors of Delay Proportional Probability in Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis Vaccination of Iranian Children; Life Table Approach Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Mohsen; Rezaeimanesh, Masoomeh; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Mohammadsalehi, Narges; Ansari, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Despite success in expanded program immunization for an increase in vaccination coverage in the children of world, timeliness and schedule of vaccination remains as one of the challenges in public health. This study purposed to demonstrate the related factors of delayed diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination using life table approach. A historical cohort study conducted in the poor areas of five large Iran cities. Totally, 3610 children with 24-47 months old age who had documented vaccination card were enrolled. Time of vaccination for the third dose of DTP vaccine was calculated. Life table survival was used to calculate the proportional probability of vaccination in each time. Wilcoxon test was used for the comparison proportional probability of delayed vaccination based on studies factors. The overall median delayed time for DTP3 was 38.52 days. The Wilcoxon test showed that city, nationality, education level of parents, birth order and being in rural areas are related to the high probability of delay time for DTP3 vaccination (P < 0. 001). Moreover, child gender and parent's job were not significant factors (P > 0.05). Being away from the capital, a high concentration of immigrants in the city borders with a low socioeconomic class leads to prolonged delay in DTP vaccination time. Special attention to these areas is needed to increase the levels of parental knowledge and to facilitate access to the health services care.

  14. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McAtee, Casey L; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5-24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus.

  15. Burden of Norovirus and Rotavirus in Children after Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction, Cochabamba, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    McAtee, Casey L.; Webman, Rachel; Gilman, Robert H.; Mejia, Carolina; Bern, Caryn; Apaza, Sonia; Espetia, Susan; Pajuelo, Mónica; Saito, Mayuko; Challappa, Roxanna; Soria, Richard; Ribera, Jose P.; Lozano, Daniel; Torrico, Faustino

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine in the field may set the stage for a changing landscape of diarrheal illness affecting children worldwide. Norovirus and rotavirus are the two major viral enteropathogens of childhood. This study describes the prevalence of norovirus and rotavirus 2 years after widespread rotavirus vaccination in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Stool samples from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and outpatients aged 5–24 months without AGE were recruited from an urban hospital serving Bolivia's third largest city. Both viruses were genotyped, and norovirus GII.4 was further sequenced. Norovirus was found much more frequently than rotavirus. Norovirus was detected in 69/201 (34.3%) of specimens from children with AGE and 13/71 (18.3%) of those without diarrhea. Rotavirus was detected in 38/201 (18.9%) of diarrheal specimens and 3/71 (4.2%) of non-diarrheal specimens. Norovirus GII was identified in 97.8% of norovirus-positive samples; GII.4 was the most common genotype (71.4% of typed specimens). Rotavirus G3P[8] was the most prevalent rotavirus genotype (44.0% of typed specimens) and G2P[4] was second most prevalent (16.0% of typed specimens). This community is likely part of a trend toward norovirus predominance over rotavirus in children after widespread vaccination against rotavirus. PMID:26598569

  16. Pneumococcal septicemia despite pneumococcal vaccine and prescription of penicillin prophylaxis in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, G R; Smith, S J

    1986-05-01

    Although polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine and prophylactic penicillin are used to prevent overwhelming Streptococcus pneumoniae septicemia in infants and young children with sickle cell anemia, infection rates remain high. We have reviewed our seven-year experience with a regimen of twice daily oral penicillin V potassium prophylaxis in 88 affected children. The median age at the start of prophylaxis was 10 months, and the median duration of prophylaxis was 29 months (range, three months to seven years). The total period of observation of patients who were prescribed penicillin was 248 person-years. Most patients also received one or two doses of polyvalent pneumococcal vaccine. Despite penicillin prophylaxis and pneumococcal vaccine, eight episodes of S pneumoniae septicemia have occurred and three have been fatal. Four episodes were in children older than 3 years. Suboptimal compliance with the prescribed oral penicillin regimen was usually apparent. With one possible exception, the infections occurred when penicillin had not been taken during the previous 24 hours. The S pneumoniae septicemia rate in this patient population, 3.2 per 100 person-years, is somewhat less than that described in previous reports of children not receiving penicillin but is still unacceptably high. Vigorous advocacy of a penicillin prophylaxis regimen does not eliminate the risk of pneumococcal septicema in this patient population.

  17. Phase-I study MEDI-534, of a live, attenuated intranasal vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza-3 virus in seropositive children.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Margarita; Mufson, Maurice A; Dubovsky, Filip; Knightly, Conor; Zeng, Wen; Losonsky, Genevieve

    2009-07-01

    A live, attenuated respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus type 3 vaccine was evaluated in healthy respiratory syncytial virus/parainfluenza virus type 3 seropositive children aged 1 to 9 years. Three cohorts of 40 children were randomized 1:1 to receive 10, 10, or 10 median tissue culture infectious dose50 MEDI-534 vaccine or placebo. The vaccine's safety profile was similar to placebo, no viral shedding was detected, and the vaccine was minimally immunogenic.

  18. Immune response to influenza vaccination in children treated with methotrexate or/and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Andreas; Sauvain, Marie-Josèphe; Aebi, Christoph; Otth, Margrit; Bolt, Isabel B

    2011-12-01

    In children treated with immunosuppressive medication such as methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors, additional immunizations are recommended because of increased susceptibility to infections. However, it is unclear if adequate antibody response to vaccinations can be established in children receiving methotrexate and/or TNF-α inhibitors. In a prospective open label study, we assessed seroprotection and seroconversion following influenza vaccination during 2 seasons (6 strains) in 36 children with autoimmune disease treated either with methotrexate (n=18), TNF-α inhibitors (n=10) or both (n=8) and a control group of 16 immunocompetent children. Influenza antibody titers were determined by hemagglutinin inhibition assay, before and 4-8 weeks after vaccination. Post-vaccination seroprotection (defined as a titer ≥1:40) did not significantly differ between immunosuppressed and immunocompetent subjects. Seroconversion, defined as the change from a nonprotective (< 1:40) to a protective titer (≥1:40) with at least a 4-fold titer increase, was less likely to occur in immunosuppressed patients, although no significant difference from the control group was established. Safety evaluation of vaccination showed no serious adverse events. Children receiving methotrexate and/or TNF-α inhibitors can be safely and effectively immunized against influenza, with a seroprotection after vaccination comparable to immunocompetent children.

  19. Antibody response patterns to Bordetella pertussis antigens in vaccinated (primed) and unvaccinated (unprimed) young children with pertussis.

    PubMed

    Cherry, James D; Heininger, Ulrich; Richards, David M; Storsaeter, Jann; Gustafsson, Lennart; Ljungman, Margaretha; Hallander, Hans O

    2010-05-01

    In a previous study, it was found that the antibody response to a nonvaccine pertussis antigen in children who were vaccine failures was reduced compared with the response in nonvaccinated children who had pertussis. In two acellular pertussis vaccine efficacy trials in Sweden, we studied the convalescent-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) geometric mean values (GMVs) in response to pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), pertactin (PRN), and fimbriae (FIM 2/3) in vaccine failures and controls with pertussis. In Germany, the antibody responses to Bordetella pertussis antigens PT, FHA, PRN, and FIM-2 were analyzed by ELISA according to time of serum collection after onset of illness in children with pertussis who were vaccine failures or who were previously unvaccinated. Antibody values were also compared by severity of clinical illness. In Sweden, infants who had received a PT toxoid vaccine and who were vaccine failures had a blunted response to the nonvaccine antigen FHA compared with the response in children who had received a PT/FHA vaccine. Similarly, infants who had pertussis and who had received a PT/FHA vaccine had a blunted response to the nonvaccine antigens PRN and FIM 2/3 compared with the response in children who were vaccine failures and who had received a PT, FHA, PRN, and FIM 2/3 vaccine. In Germany, in sera collected from 0 to 15 days after pertussis illness onset, the GMVs for all 4 antigens (PT, FHA, PRN, and FIM-2) were significantly lower in an unvaccinated group than in children who were diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine failures. In the unvaccinated group, the GMV of the PT antibody rose rapidly over time so that it was similar to that of the DTaP vaccine recipients at the 16- to 30-day period. In contrast, the antibody responses to FHA, PRN, and FIM-2 at all time periods were lower in the diphtheria-tetanus vaccine (DT) recipients than in the DTaP vaccine failures. In both Sweden and Germany

  20. [Vaccination of children against hepatitis B in Mayotte, French Comoros Island].

    PubMed

    Muszlak, M; Lartigau-Roussin, C; Farthouat, L; Petinelli, M; Hebert, J-C; Santiago, J

    2007-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for a worldwide mortality of 1 million people each year. It constitutes a major public health problem, especially in highly endemic zones, where it concerns the youngest children, primarily by a mother to child transmission, with a strong risk of chronic hepatitis infection and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunisation of children versus HBV is known to be efficient and safe. In Mayotte, a French overseas territory in Indian Ocean, immunisation versus HBV has been introduced since 1993 in the vaccine schedule, starting at day 1 of life. We report hereby the local experience and practice on HBV infection, state of vaccine coverage, and difficulties met with this major public health issue.

  1. Long-term antibody response and immunologic memory in children immunized with hepatitis B vaccine at birth.

    PubMed

    Saffar, M J; Rezai, M S

    2004-12-01

    Four hundred and fifty three healthy children immunized with a course of hepatitis B vaccine beginning at birth were tested at 10-11 years of age for persistence of anti-hepatitis B-S antigen antibody (anti-HBs); and responses of children without protective antibody to different doses of hepatitis B vaccine booster were evaluated. Although nearly 42% of them were not seroprotected, but most of boosted subjects (87.3%) retained robust immunologic memory and rapidly retained a protective anti-HBs antibody titer of at least 10 IU/L after booster vaccination.

  2. [The journey of the vaccine against smallpox: one expedition, two oceans, three continents, and thousands of children].

    PubMed

    Tuells, José; Duro-Torrijos, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Spain encouraged, during the Bourbon dynasty, the formation of scientific expeditions, among which was the Royal Philanthropic Vaccine Expedition, an example of biopolitics applied by the state in order to protect health. The expedition went all over the world, using children as a reservoir to transport the vaccine fluid. Francisco Xavier Balmis established a human chain that arm-to-arm materialized the success of the mission. The characteristics and difficulties which children had to pass through and their contribution to the spread of the smallpox vaccine are analyzed.

  3. Age-dependent decrease of anti-HBs titers and effect of booster doses using 2 different vaccines in Palestinian children vaccinated in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Qawasmi, Mohammad; Samuh, Monjed; Glebe, Dieter; Gerlich, Wolfram H; Azzeh, Maysa

    2015-01-01

    Immunization against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has proven to be highly effective and led to significant reduction of new infections worldwide. However, protective immunity measured by anti-HBs titers may decrease to critical levels in the years after basal immunization, particularly in case of exposure to HBV variants different from the vaccine strain. We tested 400 Palestinian children between one and 19 years of age for their anti-HBs titer, challenged the immune memory of those with low or absent anti-HBs with 2 types of hepatitis B vaccines and determined thereafter the anti-HBs titer. At the age of one, 92.2% of the children presented with protective anti-HBs titers (≥ 10 mIU/ml) with the majority having ≥ 100 mIU/ml. Protective immunity was still high at ages 2 (87.5%) and 4 (95%), declining by age 5 and 6 (from 69.2% to 66.7%) and down to an average of 39.8% between the ages of 7 and 19. 160 children with a nonprotective or low immune response challenged with either the yeast-derived Engerix-B or the mammalian cell-derived preS1-containing Sci-B-Vac vaccine showed an anamnestic immune response. 92.4% and 85.9% of the children challenged with one dose Sci-B-Vac and Engerix-B presented with anti-HBs titers >100 mIU/ml respectively. Our results reveal that vaccine-induced protective anti-HBs titers against HBV decrease rapidly beyond the age of 6 in Palestinian children, but can be strongly enhanced with a single booster vaccine dose, independent of brand and antigen composition. Our data suggest that a booster vaccine dose against HBV during school years may be useful.

  4. Humoral, Mucosal, and Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Vaccine and Nonvaccine Genotypes After Administration of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine to HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Song, Lin-Ye; Saah, Alfred; Brown, Martha; Moscicki, Anna B.; Meyer, William A.; Bryan, Janine; Levin, Myron J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To characterize the immunogenicity of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (QHPV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected children, we studied their immune responses to 3 or 4 doses. Methods. HIV-infected children aged 7–12 years with a CD4 cell percentage of ≥15% of lymphocytes, received 3 doses of QHPV with or without a fourth dose after 72 weeks. Type-specific and cross-reactive antibodies and cell-mediated immunity were measured. Results. Type-specific antibodies to HPV6, 11, and 16 were detected in 100% and ≥94% of children at 4 and 72 weeks, respectively, after the third QHPV dose. Corresponding numbers for HPV18 were 97% and 76%, respectively. A fourth QHPV dose increased seropositivity to ≥96% for all vaccine genotypes. Four weeks after the third QHPV dose, 67% of vaccinees seroconverted to HPV31, an HPV16-related genotype not in the vaccine; 69% and 39% of vaccinees developed mucosal HPV16 and 18 immunoglobulin G antibodies, respectively; and 60% and 52% of vaccinees developed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for HPV16 and 31, respectively. Conclusions. Three QHPV doses generated robust and persistent antibodies to HPV6, 11, and 16 but comparatively weaker responses to HPV18. A fourth dose increased antibodies against all vaccine genotypes in an anamnestic fashion. CTLs and mucosal antibodies against vaccine genotypes, as well as cross-reactive antibodies and CTL against nonvaccine genotypes, were detected. PMID:22859825

  5. Immunogenicity and safety of a pediatric dose of a virosomal hepatitis A vaccine in healthy children in India

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Hemat; Kumavat, Vandana; Singh, Tejinder; Versteilen, Amanda; Sarnecki, Michal

    2014-01-01

    As India is transitioning from high to intermediate hepatitis A endemicity, the need for hepatitis A vaccination programs increases. This study investigated the immunogenicity and safety of a virosomal hepatitis A vaccine (HAVpur Junior) compared with an aluminum-adsorbed hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix 720 Junior) in Indian children. Healthy children aged 18–47 months, stratified by age, were randomized to either HAVpur Junior or Havrix 720 Junior. The first dose of vaccine was administered on Day 1 and the second (booster) dose 6 months later. Antibodies against hepatitis A virus (HAV) were measured using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The primary objective assessed non-inferiority of HAVpur Junior to Havrix 720 Junior in terms of seroprotection rates (≥ 10 mIU/mL anti-HAV antibodies) at 1 month after the first vaccination. Non-inferiority was demonstrated if the lower limit of the 90% confidence interval of the group difference was greater than –10%. Local and systemic adverse events were recorded. The seroprotection rate at 1 month was 95.9% in the HAVpur Junior group and 96.6% in the Havrix 720 Junior group. As the lower limit of the 90% confidence interval of the group difference was greater than –10% (–4.7), non-inferiority of HAVpur Junior to Havrix 720 Junior was established. The overall incidence of adverse events (solicited and unsolicited) after each vaccination was similar in both groups. In conclusion, the aluminum-free virosomal vaccine HAVpur Junior induced a similar immune response to Havrix 720 Junior in healthy Indian children aged 18 to 47 months. Both vaccines were well tolerated. The study shows that the low-dose virosomal HAV vaccine is consistently efficacious and well tolerated in children of all age groups and is suitable for inclusion into Indian childhood vaccination schedules. PMID:25424821

  6. Immunogenicity and safety of a pediatric dose of a virosomal hepatitis A vaccine in healthy children in India.

    PubMed

    Jain, Hemat; Kumavat, Vandana; Singh, Tejinder; Versteilen, Amanda; Sarnecki, Michal

    2014-01-01

    As India is transitioning from high to intermediate hepatitis A endemicity, the need for hepatitis A vaccination programs increases. This study investigated the immunogenicity and safety of a virosomal hepatitis A vaccine (HAVpur Junior) compared with an aluminum-adsorbed hepatitis A vaccine (Havrix 720 Junior) in Indian children. Healthy children aged 18-47 months, stratified by age, were randomized to either HAVpur Junior or Havrix 720 Junior. The first dose of vaccine was administered on Day 1 and the second (booster) dose 6 months later. Antibodies against hepatitis A virus (HAV) were measured using a microparticle enzyme immunoassay. The primary objective assessed non-inferiority of HAVpur Junior to Havrix 720 Junior in terms of seroprotection rates (≥ 10 mIU/mL anti-HAV antibodies) at 1 month after the first vaccination. Non-inferiority was demonstrated if the lower limit of the 90% confidence interval of the group difference was greater than -10%. Local and systemic adverse events were recorded. The seroprotection rate at 1 month was 95.9% in the HAVpur Junior group and 96.6% in the Havrix 720 Junior group. As the lower limit of the 90% confidence interval of the group difference was greater than -10% (-4.7), non-inferiority of HAVpur Junior to Havrix 720 Junior was established. The overall incidence of adverse events (solicited and unsolicited) after each vaccination was similar in both groups. In conclusion, the aluminum-free virosomal vaccine HAVpur Junior induced a similar immune response to Havrix 720 Junior in healthy Indian children aged 18 to 47 months. Both vaccines were well tolerated. The study shows that the low-dose virosomal HAV vaccine is consistently efficacious and well tolerated in children of all age groups and is suitable for inclusion into Indian childhood vaccination schedules.

  7. Primary and booster vaccination in Latin American children with a DTPw-HBV/Hib combination: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis (DTPw)-based combination vaccines are an attractive option to rapidly achieve high coverage and protection against other important pathogens, such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib). To ensure adequate antigen supply, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals has introduced a new DTPw antigen source and developed a new DTPw-HBV/Hib combination vaccine containing a reduced amount of Hib polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP). This study was undertaken to compare the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of this new DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine with a licensed DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine (Tritanrix™-HBV/Hib). Methods This was a randomized, partially-blind, multicenter study in three countries in Latin America (Argentina, Chile and Nicaragua). Healthy children received either the new DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine (1 of 3 lots; n = 439; double-blind) or Tritanrix™-HBV/Hib (n = 146; single-blind) co-administered with oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) at 2, 4 and 6 months, with a booster dose at 18-24 months. Results One month after the end of the 3-dose primary vaccination course, the new DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine was non-inferior to Tritanrix™-HBV/Hib in terms of seroprotection/vaccine response rates for all component antigens; ≥97.3% and ≥93.9% of subjects in the two groups, respectively, had seroprotective levels of antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, hepatitis B and Hib and a vaccine response to the pertussis component. Persistence of antibodies against all vaccine antigens was comparable between groups, with marked increases in all antibody concentrations after booster administration in both groups. Both vaccines were generally well-tolerated as primary and booster doses. Conclusions Results confirm the suitability of this new DTPw-HBV/Hib vaccine comprising antigens from a new source and a reduced PRP content for inclusion into routine childhood vaccination programs. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT

  8. A Randomized Controlled Phase Ib Trial of the Malaria Vaccine Candidate GMZ2 in African Children

    PubMed Central

    Hounkpatin, Aurore B.; Schaumburg, Frieder; Ngoa, Ulysse Ateba; Esen, Meral; Fendel, Rolf; de Salazar, Pablo Martinez; Mürbeth, Raymund E.; Milligan, Paul; Imbault, Nathalie; Imoukhuede, Egeruan Babatunde; Theisen, Michael; Jepsen, Søren; Noor, Ramadhani A.; Okech, Brenda; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mordmüller, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Background GMZ2 is a fusion protein of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3 (MSP3) and glutamate rich protein (GLURP) that mediates an immune response against the blood stage of the parasite. Two previous phase I clinical trials, one in naïve European adults and one in malaria-exposed Gabonese adults showed that GMZ2 was well tolerated and immunogenic. Here, we present data on safety and immunogenicity of GMZ2 in one to five year old Gabonese children, a target population for future malaria vaccine efficacy trials. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty children one to five years of age were randomized to receive three doses of either 30 µg or 100 µg of GMZ2, or rabies vaccine. GMZ2, adjuvanted in aluminum hydroxide, was administered on Days 0, 28 and 56. All participants received a full course of their respective vaccination and were followed up for one year. Both 30 µg and 100 µg GMZ2 vaccine doses were well tolerated and induced antibodies and memory B-cells against GMZ2 as well as its antigenic constituents MSP3 and GLURP. After three doses of vaccine, the geometric mean concentration of antibodies to GMZ2 was 19-fold (95%CI: 11,34) higher in the 30 µg GMZ2 group than in the rabies vaccine controls, and 16-fold (7,36) higher in the 100 µg GMZ2 group than the rabies group. Geometric mean concentration of antibodies to MSP3 was 2.7-fold (1.6,4.6) higher in the 30 µg group than in the rabies group and 3.8-fold (1.5,9.6) higher in the 100 µg group. Memory B-cells against GMZ2 developed in both GMZ2 vaccinated groups. Conclusions/Significance Both 30 µg as well as 100 µg intramuscular GMZ2 are immunogenic, well tolerated, and safe in young, malaria-exposed Gabonese children. This result confirms previous findings in naïve and malaria-exposed adults and supports further clinical development of GMZ2. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00703066 PMID:21829466

  9. Impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Universal Routine Vaccination on Pneumococcal Disease in Italian Children

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Domenico; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Cozza, Vanessa; Prato, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, the effectiveness of pneumococcal universal vaccination in preventing vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the PCV7/PCV13 shifting period was estimated to be 84.3% (95% CI: 84.0–84.6%) in children <5 years. This study aims at corroborating the estimation of both the effectiveness (VE) of PCVs and its impact in reducing pneumococcal diseases. A 1 : 3 matched-case-control study was conducted among children <5 years old hospitalized for IPD or pneumococcal pneumonia (PP) between 2006 and 2012 in the Puglia region. Moreover, hospitalizations for pneumococcal outcomes in the pre- and postvaccination period and the hospitalization risk ratios (HRRs) with 95% CIs were computed in Italy and in the first eight regions that introduced PCVs in 2006. The overall effectiveness of PCVs was 75% (95% CI: 61%–84%); it was 69% (95% CI: 30%–88%) against IPD and 77% (95% CI: 61%–87%) against PP. PCVs showed a significant impact on IPD and acute otitis media either at a national level or in those regions with a longer vaccination history, with a nearly 40% reduction of hospitalizations for both outcomes. Our findings provide further evidence of the effectiveness of PCVs against pneumococcal diseases and its impact on nasopharyngeal carriage in children <5 years, indicating the importance of maintaining high immunization coverage. PMID:26351644

  10. Antibody Persistence 1–5 Years Following Vaccination With MenAfriVac in African Children Vaccinated at 12–23 Months of Age

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Milagritos D.; Findlow, Helen; Idoko, Olubukola T.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Enwere, Godwin C.; Elie, Cheryl; Parulekar, Varsha; Sow, Samba O.; Haidara, Fadima Cheick; Diallo, Fatoumata; Doumbia, Moussa; Akinsola, Adebayo K.; Adegbola, Richard A.; Kampmann, Beate; Chaumont, Julie; Martellet, Lionel; Marchetti, Elisa; Viviani, Simonetta; Tang, Yuxiao; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Marc LaForce, F.; Carlone, George; Borrow, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Background. Following mass vaccination campaigns in the African meningitis belt with group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenAfriVac (PsA-TT), disease due to group A meningococci has nearly disappeared. Antibody persistence in healthy African toddlers was investigated. Methods. African children vaccinated at 12–23 months of age with PsA-TT were followed for evaluation of antibody persistence up to 5 years after primary vaccination. Antibody persistence was evaluated by measuring group A serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) with rabbit complement and by a group A–specific IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. Group A antibodies measured by SBA and ELISA were shown to decline in the year following vaccination and plateaued at levels significantly above baseline for up to 5 years following primary vaccination. Conclusions. A single dose of PsA-TT induces long-term sustained levels of group A meningococcal antibodies for up to 5 years after vaccination. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRTCN78147026. PMID:26553683

  11. Parental education and text messaging reminders as effective community based tools to increase HPV vaccination rates among Mexican American children

    PubMed Central

    Aragones, Abraham; Bruno, Denise M.; Ehrenberg, Mariane; Tonda-Salcedo, Josana; Gany, Francesca M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Latino populations, particularly Mexican-Americans who comprise 65% of the Latinos in the U.S., are disproportionately affected by HPV-related diseases. The HPV vaccination completion rates remain low, well below the Healthy People 2020 goal. In this study we assessed the effect of parental education and a text messaging reminder service on HPV vaccine completion rates among eligible children of Mexican American parents. Study design Nonequivalent group study of Mexican parents of HPV vaccine eligible children attended the Health Window program at the Mexican Consulate in New York City, a non-clinical, trusted community setting, during 2012–2013. 69 parents received HPV education onsite, 45 of whom also received a series of text message vaccination reminders. We measured HPV vaccination completion of the youngest eligible children of Mexican parents as the main outcome. Results 98% of those in the education plus text messaging group reported getting the first dose of the vaccine for their child and 87% among those in the educational group only (p = 0.11). 88% of those receiving the 1st dose in the text messaging group reported completing the three doses versus 40% in the educational group only (p = 0.004). Conclusions Parental text messaging plus education, implemented in a community based setting, was strongly associated with vaccine completion rates among vaccine-eligible Mexican American children. Although pilot in nature, the study achieved an 88% series completion rate in the children of those who received the text messages, significantly higher than current vaccination levels. PMID:26844117

  12. Five-year antibody persistence in children after one dose of inactivated or live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhilun; Zhu, Xiangjun; Hu, Yuansheng; Liang, Miao; Sun, Jin; Song, Yufei; Yang, Qi; Ji, Haiquan; Zeng, Gang; Song, Lifei; Chen, Jiangting

    2017-02-14

    In China, both inactivated hepatitis A (HA) vaccine and live attenuated HA vaccine are available. We conducted a trial to evaluate 5-year immune persistence induced by one dose of inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccines in children. Subjects with no HA vaccination history had randomly received one dose of inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccine at 18-60 months of age. Anti-HAV antibody concentrations were measured before vaccination and at the first, second, and fifth year after vaccination. Suspected cases of hepatitis A were monitored during the study period. A total of 332 subjects were enrolled and 182 provided evaluable serum samples at all planned time points. seropositive rate at 5 y was 85.9% in the inactivated HA vaccine group and 90.7% in the live attenuated HA vaccine group. GMCs were 76.3% mIU/ml (95% CI: 61.7 - 94.4) and 66.8mIU/ml (95% CI: 57.8 - 77.3), respectively. No significant difference in antibody persistence between 2 groups was found. No clinical hepatitis A case was reported. A single dose of an inactivated or live attenuated HA vaccine at 18-60 months of age resulted in high HAV seropositive rate and anti-HAV antibody concentrations that lasted for at least 5 y.

  13. Is a prostate cancer screening anxiety measure invariant across two different samples of age-appropriate men?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to explore the influence of anxiety on decision–making processes, valid anxiety measures are needed. We evaluated a prostate cancer screening (PCS) anxiety scale that measures anxiety related to the prostate–specific antigen (PSA) test, the digital rectal examination (DRE), and the decision to undergo PCS (PCS-D) using two samples in different settings. Methods We assessed four psychometric properties of the scale using baseline data from a randomized, controlled decision aid trial (n = 301, private clinic; n = 149, public). Results The 3-factor measure had adequate internal consistency reliability, construct validity, and discriminant validity. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the 3–factor model did not have adequate fit. When subscales were considered separately, only the 6–item PCS-D anxiety measure had adequate fit and was invariant across clinics. Conclusions Our results support the use of a 6–item PCS-D anxiety measure with age-appropriate men in public and private settings. The development of unique anxiety items relating to the PSA test and DRE is still needed. PMID:22681782

  14. Booster vaccination of pre-school children with reduced-antigen-content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus vaccine co-administered with measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ferrera, Giuseppe; Cuccia, Mario; Mereu, Gabriele; Icardi, Giancarlo; Bona, Gianni; Esposito, Susanna; Marchetti, Federico; Messier, Marc; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Hardt, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pertussis occurs in older children, adolescents and adults due to waning immunity after primary vaccination. Booster vaccination for pre-school children has been recommended in Italy since 1999. In this study (NCT00871000), the immunogenicity, safety and reactogenicity of a booster dose of reduced-antigen content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus vaccine (dTpa-IPV; GSK Biologicals Boostrix™-Polio; 3-component pertussis) vs. full-strength DTPa-IPV vaccine (sanofi-pasteur—MSD Tetravac™; 2-component pertussis) was evaluated in pre-school Italian children.   Methods: Healthy children aged 5–6 y primed in a routine vaccination setting with three doses of DTPa-based vaccines were enrolled and randomized (1:1) in this phase IIIb, booster study to receive a single dose of dTpa-IPV or DTPa-IPV; the MMRV vaccine was co-administered. Antibody concentrations/titers against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliovirus 1–3 were measured before and one month post-booster. Reactogenicity and safety was assessed. Results: 305 subjects were enrolled of whom 303 (dTpa-IPV = 151; DTPa-IPV = 152) received booster vaccination. One month post-booster, all subjects were seroprotected/seropositive for anti-diphtheria, anti-tetanus, anti-PT, anti-FHA and anti-poliovirus 1–3; 99.3% of dTpa-IPV and 60.4% of DTPa-IPV subjects were seropositive for anti-PRN; 98–100% of subjects were seropositive against MMRV antigens post-booster. Pain at the injection site (dTpa-IPV: 63.6%; DTPa-IPV: 63.2%) and fatigue (dTpa-IPV: 26.5%; DTPa-IPV: 23.7%) were the most commonly reported solicited local and general symptoms, during the 4-d follow-up period. No SAEs or fatalities were reported. Conclusions: The reduced-antigen-content dTpa-IPV vaccine was non-inferior to full-strength DTPa-IPV vaccine with respect to immunogenicity. The vaccine was well-tolerated and can be confidently used as a booster dose in pre-school children. PMID:22327497

  15. Diarrhoea-related hospitalizations in children before and after implementation of monovalent rotavirus vaccination in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Esparza-Aguilar, Marcelino; Sánchez-Uribe, Edgar; Desai, Rishi; Parashar, Umesh D; Richardson, Vesta; Patel, Manish

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess, by socioeconomic setting, the effect of nationwide vaccination against species A rotavirus (RVA) on childhood diarrhoea-related hospitalizations in Mexico. Methods Data on children younger than 5 years who were hospitalized for diarrhoea in health ministry hospitals between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2011 were collected from monthly discharge reports. Human development indexes were used to categorize the states where hospitals were located as having generally high, intermediate or low socioeconomic status. Annual rates of hospitalization for diarrhoea – per 10 000 hospitalizations for any cause – were calculated. Administrative data were used to estimate vaccine coverage. Findings In the states with high, intermediate and low socioeconomic status, coverage with a two-dose monovalent RVA vaccine – among children younger than 5 years – had reached 93%, 86% and 71%, respectively, by 2010. The corresponding median annual rates of hospitalization for diarrhoea – per 10 000 admissions – fell from 1001, 834 and 1033 in the “prevaccine” period of 2003–2006, to 597, 497 and 705 in the “postvaccine” period from 2008 to 2011, respectively. These decreases correspond to rate reductions of 40% (95% confidence interval, CI: 38–43), 41% (95% CI: 38–43) and 32% (95% CI: 29–34), respectively. Nationwide, RVA vaccination appeared to have averted approximately 16 500 hospitalizations for childhood diarrhoea in each year of the postvaccine period. Conclusion Monovalent RVA vaccination has substantially reduced childhood diarrhoea-related hospitalizations for four continuous years in discretely different socioeconomic populations across Mexico. PMID:24623905

  16. Seasonal Effectiveness of Live Attenuated and Inactivated Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Brendan; Thompson, Mark G.; Gaglani, Manjusha; Jackson, Michael L.; Monto, Arnold S.; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Talbot, H. Keipp; Treanor, John J.; Belongia, Edward A.; Murthy, Kempapura; Jackson, Lisa A.; Petrie, Joshua G.; Zimmerman, Richard K.; Griffin, Marie R.; McLean, Huong Q.; Fry, Alicia M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few observational studies have evaluated the relative effectiveness of live attenuated (LAIV) and inactivated (IIV) influenza vaccines against medically attended laboratory-confirmed influenza. METHODS: We analyzed US Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Network data from participants aged 2 to 17 years during 4 seasons (2010–2011 through 2013–2014) to compare relative effectiveness of LAIV and IIV against influenza-associated illness. Vaccine receipt was confirmed via provider/electronic medical records or immunization registry. We calculated the ratio (odds) of influenza-positive to influenza-negative participants among those age-appropriately vaccinated with either LAIV or IIV for the corresponding season. We examined relative effectiveness of LAIV and IIV by using adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 6819 participants aged 2 to 17 years, 2703 were age-appropriately vaccinated with LAIV (n = 637) or IIV (n = 2066). Odds of influenza were similar for LAIV and IIV recipients during 3 seasons (2010–2011 through 2012–2013). In 2013–2014, odds of influenza were significantly higher among LAIV recipients compared with IIV recipients 2 to 8 years old (OR 5.36; 95% CI, 2.37 to 12.13). Participants vaccinated with LAIV or IIV had similar odds of illness associated with influenza A/H3N2 or B. LAIV recipients had greater odds of illness due to influenza A/H1N1pdm09 in 2010–2011 and 2013–2014. CONCLUSIONS: We observed lower effectiveness of LAIV compared with IIV against influenza A/H1N1pdm09 but not A(H3N2) or B among children and adolescents, suggesting poor performance related to the LAIV A/H1N1pdm09 viral construct. PMID:26738884

  17. Vaccination Coverage among Kindergarten Children in Phoenix, Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frimpong, Jemima A.; Rivers, Patrick A.; Bae, Sejong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate school immunization records and document the immunization coverage and compliance level of children enrolled in kindergarten in Phoenix during the 2001-2002 school year. The purpose was to obtain information on: 1) immunization status by age two; 2) under-immunization in kindergarten; 3) administration error; and 4)…

  18. Effect of BCG vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, A; Eisenhut, M; Harris, R J; Rodrigues, L C; Sridhar, S; Habermann, S; Snell, L; Mangtani, P; Adetifa, I; Lalvani, A

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether BCG vaccination protects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection as assessed by interferon γ release assays (IGRA) in children. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Searches of electronic databases 1950 to November 2013, checking of reference lists, hand searching of journals, and contact with experts. Setting Community congregate settings and households. Inclusion criteria Vaccinated and unvaccinated children aged under 16 with known recent exposure to patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Children were screened for infection with M tuberculosis with interferon γ release assays. Data extraction Study results relating to diagnostic accuracy were extracted and risk estimates were combined with random effects meta-analysis. Results The primary analysis included 14 studies and 3855 participants. The estimated overall risk ratio was 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.92), indicating a protective efficacy of 19% against infection among vaccinated children after exposure compared with unvaccinated children. The observed protection was similar when estimated with the two types of interferon γ release assays (ELISpot or QuantiFERON). Restriction of the analysis to the six studies (n=1745) with information on progression to active tuberculosis at the time of screening showed protection against infection of 27% (risk ratio 0.73, 0.61 to 0.87) compared with 71% (0.29, 0.15 to 0.58) against active tuberculosis. Among those infected, protection against progression to disease was 58% (0.42, 0.23 to 0.77). Conclusions BCG protects against M tuberculosis infection as well as progression from infection to disease. Trial registration PROSPERO registration No CRD42011001698 (www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/). PMID:25097193

  19. Attitudes to HPV vaccination among parents of children aged 12-15 years-a population-based survey in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dahlström, Lisen A; Tran, Trung N; Lundholm, Cecilia; Young, Cecilia; Sundström, Karin; Sparén, Pär

    2010-01-15

    In this population-based survey undertaken in Sweden in 2007, we investigated correlates of attitudes to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among parents of children aged 12-15 years. We invited 16,000 parents of girls and 4,000 parents of boys, randomly selected from the Swedish population. Response rates were 70 and 69%, respectively. Multinomial logistic regression models were applied to investigate correlates of acceptability to HPV vaccination. Among studied parents, 76% were willing to vaccinate their child if the vaccine is for free and 63% were willing to vaccinate even if the vaccine comes with a cost. Having heard of HPV was associated with both willingness to vaccinate if the vaccine is free (odds ratio [OR]: 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.66) and willingness to vaccinate even if the vaccine is not free (OR: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.75-2.20) compared with those who never heard of HPV. Beliefs about vaccine safety and efficacy were also strong correlates of willingness to vaccinate. Parents born outside Europe and those with higher education were less willing to vaccinate if the vaccine is not free. In conclusion, the willingness to vaccinate was reasonably high and cost did not appear to be a major barrier. Information about vaccine safety and efficacy is important and parents need information about HPV and the HPV vaccine.

  20. Monitoring the circulation of rotavirus among children after the introduction of the Rotarix™ vaccine in Goiânia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borges, Ana Maria Tavares; Dias e Souza, Menira; Fiaccadori, Fabíola Souza; Cardoso, Divina das Dores de Paula

    2011-06-01

    The epidemiological features of rotavirus A (RVA) infection differ between children from developing and developed countries which could result in differences in vaccine efficacy around the world. To evaluate the impact of Rotarix™ on RVA prevalence, we monitored RVA genotypes circulating in Goiânia by monitoring virus in faecal samples from children that had or had not been previously vaccinated. From February-November of 2008, 220 faecal samples were collected from children in seven day-care centres. RVA detection was performed by two methodologies and the results were confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. From the 220 samples, eight were RVA-positive (3.6%) and five were from children that had received either one or two doses of the vaccine. All positive samples were collected from children with diarrhoea during August and September. Genotyping of the RVA characterised five of the viral samples as genotype G2P[4] and one as G8P[4], suggesting that G2P[4] was the predominant circulating genotype in Goiânia during the study. The fact that vaccinated children were also infected by RVA suggests that the vaccine does not fully protect against infection by the G2[P4] RVA genotype.

  1. Measles-mumps-rubella-varicella combination vaccine (ProQuad): a guide to its use in children in the E.U.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2015-04-01

    In the EU, the live attenuated, tetravalent measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine ProQuad is indicated for simultaneous vaccination against measles, mumps, rubella and varicella in individuals from 12 months of age using a two-dose schedule and may be used in infants from 9 months of age to conform with a national vaccination schedule, outbreak situations or travel to a region with a high prevalence of measles. Clinical data in young children indicates that vaccination with ProQuad is as immunogenic as the component vaccines, provides long-term protection against these potentially serious childhood infections and has an acceptable safety profile. Combining the viral strains of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine M-M-RVAXPRO and the varicella vaccine Varivax in ProQuad reduces the complexity of vaccination schedules, thereby potentially improving vaccination coverage and the timeliness of vaccination.

  2. Correlates of Immunity to Influenza as Determined by Challenge of Children with Live, Attenuated Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter F.; Hoen, Anne G.; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Brown, Eric P.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Wieland-Alter, Wendy; Connor, Ruth I.; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Haynes, Brenda C.; Luke, Catherine J.; Subbarao, Kanta; Treanor, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The efficacy of live, attenuated live attenuated influenza vaccine(LAIV) and inactivated influenza vaccine(IIV) is poorly explained by either single or composite immune responses to vaccination. Protective biomarkers were therefore studied in response to LAIV or IIV followed by LAIV challenge in children. Methods. Serum and mucosal responses to LAIV or IIV were analyzed using immunologic assays to assess both quantitative and functional responses. Cytokines and chemokines were measured in nasal washes collected before vaccination, on days 2, 4, and 7 after initial LAIV, and again after LAIV challenge using a 63-multiplex Luminex panel. Results. Patterns of immunity induced by LAIV and IIV were significantly different. Serum responses induced by IIV, including hemagglutination inhibition, did not correlate with detection or quantitation of LAIV on subsequent challenge. Modalities that induced sterilizing immunity seen after LAIV challenge could not be defined by any measurements of mucosal or serum antibodies induced by the initial LAIV immunization. No single cytokine or chemokine was predictive of protection. Conclusions. The mechanism of protective immunity observed after LAIV could not be defined, and traditional measurements of immunity to IIV did not correlate with protection against an LAIV challenge. PMID:27419180

  3. Effect of monovalent rotavirus vaccine on rotavirus disease burden and circulating rotavirus strains among children in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Benhafid, Mohammed; Elomari, Nezha; Azzouzi Idrissi, Meryem; Rguig, Ahmed; Gentsch, Jon R; Parashar, Umesh; Elaouad, Rajae

    2015-06-01

    Rotarix(TM) vaccine was introduced into the National Program of Immunization of Morocco in October 2010, reaching quickly 87% of the target population of children nationally. The incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis and the prevalence of circulating rotavirus strains has been monitored in three sentinel hospitals since June 2006. The average percentage of rotavirus positive cases among all children under 5 years old hospitalized for gastroenteritis during the pre-vaccine period (2006-2010) was 44%. This percentage dropped to 29%, 15% and 24% in the 3 years post vaccine introduction (2011, 2012 and 2013), which is a decline of 34%, 66%, and 45%, respectively. Declines in prevalence were greatest among children 0-1 years of age (53%) and were most prominent during the winter and autumn rotavirus season. The prevalence of the G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotype sharply increased in the post vaccine period (2011-2013) compared to the previous seasons (2006-2010). Rotavirus vaccines have reduced greatly the number of children hospitalized due to rotavirus infection at the three sentinel hospitals; it is however unclear if the predominance of G2P[4] and G9P[8] genotypes is related to the vaccine introduction, or if this is attributable to normal genotype fluctuations. Continued surveillance will be pivotal to answer this question in the future.

  4. Systematic review of fever, febrile convulsions and serious adverse events following administration of inactivated trivalent influenza vaccines in children.

    PubMed

    Li-Kim-Moy, J; Yin, J K; Rashid, H; Khandaker, G; King, C; Wood, N; Macartney, K K; Jones, C; Booy, R

    2015-06-18

    In 2010, increased febrile convulsions (FC) occurred after administration of inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) in Australia. We systematically reviewed the rates of fever, FC and serious adverse events (SAEs) after TIV, focussing on published and unpublished clinical trial data from 2005 to 2012, and performed meta-analysis of fever rates. From 4,372 records in electronic databases, 18 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), 14 non-randomised clinical trials, six observational studies and 12 registered trials (five RCTs and seven non-randomised) were identified. In published RCTs, fever ≥ 38 °C rates after first dose of non-adjuvanted TIV were 6.7% and 6.9% for children aged 6–35 months and ≥ 3 years, respectively. Analysis of RCTs by vaccine manufacturer showed pooled fever estimates up to 5.1% with Sanofi or GlaxoSmithKline vaccines; bioCSL vaccines were used in two non-randomised clinical trials and one unpublished RCT and were associated with fever in 22.5–37.1% for children aged 6–35 months. In RCTs, FCs occurred at a rate of 1.1 per 1,000 vaccinated children. While most TIVs induced acceptably low fever rates, bioCSL influenza vaccines were associated with much higher rates of fever in young children. Future standardised study methodology and access to individual level data would be illuminating.

  5. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  6. Vaccination Coverage Disparities Between Foreign-Born and U.S.-Born Children Aged 19-35 Months, United States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Varan, Aiden K; Rodriguez-Lainz, Alfonso; Hill, Holly A; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Yankey, David; Li, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Healthy People 2020 targets high vaccination coverage among children. Although reductions in coverage disparities by race/ethnicity have been described, data by nativity are limited. The National Immunization Survey is a random-digit-dialed telephone survey that estimates vaccination coverage among U.S. children aged 19-35 months. We assessed coverage among 52,441 children from pooled 2010-2012 data for individual vaccines and the combined 4:3:1:3*:3:1:4 series (which includes ≥4 doses of diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine/diphtheria and tetanus toxoids vaccine/diphtheria, tetanus toxoids, and pertussis vaccine, ≥3 doses of poliovirus vaccine, ≥1 dose of measles-containing vaccine, ≥3 or ≥4 doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (depending on product type of vaccine; denoted as 3* in the series name), ≥3 doses of hepatitis B vaccine, ≥1 dose of varicella vaccine, and ≥4 doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine). Coverage estimates controlling for sociodemographic factors and multivariable logistic regression modeling for 4:3:1:3*:3:1:4 series completion are presented. Significantly lower coverage among foreign-born children was detected for DTaP, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, Hib, pneumococcal conjugate, and rotavirus vaccines, and for the combined series. Series completion disparities persisted after control for demographic, access-to-care, poverty, and language effects. Substantial and potentially widening disparities in vaccination coverage exist among foreign-born children. Improved immunization strategies targeting this population and continued vaccination coverage monitoring by nativity are needed.

  7. Pharmacological and Combined Interventions to Reduce Vaccine Injection Pain in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Taddio, Anna; McMurtry, C. Meghan; Halperin, Scott A.; Noel, Melanie; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Chambers, Christine T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This systematic review assessed the effectiveness and safety of pharmacotherapy and combined interventions for reducing vaccine injection pain in individuals across the lifespan. Design/Methods: Electronic databases were searched for relevant randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Self-reported pain and fear as well as observer-rated distress were critically important outcomes. Data were combined using standardized mean difference (SMD) or relative risk with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Fifty-five studies that examined breastfeeding (which combines sweet-tasting solution, holding, and sucking), topical anesthetics, sweet-tasting solutions (sucrose, glucose), vapocoolants, oral analgesics, and combination of 2 versus 1 intervention were included. The following results report findings of analyses of critical outcomes with the largest number of participants. Compared with control, acute distress was lower for infants breastfed: (1) during vaccination (n=792): SMD −1.78 (CI, −2.35, −1.22) and (2) before vaccination (n=100): SMD −1.43 (CI, −2.14, −0.72). Compared with control/placebo, topical anesthetics showed benefit on acute distress in children (n=1424): SMD −0.91 (CI, −1.36, −0.47) and self-reported pain in adults (n=60): SMD −0.85 (CI, −1.38, −0.32). Acute and recovery distress was lower for children who received sucrose (n=2071): SMD −0.76 (CI, −1.19, −0.34) or glucose (n=818): SMD −0.69 (CI, −1.03, −0.35) compared with placebo/no treatment. Vapocoolants reduced acute pain in adults [(n=185), SMD −0.78 (CI, −1.08, −0.48)] but not children. Evidence from other needle procedures showed no benefit of acetaminophen or ibuprofen. The administration of topical anesthetics before and breastfeeding during vaccine injections showed mixed results when compared with topical anesthetics alone. There were no additive benefits of combining glucose and non-nutritive sucking (pacifier) compared with

  8. Rotavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Catherine; Tate, Jacqueline E; Hyde, Terri B; Cortese, Margaret M; Lopman, Benjamin A; Jiang, Baoming; Glass, Roger I; Parashar, Umesh D

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea among children <5 years worldwide. Currently licensed rotavirus vaccines have been efficacious and effective, with many countries reporting substantial declines in diarrheal and rotavirus-specific morbidity and mortality. However, the full public health impact of these vaccines has not been realized. Most countries, including those with the highest disease burden, have not yet introduced rotavirus vaccines into their national immunization programs. Research activities that may help inform vaccine introduction decisions include (1) establishing effectiveness, impact, and safety for rotavirus vaccines in low-income settings; (2) identifying potential strategies to improve performance of oral rotavirus vaccines in developing countries, such as zinc supplementation; and (3) pursuing alternate approaches to oral vaccines, such as parenteral immunization. Policy- and program-level barriers, such as financial implications of new vaccine introductions, should be addressed to ensure that countries are able to make informed decisions regarding rotavirus vaccine introduction. PMID:24755452

  9. Association between perfluoroalkyl substance exposure and asthma and allergic disease in children as modified by MMR vaccination.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Jensen, Tina Kold; Osuna, Christa Elyse; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Nielsen, Flemming; Poulsen, Lars K; Weihe, Pál; Grandjean, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are highly persistent chemicals that might be associated with asthma and allergy, but the associations remain unclear. Therefore, this study examined whether pre- and postnatal PFAS exposure was associated with childhood asthma and allergy. Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination in early life may have a protective effect against asthma and allergy, and MMR vaccination is therefore taken into account when evaluating these associations. In a cohort of Faroese children whose mothers were recruited during pregnancy, serum concentrations of five PFASs - Perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) - were measured at three timepoints (maternal serum in pregnancy week 34-36 and child serum at ages 5 and 13 years) and their association with immunoglobulin E (IgE) (cord blood and at age 7 years) and asthma/allergic diseases (questionnaires at ages 5 and 13 years and skin prick test at age 13 years) was determined. A total of 559 children were included in the analyses. Interactions with MMR vaccination were evaluated. Among 22 MMR-unvaccinated children, higher levels of the five PFASs at age 5 years were associated with increased odds of asthma at ages 5 and 13. The associations were reversed among MMR-vaccinated children. Prenatal PFAS exposure was not associated with childhood asthma or allergic diseases regardless of MMR vaccination status. In conclusion, PFAS exposure at age 5 was associated with increased risk of asthma among a small subgroup of MMR-unvaccinated children but not among MMR-vaccinated children. While PFAS exposure may impact immune system functions, this study suggests that MMR vaccination might be a potential effect-modifier.

  10. The effects of booster vaccination on combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine in both anti-HBs and anti-HAV negative children 5-15 years after hepatitis B vaccine primary immunization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongdi; Gu, Hua; Cheng, Suyun; Shen, Lingzhi; Cui, Fujiang; Wang, Fuzhen; Yao, Jun; Xia, Shichang; Lv, Huakun; Liang, Xiaofeng

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the changes in both anti-HAV lgG and anti-HBs lgG levels and compared the antibody seroconversion rates of different doses of combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine in children. Children who were vaccinated as infants with Hepatitis B vaccine were revaccinated at 5-15 y of age, then the antibody titers were monitored. Among 283 children, this study found that the anti-HAV seroconversion rates (defined as anti-HAV ≥ 1 mIU/ml) after the first and the third dose were 79.9% and 100% respectively; these observed differences were statistically significant (P<0.05); the corresponding geometric mean titers (GMTs) were 4.72 ± 2.63 mIU/ml and 13.46 ± 1.16 mIU/ml respectively. The anti-HBs seroconversion rates (defined as an anti-HBs ≥ 10 mIU/ml) were 82.3% and 99.0% respectively; these observed differences were statistically significant (P<0.05); and the corresponding titers were 319.95 ± 5.16 mIU/ml and 418.59 ± 3.89 mIU/ml respectively. After the first booster dose, the difference in anti-HAV seroconversion rate was statistically significant in children aged 5-9 y and 10-15 y (P<0.05), as was the difference of anti-HBs seroconversion, whereas after the third dose the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). This study demonstrated that the immunization effects of booster vaccination with combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine is successful for children. A single booster dose is adequate for younger children, while three doses are needed for older children.

  11. Impact of Body Mass Index on Immunogenicity of Pandemic H1N1 Vaccine in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, S. Todd; Wolff, Mark; Hill, Heather R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Keitel, Wendy; Atmar, Robert; Patel, Shital; Sahly, Hana El; Munoz, Flor; Paul Glezen, W.; Brady, Rebecca; Frenck, Robert; Bernstein, David; Harrison, Christopher; Jackson, Mary Anne; Swanson, Douglas; Newland, Jason; Myers, Angela; Livingston, Robyn A; Walter, Emmanuel; Dolor, Rowena; Schmader, Kenneth; Mulligan, Mark J.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Rouphael, Nadine; Whitaker, Jennifer; Spearman, Paul; Keyserling, Harry; Shane, Andi; Eckard, Allison Ross; Jackson, Lisa A.; Frey, Sharon E.; Belshe, Robert B.; Graham, Irene; Anderson, Edwin; Englund, Janet A.; Healy, Sara; Winokur, Patricia; Stapleton, Jack; Meier, Jeffrey; Kotloff, Karen; Chen, Wilbur; Hutter, Julia; Stephens, Ina; Wooten, Susan; Wald, Anna; Johnston, Christine; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Buddy Creech, C.; Todd Callahan, S.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity emerged as a risk factor for morbidity and mortality related to 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection. However, few studies examine the immune responses to H1N1 vaccine among children and adults of various body mass indices (BMI). Pooling data from 3 trials of unadjuvanted split-virus H1N1 A/California/07/2009 influenza vaccines, we analyzed serologic responses of participants stratified by BMI grouping. A single vaccine dose produced higher hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers at day 21 in obese compared to nonobese adults, but there were no significant differences in responses to H1N1 vaccine among children or adults of various BMI following 2 doses. PMID:24795475

  12. Antibody persistence and immunologic memory in children vaccinated with 4 doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines: Results from 2 long-term follow-up studies

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Jacek; Brzostek, Jerzy; Konior, Ryszard; Panzer, Falko G.; François, Nancy A.; Ravula, Sudheer M.; Kolhe, Devayani A.; Song, Yue; Dieussaert, Ilse; Schuerman, Lode; Borys, Dorota

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate long-term antibody persistence following the administration of the 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV), we present results of 2 follow-up studies assessing antibody persistence following 2 3+1 schedules up to 4 (NCT00624819 – Study A) and 5 years (NCT00891176 – Study B) post-booster vaccination. In Study A, antibody persistence was measured one, 2 and 4 years post-booster in children previously primed and boosted with PHiD-CV, or primed with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vCRM) and boosted with either PHiD-CV or 7vCRM. In Study B, PHiD-CV was co-administered with meningococcal vaccines, and pneumococcal antibody persistence was measured 2, 3 and 5 years post-booster. An age-matched control group, unvaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae, was enrolled in Study A, allowing assessment of immunologic memory by administration of one dose of PHiD-CV to both primed (4 years post-booster) and unprimed 6-year-old children. Four years post-booster (Study A), antibody concentrations and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titers remained higher compared to the pre-booster timepoint, with no major differences between the 3 primed groups. Antibody persistence was also observed in Study B, with minimal differences between groups. The additional PHiD-CV dose administered 4 years post-booster in Study A elicited more robust immune responses in primed children than in unprimed children. Long-term serotype-specific antibody persistence and robust immunologic memory responses observed in these 2 studies suggest induction of long-term protection against pneumococcal disease after PHiD-CV vaccination. PMID:27736293

  13. Antibody persistence and immunologic memory in children vaccinated with 4 doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines: Results from 2 long-term follow-up studies.

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Jacek; Brzostek, Jerzy; Konior, Ryszard; Panzer, Falko G; François, Nancy A; Ravula, Sudheer M; Kolhe, Devayani A; Song, Yue; Dieussaert, Ilse; Schuerman, Lode; Borys, Dorota

    2016-10-13

    To investigate long-term antibody persistence following the administration of the 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV), we present results of 2 follow-up studies assessing antibody persistence following 2 3+1 schedules up to 4 (NCT00624819 - Study A) and 5 years (NCT00891176 - Study B) post-booster vaccination. In Study A, antibody persistence was measured one, 2 and 4 years post-booster in children previously primed and boosted with PHiD-CV, or primed with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vCRM) and boosted with either PHiD-CV or 7vCRM. In Study B, PHiD-CV was co-administered with meningococcal vaccines, and pneumococcal antibody persistence was measured 2, 3 and 5 years post-booster. An age-matched control group, unvaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae, was enrolled in Study A, allowing assessment of immunologic memory by administration of one dose of PHiD-CV to both primed (4 years post-booster) and unprimed 6-year-old children. Four years post-booster (Study A), antibody concentrations and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titers remained higher compared to the pre-booster timepoint, with no major differences between the 3 primed groups. Antibody persistence was also observed in Study B, with minimal differences between groups. The additional PHiD-CV dose administered 4 years post-booster in Study A elicited more robust immune responses in primed children than in unprimed children. Long-term serotype-specific antibody persistence and robust immunologic memory responses observed in these 2 studies suggest induction of long-term protection against pneumococcal disease after PHiD-CV vaccination.

  14. Consensus document on the approach to children with allergic reactions after vaccination or allergy to vaccine components.

    PubMed

    Echeverría-Zudaire, Luis A; Ortigosa-del Castillo, Luis; Alonso-Lebrero, Elena; Álvarez-García, Francisco J; Cortés-Álvarez, Nuria; García-Sánchez, Nuria; Martorell-Aragonés, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinations are one of the main public health tools for the control of vaccine-preventable diseases. If a child is identified as having had an allergic reaction to a vaccine, subsequent immunisations will probably be suspended - with the risks such a decision implies. The incidence of severe allergic reactions is very low, ranging between 0.5 and 1 cases/100,000 doses. Rather than the vaccine antigens as such, the causes of allergic reactions to vaccines are often residual protein components of the manufacturing process such as gelatine or egg, and less commonly yeasts or latex. Most vaccine reactions are mild and circumscribed to the injection site; although in some cases severe anaphylactic reactions can be observed. If an immediate-type allergic reaction is suspected at vaccination, or if a child with allergy to some of the vaccine components is scheduled for vaccination, a correct diagnosis of the possible allergic process must be made. The usual vaccine components must be known in order to determine whether vaccination can be safely performed.

  15. The Effect of Prophylactic Antipyretic Administration on Post-Vaccination Adverse Reactions and Antibody Response in Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Panigrahi, Inusha; Naik, Sushree Samiksha

    2014-01-01

    Background Prophylactic antipyretic administration decreases the post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent study finds that they may also decrease the antibody responses to several vaccine antigens. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for a relationship between prophylactic antipyretic administration, post-vaccination adverse events, and antibody response in children. Methods A systematic search of major databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was carried out till March 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing prophylactic antipyretic treatment versus placebo post-vaccination in children ≤6 years of age were included. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed the studies for methodological quality, and extracted data [PROSPERO registration: CRD42014009717]. Results Of 2579 citations retrieved, a total of 13 RCTs including 5077 children were included in the review. Prophylactic antipyretic administration significantly reduced the febrile reactions (≥38.0°C) after primary and booster vaccinations. Though there were statistically significant differences in the antibody responses between the two groups, the prophylactic PCM group had what would be considered protective levels of antibodies to all of the antigens given after the primary and booster vaccinations. No significant difference in the nasopharyngeal carriage rates (short-term and long-term) of H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae serotypes was found between the prophylactic and no prophylactic PCM group. There was a significant reduction in the local and systemic symptoms after primary, but not booster vaccinations. Conclusions Though prophylactic antipyretic administration leads to relief of the local and systemic symptoms after primary vaccinations, there is a reduction in antibody responses to some vaccine antigens without any effect on the nasopharyngeal carriage rates of S. pneumoniae & H. influenza serotypes. Future trials and surveillance programs

  16. Hemagglutination inhibiting antibody persistence 1 year after influenza vaccination in Korean children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eun Kyeong; Eun, Byung Wook; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, Yun Kyung; Lim, Jung Sub; Kim, Dong Ho

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the 1-y immunogenicity of influenza vaccines and the association between immunogenicity at 1 m and further influenza infections in children aged 6 m to 18 y. Serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titers and GMTs were determined for the recommended influenza strains 0, 1, 6, and 12 m post-vaccination. The serological evidence of influenza infections were defined as the increase of HI titer (HI ≥1:40 and 4-fold rise). The seroprotection rates for strains A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B were 91.2%, 87.6%, and 87.6%, respectively, at 1 month (n = 174). These rates were 76.5%, 64.7%, and 54.6%, respectively, at 12 m. The seroprotection rates and GMTs for influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) were higher at 12 m than at 0 m (p < 0.05) but not for B. There were 39 subjects (42 cases) of serological influenza infections. Subjects with seroprotection at 1 m post-vaccination had showed fewer serologic A(H1N1) (10.1 vs 54.5%) and A(H3N2) (7.2 vs 38.1%) infections than the ones with HI titer <1:40 during follow-up (P < 0.01). In conclusion, influenza vaccines used during the 2008-09 season induced adequate 1-y immunogenicity for A(H1N1) and A(H3N2). The immunogenicity at one month after vaccination influenced further serological influenza infections.

  17. Pandemic influenza 2009: Impact of vaccination coverage on critical illness in children, a Canada and France observational study

    PubMed Central

    Fléchelles, Olivier; Brissaud, Olivier; Fowler, Robert; Ducruet, Thierry; Jouvet, Philippe; the Pediatric Canadian Critical Care Trials Group H1N1 Collaborative and Groupe Francophone de Réanimation et Urgences Pédiatriques

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the impact of vaccination critical illness due to H1N1pdm09, we compared the incidence and severity of H1N1pdm09 infection in Canada and France. METHODS We studied two national cohorts that included children with documented H1N1pdm09 infection, admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) in Canada and in France between October 1, 2009 and January 31, 2010. RESULTS Vaccination coverage prior to admission to PICUs was higher in Canada than in France (21% vs 2% of children respectively, P < 0.001), and in both countries, vaccination coverage prior to admission of these critically ill patients was substantially lower than in the general pediatric population (P < 0.001). In Canada, 160 children (incidence = 2.6/100000 children) were hospitalized in PICU compared to 125 children (incidence = 1.1/100000) in France (P < 0.001). Mortality rates were similar in Canada and France (4.4% vs 6.5%, P = 0.45, respectively), median invasive mechanical ventilation duration and mean PICU length of stay were shorter in Canada (4 d vs 6 d, P = 0.02 and 5.7 d vs 8.2 d, P = 0.03, respectively). H1N1pdm09 vaccination prior to PICU admission was associated with a decreased risk of requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (OR = 0.30, 95%CI: 0.11-0.83, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION The critical illness due to H1N1pdm09 had a higher incidence in Canada than in France. Critically ill children were less likely to have received vaccination prior to hospitalization in comparison to general population and children vaccinated had lower risk of ventilation. PMID:27872826

  18. Increased risk of narcolepsy in children and adults after pandemic H1N1 vaccination in France.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Monaca Charley, Christelle; Franco, Patricia; Drouot, Xavier; d'Ortho, Marie-Pia; Launois, Sandrine; Lignot, Séverine; Bourgin, Patrice; Nogues, Béatrice; Rey, Marc; Bayard, Sophie; Scholz, Sabine; Lavault, Sophie; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Saussier, Cristel; Pariente, Antoine

    2013-08-01

    An increased incidence of narcolepsy in children was detected in Scandinavian countries where pandemic H1N1 influenza ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine was used. A campaign of vaccination against pandemic H1N1 influenza was implemented in France using both ASO3-adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted vaccines. As part of a study considering all-type narcolepsy, we investigated the association between H1N1 vaccination and narcolepsy with cataplexy in children and adults compared with matched controls; and compared the phenotype of narcolepsy with cataplexy according to exposure to the H1N1 vaccination. Patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy were included from 14 expert centres in France. Date of diagnosis constituted the index date. Validation of cases was performed by independent experts using the Brighton collaboration criteria. Up to four controls were individually matched to cases according to age, gender and geographic location. A structured telephone interview was performed to collect information on medical history, past infections and vaccinations. Eighty-five cases with narcolepsy-cataplexy were included; 23 being further excluded regarding eligibility criteria. Of the 62 eligible cases, 59 (64% males, 57.6% children) could be matched with 135 control subjects. H1N1 vaccination was associated with narcolepsy-cataplexy with an odds ratio of 6.5 (2.1-19.9) in subjects aged<18 years, and 4.7 (1.6-13.9) in those aged 18 and over. Sensitivity analyses considering date of referral for diagnosis or the date of onset of symptoms as the index date gave similar results, as did analyses focusing only on exposure to ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine. Slight differences were found when comparing cases with narcolepsy-cataplexy exposed to H1N1 vaccination (n=32; mostly AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, n=28) to non-exposed cases (n=30), including shorter delay of diagnosis and a higher number of sleep onset rapid eye movement periods for exposed cases. No difference was found regarding history of infections. In

  19. A two-dose schedule for combined hepatitis A and B vaccination in children aged 6-15 years.

    PubMed

    Kurugöl, Zafer; Mutlubaş, Fatma; Ozacar, Tijen

    2005-04-22

    A combined hepatitis A and B vaccine, Twinrix, in a paediatric formulation for ages 1-15 years and in an adult formulation for those ages 16 years and older, became commercially available in Turkey as well as in many countries. It is administered according to a three-dose schedule (0, 1 and 6 months). A reduction in the number of doses would improve the compliance rate and reduce administration costs. Therefore, we planned a trial evaluation of the immunogenicity, safety and reactogenicity profile of a high-dose combined hepatitis A and B vaccine, administered in two doses, compared with the profile of a paediatric-dose combined vaccine, administered in three doses, in healthy children aged 6-15 years. One hundred children were randomly attributed to the two study groups. The first group (paediatric-dose vaccine group) received the licensed Twinrix Paediatric, at months 0, 1 and 6; the second group (high-dose vaccine group) received the high-dose vaccine, following a 0, 6 months schedule. The reactogenicity was assessed after each vaccine dose. The immunogenicity was evaluated by testing for anti-HBs and anti-HAV antibodies. Seroconversion rates and geometric mean titres (GMTs) were compared. Both formulations of the combined vaccine were well tolerated. The high-dose combined vaccine administered in two doses, elicits satisfactory immunogenicity profiles, similar to those elicited by the paediatric vaccine administered in three doses. On completion of the vaccination schedule in the two groups all children were protected against hepatitis B and immune for hepatitis A. Anti-HAV GMTs after completion of the vaccination schedule were 7163 mlU/ml in the paediatric-dose group, 8241 mlU/ml in the high-dose group; anti-HBs GMTs were 8679 and 4583 mlU/ml, respectively. These results indicate that a two-dose schedule, compared with the standard three-dose schedule, offers fewer injections for satisfactory protection against the two infections. This means fewer clinic

  20. Decline in cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia after introduction of a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Clark, H Fred; Lawley, Diane; Mallette, Laura A; DiNubile, Mark J; Hodinka, Richard L

    2009-03-01

    A pentavalent rotavirus vaccine for infants became available in the United States in February 2006. By 2007, vaccination rates nationwide were estimated to be approximately 50%. We studied the effectiveness of the vaccine in a real-world setting outside of a clinical trial. All children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA [followed by genotyping if ELISA positive]) since the 1994-1995 epidemic season, presenting a unique opportunity to assess the impact of the recently introduced vaccine. The annual number of community-acquired cases over the preceding 13 years had approached or exceeded 100, with 271 cases in 2005 to 2006 and 167 cases in 2006 to 2007. In the 2007-2008 season, only 36 community-acquired cases were identified, representing an 87% reduction from the same period in 2005 to 2006. G3 was the predominant serotype, accounting for 15 community cases (42%). Our study is limited by its observational design using historical comparisons. Nonetheless, the abrupt decline in rotavirus gastroenteritis cases during the 2007-2008 season likely resulted from vaccination. Because protection rates appeared to have exceeded vaccination rates, herd immunity may have contributed to some degree to the effectiveness of the vaccine.

  1. Public health impact and cost-effectiveness of intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccination of children in Germany.

    PubMed

    Damm, Oliver; Eichner, Martin; Rose, Markus Andreas; Knuf, Markus; Wutzler, Peter; Liese, Johannes Günter; Krüger, Hagen; Greiner, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    In 2011, intranasally administered live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) was approved in the EU for prophylaxis of seasonal influenza in 2-17-year-old children. Our objective was to estimate the potential epidemiological impact and cost-effectiveness of an LAIV-based extension of the influenza vaccination programme to healthy children in Germany. An age-structured dynamic model of influenza transmission was developed and combined with a decision-tree to evaluate different vaccination strategies in the German health care system. Model inputs were based on published literature or were derived by expert consulting using the Delphi technique. Unit costs were drawn from German sources. Under base-case assumptions, annual routine vaccination of children aged 2-17 years with LAIV assuming an uptake of 50% would prevent, across all ages, 16 million cases of symptomatic influenza, over 600,000 cases of acute otitis media, nearly 130,000 cases of community-acquired pneumonia, nearly 1.7 million prescriptions of antibiotics and over 165,000 hospitalisations over 10 years. The discounted incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was 1,228 per quality-adjusted life year gained from a broad third-party payer perspective (including reimbursed direct costs and specific transfer payments), when compared with the current strategy of vaccinating primarily risk groups with the conventional trivalent inactivated vaccine. Inclusion of patient co-payments and indirect costs in terms of productivity losses resulted in discounted 10-year cost savings of 3.4 billion. In conclusion, adopting universal influenza immunisation of healthy children and adolescents would lead to a substantial reduction in influenza-associated disease at a reasonable cost to the German statutory health insurance system. On the basis of the epidemiological and health economic simulation results, a recommendation of introducing annual routine influenza vaccination of children 2-17 years of age might be

  2. Gender Determinants of Vaccination Status in Children: Evidence from a Meta-Ethnographic Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Biaggi, Christina; Secula, Florence; Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Namgyal, Pem; Hombach, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Using meta-ethnographic methods, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to understand gender-related reasons at individual, family, community and health facility levels why millions of children in low and middle income countries are still not reached by routine vaccination programmes. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ERIC, Anthropological Lit, CSA databases, IBSS, ISI Web of Knowledge, JSTOR, Soc Index and Sociological Abstracts was conducted. Key words were built around the themes of immunization, vaccines, health services, health behaviour, and developing countries. Only papers, which reported on in-depth qualitative data, were retained. Twenty-five qualitative studies, which investigated barriers to routine immunisation, were included in the review. These studies were conducted between 1982 and 2012; eighteen were published after 2000. The studies represent a wide range of low- to middle income countries including some that have well known coverage challenges. We found that women's low social status manifests on every level as a barrier to accessing vaccinations: access to education, income, as well as autonomous decision-making about time and resource allocation were evident barriers. Indirectly, women's lower status made them vulnerable to blame and shame in case of childhood illness, partly reinforcing access problems, but partly increasing women's motivation to use every means to keep their children healthy. Yet in settings where gender discrimination exists most strongly, increasing availability and information may not be enough to reach the under immunised. Programmes must actively be designed to include mitigation measures to facilitate women's access to immunisation services if we hope to improve immunisation coverage. Gender inequality needs to be addressed on structural, community and household levels if the number of unvaccinated children is to substantially decrease. PMID:26317975

  3. Gender Determinants of Vaccination Status in Children: Evidence from a Meta-Ethnographic Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Merten, Sonja; Martin Hilber, Adriane; Biaggi, Christina; Secula, Florence; Bosch-Capblanch, Xavier; Namgyal, Pem; Hombach, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Using meta-ethnographic methods, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to understand gender-related reasons at individual, family, community and health facility levels why millions of children in low and middle income countries are still not reached by routine vaccination programmes. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ERIC, Anthropological Lit, CSA databases, IBSS, ISI Web of Knowledge, JSTOR, Soc Index and Sociological Abstracts was conducted. Key words were built around the themes of immunization, vaccines, health services, health behaviour, and developing countries. Only papers, which reported on in-depth qualitative data, were retained. Twenty-five qualitative studies, which investigated barriers to routine immunisation, were included in the review. These studies were conducted between 1982 and 2012; eighteen were published after 2000. The studies represent a wide range of low- to middle income countries including some that have well known coverage challenges. We found that women's low social status manifests on every level as a barrier to accessing vaccinations: access to education, income, as well as autonomous decision-making about time and resource allocation were evident barriers. Indirectly, women's lower status made them vulnerable to blame and shame in case of childhood illness, partly reinforcing access problems, but partly increasing women's motivation to use every means to keep their children healthy. Yet in settings where gender discrimination exists most strongly, increasing availability and information may not be enough to reach the under immunised. Programmes must actively be designed to include mitigation measures to facilitate women's access to immunisation services if we hope to improve immunisation coverage. Gender inequality needs to be addressed on structural, community and household levels if the number of unvaccinated children is to substantially decrease.

  4. Intestinal helminthes and/or Toxocara infection are unrelated to anti-HBs titers in seven-year-old children vaccinated at birth with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Marisa B C L; Fragoso, Roberta; Foletto, Silvio; Lemos, Elenice M; Pereira, Fausto E L

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the possible effect of nematode infection on anti-HBs antibody levels in the serum of seven-year-old schoolchildren vaccinated at birth with the recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. Anti-HBs and anti HBc antibodies were evaluated in the sera of 100 schoolchildren with at least one intestinal nematode and/or a positive serological reaction for anti-Toxocara antibodies and in 95 schoolchildren without intestinal helminthiasis or serum anti-Toxocara antibodies. Both groups were from public elementary schools located on the urban periphery of Vitória, ES, Brazil. Among these 195 children, the median anti-HBs antibody titer was 31.3 IU/ml and the frequency of titers less than 10 IU/ml was 33.8% (95% CI: 27.1-40.4%). There were no significant differences between the medians of anti-HBs titers or the frequency of titers less than 10 IU/ml between the groups with or without helminthes (29.5 and 32.9 IU/ml and 33 and 34.7%, respectively; p>0.05). Even when the children with intestinal nematodes and/or anti-Toxocara antibodies and with blood eosinophil counts over 600/mm(3) were compared with children without infection from intestinal nematodes and without anti-Toxocara antibodies, with blood eosinophil counts less than 400 eosinophils/mm(3), these differences were not significant. None of the children presented anti-HBc antibodies. In conclusion, infections with intestinal nematodes and/or the presence of anti-Toxocara antibodies did not interfere with the anti-HBs antibody titers in seven-year-old children vaccinated at birth with the recombinant hepatitis B vaccine.

  5. Communicating with parents of children with autism about vaccines and complementary and alternative approaches.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vidya Bhushan

    2010-05-01

    Despite incontrovertible evidence that vaccines do not cause autism, some parents continue to refuse them and many parents of children with autism seek hope in unproven and potentially harmful complementary and alternative (CAM) approaches. This commentary explores the reasons for such behaviors and proposes that pediatricians may support parents in their pursuit of hope in unproven treatments as long as these are not potentially harmful to the child or prohibitively expensive. While respecting parental autonomy and hope the pediatricians should share with parents their concerns about lack of scientific evidence about CAM and potential for harm by some approaches.

  6. Influenza epidemiology, vaccine coverage and vaccine effectiveness in children admitted to sentinel Australian hospitals in 2014: the Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN).

    PubMed

    Blyth, Christopher C; Macartney, Kristine K; Hewagama, Saliya; Senenayake, Sanjaya; Friedman, N Deborah; Simpson, Graham; Upham, John; Kotsimbos, Tom; Kelly, Paul; Cheng, Allen C

    2016-07-28

    The Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN) is a sentinel hospital-based surveillance programme operating in all states and territories in Australia. We summarise the epidemiology of children hospitalised with laboratory-confirmed influenza in 2014 and reports on the effectiveness of inactivated trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) in children. In this observational study, cases were defined as children admitted with acute respiratory illness (ARI) with influenza confirmed by PCR. Controls were hospitalised children with ARI testing negative for influenza. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated as 1 minus the odds ratio of vaccination in influenza positive cases compared with test-negative controls using conditional logistic regression models. From April until October 2014, 402 children were admitted with PCR-confirmed influenza. Of these, 28% were aged < 1 year, 16% were Indigenous, and 39% had underlying conditions predisposing to severe influenza. Influenza A was detected in 90% of cases of influenza; influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was the most frequent subtype (109/141 of subtyped cases) followed by A(H3N2) (32/141). Only 15% of children with influenza received antiviral therapy. The adjusted VE of one or more doses of TIV for preventing hospitalised influenza was estimated at 55.5% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 11.6-77.6%). Effectiveness against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 was high (91.6% , 95% CI: 36.0-98.9%) yet appeared poor against H3N2. In summary, the 2014 southern hemisphere TIV was moderately effective against severe influenza in children. Significant VE was observed against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09.

  7. The impact of BCG vaccination on tuberculin skin test responses in children is age dependent: evidence to be considered when screening children for tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, James A; Paton, James; Nademi, Zohreh; Keane, Denis; Williams, Bhanu; Williams, Amanda; Welch, Steven B; Liebeschutz, Sue; Riddell, Anna; Bernatoniene, Jolanta; Patel, Sanjay; Martinez-Alier, Nuria; McMaster, Paddy; Kampmann, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Background Following exposure to TB, contacts are screened to target preventive treatment at those at high risk of developing TB. The UK has recently revised its recommendations for screening and now advises a 5 mm tuberculin skin test (TST) cut-off irrespective of age or BCG status. We sought to evaluate the impact of BCG on TST responses in UK children exposed to TB and the performance of different TST cut-offs to predict interferon γ release assay (IGRA) positivity. Methods Children <15 years old were recruited from 11 sites in the UK between January 2011 and December 2014 if exposed in their home to a source case with sputum smear or culture positive TB. Demographic details were collected and TST and IGRA undertaken. The impact of BCG vaccination on TST positivity was evaluated in IGRA-negative children, as was the performance of different TST cut-offs to predict IGRA positivity. Results Of 422 children recruited (median age 69 months; IQR: 32–113 months), 300 (71%) had been vaccinated with BCG. BCG vaccination affected the TST response in IGRA-negative children less than 5 years old but not in older children. A 5 mm TST cut-off demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity in BCG-unvaccinated children, and an excellent negative predictive value but was associated with low specificity (62.7%; 95% CI 56.1% to 69.0%) in BCG-vaccinated children. For BCG-vaccinated children, a 10 mm cut-off provided a high negative predictive value (97.7%; 95% CI 94.2% to 99.4%) with the positive predictive value increasing with increasing age of the child. Discussion BCG vaccination had little impact on TST size in children over 5 years of age. The revised TST cut-off recommended in the recent revision to the UK TB guidelines demonstrates good sensitivity but is associated with impaired specificity in BCG-vaccinated children. PMID:27335104

  8. Effectiveness of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine against vaccine-type invasive disease among children in Uruguay: an evaluation using existing data.

    PubMed

    Picón, Teresa; Alonso, Lucía; García Gabarrot, Gabriela; Speranza, Noelia; Casas, Mariana; Arrieta, Fernando; Camou, Teresa; Rosa, Raquel; De Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Verani, Jennifer Rabke

    2013-07-02

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced into the routine immunization program in Uruguay in March 2008 with a 2-dose primary series (given at 2 and 4 months) plus a booster (at 12 months) and a catch-up campaign (two doses given at 15 and 17 months). We used a case-control methodology and existing laboratory surveillance and immunization registry data from Uruguay to evaluate PCV7 effectiveness against vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (VT-IPD). Cases of VT-IPD (with pneumococcus obtained from a normally sterile site) were identified through the National Reference Laboratory. Age- and neighborhood-matched controls were obtained through a national immunization registry in which all children are enrolled at birth regardless of vaccine receipt; all eligible controls were included. Immunization status of cases and controls was assessed through the immunization registry, and conditional logistic regression was used to calculate PCV7 effectiveness. Between April 2008 and February 2010, 44 cases of VT-IPD among children<5 years were identified; 43 (98%) of those children were located in the registry. Among located case patients, 7 (16.3%) were age-eligible to have received at least one dose of PCV7. A total of 637 matched controls were included. Vaccine effectiveness was 91.3% (95% CI: 46.4, 98.6) for ≥ 1 PCV7 doses and 94.8% (95% CI: 43.1, 99.5) for ≥ 2 PCV7 doses. Using existing data we demonstrated high effectiveness of PCV7 against VT-IPD in Uruguay-a middle-income country using a 2-dose primary series plus a booster dose and a limited catch-up campaign. These data also highlight the utility of surveillance and high-quality immunization registries for evaluating the effectiveness of vaccines.

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of rotavirus vaccination among Libyan children using a simple economic model

    PubMed Central

    Alkoshi, Salem; Maimaiti, Namaitijiang; Dahlui, Maznah

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotavirus infection is a major cause of childhood diarrhea in Libya. The objective of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in that country. Methods We used a published decision tree model that has been adapted to the Libyan situation to analyze a birth cohort of 160,000 children. The evaluation of diarrhea events in three public hospitals helped to estimate the rotavirus burden. The economic analysis was done from two perspectives: health care provider and societal. Univariate sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess uncertainty in some values of the variables selected. Results The three hospitals received 545 diarrhea patients aged≤5 with 311 (57%) rotavirus positive test results during a 9-month period. The societal cost for treatment of a case of rotavirus diarrhea was estimated at US$ 661/event. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio with a vaccine price of US$ 27 per course was US$ 8,972 per quality-adjusted life year gained from the health care perspective. From a societal perspective, the analysis shows cost savings of around US$ 16 per child. Conclusion The model shows that rotavirus vaccination could be economically a very attractive intervention in Libya. PMID:25499622

  10. Poor memory B cell generation contributes to non-protective responses to DTaP vaccine antigens in otitis-prone children.

    PubMed

    Basha, S; Pichichero, M E

    2015-12-01

    We recently identified a cohort of children with recurrent episodes of acute otitis media (AOM) who fail to generate protective antibody titres to otopathogens and several vaccine antigens. In this study we determined the antibody levels against DTaP vaccine antigens, diphtheria toxoid (DT), tetanus toxoid (TT) and acellular pertussis toxoid (PT) in sera from 15 stringently defined otitis-prone (sOP) children and 20 non-otitis-prone (NOP) children. We found significantly lower concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies against vaccine antigens in the serum of sOP children compared to age-matched NOP children. To elucidate immunological cellular responses to the vaccines in these children, we investigated memory B cell responses to DTaP vaccination. We used fluorescently conjugated vaccine antigens to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells and examined the frequency of antigen-specific CD19(+) CD27(+) memory B cells in the peripheral blood. sOP children showed a significantly lower percentage of antigen-specific CD19(+) CD27(+) memory B cells than NOP children. We also found a linear correlation between the frequencies of memory B cells and circulating IgG titres for DT, TT and PT proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show significant differences in memory B cell responses to DTaP vaccine antigens and their correlation with the circulating antibodies in young children with recurrent AOM.

  11. Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination in prevention of hospital admissions for rotavirus gastroenteritis among young children in Belgium: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Braeckman, Tessa; Van Herck, Koen; Meyer, Nadia; Pirçon, Jean-Yves; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse; Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Azou, Myriam; Capiau, Heidi; De Koster, Jan; Maernoudt, Anne-Sophie; Raes, Marc; Verdonck, Lutgard; Verghote, Marc; Vergison, Anne; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Van Ranst, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccination among young children in Belgium. Design Prospective case-control study. Setting Random sample of 39 Belgian hospitals, February 2008 to June 2010. Participants 215 children admitted to hospital with rotavirus gastroenteritis confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and 276 age and hospital matched controls. All children were of an eligible age to have received rotavirus vaccination (that is, born after 1 October 2006 and aged ≥14 weeks). Main outcome measure Vaccination status of children admitted to hospital with rotavirus gastroenteritis and matched controls. Results 99 children (48%) admitted with rotavirus gastroenteritis and 244 (91%) controls had received at least one dose of any rotavirus vaccine (P<0.001). The monovalent rotavirus vaccine accounted for 92% (n=594) of all rotavirus vaccine doses. With hospital admission as the outcome, the unadjusted effectiveness of two doses of the monovalent rotavirus vaccine was 90% (95% confidence interval 81% to 95%) overall, 91% (75% to 97%) in children aged 3-11 months, and 90% (76% to 96%) in those aged ≥12 months. The G2P[4] genotype accounted for 52% of cases confirmed by polymerase chain reaction with eligible matched controls. Vaccine effectiveness was 85% (64% to 94%) against G2P[4] and 95% (78% to 99%) against G1P[8]. In 25% of cases confirmed by polymerase chain reaction with eligible matched controls, there was reported co-infection with adenovirus, astrovirus and/or norovirus. Vaccine effectiveness against co-infected cases was 86% (52% to 96%). Effectiveness of at least one dose of any rotavirus vaccine (intention to vaccinate analysis) was 91% (82% to 95%). Conclusions Rotavirus vaccination is effective for the prevention of admission to hospital for rotavirus gastroenteritis among young children in Belgium, despite the high prevalence of G2P[4] and viral co-infection. PMID:22875947

  12. Impact of infant and preschool pertussis vaccinations on memory B-cell responses in children at 4 years of age.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Lotte H; de Rond, Lia G H; Oztürk, Kemal; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-08-05

    Whooping cough, caused by Bordetella pertussis, is reemerging in the vaccinated population. Antibody levels to pertussis antigens wane rapidly after both whole-cell (wP) and acellular pertussis (aP) vaccination and protection may largely depend on long-term B- and T-cell immunity. We studied the effect of wP and aP infant priming at 2, 3, 4 and 11 months according to the Dutch immunization program on pertussis-specific memory B-cell responses before and after a booster vaccination with either a high- or low-pertussis dose vaccine at 4 years of age. Purified B-cells were characterized by FACS-analysis and after polyclonal stimulation, memory B-cells were detected by ELISPOT-assays specific for pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin and pertactin. Before and after the booster, higher memory B-cell responses were measured in aP primed children compared with wP primed children. In contrast with antibody levels, no dose-effect was observed on the numbers of memory B-cell responses. In aP primed children a fifth high-dose aP vaccination tended to induce even lower memory B-cell responses than a low-dose aP booster. In both wP and aP primed children, the number of memory B-cells increased after the booster and correlated with the pertussis-specific antibody concentrations and observed affinity maturation. This study indicates that aP vaccinations in the first year of life induce higher pertussis-specific memory B-cell responses in children 4 years of age compared with Dutch wP primary vaccinations. Since infant aP vaccinations have improved protection against whooping cough in children despite waning antibody levels, this suggests that an enhanced memory B-cell pool induction may have an important role in protection. However, the pertussis-dose of the preschool booster needs to be considered depending on the vaccine used for priming to optimize long-term protection against whooping cough.

  13. Effects of hepatitis B vaccine boosters on anti-HBs-negative children after primary immunization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shunshun; Ren, Jingjing; Li, Qian; Jiang, Zhenggang; Chen, Yongdi; Xu, Kaijin; Ruan, Bing; Yang, Shigui; Xie, Tiansheng; Yang, Linna; Li, Jing; Yao, Jun

    2016-12-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the changes of hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) titer after booster vaccinations in 5-15-year-old children with negative antibodies (<10 mIU/mL). 225 subjects (mean age, 9.28 ± 2.95 years) included in the study consisted of 123 males and 102 females, with a complete hepatitis B vaccination during infancy. The participants were divided into 3 groups according to their pre-booster anti-HBs level: Group I, <0.1 mIU/mL; Group II, 0.1 to <1.0 mIU/mL; Group III, 1.0 to <10.0 mIU/mL. All the participants were administered 3 doses of booster hepatitis B vaccination (0-1-6 month, 20 µg), and changes in the levels of antibodies were examined at 4 time-points (one month after the first and the third dose, one year and 5 years after the third dose). The seroprotective rate (defined as anti-HBs ≥10.0 mIU/mL) among 225 subjects at the 4 time-points were 93.8%, 100%, 83.6% and 73.4%, respectively (χ(2) = 90.29, p < 0.05). The seroprotective rate (≥10 mIU/mL) and anti-HBs geometric mean titer (GMT) in Group III were always higher than those in the other 2 groups (all p < 0.05). The immune effect of a 3 -dose booster revaccination is good, and the booster-induced immune response was correlated with the pre-booster titer level, and ≥1.0 mIU/mL ensuring a robust positive response, whereas titers below this value may indicate the need for a course of booster vaccination.

  14. Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Carriage among Healthy Children in Cyprus Post Widespread Simultaneous Implementation of PCV10 and PCV13 Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Efstathiou, Elisavet; Alexandrou, Maria; Panayiotou, Loukia; Zachariadou, Chrystalla; Petrou, Panayiotis; Papaevangelou, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the incidence of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage, serotype distribution and antibiotic resistance profile of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal isolates in healthy children aged 6 to 36 months following the implementation of conjugate vaccines. A nasopharyngeal swab was collected from 1105 healthy children following a stratified random sampling between September 2013 and April 2014. Demographics, vaccination status and data on possible risk factors were recorded. Isolates were serotyped and tested for antibiotic susceptibility. The nasopharyngeal carriage rate was 25.3%. Among 1105 children enrolled, 393 had received PCV13 and 685 PCV10. The prevailing isolated serotypes were: 23A (14.3%), 15A (8.9%), 6C (8.6%), 23B (7.5%), 19A (5.4%) and 15B (5%). The proportion of non-vaccine serotypes, PCV10 serotypes, PCV13 additional serotypes (3, 6A, 19A) was 76.8%, 2.1% and 10.4% respectively. Although children, who were fully or partially vaccinated with PCV13, were 63% less likely to be colonized with additional PCV13 serotypes compared to those vaccinated with PCV10, the difference is not significant (95%Cl = 0.14–1.02, p = 0.053). The highest antibiotic non-susceptible rates were found for erythromycin (28.2%) and penicillin (27.9%). The overall multidrug resistance rate was 13.2%, with serotypes 24F (4/6), 15A (14/25) and 19A (6/15) being the main contributors. Carriage rate was similar between children vaccinated with PCV10 or PCV13. The high incidence of 15A serotype which is also multidrug resistant should be underlined. Ongoing surveillance is needed to monitor the dynamics on nasopharyngeal carriage. PMID:27706247

  15. Clinical Studies of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Conjugate Vaccines in Adults and Young Children.

    PubMed

    Szu, Shousun Chen; Ahmed, Amina

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric immunization has been the most effective measure to prevent and reduce the burden of infectious diseases in children. The recent inclusion of pneumococcal and meningococcal polysaccharide conjugates in infant immunization further reinforces their importance. Currently there is no human vaccine against enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections. This review focuses on the human EHEC vaccine that has been studied clinically, in particular, the polysaccharide conjugate against E. coli O157. The surface polysaccharide antigen, O-specific polysaccharide, was linked to rEPA, recombinant exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In adults and children 2 to 5 years old, O157-rEPA conjugates, shown to be safe, induced high levels of antilipopolysaccharide immunoglobulin G with bactericidal activities against E. coli O157, a functional bioassay that mimics the killing of inoculum in vivo. A similar construct using the B subunit of Shiga toxin (Stx) 1 as the carrier protein elicited both bactericidal and toxin-neutralizing antibodies in mice. So far there is no clinical study of Stx-based human vaccine. Passive immunization of Stx-specific antibodies with humanized, chimeric, or human monoclonal antibodies, produced in transgenic mice, showed promising data in animal models and offered high prospects. Demonstrations of their safety and effectiveness in treating hemolytic-uremic syndrome or patients with EHEC infections are under way, and results are much anticipated. For future development, other virulence factors such as the nontoxic Stx B subunit or intimin should be included, either as carrier protein in conjugates or as independent components. The additional antigens from O157 may provide broader coverage to non-O157 Stx-producing E. coli and facilitate both preventive and therapeutic treatment.

  16. Anti-HBs profiles in children treated for neoplastic disease who had been vaccinated against hepatitis B postnatally or as infants.

    PubMed

    Koltan, S; Koltan, A; Wysocki, M; Debski, R; Styczynski, J

    2005-05-01

    Children with cancer are a risk group for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In Poland, the initiation of a national HBV vaccination programme in neonates and infants in 1995 has contributed to the prevention of HBV infection in children treated for neoplastic diseases. The objective of this study was to analyse the anti-HBs pattern and occurrence of HBV infections in children with cancer who had been vaccinated during infancy. The study included 96 children divided into three groups: Group A, children who had received a full vaccination course with an initial level of anti-HBs >/=100 IU/L; Group B, children who had received a full vaccination course with anti-HBs <100 IU/L, for whom an additional dose of vaccine was administered; and Group C, children who had further immunoprophylaxis because they did not complete the vaccination course before cancer diagnosis. A protective level of anti-HBs after the full vaccination programme was found in 80.5% of children after three months, 74.2% after six months, 61.5% after 12 months and 78.6% after 18 months. Among children who produced antibodies, a slow decrease in the level of anti-HBs was observed. It was still protective during follow-up in Group A, but occasionally fell below 100 IU/L in Group B. In Group C, five of 11 subjects had a protective level of anti-HBs throughout follow-up. Of 28 children who showed the presence of HBsAg during follow-up, 23 eradicated the virus. In children with cancer vaccinated against HBV according to the vaccination schedule, the immune response maintains a protective level of anti-HBs in more than 60% of cases, despite immunosuppression.

  17. Statewide School-located Influenza Vaccination Program for Children 5–13 Years of Age, Hawaii, USA

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Carl; He, Howard; Gaynor, Kate; Sakamoto, Steve; Nagao, Marcia; Mendez, Lisa; Park, Sarah Y.

    2010-01-01

    New guidance recommends annual influenza vaccination for all children 5–18 years of age in the United States. During 2007–2008, Hawaii offered inactivated and live attenuated influenza vaccine at school-located clinics for grades kindergarten through 8. Most (90%) public and private schools participated, and 622 clinics were conducted at 340 schools. Of 132,775 children 5–13 years of age, 60,760 (46%) were vaccinated. The proportion vaccinated peaked at 54% for those 6 years of age and declined for older cohorts. More than 90% of schoolchildren transited the clinic in <10 minutes. A total of 16,920 staff-hours were expended; estimated cost per dose administered was $27 and included vaccine purchase and administration, health staffing resources, printing costs, data management, and promotion. This program demonstrates the feasibility of conducting mass school-located influenza vaccination programs in public and private schools statewide, as might be indicated to respond to pandemic influenza. PMID:20113554

  18. Tolerability of modified tick-borne encephalitis vaccine FSME-IMMUN "NEW" in children: results of post-marketing surveillance.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Borislava G; Loew-Baselli, Alexandra; Fritsch, Sandor; Poellabauer, Eva Maria; Vartian, Nina; Rinke, Ingeborg; Ehrlich, Hartmut J

    2003-01-30

    A new, highly purified, inactivated tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccine FSME-IMMUN "NEW" has been developed by Baxter using a production virus seed derived from chick embryo cells instead of mouse brain. In clinical trials, the vaccine was shown to be highly immunogenic and well tolerated in adults and children. Following licensure in 2001, the tolerability of half the adult dose of FSME-IMMUN "NEW" (1.2 microg antigen/0.25 ml) was investigated in a post-marketing surveillance in 1899 children aged 6 months to 12 years. Rectal body temperature was measured daily for 3 days after the first vaccination. An overall fever rate of 20.3% (95% CI=18.5; 22%) was observed, which was mostly mild in nature (>38.0 to vaccine at a dose of 1.2 microg antigen/0.25 ml is safe for the first vaccination in children.

  19. Feedback of research findings for vaccine trials: experiences from two malaria vaccine trials involving healthy children on the Kenyan Coast.

    PubMed

    Gikonyo, Caroline; Kamuya, Dorcas; Mbete, Bibi; Njuguna, Patricia; Olotu, Ally; Bejon, Philip; Marsh, Vicki; Molyneux, Sassy

    2013-04-01

    Internationally, calls for feedback of findings to be made an 'ethical imperative' or mandatory have been met with both strong support and opposition. Challenges include differences in issues by type of study and context, disentangling between aggregate and individual study results, and inadequate empirical evidence on which to draw. In this paper we present data from observations and interviews with key stakeholders involved in feeding back aggregate study findings for two Phase II malaria vaccine trials among children under the age of 5 years old on the Kenyan Coast. In our setting, feeding back of aggregate findings was an appreciated set of activities. The inclusion of individual results was important from the point of view of both participants and researchers, to reassure participants of trial safety, and to ensure that positive results were not over-interpreted and that individual level issues around blinding and control were clarified. Feedback sessions also offered an opportunity to re-evaluate and re-negotiate trial relationships and benefits, with potentially important implications for perceptions of and involvement in follow-up work for the trials and in future research. We found that feedback of findings is a complex but key step in a continuing set of social interactions between community members and research staff (particularly field staff who work at the interface with communities), and among community members themselves; a step which needs careful planning from the outset. We agree with others that individual and aggregate results need to be considered separately, and that for individual results, both the nature and value of the information, and the context, including social relationships, need to be taken into account.

  20. Vaccines for Children: Critical Issues in Design and Implementation. Report to Congressional Requesters [and] Vaccines for Children: Major Implementation Hurdles Remain. Testimony of Kwai-Cheung Chan, before the Subcommittee on Labor, Health, Human Services, and Education, Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Program Evaluation and Methodology Div.

    In response to congressional request, this report provides information on the implementation plans developed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) for the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program. Introductory material indicates that the VFC was created to increase vaccine coverage levels nationwide by creating an entitlement to free vaccine for…

  1. [Suspected adverse reactions after vaccination. Results from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents. Part 2: predictors of parental reporting of suspected adverse reactions after vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Poethko-Müller, C; Atzpodien, K; Schmitz, R; Schlaud, M

    2011-03-01

    Each method to monitor vaccine safety has strengths and limitations. Therefore, vaccine safety monitoring should rely on different types of data sources. Methods commonly rely on patient-reported adverse reactions. Little is, however, known about factors that may affect the probability with which patients report adverse reactions to vaccines. From 2003-2006, the representative National Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents ("Kinder- und Jugendgesundheitssurvey", KiGGS) retrospectively collected information about vaccines, vaccination dates, and suspected vaccine related adverse reactions from a total of 17,641 participants (<17 years). Poorly tolerated vaccinations were more likely reported from parents living in former West Germany compared to former East Germany (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.08-2.39), parents of children with special health care needs (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.08-2.04), and from parents reporting reservations against vaccinations (OR 3.29; 95% CI 2.28-4.75). Parental reporting of adverse vaccine reactions appears to be associated with parental perception and assessment of possible adverse vaccine reactions, as well as with the parents' attitude towards immunization in general.

  2. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum growth inhibition among Malian children immunized with a blood-stage malaria vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kouriba, Bourema; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Angov, Evelina; Coulibaly, Drissa; Diarra, Issa; Daou, Modibo; Niangaly, Amadou; Blackwelder, William C.; Wu, Yukun; Cohen, Joe; Ballou, W. Ripley; Vekemans, Johan; Lanar, David E.; Dutta, Sheetij; Diggs, Carter; Soisson, Lorraine; Heppner, D. Gray; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.; Thera, Mahamadou A.

    2017-01-01

    The blood-stage malaria vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A, comprised of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the adjuvant system AS02A, had strain-specific efficacy against clinical malaria caused by P. falciparum with the vaccine strain 3D7 AMA1 sequence. To evaluate a potential correlate of protection, we measured the ability of participant sera to inhibit growth of 3D7 and FVO strains in vitro using high-throughput growth inhibition assay (GIA) testing. Sera from 400 children randomized to receive either malaria vaccine or a control rabies vaccine were assessed at baseline and over two annual malaria transmission seasons after immunization. Baseline GIA against vaccine strain 3D7 and FVO strain was similar in both groups, but more children in the malaria vaccine group than in the control group had 3D7 and FVO GIA activity ≥15% 30 days after the last vaccination (day 90) (49% vs. 16%, p<0.0001; and 71.8% vs. 60.4%, p = 0.02). From baseline to day 90, 3D7 GIA in the vaccine group was 7.4 times the mean increase in the control group (p<0.0001). In AMA1 vaccinees, 3D7 GIA activity subsequently returned to baseline one year after vaccination (day 364) and did not correlate with efficacy in the extended efficacy time period to day 730. In Cox proportional hazards regression models with time-varying covariates, there was a slight suggestion of an association between 3D7 GIA activity and increased risk of clinical malaria between day 90 and day 240. We conclude that vaccination with this AMA1-based malaria vaccine increased inhibition of parasite growth, but this increase was not associated with allele-specific efficacy in the first malaria season. These results provide a framework for testing functional immune correlates of protection against clinical malaria in field trials, and will help to guide similar analyses for next-generation malaria vaccines. Clinical trials registry: This clinical trial was registered on clinicaltrials.gov, registry

  3. Using the Immunization Information System to Determine Vaccination Coverage Rates among Children Aged 1–7 Years: A Report from Zhejiang Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Hu, Yu; Zhong, Yanpeng; Chen, Yaping; Tang, Xuewen; Guo, Jing; Shen, Lingzhi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Zhejiang Immunization Information System (ZJIIS) was established in 2004. This study described the coverage rates of NIP vaccines in Zhejiang Province using the ZJIIS. Methods: Children aged 1–7 years (born from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2011) registered in ZJIIS were enrolled in this study. All immunization records were obtained from the ZJIIS on 31 December 2012. The cohort method had been used for identifying trends and patterns in vaccine administration. Immunization coverage estimates were analyzed for both individual NIP vaccines and “Fully immunized” by age group, birth cohort, immigration status, and geography area. We also examined the timeliness vaccination for the 2010 birth cohort. Results: A total of 3,579,896 children were registered in ZJIIS. All the vaccines and doses which scheduled to be given at ≤12 months of age exceeded 90%. There was substantial decrease trend in the vaccines scheduled at >12 months of age and most of these vaccines were below 90%. The coverage of migrant children was lower than for resident children and the coverage of WenZhou (WZ), Zhoushan (ZS) and TaiZhou (TZ) was lower than other municipalities for most of vaccines across all the birth cohorts. Nearly 20%–30% of children of 2010 birth cohort delayed for the primary series vaccination scheduled at ≤12 months of age, especially among migrant children. Conclusions: The ZJIIS is useful in tracking vaccine coverage of children aged 1–7 years and the data provided by ZJIIS reflected the fact that NIP delivery was improving in Zhejiang Province, while identifying some areas for improvement. We recommend continuing surveillance to estimate of vaccine coverage through ZJIIS. Immunization strategies such as Assessment, Feedback, Incentives, and Exchange program, reminder/recall activity, home visits, school entry requirements and school-based clinics could be used to reach a higher coverage of the population. PMID:24603495

  4. Two consecutive randomized controlled pertussis booster trials in children initially vaccinated in infancy with an acellular vaccine: The first with a five-component Tdap vaccine to 5-year olds and the second with five- or monocomponent Tdap vaccines at age 14-15 years.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, R M; Gustafsson, L; Hallander, H O; Ljungman, M; Olin, P; Gothefors, L; Nilsson, L; Netterlid, E

    2015-07-17

    Prior study children from a DTaP efficacy trial were recruited at ages 5 and 15 years to randomized booster trials addressing immunogenicity and reactogenicity; 475 preschool children received mixed or separate injections of a reduced antigen vaccine (Tdap5, Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and an inactivated polio vaccine, and 230 adolescents received the same or another booster vaccine (Tdap1, SSI, Denmark). Pre-vaccination antibody concentrations against pertussis antigens were significantly higher at 15 than 5 years of age, probably due to natural boosting between the studies. Tdap5 induced comparable anti-PT concentrations at both ages, but antibody responses were significantly higher to filamentous haemagglutinin, pertactin and fimbriae 2/3 in adolescents. As expected, a higher amount of PT (Tdap1, 20μg) induced a stronger anti-PT response than a lower amount (Tdap5, 2.5μg). The frequency of adverse events was low and there were no serious adverse reactions. All local reactions had an early onset and a short duration. A large swelling or redness of more than half of the upper arm circumference was reported in 8/475 5-year-olds and in 6/230 15-year-olds. Children vaccinated with Tdap5 reported more moderate pain in adolescence than at preschool age, whereas itching was only reported in preschool children. Sweden introduced DTaP vaccines in 1996 after a 17-year hiatus with no general pertussis vaccination and pertussis was still endemic at the time of the studies. The frequency of adverse events was nevertheless low in both preschool children and adolescents and antibody responses were adequate. These studies document immunogenicity and reactogenicity in a trial cohort consecutively vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines from infancy to adolescence. The adolescent study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov on 26 March 2009 (NCT00870350).

  5. Parental concern about vaccine safety in Canadian children partially immunized at age 2: a multivariable model including system level factors.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Shannon E; Schopflocher, Donald P; Vaudry, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Children who begin but do not fully complete the recommended series of childhood vaccines by 2 y of age are a much larger group than those who receive no vaccines. While parents who refuse all vaccines typically express concern about vaccine safety, it is critical to determine what influences parents of 'partially' immunized children. This case-control study examined whether parental concern about vaccine safety was responsible for partial immunization, and whether other personal or system-level factors played an important role. A random sample of parents of partially and completely immunized 2 y old children were selected from a Canadian regional immunization registry and completed a postal survey assessing various personal and system-level factors. Unadjusted odds ratios (OR) and adjusted ORs (aOR) were calculated with logistic regression. While vaccine safety concern was associated with partial immunization (OR 7.338, 95% CI 4.138-13.012), other variables were more strongly associated and reduced the strength of the relationship between concern and partial immunization in multivariable analysis (aOR 2.829, 95% CI 1.151-6.957). Other important factors included perceived disease susceptibility and severity (aOR 4.629, 95% CI 2.017-10.625), residential mobility (aOR 3.908, 95% CI 2.075-7.358), daycare use (aOR 0.310, 95% CI 0.144-0.671), number of needles administered at each visit (aOR 7.734, 95% CI 2.598-23.025) and access to a regular physician (aOR 0.219, 95% CI 0.057-0.846). While concern about vaccine safety may be addressed through educational strategies, this study suggests that additional program and policy-level strategies may positively impact immunization uptake.

  6. Parents' vaccine beliefs: a study of experiences and attitudes among parents of children in private pre-schools.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Even among highly vaccinated populations such as Rhode Island (RI), there exists a vulnerability to disease outbreaks. This is the basis for requiring proof of immunization for enrollment into school. Although RI grants medical, temporary, and religious vaccination exemptions, little is known about the beliefs of RI parents who seek exemptions for their children. The purpose of this small-scale, cross-sectional, Web-based survey is to describe the vaccine behaviors and beliefs of parents of children attending private pre-school in Providence, RI. In spite of limitations, the results provided the intended baseline assessment of the target population. While such findings should be interpreted with caution, they can be used as the foundation for future research and interventions.

  7. Vaccine-Induced Anti-HBs Level in 5-6 Year-Old Malnourished Children

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mehran; Raee, Ali; Baghianimoghadam, Behnam; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Malnutrition is the most common cause of immune deficiency. It results in reduced secretion of T-cells and B-cell-stimulating factors leading to declining of special immunoglobulins. On the other hand, hepatitis B, as a major world health problem, can be prevented effectively by vaccination. Three doses of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine induce protective levels of anti-hepatitis B surface (anti-HBs) in 95% of healthy children. This level decreases gradually over time. Objectives The goal of this study was to assess anti-HBs in malnourished children, who confronted to some degrees of immune deficiency. Patients and Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted during May to August 2010 in therapeutic clinics of Yazd, Iran. Samples were selected simply and consecutively among 5-6 year-old children with a history of three doses of HBV vaccine in infancy. On the basis of World Health Organization’s definition on malnutrition, which considers anthropometric measurements, malnourished children entered the study. Totally 83 cases (37 boys and 46 girls) were gathered and classified into three groups of mild, moderate, and severe malnutrition. One milliliter of venous blood was taken and anti-HBs were tested by enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results Overall, seroprotection rate and geometric mean titer (GMT) of anti-HBs were 60.2% and 15.47 ± 10.92 mIU/mL, respectively. Seroprotection rate was 71.4%, 55.2%, and 72.7% in mild, moderate, and severe malnourished children, respectively. GMT was 30.78 mIU/mL, 12.15 mIU/mL, and 22.95 mIU/mL in these groups, respectively. None of these two indices were significant in these groups (P = 0.471, P = 0.364). Seroprotection rate and GMT were 54.1% and 13.26 ± 11.59 mIU/mL in boys, and 65.2% and 17.5 ± 10.59 mIU/mL in girls, respectively, showing no significant relationship with gender (P = 0.302, P = 0.602). Lowest seroprotection rate was in stunted cases (47.1%) and highest in wasted children (77

  8. Safety and Immunogenicity of Human Serum Albumin-Free MMR Vaccine in US Children Aged 12–15 Months

    PubMed Central

    Mufson, Maurice A.; Diaz, Clemente; Leonardi, Michael; Harrison, Christopher J.; Grogg, Stanley; Carbayo, Antonio; Carlo-Torres, Simon; JeanFreau, Robert; Quintero-Del-Rio, Ana; Bautista, Gisele; Povey, Michael; Da Costa, Christopher; Nicholson, Ouzama; Innis, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Background M-M-RTMII (MMRII; Merck & Co) is currently the only measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine licensed in the United States. Another licensed vaccine would reinforce MMR supply. This study assessed the immunogenicity of a candidate vaccine (PriorixTM, GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines [MMR-RIT]) when used as a first dose among eligible children in the United States. Methods In this exploratory Phase-2, multicenter, observer-blind study, 1220 healthy subjects aged 12–15 months were randomized (3:3:3:3) and received 1 dose of 1 of 3 MMR-RIT lots with differing mumps virus titers (MMR-RIT-1 [4.8 log10]; MMR-RIT-2 [4.1 log10]; MMR-RIT-3 [3.7 log10] CCID50) or MMRII co-administered with hepatitis A vaccine (HAV), varicella vaccine (VAR) and 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). Immune response to measles, mumps, and rubella viruses was evaluated at Day 42 post-vaccination. Incidence of solicited injection site, general, and serious adverse events was assessed. Results Seroresponse rates for MMR vaccine viral components in MMR-RIT lots were 98.3–99.2% (measles), 89.7–90.7% (mumps), and 97.5–98.8% (rubella), and for MMRII were 99.6%, 91.1%, and 100%, respectively. Immune responses to HAV, VAR, and PCV7 were similar when co-administered with any of the 3 MMR-RIT lots or MMRII. There were no apparent differences in solicited or serious adverse events among the 4 groups. Conclusions Immune responses were above threshold levels for projected protection against the 3 viruses from MMR-RIT lots with differing mumps virus titers. MMR-RIT had an acceptable safety profile when co-administered with HAV, VAR, and PCV7. Clinical Trials Registration NCT00861744; etrack; 111870 PMID:26582873

  9. Serologic response after vaccination against influenza (A/H1N1)pdm09 in children with renal disease receiving oral immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiji; Saikusa, Tomoko; Katafuchi, Yuno; Ushijima, Kosuke; Ohtsu, Yasushi; Tsumura, Naoki; Ito, Yuhei

    2015-09-11

    A limited number of reports are available regarding the effect of the influenza vaccine in pediatric patients receiving steroid and immunosuppressant therapy. The influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine was administered to 15 children with renal disease who were receiving steroid and immunosuppressant therapy (treatment group) and 23 children with who were not receiving these drugs (non-treatment group). Titer transition of the hemagglutination inhibition antibody was compared between the 2 groups immediately before vaccination and 4 weeks and 6 months after vaccination. Multivariate analysis showed a significant correlation between geometric mean titer, SCR, and SPR with age, while no correlation was observed between treatment with immunosuppressant therapy and efficacy. No serious adverse reactions occurred after vaccination. This strain is not present in existing influenza vaccines, and A(H1N1)pdm09HA vaccination was administered alone in 2009. The children in this study had not previously been exposed to this strain. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of the A(H1N1)pdm09HA vaccine without the effects of vaccination or past infection with A(H1N1)pdm09HA or A(H3N2) vaccination in the previous year.

  10. Effect of Influenza Vaccination of Children on Infection Rate in Hutterite Communities: Follow-Up Study of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Biao; Russell, Margaret L.; Moss, Lorraine; Fonseca, Kevin; Earn, David J. D.; Aoki, Fred; Horsman, Gregory; Caeseele, Paul Van; Chokani, Khami; Vooght, Mark; Babiuk, Lorne; Webby, Richard; Walter, Stephen D.; Loeb, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background An earlier cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) of Hutterite colonies had shown that if more than 80% of children and adolescents were immunized with influenza vaccine there was a statistically significant reduction in laboratory-confirmed influenza among all unimmunized community members. We assessed the impact of this intervention for two additional influenza seasonal periods. Methods Follow-up data for two influenza seasonal periods of a cluster randomized trial involving 1053 Canadian children and adolescents aged 36 months to 15 years in Season 2 and 1014 in Season 3 who received the study vaccine, and 2805 community members in Season 2 and 2840 in Season 3 who did not receive the study vaccine. Follow-up for Season 2 began November 18, 2009 and ended April 25, 2010 while Season 3 extended from December 6, 2010 and ended May 27, 2011. Children were randomly assigned in a blinded manner according to community membership to receive either inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine or hepatitis A. The primary outcome was confirmed influenza A and B infection using RT-PCR assay. Due to the outbreak of 2009 H1N1 pandemic, data in Season 2 were excluded for analysis. Results For an analysis of the combined Season 1 and Season 3 data, among non-recipients (i.e., participants who did not receive study vaccines), 66 of the 2794 (2.4%) participants in the influenza vaccine colonies and 121 of the 2301 (5.3%) participants in the hepatitis A colonies had influenza confirmed by RT-PCR, for a protective effectiveness of 60% (95% CI, 6% to 83%; P = 0.04); among all study participants (i.e., including both those who received study vaccine and those who did not), 125 of the 3806 (3.3%) in the influenza vaccine colonies and 239 of the 3243 (7.4%) in the hepatitis A colonies had influenza confirmed by RT-PCR, for a protective effectiveness of 63% (95% CI, 5% to 85%; P = 0.04). Conclusion Immunizing children and adolescents with inactivated influenza vaccine can

  11. Routine childhood vaccination programme coverage, El Salvador, 2011-In search of timeliness.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Castaneda, Eduardo; Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Elas, Miguel; Baltrons, Rafael; Crespin-Elías, Elner Osmin; Pleitez, Oscar A Rivera; de Campos, María Isabel Quintanilla; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina

    2014-01-16

    While assessing immunization programmes, not only vaccination coverage is important, but also timely receipt of vaccines. We estimated both vaccination coverage and timeliness, as well as reasons for non-vaccination, and identified predictors of delayed or missed vaccination, for vaccines of the first two years of age, in El Salvador. We conducted a cluster survey among children aged 23-59 months. Caregivers were interviewed about the child immunization status and their attitudes towards immunization. Vaccination dates were obtained from children immunization cards at home or at health facilities. We referred to the 2006 vaccination schedule for children below two years: one dose of BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) at birth; rotavirus at two and four months; three doses of pentavalent - DTP (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis), hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) - and of oral poliomyelitis vaccine (polio) at two, four, and six months; first MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) at 12 months; and first boosters of DTP and OPV at 18 months. Timeliness was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis; Cox and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of vaccination. We surveyed 2550 children. Coverage was highest for BCG (991%; 95% CI: 98.8-99.5) and lowest for rotavirus, especially second dose (86.3%; 95% CI: 84.2-88.4). The first doses of MMR and DTP had 991% (95% CI: 98.5-99.6) and 977% (95% CI: 970-985), respectively. Overall coverage was 837% (95% CI: 81.4-86.0); 96.4% (95% CI: 95.4-97.5), excluding rotavirus. However, only 26.7% (95% CI: 24.7-28.8) were vaccinated within the age interval recommended by the Expanded Programme on Immunization. Being employed and using the bus for transport to the health facility were associated with age-inappropriate vaccinations; while living in households with only two residents and in the "Paracentral", "Occidental", and "Oriental" regions was associated with age-appropriate vaccinations. Vaccination coverage was high in El

  12. Reactogenicity, safety and immunogenicity of a protein-based pneumococcal vaccine in Gambian children aged 2-4 years: A phase II randomized study.

    PubMed

    Odutola, A; Ota, M O; Ogundare, E O; Antonio, M; Owiafe, P; Worwui, A; Greenwood, B; Alderson, M; Traskine, M; Verlant, V; Dobbelaere, K; Borys, D

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have been successful in preventing invasive pneumococcal disease but effectiveness has been challenged by replacement of vaccine serotypes with non-vaccine serotypes. Vaccines targeting common pneumococcal protein(s) found in most/all pneumococci may overcome this limitation. This phase II study assessed safety and immunogenicity of a new protein-based pneumococcal vaccine containing polysaccharide conjugates of 10 pneumococcal serotypes combined with pneumolysin toxoid(dPly) and pneumococcal histidine triad protein D(PhtD) (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30) in African children. 120 Gambian children (2-4 years, not previously vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae) randomized (1:1) received a single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 or PCV13. Adverse events occurring over 4 d post-vaccination were reported, and blood samples obtained pre- and 1-month post-vaccination. Serious adverse events were reported for 6 months post-vaccination. Solicited local and systemic adverse events were reported at similar frequency in each group. One child (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 group) reported a grade 3 local reaction to vaccination. Haematological and biochemical parameters seemed similar pre- and 1-month post-vaccination in each group. High pre-vaccination Ply and PhtD antibody concentrations were observed in each group, but only increased in PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees one month post-vaccination. One month post-vaccination, for each vaccine serotype ≥96.2% of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees had serotype-specific polysaccharide antibody concentrations ≥0.20µg/mL except serotypes 6B (80.8%) and 23F (65.4%), and ≥94.1% had OPA titres of ≥8 except serotypes 1 (51.9%), 5 (38.5%) and 6B (78.0%), within ranges seen in PCV13-vaccinated children. A single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccine, administered to Gambian children aged 2-4 y not previously vaccinated with a pneumococcal vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic.

  13. Subnormal and waning immunity to tetanus toxoid in previously vaccinated HIV-infected children and response to booster doses of the vaccine.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shahana A; Matin, Fazle

    2013-12-01

    Little is known regarding waning immunity to tetanus toxoid (TT) in HIV-infected children and the need for booster doses before the recommended interval of 5-10 years. Anti-tetanus antibodies were assessed by ELISA in 24 HIV-infected and 24 control children. A protective level (>0.1 IU/ml) of TT antibodies was observed in 62% of HIV-infected children and in 100% of controls. HIV-infected children with five doses had a significantly (p=0.01) lower prevalence of protective immunity compared to controls. Follow-up anti-TT antibody levels in nine HIV-infected children declined from 1.27 to 0.26 IU/ml, but levels did not decline in the seven controls; five of the seven (71%) children with a non-protective level of antibodies responded with a level>0.16 IU/ml following one booster dose of the vaccine. HIV-infected children may need TT boosters before the recommended 5-10 years.

  14. [Measurement of the in vitro immune response of live attenuated measles virus vaccine and antibody levels in 0 to 10-year-old children].

    PubMed

    Unalan, H; Ustaçelebi, S

    1985-10-01

    The present study was carried out in order to test the antigenic effectiveness of the live attenuated meales vaccine which is routinly employed in our country. Sera obtained from 11 children before and after measles vaccination were tested for measles antibodies by complement fixation and neutralization tests. Sera samples were also collected from 0-10 years old children with history of vaccination, passed measles infection and none at all. These sera were also tested for measles antibody by complement fixation test. Virus isolation and seroconversion studies in children who were admitted to the outpatient clinics of Hacettepe hospital is also presented in this communication.

  15. Assessment of Vaccine Exemptions among Wyoming School Children, 2009 and 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pride, Kerry R.; Geissler, Aimee L.; Kolasa, Maureen S.; Robinson, Byron; Van Houten, Clay; McClinton, Reginald; Bryan, Katie; Murphy, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    During 2010-2011, varicella vaccination was an added requirement for school entrance in Wyoming. Vaccination exemption rates were compared during the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 school years, and impacts of implementing a new childhood vaccine requirement were evaluated. All public schools, grades K-12, were required to report vaccination status of…

  16. Vaccine-associated Paralytic Poliomyelitis in Immunodeficient Children, Iran, 1995–2008

    PubMed Central

    Shahmahmoodi, Shohreh; Mamishi, Setareh; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Tabatabaie, Hamideh; Gooya, Mohammad Mehdi; Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Mousavi, Taha; Yousefi, Maryam; Farrokhi, Kobra; Mohammadpour, Masoud; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Nategh, Rakhshandeh

    2010-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) in immunodeficient infants, we reviewed all documented cases caused by immunodeficiency-associated vaccine-derived polioviruses in Iran from 1995 through 2008. Changing to an inactivated polio vaccine vaccination schedule and introduction of screening of neonates for immunodeficiencies could reduce the risk for VAPP infection. PMID:20587188

  17. Neurodevelopment of Amazonian children exposed to ethylmercury (from Thimerosal in vaccines) and methylmercury (from fish).

    PubMed

    Marques, Rejane C; Abreu, Luciana; Bernardi, José V E; Dórea, José G

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have addressed co-occurring methylmercury (MeHg) from maternal origin and ethylmercury (EtHg) from Thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCVs) during infant's neurodevelopment. We studied children (n=1139) from the Western Amazon based on combined (low, intermediate, and high) exposure to chronic MeHg from fish consumption and acute TCV- EtHg. Neurodevelopment outcomes were age of walking and age of talking, and the Bayley Scale of Infant Development (BSID). The Mental Developmental Index (MDI) and Psychomotor Developmental Index (PDI) were measured at six and 24 months of age. Median hair-Hg (HHg) at birth was 6.4µgg(-1) in mothers, and 1.94µgg(-1) in newborns; total (pregnancy and infancy) EtHg exposure ranged from 0 to 187.5µg. The combined (MeHg+EtHg) exposure showed significant differences for MDI but not for PDI; however, there was a significant decrease in both MDI and PDI scores at 24 months. The increase in BSID delays (scores <80) between six and 24 months was not discernible with regards to EtHg or MeHg exposure. We found a statistically significant increase in neurodevelopmental (BSID) delays related to the combined exposure to Hg (MeHg>EtHg). Neurodevelopment delays due to low-doses of organic mercury (albeit undiscernible) are not predictable but can be avoided by choosing low-Hg fish and providing Thimerosal-free vaccines.

  18. Enhanced memory B-cell immune responses after a second acellular pertussis booster vaccination in children 9 years of age.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Lotte H; Felderhof, Mariet K; Oztürk, Kemal; de Rond, Lia G H; van Houten, Marlies A; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-12-09

    Whooping cough has made its comeback and the incidence of pertussis in countries with widespread pertussis vaccination is most prominent in individuals above 9 years of age. To control the burden of infection, several countries already introduced acellular pertussis (aP) booster vaccination in adolescents and/or adults. However, antibody levels wane rapidly after vaccination even at older age. In this longitudinal study we investigated the effect of a second aP booster on the pertussis-specific memory B-cell immunity in children 9 years of age that have previously been vaccinated according to the national immunization program. Longitudinal blood samples were taken before, one month and one year after the booster. Purified B-cells were polyclonally stimulated and frequencies of memory B-cells were identified by ELISPOT-assays specific for various pertussis antigens. In addition, IgG levels and avidity indices were measured with fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassays. Starting with low pertussis-specific antibody and memory B-cell levels, a typical booster response was measured at one month after vaccination with increased antibody and memory B-cell responses. Although these responses declined slightly after one year, they substantially exceeded pre-booster levels and the avidity indices of the anti-pertussis antibodies remained high. Furthermore, high numbers of pertussis-specific memory B-cells at one-month post-booster correlate quite reliably with the corresponding high antibody response at one-year follow-up. In conclusion, booster vaccination in children 9 years of age induced an enhanced pertussis-specific memory immune response that sustained at least for one year. Therefore, this study supports the introduction of booster vaccination in older age groups.

  19. Immunogenicity, Safety, and Lot Consistency of a Novel Inactivated Enterovirus 71 Vaccine in Chinese Children Aged 6 to 59 Months

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue-Mei; Wang, Xu; Wang, Jun-Zhi; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Chang, Lin; Liang, Zheng-Lun; Xia, Jie-Lai; Dai, Qi-Gang; Hu, Ya-Ling; Mao, Qun-Ying; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Song, Yu-Fei; Gao, Fan

    2013-01-01

    The determination of lot-to-lot consistency in the manufacturing process is a mandatory step in the clinical development of the novel enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine. A phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial assessed the lot consistency, immunogenicity, and safety of the EV71 vaccine in children aged 6 to 59 months. Healthy children (n = 1,400) received one of three lots of the EV71 vaccine containing 400 U of EV71 antigen or a placebo at days 0 and 28. Blood samples were collected before dose 1 and at 28 days after dose 2 (day 56) for an anti-EV71 neutralizing antibody (NTAb) assay. The geometric mean titer (GMT) and the seropositivity rates (with titers of ≥1:8) were compared at day 56. After each dose, the solicited injection site and general adverse events (AEs) were recorded for 7 days, and unsolicited AEs were recorded for 28 days. At day 56, the seropositivity rates ranged from 99.7% to 100% for the vaccine groups. The NTAb GMTs for the vaccine were 140.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 117.8 to 167.1), 141.5 (95% CI, 118.0 to 169.6), and 146.6 (95% CI, 122.5 to 175.3). The two-sided 95% CI of the log difference in GMTs between the pairs of lots were between −0.176 and 0.176, therefore meeting the predefined equivalence criteria. The percentages of subjects reporting any injection site AEs, general AEs, or serious AEs were similar across the four vaccination groups. In conclusion, the demonstration of consistency between the manufacturing lots confirms for the purposes of clinical development the reliability of the EV71 vaccine production process. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01636245.) PMID:24108780

  20. Measles vaccine coverage and immune response in children of Caiabi and Metuktire Indian tribes living in malarial endemic area: Parque indígena do Xingu, Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Spindel, R; Baruzzi, R G; Souza, V A; Ferreira, A W; Avila, S L

    2001-07-01

    Measles vaccination efficiency was evaluated in children from two Indian tribes - Caiabi and Metuktire - living in the Amazon region, in the Parque Indigena do Xingu (PIX). The population sample, selected at random, made up 37 Caiabi and 28 Metuktire children, aged from 20-75 months (40%). For operational and epidemiological reasons, measles vaccine is given from 6 months of age. The average age of children when they received the vaccine was 11.5 months for the first dose and 20 months for the second. The search for IgG antibodies against measles virus and Plasmodium falciparum was made through immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Measles vaccine coverage has reached 60% at 12 months of age and 92% at 18 months, whereas post-vaccine serum conversion was 95% in Caiabi children (geometric mean of titres (GMT) 126) and 89% in Metuktire (GMT 109). The difference in GMT is not statistically significant. Seventy-three per cent of Caiabi children (GMT 101) and 100% of Metuktire children (GMT135) were plasmodium antibody positive, showing they had been exposed to malarial infection. Despite the differences detected, the immune response to measles vaccine was satisfactory in both groups, with a positive percentage consistent with that achieved in non-malarial areas in Americas. The results show the efficiency of a vaccination programme in an indigenous area despite the difficulties in reaching the villages and maintaining the cold chain, and also despite the malaria endemicity.

  1. Do Maternal Knowledge and Attitudes towards Childhood Immunizations in Rural Uganda Correlate with Complete Childhood Vaccination?

    PubMed Central

    Vonasek, Bryan J.; Bajunirwe, Francis; Jacobson, Laura E.; Twesigye, Leonidas; Dahm, James; Grant, Monica J.; Sethi, Ajay K.; Conway, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Improving childhood vaccination coverage and timeliness is a key health policy objective in many developing countries such as Uganda. Of the many factors known to influence uptake of childhood immunizations in under resourced settings, parents’ understanding and perception of childhood immunizations has largely been overlooked. The aims of this study were to survey mothers’ knowledge and attitudes towards childhood immunizations and then determine if these variables correlate with the timely vaccination coverage of their children. From September to December 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1,000 parous women in rural Sheema district in southwest Uganda. The survey collected socio-demographic data and knowledge and attitudes towards childhood immunizations. For the women with at least one child between the age of one month and five years who also had a vaccination card available for the child (N = 302), the vaccination status of this child was assessed. 88% of these children received age-appropriate, on-time immunizations. 93.5% of the women were able to state that childhood immunizations protect children from diseases. The women not able to point this out were significantly more likely to have an under-vaccinated child (PR 1.354: 95% CI 1.018–1.802). When asked why vaccination rates may be low in their community, the two most common responses were “fearful of side effects” and “ignorance/disinterest/laziness” (44% each). The factors influencing caregivers’ demand for childhood immunizations vary widely between, and also within, developing countries. Research that elucidates local knowledge and attitudes, like this study, allows for decisions and policy pertaining to vaccination programs to be more effective at improving child vaccination rates. PMID:26918890

  2. Do Maternal Knowledge and Attitudes towards Childhood Immunizations in Rural Uganda Correlate with Complete Childhood Vaccination?

    PubMed

    Vonasek, Bryan J; Bajunirwe, Francis; Jacobson, Laura E; Twesigye, Leonidas; Dahm, James; Grant, Monica J; Sethi, Ajay K; Conway, James H

    2016-01-01

    Improving childhood vaccination coverage and timeliness is a key health policy objective in many developing countries such as Uganda. Of the many factors known to influence uptake of childhood immunizations in under resourced settings, parents' understanding and perception of childhood immunizations has largely been overlooked. The aims of this study were to survey mothers' knowledge and attitudes towards childhood immunizations and then determine if these variables correlate with the timely vaccination coverage of their children. From September to December 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1,000 parous women in rural Sheema district in southwest Uganda. The survey collected socio-demographic data and knowledge and attitudes towards childhood immunizations. For the women with at least one child between the age of one month and five years who also had a vaccination card available for the child (N = 302), the vaccination status of this child was assessed. 88% of these children received age-appropriate, on-time immunizations. 93.5% of the women were able to state that childhood immunizations protect children from diseases. The women not able to point this out were significantly more likely to have an under-vaccinated child (PR 1.354: 95% CI 1.018-1.802). When asked why vaccination rates may be low in their community, the two most common responses were "fearful of side effects" and "ignorance/disinterest/laziness" (44% each). The factors influencing caregivers' demand for childhood immunizations vary widely between, and also within, developing countries. Research that elucidates local knowledge and attitudes, like this study, allows for decisions and policy pertaining to vaccination programs to be more effective at improving child vaccination rates.

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant tetravalent dengue vaccine in children and adolescents ages 9-16 years in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Gustavo H; Garbes, Pedro; Noriega, Fernando; Izoton de Sadovsky, Ana Daniela; Rodrigues, Patricia Marques; Giuberti, Camila; Dietze, Reynaldo

    2013-12-01

    Immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue disease vaccine (CYD-TDV) was evaluated in children/adolescents in Brazil. In this observer-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II single-center study, children/adolescents (ages 9-16 years) were randomized to receive CYD-TDV or placebo at 0, 6, and 12 months. Immunogenicity was assessed using a 50% plaque neutralization test. Overall, 150 participants were enrolled (CYD-TDV: N = 100; placebo: N = 50). Injection site pain and headache were the most common solicited injection site and systemic reactions. Unsolicited adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs were similar between groups. No serious AEs were vaccine-related. Geometric mean titers against all dengue virus serotypes increased with CYD-TDV vaccination and were 267, 544, 741, and 432 1/dil for serotypes 1-4, respectively, after dose 3, representing a mean fold increase from baseline of 5, 6, 6, and 20, respectively. CYD-TDV vaccination elicited a neutralizing antibody response against serotypes 1-4 and was well-tolerated in children/adolescents in a dengue-endemic region.

  4. Safety and preliminary immunogenicity of Cuban pneumococcal conjugate vaccine candidate in healthy children: a randomized phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dotres, Carlos P; Puga, Rinaldo; Ricardo, Yariset; Broño, Carmen R; Paredes, Beatriz; Echemendía, Vladimir; Rosell, Sandra; González, Nadezhda; García-Rivera, Dagmar; Valdés, Yury; Goldblatt, David; Vérez-Bencomo, Vicente

    2014-09-15

    A new heptavalent conjugate vaccine (PCV7-TT) is under development in Cuba. PCV7-TT contains 2 μg of serotypes 1, 5, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F and 4 μg of 6B, each one conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT). This vaccine was designed with the serotypes that cause most invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) worldwide. In the present study, we investigated the safety and explored the immunogenicity of PCV7-TT during a controlled, randomized and double blind clinical trial phase I in 4-5-year-old children. PCV7-TT was well tolerated and as safe as Synflorix used as control vaccine. Following a single-dose vaccination, all individual serotypes included in PCV7-TT induced statistically significant increase of IgG GMC and OPA GMT. These are the first clinical results of PCV7-TT in children and they pave the way toward next clinical trials in children and infants. This clinical trial was published in the Cuban Public Register of Clinical Trials with code RPCEC00000173.

  5. Concurrent and cross-season protection of inactivated influenza vaccine against A(H1N1)pdm09 illness among young children: 2012-2013 case-control evaluation of influenza vaccine effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chuanxi; Xu, Jianxiong; Lin, Jinyan; Wang, Ming; Li, Kuibiao; Ge, Jing; Thompson, Mark G

    2015-06-09

    In 2012-2013, we examined 1729 laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza cases matched 1:1 with healthy controls and estimated influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) to be 67% (95% confidence interval=58-74%) for ages 8 months to 6 years old. Among children aged 8-35 months old, VE for fully vaccinated children (73%, 60-81%) was significantly higher than VE for partially vaccinated children (55%, 33-70%). Significant cross-season protection from prior IIV3 was noted, including VE of 31% (8-48%) from IIV3 received in 2010-2011 against influenza illness in 2012--2013 without subsequent boosting doses.

  6. Transient hypogammaglobulinaemia of infants in children with mastocytosis – strengthened indications for vaccinations

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Magdalena; Dawicka, Joanna; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a disease caused by the accumulation of mast cells (MC) in the skin and/or in other tissues. Both the cutaneous form of the disease (CM) predominating in children and the systemic form (SM) typical for adults are associated with the occurrence of MC mediator-related symptoms. The release of mediators can be induced by physical stimuli and/or specific triggering factors. The routine vaccination program performed in the majority of children in infancy can be considered as an additional factor provoking exacerbation of CM. Conscious of the important role of MC in the innate immunity, we have analysed retrospective data concerning the levels of immunoglobulins, an adaptive factor, in a group of 74 infants and toddlers with CM. The values corresponding to transient hypogammaglobulinaemia of infants (THI) were found in 8 (10.81%) of cases. Classification of the antibody deficiency was done according to the working definitions for clinical diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency of the European Society of Immunodeficiencies (ESID) Registry – version May 11, 2015. Following the retrospective data, the final diagnosis of THI cannot be made due to the young age of the study group. The percentage may significantly exceed the published incidence of THI, i.e. about 0.11%. The results of our study may indicate, importantly, a higher incidence of THI in childhood-onset mastocytosis than in the general paediatric population and strengthen indications for vaccinations. In conclusion, we suggest that THI may be considered as a new aspect of paediatric mastocytosis that requires further investigation. PMID:27833446

  7. Effectiveness and safety of the A-H1N1 vaccine in children: a hospital-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To verify whether vaccination against the A-H1N1 virus in the paediatric population was effective in preventing the occurrence of influenza-like illness (ILI) or was associated with adverse events of special interest. Design, setting and patients A case–control analysis was performed as part of surveillance of children hospitalised through the emergency departments of eight paediatric hospitals/wards for ILI, neurological disorders, non-infectious muco-cutaneous diseases and vasculitis, thrombocytopaenia and gastroduodenal lesions. Results Among 736 children enrolled from November 2009 to August 2010, only 25 had been vaccinated with the pandemic vaccine. Out of 268 children admitted for a diagnosis compatible with the adverse events of special interest, six had received the A-H1N1 vaccine, although none of the adverse events occurred within the predefined risk windows. Only 35 children out of 244 admitted with a diagnosis of ILI underwent laboratory testing: 11 were positive and 24 negative for the A-H1N1 virus. None of the A-H1N1 positive children had received the pandemic vaccine. The OR of ILI associated with any influenza vaccination was 0.9 (95% CI 0.1 to 5.5). Conclusions The study provides additional information on the benefit–risk profile of the pandemic vaccine. No sign of risk associated with the influenza A-H1N1 vaccine used in Italy was found, although several limitations were observed: in Italy, pandemic vaccination coverage was low, the epidemic was almost over by mid December 2009 and the A-H1N1 laboratory test was performed only during the epidemic phase (in <10% of children). This study supports the importance of the existing network of hospitals for the evaluation of signals relevant to new vaccines and drugs. PMID:22021877

  8. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    MedlinePlus

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  9. Culture versus the law in the decision not to vaccinate children: meanings assigned by middle-class couples in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Carolina Luisa Alves; Couto, Márcia Thereza; Aith, Fernando Mussa Abujamra

    2017-03-09

    This study aimed to learn how middle-class parents in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, interpreted the country's prevailing vaccination requirements, based on their experiences with vaccinating, selectively vaccinating, or not vaccinating their children. A qualitative approach was used with in-depth interviews. The analytical process was guided by content analysis and the theoretical framework of the anthropology of the law and morality. For parents that vaccinated, Brazil's culture of immunization outweighed the feeling of compliance with the law; for selective parents, selection of vaccines was not perceived as deviating from the law. In both, the act of vaccinating their children was a matter of moral status. Meanwhile, the non-vaccinators, counter to the legal perspective, attributed their choice to care for the child on grounds that mandatory vaccination was contrary to their way of life; they experienced a feeling of social coercion and fear of legal impositions. Vaccination is an important practice in public health, but it can reveal tensions and conflicts from normative systems, whether moral, cultural, or legal.

  10. Direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness of the rotavirus vaccines for the prevention of gastroenteritis hospitalizations in privately insured US children, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Catherine A; Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Pate, Virginia; Weber, David J; Jonsson Funk, Michele; Stürmer, Til; Brookhart, M Alan

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate how direct, indirect, total, and overall effectiveness estimates and absolute benefits of rotavirus vaccines vary through the years following vaccine introduction. Privately insured US children in a large claims database were followed from age 8 months until they 1) experienced a hospitalization for rotavirus or acute gastroenteritis; 2) lost continuous health plan enrollment; 3) turned 20 months of age; or 4) reached the end of the study period. Vaccine effectiveness estimates in preventing rotavirus and acute gastroenteritis hospitalizations were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression, stratified by calendar year and adjusted for birth month. Incidence rate differences were estimated to determine the absolute number of gastroenteritis hospitalizations prevented in the cohort. Among 905,718 children, 51%, 66%, 80%, and 86% received 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in each year from 2007 to 2010. The direct vaccine effectiveness of 1 or more doses of rotavirus vaccine in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis hospitalizations ranged from 87% to 92% each year. Accounting for indirect protection increased estimates of vaccine effectiveness by an additional 3%-8% among those vaccinated. Failing to account for population-level vaccine benefits in 2010, when circulation of rotavirus was low, could underestimate the sustained impact of the vaccine program.

  11. A Survey of Parental Perception and Pattern of Action in Response to Influenza-like Illness in Their Children: Including Healthcare Use and Vaccination in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality of children in Korea. However, few data are available on parental perception and action toward childhood influenza. This study aimed to characterize parental perception and patterns of action in response to influenza and influenza-like illnesses (ILIs), including vaccination and healthcare use. This prospective study involved a random survey of parents whose children were aged 6–59 months. The survey was conducted in October 2014. The study included 638 parents of 824 children younger than 6 years. Most parental information of influenza came from mass media (28.2%) and social media (15.5%). The factor that most often motivated parents to vaccinate their children against influenza was promotion of the government or mass media (36.6%). Negative predictors of immunization included safety concerns about influenza vaccination (28.1%) and mistrust in the vaccine's effectiveness (23.3%). Therefore, correct information about influenza and vaccination from mass media will be one of the cornerstones for implementing a successful childhood immunization program and reducing morbidity and mortality in Korea. Furthermore, to enroll younger children in vaccination programs, and to minimize coverage gaps, public concerns about vaccine safety should be resolved. The demographic data in the present study will be used to provide a deeper insight into a parental perception and will help health care providers increase influenza immunization rate. PMID:28049230

  12. Effectiveness of one and two doses of varicella vaccine in preventing laboratory-confirmed cases in children in Navarre, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Cenoz, Manuel García; Martínez-Artola, Víctor; Guevara, Marcela; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Castilla, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Varicella vaccine effectiveness was evaluated in a case-control study in Navarre, Spain, in 2010–2012. The cases were 54 children aged 15 months to 10 years with a diagnosis of varicella confirmed by polymerase-chain-reaction. Each case was matched with eight controls by pediatric practice, district of residence and date of birth. The effectiveness was 87% (95% confidence interval: 60% to 97%) for one dose of vaccine and 97% (80% to 100%) for two doses. A single dose was 93% (34% to 100%) effective in the first year, which declined to 61% (95% CI: -64% to 94%) after the third year. In conclusion, varicella vaccine is highly effective in preventing confirmed cases, although this effect declines over time since the first dose. A second dose helps to reestablish very high levels of effectiveness and to reduce the risk of breakthrough varicella. PMID:23324571

  13. Factors impacting influenza vaccination of urban low-income Latino children under nine years requiring two doses in the 2010-2011 season.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Annika M; Barrett, Angela; Stockwell, Melissa S

    2015-04-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that certain children under 9 years of age receive two influenza vaccine doses in a season for optimal protection. Recent data indicate that many of these children fail to receive one or both of these needed doses. Contributing factors to under-vaccination of this population remain unclear. Caregivers of children aged 6 months-8 years requiring two influenza vaccine doses in the 2010-2011 season were identified from households enrolled in four urban Head Start programs. Recruitment and survey administration were conducted between March and June 2011. The impact of caregiver, provider, and practice-based factors on influenza vaccine receipt was assessed using bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Caregivers (n = 128) were predominantly mothers, Latina, Spanish-speaking, and non-U.S. born. Few children received one (31 %) or both (7 %) influenza vaccine doses. Caregivers who discussed influenza vaccination with providers were more likely to know their child needed two doses (55 vs. 35 %, p < 0.05) and have a fully vaccinated child (11 vs. 0 %, p < 0.05). Among caregivers whose child received the first dose, those who reported being told when to return for the second dose were also more likely to have a fully vaccinated child (35 vs. 0 %, p = 0.05). Belief in influenza vaccine effectiveness was positively associated with vaccination (p < 0.001), while safety concerns were negatively associated (p < 0.05). This study highlights the importance of provider-family communication about the two-dose regimen as well as influenza vaccine effectiveness and safety.

  14. Assessment of metallothionein and antibodies to metallothionein in normal and autistic children having exposure to vaccine-derived thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijendra K; Hanson, Jeff

    2006-06-01

    Allergic autoimmune reaction after exposure to heavy metals such as mercury may play a causal role in autism, a developmental disorder of the central nervous system. As metallothionein (MT) is the primary metal-detoxifying protein in the body, we conducted a study of the MT protein and antibodies to metallothionein (anti-MT) in normal and autistic children whose exposure to mercury was only from thimerosal-containing vaccines. Laboratory analysis by immunoassays revealed that the serum level of MT did not significantly differ between normal and autistic children. Furthermore, autistic children harboured normal levels of anti-MT, including antibodies to isoform MT-I (anti-MT-I) and MT-II (anti-MT-II), without any significant difference between normal and autistic children. Our findings indicate that because autistic children have a normal profile of MT and anti-MT, the mercury-induced autoimmunity to MT may not be implicated in the pathogenesis of autism.

  15. Live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine in children, adolescents and adults in a dengue endemic country: randomized controlled phase I trial in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Capeding, Rosario Z; Luna, Imelda A; Bomasang, Emily; Lupisan, Socorro; Lang, Jean; Forrat, Remi; Wartel, Anh; Crevat, Denis

    2011-05-17

    A recombinant live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (TDV) is safe and immunogenic in adults and children in dengue-naïve populations. Data are needed in dengue endemic populations. In a phase I, randomized, controlled, blind-observer study in the Philippines, groups of participants aged 2-5, 6-11, 12-17, and 18-45 years received either three TDV vaccinations at months 0, 3.5, and 12 (TDV-TDV-TDV group) or licensed typhoid vaccination at month 0 and TDV at months 3.5 and 12 (TyVi-TDV-TDV group) and were followed for safety (including biological safety and vaccine virus viremia) and immunogenicity. No serious adverse vaccine related events and no significant trends in biological safety parameters were reported. Injection site pain, headache, malaise, myalgia, fever, and asthenia were reported most frequently, as mild to moderate in most cases and transient. Reactogenicity did not increase with successive vaccinations and was no higher in children than in adults and adolescents. Low levels of vaccinal viremia were detected in both groups after each TDV vaccination. After three TDV vaccinations, the seropositivity rates against serotypes 1-4 were: 91%, 100%, 96%, 100%, respectively, in 2-5 year-olds; 88%, 96% 96%, 92% in 6-11 year-olds; 88%, 83%, 92%, 96% in adolescents; and 100% for all serotypes in adults. A similar response was observed after two doses for the TyVi-TDV-TDV group. The safety profile of TDV in a flavivirus endemic population was consistent with previous reports from flavivirus naïve populations. A vaccine regimen of either three TDV vaccinations administered over a year or two TDV vaccinations given more than 8 months apart resulted in a balanced antibody response to all four dengue serotypes in this flavivirus-exposed population, including children.

  16. Immunogenicity and safety assessment of a trivalent, inactivated split influenza vaccine in Korean children: Double-blind, randomized, active-controlled multicenter phase III clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Beom; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Shin, Hye Jo; Lee, Soo Young; Kim, Hyun-Hee; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Park, Joon Soo; Kim, Hwang Min; Kim, Chun Soo; Kim, Dong Ho; Choi, Young Youn; Cha, Sung-Ho; Hong, Young Jin; Kang, Jin Han

    2015-01-01

    A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, active-control phase III clinical trial was performed to assess the immunogenicity and safety of a trivalent, inactivated split influenza vaccine. Korean children between the ages of 6 months and 18 y were enrolled and randomized into a study (study vaccine) or a control vaccine group (commercially available trivalent, inactivated split influenza vaccine) in a 5:1 ratio. Antibody responses were determined using hemagglutination inhibition assay, and post-vaccination immunogenicity was assessed based on seroconversion and seroprotection rates. For safety assessment, solicited local and systemic adverse events up to 28 d after vaccination and unsolicited adverse events up to 6 months after vaccination were evaluated. Immunogenicity was assessed in 337 and 68 children of the study and control groups. In the study vaccine group, seroconversion rates against influenza A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B strains were 62.0% (95% CI: 56.8-67.2), 53.4% (95% CI: 48.1-58.7), and 54.9% (95% CI: 48.1-60.2), respectively. The corresponding seroprotection rates were 95.0% (95% CI: 92.6-97.3), 93.8% (95% CI: 91.2-96.4), and 95.3% (95% CI: 93.0-97.5). The lower 95% CI limits of the seroconversion and seroprotection rates were over 40% and 70%, respectively, against all strains. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates were not significantly different between the study and control vaccine groups. Furthermore, the frequencies of adverse events were not significantly different between the 2 vaccine groups, and no serious vaccination-related adverse events were noted. In conclusion, the study vaccine exhibited substantial immunogenicity and safety in Korean children and is expected to be clinically effective.

  17. Do Maternal Living Arrangements Influence the Vaccination Status of Children Age 12–23 Months? A Data Analysis of Demographic Health Surveys 2010–11 from Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although vaccination is an effective intervention to reduce childhood mortality and morbidity, reasons for incomplete vaccination, including maternal living arrangements, have been marginally explored. This study aims at assessing whether maternal living arrangements are associated with vaccination status of children aged 12–23 months in Zimbabwe. It also explores other variables that may be associated with having children not fully vaccinated. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional analysis was performed on the DHS-VI done in Zimbabwe in 2010–2011 (response rate 93%). Incomplete vaccination of children (outcome), was defined as not having received one dose of BCG and measles, 3 doses of polio and DPT/Pentavalent. Maternal living arrangements (main exposure), and other exposure variables were analysed. Survey logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted OR for exposures against the outcome. Results The dataset included 1,031 children aged 12–23 months. 65.8% of children were fully vaccinated. 65.7% of the mothers were married and cohabitating with a partner, 20.3% were married/partnered but living separately and 14% were not married. Maternal living arrangements were not associated with the vaccination status of children both in crude and adjusted analysis. Factors associated with poorer vaccination status of the children included: no tetanus vaccination for mothers during pregnancy (adjusted OR = 2.1, 95%CI 1.5;3.0), child living away from mother (adjusted OR = 1.5, 95%CI 1.2;1.8), mother’s education (adjusted OR = 0.6, 95%CI 0.4;0.9), high number of children living in the household (adjusted OR = 1.5, 95%CI 1.1;2.2), child age (adjusted OR = 0.7, 95%CI 0.5;0.9). Discussion Maternal living arrangements were not associated with vaccination status of Zimbabwean children. Other factors, such as the mother’s health-seeking behaviour and education were major factors associated with the children’s vaccination status. Given the

  18. Study of live recombinant cold-adapted influenza bivalent vaccine of type A for use in children: an epidemiological control trial.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, G I; Budilovsky, G N; Koval, T A; Polezhaev, F I; Garmashova, L M; Ghendon YuZ; Romanova, Y R; Smorodintsev, A A

    1986-06-01

    Live cold-adapted recombinant bivalent vaccine of influenza type A was studied in a controlled field trial in 1982-1983 among nearly 30,000 children 3-15 years old. The bivalent vaccine consisted of recombinants 47/25/1 (H1N1) and 47/7/2 (H3N2) of wild-type viruses A/Brazil/11/78 (H1N1) and A/Bangkok/1/79 (H3N2) with cold-adapted donor A/Leningrad/134/47/57 (H2N2). The recombinants which received mutant nonglycoprotein genes from cold-adapted donor did not suppress each other after simultaneous inoculation of children and stimulated antibody response to both strains. The bivalent vaccine was completely attenuated for children. It caused less than 1% transient febrile reactions during five days after the first vaccination, including double seronegative individuals with low antibody titres to both vaccinal strains. The cold-adapted bivalent vaccine tested proved to be safe for children according to the analysis of morbidity studies among vaccines and a control group performed during the five days and the following six months after the first immunization. There is a similar distribution of non-influenza illnesses and a statistically significant decrease in influenza-like diseases among vaccines compared to the control group. In the four months after the immunization programme was completed, epidemics of influenza A H1N1 and H3N2 occurred. The incidence of influenza-like diseases was approximately 50% less in the vaccinated than in the control groups. This is the first evidence of safety and protective efficacy of recombinant live influenza vaccine for children 3-15 years of age.

  19. Postlicensure surveillance for pre-specified adverse events following the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hung Fu; Sy, Lina S; Liu, In-Lu Amy; Qian, Lei; Marcy, S Michael; Weintraub, Eric; Yih, Katherine; Baxter, Roger; Glanz, Jason M; Donahue, James; Naleway, Allison; Nordin, James; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2013-05-24

    Although no increased risk was detected for serious adverse events in the prelicensure trials for the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine, Prevnar 13(®) (PCV13), continued monitoring of rare but serious adverse events is necessary. A surveillance system using cohort study design was set up to monitor safety of PCV13 immediately after it was included in the childhood immunization program in the United States. The exposed population included children of 1 month to 2 years old who received PCV13 from April, 2010 to January, 2012 from the eight managed care organizations participating in the Vaccine Safety Datalink Project in the United States. The historical unexposed population was children of the same age who received the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine Prevnar 7(®) (PCV7) in 2007 (or 2005 depending on the outcome of interest) to 2009. The risk of pre-specified adverse events in the risk window following PCV13 was repeatedly compared to that in the historical comparison group. The number of doses included in the study was 599,229. No increased risk was found for febrile seizures, urticaria or angioneurotic edema, asthma, thrombocytopenia, or anaphylaxis. An increased risk for encephalopathy was not confirmed following the medical record review. The relative risk for Kawasaki disease in 0-28 days following vaccination was 1.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.79-4.86), comparing PCV13 to PCV7. Comparing to PCV7 vaccine, we identified no significant increased risk of pre-specified adverse events in the Vaccine Safety Datalink study cohort. The possible association between PCV13 and Kawasaki disease may deserve further investigation.

  20. Parents' attitudes towards hepatitis B vaccination for their children. A survey comparing paper and web questionnaires, Sweden 2005

    PubMed Central

    Dannetun, Eva; Tegnell, Anders; Giesecke, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Background The World Health Organisation, WHO, recommends that most countries should vaccinate all children against hepatitis B. Sweden has chosen not to do so, but the issue is reassessed regularly. The objective of this survey was to assess knowledge and attitudes towards hepatitis B vaccine for children among parents living in Sweden, and to compare distribution of responses and response rate between parents answering a postal questionnaire and those responding via the Internet. Methods A population-based cross-sectional survey, where the sampling frame consisted of all parents to a child born 2002 living in Sweden. Two independent samples of 1001 parents in each sample were drawn. All parents were contacted by postal mail. The parents in the first sample were invited to participate by answering a paper questionnaire. The parents in the second sample were given an individual user name along with a password, and asked to log on to the Internet to answer an identical electronic questionnaire. Results A total of 1229 questionnaires were analysed. The overall response rate for paper questionnaires was 55%, and 15% for the web version. Knowledge of the disease hepatitis B was overall high (90%). A higher degree of knowledge was seen among parents with education beyond high school (p = 0.001). This group of parents also had a higher tendency to reply via the Internet (p = 0.001). The willingness to accept hepatitis B vaccine for their child was correlated to the acceptance of the present childhood vaccination programme (p = 0.001). Conclusion The results reveal a high level of knowledge of the disease and a positive attitude to having their children vaccinated. This study also displays that the conventional postal method of surveying still delivers a higher response rate than a web-based survey. PMID:17511891

  1. Efficacy and safety of vi-tetanus toxoid conjugated typhoid vaccine (PedaTyph™) in Indian children: School based cluster randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Monjori; Shah, Nitin; Ghosh, Apurba; Chatterjee, Suparna; Kaur, Iqbal; Bhattacharya, Nisha; Basu, Suparna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vi polysaccharide typhoid vaccines cannot be used in children <2 years owing to poor immunogenic and T cell independent properties. Conjugate vaccine prepared by binding Vi to tetanus toxoids (Vi-TT) induces protective levels even in children <2 years. We evaluated efficacy and safety following vaccination with a Vi-TT vaccine in children 6 months to 12 years of age. Overall, 1765 subjects were recruited from two registered municipal urban slums of southern Kolkata. Most of the children of the slum dwellers attended the schools in the locality which was selected with permission from the school authority. Schools were randomly divided into vaccinated (Test group) and unvaccinated group (Control group). Children and their siblings of test group received 2-doses of PedaTyph™ vaccine at 6 weeks interval. Control group received vaccines as per national guidelines. Adverse events (AEs) were examined after 30 minutes, 1 month and clinical events were observed till 12 months post-vaccination. Incidence of culture positive typhoid fever in the control group was 1.27% vis-a-vis none in vaccine group during 12 months. In subgroup evaluated for immunogenicity, an antibody titer value of 1.8 EU/ml (95% CI: 1.5 EU/ml, 2.2 EU/ml), 32 EU/ml (95% CI: 27.0 EU/ml, 39.0 EU/ml) and 14 EU/ml (95% CI: 12.0 EU/ml, 17.0 EU/ml) at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 months, respectively was observed. Sero-conversion among the sub-group was 100% after 6 weeks of post-vaccination and 83% after 12 months considering 4-fold rise from baseline. The efficacy of vaccine was 100 % (95% CI: 97.6%, 100%) in the first year of follow-up with minimal AEs post vaccination. Vi conjugate typhoid vaccine conferred 100% protection against typhoid fever in 1765 children 6 months to 12 years of age with high immunogenicity in a subgroup from the vaccine arm. PMID:26901576

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of meningococcal ACWY CRM197-conjugate vaccine in children, adolescents and adults in Russia.

    PubMed

    Ilyina, Natalia; Kharit, Susanna; Namazova-Baranova, Leila; Asatryan, Asmik; Benashvili, Mayya; Tkhostova, Elmira; Bhusal, Chiranjiwi; Arora, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is the leading cause of bacterial invasive infections in people aged <15 years in the Russian Federation. The aim of this phase III, multicenter, open-label study was to assess the immunogenicity and safety of the quadrivalent meningococcal CRM197-conjugate vaccine MenACWY when administered to healthy Russian subjects aged 2 years and above. A total of 197 subjects were immunized with a single dose of the vaccine, and serogroup-specific serum bactericidal activity was measured pre and 1-month post-vaccination with human complement (hSBA) serum titers. Regardless of baseline serostatus, 1 month after a single dose of MenACWY-CRM197 85% (95%CI, 79-90%) of subjects showed serologic response against serogroup A, 74% (67-80%) against serogroup C, 60% (53-67%) against serogroup W, and 83% (77-88%) against serogroup Y. The percentage of subjects with hSBA titers ≥ 1:8 1 month after vaccination was 89% (83-93%) against serogroup A, 84% (78-89%) against serogroup C, 97% (93-99%) against serogroup W, and 88% (82-92%) against serogroup Y. Comparable results were obtained across all subjects: children (2 to 10 years), adolescents (11 to 17 years), and adults (≥18 years). The MenACWY-CRM197 vaccine showed an acceptable safety profile and was well tolerated across all age groups, with no serious adverse events or deaths reported during the study. In conclusion, a single dose of meningococcal MenACWY-CRM197 vaccine is immunogenic and has an acceptable safety profile, provides a broad protection against the most frequent epidemic serogroups, and is a suitable alternative to currently available unconjugated monovalent or bivalent polysaccharide vaccines in Russia.

  3. Ex vivo analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocytes to measles antigens during infection and after vaccination in Gambian children.

    PubMed Central

    Jaye, A; Magnusen, A F; Sadiq, A D; Corrah, T; Whittle, H C

    1998-01-01

    The study of cytotoxic T cell responses to measles antigens during infection and after vaccination may provide insight into the immunopathology of the infection. It will also provide a knowledge of the immunity conferred by wild or attenuated virus, which will help in the design of new vaccines. Direct cytotoxic T cell responses, which did not require in vitro restimulation, were measured from peripheral blood by a standard 51Cr-release assay in 35 patients with acute measles, using HLA class I matched allogeneic B cells as targets. 77% showed specific responses to measles fusion protein, 69% to the hemagglutinin, and 50% to the nucleoprotein. These responses, which were related to severity of disease and history of previous vaccination, had waned by 14-24 wk after measles when memory responses to the same antigens could be elicited by restimulation in 71% of the 13 patients tested. A similar pattern followed vaccination: direct cytotoxic responses to fusion and hemagglutinin proteins were shown in 70% of the 20 children tested while 50% responded to the nucleoprotein. These responses, which were mediated by both CD8(+) and CD4(+) cells, faded over 6 wk when memory responses could be restimulated. Thus, a vigorous cytotoxic T lymphocyte response to fusion, hemagglutinin, and nucleoproteins is important in both natural and vaccine-induced immunity to measles. PMID:9835622

  4. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... or HIV infection); or cochlear implants. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Children younger than 2 years old, ...

  5. Adult vaccination in 11 Central European countries - calendars are not just for children.

    PubMed

    Chlibek, Roman; Anca, Ioana; André, Francis; Čižman, Milan; Ivaskeviciene, Inga; Mangarov, Atanas; Mészner, Zsófia; Perenovska, Penka; Pokorn, Marko; Prymula, Roman; Richter, Darko; Salman, Nuran; Šimurka, Pavol; Tamm, Eda; Tešović, Goran; Urbancikova, Ingrid; Zavadska, Dace; Usonis, Vytautas

    2012-02-21

    As Europe's population ages, disease morbidity and treatment costs in the adult population are likely to rise substantially, making this a pertinent time to review and revise preventive strategies such as vaccination. Vaccine uptake remains a problem for adults and there is a lack of coordinated programmes for vaccination of adults. Countries in Western Europe have begun to identify the need to increase adult vaccination, but the situation in Central European countries remains poorly identified and inadequately described. This paper summarises the evidence to support the development of an adult vaccination calendar in the Central European Vaccination Awareness Group (CEVAG) member countries (Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Turkey). CEVAG recommends the introduction of an adult vaccination calendar, which should include vaccination against diseases that represent a large burden in adults in terms of mortality and morbidity. This calendar could be modified to meet the priorities of individual countries.

  6. A prototype of a novel cell phone application for tracking the vaccination coverage of children in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Katib, Anas; Rao, Deepthi; Rao, Praveen; Williams, Karen; Grant, Jim

    2015-11-01

    Immunization saves millions of lives against vaccine-preventable diseases. Yet, 24 million children born every year do not receive proper immunization during their first year. UNICEF and WHO have emphasized the need to strengthen the immunization surveillance and monitoring in developing countries to reduce childhood deaths. In this regard, we present a software application called Jeev to track the vaccination coverage of children in rural communities. Jeev synergistically combines the power of smartphones and the ubiquity of cellular infrastructure, QR codes, and national identification cards. We present the design of Jeev and highlight its unique features along with a detailed evaluation of its performance and power consumption using the National Immunization Survey datasets. We are in discussion with a non-profit organization in Haiti to pilot test Jeev in order to study its effectiveness and identify socio-cultural issues that may arise in a large-scale deployment.

  7. Direct and Indirect Effectiveness of Influenza Vaccination Delivered to Children at School Preceding an Epidemic Caused by 3 New Influenza Virus Variants

    PubMed Central

    Glezen, W. Paul; Gaglani, Manjusha J.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Piedra, Pedro A.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Influenza is an uncontrolled epidemic disease that is vaccine preventable. New recommendations for universal immunization present a challenge to the implementation of vaccine delivery. This field trial examines the effectiveness of school-based clinics for vaccine delivery before an epidemic caused by 3 new influenza virus variants not contained in the vaccine. Methods. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) was offered to eligible children in elementary schools of eastern Bell County, Texas. Age-specific rates of medically attended acute respiratory illness for health plan members at the intervention site were compared with those for members at comparison sites during the epidemic, defined by viral surveillance at all sites. Results. Almost 48% of children in elementary schools were vaccinated. Significant herd protection attributed to LAIV was detected for all age groups except 12–17-year-old students, who were not offered free vaccine. Approximately 2500 medical encounters were prevented at the intervention site. Inactivated vaccine provided marginal protection against the epidemic viruses. Conclusions. LAIV delivered to elementary-school children before an epidemic caused by 3 new variant influenza viruses generated significant cross-protection for the recipients and indirect (herd) protection for the community. Trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00138294. PMID:21028955

  8. Echolalia and Comprehension in Autistic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jacqueline M. A.

    1989-01-01

    The study with 10 autistic children (ages 4-17) found that those children with poor receptive language skills produced significantly more echolalic utterances than those children whose receptive skills were more age-appropriate. (Author/DB)

  9. The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act. The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Susan G.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act and the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program to specifically address the injuries sustained through vaccination. The compensation program allows special education for children permanently injured by vaccines. Analyzes selected cases. (57 footnotes) (MLF)

  10. Multi-Serotype Pneumococcal Nasopharyngeal Carriage Prevalence in Vaccine Naïve Nepalese Children, Assessed Using Molecular Serotyping

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Rama; Gurung, Meeru; Thapa, Anushil; Ndimah, Susan; Adhikari, Neelam; Murdoch, David R.; Kelly, Dominic F.; Waldron, Denise E.; Gould, Katherine A.; Thorson, Stephen; Shrestha, Shrijana; Hinds, Jason; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is one of the major causes of death in young children in resource poor countries. Nasopharyngeal carriage studies provide insight into the local prevalence of circulating pneumococcal serotypes. There are very few data on the concurrent carriage of multiple pneumococcal serotypes. This study aimed to identify the prevalence and serotype distribution of pneumococci carried in the nasopharynx of young healthy Nepalese children prior to the introduction of a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using a microarray-based molecular serotyping method capable of detecting multi-serotype carriage. We conducted a cross-sectional study of healthy children aged 6 weeks to 24 months from the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal between May and October 2012. Nasopharyngeal swabs were frozen and subsequently plated on selective culture media. DNA extracts of plate sweeps of pneumococcal colonies from these cultures were analysed using a molecular serotyping microarray capable of detecting relative abundance of multiple pneumococcal serotypes. 600 children were enrolled into the study: 199 aged 6 weeks to <6 months, 202 aged 6 months to < 12 months, and 199 aged 12 month to 24 months. Typeable pneumococci were identified in 297/600 (49·5%) of samples with more than one serotype being found in 67/297 (20·2%) of these samples. The serotypes covered by the thirteen-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine were identified in 44·4% of samples containing typeable pneumococci. Application of a molecular serotyping approach to identification of multiple pneumococcal carriage demonstrates a substantial prevalence of co-colonisation. Continued surveillance utilising this approach following the introduction of routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccinates in infants will provide a more accurate understanding of vaccine efficacy against carriage and a better understanding of the dynamics of subsequent serotype and genotype replacement. PMID:25643355

  11. Antibody titers against vaccine and contemporary wild poliovirus type 1 in children immunized with IPV+OPV and young adults immunized with OPV.

    PubMed

    Lukashev, Alexander N; Yarmolskaya, Maria S; Shumilina, Elena Yu; Sychev, Daniil A; Kozlovskaya, Liubov I

    2016-02-02

    In 2010, a type 1 poliovirus outbreak in Congo with 445 lethal cases was caused by a virus that was neutralized by sera of German adults vaccinated with inactivated polio vaccine with a reduced efficiency. This seroprevalence study was done in two cohorts immunized with other vaccination schedules. Russian children aged 3-6 years immunized with a combination of inactivated and live polio vaccines were reasonably well protected against any wild type poliovirus 1, including the Congolese isolate. Adults aged 20-29 years immunized only with live vaccine were apparently protected against the vaccine strain (92% seropositive), but only 50% had detectable antibodies against the Congo-2010 isolate. Both waning immunity and serological divergence of the Congolese virus could contribute to this result.

  12. Nasopharyngeal flora in children with acute otitis media before and after implementation of 7 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in France

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies have investigated the impact of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) on pneumococcal (Sp) and staphylococcal (Sa) nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage. Few have investigated the impact on Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Moraxella catarrhalis (Mc) carriage. We aimed to compare the NP carriage rates in young children with acute otitis media (AOM) before and after PCV7 implementation in France. Methods Prior to PCV7 implementation, we performed 4 successive randomized trials with NP samples. These studies compared several antibiotic regimens for treating AOM in young children (6 to 30 months). After PCV7 implementation, to assess the impact of the vaccination program on NP flora, young children with AOM were enrolled in a prospective surveillance study. In each study, we obtained an NP sample to analyze the carriage rates of Sp, Hi, Mc and Sa and the factors influencing the carriage. Standardized history and physical examination findings were recorded; the methods used for NP swabs (sampling and cultures) were the same in all studies. Results We enrolled 4,405 children (mean age 13.9 months, median 12.8). Among the 2,598 children enrolled after PCV7 implementation, 98.3% were vaccinated with PCV7. In comparing the pre- and post-PCV7 periods, we found a slight but non-significant decrease in carriage rates of pneumococcus (AOR = 0.85 [0.69;1.05]), H. influenzae (AOR = 0.89 [0.73;1.09]) and S. aureus (AOR = 0.92 [0.70;1.19]). By contrast, the carriage rate of M. catarrhalis increased slightly but not significantly between the 2 periods (AOR = 1.08 [0.95;1.2]). Among Sp carriers, the proportion of PCV7 vaccine types decreased from 66.6% to 10.7% (P < 0.001), penicillin intermediate-resistant strains increased from 30.3% to 43.4% (P < 0.001), and penicillin-resistant strains decreased greatly from 22.8% to 3.8% (P < 0.001). The proportion of Hi ß-lactamase-producing strains decreased from 38.6% to 17.1% (P < 0.001). Conclusion The carriage

  13. BCG vaccination of children against leprosy: seven-year findings of the controlled WHO trial in Burma*

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, L. M.; Garbajosa, P. Gallego; Gyi, Mg Mg; Uemura, K.; Sundaresan, T.; Domínguez, V. Martínez; Matejka, M.; Tamondong, C.; Quagliato, R.; Engler, V.; Altmann, M.

    1973-01-01

    A controlled study of the efficacy of BCG vaccination for the prevention of leprosy began in Burma at the end of August 1964. This paper presents the findings after 7 years—i.e., the results of 6 annual follow-up examinations up to the end of June 1971. The incidence rate in BCG-vaccinated children 0-4 years of age at intake was lower than that in children in the control group. The protection conferred by BCG was relatively low (44%) and applied only to early cases of leprosy, the great majority tuberculoid cases. BCG vaccination did not protect household contacts or children 5-14 years of age who were not exposed in the household. This reduction must be interpreted in the light of several factors: form of leprosy, bacterial status, lepromin reactivity, evolution of cases, and level of endemicity. Consequently it does not seem probable that the reduction in incidence would substantially affect the pattern or trend of the disease in an area similar to that where the study is being carried out; the probability would be much lower if not nil in regions of relatively low endemicity (1-2 per 1 000 or less). PMID:4270384

  14. Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Antigenically Drifted Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses among Children and Adolescents following 2014-2015 Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Judith M.; Gross, F. Liaini; Jefferson, Stacie; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Archibald, Crystal Ann; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Susick, Michael; Moehling, Krissy; Spencer, Sarah; Chung, Jessie R.; Flannery, Brendan; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza A(H3N2) viruses that predominated during the moderately severe 2014-2015 influenza season differed antigenically from the vaccine component, resulting in reduced vaccine effectiveness (VE). To examine antibody responses to 2014-2015 inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) among children and adolescents, we collected sera before and after vaccination from 150 children aged 3 to 17 years enrolled at health care facilities. Hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays were used to assess the antibody responses to vaccine strains. We evaluated cross-reactive antibody responses against two representative A(H3N2) viruses that had antigenically drifted from the A(H3N2) vaccine component using microneutralization (MN) assays. Postvaccination antibody titers to drifted A(H3N2) viruses were higher following receipt of IIV (MN geometric mean titers [GMTs], 63 to 68; 38 to 45% achieved seroconversion) versus LAIV (MN GMT, 22; only 3 to 5% achieved seroconversion). In 9- to 17-year-olds, the highest MN titers were observed among IIV-vaccinated individuals who had received LAIV in the previous season. Among all IIV recipients aged 3 to 17 years, the strongest predictor of antibody responses to the drifted viruses was the prevaccination titers to the vaccine strain. The results of our study suggest that in an antigenically drifted influenza season, vaccination still induced cross-reactive antibody responses to drifted circulating A(H3N2) viruses, although higher antibody titers may be required for protection. Antibody responses to drifted A(H3N2) viruses following vaccination were influenced by multiple factors, including vaccine type and preexisting immunity from prior exposure. PMID:27558294

  15. Different IgG-subclass distributions after whole-cell and acellular pertussis infant primary vaccinations in healthy and pertussis infected children.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Lotte H; Schure, Rose-Minke; Oztürk, Kemal; de Rond, Lia G H; de Greeff, S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-09-16

    The distribution of IgG-subclasses provides insight in the immunological mechanisms of protection against whooping cough. We investigated the effect of Dutch whole-cell pertussis and acellular pertussis vaccines administered in infancy on the IgG-subclass distributions in healthy children aged 12 months, 4 years and 9 years as well as in children who have been infected with Bordetella pertussis. A fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassay was used for the measurement of IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 responses against pertussis toxin, filamentous heamagglutinin and pertactin. Although IgG1 was the predominant subclass for all pertussis antigens in both healthy and infected children, elevated IgG4 levels were only present in children who had received repeated number of acellular pertussis vaccinations. IgG2 and IgG3 antibodies did not contribute to the IgG response. No differences in IgG-subclasses between healthy vaccinated or infected children were found. The pertussis vaccine used for priming seems to determine the IgG-subclass composition elicited after a secondary antibody response either induced by pertussis vaccination or infection. The pronounced anti-pertussis IgG4 response might reflect the Th2-skewing of the immune response after aP vaccination.

  16. [Universal vaccination against varicella in Italy: the same opportunity for all children].

    PubMed

    Gabutti, Giovanni; Azzari, Chiara; Bonanni, Paolo; Conversano, Michele; Esposito, Susanna; Prato, Rosa; Russo, Rocco; Tozzi, Alberto Eugenio; Vitali Rosati, Giovanni; Zanetti, Alessandro; Zuccotti, Gianvincenzo; Franco, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Varicella is an infectious disease still frequent in Italy, where 8 out 20 Regions have adopted universal vaccination programs starting from 2003. Accordingly to National Vaccination Plan, all Regions should introduce universal varicella vaccination in 2015. An independent multidisciplinary group of experts met to discuss some debated questions. The available evidence of varicella vaccine efficacy in the 8 Regions was evaluated and the evidence of safety of monovalent and combined varicella vaccines are presented. The strategy for introducing universal varicella vaccine in the pediatric immunization schedule is discussed. The expert group concludes that available evidence supports the active offer of varicella vaccine in all Italian Regions and that catch up programs for susceptible cohorts should be encouraged.

  17. Efficacy and Safety of the RTS,S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine during 18 Months after Vaccination: A Phase 3 Randomized, Controlled Trial in Children and Young Infants at 11 African Sites

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A malaria vaccine could be an important addition to current control strategies. We report the safety and vaccine efficacy (VE) of the RTS,S/AS01 vaccine during 18 mo following vaccination at 11 African sites with varying malaria transmission. Methods and Findings 6,537 infants aged 6–12 wk and 8,923 children aged 5–17 mo were randomized to receive three doses of RTS,S/AS01 or comparator vaccine. VE against clinical malaria in children during the 18 mo after vaccine dose 3 (per protocol) was 46% (95% CI 42% to 50%) (range 40% to 77%; VE, p<0.01 across all sites). VE during the 20 mo after vaccine dose 1 (intention to treat [ITT]) was 45% (95% CI 41% to 49%). VE against severe malaria, malaria hospitalization, and all-cause hospitalization was 34% (95% CI 15% to 48%), 41% (95% CI 30% to 50%), and 19% (95% CI 11% to 27%), respectively (ITT). VE against clinical malaria in infants was 27% (95% CI 20% to 32%, per protocol; 27% [95% CI 21% to 33%], ITT), with no significant protection against severe malaria, malaria hospitalization, or all-cause hospitalization. Post-vaccination anti-circumsporozoite antibody geometric mean titer varied from 348 to 787 EU/ml across sites in children and from 117 to 335 EU/ml in infants (per protocol). VE waned over time in both age categories (Schoenfeld residuals p<0.001). The number of clinical and severe malaria cases averted per 1,000 children vaccinated ranged across sites from 37 to 2,365 and from −1 to 49, respectively; corresponding ranges among infants were −10 to 1,402 and −13 to 37, respectively (ITT). Meningitis was reported as a serious adverse event in 16/5,949 and 1/2,974 children and in 9/4,358 and 3/2,179 infants in the RTS,S/AS01 and control groups, respectively. Conclusions RTS,S/AS01 prevented many cases of clinical and severe malaria over the 18 mo after vaccine dose 3, with the highest impact in areas with the greatest malaria incidence. VE was higher in children than in infants, but even at

  18. Similar protective immunity induced by an inactivated enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine in neonatal rhesus macaques and children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Ma, Kaili; Yang, Erxia; Wang, Jingjing; Che, Yanchun; Jiang, Li; Pu, Jing; Guo, Lei; Feng, Min; Liang, Yan; Cui, Wei; Yang, Huai; Li, Qihan

    2015-11-17

    During the development of enterovirus 71 (EV71) inactivated vaccine for preventing human hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) by EV71 infection, an effective animal model is presumed to be significant and necessary. Our previous study demonstrated that the vesicles in oral regions and limbs potentially associated with viremia, which are the typical manifestations of HFMD, and remarkable pathologic changes were identified in various tissues of neonatal rhesus macaque during EV71 infection. Although an immune response in terms of neutralizing antibody and T cell memory was observed in animals infected by the virus or stimulated by viral antigen, whether such a response could be considered as an indicator to justify the immune response in individuals vaccinated or infected in a pandemic needs to be investigated. Here, a comparative analysis of the neutralizing antibody response and IFN-γ-specific T cell response in vaccinated neonatal rhesus macaques and a human clinical trial with an EV71 inactivated vaccine was performed, and the results showed the identical tendency and increased level of neutralizing antibody and the IFN-γ-specific T cell response stimulated by the EV71 antigen peptide. Importantly, the clinical protective efficacy against virus infection by the elicited immune response in the immunized population compared with the placebo control and the up-modulated gene profile associated with immune activation were similar to those in infected macaques. Further safety verification of this vaccine in neonatal rhesus macaques and children confirmed the potential use of the macaque as a reliable model for the evaluation of an EV71 candidate vaccine.

  19. Safety of a second dose of varicella vaccine administered at 4 to 6 years of age in healthy children in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Diego; Monti, Andrea; Armoni, Judith; Stamboulian, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Varicela Biken [Live varicella Biken vaccine (strain Oka)] is an effective and safe vaccine for the prevention of varicella infection. Although the recommended schedule in all age groups (children, adolescents and adults) is a single dose, physicians in some countries follow the 2007 recommendation of the US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) which recommends “implementation of a routine 2-dose varicella vaccination program for children, with the first dose administered at age 12–15 months and the second dose at age 4–6 years.”1 Therefore, cases can arise when two doses of Varicela Biken are given even though the ACIP guidelines are a response to the US epidemiological situation and for US licensed products based on the Oka/Merck and the Oka-RIT strains (Varicela Biken is not registered in US). The aim of this study is to ascertain the safety of a second dose of Varicela Biken in children who have been previously vaccinated with the same vaccine. In this study, children, 4–6 years of age who had been previously vaccinated with Varicela Biken, received a single 0.5 mL dose of live attenuated varicella virus vaccine containing at least 1,000 Plaque Forming Units (PFU) attenuated live Varicella-zoster virus (Oka strain). Participants were monitored for 30 minutes after vaccination. Predefined injection site and systemic reactions were solicited during the subsequent seven days. Unsolicited injection site reactions and unsolicited systemic events were collected throughout the study. Any serious adverse events occurring throughout the study were reported to the sponsor's pharmacovigilance department. One hundred and twenty two children were recruited and all provided safety data. There were no immediate adverse events or injection site reactions. Forty three percent of participants reported injection site reactions and 22.1% reported systemic reactions on solicitation during the seven days after vaccination. During the 30 day monitoring period

  20. Effectiveness and harms of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines in children, adults and elderly: a critical review and re-analysis of 15 meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Manzoli, Lamberto; Ioannidis, John P A; Flacco, Maria Elena; De Vito, Corrado; Villari, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    Fifteen meta-analyses have been published between 1995 and 2011 to evaluate the efficacy/effectiveness and harms of diverse influenza vaccines--seasonal, H5N1 and 2009 (H1N1)--in various age-classes (healthy children, adults or elderly). These meta-analyses have often adopted different analyses and study selection criteria. Because it is difficult to have a clear picture of vaccine benefits and harms examining single systematic reviews, we compiled the main findings and evaluated which could be the most reasonable explanations for some differences in findings (or their interpretation) across previously published meta-analyses. For each age group, we performed analyses that included all trials that had been included in at least one relevant meta-analysis, also exploring whether effect sizes changed over time. Although we identified several discrepancies among the meta-analyses on seasonal vaccines for children and elderly, overall most seasonal influenza vaccines showed statistically significant efficacy/effectiveness, which was acceptable or high for laboratory-confirmed cases and of modest magnitude for clinically-confirmed cases. The available evidence on parenteral inactivated vaccines for children aged < 2 y remains scarce. Pre-pandemic "avian" H5N1 and pandemic 2009 (H1N1) vaccines can achieve satisfactory immunogenicity, but no meta-analysis has addressed H1N1 vaccination impact on clinical outcomes. Data on harms are overall reassuring, but their value is diminished by inconsistent reporting.

  1. Formative research and development of an evidence-based communication strategy: the introduction of Vi typhoid fever vaccine among school-aged children in Karachi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Pach, Alfred; Tabbusam, Ghurnata; Khan, M Imran; Suhag, Zamir; Hussain, Imtiaz; Hussain, Ejaz; Mumtaz, Uzma; Haq, Inam Ul; Tahir, Rehman; Mirani, Amjad; Yousafzai, Aisha; Sahastrabuddhe, Sushant; Ochiai, R Leon; Soofi, Sajid; Clemens, John D; Favorov, Michael O; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted formative research (a) to identify stakeholders' concerns related to typhoid fever and the need for disease information and (b) to develop a communication strategy to inform stakeholders and address their concerns and motivate for support of a school-based vaccination program in Pakistan. Data were collected during interactive and semi-structured focus group discussions and interviews, followed by a qualitative analysis and multidisciplinary consultative process to identify an effective social mobilization strategy comprised of relevant media channels and messages. The authors conducted 14 focus group discussions with the parents of school-aged children and their teachers, and 13 individual interviews with school, religious, and political leaders. Parents thought that typhoid fever was a dangerous disease, but were unsure of their children's risk. They were interested in vaccination and were comfortable with a school-based vaccination if conducted under the supervision of trained and qualified staff. Teachers and leaders needed information on typhoid fever, the vaccine, procedures, and sponsors of the vaccination program. Meetings were considered the best form of information dissemination, followed by printed materials and mass media. This study shows how qualitative research findings can be translated into an effective social mobilization and communication approach. The findings of the research indicated the importance of increasing awareness of typhoid fever and the benefits of vaccination against the disease. Identification and dissemination of relevant, community-based disease and vaccination information will increase demand and use of vaccination.

  2. Risk analysis of aseptic meningitis after measles-mumps-rubella vaccination in Korean children by using a case-crossover design.

    PubMed

    Ki, Moran; Park, Taesung; Yi, Sung Gon; Oh, Jin Kyoung; Choi, BoYoul

    2003-01-15

    Epidemiologic study of a vaccine's adverse events is not easy; so many countries have no reliable data. Vaccines containing the Urabe or Hoshino strain have been withdrawn from use in several countries. However, the data are not strong enough to form the basis of a recommendation not to use specific strains. The authors used a case-crossover design to estimate the relative risk of aseptic meningitis in children after receiving the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine in Korea. Study subjects were hospitalized children aged 8-36 months who had aseptic meningitis in 1998. Cases were confirmed by hospital chart reviews using previously defined criteria. Through a telephone survey, the authors obtained vaccination date and place information from parents' vaccination records. Study results showed that no significant risk was associated with the Jeryl Lynn or Rubini strain of the vaccine (relative risk = 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.18, 1.97). For the Urabe or Hoshino strain, the relative risk was 5.5 (95% CI: 2.6, 11.8); the risk increased in the third week after vaccination (relative risk = 15.6, 95% CI: 5.9, 41.2) and was elevated until the sixth week. The case-crossover design was useful in confirming the risk of acute adverse events after receiving vaccines.

  3. Comparison of accelerated and rapid schedules for monovalent hepatitis B and combined hepatitis A/B vaccines in children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Yavuz; Varan, Ali; Aydin, G Burca; Sari, Neriman; Yazici, Nalan; Yalcin, Bilgehan; Kutluk, Tezer; Akyuz, Canan; Büyükpamukçu, Münevver

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of immunization against hepatitis A and B infections with "rapid" or "accelerated" schedules in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Fifty-one children were recruited to receive either vaccination schedule, in the "rapid vaccination schedule"; hepatitis B (group I) or combined hepatitis A/B vaccines (group III) were administered at months 0, 1, 2, and 12; in the "accelerated vaccination schedule," hepatitis B (group II) or combined hepatitis A/B (group IV) vaccines were administered on days 0, 7, 21, and 365 intramuscularly. The seroconversion rates at months 1 and 3 were 35.7 and 57.1% in group I and 25 and 18.8% in group II, respectively. Group I developed higher seroconversion rates at month 3. In group III the seroconversion rates for hepatitis B at months 1 and 3 were 54.5 and 60% and in group IV 50 and 70%, respectively. For hepatitis A, the seroconversion rates at months 1 and 3 were 81.8 and 90% in group III and 80 and 88.9% in group IV, respectively. The accelerated vaccination schedule seems to have no advantage in children receiving cancer chemotherapy except for high antibody levels at month 1. In conclusion, the accelerated vaccination schedules are not good choices for cancer patients. The combined hepatitis A/B vaccine is more effective than monovalent vaccine in cancer patients, which probably can be explained by an adjuvant effect of the antigens. The seroconversion of hepatitis A by the combined hepatitis A/B vaccination is very good in cancer patients.

  4. A cost-effectiveness analysis of a 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children in six Latin American countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A recently developed 10-valent pneumococcal non-typeable H influenzae protein D-conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) is expected to afford protection against more than two thirds of isolates causing IPD in children in Latin America, and also against acute otitis media caused by both Spn and NTHi. The objective of this study is to assess the cost-effectiveness of PHiD-CV in comparison to non-vaccination in children under 10 years of age in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru. Methods We used a static, deterministic, compartmental simulation model. The dosing regimen considered included three vaccine doses (at 2 months, 4 months and 6 months) and a booster dose (at 13 months) (3 + 1 schedule). Model outcomes included number of cases prevented, deaths averted, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained and costs. Discount for costs and benefits of long term sequelae was done at 3.5%, and currency reported in 2008-2009 U$S varying between countries. Results The largest effect in case prevention was observed in pneumococcal meningitis (from 27% in Peru to 47% in Colombia), neurologic sequelae after meningitis (from 38% in Peru to 65% in Brazil) and bacteremia (from 42% in Argentina to 49% in Colombia). The proportion of predicted deaths averted annually ranged from 18% in Peru to 33% in Brazil. Overall, the health benefits achieved with PHiD-CV vaccination resulted in a lower QALY loss (from 15% lower in Peru to 26% in Brazil). At a cost of USD 20 per vaccine dose, vaccination was cost-effective in all countries, from being cost saving in Chile to a maximum Incremental Cost-effectiveness Ratio of 7,088 US$ Dollars per QALY gained. Results were robust in the sensitivity analysis, and scenarios with indirect costs affected results more than those with herd immunity. Conclusions The incorporation of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine into routine infant immunization programs in Latin American countries could be a cost-effective strategy

  5. Malnutrition levels among vaccinated and unvaccinated children between 2 and 3 years of age following enrollment in a randomized clinical trial with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (PRV) in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Feller, Andrea J; Zaman, K; Lewis, Kristen D C; Hossain, Ilias; Yunus, M; Sack, David A

    2012-04-27

    A double-masked, individually randomized Phase 3 clinical trial to assess the efficacy, safety and immunogenicity of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (PRV), RotaTeq™, was conducted in rural Matlab, Bangladesh (NCT00362648). A total of 1136 infants were enrolled and randomized to receive either vaccine or placebo in a 1:1 ratio administered with the standard EPI vaccines at a mean age of approximately 8, 12, and 16 weeks. Weight was collected at four time points (study vaccine doses 1, 2, and 3, and a close-out visit in March 2009 at 15-26 months of age), and birth weight was retrospectively collected from information contained on the mother's health card when available. Approximately one year following trial completion a separate study was conducted to collect anthropometry measurements, including weight and height. These measurements were linked with Phase 3 trial data and a post hoc analysis was conducted to assess the effects of rotavirus vaccination on malnutrition among enrolled children who could be located when they were between 27 and 38 months old. Among the 1033 (91%) children located, and measured, for this analysis height-for-age and weight-for-height Z scores were calculated and compared between vaccine and placebo recipients at the anthropometry follow-up 1-year post-trial, and weight-for-age Z scores were calculated at four trial time points in addition to the anthropometry follow-up. The data indicated that there was no effect of rotavirus vaccination on malnutrition in this population at any of the measured time points. PRV, estimated to have about 43% efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in this population, may not reduce the overall burden of diarrheal illness sufficiently among all vaccinees to appreciably measure impact on growth compared with non-vaccinees. Regardless of the impact on malnutrition indicators, rotavirus vaccines are an important intervention for reducing morbidity and mortality in children in developing

  6. Uptake and impact of vaccinating school age children against influenza during a season with circulation of drifted influenza A and B strains, England, 2014/15.

    PubMed

    Pebody, Richard G; Green, Helen K; Andrews, Nick; Boddington, Nicola L; Zhao, Hongxin; Yonova, Ivelina; Ellis, Joanna; Steinberger, Sophia; Donati, Matthew; Elliot, Alex J; Hughes, Helen E; Pathirannehelage, Sameera; Mullett, David; Smith, Gillian E; de Lusignan, Simon; Zambon, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season was the second season of roll-out of a live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) programme for healthy children in England. During this season, besides offering LAIV to all two to four year olds, several areas piloted vaccination of primary (4-11 years) and secondary (11-13 years) age children. Influenza A(H3N2) circulated, with strains genetically and antigenically distinct from the 2014/15 A(H3N2) vaccine strain, followed by a drifted B strain. We assessed the overall and indirect impact of vaccinating school age children, comparing cumulative disease incidence in targeted and non-targeted age groups in vaccine pilot to non-pilot areas. Uptake levels were 56.8% and 49.8% in primary and secondary school pilot areas respectively. In primary school age pilot areas, cumulative primary care influenza-like consultation, emergency department respiratory attendance, respiratory swab positivity, hospitalisation and excess respiratory mortality were consistently lower in targeted and non-targeted age groups, though less for adults and more severe end-points, compared with non-pilot areas. There was no significant reduction for excess all-cause mortality. Little impact was seen in secondary school age pilot only areas compared with non-pilot areas. Vaccination of healthy primary school age children resulted in population-level impact despite circulation of drifted A and B influenza strains.

  7. A review of immunogenicity and tolerability of live attenuated Hepatitis A vaccine in children

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sameer; Mao, J. S.; Motlekar, Salman; Fangcheng, Zhuang; Kadhe, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changing epidemiology of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) has led to an increased susceptibility of adolescents and adults to the infection. Vaccination can remarkably reduce the incidence and associated morbidity of HAV infection. This review is focused on the safety and efficacy of H2 strain derived live attenuated Hepatitis A vaccine. We found the vaccine to be highly immunogenic with minimal or negligible safety issues. Moreover, a single dose of live attenuated vaccine persists a long term immune response and can be a preferred option for developing countries. In 2014, Indian Academy of Paediatrics (IAP) also updated their recommendations for H2 vaccine as a single dose as against the previous 2 dose schedule. A focused approach to include the vaccine in national immunization program should be explored. PMID:27532370

  8. Antibody responses of three Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines after one, two and three doses in Filipino children.

    PubMed

    Capeding, M R; Nohynek, H; Käyhty, H; Pascual, L G; Sunico, E S; Tamundong, A A; Ruutu, P

    1998-01-01

    Differences in the magnitude of antibody response after one, two or three doses of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines have been reported which may influence decision-making regarding which vaccine should be used. This is of particular importance in developing countries where children may not receive a full immunization series and the vaccination schedule may be delayed. Serum antibody responses to three Hib capsular polysaccharide protein conjugate vaccines (PRP-OMP, HbOC and PRP-T) were evaluated in 102 Filipino infants. Vaccination was carried out at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age based on the national Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedule together with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, hepatitis B and oral poliomyelitis vaccines. Sera were collected at 6 weeks and 1 month after each vaccination. Anti-Hib polysaccharide antibody concentrations were determined by Farrtype radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzymeimmunoassay (EIA), Following the first dose, the geometric mean concentrations (GMC, micrograms ml-1) for PRP-OMP, HbOC and PRP-T were 0.69, 0.27 and 0.38, respectively. After two doses, there was a significant response (P < 0.05) to PRP-OMP and PRP-T (0.89 and 1.47) but not for HbOC (0.37). Differences in the GMC after the primary series were significant (pairwise P < 0.05): GMC was highest for PRP-T (4.0), followed by HbOC (1.6) and PRP-OMP (1.1). All three Hib vaccines were immunogenic when given in the local EPI schedule in Filipino infants although significant differences in the kinetics and magnitude of antibody responses were noted. The anti-Hib antibody concentrations determined by RIA and EIA were also compared in order to validate the latter for use in laboratories where it is feasible. There was a good correlation (r2 = 76%; P = 0.0001) in the Hib antibody titres obtained by both assays.

  9. Immune Responses to the O-Specific Polysaccharide Antigen in Children Who Received a Killed Oral Cholera Vaccine Compared to Responses following Natural Cholera Infection in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Taher; Xu, Peng; Aktar, Amena; Johnson, Russell A.; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Bufano, Meagan Kelly; Eckhoff, Grace; Wu-Freeman, Ying; Yu, Yanan; Sultana, Tania; Khanam, Farhana; Saha, Amit; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraf I.; Charles, Richelle C.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Kováč, Pavol; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Current oral cholera vaccines induce lower levels of protective efficacy and shorter durations of protection in young children than in adults. Immunity against cholera is serogroup specific, and immune responses to Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the antigen that mediates serogroup-specific responses, are associated with protection against disease. Despite this, responses against V. cholerae O-specific polysaccharide (OSP), a key component of the LPS responsible for specificity, have not been characterized in children. Here, we report a comparison of polysaccharide antibody responses in children from a region in Bangladesh where cholera is endemic, including infants (6 to 23 months, n = 15), young children (24 to 59 months, n = 14), and older children (5 to 15 years, n = 23) who received two doses of a killed oral cholera vaccine 14 days apart. We found that infants and young children receiving the vaccine did not mount an IgG, IgA, or IgM antibody response to V. cholerae OSP or LPS, whereas older children showed significant responses. In comparison to the vaccinees, young children with wild-type V. cholerae O1 Ogawa infection did mount significant antibody responses against OSP and LPS. We also demonstrated that OSP responses correlated with age in vaccinees, but not in cholera patients, reflecting the ability of even young children with wild-type cholera to develop OSP responses. These differences might contribute to the lower efficacy of protection rendered by vaccination than by wild-type disease in young children and suggest that efforts to improve lipopolysaccharide-specific responses might be critical for achieving optimal cholera vaccine efficacy in this younger age group. PMID:23515016

  10. Prevalence of SCN1A-Related Dravet Syndrome among Children Reported with Seizures following Vaccination: A Population-Based Ten-Year Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Verbeek, Nienke E.; van der Maas, Nicoline A. T.; Jansen, Floor E.; van Kempen, Marjan J. A.; Lindhout, Dick; Brilstra, Eva H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of Dravet syndrome, an epileptic encephalopathy caused by SCN1A-mutations, often with seizure onset after vaccination, among infants reported with seizures following vaccination. To determine differences in characteristics of reported seizures after vaccination in children with and without SCN1A-related Dravet syndrome. Methods Data were reviewed of 1,269 children with seizures following immunization in the first two years of life, reported to the safety surveillance system of the Dutch national immunization program between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2006. Selective, prospective follow-up was performed of children with clinical characteristics compatible with a diagnosis of Dravet syndrome. Results In 21.9% (n = 279) of children, a diagnosis of Dravet syndrome could not be excluded based on available clinical data (median age at follow-up 16 months). Additional follow-up data were obtained in 83.9% (n = 234) of these children (median age 8.5 years). 15 (1.2% of 1,269; 95%CI:0.6 to 1.8%) children were diagnosed with SCN1A-related Dravet syndrome. Of all reported seizures following vaccinations in the first year of life, 2.5% (95%CI:1.3 to 3.6%) were due to SCN1A-related Dravet syndrome, as were 5.9% of reported seizures (95%CI:3.1 to 8.7%) after 2nd or 3rd DTP-IPV-Hib vaccination. Seizures in children with SCN1A-related Dravet syndrome occurred more often with a body temperature below 38.5°C (57.9% vs. 32.6%, p = 0.020) and reoccurred more often after following vaccinations (26.7% vs. 4.0%, p = 0.003), than in children without a diagnosis of SCN1A-related Dravet Syndrome. Conclusions Although Dravet syndrome is a rare genetic epilepsy syndrome, 2.5% of reported seizures following vaccinations in the first year of life in our cohort occurred in children with this disorder. Knowledge on the specific characteristics of vaccination-related seizures in this syndrome might promote early diagnosis and indirectly

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of two doses of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine or one dose of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine, both administered concomitantly with routine immunization to 12- to 18-month-old children

    PubMed Central

    Noya, Francisco; McCormack, Deirdre; Reynolds, Donna L; Neame, Dion; Oster, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the immunogenicity and safety of a two-dose series of a quadrivalent meningococcal (serogroups A, C, Y and W) polysaccharide diphtheria toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACYW-D) administered to toddlers. METHODS: Children were randomly assigned (1:1) at study entry to receive MenACYW-D at 12 and 18 months of age (group 1; n=61) or meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine (MCC) at 12 months of age (group 2; n=62). All received routine childhood immunizations. A, C, Y and W antibody titres were measured in group 1 before and one month after the 18-month MenACYW-D vaccination and were measured in group 2 at one and seven months post-MCC vaccination. Antibodies elicited by diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, and acellular pertussis vaccine adsorbed combined with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae b conjugate (DTaP-IPV-Hib) vaccine coadministered at the 18-month vaccination were measured one month later. Safety data were collected. RESULTS: At 19 months of age, ≥96% in group 1 achieved protective titres for the four meningococcal serogroups after dose 2; 67% in group 2 exhibited protective titres against serogroup C 28 days after MCC vaccination at 12 months of age, declining to 27% seven months later. DTaP-IPV-Hib elicited high antibody concentrations/titres in groups 1 and 2, consistent with historical values. The safety profiles after each dose generated no unexpected safety signals; no serious adverse events were related to vaccination. DISCUSSION: A two-dose series of MenACYW-D given concomitantly with a DTaP-IPV-Hib booster dose at 18 months of age demonstrated a good immunogenicity and safety profile. A two-dose series of MenACYW-D can be used as an alternative to one dose of MCC and provides protection against additional serogroups (NCT ID: NCT01359449). PMID:25285126

  12. Immunogenicity and safety of the 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) co-administered with DTPa vaccine in Japanese children: A randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Satoshi; Kawamura, Naohisa; Kuroki, Haruo; Tokoeda, Yasunobu; Miyazu, Mitsunobu; Iwai, Asayuki; Oishi, Tomohiro; Sato, Tomohide; Suyama, Akari; François, Nancy; Shafi, Fakrudeen; Ruiz-Guiñazú, Javier; Borys, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    This phase III, randomized, open-label, multicenter study (NCT01027845) conducted in Japan assessed the immunogenicity, safety, and reactogenicity of 10-valent pneumococcal nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV, given intramuscularly) co-administered with diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine (DTPa, given subcutaneously). Infants (N=360 ) were randomized (2:1) to receive either PHiD-CV and DTPa (PHiD-CV group) or DTPa alone (control group) as 3-dose primary vaccination (3-4-5 months of age) and booster vaccination (17-19 months of age). Immune responses were measured before and one month after primary/booster vaccination and adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Post-primary immune responses were non-inferior to those in pivotal/efficacy European or Latin American pneumococcal protein D-conjugate vaccine studies. For each PHiD-CV serotype, at least 92.6% of infants post-primary vaccination and at least 97.7% of children post-booster had pneumococcal antibody concentrations ≥0.2 μg/ml, and at least 95.4% post-primary and at least 98.1% post-booster had opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titers ≥8 . Geometric mean antibody concentrations and OPA titers (except OPA titer for 6B) were higher post-booster than post-priming for each serotype. All PHiD-CV-vaccinated children had anti-protein D antibody concentrations ≥100 EL.U/ml one month post-primary/booster vaccination and all were seroprotected/seropositive against each DTPa antigen. Redness and irritability were the most common solicited AEs in both groups. Incidences of unsolicited AEs were comparable between groups. Serious AEs were reported for 47 children (28 in PHiD-CV group); none were assessed as vaccine-related. In conclusion, PHiD-CV induced robust immune responses and was well tolerated when co-administered with DTPa in a 3-dose priming plus booster regimen to Japanese children.

  13. Epidemiology and Factors Related to Clinical Severity of Acute Gastroenteritis in Hospitalized Children after the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate epidemiology and host- and pathogen-related factors associated with clinical severity of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children after rotavirus vaccination introduction. Factors assessed included age, co-infection with more than 2 viruses, and virus-toxigenic Clostridium difficile co-detection. Fecal samples and clinical information, including modified Vesikari scores, were collected from hospitalized children with AGE. The presence of enteric viruses and bacteria, including toxigenic C. difficile, was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Among the 415 children included, virus was detected in stool of 282 (68.0%) children. Co-infection with more than 2 viruses and toxigenic C. difficile were found in 24 (8.5%) and 26 (9.2%) children with viral AGE, respectively. Norovirus (n = 130) infection, including norovirus-associated co-infection, was the most frequent infection, especially in children aged < 24 months (P < 0.001). In the severity-related analysis, age < 24 months was associated with greater diarrheal severity (P < 0.001) and modified Vesikari score (P = 0.001), after adjustment for other severity-related factors including rotavirus status. Although the age at infection with rotavirus was higher than that for other viruses (P = 0.001), rotavirus detection was the most significant risk factor for all severity parameters, including modified Vesikari score (P < 0.001). Viral co-infection and toxigenic C. difficile co-detection were not associated with any severity-related parameter. This information will be helpful in the management of childhood AGE in this era of rotavirus vaccination and availability of molecular diagnostic tests, which often lead to the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens. PMID:28145650

  14. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of two diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis vaccines in Iranian pre-school children, a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Saeed; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Mehdi Akhondi, Mohammad; Zeraati, Hojjat; Ferydonfar, Amir Ali; Nasernia, Jalaledin; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Shokri, Fazel

    2013-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of two diphtheria-tetanus-whole cell pertussis (DTwP) vaccines administered to Iranian preschool children. In this randomized, double-blind and multicenter prospective study, 672 children aged 4-6 y were administered with either a local DTwP vaccine (DTwP-Local) (n = 337) or a commercial vaccine (DTwP-Pasteur) (n = 335). All subjects received DTwP vaccine at 4-6 y of age, following the national immunization schedule of Iran. Blood samples were collected before and 2-4 weeks after the vaccination. Immunogenicity of each vaccine was assessed by ELISA using commercial kits. Reactogenicity was assessed by the parents for seven days post-booster using diary cards. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) of the antibodies induced against diphtheria and tetanus by DTwP-Local were 7.7 and 9.4 IU/ml and those of DTwP-Pasteur were 8.2 and 8.6 IU/ml, respectively. There was no significant difference between the immunogenicity of the two vaccines against diphtheria and tetanus. The GMTs of antibodies produced against pertussis were 30.2 EU/ml for DTwP-Local and 47.9 EU/ml for DTwP-Pasteur vaccines (p<0.001). Pain and fever (axillary temperature>37.5°C) were the most frequent local and systemic reactions observed after the vaccination. All local and systemic reactions observed after vaccination were significantly higher in subjects immunized with DTwP-Local vaccine. Immunogenicity against diphtheria and tetanus was similar for the two vaccines, but immunogenicity of the local vaccine against pertussis was significantly less efficient than that of DTwP-Pasteur. This difference and the higher side effects of the DTwP-Local vaccine could be due to the bacterial strain or the preparation or formulation protocol of the local pertussis vaccine.

  15. 17DD and 17D-213/77 Yellow Fever Substrains Trigger a Balanced Cytokine Profile in Primary Vaccinated Children

    PubMed Central

    Luiza-Silva, Maria; Batista, Maurício Azevedo; Martins, Marina Angela; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; da Silveira-Lemos, Denise; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos; de Menezes Martins, Reinaldo; de Lourdes de Sousa Maia, Maria; Farias, Roberto Henrique Guedes; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Galler, Ricardo; Homma, Akira; Ribeiro, José Geraldo Leite; Lemos, Jandira Aparecida Campos; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Caldas, Iramaya Rodrigues; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare the cytokine-mediated immune response in children submitted to primary vaccination with the YF-17D-213/77 or YF-17DD yellow fever (YF) substrains. Methods A non-probabilistic sample of eighty healthy primary vaccinated (PV) children was selected on the basis of their previously known humoral immune response to the YF vaccines. The selected children were categorized according to their YF-neutralizing antibody titers (PRNT) and referred to as seroconverters (PV-PRNT+) or nonseroconverters (PV-PRNT−). Following revaccination with the YF-17DD, the PV-PRNT− children (YF-17D-213/77 and YF-17DD groups) seroconverted and were referred as RV-PRNT+. The cytokine-mediated immune response was investigated after short-term in vitro cultures of whole blood samples. The results are expressed as frequency of high cytokine producers, taking the global median of the cytokine index (YF-Ag/control) as the cut-off. Results The YF-17D-213/77 and the YF-17DD substrains triggered a balanced overall inflammatory/regulatory cytokine pattern in PV-PRNT+, with a slight predominance of IL-12 in YF-17DD vaccinees and a modest prevalence of IL-10 in YF-17D-213/77. Prominent frequency of neutrophil-derived TNF-α and neutrophils and monocyte-producing IL-12 were the major features of PV-PRNT+ in the YF-17DD, whereas relevant inflammatory response, mediated by IL-12+CD8+ T cells, was the hallmark of the YF-17D-213/77 vaccinees. Both substrains were able to elicit particular but relevant inflammatory events, regardless of the anti-YF PRNT antibody levels. PV-PRNT− children belonging to the YF-17DD arm presented gaps in the inflammatory cytokine signature, especially in terms of the innate immunity, whereas in the YF-17D-213/77 arm the most relevant gap was the deficiency of IL-12-producing CD8+T cells. Revaccination with YF-17DD prompted a balanced cytokine profile in YF-17DD nonresponders and a robust inflammatory profile in YF-17D-213/77 nonresponders

  16. The beneficial effects of game-based exercise using age-appropriate tennis lessons on the executive functions of 6-12-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Toru; Sugasawa, Shigemi; Matsuda, Yusuke; Mizuno, Masao

    2017-03-06

    This study evaluated the effects of two different types of tennis lessons-those involving a technique-based approach (TBA) and those involving a game-based approach (PLAY+STAY [P+S])-on the executive functions (EFs) of junior tennis players. Eighty-one tennis players (6-12 years old) were recruited and assigned to one of three groups: TBA, P+S, or watching TV (CONT). Subjects completed evaluations of EFs (inhibitory control, working memory, and cognitive flexibility) before and after 50min programs. The overall score for EFs improved significantly for both the P+S and TBA groups but not for the CONT group; indeed the CONT group showed no improvement in overall EFs. Furthermore, the overall EF score improved more for P+S participants than for those in TBA. Looking at components of EFs, the pattern for inhibitory control reflected the pattern for the overall EF index: Improvement in the P+S and TBA groups but not in the CONT group. Only the P+S group improved in working memory. Thus, playing tennis and practicing isolated tennis skills both improved EFs of junior players more than did watching TV, and game-based tennis lessons seem to hold more promise for improving EFs than drills of tennis skills.

  17. Identifying long-term memory B-cells in vaccinated children despite waning antibody levels specific for Bordetella pertussis proteins.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Lotte H; Oztürk, Kemal; de Rond, Lia G H; Veenhoven, Reinier H; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Berbers, Guy A M; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-04

    Whooping cough is a respiratory disease caused by Bordetella pertussis. Since the 1950s in developed countries pertussis vaccinations are included in the national immunization program. However, antibody levels rapidly wane after both whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccination. Therefore protection against pertussis may depend largely on long-term B- and T-cell immunities. We investigated long-term pertussis-specific memory B-cell responses in children who were primed at infant age with the Dutch wP-vaccine (ISRCTN65428640). Purified B-cells were characterized by FACS-analysis and after polyclonal stimulation memory B-cells were detected by ELISPOT-assays specific for pertussis toxin, filamentous haemagglutinin, pertactin and tetanus. In addition, plasma IgG levels directed to the same antigens were measured by a fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassay. Two and 3 years after wP priming as well as 2 and 5 years after the aP booster at the age of 4, low plasma IgG levels to the pertussis proteins were found. At the same time, however pertussis protein-specific memory B-cells could be detected and their number increased with age. The number of tetanus-specific memory B-cells was similar in all age groups, whereas IgG-tetanus levels were high 2 years after tetanus booster compared to pre- and 5 years post-booster levels. This study shows the presence of long-term pertussis protein-specific memory B-cells in children despite waning antibody levels after vaccination, which suggests that memory B-cells in addition to antibodies may contribute to protection against pertussis.

  18. Infectious diseases prevalence, vaccination coverage, and diagnostic challenges in a population of internationally adopted children referred to a Tertiary Care Children's Hospital from 2009 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Sollai, Sara; Ghetti, Francesca; Bianchi, Leila; de Martino, Maurizio; Galli, Luisa; Chiappini, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Infectious diseases are common in internationally adopted children (IAC). With the objective to evaluate infectious diseases prevalence in a large cohort of IAC and to explore possible risk factors for tuberculosis (TB) and parasitic infections, clinical and laboratory data at first screening visit of all IAC (<18 years) consecutively referred to our Center in 2009 to 2015 were collected and analyzed. In total, 1612 children (median age: 5.40 years; interquartile range: 3.00–7.90) were enrolled, 123/1612 (7.60%) having medical conditions included in the special needs definition. The most frequent cutaneous infections were Molluscum contagiosum (42/1612; 2.60%) and Tinea capitis (37/1612; 2.30%). Viral hepatitis prevalence was <1% (hepatitis B virus [HBV]: 13 children, 0.80%; hepatitis C virus: 1 child, 0.10%; hepatitis A virus: 6 children, 0.40%). A parasitic infection was diagnosed in 372/1612 (23.10%) children. No risk factors for parasitosis were evidenced. Active TB was diagnosed in 4/1355 (0.3%) children, latent TB in 222/1355 (16.40%). Only 3.7% (51/1355) children had concordant positive tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-G-IT) results. Risk factors for TST+/QFT-G-IT− results were previous Bacille de Calmette-Guérin vaccination (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.18; 96% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26–3.79; P = 0.006), and age ≥5 years (aOR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.06–2.11; P = 0.02). The proportion of children with nonprotective titers for vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) ranged from 15.70% (208/1323) for tetanus to 35.10% (469/1337) for HBV. Infectious diseases were commonly observed in our cohort. The high rate of discordant TST/QFT-G results brings up questions regarding the optimal management of these children, and suggests that, at least in children older than 5 years, only QFT-G-IT results may be reliable. The low proportion of children protected for VPD, confirms importance of a timely screening. PMID

  19. Interventions to reduce inequalities in vaccine uptake in children and adolescents aged <19 years: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Crocker-Buque, Tim; Edelstein, Michael; Mounier-Jack, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Background In high-income countries, substantial differences exist in vaccine uptake relating to socioeconomic status, gender, ethnic group, geographic location and religious belief. This paper updates a 2009 systematic review on effective interventions to decrease vaccine uptake inequalities in light of new technologies applied to vaccination and new vaccine programmes (eg, human papillomavirus in adolescents). Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, ASSIA, The Campbell Collaboration, CINAHL, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Eppi Centre, Eric and PsychINFO for intervention, cohort or ecological studies conducted at primary/community care level in children and young people from birth to 19 years in OECD countries, with vaccine uptake or coverage as outcomes, published between 2008 and 2015. Results The 41 included studies evaluated complex multicomponent interventions (n=16), reminder/recall systems (n=18), outreach programmes (n=3) or computer-based interventions (n=2). Complex, locally designed interventions demonstrated the best evidence for effectiveness in reducing inequalities in deprived, urban, ethnically diverse communities. There is some evidence that postal and telephone reminders are effective, however, evidence remains mixed for text-message reminders, although these may be more effective in adolescents. Interventions that escalated in intensity appeared particularly effective. Computer-based interventions were not effective. Few studies targeted an inequality specifically, although several reported differential effects by the ethnic group. Conclusions Locally designed, multicomponent interventions should be used in urban, ethnically diverse, deprived populations. Some evidence is emerging for text-message reminders, particularly in adolescents. Further research should be conducted in the UK and Europe with a focus on reducing specific inequalities. PMID:27535769

  20. Concomitant administration of hepatitis A vaccine with measles/mumps/rubella/varicella and pneumococcal vaccines in healthy 12- to 23-month-old children.

    PubMed

    Yetman, Robert J; Shepard, Julie S; Duke, Anton; Stek, Jon E; Petrecz, Maria; Klopfer, Stephanie O; Kuter, Barbara J; Schödel, Florian P; Lee, Andrew W

    2013-08-01

    This open-label, multicenter, randomized, comparative study evaluated immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of concomitant (Group 1; n=330) vs. non-concomitant (Group 2; n=323) VAQTA™ (25U/0.5 mL) (hepatitis A vaccine; HAV) with ProQuad™ (measles/mumps/rubella/varicella; MMRV) and Prevnar™ (7-valent pneumococcal; PCV-7) in healthy, 12-23 mo old children. Group 1 received HAV/MMRV/PCV-7 concomitantly on Day 1 and second doses of HAV/MMRV at Week 24. Group 2 received MMRV/PCV-7 on Day 1, HAV at Weeks 6 and 30 and MMRV at Week 34. Hepatitis A seropositivity rate (SPR: ≥10 mIU/mL; 4 weeks postdose 2), varicella zoster-virus (VZV) SPR (≥5 gpELISA units/mL) and geometric mean titers (GMT) to S. pneumoniae were examined. Injection-site and systemic adverse experiences (AEs) and daily temperatures were collected. Hepatitis A SPR were 100% for Group 1 and 99.4% for Group 2 after two HAV doses; risk difference=0.7 (95%CI: -1.4,3.8, non-inferior) regardless of initial serostatus. VZV SPR was 93.3% for Group 1 and 98.3% for Group 2; risk difference=-5.1 (95%CI: -9.3, -1.4; non-inferior). S. pneumoniae GMT fold-difference (7 serotypes) ranged from 0.9 to 1.1; non-inferior. No statistically significant differences in the incidence of individual AEs were seen when HAV was administered concomitantly vs. non-concomitantly. Three (all Group 2 post-administration of MMRV/PCV-7) of 11 serious AEs were considered possibly vaccine-related: dehydration and gastroenteritis (same subject) on Day 52; febrile seizure on Day 9. No deaths were reported. Antibody responses to each vaccine given concomitantly were non-inferior to HAV given non-concomitantly with MMRV and PCV-7. Administration of HAV with PCV-7 and MMRV had an acceptable safety profile in 12- to 23-mo-old children.

  1. Pre-exposure prophylaxis against rabies in children: safety of purified chick embryo cell rabies vaccine (Vaxirab N) when administered by intradermal route.

    PubMed

    Ravish, Haradanahalli S; Srikanth, Jayanthi; Ashwath Narayana, Doddabele Hanumanthaiah; Annadani, Rachana; Vijayashankar, Veena; Undi, Malatesh

    2013-09-01

    Animal bites in humans are a public health problem. Children are the most frequently exposed, representing 50% of human exposures in canine rabies infected areas. Pre-exposure vaccination using cell culture vaccines is a safe and effective method of preventing rabies among children in these highly endemic regions. The development of immunological memory after pre exposure vaccination has established long lasting immunity against rabies in humans. The present study assessed the safety of Purified Chick Embryo cell Rabies Vaccine (Vaxirab N) administered as a three-dose intradermal pre-exposure regimen on days 0, 7, and 21 in healthy volunteered children of 5-10 y age group from an urban poor locality in Bangalore, India. One hundred fifty three apparently healthy children of both sexes between 5 and 10 y of age were enrolled in the study and 123 (80.4%) completed all three doses. A total of 405 doses of intradermal vaccine was administered, among which 25 adverse reactions were reported from 17 children. The adverse reactions were pain at the injection site 15 (3.7%), redness 2 (0.5%), itching at the site of injection 1 (0.2%), fatigue 1 (0.2%), fever 3 (0.7%), myalgia 2 (0.5%) and allergy 1 (0.2%). All reactions subsided without any complication. In conclusion, pre exposure vaccination against rabies is a useful tool for protecting children living in highly endemic regions and Vaxirab N has proved to be safe and well tolerated by intradermal route among children.

  2. The Serum Anti-HBs Level Among Children Who Received Routine Hepatitis B Vaccination During Infancy in Mianyang City, China: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    He, Fang; Ma, Yuan-ji; Zhou, Tao-you; Duan, Jin-chao; Wang, Jun-feng; Ji, Yu-lin; Li, Hong; Zhang, Ju-ying; Tang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevalence has declined remarkably in children due to nationwide universal vaccination program for HBV in China. However, the persistence of immune response against HBV infection and the optimal time point when a booster vaccination should be performed remain to be elucidated. To assess the persistence and level of antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) in a representative population of age 15 and younger who received routine hepatitis B vaccination in Mianyang City, China. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011. One thousand five hundred twenty-six children of age 15 and younger who received three doses of 5 μg hepatitis B vaccine series during infancy but did not receive a booster vaccination later were enrolled. Of the 1,526 children, the mean age was 8.2 ± 4.1 and 739 children were male. The median anti-HBs level was 23.0 mIU/mL, and the total percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥10 mIU/mL was 60.9%. With an increase of age, median anti-HBs level, percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥10 mIU/mL, and percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥100 mIU/mL declined remarkably in the early period and reached the lowest level at the age of 3 and then remained relatively stable. The median anti-HBs level, the percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥10 mIU/mL, and the percentage of anti-HBs levels ≥100 mIU/mL in 1- and 2-year-old children were much higher than that in children aged 3-15 (p < 0.05, respectively). Immunity against HBV infection gradually decreased in early ages of children of 15 and younger who received three doses of 5 μg hepatitis B vaccine series during infancy in China. Three dosages of 10 μg hepatitis B vaccine for infants and repeated vaccination or additional booster vaccination for some children at or before age 3 should be provided to get much more powerful immunity to HBV.

  3. A randomized study of the immunogenicity and safety of Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) in comparison with SA14-14-2 vaccine in children in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Soo; Houillon, Guy; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Cha, Sung-Ho; Choi, Soo-Han; Lee, Jin; Kim, Hwang Min; Kim, Ji Hong; Kang, Jin Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hee Soo; Bang, Joon; Naimi, Zulaikha; Bosch-Castells, Valérie; Boaz, Mark; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2014-01-01

    A new live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) has been developed based on innovative technology to give protection against JE with an improved immunogenicity and safety profile. In this phase 3, observer-blind study, 274 children aged 12-24 months were randomized 1:1 to receive one dose of JE-CV (Group JE-CV) or the SA14-14-2 vaccine currently used to vaccinate against JE in the Republic of Korea (Group SA14-14-2). JE neutralizing antibody titers were assessed using PRNT50 before and 28 days after vaccination. The primary endpoint of non-inferiority of seroconversion rates on D28 was demonstrated in the Per Protocol analysis set as the difference between Group JE-CV and Group SA14-14-2 was 0.9 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI]: -2.35; 4.68), which was above the required -10%. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates 28 days after administration of a single vaccine dose were 100% in Group JE-CV and 99.1% in Group SA14-14-2; all children except one (Group SA14-14-2) were seroprotected. Geometric mean titers (GMTs) increased in both groups from D0 to D28; GM of titer ratios were slightly higher in Group JE-CV (182 [95% CI: 131; 251]) than Group SA14-14-2 (116 [95% CI: 85.5, 157]). A single dose of JE-CV was well tolerated and no safety concerns were identified. In conclusion, a single dose of JE-CV or SA14-14-2 vaccine elicited a comparable immune response with a good safety profile. Results obtained in healthy Korean children aged 12-24 months vaccinated with JE-CV are consistent with those obtained in previous studies conducted with JE-CV in toddlers.

  4. Immune memory to hepatitis B persists in children aged 7-8 years, who were vaccinated in infancy with 4 doses of hexavalent DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib (Infanrix™ hexa) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Van Der Meeren, Olivier; Bleckmann, Gerhard; Crasta, Priya D

    2014-01-01

    Protection against hepatitis B disease relies on either protective serum antibodies or on the ability of the immune system to mount an anamnestic response when confronted with the hepatitis B virus (HBV). This open multicenter study (EUDRACT: 2010-022538-10) measured antibodies to HBV surface antigen (anti-HBs) in 7-8-year-old children who had received 4 doses of hexavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-HBV-inactivated poliovirus-Hemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib: Infanrix™ hexa; GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) in the first 2 years of life through routine vaccine services in Germany. The ability of these children to mount an anamnestic response to a challenge dose of monovalent HBV vaccine (Engerix™ B Kinder; GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines) was also assessed. Before the challenge dose, 78.5% of children had anti-HBs levels ≥6.2 mIU/mL (seropositive) and 72.2% had anti-HBs levels ≥10 mIU/mL (seroprotected). Post-challenge, 98.9% had anti-HBs levels ≥10 mIU/mL and 95.8% had anti-HBs ≥100 mIU/mL. An anamnestic response to the challenge was observed in 96.6% of all subjects. The challenge dose was well tolerated, with a reactogenicity and safety profile consistent with published data. DTPa-HBV-IPV/Hib induces long-lasting immune memory to HBV that appears very similar to that induced by monovalent HBV vaccines. Protection against hepatitis B may be conferred through immune memory in subjects who responded to primary vaccination, even when they subsequently lose detectable levels of circulating anti-HBs antibodies.

  5. Economic and clinical evaluation of a catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in children already immunized with three doses of the 7-valent vaccine in Italy.

    PubMed

    Boccalini, Sara; Azzari, Chiara; Resti, Massimo; Valleriani, Claudia; Cortimiglia, Martina; Tiscione, Emilia; Bechini, Angela; Bonanni, Paolo

    2011-11-28

    A new 13-valent conjugated polysaccharide vaccine (PCV13) against Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, which replaced the 7-valent vaccine (PCV7) in the regional immunization programmes for newborns and children who started but not completed the 3 doses schedule of PCV7, is available in Italy since 2010. The opportunity of administering a further dose of PCV13 to children under 5 years of age who had already completed their vaccination with PCV7, with the aim of extending the serotype coverage, triggered an animated scientific debate. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical/economic evaluation of the administration of a dose of PCV13, in a catch-up programme, for children under 5 years of age, who had already received 3 doses of PCV7. A mathematical model of the clinical/economic impact of the adoption of 4 catch-up strategies with PCV13 (children up to 24, 36, 48 and 60 months old) was set up, with a vaccination coverage of 80%, versus immunization with 3 doses of PCV7 without the catch-up programme. The time span covered by the simulation was 5.5 years. The following clinical outcomes of infection were evaluated: hospitalised meningitis/sepsis, hospitalised bacteraemic pneumonias (complicated and uncomplicated), hospitalised non-bacteraemic pneumonias, and non-hospitalised pneumonias. The administration of one dose of PCV13 to children up to 60 months of age significantly reduces the number of cases of pneumococcal diseases (especially, non-hospitalised pneumonias, 80% of all events prevented, and hospitalised cases of non-bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonias, 15% of all events prevented) and, subsequently, the relative cost for medical treatment. This results in savings for medical costs amounting to more than 1,000,000 Euros when vaccinating children under 24 months of age (up to almost 3 million Euros for children up to 60 months). More than half of those savings are attributable to avoided hospitalised cases of non-bacteraemic pneumococcal

  6. Early BCG and pertussis vaccination and atopic diseases in 5- to 7-year-old preschool children from Augsburg, Germany: results from the MIRIAM study.

    PubMed

    Möhrenschlager, Matthias; Haberl, Victoria M; Krämer, Ursula; Behrendt, Heidrun; Ring, Johannnes

    2007-02-01

    The role of immunization in the development of atopic disorders is still under debate. One reason might be, that because of high vaccination coverage in most countries only few and selected children are not immunized, leading to unstable and often biased effect estimates. In Germany, the situation was different between 1985 and 1991: bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and pertussis vaccination were not officially recommended leading to high numbers of non-vaccinated children in the 1990s. We report on a cross-sectional study with 1673 participants among 5- to 7-year-old preschool children conducted in 1996. We found no hint that BCG vaccination or whole-cell pertussis (WCP) vaccination may lead to higher prevalences of asthma, allergic rhinitis, eczema or allergic sensitization at preschool age. None of the associations was significantly positive. WCP vaccination may be protective against asthma OR 0.55 (95% CI: 0.31-0.98) and against symptoms of eczema in boys.

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of cell-derived MF59®-adjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine for children

    PubMed Central

    Knuf, Markus; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Rümke, Hans; Rivera, Luis; Pedotti, Paola; Arora, Ashwani Kumar; Lattanzi, Maria; Kieninger, Dorothee; Cioppa, Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Mass immunization of children has the potential to decrease infection rates and prevent the transmission of influenza. We evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of different formulations of cell-derived MF59-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted A/H1N1 influenza vaccine in children and adolescents. This was a randomized, single-blind, multicenter study with a total of 666 healthy subjects aged 6 months–17 y in one of 3 vaccination groups, each receiving formulations containing different amounts of influenza A/H1N1 antigen with or without MF59. A booster trivalent seasonal MF59 vaccine was administered one year after primary vaccinations. Antibody titers were assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and microneutralization assays obtained on days 1, 22, 43, 366, and 387 (3 weeks post booster). Safety was monitored throughout the study. One vaccination with 3.75 μg of A/H1N1 antigen formulated with 50% MF59 (3.75_halfMF59) or 7.5 μg of A/H1N1 antigen formulated with 100% MF59 (7.5_fullMF59) induced an HI titer ≥1:40 in >70% of children in the 1–<3, 3–8, and 9–17 y cohorts; however, 2 vaccinations with nonadjuvanted 15 μg A/H1N1 antigen were needed to achieve this response in the 1–<3 and 3–8 y cohorts. Among children aged 6–11 months, 1 dose of 7.5_fullMF59 resulted in an HI titer ≥1:40 in >70% while 2 doses of 3.75_halfMF59 were required to achieve this result. All vaccines were well tolerated. Our findings support the immunogenicity and safety of the 3.75_halfMF59 (2 doses for children <12 months) and 7.5_fullMF59 vaccine formulations for use in children and adolescents aged 6 months to 17 y The use of the 3.75_halfMF59 could have the benefit of antigen and adjuvant sparing, increasing the available vaccine doses allowing vaccination of more people. PMID:25621884

  8. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    PubMed

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

  9. The ESPID/ESWI Joint Symposium - A strong vote for universal influenza vaccination in children in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kobbe, Robin

    2015-12-08

    During this year's 33rd annual meeting in Leipzig, Germany, the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (ESPID) jointly together with the European Scientific Working group on Influenza (ESWI), organized a staged debate on the motion of universal annual immunization of children against influenza as a cost-effective health intervention in Europe. Six invited speakers, all experts in the field of influenza vaccination, who were not necessary confident with their given position of pro or contra, battled each other with short oral presentations to convince the audience to vote for or against the motion.

  10. Vaccines Stop Illness | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Diseases and Vaccinations Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of ... like polio and meningitis will affect their children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  11. The safety and reactogenicity of a reduced-antigen-content diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (dTpa) booster vaccine in healthy Vietnamese children.

    PubMed

    Anh, Dang Duc; Jayadeva, Girish; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-08-17

    Despite effective infant immunization against pertussis, the disease continues to circulate due to waning immunity. Booster vaccinations against pertussis beyond infancy are widely recommended. In Vietnam, however, no recommendations for pertussis boosters beyond the second year of life exist. This open-label, single-centre study was designed to assess the safety of a single booster dose of reduced-antigen-content-diphtheria-tetanus-acellular-pertussis vaccine (dTpa) in 300 healthy Vietnamese children (mean age 7.9years), who had completed primary vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis. Solicited symptoms were recorded for 4days and unsolicited and serious adverse events (SAEs) for 31days post-vaccination. Pain and fatigue were the most common solicited local and general symptoms in 35.0% and 14.0% of children, respectively. Grade 3 swelling occurred in 3 children; no large injection site reactions or SAEs were reported. The dTpa booster vaccine was well tolerated and this study supports its administration in school age Vietnamese children.

  12. Does vaccination ensure protection? Assessing diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels in a population of healthy children: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek; Kałużna, Ewelina; Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Michalak, Michał; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2016-12-01

    Vaccination effectiveness is proven when the disease does not develop after a patient is exposed to the pathogen. In the case of rare diseases, vaccination effectiveness is assessed by monitoring specific antibody levels in the population. Such recurrent analyses allow the evaluation of vaccination programs. The primary schedule of diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations is similar in various countries, with differences mainly in the number and timing of booster doses. The aim of the study was to assess diphtheria and tetanus antibody concentrations in a population of healthy children.Diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels were analyzed in a group of 324 children aged 18 to 180 months. All children were vaccinated in accordance with the Polish vaccination schedule.Specific antibody concentrations greater than 0.1 IU/mL were considered protective against tetanus or diphtheria. Levels above 1.0 were considered to ensure long-term protection.Protective levels of diphtheria antibodies were found in 229 patients (70.46%), and of tetanus in 306 patients (94.15%). Statistically significant differences were found in tetanus antibody levels in different age groups. Mean concentrations and the percentage of children with high tetanus antibody titers increased with age. No similar correlation was found for diphtheria antibodies. High diphtheria antibody levels co-occurred in 72% of the children with high tetanus antibody levels; 95% of the children with low tetanus antibody levels had low levels of diphtheria antibodies.The percentage of children with protective diphtheria antibody levels is lower than that in the case of tetanus antibodies, both in Poland and abroad, but the high proportion of children without diphtheria protection in Poland is an exception. This is all the more puzzling when taking into account that Polish children are administered a total of 5 doses containing a high concentration of diphtheria toxoid, at intervals shorter than 5 years. The decrease in

  13. Modeling the Potential for Vaccination to Diminish the Burden of Invasive Non-typhoidal Salmonella Disease in Young Children in Mali, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Kristin; Hungerford, Laura; Hartley, David; Sorkin, John D.; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Sow, Samba O.; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M.

    2017-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, systematic surveillance of young children with suspected invasive bacterial disease (e.g., septicemia, meningitis) has revealed non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) to be a major pathogen exhibiting high case fatality (~20%). Where infant vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae has been introduced to prevent invasive disease caused by these pathogens, as in Bamako, Mali, their burden has decreased markedly. In parallel, NTS has become the predominant invasive bacterial pathogen in children aged <5 years. While NTS is believed to be acquired orally via contaminated food/water, epidemiologic studies have failed to identify the reservoir of infection or vehicles of transmission. This has precluded targeting food chain interventions to diminish disease transmission but conversely has fostered the development of vaccines to prevent invasive NTS (iNTS) disease. We developed a mathematical model to estimate the potential impact of NTS vaccination programs in Bamako. Methodology/Principal Findings A Markov chain transmission model was developed utilizing age-specific Bamako demographic data and hospital surveillance data for iNTS disease in children aged <5 years and assuming vaccine coverage and efficacy similar to the existing, successfully implemented, Hib vaccine. Annual iNTS hospitalizations and deaths in children <5 years, with and without a Salmonella Enteritidis/Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine, were the model’s outcomes of interest. Per the model, high coverage/high efficacy iNTS vaccination programs would drastically diminish iNTS disease except among infants age <8 weeks. Conclusions/Significance The public health impact of NTS vaccination shifts as disease burden, vaccine coverage, and serovar distribution vary. Our model shows that implementing an iNTS vaccine through an analogous strategy to the Hib vaccination program in Bamako would markedly reduce cases and deaths due to iNTS among

  14. Pneumococcal carriage in children attending a hospital outpatient clinic in the era of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Barcelona.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Bou, Susanna; Garcia-Garcia, Juan Jose; Gene, Amadeu; Esteva, Cristina; del Amo, Eva; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2012-11-01

    Between April 2004 and March 2006 an oropharyngeal swab was obtained from 502 asymptomatic children, aged 6 months to 6 years, at a tertiary children's hospital outpatient department to assess the pneumococcal colonisation rate, risk factors, serotype distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility. Only 126 (25.3%) children had received ≥ 1 dose of PCV7. The pneumococcal carriage rate was 23.5%. Carrier rates were significantly higher in children aged ≥ 24 months and children attending daycare center. Thirty six (31.0%) of the isolates were contained in PCV7, 39 (33.6%) in PCV10 and 62 (53.4%) in PCV13. Forty-four strains (37.9%) were resistant to penicillin. Vaccine serotype (VT) strains were more likely to be penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae than non-PCV7 serotype (NVT) strains (66.7% vs. 21.6%; P < 0.001). In our pediatric population, NVT were predominant among pneumococcal carriers whereas antibiotic resistance was significantly associated with VT. PCV13 can substantially increase the serotype coverage of S.pneumoniae in healthy carriers.

  15. Safety and immunogenicity of an intramuscular quadrivalent influenza vaccine in children 3 to 8 y of age: A phase III randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Stephanie; Szymanski, Henryk; Rochín Kobashi, Ilya Angélica; Villagomez Martinez, Sandra; González Zamora, José Francisco; Brzostek, Jerzy; Huang, Li-Min; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Po-Yen; Ahonen, Anitta; Forstén, Aino; Seppä, Ilkka; Quiroz, René Farfán; Korhonen, Tiina; Rivas, Enrique; Monfredo, Celine; Hutagalung, Yanee; Menezes, Josemund; Vesikari, Timo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A quadrivalent, inactivated, split-virion influenza vaccine containing a strain from both B lineages (IIV4) has been developed, but its safety and immunogenicity in young children has not been described. This was a phase III, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, multi-center study to examine the immunogenicity and safety of IIV4 in children 3–8 y of age (EudraCT no. 2011-005374-33). Participants were randomized 5:1:1 to receive the 2013/2014 Northern Hemisphere formulation of IIV4, an investigational trivalent comparator (IIV3) containing the B/Victoria lineage strain, or the licensed Northern Hemisphere IIV3 containing the B/Yamagata lineage strain. Participants who had not previously received a full influenza vaccination schedule received 2 doses of vaccine 28 d apart; all others received a single dose. 1242 children were included. For all 4 strains, IIV4 induced geometric mean haemagglutination inhibition titres non-inferior to those induced by the IIV3 comparators. For both B strains, geometric mean antibody titres induced by IIV4 were superior to those induced by the IIV3 with the alternative lineage strain. Similar proportions of participants vaccinated with IIV4 and IIV3 reported solicited injection-site reactions, solicited systemic reactions, and vaccine-related adverse events. A single vaccine-related serious adverse event, thrombocytopenia, was reported 9 d after vaccination with IIV4 and resolved without sequelae. In conclusion, in children aged 3–8 y who received one dose or 2 doses 28 d apart, IIV4 had an acceptable safety profile, was as immunogenic as IIV3 for the shared strains, and had superior immunogenicity for the additional B strain. PMID:27565435

  16. Vexing Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  17. A model for estimating the impact of changes in children's vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, K N; Biddle, A K; Rabinovich, N R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To assist in strategic planning for the improvement of vaccines and vaccine programs, an economic model was developed and tested that estimates the potential impact of vaccine innovations on health outcomes and costs associated with vaccination and illness. METHODS. A multistep, iterative process of data extraction/integration was used to develop the model and the scenarios. Parameter replication, sensitivity analysis, and expert review were used to validate the model. RESULTS. The greatest impact on the improvement of health is expected to result from the production of less reactogenic vaccines that require fewer inoculations for immunity. The greatest economic impact is predicted from improvements that decrease the number of inoculations required. CONCLUSIONS. Scenario analysis may be useful for integrating health outcomes and economic data into decision making. For childhood infections, this analysis indicates that large cost savings can be achieved in the future if we can improve vaccine efficacy so that the number of required inoculations is reduced. Such an improvement represents a large potential "payback" for the United States and might benefit other countries. PMID:7503342

  18. Incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis by age in African, Asian and European children: Relevance for timing of rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Steele, A. Duncan; Madhi, Shabir A.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; Vesikari, Timo; Phua, Kong Boo; Lim, Fong Seng; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Lau, Yu-Lung; Huang, Li-Min; Karkada, Naveen; Debrus, Serge; Han, Htay Htay; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variability in rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) epidemiology can influence the optimal vaccination schedule. We evaluated regional trends in the age of RVGE episodes in low- to middle- versus high-income countries in three continents. We undertook a post-hoc analysis based on efficacy trials of a human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix™, GSK Vaccines), in which 1348, 1641, and 5250 healthy infants received a placebo in Europe (NCT00140686), Africa (NCT00241644), and Asia (NCT00197210, NCT00329745). Incidence of any/severe RVGE by age at onset was evaluated by active surveillance over the first two years of life. Severity of RVGE episodes was assessed using the Vesikari-scale. The incidence of any RVGE in Africa was higher than in Europe during the first year of life (≤2.78% vs. ≤2.03% per month), but much lower during the second one (≤0.86% versus ≤2.00% per month). The incidence of severe RVGE in Africa was slightly lower than in Europe during the first year of life. Nevertheless, temporal profiles for the incidence of severe RVGE in Africa and Europe during the first (≤1.00% and ≤1.23% per month) and second (≤0.53% and ≤1.13% per month) years of life were similar to those of any RVGE. Any/severe RVGE incidences peaked at younger ages in Africa vs. Europe. In high-income Asian regions, severe RVGE incidence (≤0.31% per month) remained low during the study. The burden of any RVGE was higher earlier in life in children from low- to middle- compared with high-income countries. Differing rotavirus vaccine schedules are likely warranted to maximize protection in different settings. PMID:27260009

  19. Incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis by age in African, Asian and European children: Relevance for timing of rotavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Steele, A Duncan; Madhi, Shabir A; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Vesikari, Timo; Phua, Kong Boo; Lim, Fong Seng; Nelson, E Anthony S; Lau, Yu-Lung; Huang, Li-Min; Karkada, Naveen; Debrus, Serge; Han, Htay Htay; Benninghoff, Bernd

    2016-09-01

    Variability in rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) epidemiology can influence the optimal vaccination schedule. We evaluated regional trends in the age of RVGE episodes in low- to middle- versus high-income countries in three continents. We undertook a post-hoc analysis based on efficacy trials of a human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; Rotarix™, GSK Vaccines), in which 1348, 1641, and 5250 healthy infants received a placebo in Europe (NCT00140686), Africa (NCT00241644), and Asia (NCT00197210, NCT00329745). Incidence of any/severe RVGE by age at onset was evaluated by active surveillance over the first two years of life. Severity of RVGE episodes was assessed using the Vesikari-scale. The incidence of any RVGE in Africa was higher than in Europe during the first year of life (≤2.78% vs. ≤2.03% per month), but much lower during the second one (≤0.86% versus ≤2.00% per month). The incidence of severe RVGE in Africa was slightly lower than in Europe during the first year of life. Nevertheless, temporal profiles for the incidence of severe RVGE in Africa and Europe during the first (≤1.00% and ≤1.23% per month) and second (≤0.53% and ≤1.13% per month) years of life were similar to those of any RVGE. Any/severe RVGE incidences peaked at younger ages in Africa vs. Europe. In high-income Asian regions, severe RVGE incidence (≤0.31% per month) remained low during the study. The burden of any RVGE was higher earlier in life in children from low- to middle- compared with high-income countries. Differing rotavirus vaccine schedules are likely warranted to maximize protection in different settings.

  20. Detection of influenza vaccine effectiveness among nursery school children: Lesson from a season with cocirculating respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Keiko; Fujieda, Megumi; Miki, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Wakaba; Ohfuji, Satoko; Maeda, Akiko; Kase, Tetsuo; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    In the winter influenza epidemic season, patients with respiratory illnesses including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections increase among young children. Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against influenza-like illness (ILI) using a technique to identify outbreaks of RSV infection and to distinguish those patients from ILI patients. The study subjects were 101 children aged 12 to 84 months attending nursery school. We classified the cases into 6 levels based on the definitions of ILI for outcomes. We established observation periods according to information obtained from regional surveillance and rapid diagnostic tests among children. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) for each case classification were obtained using a logistic regression model for each observation period. For the entire observation period, ORs for cases with fever plus respiratory symptoms were reduced marginally significantly. For the local influenza epidemic period, only the OR for the most serious cases was significantly decreased (0.20 [95%CI: 0.04-0.94]). During the influenza outbreak among the nursery school children, multivariate ORs for fever plus respiratory symptoms decreased significantly (≥ 38.0°C plus ≥ one symptoms: 0.23 [0.06-0.91), ≥ 38.0°C plus ≥ 2 symptoms: 0.21 [0.05-0.85], ≥ 39.0°C plus ≥ one symptoms: 0.18 [0.04-0.93] and ≥ 39.0°C plus ≥ 2 symptoms: 0.16 [0.03-0.87]). These results suggest that confining observation to the peak influenza epidemic period and adoption of a strict case classification system can minimize outcome misclassification when evaluating the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against ILI, even if influenza and RSV cocirculate in the same season. PMID:25714791

  1. Pneumococcal Carriage in Children under Five Years in Uganda-Will Present Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines Be Appropriate?

    PubMed Central

    Kalyango, Joan; Alfvén, Tobias; Darenberg, Jessica; Kadobera, Daniel; Bwanga, Freddie; Peterson, Stefan; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Källander, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Pneumonia is the major cause of death in children globally, with more than 900,000 deaths annually in children under five years of age. Streptococcus pneumoniae causes most deaths, most often in the form of community acquired pneumonia. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) are currently being implemented in many low-income countries. PCVs decrease vaccine-type pneumococcal carriage, a prerequisite for invasive pneumococcal disease, and thereby affects pneumococcal disease and transmission. In Uganda, PCV was launched in 2014, but baseline data is lacking for pneumococcal serotypes in carriage. Objectives To study pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage and serotype distribution in children under 5 years of age prior to PCV introduction in Uganda Methods Three cross-sectional pneumococcal carriage surveys were conducted in 2008, 2009 and 2011, comprising respectively 150, 587 and 1024 randomly selected children aged less than five years from the Iganga/Mayuge Health and Demographic Surveillance Site. The caretakers were interviewed about illness history of the child and 1723 nasopharyngeal specimens were collected. From these, 927 isolates of S. pneumoniae were serotyped. Results Overall, the carriage rate of S. pneumoniae was 56% (957/1723). Pneumococcal carriage was associated with illness on the day of the interview (OR = 1.50, p = 0.04). The most common pneumococcal serotypes were in descending order 19F (16%), 23F (9%), 6A (8%), 29 (7%) and 6B (7%). One percent of the strains were non-typeable. The potential serotype coverage rate for PCV10 was 42% and 54% for PCV13. Conclusion About half of circulating pneumococcal serotypes in carriage in the Ugandan under-five population studied was covered by available PCVs. PMID:27829063

  2. Pneumococcal serotype distribution in adults with invasive disease and in carrier children in Italy: Should we expect herd protection of adults through infants' vaccination?

    PubMed

    Azzari, Chiara; Cortimiglia, Martina; Nieddu, Francesco; Moriondo, Maria; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Mattei, Romano; Zuliani, Massimo; Adriani, Beatrice; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Consales, Guglielmo; Aquilini, Donatella; Bini, Giancarlo; Di Natale, Massimo Edoardo; Canessa, Clementina; Ricci, Silvia; de Vitis, Elisa; Mangone, Giusi; Bechini, Angela; Bonanni, Paolo; Pasinato, Angela; Resti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) produced a significant herd protection in unvaccinated adult population mostly because of pneumococcus carriage decrease in vaccinated children. It is not known if the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine can give similar effect on adults. Aims of the work were to evaluate whether the 6 additional serotypes are present in nasopharynx of children and serotype distribution in invasive pneumococcal infections (IPD) in adults. Realtime-PCR was used to evaluate pneumococcal serotypes in adults with confirmed IPD and in nasopharyngeal swabs (NP) from 629 children not vaccinated or vaccinated with PCV7 and resident in the same geographical areas. Two hundred twenty-one patients (116 males, median 67.9 years) with IPD were studied (pneumonia n = 103, meningitis n = 61 sepsis n = 50, other n = 7). Two hundred twelve were serotyped. The most frequent serotypes were 3, (31/212; 14.6%), 19A, (19/212; 9.0%), 12 (17/212; 8.0%), 7F, (14/212; 6.6%). In NP of children, the frequency of those serotypes causing over 50% of IPD in adults was very low, ranging from 0.48% for serotype 7F to 7.9% for serotype 19A. On the other side serotype 5, very frequent in NP (18.7%) caused <1% IPD. In conclusion serotypes causing IPD in adults are very rarely found in children NP. We suggest that herd protection obtainable with the additional 6 serotypes included in PCV13 may be more limited than that demonstrated with PCV7 in the past. In order to reduce the burden of disease in adults, adults should be offered a specific vaccination program with highly immunogenic PCV.

  3. The manufacturing process should remain the focus for severe febrile reactions in children administered an Australian inactivated influenza vaccine during 2010.

    PubMed

    Li-Kim-Moy, Jean; Booy, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Influenza vaccine safety is an ongoing issue. In 2010, inactivated trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs), Fluvax(®) and Fluvax Junior(®) manufactured by CSL Biotherapies ('CSL'), Parkville, Australia, were associated with a marked increase in febrile seizures (FS) in children <5 years old. Extensive investigations initially failed to identify a root cause. The company's researchers recently published two papers outlining their latest findings. Cytokine responses to TIV were measured in paediatric whole blood assays (WBA); NF-κB activation was assessed using a HEK293 cell line reporter assay. CSL suggest that the combination of new influenza strains (H1N1 A/California/7/2009 and B/Brisbane/60/2008), increased complexes of viral RNA and lipid in the vaccine, and inherent sensitivities of some children <5 years old caused elevated inflammatory responses resulting in FS. Whilst the papers provide insight into pathogenesis, much remains unclear. The WBA were from only 10 'healthy' children, potentially affecting generalisability of the results and reliability of these in vitro tests in assessing future influenza vaccine safety. Increased fever rates (without FS) found in CSL TIV studies between 2005 and 2010 suggest a long-standing contribution to reactogenicity from the manufacturing process. More detailed comparisons with non-CSL vaccines would have helped elucidate the relative contribution of patient/strain factors and the manufacturing process. The focus remains on manufacturing process differences as the key causative factor of elevated febrile responses. Studies underway, of modified vaccines in young children, will determine whether reactogenicity issues have been successfully addressed and whether CSL TIV can be relicensed in children <5 years of age.

  4. A randomized controlled study to evaluate the immunogenicity of a trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine at two dosages in children 6 to 35 months of age.

    PubMed

    Pavia-Ruz, Noris; Angel Rodriguez Weber, Miguel; Lau, Yu-Lung; Nelson, E Anthony S; Kerdpanich, Angkool; Huang, Li-Min; Silas, Peter; Qaqundah, Paul; Blatter, Mark; Jeanfreau, Robert; Lei, Paul; Jain, Varsha; El Idrissi, Mohamed; Feng, Yang; Innis, Bruce; Peeters, Mathieu; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie

    2013-09-01

    The trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine Fluarix™ is licensed in the US for adults and children from 3 years old. This randomized observer-blind study (NCT00764790) evaluated Fluarix™ at two doses; 0.25 ml (Flu-25) and 0.5 ml (Flu-50) in children aged 6-35 months. The primary objective was to demonstrate immunogenic non-inferiority vs. a control vaccine (Fluzone®; 0.25 ml). Children received Flu-25 (n = 1107), Flu-50 (n = 1106) or control vaccine (n = 1104) at Day 0 and for un-primed children, also on Day 28. Serum hemagglutination-inhibition titers were determined pre-vaccination and at Day 28 (primed) or Day 56 (un-primed). Non-inferiority was assessed by post-vaccination geometric mean titer (GMT) ratio, (upper 95% confidence interval [CI] ≤ 1.5) and difference in seroconversion rate (upper 95% CI ≤ 10%). Reactogenicity/safety was monitored. The immune response to Flu-50 met all regulatory criteria. Indicated by adjusted GMT ratios [with 95% CI], the criteria for non-inferiority of Flu-50 vs. control vaccine were reached for the B/Florida strain (1.13 [1.01-1.25]) but not for the A/Brisbane/H1N1 (1.74 [1.54-1.98]) or A/Uruguay/H3N2 (1.72 [1.57-1.89]) strains. In children aged 18-35 months similar immune responses were observed for Flu-50 and the control vaccine. Flu-50 induced a higher response than Flu-25 for all strains. Temperature (≥ 37.5°C) was reported in 6.2%, 6.4%, and 6.6% of the Flu-25, Flu-50, and control group, respectively. Reactogenicity/safety endpoints were within the same range for all vaccines. In children aged 6-35 months, immune responses with Flu-50 fulfilled regulatory criteria but did not meet the pre-defined criteria for non-inferiority vs. control. This appeared to be due to differences in immunogenicity in children aged<18 months.

  5. Reactogenicity and immunogenicity profile of a two-dose combined hepatitis A and B vaccine in 1-11-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Roberton, D; Marshall, H; Nolan, T M; Sokal, E; Díez-Domingo, J; Flodmark, C-E; Rombo, L; Lewald, G; Flor, J de la; Casanovas, J M; Verdaguer, J; Marés, J; Esso, D Van; Dieussaert, I; Stoffel, M

    2005-10-17

    This study was conducted to compare the reactogenicity, immunogenicity and safety of a combined two-dose (0, 6 months) hepatitis A and B vaccine (720ELU HAV, 20 mcg HBsAg) with the established three-dose (0, 1 and 6 months) hepatitis A and B vaccine (360ELU HAV, 10 mcg HBsAg). A total of 511 children aged 1-11 years who had not previously received a hepatitis A or B vaccine were enrolled in the study. Both vaccines were well tolerated, and were shown to be safe and immunogenic. The analysis, stratified according to two age groups (1-5 year and 6-11-year-old children) demonstrated that the reactogenicity profile of the two-dose schedule was at least as good as that of the established schedule. Both vaccines and schedules provided at least 98% seroprotection against hepatitis B and 100% seroconversion against hepatitis A, 1 month after the end of the vaccination course (Month 7).

  6. A randomised double-blind clinical trial of two yellow fever vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77 in children nine-23 months old

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This randomised, double-blind, multicentre study with children nine-23 months old evaluated the immunogenicity of yellow fever (YF) vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77. YF antibodies were tittered before and 30 or more days after vaccination. Seropositivity and seroconversion were analysed according to the maternal serological status and the collaborating centre. A total of 1,966 children were randomised in the municipalities of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais and São Paulo and blood samples were collected from 1,714 mothers. Seropositivity was observed in 78.6% of mothers and 8.9% of children before vaccination. After vaccination, seropositivity rates of 81.9% and 83.2%, seroconversion rates of 84.8% and 85.8% and rates of a four-fold increase over the pre-vaccination titre of 77.6% and 81.8% were observed in the 17D-213/77 and 17DD subgroups, respectively. There was no association with maternal immunity. Among children aged 12 months or older, the seroconversion rates of 69% were associated with concomitant vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. The data were not conclusive regarding the interference of maternal immunity in the immune response to the YF vaccine, but they suggest interference from other vaccines. The failures in seroconversion after vaccination support the recommendation of a booster dose in children within 10 years of the first dose. PMID:26517656

  7. A randomised double-blind clinical trial of two yellow fever vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77 in children nine-23 months old.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    This randomised, double-blind, multicentre study with children nine-23 months old evaluated the immunogenicity of yellow fever (YF) vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77. YF antibodies were titered before and 30 or more days after vaccination. Seropositivity and seroconversion were analysed according to the maternal serological status and the collaborating centre. A total of 1,966 children were randomised in the municipalities of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais and São Paulo and blood samples were collected from 1,714 mothers. Seropositivity was observed in 78.6% of mothers and 8.9% of children before vaccination. After vaccination, seropositivity rates of 81.9% and 83.2%, seroconversion rates of 84.8% and 85.8% and rates of a four-fold increase over the pre-vaccination titre of 77.6% and 81.8% were observed in the 17D-213/77 and 17DD subgroups, respectively. There was no association with maternal immunity. Among children aged 12 months or older, the seroconversion rates of 69% were associated with concomitant vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. The data were not conclusive regarding the interference of maternal immunity in the immune response to the YF vaccine, but they suggest interference from other vaccines. The failures in seroconversion after vaccination support the recommendation of a booster dose in children within 10 years of the first dose.

  8. Bacterial Density, Serotype Distribution and Antibiotic Resistance of Pneumococcal Strains from the Nasopharynx of Peruvian Children Before and After Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine 7

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Christiane R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Chochua, Sopio; Pletz, Mathias W.; Hornberg, Claudia; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Griffin, Marie R.; Verastegui, Hector; Gil, Ana I.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Klugman, Keith P.; Vidal, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) have decreased nasopharyngeal carriage of vaccine-types but little data exists from rural areas. We investigated bacterial density, serotype distribution and antibiotic resistance of pneumococcal strains within the nasopharynx of young children in the Peruvian Andes, two years after PCV7 was introduced. Methods Pneumococcal strains were isolated from a subset of 125 children from our Peruvian cohort, who entered the study in 2009 and had pneumococcus detected in the nasopharynx in both 2009 and during follow-up in 2011. Strains were quellung-serotyped and tested for susceptibility to antibiotics. Bacterial density was determined by qPCR. Results The prevalence of PCV7 strains decreased from 48% in 2009 to 28.8% in 2011, whereas non-PCV7 types increased from 52% to 71.2% (p=0.002). There was a 3.5-fold increase in carriage of serotype 6C in 2011 (p=0.026). Vaccination with PCV7 did not affect pneumococcal density in children colonized by a PCV7 type but did increased density in those colonized with a non-PCV7 type. Antibiotic resistance did not change after vaccine introduction; strains were non-susceptible to tetracycline (97.2%), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (56.4%), penicillin (34%), erythromycin (22.4%), chloramphenicol (18.8%) and clindamycin (12.4%). Conclusions Serotype replacement was observed post-PCV7 vaccination with a concomitant, not previously recognized, increased nasopharyngeal density. PMID:26974749

  9. Long-Term Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Live-Attenuated Dengue Vaccine and Evaluation of a Booster Dose Administered to Healthy Thai Children.

    PubMed

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Simasathien, Sriluck; Mammen, Mammen P; Nisalak, Ananda; Tournay, Elodie; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Putnak, Robert J; Gibbons, Robert V; Yoon, In-Kyu; Jarman, Richard G; De La Barrera, Rafael; Moris, Philippe; Eckels, Kenneth H; Thomas, Stephen J; Innis, Bruce L

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of two doses of a live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (F17/Pre formulation) and a booster dose in a dengue endemic setting in two studies. Seven children (7- to 8-year-olds) were followed for 1 year after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17/Pre formulation), and followed for four more years (Child study). In the Infant study, 49 2-year-olds, vaccinated as infants, were followed for approximately 3.5 years after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17) and followed for one additional year. Two clinically notable events were observed, both in dengue vaccine recipients in the Infant study: 1 case of dengue approximately 2.7 years after dose 2 and 1 case of suspected dengue after booster vaccinations. The booster vaccinations had a favorable safety profile in terms of reactogenicity and adverse events reported during the 1-month follow-up periods. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the studies. Neutralizing antibodies against dengue viruses 1-4 waned during the 1-3 years before boosting, which elicited a short-lived booster response but did not provide a long-lived, multivalent antibody response in most subjects. Overall, this candidate vaccine did not elicit a durable humoral immune response.

  10. Randomized trial to compare the safety and immunogenicity of CSL Limited's 2009 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine to an established vaccine in United States children.

    PubMed

    Brady, Rebecca C; Hu, Wilson; Houchin, Vonda G; Eder, Frank S; Jackson, Kenneth C; Hartel, Gunter F; Sawlwin, Daphne C; Albano, Frank R; Greenberg, Michael

    2014-12-12

    A trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (CSL's TIV, CSL Limited) was licensed under USA accelerated approval regulations for use in persons≥18 years. We performed a randomized, observer-blind study to assess the safety and immunogenicity of CSL's TIV versus an established US-licensed vaccine in a population≥6 months to <18 years of age. Subjects were stratified as follows: Cohort A (≥6 months to <3 years); Cohort B (≥3 years to <9 years); and Cohort C (≥9 years to <18 years). The subject's age and influenza vaccination history determined the dosing regimen (one or two vaccinations). Subjects received CSL's TIV (n=739) or the established vaccine (n=735) in the autumn of 2009. Serum hemagglutination-inhibition titers were determined pre-vaccination and 30 days after the last vaccination. No febrile seizures or other vaccine-related SAEs were reported. After the first vaccination for Cohorts A and B, respectively, the relative risks of fever were 2.73 and 2.32 times higher for CSL's TIV compared to the established vaccine. Irritability and loss of appetite (for Cohort A) and malaise (for Cohort B) were also significantly higher for CSL's TIV compared to the established vaccine. Post-vaccination geometric mean titers (GMTs) for CSL's TIV versus the established vaccine were 385.49 vs. 382.45 for H1N1; 669.13 vs. 705.61 for H3N2; and 100.65 vs. 93.72 for B. CSL's TIV demonstrated immunological non-inferiority to the established vaccine in all cohorts.

  11. A phase 1, open-label safety and immunogenicity study of an AS03-adjuvanted trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in children aged 6 to 35 months

    PubMed Central

    Carmona Martinez, Alfonso; Salamanca de la Cueva, Ignacio; Boutet, Philippe; Vanden Abeele, Carline; Smolenov, Igor; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is a need for better vaccines and vaccine strategies to reduce the burden of influenza in very young children.   Methods: This phase 1, open-label study assessed the reactogenicity, safety, and immunogenicity of an inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) containing low doses of hemagglutinin antigen (7.5 µg each strain), adjuvanted with a tocopherol-based oil-in-water emulsion Adjuvant System (AS03). Influenza vaccine-naïve children aged 6–35 months were sequentially enrolled to receive TIV-AS03D (1.48 mg tocopherol) or TIV-AS03C (2.97 mg tocopherol), then a 6-month booster of conventional TIV. The primary endpoint was the incidence of fever (axillary temperature >38 °C) for 7 days post-vaccination. Immune responses were assessed by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay. Results: Forty children were sequentially enrolled into the TIV-AS03D or the TIV-AS03C group. Fever >38.0 °C was reported in 5/20 (25.0%) and 7/20 (35.0%) children after the first and second doses of TIV-AS03D, respectively, and in 7/20 (35.0%) children after 1 dose of TIV-AS03C; the latter fulfilled the holding rule for safety, and the second dose of TIV-AS03C was cancelled. HI immune responses exceeded adult European licensure criteria for the immunogenicity, and all children had HI antibody titers ≥ 1:40 after 1 dose of TIV booster against booster strains. Conclusions: One dose of primary vaccine containing a low dose of antigen and AS03 may be a possible influenza vaccination strategy for young children. The relatively high frequency of fever warrants further investigation, although the generalizability of the findings are uncertain given that many of the children had antibody evidence suggesting recent infection with A(H1N1)pdm09. PMID:25424805

  12. Characterization of Functional Antibody and Memory B-Cell Responses to pH1N1 Monovalent Vaccine in HIV-Infected Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Donna J.; Muresan, Petronella; Nachman, Sharon; Fenton, Terence; Richardson, Kelly M.; Dominguez, Teresa; Flynn, Patricia M.; Spector, Stephen A.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Bloom, Anthony; Weinberg, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We investigated immune determinants of antibody responses and B-cell memory to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected children. Methods Ninety subjects 4 to <25 years of age received two double doses of pH1N1 vaccine. Serum and cells were frozen at baseline, after each vaccination, and at 28 weeks post-immunization. Hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers, avidity indices (AI), B-cell subsets, and pH1N1 IgG and IgA antigen secreting cells (ASC) were measured at baseline and after each vaccination. Neutralizing antibodies and pH1N1-specific Th1, Th2 and Tfh cytokines were measured at baseline and post-dose 1. Results At entry, 26 (29%) subjects had pH1N1 protective HAI titers (≥1:40). pH1N1-specific HAI, neutralizing titers, AI, IgG ASC, IL-2 and IL-4 increased in response to vaccination (p<0.05), but IgA ASC, IL-5, IL-13, IL-21, IFNγ and B-cell subsets did not change. Subjects with baseline HAI ≥1:40 had significantly greater increases in IgG ASC and AI after immunization compared with those with HAI <1:40. Neutralizing titers and AI after vaccination increased with older age. High pH1N1 HAI responses were associated with increased IgG ASC, IFNγ, IL-2, microneutralizion titers, and AI. Microneutralization titers after vaccination increased with high IgG ASC and IL-2 responses. IgG ASC also increased with high IFNγ responses. CD4% and viral load did not predict the immune responses post-vaccination, but the B-cell distribution did. Notably, vaccine immunogenicity increased with high CD19+CD21+CD27+% resting memory, high CD19+CD10+CD27+% immature activated, low CD19+CD21-CD27-CD20-% tissue-like, low CD19+CD21-CD27-CD20-% transitional and low CD19+CD38+HLADR+% activated B-cell subsets. Conclusions HIV-infected children on HAART mount a broad B-cell memory response to pH1N1 vaccine, which was higher for subjects with baseline HAI≥1:40 and increased with age, presumably due to prior exposure to pH1N1 or to other influenza vaccination/infection. The response

  13. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Islam, Shahidul; Nishat, Naoshin S.; Hossain, Motaher; Rafique, Tanzeem Ahmed; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Zhang, Yue; Saha, Amit; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Ryan, Edward T.; Leung, Daniel T.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV). We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3–14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT), and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), and soluble CD14 (sCD14). We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional) status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03) and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02); plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07); plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01) and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01); stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory) T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02), and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02). In summary, in a cohort of children 3–14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV. PMID:27824883

  14. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Islam, Shahidul; Nishat, Naoshin S; Hossain, Motaher; Rafique, Tanzeem Ahmed; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Zhang, Yue; Saha, Amit; Harris, Jason B; Calderwood, Stephen B; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Ryan, Edward T; Leung, Daniel T; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-11-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV). We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3-14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT), and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), and soluble CD14 (sCD14). We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional) status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03) and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02); plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07); plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01) and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01); stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory) T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02), and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02). In summary, in a cohort of children 3-14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV.

  15. Development of Extended-Release Oral Flexible Tablet (ER-OFT) Formulation for Pediatric and Geriatric Compliance: an Age-Appropriate Formulation.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Prabagaran; Kandasamy, Ruckmani

    2017-01-30

    Development of age-appropriate formulation suitable for pediatric and geriatric patients involves various challenges. The objective of this research was to develop extended-release oral flexible tablet (ER-OFT) formulation using carbamazepine (CBZ) as model drug for pediatric and geriatric compliance. ER-microparticles of carbamazepine, a BCS class 2, and narrow therapeutic index (NTI) drug, were prepared using ethyl cellulose as matrixing polymer and hypromellose as hydrophilic pore former. Microparticles were prepared using high-shear granulator fitted with an atomizing spray system. Granulation of carbamazepine and ethyl cellulose (EC-FP) with ethanolic binder solution resulted in ER-microparticles with extended-release >16 h. Release kinetics of ER microparticles showed Higuchi model by drug diffusion and erosion. Korsemeyer-peppas release exponent "n" value 0.42 suggested Fickian diffusion. ER-OFT was prepared by blending of ER-microparticles with water-insoluble compressible aid and disintegrating agent. ER-OFT was characterized for performance characteristics and elemental impurities. As the polymer content in formulation was <10%, the size of ER-OFT was smaller compared to marketed ER-formulations. ER-OFT showed in vitro disintegration time of <30 s as per USP and dispersion time of ∼60 to 180 s in 5 to 10 mL of water. Drug release profiles of ER-microparticles and ER-OFT were comparable as f2 values were >50. In vitro dissolution of ER-OFT was comparable to the marketed ER formulation in the pH range of GIT. ER-OFT can be orally swallowed, orally disintegrating, and used as dispersible tablets. Compared to non-disintegrating type ER-formulations, ER-OFT would provide uniform drug release in GIT with low within-subject variability an essential criterion for NTI drug.

  16. Assessing dietary intake during the transition to adulthood: a comparison of age-appropriate FFQ for youth/adolescents and adults

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nicole; Harnack, Lisa; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective Assessing changes in dietary intake during the transition from adolescence to adulthood is challenging given the need for age-appropriate tools at different developmental stages. The present study investigated the comparability of intake estimates as assessed with the youth/adolescent and adult forms of Willett’s FFQ. Design Young adults were first asked to complete the adult FFQ as part of a larger study, Project EAT-III (Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults). A stratified random sample of respondents was invited to complete the youth/adolescent FFQ by mail within a 3-week period. Setting Participants were members of a longitudinal cohort who completed baseline surveys (including the adolescent FFQ) at schools in Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota and completed Project EAT-III surveys online or by mail in 2008–2009. Subjects There were ninety-one men and 103 women (median age = 24·6 years) who completed both forms of the FFQ. Results The adolescent and adult forms did not provide comparable absolute intake estimates. However, with few exceptions, correlation coefficients between intake estimates were moderate (r = 0·4–0·6). Furthermore, the percentage of individuals classified into the same quartile rank category based on their responses to the adolescent and adult forms was ≥50 % for fibre, vitamins A and E, and servings of fruit (excluding juice), vegetables, dairy, whole grains and soft drinks. Conclusions Although responses on the adolescent and adult FFQ cannot be compared to describe changes in absolute intake over time, these tools provide comparable intake rankings and may be used together in longitudinal studies to investigate influences on diet. PMID:21929844

  17. Drug and vaccine allergy.

    PubMed

    Kelso, John M

    2015-02-01

    Most children with a history of penicillin allergy are labeled allergic and denied treatment with penicillin and sometimes other beta-lactam antibiotics. Most of these children never were or are no longer allergic to penicillin. Penicillin skin testing and oral challenge can identify patients who are not currently allergic, allowing them to be treated with penicillin. Children with egg allergy are often denied influenza vaccination, because the vaccine contains a small amount of egg protein. However, recent studies have demonstrated that children with even severe egg allergy can safely receive the vaccine, reducing their risk of the morbidity and mortality associated with influenza.

  18. HPV vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  19. Determinants of European parents' decision on the vaccination of their children against measles, mumps and rubella: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabacchi, Garden; Costantino, Claudio; Napoli, Giuseppe; Marchese, Valentina; Cracchiolo, Manuela; Casuccio, Alessandra; Vitale, Francesco; on behalf of the ESCULAPIO working group

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) immunization levels in European children highlight the importance of identifying determinants of parental vaccine uptake to implement policies for increasing vaccine compliance. The aim of this paper is to identify the main factors associated with partial and full MMR vaccination uptake in European parents, and combine the different studies to obtain overall quantitative measures. This activity is included within the ESCULAPIO project, funded by the Italian Ministry of Health. ORs and CIs were extracted, sources of heterogeneity explored and publication bias assessed. Forty-five papers were retrieved for the qualitative study, 26 of which were included in the meta-analysis. The following factors were associated with lower MMR vaccine uptake: misleading knowledge, beliefs and perceptions on vaccines (OR 0.57, CI 0.37-0.87); negative attitudes and behaviors toward vaccination (OR 0.71, CI 0.52-0.98); demographic characteristics, such as different ethnicity in Southern populations (OR 0.44, CI 0.31-0.61), higher child's age (OR 0.80, CI 0.76-0.85); low socio-economic status (OR 0.64, CI 0.51-0.80), especially low income (OR 0.39, CI 0.25-0.60) and education (OR 0.64, CI 0.48-0.84), high number of children (OR 0.54, CI 0.42-0.69), irregular marital status (OR 0.80, CI 0.66-0.96). The factors explaining heterogeneity were country location, administration modality, collection setting and responses reported on MMR alone or in combination. Findings from this study suggest policy makers to focus communication strategies on providing better knowledge, correct beliefs and perceptions on vaccines, and improving attitudes and behaviors in parents; and to target policies to people of ethnic minority from Southern Europe, low educated and deprived, with higher number of children and non-married marital status. PMID:27163657

  20. Vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The distinctive immune system characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease (KD) could suggest that they respond in a particular way to all antigenic stimulations, including those due to vaccines. Moreover, treatment of KD is mainly based on immunomodulatory therapy. These factors suggest that vaccines and KD may interact in several ways. These interactions could be of clinical relevance because KD is a disease of younger children who receive most of the vaccines recommended for infectious disease prevention. This paper shows that available evidence does not support an association between KD development and vaccine administration. Moreover, it highlights that administration of routine vaccines is mandatory even in children with KD and all efforts must be made to ensure the highest degree of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases for these patients. However, studies are needed to clarify currently unsolved issues, especially issues related to immunologic interference induced by intravenous immunoglobulin and biological drugs.

  1. [Impact of PCV10 pneumococcal vaccine on mortality from pneumonia in children less than one year of age in Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Kupek, Emil; Vieira, Ilse Lisiane Viertel

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of PCV10 pneumococcal vaccine on mortality from pneumonia in children less than one year of age in Santa Catarina State, Brazil, comparing the four years prior and the four years subsequent to the vaccine's introduction in 2010. This ecological study used data from the Mortality Information System and vaccination coverage of children less than one year. Data were grouped by municipalities of residence and regions. Average mortality from pneumonia in children under one year decreased from 29.69 to 23.40 per 100,000, comparing 2006-2009 and 2010-2013, or a reduction of 11%. However there were differences between regions with a drop in mortality (Grande Florianópolis, Sul, Planalto Norte, and Nordeste) and others with an increase in the annual rates (Oeste, Itajaí, and Serra). In short, the state as a whole showed 11% reduction in mortality from pneumonia in children less than one year of age, four years after implementing routine PCV10 vaccination in the National Immunization Program, but with heterogeneous effects when comparing regions of the state.

  2. Anti-pertussis antibody kinetics following DTaP-IPV booster vaccination in Norwegian children 7-8 years of age.

    PubMed

    Aase, Audun; Herstad, Tove Karin; Jørgensen, Silje Bakken; Leegaard, Truls Michael; Berbers, Guy; Steinbakk, Martin; Aaberge, Ingeborg

    2014-10-14

    At the age of 7-8 years a booster of diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis and polio vaccine is recommended for children in Norway. In this cross-sectional study we have analysed the antibody levels against pertussis vaccine antigens in sera from 498 children aged 6-12 years. The purposes of this study were to investigate the duration of the booster response against the pertussis vaccine antigens pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA); to determine the presence of high levels of pertussis antibodies in absence of recent vaccination; and to analyse how booster immunisation may interfere with the serological pertussis diagnostics. Prior to the booster the IgG antibody levels against PT revealed a geometric mean of 7.3IU/ml. After the booster the geometric mean peak anti-PT IgG response reached to 45.6IU/ml, followed by a steady decline in antibody levels over the next few years. The IgG anti-FHA levels followed the anti-PT IgG profiles. Three years after the booster the geometric mean IgG levels were only slightly above pre-booster levels. Prior to the booster 44% of the sera contained ≤5IU/ml of anti-PT IgG compared to18% 3 years after and 30% 4 years after the booster. When recently vaccinated children were excluded, 6.2% of the children had anti-PT IgG levels above 50IU/ml which may indicate pertussis infection within the last 2 years. This study indicates that the currently used acellular pertussis vaccines induce moderate immune responses to the pertussis antigens and that the antibodies wane within few years after the booster. This lack of sustained immune response may partly be responsible for the increased number of pertussis cases observed in this age group during the last years.

  3. Direct, indirect and total effects of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination on invasive pneumococcal disease in children in Navarra, Spain, 2001 to 2014: cohort and case-control study.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Marcela; Barricarte, Aurelio; Torroba, Luis; Herranz, Mercedes; Gil-Setas, Alberto; Gil, Francisco; Bernaola, Enrique; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    We estimated the direct, indirect and total effects of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children. A population-based cohort study followed children aged between 2.5 and 59 months between 2001 and 2014 in Navarra, Spain. IPD incidence was compared by PCV status and period. All cases diagnosed from July 2010 to December 2014 and eight matched controls per case were analysed to estimate the adjusted direct effect of PCV13. A total of 120,980 children were followed and 206 IPD cases were detected. Compared with unvaccinated children in the baseline period (2001-2004), overall IPD incidence in 2011-2014 (76% average PCV coverage) declined equally in vaccinated (total effect: 76%; hazard ratio (HR): 0.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.14-0.40) and unvaccinated children (indirect effect: 78%; HR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.09-0.55). IPD incidence from non-PCV13 serotypes increased among vaccinated children (HR: 2.84; 95% CI: 1.02-7.88). The direct effect of one or more doses of PCV13 against vaccine serotypes was 95% (odds ratio: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01-0.55). PCV13 was highly effective in preventing vaccine-serotype IPD. The results suggest substantial and similar population-level vaccine benefits in vaccinated and unvaccinated children through strong total and indirect effects.

  4. Seasonal influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Anthony E; Bridges, Carolyn B; Cox, Nancy J

    2009-01-01

    Influenza vaccines are the mainstay of efforts to reduce the substantial health burden from seasonal influenza. Inactivated influenza vaccines have been available since the 1940s and are administered via intramuscular injection. Inactivated vaccines can be given to anyone six months of age or older. Live attenuated, cold-adapted influenza vaccines (LAIV) were developed in the 1960s but were not licensed in the United States until 2003, and are administered via nasal spray. Both vaccines are trivalent preparations grown in eggs and do not contain adjuvants. LAIV is licensed for use in the United States for healthy nonpregnant persons 2-49 years of age.Influenza vaccination induces antibodies primarily against the major surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA); antibodies directed against the HA are most important for protection against illness. The immune response peaks at 2-4 weeks after one dose in primed individuals. In previously unvaccinated children <9 years of age, two doses of influenza vaccine are recommended, as some children in this age group have limited or no prior infections from circulating types and subtypes of seasonal influenza. These children require both an initial priming dose and a subsequent booster dose of vaccine to mount a protective antibody response.The most common adverse events associated with inactivated vaccines are sore arm and redness at the injection site; systemic symptoms such as fever or malaise are less commonly reported. Guillian-Barré Syndrome (GBS) was identified among approximately 1 per 100,000 recipients of the 1976 swine influenza vaccine. The risk of influenza vaccine-associated GBS from seasonal influenza vaccine is thought to be at most approximately 1-2 cases per 1 million vaccinees, based on a few studies that have found an association; other studies have found no association.The most common adverse events associated with LAIV are nasal congestion, headache, myalgias or fever. Studies of the

  5. Impact of ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on pneumonia in Finnish children in a nation-wide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Palmu, Arto A.; Rinta-Kokko, Hanna; Nohynek, Hanna; Nuorti, J. Pekka; Kilpi, Terhi M.; Jokinen, Jukka

    2017-01-01

    Background The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the Finnish National Vaccination Program (NVP) in September 2010 using a 2+1 schedule (3, 5, 12 months). We estimated the direct and indirect effects of PCV10 on pneumonia among children to evaluate the public health impact of the vaccine. Methods We conducted a nation-wide population-based, observational study comparing rates of pneumonia in children before and after the NVP introduction. For the total (direct and indirect) effect, the cohort of vaccine-eligible children (born June 1, 2010 or later) was followed until the end of 2013 (age range 3–42 months). For the indirect effect, a cohort of older children (age range 7–71 months) not eligible for the PCV vaccination was followed from 2011 to 2013. Both cohorts were compared with two season- and age-matched reference cohorts before NVP introduction. Hospitals’ in- and outpatient discharge notifications with ICD-10 diagnoses compatible with pneumonia (J10.0, J11.0, J12-J18, J85.1 or J86) as set by the hospital pediatricians were collected from the national Care Register. The main outcome was hospital-treated primary pneumonia (HTPP), defined as primary diagnosis of pneumonia after in-patient hospitalization. We compared rates of pneumonia in the NVP target and reference cohorts by using Poisson regression models. Results The rate of HTPP episodes was 5.3/1000 person-years in the combined reference cohorts and 4.1/1000 person-years in the target cohort vaccine-eligible children. Compared with the reference cohort, the relative rate reduction in target cohort was 23% (95%CI 18–28) and the absolute reduction 1.3/1000 person-years. In the indirect effect evaluation, we observed continued increase in HTPP incidence until 2011 with a subsequent reduction of 18% (95%CI 10–25) during years 2012 to 2013. Number of empyema diagnoses remained low. Conclusions A substantial decrease in pneumonia rates was observed both among

  6. A Cross-Sectional Observational Study of Pneumococcal Carriage in Children, Their Parents, and Older Adults Following the Introduction of the 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hamaluba, Mainga; Kandasamy, Rama; Ndimah, Susan; Morton, Richard; Caccamo, Marisa; Robinson, Hannah; Kelly, Sarah; Field, Aimee; Norman, Lily; Plested, Emma; Thompson, Ben A.V.; Zafar, Azhar; Kerridge, Simon A.; Lazarus, Rajeka; John, Tessa; Holmes, Jane; Fenlon, Shannon N.; Gould, Katherine A.; Waight, Pauline; Hinds, Jason; Crook, Derrick; Snape, Matthew D.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Using nasopharyngeal carriage as a marker of vaccine impact, pneumococcal colonization and its relation to invasive disease were examined in children, their parents, and older adults in the United Kingdom following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and prior to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). A cross-sectional observational study was conducted, collecting nasopharyngeal swabs from children aged 25 to 55 months who had previously received 3 doses of PCV7, their parents, and adults aged ≥65 years. Pneumococcal serotyping was conducted according to World Health Organization guidelines with nontypeable isolates further analyzed by molecular serotyping. A national invasive disease surveillance program was conducted throughout the corresponding period. Pneumococcus was isolated from 47% of children, 9% of parents, and 2.2% of older adults. For these groups, the percentage of serotypes covered by PCV7 were 1.5%, 0.0%, and 15.4%, with a further 20.1%, 44.4%, and 7.7% coverage added by those in PCV13. In each group, the percentage of disease due to serotypes covered by PCV7 were 1.0%, 7.4% and 5.1% with a further 65.3%, 42.1%, and 61.4% attributed to those in PCV13. The prevalence of carriage is the highest in children, with direct vaccine impact exemplified by low carriage and disease prevalence of PCV7 serotypes in vaccinated children, whereas the indirect effects of herd protection are implied by similar observations in unvaccinated parents and older adults. PMID:25569650

  7. Herd immunity in adults against influenza-related illnesses with use of the trivalent-live attenuated influenza vaccine (CAIV-T) in children.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Pedro A; Gaglani, Manjusha J; Kozinetz, Claudia A; Herschler, Gayla; Riggs, Mark; Griffith, Melissa; Fewlass, Charles; Watts, Matt; Hessel, Colin; Cordova, Julie; Glezen, W Paul

    2005-02-18

    Highest attack rates for influenza occur in children. Immunization of schoolchildren with inactivated influenza vaccine in Michigan and Japan was associated with decreased morbidity and mortality, respectively, in older community contacts. An open-labeled, non-randomized, community-based trial in children with the cold adapted influenza vaccine, trivalent (CAIV-T) was initiated to determine the coverage necessary to reduce spread of influenza in the community. Age-specific baseline rates of medically attended acute respiratory illness (MAARI) for Scott and White Health Plan (SWHP) members at intervention (Temple and Belton) and comparison communities (Waco, Bryan, and College Station) were obtained in 1997-1998. During three subsequent vaccination years, 4298, 5251 and 5150 children received one dose per season of CAIV-T. Vaccinees represented 20-25% of the age-eligible children. Age-specific MAARI rates were compared for SWHP members in the intervention and comparison sites during the influenza outbreaks. Baseline age-specific MAARI rates per 100 persons for the influenza season were comparable between the intervention and comparison communities. In the subsequent three influenza seasons, the age groups 35-44, 45-54, 55-65 and >64 years experienced reductions in MAARI rates in the intervention communities. In adults > or =35 years of age, significant reductions in MAARI of 0.08 (95% CI: 0.04, 0.13), 0.18 (95% CI: 0.14, 0.22) and 0.15 (95% CI: 0.12, 0.19), were observed in the influenza seasons for vaccination years 1, 2 and 3, respectively. No consistent reduction in MAARI rates was detected in the younger age groups. Vaccination of approximately 20-25% of children, 1.5-18 years of age in the intervention communities resulted in an indirect protection of 8-18% against MAARI in adults > or =35 years of age.

  8. Parental knowledge of paediatric vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Borràs, Eva; Domínguez, Àngela; Fuentes, Miriam; Batalla, Joan; Cardeñosa, Neus; Plasencia, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Background Although routine vaccination is a major tool in the primary prevention of some infectious diseases, there is some reluctance in a proportion of the population. Negative parental perceptions of vaccination are an important barrier to paediatric vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate parental knowledge of paediatric vaccines and vaccination in Catalonia. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged < 3 years recruited by random sampling from municipal districts of all health regions of Catalonia. The total sample was 630 children. Parents completed a standard questionnaire for each child, which included vaccination coverage and knowledge about vaccination. The level of knowledge of vaccination was scored according to parental answers. Results An association was observed between greater vaccination coverage of the 4:4:4:3:1 schedule (defined as: 4 DTPa/w doses, 4 Hib doses, 4 OPV doses, 3 MenC doses and 1 MMR dose) and maternal age >30 years (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.20–4.43) and with a knowledge of vaccination score greater than the mean (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.28–0.72). The score increased with maternal educational level and in parents of vaccinated children. A total of 20.47% of parents stated that vaccines could have undesirable consequences for their children. Of these, 23.26% had no specific information and 17.83% stated that vaccines can cause adverse reactions and the same percentage stated that vaccines cause allergies and asthma. Conclusion Higher vaccination coverage is associated with older maternal age and greater knowledge of vaccination. Vaccination coverage could be raised by improving information on vaccines and vaccination. PMID:19473498

  9. Vaccination coverage levels among Alaska Native children aged 19-35 months--National Immunization Survey, United States, 2000-2001.

    PubMed

    2003-08-01

    In 2000, a total of 118,846 persons indicated that their race/ethnicity was Alaska Native (AN), either alone or in combination with one or more other racial/ethnic groups. AN groups comprise 19% of the population of Alaska and 0.4% of the total U.S. population. The AN grouping includes Eskimos, Aleuts, and Alaska Indians (members of the Alaska Athabaskan, Tlingit, Haida, or other AN tribes). Eskimo represented the largest AN tribal grouping, followed by Tlingit/Haida, Alaska Athabascan, and Aleut. Vaccination coverage levels among AN children have not been reported previously. This report presents data from the National Immunization Survey (NIS) for 2000-2001, which indicate that vaccination coverage levels among AN children aged 19-35 months exceeded the national health objective for 2010 (objective no. 14-22) for the majority of vaccines. This achievement indicates the effectiveness of using multiple strategies to increase vaccination coverage. Similar efforts might increase vaccination coverage in other rural regions with American Indian (AI)/AN populations.

  10. Evaluation of the Immune Response to Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Among BCG Vaccinated Children in East of Egypt: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Beshir, Mohamed Refaat; Zidan, Alaa Ebrahim; El-Saadny, Hosam Fathi; Ramadan, Raghdaa Abdelaziz; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Amin, Ezzat Kamel; Mohamed, Marwa Zakaria; Abdelsamad, Nahla Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) vaccination is used routinely in most of countries, especially developing one. The efficacy of the BCG vaccination generally decreases with time. The tuberculin skin test (TST) is a most popular diagnostic test for suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) in children till now, but it has many false positives. The interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is more specific than TST for detection of childhood TB, as it is more specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Evaluate the interferon gamma response and TST reaction in BCG vaccinated children in east of Egypt.150 children were included in the study aged 1 month to 12 years; the collected data from the children included, full history taking, clinical examination, examination for the presence or absence of BCG scar under direct light. All the children had performed TST, IGRA.TST was done for all studied group reveal 51.3% with size of reaction <5 mm, 39.3% with size of reaction = 5 to 9 mm while 9.3% with size of reaction ≥10 mm. Mean size of reaction was 4.07 mm. Interferon gamma release assay was done for all studied group reveal 5 children (3.3%) with positive test. There was significant difference between the size of TST reaction and age (P < 0.01) with old children were more frequent to show positive reaction. Also, children with age range 1 month to 1 year were frequently have negative IGRA test, while children with age range 4 years to 12 years were frequently have positive test (P < 0.01). There was moderate agreement between IGRA and TST results (Kappa [κ] = 0.475). With high agreement between IGRA and TST results in children with absent BCG scar (κ = 1000).Therefore, Interferon gamma release assays have higher specificity and lower cross-reactions with BCG vaccination and nontuberculous Mycobacteraie than TST.

  11. High pneumonia lifetime-ever incidence in Beijing children compared with locations in other countries, and implications for national PCV and Hib vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Fang; Sun, Yuexia; Sundell, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the proportion of Beijing children who have ever had pneumonia (%Pneumonia) to those in other locations, and to estimate by how much national vaccine coverage with Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) and Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) could reduce Beijing %Pneumonia. Methods %Pneumonia was obtained for each age group from 1 to 8 years inclusive from 5,876 responses to a cross-sectional questionnaire. Literature searches were conducted for world-wide reports of %Pneumonia. Previous vaccine trials conducted worldwide were used to estimate the pneumococcal (S. pneumoniae) and Hib (H. influenzae) burdens and %Pneumonia as well as the potential for PCV and Hib vaccines to reduce Beijing children’s %Pneumonia. Findings The majority of pneumonia cases occurred by the age of three. The cumulative %Pneumonia for 3–8 year-old Beijing children, 26.9%, was only slightly higher than the 25.4% for the discrete 3 year-old age group, similar to trends for Tianjin (China) and Texas (USA). Beijing’s %Pneumonia is disproportionally high relative to its Gross National Income (GNI) per capita, and markedly higher than %Pneumonia in the US and other high GNI per capita countries. Chinese diagnostic guidelines recommend chest X-ray confirmation while most other countries discourage it in favor of clinical diagnosis. Literature review shows that chest X-ray confirmation returns far fewer pneumonia diagnoses than clinical diagnosis. Accordingly, Beijing’s %Pneumonia is likely higher than indicated by raw numbers. Vaccine trials suggest that national PCV and Hib vaccination could reduce Beijing’s %Pneumonia from 26.9% to 19.7% and 24.9% respectively. Conclusion National PCV and Hib vaccination programs would substantially reduce Beijing children’s pneumonia incidence. PMID:28166256

  12. Effectiveness of the 10-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV-10) in Children in Chile: A Nested Case-Control Study Using Nationwide Pneumonia Morbidity and Mortality Surveillance Data

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Cristiana M.; Alencar, Gizelton P.; Alvarez, Andrés; Valenzuela, Maria T.; Andrus, Jon; del Aguila, Roberto; Hormazábal, Juan C.; Araya, Pamela; Pidal, Paola; Matus, Cuauhtemoc R.; de Oliveira, Lucia H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The ten-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced into the Chilean National Immunization Program (NIP) in January 2011 with a 3+1 schedule (2, 4, 6 and 12 months) without catch-up vaccination. We evaluated the effectiveness of PCV10 on pneumonia morbidity and mortality among infants during the first two years after vaccine introduction. Methods This is a population-based nested case-control study using four merged nationwide case-based electronic health data registries: live birth, vaccination, hospitalization and mortality. Children born in 2010 and 2011 were followed from two moths of age for a period of two years. Using four different case definitions of pneumonia hospitalization and/or mortality (all-cause and pneumonia related deaths), all cases and four randomly selected matched controls per case were selected. Controls were matched to cases on analysis time. Vaccination status was then assessed. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated using conditional logistic regression. Results There were a total of 497,996 children in the 2010 and 2011 Chilean live-birth cohorts. PCV10 VE was 11.2% (95%CI 8.5–13.6) when all pneumonia hospitalizations and deaths were used to define cases. VE increased to 20.7 (95%CI 17.3–23.8) when ICD10 codes used to denote viral pneumonia were excluded from the case definition. VE estimates on pneumonia deaths and all-cause deaths were 71.5 (95%CI 9.0–91.8) and 34.8 (95% CI 23.7–44.4), respectively. Conclusion PCV10 vaccination substantially reduced the number of hospitalizations due to pneumonia and deaths due to pneumonia and to all-causes over this study period. Our findings also reinforce the importance of having quality health information systems for measuring VE. PMID:27058873

  13. Low hepatitis B immunogenicity of a hexavalent vaccine widely used in Germany: results of the German Health Survey for Children and Adolescents, 2003-2006.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, P; Poethko-Müller, C; Hellenbrand, W; Jilg, W; Thierfelder, W; Meyer, C; an der Heiden, M; Schlaud, M; Radun, D

    2010-11-01

    The success of childhood vaccination against hepatitis B relies on persistence of immunity into adolescence and adulthood. In 2000, two hexavalent vaccines with a hepatitis B component (Hexavac, Infanrix hexa) were introduced in Germany. Hexavac was withdrawn in 2005 amidst concerns about its long-term hepatitis B protection. We compared hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) levels in children fully vaccinated with Hexavac or Infanrix hexa (n=477) in a secondary data analysis of a large cross-sectional health survey in Germany. On average 2.4 years after vaccination, 25.3% of Hexavac vaccinees had anti-HBs levels <10 mIU/ml (95% CI 19.0-32.8) compared to 4.7% of Infanrix hexa vaccinees (95% CI 2.4-8.9). These findings suggest that short-term hepatitis B immunogenicity in Hexavac vaccinees may also be weaker. Further studies are warranted to assess whether Hexavac vaccinees should be re-vaccinated or receive a booster vaccination before these birth cohorts reach adolescence.

  14. A randomized study of the immunogenicity and safety of Japanese Encephalitis Chimeric Virus Vaccine (JE-CV) in comparison with SA14-14-2 Vaccine in children in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Soo; Houillon, Guy; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Cha, Sung-Ho; Choi, Soo-Han; Lee, Jin; Kim, Hwang Min; Kim, Ji Hong; Kang, Jin Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hee Soo; Bang, Joon; Naimi, Zulaikha; Bosch-Castells, Valérie; Boaz, Mark; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2014-01-01

    A new live attenuated Japanese encephalitis chimeric virus vaccine (JE-CV) has been developed based on innovative technology to give protection against JE with an improved immunogenicity and safety profile. In this phase 3, observer-blind study, 274 children aged 12−24 months were randomized 1:1 to receive one dose of JE-CV (Group JE-CV) or the SA14–14–2 vaccine currently used to vaccinate against JE in the Republic of Korea (Group SA14–14–2). JE neutralizing antibody titers were assessed using PRNT50 before and 28 days after vaccination. The primary endpoint of non-inferiority of seroconversion rates on D28 was demonstrated in the Per Protocol analysis set as the difference between Group JE-CV and Group SA14–14–2 was 0.9 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI]: −2.35; 4.68), which was above the required −10%. Seroconversion and seroprotection rates 28 days after administration of a single vaccine dose were 100% in Group JE-CV and 99.1% in Group SA14–14–2; all children except one (Group SA14–14–2) were seroprotected. Geometric mean titers (GMTs) increased in both groups from D0 to D28; GM of titer ratios were slightly higher in Group JE-CV (182 [95% CI: 131; 251]) than Group SA14–14–2 (116 [95% CI: 85.5, 157]). A single dose of JE-CV was well tolerated and no safety concerns were identified. In conclusion, a single dose of JE-CV or SA14–14–2 vaccine elicited a comparable immune response with a good safety profile. Results obtained in healthy Korean children aged 12−24 months vaccinated with JE-CV are consistent with those obtained in previous studies conducted with JE-CV in toddlers. PMID:25483480

  15. Vaccination Perceptions and Barriers of School Employees: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luthy, Karlen E.; Houle, Kim; Beckstrand, Renea L.; Macintosh, Janelle; Lakin, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Schools are where vaccine-preventable diseases can spread. Vaccination of school children has been studied; however, data are lacking on the vaccination status, perceptions, and barriers to vaccination for school employees. We surveyed school employees' vaccination perceptions, awareness of current vaccination status, and potential barriers to…

  16. Safety and persistence of the humoral and cellular immune responses induced by 2 doses of an AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza vaccine administered to infants, children and adolescents: Two open, uncontrolled studies.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sicilia, José; Arístegui, Javier; Omeñaca, Félix; Carmona, Alfonso; Tejedor, Juan C; Merino, José M; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Walravens, Karl; Bambure, Vinod; Moris, Philippe; Caplanusi, Adrian; Gillard, Paul; Dieussaert, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    In children, 2 AS03-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine doses given 21 days apart were previously shown to induce a high humoral immune response and to have an acceptable safety profile up to 42 days following the first vaccination. Here, we analyzed the persistence data from 2 open-label studies, which assessed the safety, and humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by 2 doses of this vaccine. The first study was a phase II, randomized trial conducted in 104 children aged 6-35 months vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 1.9 µg haemagglutinin antigen (HA) and AS03B (5.93 mg tocopherol) and the second study, a phase III, non-randomized trial conducted in 210 children and adolescents aged 3-17 years vaccinated with the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine containing 3.75 µg HA and AS03A (11.86 mg tocopherol). Approximately one year after the first dose, all children with available data were seropositive for haemagglutinin inhibition and neutralising antibody titres, but a decline in geometric mean antibody titres was noted. The vaccine induced a cell-mediated immune response in terms of antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells, which persisted up to one year post-vaccination</