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Sample records for age-associated diseases including

  1. Resveratrol: a multitargeted agent for age-associated chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2008-04-15

    Extensive research within the last decade has revealed that most chronic illnesses such as cancer, cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, neurological diseases, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases exhibit dysregulation of multiple cell signaling pathways that have been linked to inflammation. Thus mono-targeted therapies developed for the last two decades for these diseases have proven to be unsafe, ineffective and expensive. Although fruits and vegetables are regarded to have therapeutic potential against chronic illnesses, neither their active component nor the mechanism of action is well understood. Resveratrol (trans-3, 5, 4'-trihydroxystilbene), a component of grapes, berries, peanuts and other traditional medicines, is one such polyphenol that has been shown to mediate its effects through modulation of many different pathways. This stilbene has been shown to bind to numerous cell-signaling molecules such as multi drug resistance protein, topoisomerase II, aromatase, DNA polymerase, estrogen receptors, tubulin and F1-ATPase. Resveratrol has also been shown to activate various transcription factor (e.g; NFkappaB, STAT3, HIF-1alpha, beta-catenin and PPAR-gamma), suppress the expression of antiapoptotic gene products (e.g; Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L), XIAP and survivin), inhibit protein kinases (e.g; src, PI3K, JNK, and AKT), induce antioxidant enzymes (e,g; catalase, superoxide dismutase and hemoxygenase-1), suppress the expression of inflammatory biomarkers (e.g., TNF, COX-2, iNOS, and CRP), inhibit the expression of angiogenic and metastatic gene products (e.g., MMPs, VEGF, cathepsin D, and ICAM-1), and modulate cell cycle regulatory genes (e.g., p53, Rb, PTEN, cyclins and CDKs). Numerous animal studies have demonstrated that this polyphenol holds promise against numerous age-associated diseases including cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer, cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. In view of these studies, resveratrol's prospects for use in the clinics are rapidly accelerating

  2. Antioxidant Supplementation in the Treatment of Aging-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Valeria; Izzo, Viviana; Corbi, Graziamaria; Russomanno, Giusy; Manzo, Valentina; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Filippelli, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is generally considered as the consequence of an imbalance between pro- and antioxidants species, which often results into indiscriminate and global damage at the organismal level. Elderly people are more susceptible to oxidative stress and this depends, almost in part, from a decreased performance of their endogenous antioxidant system. As many studies reported an inverse correlation between systemic levels of antioxidants and several diseases, primarily cardiovascular diseases, but also diabetes and neurological disorders, antioxidant supplementation has been foreseen as an effective preventive and therapeutic intervention for aging-associated pathologies. However, the expectations of this therapeutic approach have often been partially disappointed by clinical trials. The interplay of both endogenous and exogenous antioxidants with the systemic redox system is very complex and represents an issue that is still under debate. In this review a selection of recent clinical studies concerning antioxidants supplementation and the evaluation of their influence in aging-related diseases is analyzed. The controversial outcomes of antioxidants supplementation therapies, which might partially depend from an underestimation of the patient specific metabolic demand and genetic background, are presented. PMID:26903869

  3. Age-Associated Chronic Diseases Require Age-Old Medicine: Role of Chronic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Most chronic diseases - such as cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, arthritis, diabetes and obesity - are becoming leading causes of disability and death all over the world. Some of the most common causes of these age-associated chronic diseases are lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, tobacco use, and excessive alcohol consumption. All the risk factors linked to these chronic diseases have been shown to up-regulate inflammation. Therefore, downregulation of inflammation-associated risk factors could prevent or delay these age-associated diseases. Although modern science has developed several drugs for treating chronic diseases, most of these drugs are enormously expensive and are associated with serious side effects and morbidity. In this review, we present evidence on how chronic inflammation leads to age-associated chronic disease. Furthermore, we discuss diet and lifestyle as solutions for age-associated chronic disease. PMID:22178471

  4. Mitochondria and PGC-1α in Aging and Age-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Aging is the most significant risk factor for a range of degenerative disease such as cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders. While the cause of aging and its associated diseases is multifactorial, mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the aging process and the onset and progression of age-associated disorders. Recent studies indicate that maintenance of mitochondrial function is beneficial in the prevention or delay of age-associated diseases. A central molecule seems to be the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator α (PGC-1α), which is the key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Besides regulating mitochondrial function, PGC-1α targets several other cellular processes and thereby influences cell fate on multiple levels. This paper discusses how mitochondrial function and PGC-1α are affected in age-associated diseases and how modulation of PGC-1α might offer a therapeutic potential for age-related pathology. PMID:21629705

  5. Mitochondria and PGC-1α in Aging and Age-Associated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Aging is the most significant risk factor for a range of degenerative disease such as cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders. While the cause of aging and its associated diseases is multifactorial, mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the aging process and the onset and progression of age-associated disorders. Recent studies indicate that maintenance of mitochondrial function is beneficial in the prevention or delay of age-associated diseases. A central molecule seems to be the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator α (PGC-1α), which is the key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Besides regulating mitochondrial function, PGC-1α targets several other cellular processes and thereby influences cell fate on multiple levels. This paper discusses how mitochondrial function and PGC-1α are affected in age-associated diseases and how modulation of PGC-1α might offer a therapeutic potential for age-related pathology.

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide, the Next Potent Preventive and Therapeutic Agent in Aging and Age-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Tang, Zhi-Han; Ren, Zhong; Qu, Shun-Lin; Liu, Mi-Hua; Liu, Lu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third endogenous signaling gasotransmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. It is physiologically generated by cystathionine-γ-lyase, cystathionine-β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. H2S has been gaining increasing attention as an important endogenous signaling molecule because of its significant effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Substantial evidence shows that H2S is involved in aging by inhibiting free-radical reactions, activating SIRT1, and probably interacting with the age-related gene Klotho. Moreover, H2S has been shown to have therapeutic potential in age-associated diseases. This article provides an overview of the physiological functions and effects of H2S in aging and age-associated diseases, and proposes the potential health and therapeutic benefits of H2S. PMID:23297346

  7. Oxidative Stress and Salvia miltiorrhiza in Aging-Associated Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Yu-Chun; Hu, Wen-Long; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have some risk factors that are closely related to oxidative stress. Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) has been used commonly to treat CVDs for hundreds of years in the Chinese community. We aimed to explore the effects of SM on oxidative stress in aging-associated CVDs. Through literature searches using Medicine, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CINAHL, and Scopus databases, we found that SM not only possesses antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects but also exerts angiogenic and cardioprotective activities. SM may reduce the production of reactive oxygen species by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting the oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins, and ameliorating mitochondrial oxidative stress. SM also increases the activities of catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and coupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In addition, SM reduces the impact of ischemia/reperfusion injury, prevents cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction, preserves cardiac function in coronary disease, maintains the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and promotes self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in stroke. However, future clinical well-designed and randomized control trials will be necessary to confirm the efficacy of SM in aging-associated CVDs.

  8. Oxidative Stress and Salvia miltiorrhiza in Aging-Associated Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have some risk factors that are closely related to oxidative stress. Salvia miltiorrhiza (SM) has been used commonly to treat CVDs for hundreds of years in the Chinese community. We aimed to explore the effects of SM on oxidative stress in aging-associated CVDs. Through literature searches using Medicine, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, CINAHL, and Scopus databases, we found that SM not only possesses antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects but also exerts angiogenic and cardioprotective activities. SM may reduce the production of reactive oxygen species by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting the oxidative modification of low-density lipoproteins, and ameliorating mitochondrial oxidative stress. SM also increases the activities of catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and coupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In addition, SM reduces the impact of ischemia/reperfusion injury, prevents cardiac fibrosis after myocardial infarction, preserves cardiac function in coronary disease, maintains the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and promotes self-renewal and proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in stroke. However, future clinical well-designed and randomized control trials will be necessary to confirm the efficacy of SM in aging-associated CVDs. PMID:27807472

  9. Age-associated changes in expression of small, noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs, in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masaomi; Chen, Xiaowei; Inukai, Sachi; Zhao, Hongyu; Slack, Frank J

    2011-10-01

    Small, noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs), impact diverse biological events through the control of gene expression and genome stability. However, the role of these sncRNAs in aging remains largely unknown. To understand the contribution of sncRNAs to the aging process, we performed small RNA profiling by deep-sequencing over the course of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) aging. Many small RNAs, including a significant number of miRNAs, change their expression during aging in C. elegans. Further studies of miRNA expression changes under conditions that modify lifespan demonstrate the tight control of their expression during aging. Adult-specific loss of argonaute-like gene-1 (alg-1) activity, which is necessary for miRNA maturation and function, resulted in an abnormal lifespan, suggesting that miRNAs are, indeed, required in adulthood for normal aging. miRNA target prediction algorithms combined with transcriptome data and pathway enrichment analysis revealed likely targets of these age-associated miRNAs with known roles in aging, such as mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, a computational analysis of our deep-sequencing data identified additional age-associated sncRNAs, including miRNA star strands, novel miRNA candidates, and endo-siRNA sequences. We also show an increase of specific transfer RNA (tRNA) fragments during aging, which are known to be induced in response to stress in several organisms. This study suggests that sncRNAs including miRNAs contribute to lifespan regulation in C. elegans, and indicates new connections between aging, stress responses, and the small RNA world.

  10. The maternal-age-associated risk of congenital heart disease is modifiable.

    PubMed

    Schulkey, Claire E; Regmi, Suk D; Magnan, Rachel A; Danzo, Megan T; Luther, Herman; Hutchinson, Alayna K; Panzer, Adam A; Grady, Mary M; Wilson, David B; Jay, Patrick Y

    2015-04-09

    Maternal age is a risk factor for congenital heart disease even in the absence of any chromosomal abnormality in the newborn. Whether the basis of this risk resides with the mother or oocyte is unknown. The impact of maternal age on congenital heart disease can be modelled in mouse pups that harbour a mutation of the cardiac transcription factor gene Nkx2-5 (ref. 8). Here, reciprocal ovarian transplants between young and old mothers establish a maternal basis for the age-associated risk in mice. A high-fat diet does not accelerate the effect of maternal ageing, so hyperglycaemia and obesity do not simply explain the mechanism. The age-associated risk varies with the mother's strain background, making it a quantitative genetic trait. Most remarkably, voluntary exercise, whether begun by mothers at a young age or later in life, can mitigate the risk when they are older. Thus, even when the offspring carry a causal mutation, an intervention aimed at the mother can meaningfully reduce their risk of congenital heart disease.

  11. Involvement of blood mononuclear cells in the infertility, age-associated diseases and cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    Blood mononuclear cells consist of T cells and monocyte derived cells. Beside immunity, the blood mononuclear cells belong to the complex tissue control system (TCS), where they exhibit morphostatic function by stimulating proliferation of tissue stem cells followed by cellular differentiation, that is stopped after attaining the proper functional stage, which differs among various tissue types. Therefore, the term immune and morphostatic system (IMS) should be implied. The TCS-mediated morphostasis also consists of vascular pericytes controlled by autonomic innervation, which is regulating the quantity of distinct tissues in vivo. Lack of proper differentiation of tissue cells by TCS causes either tissue underdevelopment, e.g., muscular dystrophy, or degenerative functional failures, e.g., type 1 diabetes and age-associated diseases. With the gradual IMS regression after 35 years of age the gonadal infertility develops, followed by a growing incidence of age-associated diseases and cancers. Without restoring an altered TCS function in a degenerative disease, the implantation of tissue-specific stem cells alone by regenerative medicine can not be successful. Transfused young blood could temporarily restore fertility to enable parenthood. The young blood could also temporarily alleviate aging diseases, and this can be extended by substances inducing IMS regeneration, like the honey bee propolis. The local and/or systemic use of honey bee propolis stopped hair and teeth loss, regressed varicose veins, improved altered hearing, and lowered high blood pressure and sugar levels. Complete regression of stage IV ovarian cancer with liver metastases after a simple elaborated immunotherapy is also reported. PMID:28074124

  12. Age-associated changes in cardiovascular structure and function: a fertile milieu for future disease.

    PubMed

    Fleg, Jerome L; Strait, James

    2012-09-01

    Important changes occur in the cardiovascular system with advancing age, even in apparently healthy individuals. Thickening and stiffening of the large arteries develop due to collagen and calcium deposition and loss of elastic fibers in the medial layer. These arterial changes cause systolic blood pressure to rise with age, while diastolic blood pressure generally declines after the sixth decade. In the left ventricle, modest concentric wall thickening occurs due to cellular hypertrophy, but cavity size does not change. Although left ventricular systolic function is preserved across the age span, early diastolic filling rate declines 30-50% between the third and ninth decades. Conversely, an age-associated increase in late diastolic filling due to atrial contraction preserves end-diastolic volume. Aerobic exercise capacity declines approximately 10% per decade in cross-sectional studies; in longitudinal studies, however, this decline is accelerated in the elderly. Reductions in peak heart rate and peripheral oxygen utilization but not stroke volume appear to mediate the age-associated decline in aerobic capacity. Deficits in both cardiac β-adrenergic receptor density and in the efficiency of postsynaptic β-adrenergic signaling contribute significantly to the reduced cardiovascular performance during exercise in older adults. Although these cardiovascular aging changes are considered "normative", they lower the threshold for the development of cardiovascular disease, which affects the majority of older adults.

  13. NOX4 NADPH Oxidase-Dependent Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Aging-Associated Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vendrov, Aleksandr E.; Vendrov, Kimberly C.; Smith, Alberto; Yuan, Jinling; Sumida, Arihiro; Robidoux, Jacques; Madamanchi, Nageswara R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Increased oxidative stress and vascular inflammation are implicated in increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence with age. We and others demonstrated that NOX1/2 NADPH oxidase inhibition, by genetic deletion of p47phox, in Apoe−/− mice decreases vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and atherosclerosis in young age. The present study examined whether NOX1/2 NADPH oxidases are also pivotal to aging-associated CVD. Results: Both aged (16 months) Apoe−/− and Apoe−/−/p47phox−/− mice had increased atherosclerotic lesion area, aortic stiffness, and systolic dysfunction compared with young (4 months) cohorts. Cellular and mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) levels were significantly higher in aortic wall and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from aged wild-type and p47phox−/− mice. VSMCs from aged mice had increased mitochondrial protein oxidation and dysfunction and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression, which was abrogated with (2-(2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl-4-ylamino)-2-oxoethyl)triphenylphosphonium chloride (MitoTEMPO) treatment. NOX4 expression was increased in the vasculature and mitochondria of aged mice and its suppression with shRNA in VSMCs from aged mice decreased mtROS levels and improved function. Increased mtROS levels were associated with enhanced mitochondrial NOX4 expression in aortic VSMCs from aged subjects, and NOX4 expression levels in arterial wall correlated with age and atherosclerotic severity. Aged Apoe−/− mice treated with MitoTEMPO and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)-4-methyl-5-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]pyridine-3,6(2H,5H)-dione had decreased vascular ROS levels and atherosclerosis and preserved vascular and cardiac function. Innovation and Conclusion: These data suggest that NOX4, but not NOX1/2, and mitochondrial oxidative stress are mediators of CVD in aging under hyperlipidemic conditions. Regulating NOX4 activity/expression and using mitochondrial antioxidants are

  14. Extracellular vesicles and their synthetic analogues in aging and age-associated brain diseases

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. A.; Leonardi, T.; Huang, B.; Iraci, N.; Vega, B.; Pluchino, S.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely upon diverse and complex intercellular communications networks for a myriad of physiological processes. Disruption of these processes is implicated in the onset and propagation of disease and disorder, including the mechanisms of senescence at both cellular and organismal levels. In recent years, secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been identified as a particularly novel vector by which cell-to-cell communications are enacted. EVs actively and specifically traffic bioactive proteins, nucleic acids, and metabolites between cells at local and systemic levels, modulating cellular responses in a bidirectional manner under both homeostatic and pathological conditions. EVs are being implicated not only in the generic aging process, but also as vehicles of pathology in a number of age-related diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and disease. Thus, circulating EVs—or specific EV cargoes—are being utilised as putative biomarkers of disease. On the other hand, EVs, as targeted intercellular shuttles of multipotent bioactive payloads, have demonstrated promising therapeutic properties, which can potentially be modulated and enhanced through cellular engineering. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in employing nanomedicinal approaches to mimic the putative therapeutic properties of EVs by employing synthetic analogues for targeted drug delivery. Herein we describe what is known about the origin and nature of EVs and subsequently review their putative roles in biology and medicine (including the use of synthetic EV analogues), with a particular focus on their role in aging and age-related brain diseases. PMID:24973266

  15. Dietary arachidonic acid as a risk factor for age-associated neurodegenerative diseases: Potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mélanie H; Pelleieux, Sandra; Vitale, Nicolas; Olivier, Jean Luc

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease and associated diseases constitute a major public health concern worldwide. Nutrition-based, preventive strategies could possibly be effective in delaying the occurrence of these diseases and lower their prevalence. Arachidonic acid is the second major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and several studies support its involvement in Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this review is to examine how dietary arachidonic acid contributes to Alzheimer's disease mechanisms and therefore to its prevention. First, we explore the sources of neuronal arachidonic acid that could potentially originate from either the conversion of linoleic acid, or from dietary sources and transfer across the blood-brain-barrier. In a second part, a brief overview of the role of the two main agents of Alzheimer's disease, tau protein and Aβ peptide is given, followed by the examination of the relationship between arachidonic acid and the disease. Third, the putative mechanisms by which arachidonic acid could influence Alzheimer's disease occurrence and evolution are presented. The conclusion is devoted to what remains to be determined before integrating arachidonic acid in the design of preventive strategies against Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Quantitative EEG during normal aging: association with the Alzheimer's disease genetic risk variant in PICALM gene.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Natalya V; Andreeva, Tatiana V; Protasova, Maria S; Shagam, Lef I; Malina, Daria D; Goltsov, Andrey Yu; Fokin, Vitaly F; Illarioshkin, Sergey N; Rogaev, Evgeny I

    2017-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified novel risk variants for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among these, a gene carrying one of the highest risks for AD is PICALM. The PICALM rs3851179 A allele is thought to have a protective effect, whereas the G allele appears to confer risk for AD. The influence of the PICALM genotype on brain function in nondemented subjects remains largely unknown. We examined the possible effect of the PICALM rs3851179 genotype on quantitative electroencephalography recording at rest in 137 nondemented volunteers (age range: 20-79 years) subdivided into cohorts of those younger than and those older than 50 years of age. The homozygous presence of the AD risk variant PICALM GG was associated with an increase in beta relative power, with the effect being more pronounced in the older cohort. Beta power elevation in resting-state electroencephalography has previously been linked to cortical disinhibition and hyperexcitability. The increase in beta relative power in the carriers of the AD risk PICALM GG genotype suggests changes in the cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance, which are heightened during normal aging.

  17. Cause and Consequence: Mitochondrial Dysfunction Initiates and Propagates Neuronal Dysfunction, Neuronal Death and Behavioral Abnormalities in Age Associated Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Starkov, Anatoly; Blass, John P.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Beal, M. Flint

    2009-01-01

    approaches in age associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19715758

  18. IFI16, an amplifier of DNA-damage response: Role in cellular senescence and aging-associated inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Choubey, Divaker; Panchanathan, Ravichandran

    2016-07-01

    DNA-damage induces a DNA-damage response (DDR) in mammalian cells. The response, depending upon the cell-type and the extent of DNA-damage, ultimately results in cell death or cellular senescence. DDR-induced signaling in cells activates the ATM-p53 and ATM-IKKα/β-interferon (IFN)-β signaling pathways, thus leading to an induction of the p53 and IFN-inducible IFI16 gene. Further, upon DNA-damage, DNA accumulates in the cytoplasm, thereby inducing the IFI16 protein and STING-dependent IFN-β production and activation of the IFI16 inflammasome, resulting in the production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IL-18). Increased expression of IFI16 protein in a variety of cell-types promotes cellular senescence. However, reduced expression of IFI16 in cells promotes cell proliferation. Because expression of the IFI16 gene is induced by activation of DNA-damage response in cells and increased levels of IFI16 protein in cells potentiate the p53-mediated transcriptional activation of genes and p53 and pRb-mediated cell cycle arrest, we discuss how an improved understanding of the role of IFI16 protein in cellular senescence and associated inflammatory secretory phenotype is likely to identify the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of aging-associated human inflammatory diseases and a failure to cancer therapy.

  19. The role of macroautophagy in the ageing process, anti-ageing intervention and age-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Bergamini, E; Cavallini, G; Donati, A; Gori, Z

    2004-12-01

    Macroautophagy is a degradation/recycling system ubiquitous in eukariotic cells, which generates nutrients during fasting under the control of amino acids and hormones, and contributes to the turnover and rejuvenation of cellular components (long-lived proteins, cytomembranes and organelles). Tight coupling between these two functions may be the weak point in cell housekeeping. Ageing denotes a post-maturational deterioration of tissues and organs with the passage of time, due to the progressive accumulation of the misfunctioning cell components because of oxidative damage and an age-dependent decline of turnover rate and housekeeping. Caloric restriction (CR) and lower insulin levels may slow down many age-dependent processes and extend lifespan. Recent evidence is reviewed showing that autophagy is involved in ageing and in the anti-ageing action of anti-ageing calorie restriction: function of autophagy declines during adulthood and is almost negligible at older age; CR prevents the age-dependent decline of autophagic proteolysis and improves the sensitivity of liver cells to stimulation of lysosomal degradation; protection of autophagic proteolysis from the age-related decline co-varies with the duration and level of anti-ageing food restriction like the effects of CR extending lifespan; the pharmacological stimulation of macroautophagy has anti-ageing effects. Besides the involvement in ageing, macroautophagy may have an essential role in the pathogenesis of many age-associated diseases. Higher protein turnover may not fully account for the anti-ageing effects of macroautophagy, and effects of macroautophagy on housekeeping of the cell organelles, antioxidant machinery of cell membranes and transmembrane cell signaling should also be considered.

  20. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... and Symptoms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Haemophilus influenzae , including Hib, disease causes different symptoms depending on ...

  1. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  2. Use of anti-aging herbal medicine, Lycium barbarum, against aging-associated diseases. What do we know so far?

    PubMed

    Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-Fai

    2008-08-01

    Lycium barbarum (Gouqizi, Fructus Lycii, Wolfberry) is well known for nourishing the liver, and in turn, improving the eyesight. However, many people have forgotten its anti-aging properties. Valuable components of L. barbarum are not limited to its colored components containing zeaxanthin and carotene, but include the polysaccharides and small molecules such as betaine, cerebroside, beta-sitosterol, p-coumaric, and various vitamins. Despite the fact that L. barbarum has been used for centuries, its beneficial effects to our bodies have not been comprehensively studied with modern technology to unravel its therapeutic effects at the biochemical level. Recently, our laboratory has demonstrated its neuroprotective effects to counter neuronal loss in neurodegenerative diseases. Polysaccharides extracted from L. barbarum can protect neurons against beta-amyloid peptide toxicity in neuronal cell cultures, and retinal ganglion cells in an experimental model of glaucoma. We have even isolated the active component of polysaccharide which can attenuate stress kinases and pro-apoptotic signaling pathways. We have accumulated scientific evidence for its anti-aging effects that should be highlighted for modern preventive medicine. This review is to provide background information and a new direction of study for the anti-aging properties of L. barbarum. We hope that new findings for L. barbarum will pave a new avenue for the use of Chinese medicine in modern evidence-based medicine.

  3. Excess body weight increases the burden of age-associated chronic diseases and their associated health care expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Atella, Vincenzo; Kopinska, Joanna; Medea, Gerardo; Belotti, Federico; Tosti, Valeria; Mortari, Andrea Piano; Cricelli, Claudio; Fontana, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Aging and excessive adiposity are both associated with an increased risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, which drive ever increasing health costs. The main aim of this study was to determine the net (non‐estimated) health costs of excessive adiposity and associated age‐related chronic diseases. We used a prevalence‐based approach that combines accurate data from the Health Search CSD‐LPD, an observational dataset with patient records collected by Italian general practitioners and up‐to‐date health care expenditures data from the SiSSI Project. In this very large study, 557,145 men and women older than 18 years were observed at different points in time between 2004 and 2010. The proportion of younger and older adults reporting no chronic disease decreased with increasing BMI. After adjustment for age, sex, geographic residence, and GPs heterogeneity, a strong J‐shaped association was found between BMI and total health care costs, more pronounced in middle‐aged and older adults. Relative to normal weight, in the 45‐64 age group, the per‐capita total cost was 10% higher in overweight individuals, and 27 to 68% greater in patients with obesity and very severe obesity, respectively. The association between BMI and diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease largely explained these elevated costs. PMID:26540605

  4. Age-associated (cardio)metabolic diseases and cross-talk between adipose tissue and skeleton: endocrine aspects.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Silvia; Greco, Emanuela A; Aversa, Antonio; Lenzi, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Aged individuals continue to increase in number, and it is important to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of age-related changes in order to develop interventions that could contribute to "successful aging". Metabolic and hormonal factors, age-related changes in body composition, and a decline in physical activity are all involved in the tendency to lose muscle mass, to gain fat mass, and, also, to experience bone loss. Obesity, sarcopenia, and osteoporosis are important widespread health problems that lead to high prevalence of both mortality and morbidity. Indeed, during the last decades, obesity and osteoporosis have become a major health threat around the world. Aging increases the risk of developing obesity, sarcopenia, osteoporosis, and, also, cardiovascular diseases. A reduction of both bone and muscle mass with a corresponding increase of fat mass and inflammation and hormonal imbalance in the elderly lead to and may synergistically increase cardiovascular diseases. This review will focus on the relationship among these different medical situations, trying to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms.

  5. Genetic assessment of age-associated Alzheimer disease risk: Development and validation of a polygenic hazard score

    PubMed Central

    Cupples, L. Adrienne; Thompson, Wesley K.; Besser, Lilah; Kukull, Walter A.; Holland, Dominic; Chen, Chi-Hua; Brewer, James B.; Karow, David S.; Kauppi, Karolina; Bonham, Luke W.; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Dillon, William P.; Wilson, David M.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Mayeux, Richard; Hardy, John; Goate, Alison M.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Identifying individuals at risk for developing Alzheimer disease (AD) is of utmost importance. Although genetic studies have identified AD-associated SNPs in APOE and other genes, genetic information has not been integrated into an epidemiological framework for risk prediction. Methods and findings Using genotype data from 17,008 AD cases and 37,154 controls from the International Genomics of Alzheimer’s Project (IGAP Stage 1), we identified AD-associated SNPs (at p < 10−5). We then integrated these AD-associated SNPs into a Cox proportional hazard model using genotype data from a subset of 6,409 AD patients and 9,386 older controls from Phase 1 of the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), providing a polygenic hazard score (PHS) for each participant. By combining population-based incidence rates and the genotype-derived PHS for each individual, we derived estimates of instantaneous risk for developing AD, based on genotype and age, and tested replication in multiple independent cohorts (ADGC Phase 2, National Institute on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Center [NIA ADC], and Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative [ADNI], total n = 20,680). Within the ADGC Phase 1 cohort, individuals in the highest PHS quartile developed AD at a considerably lower age and had the highest yearly AD incidence rate. Among APOE ε3/3 individuals, the PHS modified expected age of AD onset by more than 10 y between the lowest and highest deciles (hazard ratio 3.34, 95% CI 2.62–4.24, p = 1.0 × 10−22). In independent cohorts, the PHS strongly predicted empirical age of AD onset (ADGC Phase 2, r = 0.90, p = 1.1 × 10−26) and longitudinal progression from normal aging to AD (NIA ADC, Cochran–Armitage trend test, p = 1.5 × 10−10), and was associated with neuropathology (NIA ADC, Braak stage of neurofibrillary tangles, p = 3.9 × 10−6, and Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease score for neuritic plaques, p = 6.8 × 10−6) and

  6. Aging-associated changes in human brain.

    PubMed

    Mrak, R E; Griffin, S T; Graham, D I

    1997-12-01

    A wide variety of anatomic and histological alterations are common in brains of aged individuals. However, identification of intrinsic aging changes--as distinct from changes resulting from cumulative environmental insult--is problematic. Some degree of neuronal and volume loss would appear to be inevitable, but recent studies have suggested that the magnitudes of such changes are much less than previously thought, and studies of dendritic complexity in cognitively intact individuals suggest continuing neuronal plasticity into the eighth decade. A number of vascular changes become more frequent with age, many attributable to systemic conditions such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Age-associated vascular changes not clearly linked to such conditions include hyaline arteriosclerotic changes with formation of arterial tortuosities in small intracranial vessels and the radiographic changes in deep cerebral white matter known as "leukoaraiosis." Aging is accompanied by increases in glial cell activation, in oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, in irreversible protein glycation, and in damage to DNA, and such changes may underlie in part the age-associated increasing incidence of "degenerative" conditions such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. A small number of histological changes appear to be universal in aged human brains. These include increasing numbers of corpora amylacea within astrocytic processes near blood-brain or cerebrospinal fluid-brain interfaces, accumulation of the "aging" pigment lipofuscin in all brain regions, and appearance of Alzheimer-type neurofibrillary tangles (but not necessarily amyloid plaques) in mesial temporal structures.

  7. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Compartir On this Page Diagnosis Treatment Complications Diagnosis Haemophilus influenzae , including Hib, disease is usually diagnosed with one ...

  8. Age-related alterations in mesenchymal stem cells related to shift in differentiation from osteogenic to adipogenic potential: implication to age-associated bone diseases and defects.

    PubMed

    Kim, MiJung; Kim, ChanWha; Choi, Yu Suk; Kim, MinHwan; Park, ChanJeoung; Suh, Yousin

    2012-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have attracted considerable attention in the fields of cell and gene therapy due to their intrinsic ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. The various therapeutic applications involving MSC require initial expansion and/or differentiation in vitro prior to clinical use. However, serial passages of MSC in culture lead to decreased differentiation potential and stem cell characteristics, eventually inducing cellular aging which will limit the success of cell-based therapeutic interventions. Here we review the age-related changes that occur in MSC with a special focus on the shift of differentiation potential from osteogenic to adipogenic lineage during the MSC aging processes and how aging causes this preferential shift by oxidative stress and/or energy metabolism defect. Oxidative stress-related signals and some microRNAs affect the differentiation potential shift of MSC by directly targeting key regulatory factors such as Runx-2 or PPAR-γ, and energy metabolism pathway is involved as well. All information described here including transcription factors, microRNAs and FoxOs could be used towards development of treatment regimens for age-related bone diseases and related defects based on mutually exclusive lineage fate determination of MSC.

  9. A new paradigm about HERV-K102 particle production and blocked release to explain cortisol mediated immunosenescence and age-associated risk of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Laderoute, Marian P

    2015-12-01

    The majority of chronic diseases in the aging adult are thought to relate to immune aging characterized by dominant immunosuppression and paradoxically, concomitant inflammation. This is known collectively as immunosenescence. The main change thought to be controlling immune aging is the age-related decline in dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and corresponding increase in cortisol; the net effect which decreases the DHEA/cortisol ratio. Exactly how this translates to immunosuppression and concomitant inflammation remains unclear. Recently a new component of the human innate immune system has been discovered. Human endogenous retrovirus K102 (HERV-K102) is a replication-competent foamy retrovirus unique to humans which has been implicated in chronic diseases. Accumulating evidence suggests that HERV-K102 may defend the host against viral infections, as well as against breast and other cancers. Particles are produced in activated monocytes and released into vacuoles but do not bud through the cell surface. This renders macrophages foamy, while the release of particles is only through cell lysis. New evidence presented here suggests DHEA but not DHEA-S may specifically bind and inactivate alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). AFP is a well-established immunosuppressive factor which importantly, also blocks cell lysis induction in macrophages through the 67 kilodalton (kD) AFP receptor (AFPr). Here, it is proposed that a decreased DHEA/cortisol ratio may favor the accumulation of foamy macrophages reflecting the cortisol induction of HERV-K102 particle production concomitant with the blocked release of particles by secreted AFP. This is a new paradigm to explain how cortisol-mediated immunosenescence can result in the persistence of foamy macrophages, and how this relates to risk of chronic disease.

  10. Upcoming treatments in Parkinson's disease, including gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodnitzky, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Progress is being made in the development of three categories of therapy for Parkinson's disease: (1) Symptomatic, (2) Neuroprotective, (3) Neurorestorative. Evolving approaches to symptomatic therapy, already in clinical trials, include the use of adenosine 2(A) antagonists, novel glutamate antagonists, and serotonin receptor antagonists, the latter for the therapy of Parkinson's psychosis and/or levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Examples of promising neuroprotective therapies under evaluation include the administration of creatine, urate-inducing compounds, calcium channel blockers, and pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonist. Cell-based restorative therapies are not the subject of this presentation, but various forms of gene therapy have shown promise in human Parkinson's disease trials. These protocols typically involve gene transfer into the CNS through the use of viral vectors. Currently, the most advanced studies of this technique involve delivery of an adeno-associated viral vector encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase into the subthalamic nucleus. This treatment has shown modest benefit in early clinical trials. Other gene therapies, in various stages of human clinical trials, include gene transfer for the production of trophic factors, for aromatic amino acid decarboxylase alone, and most recently, a lentiviral vector transfer of an enzymatic dopamine "factory" consisting of three essential enzymes required for production for this neurotransmitter.

  11. Advances in pleural disease management including updated procedural coding.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andrew R; Sterman, Daniel H

    2014-08-01

    Over 1.5 million pleural effusions occur in the United States every year as a consequence of a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and malignant conditions. Although rarely fatal in isolation, pleural effusions are often a marker of a serious underlying medical condition and contribute to significant patient morbidity, quality-of-life reduction, and mortality. Pleural effusion management centers on pleural fluid drainage to relieve symptoms and to investigate pleural fluid accumulation etiology. Many recent studies have demonstrated important advances in pleural disease management approaches for a variety of pleural fluid etiologies, including malignant pleural effusion, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema, and chest tube size. The last decade has seen greater implementation of real-time imaging assistance for pleural effusion management and increasing use of smaller bore percutaneous chest tubes. This article will briefly review recent pleural effusion management literature and update the latest changes in common procedural terminology billing codes as reflected in the changing landscape of imaging use and percutaneous approaches to pleural disease management.

  12. Allogeneic transplantation strategies including haploidentical transplantation in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gluckman, Eliane

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hemoglobinopathy. Despite antenatal counseling and neonatal screening programs implemented in higher income countries, SCD is still associated with multiple morbidities and early mortality. To date, the only curative approach to SCD is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but this therapy is not yet established worldwide. The registries of the European Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMT) and the Centre for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) account, respectively, for 611 and 627 patients receiving transplantations for SCD. Most of these patients were transplanted with grafts from an HLA-identical sibling donor. The main obstacles to increasing the number of transplantations are a lack of awareness on the part of physicians and families, the absence of reliable prognostic factors for severity, and the perceived risk that transplantation complications may outweigh the benefits of early transplantation. Results show that more than 90% of patients having undergone an HLA-identical sibling transplantation after myeloablative conditioning are cured, with very limited complications. Major improvement is expected from the use of new reduced-toxicity conditioning regimens and the use of alternative donors, including unrelated cord blood transplantations and related haploidentical bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantations.

  13. Citrus diseases with global ramifications including citrus canker and huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although there are a number of diseases that plague citrus production worldwide, two bacterial diseases are particularly problematic. Both are of Asian origin and currently cause severe economic damage: Asiatic citrus canker (ACC) and citrus huanglongbing (HLB). Although ACC has been found in the ...

  14. Therapeutic approaches to age-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Ruth; Derouesné, Christian; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Yesavage, Jerome A.

    2001-01-01

    The United Nations projects that the number of individuals with dementia in developed countries alone will be approximately 36,7 million by the year 2050. International recognition of the significant emotional and economic burden of Alzheimer's disease has been matched by a dramatic increase in the development of pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches to this illness in the past decade. Changing demographics have underscored the necessity to develop similar approaches for the remediation of the cognitive impairment associated with more benign syndromes, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and age-associated cognitive decline (AACD). The present article aims to provide an overview of the most current therapeutic approaches to age-associated neurocognitive disorders. Additionally, it discusses the conceptual and methodological issues that surround the design, implementation, and interpretation of such approaches. PMID:22033831

  15. Molecular signatures of age-associated chronic degeneration of shoulder muscles.

    PubMed

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Kolk, Arjen; Tatum, Zuotian; Groosjohan, Niels Kuipers; Verwey, Nisha E; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Nagels, Jochem; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Raz, Vered

    2016-02-23

    Chronic muscle diseases are highly prevalent in the elderly causing severe mobility limitations, pain and frailty. The intrinsic molecular mechanisms are poorly understood due to multifactorial causes, slow progression with age and variations between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms could lead to new treatment options which are currently limited. Shoulder complaints are highly common in the elderly, and therefore, muscles of the shoulder's rotator cuff could be considered as a model for chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. Diseased shoulder muscles were characterized by muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration compared with unaffected shoulder muscles. We confirmed fatty infiltration using histochemical analysis. Additionally, fibrosis and loss of contractile myosin expression were found in diseased muscles. Most cellular features, including proliferation rate, apoptosis and cell senescence, remained unchanged and genome-wide molecular signatures were predominantly similar between diseased and intact muscles. However, we found down-regulation of a small subset of muscle function genes, and up-regulation of extracellular region genes. Myogenesis was defected in muscle cell culture from diseased muscles but was restored by elevating MyoD levels. We suggest that impaired muscle functionality in a specific environment of thickened extra-cellular matrix is crucial for the development of chronic age-associated muscle degeneration.

  16. Molecular signatures of age-associated chronic degeneration of shoulder muscles

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Kolk, Arjen; Tatum, Zuotian; Groosjohan, Niels Kuipers; Verwey, Nisha E.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Nagels, Jochem; Hoen, Peter A. C. 't; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2016-01-01

    Chronic muscle diseases are highly prevalent in the elderly causing severe mobility limitations, pain and frailty. The intrinsic molecular mechanisms are poorly understood due to multifactorial causes, slow progression with age and variations between individuals. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms could lead to new treatment options which are currently limited. Shoulder complaints are highly common in the elderly, and therefore, muscles of the shoulder's rotator cuff could be considered as a model for chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. Diseased shoulder muscles were characterized by muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration compared with unaffected shoulder muscles. We confirmed fatty infiltration using histochemical analysis. Additionally, fibrosis and loss of contractile myosin expression were found in diseased muscles. Most cellular features, including proliferation rate, apoptosis and cell senescence, remained unchanged and genome-wide molecular signatures were predominantly similar between diseased and intact muscles. However, we found down-regulation of a small subset of muscle function genes, and up-regulation of extracellular region genes. Myogenesis was defected in muscle cell culture from diseased muscles but was restored by elevating MyoD levels. We suggest that impaired muscle functionality in a specific environment of thickened extra-cellular matrix is crucial for the development of chronic age-associated muscle degeneration. PMID:26885755

  17. Cognitive training and Bacopa monnieri: Evidence for a combined intervention to alleviate age associated cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Grace M; Downey, Luke A; Noble, Anthony; Stough, Con

    2016-10-01

    As the elderly population grows the impact of age associated cognitive decline as well as neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and dementia will increase. Ageing is associated with consistent impairments in cognitive processes (e.g., processing speed, memory, executive function and learning) important for work, well-being, life satisfaction and overall participation in society. Recently, there has been increased effort to conduct research examining methods to improve cognitive function in older citizens. Cognitive training has been shown to improve performance in some cognitive domains; including memory, processing speed, executive function and attention in older adults. These cognitive changes are thought to be related to improvements in brain connectivity and neural circuitry. Bacopa monnieri has also been shown to improve specific domains of cognition, sensitive to age associated cognitive decline (particularly processing speed and memory). These Bacopa monnieri dependent improvements may be due to the increase in specific neuro-molecular mechanisms implicated in the enhancement of neural connections in the brain (i.e. synaptogenesis). In particular, a number of animal studies have shown Bacopa monnieri consumption upregulates calcium dependent kinases in the synapse and post-synaptic cell, crucial for strengthening and growing connections between neurons. These effects have been shown to occur in areas important for cognitive processes, such as the hippocampus. As Bacopa monnieri has shown neuro-molecular mechanisms that encourage synaptogenesis, while cognitive training enhances brain connectivity, Bacopa monnieri supplementation could theoretically enhance and strengthen synaptic changes acquired through cognitive training. Therefore, the current paper hypothesises that the combination of these two interventions could improve cognitive outcomes, over and above the effects of administrating these interventions independently, as an effective

  18. Age-associated hyper-methylated regions in the human brain overlap with bivalent chromatin domains.

    PubMed

    Watson, Corey T; Disanto, Giulio; Sandve, Geir Kjetil; Breden, Felix; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2012-01-01

    Recent associations between age-related differentially methylated sites and bivalently marked chromatin domains have implicated a role for these genomic regions in aging and age-related diseases. However, the overlap between such epigenetic modifications has so far only been identified with respect to age-associated hyper-methylated sites in blood. In this study, we observed that age-associated differentially methylated sites characterized in the human brain were also highly enriched in bivalent domains. Analysis of hyper- vs. hypo-methylated sites partitioned by age (fetal, child, and adult) revealed that enrichment was significant for hyper-methylated sites identified in children and adults (child, fold difference = 2.28, P = 0.0016; adult, fold difference = 4.73, P = 4.00 × 10(-5)); this trend was markedly more pronounced in adults when only the top 100 most significantly hypo- and hyper-methylated sites were considered (adult, fold difference = 10.7, P = 2.00 × 10(-5)). Interestingly, we found that bivalently marked genes overlapped by age-associated hyper-methylation in the adult brain had strong involvement in biological functions related to developmental processes, including neuronal differentiation. Our findings provide evidence that the accumulation of methylation in bivalent gene regions with age is likely to be a common process that occurs across tissue types. Furthermore, particularly with respect to the aging brain, this accumulation might be targeted to loci with important roles in cell differentiation and development, and the closing off of these developmental pathways. Further study of these genes is warranted to assess their potential impact upon the development of age-related neurological disorders.

  19. Muscleblind-like 3 deficit results in a spectrum of age-associated pathologies observed in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jongkyu; Dixon, Donald M.; Dansithong, Warunee; Abdallah, Walid F.; Roos, Kenneth P.; Jordan, Maria C.; Trac, Brandon; Lee, Han Shin; Comai, Lucio; Reddy, Sita

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) exhibits distinctive disease specific phenotypes and the accelerated onset of a spectrum of age-associated pathologies. In DM1, dominant effects of expanded CUG repeats result in part from the inactivation of the muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins. To test the role of MBNL3, we deleted Mbnl3 exon 2 (Mbnl3ΔE2) in mice and examined the onset of age-associated diseases over 4 to 13 months of age. Accelerated onset of glucose intolerance with elevated insulin levels, cardiac systole deficits, left ventricle hypertrophy, a predictor of a later onset of heart failure and the development of subcapsular and cortical cataracts is observed in Mbnl3ΔE2 mice. Retention of embryonic splice isoforms in adult organs, a prominent defect in DM1, is not observed in multiple RNAs including the Insulin Receptor (Insr), Cardiac Troponin T (Tnnt2), Lim Domain Binding 3 (Ldb3) RNAs in Mbnl3ΔE2 mice. Although rare DM1-like splice errors underlying the observed phenotypes cannot be excluded, our data in conjunction with the reported absence of alternative splice errors in embryonic muscles of a similar Mbnl3ΔE2 mouse by RNA-seq studies, suggest that mechanisms distinct from the adult retention of embryonic splice patterns may make important contributions to the onset of age-associated pathologies in DM1. PMID:27484195

  20. Stimulation of autophagy by antilipolytic drugs may rescue rodents from age-associated hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Sara; Cavallini, Gabriella; Donati, Alessio; Pallottini, Valentina; Martini, Chiara; Trentalance, Anna; Bergamini, Ettore

    2009-04-01

    Aging is characterized by several metabolic changes responsible for the decline of certain functions and the appearance of age-related diseases, including hypercholesterolemia, which is the main risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Similar changes in a number of morphological and biochemical parameters were observed in rats. Caloric restriction (CR) was shown to increase longevity and prevent age-related diseases in various organisms, and to counteract the age-associated increase in plasma cholesterol. CR was thought to operate through the stimulation of the process of macroautophagy. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the stimulation of macroautophagy on age-associated cholesterolemia. Mature Sprague-Dawley rats were fasted overnight and given the antilipolytic agent 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP; 12 mg/kg b.w. in 0.2 mL of saline, intraperitoneally). The age-related changes in cholesterol plasma level, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA-R) activity, and lipoperoxidation were determined. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor expression was determined by immunoblot of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE)-separated liver membranes. Results show that the stimulation of macroautophagy reduces the total LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol plasma level to juvenile values, and triglycerides levels even lower. The hypocholesterolemic action of DMP requires neither the counteraction of the age-related changes in the HMG-CoA-R activation state and regulation, nor the counteraction of the age-related increase in lipoperoxidation, and only involves a restoration of the numbers of LDL receptors on liver membranes to juvenile levels.

  1. Nutrition and age-associated inflammation: implications for disease prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulating evidence suggests that aging is associated with dysregulated immune and inflammatory responses. Investigation into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon suggests that an up-regulated cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, and resulting increase in production of pr...

  2. Quadruple cancer including Bowen's disease after arsenic injections 40 years earlier: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Murata, K; Iwazawa, T; Takayama, T; Yamashita, K; Okagawa, K

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the successful treatment of quadruple cancer including Bowen's disease in a 71-year-old man who had been given injections of salvarsan, an arsenic compound, for syphilis more than 40 years earlier. Resection of a skin lesion on his chest subsequently confirmed a diagnosis of Bowen's disease, 3 years after which he was operated on for concurrent gastric cancer and sigmoid colon cancer. A fourth cancer was discovered on his left vocal cord 2 weeks after this operation; it was resected 2 years later. A discussion of multiple malignant neoplasms and the possible relationship between arsenic and cancer is presented following this case report.

  3. Hematologic manifestations of systemic disease (including iron deficiency, anemia of inflammation and DIC).

    PubMed

    Witmer, Char M

    2013-12-01

    A complete blood cell count (CBC) is a frequent test sent to aid in the diagnostic evaluation of ill patients. Not uncommonly hematologic abnormalities may be the first sign of an underlying systemic disorder. The astute clinician needs to understand how systemic disease can affect the CBC to direct further diagnostic investigations. This article focuses on the 2 most common acquired anemias including iron deficiency and anemia of inflammation as well as disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  4. Immunofluorescence Patterns in Selected Dermatoses, Including Blistering Skin Diseases Utilizing Multiple Fluorochromes

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Calle-Isaza, Juliana; Howard, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders represent a heterogeneous group of dermatoses whose diagnosis is made based on clinical history, histologic features, and immunopathologic features. The most commonly used techniques for the diagnosis of these diseases are direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF and IIF), including salt-split processing. NaCl split skin is used to determine the level of blister formation, and the localization of autoantibodies relative to the split. Classically, immunofluorescence has been performed with one fluorochrome in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Aims: To compare DIF and IIF of the skin, using a single fluorochrome versus multiple fluorochromes. Materials and Methods: We studied 20 autoimmune skin disease cases using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) alone, in comparison to multiple fluorochromes (with or without DNA counterstaining). Results: The use of multiple fluorochromes helped to simultaneously visualize reactivity in multiple skin areas, in contrast to using FITC alone. Conclusions: Using multiple fluorochromes allows simultaneous labeling of two or more antigens within the same cell/or tissue section, assists in colocalization of unknown antigens with known molecules, and helps in ruling out “background” staining. PMID:26605203

  5. Comprehensive functional characterization of murine infantile Batten disease including Parkinson-like behavior and dopaminergic markers

    PubMed Central

    Dearborn, Joshua T.; Harmon, Steven K.; Fowler, Stephen C.; O’Malley, Karen L.; Taylor, George T.; Sands, Mark S.; Wozniak, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, Infantile Batten disease) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency in palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1). The PPT1-deficient mouse (Cln1−/−) is a useful phenocopy of human INCL. Cln1−/− mice display retinal dysfunction, seizures, motor deficits, and die at ~8 months of age. However, little is known about the cognitive and behavioral functions of Cln1−/− mice during disease progression. In the present study, younger (~1–2 months of age) Cln1−/− mice showed minor deficits in motor/sensorimotor functions while older (~5–6 months of age) Cln1−/− mice exhibited more severe impairments, including decreased locomotor activity, inferior cued water maze performance, decreased running wheel ability, and altered auditory cue conditioning. Unexpectedly, certain cognitive functions such as some learning and memory capabilities seemed intact in older Cln1−/− mice. Younger and older Cln1−/− mice presented with walking initiation defects, gait abnormalities, and slowed movements, which are analogous to some symptoms reported in INCL and parkinsonism. However, there was no evidence of alterations in dopaminergic markers in Cln1−/− mice. Results from this study demonstrate quantifiable changes in behavioral functions during progression of murine INCL and suggest that Parkinson-like motor/sensorimotor deficits in Cln1−/− mice are not mediated by dopamine deficiency. PMID:26238334

  6. Mitochondrial Lon protease in human disease and aging: Including an etiologic classification of Lon-related diseases and disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bota, Daniela A.; Davies, Kelvin J.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Mitochondrial Lon protease, also called LonP1 is a product of the nuclear gene LONP1. Lon is a major regulator of mitochondrial metabolism and response to free radical damage, as well as an essential factor for the maintenance and repair of mitochondrial DNA. Lon is an ATP-stimulated protease that cycles between being bound (at the inner surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane) to the mitochondrial genome, and being released into the mitochondrial matrix where it can degrade matrix proteins. At least three different roles or functions have been ascribed to Lon: 1) Proteolytic digestion of oxidized proteins and the turnover of specific essential mitochondrial enzymes such as aconitase, TFAM, and StAR; 2) Mitochondrial (mt)DNA-binding protein, involved in mtDNA replication and mitogenesis; and 3) Protein chaperone, interacting with the Hsp60–mtHsp70 complex. LONP1 orthologs have been studied in bacteria, yeast, flies, worms, and mammals, evincing the widespread importance of the gene, as well as its remarkable evolutionary conservation. In recent years, we have witnessed a significant increase in knowledge regarding Lon's involvement in physiological functions, as well as in an expanding array of human disorders, including cancer, neurodegeneration, heart disease, and stroke. In addition, Lon appears to have a significant role in the aging process. A number of mitochondrial diseases have now been identified whose mechanisms involve various degrees of Lon dysfunction. In this paper we review current knowledge of Lon's function, under normal conditions, and we propose a new classification of human diseases characterized by a either over-expression or decline or loss of function of Lon. Lon has also been implicated in human aging, and we review the data currently available as well as speculating about possible interactions of aging and disease. Finally, we also discuss Lon as potential therapeutic target in human disease. PMID:27387767

  7. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our department. We treated her with acupuncture based on the Chinese traditional medicine and electroacupuncture five times per week. After the 2-week treatment, the assessment for the symptoms was as follows; visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the leg pain was 16 mm (70 mm, before), Hamilton's rating scales for depression (HAM-D) score was 9 (18, before), timed 3 m Up and Go took 20 steps in 30 sec (24 steps in 38 sec, before), and the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part 1 score was 13 (21, before). Autonomic symptoms, hot flashes and paroxysmal sweating, were also alleviated. Acupuncture may be a good treatment modality for nonmotor symptoms in PD. PMID:25628905

  8. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo; Mitsuma, Tadamichi

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our department. We treated her with acupuncture based on the Chinese traditional medicine and electroacupuncture five times per week. After the 2-week treatment, the assessment for the symptoms was as follows; visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the leg pain was 16 mm (70 mm, before), Hamilton's rating scales for depression (HAM-D) score was 9 (18, before), timed 3 m Up and Go took 20 steps in 30 sec (24 steps in 38 sec, before), and the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part 1 score was 13 (21, before). Autonomic symptoms, hot flashes and paroxysmal sweating, were also alleviated. Acupuncture may be a good treatment modality for nonmotor symptoms in PD.

  9. Broader prevalence of Wolbachia in insects including potential human disease vectors.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, C D; Gonçalves, D S; Baton, L A; Shimabukuro, P H F; Carvalho, F D; Moreira, L A

    2015-06-01

    Wolbachia are intracellular, maternally transmitted bacteria considered the most abundant endosymbionts found in arthropods. They reproductively manipulate their host in order to increase their chances of being transmitted to the offspring, and currently are being used as a tool to control vector-borne diseases. Studies on distribution of Wolbachia among its arthropod hosts are important both for better understanding why this bacterium is so common, as well as for its potential use as a biological control agent. Here, we studied the incidence of Wolbachia in a broad range of insect species, collected from different regions of Brazil, using three genetic markers (16S rRNA, wsp and ftsZ), which varied in terms of their sensitivity to detect this bacterium. The overall incidence of Wolbachia among species belonging to 58 families and 14 orders was 61.9%. The most common positive insect orders were Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, with Diptera and Hemiptera having the highest numbers of Wolbachia-positive families. They included potential human disease vectors whose infection status has never been reported before. Our study further shows the importance of using quantitative polymerase chain reaction for high-throughput and sensitive Wolbachia screening.

  10. Structured Regions of Alpha-synuclein Fibrils Include the Early Onset Parkinson's Disease Mutation Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Comellas Canal, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-08-26

    Alpha-Synuclein (AS) fibrils constitute the major proteinaceous component of Lewy bodies (LBs), the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Three single point mutations in the AS gene, as well as multiplication of the wild-type (WT) AS allele, have been previously identified in families with early-onset PD. Although AS fibrils have been the subject of intense study, critical details about their structure including the precise location of the B-strands and the extent of the core, the three-dimensional structure and the effects of the mutations—remain unknown. Here, we have used magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to present a detailed characterization of the full-length WT AS fibrils. With improved sample preparations, isotopic labeling patterns and NMR experiments, we have confidently assigned more than 90% of the 13C and 15N backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the detected residues from residue 39 to 97, and quantified the conformational dynamics throughout this region. Our results demonstrate that the core of AS fibrils extends with a repeated motif and that residues 30, 46 and 53-the early-onset PD mutant sites-are located in structured regions of AS fibrils.

  11. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease: different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents including curcumin.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2009-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly. Deposition of amyloid beta plaque and associated neuroinflammation are the major hallmarks of AD. Whereas reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activated microglial cells contribute to neuronal loss, nuclear factor kappaB and apolipoprotein E participate in inflammatory process of AD. Current FDA approved drugs provide only symptomatic relief in AD. For broad spectrum of activity, some natural products are also being tested. Turmeric is used as an anti-inflammatory medicine in various regions of Asia. Curcumin, which is a yellow colored polyphenol compound present in turmeric, showed anti-inflammatory properties. Herein, we discuss the neurobiological and neuroinflammatory pathways of AD, evaluate different molecular targets and potential therapeutic agents, including curcumin, for the treatment of AD.

  12. Treatment of Exudative and Vasogenic Chorioretinal Diseases Including Variants of AMD and Other CNV Related Maculopathy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-24

    Coats' Disease; Idiopathic Retinal Telangiectasia; Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation; Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy; Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum; Pathological Myopia; Multi-focal Choroiditis; Rubeosis Iridis; Von Hippel Lindau Disease; BEST VITELLIFORM MACULAR DYSTROPHY, MULTIFOCAL (Disorder)

  13. Aging-associated changes in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis: what's the connection?

    PubMed

    Henry, Curtis J; Marusyk, Andriy; DeGregori, James

    2011-06-01

    Aging is associated with a marked increase in a number of diseases, including many types of cancer. Due to the complex and multi-factorial nature of both aging and cancer, accurate deciphering of causative links between aging and cancer remains a major challenge. It is generally accepted that initiation and progression of cancers are driven by a process of clonal evolution. In principle, this somatic evolution should follow the same Darwinian logic as evolutionary processes in populations in nature: diverse heritable types arising as a result of mutations are subjected to selection, resulting in expansion of the fittest clones. However, prevalent paradigms focus primarily on mutational aspects in linking aging and cancer. In this review, we will argue that age-related changes in selective pressures are likely to be equally important. We will focus on aging-related changes in the hematopoietic system, where age-associated alterations are relatively well studied, and discuss the impact of these changes on the development of leukemias and other malignancies.

  14. Strial microvascular pathology and age-associated endocochlear potential decline in NOD congenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Rice, Mary E. Rybak; Gagnon, Patricia M.

    2008-01-01

    NOD/ShiLtJ (previously NOD/LtJ) inbred mice show polygenic autoimmune disease and are commonly used to model autoimmune-related Type I diabetes, as well as Sjogren’s syndrome. They also show rapidly progressing hearing loss, partly due to the combined effects of Cdh23ahl and Ahl2. Congenic NOD.NON-H2nb1/LtJ mice, which carry corrective alleles within the H2 histocompatibility gene complex, are free from diabetes and other overt signs of autoimmune disease, but still exhibit rapidly progressive hearing loss. Here we show that cochlear pathology in these congenics broadly includes hair cell and neuronal loss, plus endocochlear potential (EP) decline from initially normal values after 2 months of age. The EP reduction follows often dramatic degeneration of capillaries in stria vascularis, with resulting strial degeneration. The cochlear modiolus in the congenic mice also features perivascular inclusions that resemble those in some mouse autoimmune models. We posit that cochlear hair cell/neural and strial pathology in NOD.NON-H2nb1 mice arise independently. While sensory cell loss may be closely tied to Cdh23ahl and Ahl2, the strial microvascular pathology and modiolar anomalies we observe may arise from alleles on the NOD background related to immune function. Age-associated EP decline in NOD.NON-H2nb1 mice may model forms of strial age-related hearing loss caused principally by microvascular disease. The remarkable strial capillary loss in these mice may also be useful for studying the relation between strial vascular insufficiency and strial function. PMID:18727954

  15. Age-associated physiological and pathological changes at the blood-brain barrier: A review.

    PubMed

    Erdő, Franciska; Denes, László; de Lange, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The age-associated decline of the neurological and cognitive functions becomes more and more serious challenge for the developed countries with the increasing number of aged populations. The morphological and biochemical changes in the aging brain are the subjects of many extended research projects worldwide for a long time. However, the crucial role of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment and disruption in the pathological processes in age-associated neurodegenerative disorders received special attention just for a few years. This article gives an overview on the major elements of the blood-brain barrier and its supporting mechanisms and also on their alterations during development, physiological aging process and age-associated neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, pharmacoresistant epilepsy). Besides the morphological alterations of the cellular elements (endothelial cells, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, neuronal elements) of the BBB and neurovascular unit, the changes of the barrier at molecular level (tight junction proteins, adheres junction proteins, membrane transporters, basal lamina, extracellular matrix) are also summarized. The recognition of new players and initiators of the process of neurodegeneration at the level of the BBB may offer new avenues for novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of numerous chronic neurodegenerative disorders currently without effective medication.

  16. Newcastle disease: An in-depth review including epidemiology and molecular diagnostics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections of birds with strains of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), (synonyms: Newcastle disease virus (NDV), pigeon PMV-1 (PPMV-1)) are associated with two clinical outcomes: 1) Newcastle disease (ND) results from infections with virulent APMV-1, and is also called Exotic ND (END) in U. S...

  17. Suicide rates: age-associated trends and their correlates

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Suicide rates traditionally increased with ageing. There is a paucity of studies examining factors associated with age-associated trends in suicide rates. Methods: The relationship between suicide rates and ageing was examined by ascertaining suicide rates in the seven age-bands 16-24 years to 75+ years from the World Health Organisation for 97 countries. The relationship between socio-economic status, income inequality, healthcare expenditure, child mortality rates and life expectancy and countries with an increase, a decline and no change in suicide rates with ageing was examined using data from the United Nations. Results: In males and females there was a decline in 5 and 10 countries, an increase in 33 and 37 countries and no change in 59 and 50 countries respectively in suicide rates with ageing. Age-associated trends in suicide rates were significantly associated with socio-economic status (males) or income inequality (females), per capita expenditure in healthcare, the proportion of gross-national domestic product spent on healthcare, child mortality rates and life expectancy. Conclusion: The current study, of factors associated with age-associated trends in suicide rates, confirmed a previously developed five sequential stage model to explain the relationship between elderly suicide rates and socio-economic status and income inequality, quality and quantity of healthcare services, child mortality rates and life expectancy. PMID:21502781

  18. The role of the OIE in information exchange and the control of animal diseases, including zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Poissonnier, C; Teissier, M

    2013-08-01

    The growing importance of animal diseases and zoonoses at a time when globalisation has increased movements of people, animals and animal products across the globe, has strengthened the role of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) in animal disease control. The OIE's mandate since its establishment in 1924 has been to facilitate the exchange of public health, animal health and scientific information, and to further the control and eradication of animal diseases. The OIE is recognised by the World Trade Organization Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures as the international reference organisation for animal diseases and zoonoses, especially for standard setting. The standards adopted by the World Assembly of OIE Delegates on veterinary public health and animal health feature in the OlE Terrestrial Animal Health Code, the Aquatic Animal Health Code, the Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals and the Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals. The OlE is also a reference organisation for the exchange of public and animal health information among Member Countries, through an information, reporting and warning system based on transparent communication between countries. The OIE provides scientific expertise in ascertaining countries' status with regard to notifiable diseases, enabling them to secure official recognition as being free from foot and mouth disease, African horse sickness, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. The OIE also contributes its scientific expertise to stakeholder training on the surveillance and control of animal diseases and zoonoses and to the evaluation of the performance of Veterinary Services, to enhance theirwork asthe cornerstone of their countries' disease control efforts.

  19. Linkage analyses of chromosome 6 loci, including HLA, in familial aggregations of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot, J.P.; Laurent-Puig, P.; Gower-Rousseau, C.; Caillat-Zueman, S.; Beaugerie, L.; Dupas, J.L.; Van Gossum, A.; Bonaiti-Pellie, C.; Cortot, A.

    1994-08-15

    Segregation analyses of familial aggregations of Crohn disease have provided consistent results pointing to the involvement of a predisposing gene with a recessive mode of inheritance. Although extensively investigated, the role played by human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes in this inflammatory bowel disease remains elusive and the major histocompatibility complex is a candidate region for the mapping of the Crohn disease susceptibility gene. A total of 25 families with multiple cases of Crohn disease was genotyped for HLA DRB1 and for 16 highly polymorphic loci evenly distributed on chromosome 6. The data were subjected to linkage analysis using the lod score method. Neither individual nor combined lod scores for any family and for any locus tested reached values suggesting linkage or genetic heterogeneity. The Crohn disease predisposing locus was excluded from the whole chromosome 6 with lod scores less than -2. It was excluded from the major histocompatibility complex and from 91% of the chromosome 6 genetic map with lod scores less than -4. The major recessive gene involved in genetic predisposition to Crohn disease does not reside on the major histocompatibility complex nor on any locus mapping to chromosome 6. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Age-associated changes in DNA methylation across multiple tissues in an inbred mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Helen; Hannon, Eilis; Wells, Sara; Williams, Brenda; Fernandes, Cathy; Mill, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic disruption has been implicated in many diseases of aging, and age-associated DNA methylation changes at specific genomic loci in humans are strongly correlated with chronological age. The aim of this study was to explore the specificity of selected age-associated differentially methylated positions (aDMPs) identified in human epidemiological studies by quantifying DNA methylation across multiple tissues in homologous regions of the murine genome. We selected four high-confidence aDMPs (located in the vicinity of the ELOVL2, GLRA1, MYOD1 and PDE4C genes) and quantified DNA methylation across these regions in four tissues (blood, lung, cerebellum and hippocampus) from male and female C57BL/6J mice, ranging in age from fetal (embryonic day 17) to 630 days. We observed tissue-specific age-associated changes in DNA methylation that was directionally consistent with those observed in humans. These findings lend further support to the notion that changes in DNA methylation are associated with chronological age and suggest that these processes are often conserved across tissues and between mammalian species. Our data highlight the relevance of utilizing model systems, in which environmental and genetic influences can be carefully controlled, for the further study of these phenomena. PMID:26861500

  1. [Diagnosis and therapy of axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis (Bechterew's disease)].

    PubMed

    Poddubnyy, D; Sieper, J

    2012-07-01

    The term axial spondyloarthritis covers patients with established structural changes visible on x-ray in sacroiliac joints and/or in the spine (classical ankylosing spondylitis) but also patients with non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis in whom early inflammatory signs of the disease can only be visualized with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI technique plays an important role in the diagnosis of this disease and an early diagnosis is normally based on a combination of clinical, laboratory and imaging parameters. Only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TNF-α blockers are effective in the treatment of axial spondyloarthritis. Patients with short disease duration and elevated acute phase reactant levels demonstrate best therapy response and, therefore, should be closely followed-up and consistently treated.

  2. Uveitis in spondyloarthritis including psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T

    2015-06-01

    Uveitis is a common complication of spondyloarthritis. The "phenotype" of the uveitis characteristic of ankylosing spondylitis (sudden onset, anterior, unilateral, recurrent, more often male) may differ from the phenotype often seen with either psoriatic arthritis or inflammatory bowel disease (insidious onset, anterior and intermediate, bilateral, chronic, and/or more often female). The frequency of uveitis is also much greater in association with ankylosing spondylitis than with either inflammatory bowel disease or psoriasis. Uveitis may affect the choice of therapy and can rarely be a complication of therapy. Uveitis and arthritis also co-exist in several animal models.

  3. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F.; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional area (CSA) and fatty infiltration from Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Arthrography (MRA) in subjects without (N = 294) and with (N = 109) RC-tears. Normalized muscle CSA of the four RC muscles and the deltoid shoulder muscle were compared and age-associated patterns of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration were constructed. We identified two distinct age-associated patterns: in the supraspinatus and subscapularis RC muscles CSAs continuously declined throughout adulthood, whereas in the infraspinatus and deltoid reduced CSA was prominent from midlife onwards. In the teres minor, CSA was unchanged with age. Most importantly, age-associated patterns were highly similar between subjects without RC tear and those with RC-tears. This suggests that extensive RC muscle atrophy during aging could contribute to RC pathology. We compared muscle pathology between torn infraspinatus and non-torn teres minor and the deltoid in two patients with a massive RC-tear. In the torn infraspinatus we found pronounced fatty droplets, an increase in extracellular collagen-1, a loss of myosin heavy chain-1 expression in myofibers and an increase in Pax7-positive cells. However, the adjacent intact teres minor and deltoid exhibited healthy muscle features. This suggests that satellite cells and the extracellular matrix may contribute to extensive muscle fibrosis in torn RC. We suggest that torn RC muscles display hallmarks of muscle aging whereas the teres minor could represent an aging

  4. [Zhang Zhongjings lost formulas not included in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Cold Pathogenic Diseases)].

    PubMed

    Mi, Li

    2006-07-01

    In addition to the medical formulas of Zhang Zhongjing mostly existed in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Cold Pathogenic Diseases) and Jinkui Yaolve Fanglun (Synopsis of Prescriptions of the Golden Chamber ) collated by Lin Yi in the Song Dynasty, there are some other lost formulas scattered in Beiji Qianjin Yao Fang (Essential Recipes for Emergent Use Worth a Thousand Gold), Qianjin Yi Fang (A Supplement to Recipes Worth a Thousand Gold ) , Waitai Miyao (Arcane Essentials from the Imperial Library) , written in the Tang Dynasty, and Taiping Shenghui Fang (Tiping Holy Prescriptions for Universal Relief) and Isimpo (Prescriptions from the Heart of Medicine)and those written in the Song Dynasty. Based on the textual research, collation, differentiation of Zhongjings formulas in different texts and medical works, the lost formulas of Zhongjing were collected besides those in Shanghan Lun (Treatise on Cold Pathogenic Diseases) and Jinkui Yaolve Fanglun (Synopsis of Prescriptions of the Golden Chamber), and then the state of the formulas were identified.

  5. Identification of Aging-Associated Gene Expression Signatures That Precede Intestinal Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okuchi, Yoshihisa; Imajo, Masamichi; Mizuno, Rei; Kamioka, Yuji; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Taketo, Makoto Mark; Nagayama, Satoshi; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated alterations of cellular functions have been implicated in various disorders including cancers. Due to difficulties in identifying aging cells in living tissues, most studies have focused on aging-associated changes in whole tissues or certain cell pools. Thus, it remains unclear what kinds of alterations accumulate in each cell during aging. While analyzing several mouse lines expressing fluorescent proteins (FPs), we found that expression of FPs is gradually silenced in the intestinal epithelium during aging in units of single crypt composed of clonal stem cell progeny. The cells with low FP expression retained the wild-type Apc allele and the tissues composed of them did not exhibit any histological abnormality. Notably, the silencing of FPs was also observed in intestinal adenomas and the surrounding normal mucosae of Apc-mutant mice, and mediated by DNA methylation of the upstream promoter. Our genome-wide analysis then showed that the silencing of FPs reflects specific gene expression alterations during aging, and that these alterations occur in not only mouse adenomas but also human sporadic and hereditary (familial adenomatous polyposis) adenomas. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation, which suppresses adenoma development in Apc-mutant mice, reverted the aging-associated silencing of FPs and gene expression alterations. These results identify aging-associated gene expression signatures that are heterogeneously induced by DNA methylation and precede intestinal tumorigenesis triggered by Apc inactivation, and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the signature genes could be a novel strategy for the prevention and treatment of intestinal tumors. PMID:27589228

  6. Apolipoprotein E Sets the Stage: Response to Injury Triggers Neuropathology, Including Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.; Huang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and is associated with poor clinical outcome following traumatic brain injury and other neuropathological disorders. Protein instability and an isoform-specific apoE property called domain interaction are responsible for these neuropathological effects. ApoE4 is the most neurotoxic isoform and can induce neuropathology through various cellular pathways. Neuronal damage or stress induces apoE synthesis as part of the repair response; however, when apoE4 is expressed in neurons, its unique conformation makes it susceptible to proteolysis, resulting in the generation of neurotoxic fragments. These fragments cause pathological mitochondrial dysfunction and cytoskeletal alterations. Here, we review data supporting the hypothesis that apoE4 (> apoE3 > apoE2) has direct neurotoxic effects and highlight studies showing that blocking domain interaction reverses these detrimental effects. PMID:23217737

  7. Changes in human ecology and behavior in relation to the emergence of diarrheal diseases, including cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M M; Levine, O S

    1994-01-01

    Human populations throughout the world can be found in diverse conditions. A proportion of the population of developing countries lives in deprived conditions characterized by ramshackle housing, lack of piped water and sanitation, and widespread fecal contamination of the environment. Enteric infections, particularly due to bacterial pathogenes, are readily transmitted under these circumstances. In contrast, the majority of inhabitants of industrialized countries live in a sanitary environment that generally discourages the transmission of enteric pathogenes, particularly bacteria. In both these ecologic niches, changes in human ecology and behavior are leading to the emergence of certain enteric infections. Relevant factors in developing areas include urbanization (leading to periurban slums), diminished breastfeeding, and political upheaval that results in population migrations. In industrialized areas, large-scale food production (e.g., enormous poultry farms), distribution, and retailing (e.g., fast-food chains) create opportunities where widespread and extensive outbreaks of food-borne enteric infection can ensue if a breakdown in food hygiene occurs. PMID:8146128

  8. [Initial antibiotic therapy in maternal-fetal infections which include ampicillin even in countries where listeriosis is an incidental disease].

    PubMed

    Boukadida, J; Taher, N Bel Hadj; Seket, B; Monastiri, K; Salem, N; Snoussi, N

    2002-06-01

    Neonatal listeriosis is an exceptional disease in Northern Africa. Hence, protocols for maternal-fetal infection treatment include only a third generation cephalosporin and an aminoside. This protocol does not take into account the possibility of Listeria monocytogenes infection. We report a fatal case of neonatal listeriosis in Tunisia. The use of first antibiotics in maternal-foetal infection must be reconsidered when lacking sufficient bacteriological data and include systematically ampicillin in presumptive antibiotic protocols.

  9. Reduced nitric oxide causes age-associated impairment of circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Takeshige; Minamino, Tohru; Miura, Kentaro; Katsuno, Taro; Tateno, Kaoru; Miyauchi, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Shuichi; Bradfield, Christopher A; FitzGerald, Garret A; Komuro, Issei

    2008-03-14

    Impairment of circadian rhythmicity in the elderly has been suggested to cause age-associated diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) is a critical regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis, but its production declines with aging, thereby inducing vascular dysfunction. We show here that impaired circadian rhythmicity is related to a decrease of NO production with aging. Treatment with an NO donor significantly upregulated the promoter activity of the clock gene Period via the cAMP response element-dependent and the E-box enhancer element-dependent pathways. Both phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation by NO are involved in this upregulation. In aged animals, endothelial NO synthase activity was markedly decreased during the daytime, along with impairment of clock gene expression and the circadian variation in blood pressure. Treatment of aged animals with an NO donor significantly improved the impairments. Inhibition of NO synthase activity also led to impairment of clock gene expression and blood pressure rhythm. These results suggest that NO is a key regulator of the circadian clock in the cardiovascular system and may be a novel target for the treatment of age-associated alteration of circadian rhythms.

  10. Cardiorenal metabolic syndrome in the African diaspora: rationale for including chronic kidney disease in the metabolic syndrome definition.

    PubMed

    Lea, Janice P; Greene, Eddie L; Nicholas, Susanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans while the reasons for this are unclear. The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and has been recently linked to incident CKD. Historically, fewer African Americans meet criteria for the definition of metabolic syndrome, despite having higher rates of cardiovascular mortality than Caucasians. The presence of microalbuminuria portends increased cardiovascular risks and has been shown to cluster with the metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that proteinuria is a predictor of CKD progression in African American hypertensives with metabolic syndrome. In this review we explore the potential value of including CKD markers--microalbuminuria/proteinuria or low glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-in refining the cluster of factors defined as metabolic syndrome, ie, "cardiorenal metabolic syndrome."

  11. How individual age-associated changes may influence human morbidity and mortality patterns.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, S V; Yashin, A I

    2001-09-15

    Patterns of human mortality share common traits in different populations. They include higher mortality in early childhood, lower mortality during the reproductive period, an accelerated increase of mortality near the end of the reproductive period, and deceleration in the mortality increase at oldest old ages. The deceleration of mortality rate is one of the most intriguing recent findings in longevity research. The role of differential selection in this phenomenon has been well studied. Possible contribution of individual aging in the shape of mortality curve is also recognized. However, this contribution has not been studied in details. In this paper, we specify most common patterns of age-associated changes in an individual organism and discuss their possible influence on morbidity and mortality in population. We subdivide individual age-associated changes into three components, having different influence on morbidity and mortality: (1) basal, (2) ontogenetic, and (3) time-dependent. Basal changes are connected with the universal decrease in the rate of living during an individual life. As a result, some phenotypic effects of aging may accumulate in an organism at a slower rate with age. Basal changes are likely to contribute to a plateau of morbidity often observed at old ages, and may partially be responsible for mortality deceleration at oldest old ages. Ontogenetic component is connected with change of the stages of ontogenesis (e.g., the growth, the reproductive period and the climacteric) during an individual life. The ontogenesis-related changes contribute to wave-like patterns of morbidity in population and may partially be responsible for mortality increase at middle ages and its deceleration at old ages. Time-dependent changes are connected with long-time exposure of an organism to different harmful factors. They are most likely to contribute to morbidity and mortality acceleration. We discuss how all three components of individual age-associated

  12. Age-Associated Lipidome Changes in Metaphase II Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Mok, Hyuck Jun; Shin, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Geun-Kyung; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lim, Hyunjung Jade

    2016-01-01

    The quality of mammalian oocytes declines with age, which negatively affects fertilization and developmental potential. The aging process often accompanies damages to macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids. To investigate if aged oocytes display an altered lipidome compared to young oocytes, we performed a global lipidomic analysis between oocytes from 4-week-old and 42 to 50-week-old mice. Increased oxidative stress is often considered as one of the main causes of cellular aging. Thus, we set up a group of 4-week-old oocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a commonly used oxidative stressor, to compare if similar lipid species are altered between aged and oxidative-stressed oocytes. Between young and aged oocytes, we identified 26 decreased and 6 increased lipids in aged oocytes; and between young and H2O2-treated oocytes, we identified 35 decreased and 26 increased lipids in H2O2-treated oocytes. The decreased lipid species in these two comparisons were overlapped, whereas the increased lipid species were distinct. Multiple phospholipid classes, phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS), and lysophosphatidylserine (LPS) significantly decreased both in H2O2-treated and aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is similarly affected under these conditions. In contrast, a dramatic increase in diacylglycerol (DG) was only noted in H2O2-treated oocytes, indicating that the acute effect of H2O2-caused oxidative stress is distinct from aging-associated lipidome alteration. In H2O2-treated oocytes, the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 increased along with increases in phosphatidylcholine. Overall, our data reveal that several classes of phospholipids are affected in aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is associated with maintaining fertilization and developmental potential of mouse oocytes.

  13. Age-Associated Lipidome Changes in Metaphase II Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Geun-Kyung; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lim, Hyunjung Jade

    2016-01-01

    The quality of mammalian oocytes declines with age, which negatively affects fertilization and developmental potential. The aging process often accompanies damages to macromolecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids. To investigate if aged oocytes display an altered lipidome compared to young oocytes, we performed a global lipidomic analysis between oocytes from 4-week-old and 42 to 50-week-old mice. Increased oxidative stress is often considered as one of the main causes of cellular aging. Thus, we set up a group of 4-week-old oocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a commonly used oxidative stressor, to compare if similar lipid species are altered between aged and oxidative-stressed oocytes. Between young and aged oocytes, we identified 26 decreased and 6 increased lipids in aged oocytes; and between young and H2O2-treated oocytes, we identified 35 decreased and 26 increased lipids in H2O2-treated oocytes. The decreased lipid species in these two comparisons were overlapped, whereas the increased lipid species were distinct. Multiple phospholipid classes, phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS), and lysophosphatidylserine (LPS) significantly decreased both in H2O2-treated and aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is similarly affected under these conditions. In contrast, a dramatic increase in diacylglycerol (DG) was only noted in H2O2-treated oocytes, indicating that the acute effect of H2O2-caused oxidative stress is distinct from aging-associated lipidome alteration. In H2O2-treated oocytes, the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 increased along with increases in phosphatidylcholine. Overall, our data reveal that several classes of phospholipids are affected in aged oocytes, suggesting that the integrity of plasma membrane is associated with maintaining fertilization and developmental potential of mouse oocytes. PMID:26881843

  14. An Aboriginal-driven program to prevent, control and manage nutrition-related "lifestyle" diseases including diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gracey, Michael; Bridge, Ernie; Martin, David; Jones, Timothy; Spargo, Randolph M; Shephard, Mark; Davis, Elizabeth A

    2006-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and other nutrition-related so-called "lifestyle" diseases, including obesity, and cardiovascular and chronic renal disease, are very prevalent in Australian Aboriginal people and contribute to their high rates of chronic illness and premature mortality. An Aboriginal-driven, community-based health protection, health promotion and improved disease detection, management and care program was introduced in four remote, discrete communities in the far north of Western Australia (WA) in order to attempt to prevent these disorders through community-based lifestyle modification. More energetic screening for early risk factors is involved as well as early dietary and exercise interventions and medical treatment, when indicated. Distinctive features of this program include its Aboriginal initiatives and perspectives, committed partnerships between the communities, the Unity of First People of Australia of Australia (UFPA) and its carers, the communities' health care providers, external clinical specialists, other external agencies and a locally-operated point-of-care (POC) pathology testing capability that is conducted by local and UFPA personnel. The POC component is quality managed by Flinders University. These features have ensured the viability of the program in three of the communities; the other one decided not to continue with the program despite risks of serious long-term health consequences. The pre-program prevalence of diabetes in screened adults was almost 40% and in adults aged (35 years was almost 60%. After several months of the program's operation, there have been positive changes in knowledge about food, nutrition, exercise and disease and altered attitudes and behaviours related to dietary and exercise patterns. There have also been improvements in weight control and in pathology test results relevant to the risk of subsequent development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Caffeine extends life span, improves healthspan, and delays age-associated pathology in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The longevity of an organism is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. With respect to genetic factors, a significant effort is being made to identify pharmacological agents that extend life span by targeting pathways with a defined role in the aging process. On the environmental side, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the positive influence of interventions such as dietary restriction are being explored. The environment experienced by humans in modern societies already contains countless compounds that may influence longevity. Understanding the role played by common compounds that substantially affect the aging process will be critical for predicting and interpreting the outcome of introducing new interventions. Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive drug worldwide. Prior studies in flies, worms, and mice indicate that caffeine may positively impact age-associated neurodegenerative pathology, such as that observed in Alzheimer’s disease. Results Here we report that caffeine is capable of extending life span and improving healthspan in Caenorhabditis elegans, a finding that is in agreement with a recently published screen looking for FDA-approved compounds capable of extending worm life span. Life span extension using caffeine displays epistatic interaction with two known longevity interventions: dietary restriction and reduced insulin signaling. Caffeine treatment also delays pathology in a nematode model of polyglutamine disease. Conclusions The identification of caffeine as a relevant factor in aging and healthspan in worms, combined with prior work in both humans and rodents linking caffeine consumption to reduced risk of age-associated disease, suggests that caffeine may target conserved longevity pathways. Further, it may be important to consider caffeine consumption when developing clinical interventions, particularly those designed to mimic dietary restriction or modulate insulin/IGF-1-like signaling. The positive

  16. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as delayed wound healing and skin cancer development. This review describes cellular mechanisms that give rise to self-perpetuating, collagen fibril fragmentation that creates an age-associated dermal microenvironment (AADM), which contributes to decline of human skin function. PMID:25660807

  17. Assessing the applicability of currently available methods for attributing foodborne disease to sources, including food and food commodities.

    PubMed

    Pires, Sara M

    2013-03-01

    A variety of approaches to attribute foodborne diseases to specific sources are available, including hazard occurrence analysis, epidemiological methods, intervention studies, and expert elicitations. The usefulness of each method to attribute disease caused by a foodborne hazard depends on the public health question being addressed, on the data requirements, on advantages and limitations of the method, and on the data availability of the country or region in question. Previous articles have described available methods for source attribution, but have focused only on foodborne microbiological hazards. These articles have described strengths and weaknesses of each method, but no guidance on how to choose the most appropriate tool to address different public health questions has thus far been provided. We reviewed available source attribution methods; assessed their applicability to attribute illness caused by enteric, parasitic, and chemical foodborne hazards to the responsible sources; and renamed some of the approaches. The main objective was to make recommendations on the most appropriate method(s) to attribute human disease caused by different foodborne hazards. We concluded that the proportion of disease that can be attributed to specific foods items or transmission routes may be estimated for the majority of the evaluated hazards by applying one or more of the source attribution methods assessed. It was also recognized that the use of source attribution methods may be limited to specific countries, reflecting the data availability.

  18. Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 analog for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a potent intestinotrophic growth factor with therapeutic potential for the prevention or treatment of an expanding number of gastrointestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome (SBS). Teduglutide, being developed by NPS Allelix and licensee Nycomed, is a protease-resistant analog of GLP-2 for the potential treatment of gastrointestinal disease. Teduglutide has prolonged biological activity compared with native GLP-2, and preclinical studies demonstrated significant intestinotrophic activity in models of SBS, experimental colitis and chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. Patients with SBS rely on parenteral nutrition (PN) following bowel resection, and in a phase III clinical trial with teduglutide, > 20% reduction in PN was observed in patients with SBS receiving teduglutide. A phase II clinical trial for teduglutide in Crohn's disease observed remission rates of 55.6% in patients. At the time of publication, phase III clinical trials for SBS were ongoing, as were preclinical studies for chemotherapy-induced mucositis and pediatric indications. Teduglutide represents a novel, efficacious drug capable of increasing intestinal growth and improving intestinal function, and may change clinical management of intestinal disease and damage.

  19. Age association of language task induced deactivation induced in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Binjian; Berl, Madison M; Burns, Thomas G; Gaillard, William D; Hayes, Laura; Adjouadi, Malek; Jones, Richard A

    2013-01-15

    Task-induced deactivation (TID) potentially reflects the interactions between the default mode and task specific networks, which are assumed to be age dependent. The study of the age association of such interactions provides insight about the maturation of neural networks, and lays out the groundwork for evaluating abnormal development of neural networks in neurological disorders. The current study analyzed the deactivations induced by language tasks in 45 right-handed normal controls aging from 6 to 22 years of age. Converging results from GLM, dual regression and ROI analyses showed a gradual reduction in both the spatial extent and the strength of the TID in the DMN cortices as the brain matured from kindergarten to early adulthood in the absence of any significant change in task performance. The results may be ascribed to maturation leading to either improved multi-tasking (i.e. reduced deactivation) or reduced cognitive demands due to greater experience (affects both control and active tasks but leads to reduced overall difference). However, other effects, such as changes in the DMN connectivity that were not included in this study may also have influenced the results. In light of this, researchers should be cautious when investigating the maturation of DMN using TID. With a GLM analysis using the concatenated fMRI data from several paradigms, this study additionally identified an age associated increase of TID in the STG (bilateral), possibly reflecting the role of this area in speech perception and phonological processing.

  20. Autoimmunity Including Intestinal Behçet Disease Bearing the KRAS Mutation in Lymphocytes: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kinoshita, Mariko; Ohara, Osamu; Yamamoto, Shojiro; Moriguchi, Sayaka; Nunoi, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    We experienced the case of a 3-year-old male with a very rare combination of autoimmunity, including immune thrombocytopenia, recurrent Henoch-Schönlein purpura and intestinal Behçet disease. Exome sequencing of the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells identified a KRAS G13C mutation. Interestingly, the KRAS G13C mutation was observed in T and B lymphocytes, as well as natural killer cells, but not granulocytes. Our case was completely phenotypically different from RASopathies and did not meet the criteria for Ras-associated lymphoproliferative disease or juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. This is the first reported case in which the KRAS mutation existed only in the lymphoid lineage. Based on the findings of our case and the current literature, it is clear that the RAS mutation in lymphoid cells is tightly linked with various autoimmune symptoms. The presence of the RAS mutation in lymphocytes should be reconsidered as a pathogenesis in cases of autoimmunity.

  1. Ageing-Associated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Are Alleviated by Products from Grapes

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced age is associated with increased incidence of a variety of chronic disease states which share oxidative stress and inflammation as causative role players. Furthermore, data point to a role for both cumulative oxidative stress and low grade inflammation in the normal ageing process, independently of disease. Therefore, arguably the best route with which to address premature ageing, as well as age-associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and dementia, is preventative medicine aimed at modulation of these two responses, which are intricately interlinked. In this review, we provide a detailed account of the literature on the communication of these systems in the context of ageing, but with inclusion of relevant data obtained in other models. In doing so, we attempted to more clearly elucidate or identify the most probable cellular or molecular targets for preventative intervention. In addition, given the absence of a clear pharmaceutical solution in this context, together with the ever-increasing consumer bias for natural medicine, we provide an overview of the literature on grape (Vitis vinifera) derived products, for which beneficial effects are consistently reported in the context of both oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:27034739

  2. Role for suppressor T cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases (including rheumatoid arthritis). Facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Maugars, Yves

    2004-09-01

    Although uncontrolled clones of autoreactive T cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, another mechanism potentially involved in many autoimmune diseases is deficiency of suppressor T cells, most notably those belonging to the antiidiopeptide TH3/Tr1 TCD4+CD25+(high) subset. Failure of suppressor mechanisms may be in part primary, due to defective positive selection of suppressor T cells in the thymus, and in part acquired, secondary to chronic infections promoted by deficiencies in innate immunity. Renewed interest in suppressor TCD4+ cells has generated plausible explanations for many events including paradoxical induction of autoimmune disorders by immunosuppressive agents or thymectomy. Insights into the physiology of these regulatory T-cell clones might suggest new treatment options, although many currently used drugs (including anti-TNF alpha agents) enhance the activity of several suppressor T-cell clones. Investigation of these suppressor clones in rheumatoid arthritis is still in its infancy and faces obstacles such as the need for identifying key clones in each individual patient and the presence of T-cell repertoire contraction. This last phenomenon exists at disease onset and may stem from early thymus dysfunction, which may also lead to a reduction in suppressor TCD4+ cell counts. Thus, although restoring deficient suppressor clones may provide a full recovery in animals, the high prevalence of T-cell repertoire contraction in humans with rheumatoid arthritis may severely limit the beneficial effects of this therapeutic approach.

  3. Effect of changes in human ecology and behavior on patterns of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wasserheit, J N

    1994-01-01

    The last 20 years have witnessed six striking changes in patterns of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): emergence of new STD organisms and etiologies, reemergence of old STDs, shifts in the populations in which STDs are concentrated, shifts in the etiological spectra of STD syndromes, alterations in the incidence of STD complications, and increases in antimicrobial resistance. For example, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emerged to devastate the United States with a fatal pandemic involving at least 1 million people. The incidence of syphilis rose progressively after 1956 to reach a 40-year peak by 1990. In both cases, disease patterns shifted from homosexual men to include minority heterosexuals. Over the last decade, gonorrhea became increasingly concentrated among adolescents, and several new types of antimicrobial resistance appeared. Three interrelated types of environments affect STD patterns. The microbiologic, hormonal, and immunologic microenvironments most directly influence susceptibility, infectiousness, and development of sequelae. These microenvironments are shaped, in part, by the personal environments created by an individual's sexual, substance-use, and health-related behaviors. The personal environments are also important determinants of acquisition of infection and development of sequelae but, in addition, they mediate risk of exposure to infection. These are, therefore, the environments that most directly affect changing disease patterns. Finally, individuals' personal environments are, in turn, molded by powerful macroenvironmental forces, including socioeconomic, demographic, geographic, political, epidemiologic, and technological factors. Over the past 20 years, the profound changes that have occurred in many aspects of the personal environment and the macroenvironment have been reflected in new STD patterns. PMID:8146135

  4. Aging-associated formaldehyde-induced norepinephrine deficiency contributes to age-related memory decline.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yufei; Jiang, Chun; Wan, You; Lv, Jihui; Jia, Jianping; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Xu; Tong, Zhiqian

    2015-08-01

    A norepinephrine (NE) deficiency has been observed in aged rats and in patients with Alzheimer's disease and is thought to cause cognitive disorder. Which endogenous factor induces NE depletion, however, is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of aging-associated formaldehyde (FA) on the inactivation of NE in vitro and in vivo, and on memory behaviors in rodents. The results showed that age-related DNA demethylation led to hippocampal FA accumulation, and when this occurred, the hippocampal NE content was reduced in healthy male rats of different ages. Furthermore, biochemical analysis revealed that FA rapidly inactivated NE in vitro and that an intrahippocampal injection of FA markedly reduced hippocampal NE levels in healthy adult rats. Unexpectedly, an injection of FA (at a pathological level) or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, a NE depletor) can mimic age-related NE deficiency, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments, and spatial memory deficits in healthy adult rats. Conversely, an injection of NE reversed age-related deficits in both LTP and memory in aged rats. In agreement with the above results, the senescence-accelerated prone 8 (SAMP8) mice also exhibited a severe deficit in LTP and memory associated with a more severe NE deficiency and FA accumulation, when compared with the age-matched, senescence-resistant 1 (SAMR1) mice. Injection of resveratrol (a natural FA scavenger) or NE into SAMP8 mice reversed FA accumulation and NE deficiency and restored the magnitude of LTP and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that accumulated FA is a critical endogenous factor for aging-associated NE depletion and cognitive decline.

  5. Model Selection and Evaluation Based on Emerging Infectious Disease Data Sets including A/H1N1 and Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wendi; Tang, Sanyi; Xiao, Yanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to apply simple ODE models in the area of modeling the spread of emerging infectious diseases and show the importance of model selection in estimating parameters, the basic reproduction number, turning point, and final size. To quantify the plausibility of each model, given the data and the set of four models including Logistic, Gompertz, Rosenzweg, and Richards models, the Bayes factors are calculated and the precise estimates of the best fitted model parameters and key epidemic characteristics have been obtained. In particular, for Ebola the basic reproduction numbers are 1.3522 (95% CI (1.3506, 1.3537)), 1.2101 (95% CI (1.2084, 1.2119)), 3.0234 (95% CI (2.6063, 3.4881)), and 1.9018 (95% CI (1.8565, 1.9478)), the turning points are November 7,November 17, October 2, and November 3, 2014, and the final sizes until December 2015 are 25794 (95% CI (25630, 25958)), 3916 (95% CI (3865, 3967)), 9886 (95% CI (9740, 10031)), and 12633 (95% CI (12515, 12750)) for West Africa, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, respectively. The main results confirm that model selection is crucial in evaluating and predicting the important quantities describing the emerging infectious diseases, and arbitrarily picking a model without any consideration of alternatives is problematic. PMID:26451161

  6. Aging-associated B7-DC+ B cells enhance anti-tumor immunity via Th1 and Th17 induction.

    PubMed

    Tomihara, Kei; Shin, Takako; Hurez, Vincent J; Yagita, Hideo; Pardoll, Drew M; Zhang, Bin; Curiel, Tyler J; Shin, Tahiro

    2012-02-01

    Because most patients with cancer are aged and because immunological functions are altered during aging, it is important to account for aging-associated immunological alterations in the design of new cancer immunotherapies. We thus compared immune populations in young and aged mice and found that B7-DC(+) (PD-L2/CD273) B cells, a minor population in young mice, were significantly increased in aged mice. Induction of both Th1 and Th17 cells was significantly augmented by B7-DC(+) B cells from aged mice, and this effect was blocked with anti-B7-DC antibodies in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, retardation of tumor growth in aged mice was largely B7-DC dependent. Tumor growth in young mice was significantly inhibited by immunization with B7-DC(+) B cells from aged mice owing to increased induction of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These data indicate that B7-DC(+) B cells could play an important role in aging-associated cancer immunopathology as well as in other aging-associated diseases and further suggest that B7-DC(+) B cells have potential for future cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Hyperbilirubinemia Protects against Aging-Associated Inflammation and Metabolic Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Zadinová, Marie; Haluzík, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mild constitutive hyperbilirubinemia is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Since these pathologies are associated with aging, inflammation, and oxidative stress, we investigated whether hyperbilirubinemia interferes with ROS homeostasis in cell cultures and with inflammation, senescence, and mitochondrial dysfunction in aged rats. Human embryonic kidney cells and rat primary fibroblasts showed a dose-dependent decrease in the ratio of oxidized/reduced glutathione, intracellular H2O2 levels, and mitochondrial ROS production, with increasing bilirubin concentrations in the culture media. Compared to their normobilirubinemic siblings, aged hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats showed significantly smaller amounts of visceral fat, better glucose tolerance, and decreased serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-18. Simultaneously, livers from Gunn rats showed decreased expression of senescence markers and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p16. Mitochondria from aged Gunn rats showed higher respiration and lower H2O2 production compared to controls. In conclusion, we demonstrated that mildly elevated serum bilirubin is generally associated with attenuation of oxidative stress and with better anthropometric parameters, decreased inflammatory status, increased glucose tolerance, fewer signs of cellular senescence, and enhanced mitochondrial function in aged rats. PMID:27547293

  8. Aging-associated changes in renal extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Abrass, C. K.; Adcox, M. J.; Raugi, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    The composition of renal extracellular matrices was examined in 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month-old rats by immunofluorescence microscopy. No change in composition of tubular basement membrane was detected. Increased immunostaining for laminin chains B1 and s-laminin and thrombospondin characterized the thickened glomerular basement membrane. Interstitial collagens I and III were not detected in globally sclerotic glomeruli. The major change noted in the aged rat kidney at 24 months was generalized expansion of the interstitium by thrombospondin and fibronectin. In areas of tubular atrophy there was new expression of extra domain A (EDA)+ fibronectin. Collagens I and III were detected focally in the interstitium adjacent to areas of tubular atrophy, but otherwise collagens I, III, and IV and laminin did not contribute to the interstitial fibrosis. Interstitial fibrosis was detectable at 18 months of age and preceded the development of sclerotic glomeruli, tubular atrophy, or accumulations of interstitial collagen. These changes in extracellular matrix composition distinguish the aging kidney from other sclerotic forms of renal disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7887455

  9. A randomized, controlled trial of disease management modules, including telepsychiatric care, for depression in rural primary care.

    PubMed

    Hilty, Donald M; Marks, Shayna; Wegelin, Jacob; Callahan, Edward J; Nesbitt, Thomas S

    2007-02-01

    Introduction. Disease management modules (DMM), including education, tracking, support, and medical care, have improved health for patients with asthma and diabetes. For rural patients, novel ways of delivery are needed to access clinical expertise from urban or academic specialists. Telemedicine (telephone and televideo) could be instrumental in this process, though no randomized, controlled trials have assessed their effectiveness.Methods. Self-report and structured psychiatric interviews were used to screen potential depressed subjects. Subjects were randomized to: 1) usual care with a DMM using telephone and self-report questionnaires; or 2) a DMM using telephone, questionnaires, and monthly televideo psychiatric consultation emphasizing primary care physician (PCP) skill development. Subjects' depressive symptoms, health status, and satisfaction with care were tabulated at three, six, and 12 months after study entry.Results. There was significant clinical improvement for depression in both groups, with a trend toward significance in the more intensive module. Satisfaction and retention was superior in the more intensive group. There was no overall change in health functioning in either group.Conclusions. Intensive modules using telepsychiatric educational interventions toward PCPs may be superior, but the most critical ingredient may be administrative tracking of patients, prompted intervention by PCPs, and (when necessary) new ideas by a specialist.

  10. Proteome-wide analysis reveals an age-associated cellular phenotype of in situ aged human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Waldera-Lupa, Daniel M.; Kalfalah, Faiza; Florea, Ana-Maria; Sass, Steffen; Kruse, Fabian; Rieder, Vera; Tigges, Julia; Fritsche, Ellen; Krutmann, Jean; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Meyer, Helmut E.; Boege, Fritz; Theis, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed an ex vivo model of in situ aged human dermal fibroblasts, obtained from 15 adult healthy donors from three different age groups using an unbiased quantitative proteome-wide approach applying label-free mass spectrometry. Thereby, we identified 2409 proteins, including 43 proteins with an age-associated abundance change. Most of the differentially abundant proteins have not been described in the context of fibroblasts’ aging before, but the deduced biological processes confirmed known hallmarks of aging and led to a consistent picture of eight biological categories involved in fibroblast aging, namely proteostasis, cell cycle and proliferation, development and differentiation, cell death, cell organization and cytoskeleton, response to stress, cell communication and signal transduction, as well as RNA metabolism and translation. The exhaustive analysis of protein and mRNA data revealed that 77% of the age-associated proteins were not linked to expression changes of the corresponding transcripts. This is in line with an associated miRNA study and led us to the conclusion that most of the age-associated alterations detected at the proteome level are likely caused post-transcriptionally rather than by differential gene expression. In summary, our findings led to the characterization of novel proteins potentially associated with fibroblast aging and revealed that primary cultures of in situ aged fibroblasts are characterized by moderate age-related proteomic changes comprising the multifactorial process of aging. PMID:25411231

  11. Time Perspective and Age: A Review of Age Associated Differences

    PubMed Central

    Laureiro-Martinez, Daniella; Trujillo, Carlos A.; Unda, Juliana

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between age and the five dimensions of time perspective measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) (past negative, past positive, present hedonistic, present fatalistic, and future). Time perspective is related to well-being, decision-making, level of development, and many other psychological issues. Hence, the existence of a systematic relationship between time perspective and age should be considered in all studies for which time is a relevant variable. However, no specific research about this has been conducted. We collected 407 papers that referenced the ZTPI between 2001 and 2015. From those, 72 studies met our inclusion criteria. They included 29,815 participants from 19 countries whose age spans most phases of adulthood (from 13.5 to 75.5 years, mean 28.7). We analyzed these studies adapting meta-analytical techniques. We found that present hedonistic and past negative dimensions are negatively related to aging with partial eta squared effect sizes of roughly 0.15. Our results have implications for the design of studies related to time as our findings highlight the importance of taking into account the differences associated with age. PMID:28261119

  12. Time Perspective and Age: A Review of Age Associated Differences.

    PubMed

    Laureiro-Martinez, Daniella; Trujillo, Carlos A; Unda, Juliana

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between age and the five dimensions of time perspective measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI) (past negative, past positive, present hedonistic, present fatalistic, and future). Time perspective is related to well-being, decision-making, level of development, and many other psychological issues. Hence, the existence of a systematic relationship between time perspective and age should be considered in all studies for which time is a relevant variable. However, no specific research about this has been conducted. We collected 407 papers that referenced the ZTPI between 2001 and 2015. From those, 72 studies met our inclusion criteria. They included 29,815 participants from 19 countries whose age spans most phases of adulthood (from 13.5 to 75.5 years, mean 28.7). We analyzed these studies adapting meta-analytical techniques. We found that present hedonistic and past negative dimensions are negatively related to aging with partial eta squared effect sizes of roughly 0.15. Our results have implications for the design of studies related to time as our findings highlight the importance of taking into account the differences associated with age.

  13. Meeting report: American Aging Association 40th Annual Meeting, Raleigh, North Carolina, June 3-6, 2011.

    PubMed

    Swan, Melanie

    2011-08-01

    The focus of the 2011 American Aging Association meeting was emerging concepts in the mechanisms of aging. Many of the usual topics in aging were covered, such as dietary restriction (DR), inflammation, stress resistance, homeostasis and proteasome activity, sarcopenia, and neural degeneration. There was also discussion of newer methods, such as microRNAs and genome sequencing, that have been employed to investigate gene expression variance with aging and genetic signatures of longevity. Aging as a field continues to mature, including the following areas: Using a systems approach to tracing conserved pathways across organisms; sharpening definitions of sarcopenia, frailty, and health span; and distinguishing interventions by age tier (early-onset versus late-onset). A preconference session on late-onset intervention concluded that there are numerous benefits to deriving such interventions. Conference talks applied the biology of aging in a translational manner to intervention development. Using an individual's own stem cells to regenerate organs for transplantation and as a cell source for cellular therapies could be a powerful near-term solution to disease. Several proposed interventions were pharmaceutical, myostatin inhibition, losartan, Janus kinase (JAK) pathway inhibitors, and enalapril for frailty and sarcopenia, and metformin to promote the Nrf2 antiinflammation response. In DR, protein restriction was found to be better than general calorie restriction. Short-term fasting may be helpful in chemotherapy, surgery, and acute stress, simultaneously increasing the killing of cancer cells by chemotherapy, while improving the survival of normal cells. Immune system interventions remain elusive, although statins may help to improve cellular senescence promoted bacterial infection. Engineered enzymes may be useful in lysosomal catabolism. Dietary restriction mimetics, most promisingly involving target of rapamycin (TOR; TORC1 inhibition and rapamycin), may be more

  14. Including information about comorbidity in estimates of disease burden: Results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jordi; Vilagut, Gemma; Chatterji, Somnath; Heeringa, Steven; Schoenbaum, Michael; Üstün, T. Bedirhan; Rojas-Farreras, Sonia; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bromet, Evelyn; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Aimee N.; Kovess, Viviane; Levinson, Daphna; Liu, Zhaorui; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Ormel, J.; Posada-Villa, Jose; Uda, Hidenori; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The methodology commonly used to estimate disease burden, featuring ratings of severity of individual conditions, has been criticized for ignoring comorbidity. A methodology that addresses this problem is proposed and illustrated here with data from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys. Although the analysis is based on self-reports about one’s own conditions in a community survey, the logic applies equally well to analysis of hypothetical vignettes describing comorbid condition profiles. Methods Face-to-face interviews in 13 countries (six developing, nine developed; n = 31,067; response rate = 69.6%) assessed 10 classes of chronic physical and 9 of mental conditions. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess overall perceived health. Multiple regression analysis with interactions for comorbidity was used to estimate associations of conditions with VAS. Simulation was used to estimate condition-specific effects. Results The best-fitting model included condition main effects and interactions of types by numbers of conditions. Neurological conditions, insomnia, and major depression were rated most severe. Adjustment for comorbidity reduced condition-specific estimates with substantial between-condition variation (.24–.70 ratios of condition-specific estimates with and without adjustment for comorbidity). The societal-level burden rankings were quite different from the individual-level rankings, with the highest societal-level rankings associated with conditions having high prevalence rather than high individual-level severity. Conclusions Plausible estimates of disorder-specific effects on VAS can be obtained using methods that adjust for comorbidity. These adjustments substantially influence condition-specific ratings. PMID:20553636

  15. Acceleration of Age-Associated Methylation Patterns in HIV-1-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sehl, Mary; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Hultin, Patricia M.; Hultin, Lance E.; Quach, Austin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Horvath, Steve; Vilain, Eric; Jamieson, Beth D.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with treated HIV-1-infection experience earlier occurrence of aging-associated diseases, raising speculation that HIV-1-infection, or antiretroviral treatment, may accelerate aging. We recently described an age-related co-methylation module comprised of hundreds of CpGs; however, it is unknown whether aging and HIV-1-infection exert negative health effects through similar, or disparate, mechanisms. We investigated whether HIV-1-infection would induce age-associated methylation changes. We evaluated DNA methylation levels at >450,000 CpG sites in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of young (20-35) and older (36-56) adults in two separate groups of participants. Each age group for each data set consisted of 12 HIV-1-infected and 12 age-matched HIV-1-uninfected samples for a total of 96 samples. The effects of age and HIV-1 infection on methylation at each CpG revealed a strong correlation of 0.49, p<1 x10-200 and 0.47, p<1x10-200. Weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA) identified 17 co-methylation modules; module 3 (ME3) was significantly correlated with age (cor=0.70) and HIV-1 status (cor=0.31). Older HIV-1+ individuals had a greater number of hypermethylated CpGs across ME3 (p=0.015). In a multivariate model, ME3 was significantly associated with age and HIV status (Data set 1: βage= 0.007088, p=2.08 x 10-9; βHIV= 0.099574, p=0.0011; Data set 2: βage= 0.008762, p=1.27x 10-5; βHIV= 0.128649, p= 0.0001). Using this model, we estimate that HIV-1 infection accelerates age-related methylation by approximately 13.7 years in data set 1 and 14.7 years in data set 2. The genes related to CpGs in ME3 are enriched for polycomb group target genes known to be involved in cell renewal and aging. The overlap between ME3 and an aging methylation module found in solid tissues is also highly significant (Fisher-exact p=5.6 x 10-6, odds ratio=1.91). These data demonstrate that HIV-1 infection is associated with methylation patterns that are similar to

  16. Genetic determinants of ulcerative colitis include the ECM1 locus and five loci implicated in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Sheila A; Tremelling, Mark; Anderson, Carl A; Gwilliam, Rhian; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Prescott, Natalie J; Nimmo, Elaine R; Massey, Dunecan; Berzuini, Carlo; Johnson, Christopher; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Cummings, Fraser R; Drummond, Hazel; Lees, Charlie W; Onnie, Clive M; Hanson, Catherine E; Blaszczyk, Katarzyna; Inouye, Mike; Ewels, Philip; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Keniry, Andrew; Hunt, Sarah; Carter, Martyn; Watkins, Nick; Ouwehand, Willem; Lewis, Cathryn M; Cardon, Lon; Lobo, Alan; Forbes, Alastair; Sanderson, Jeremy; Jewell, Derek P; Mansfield, John C; Deloukas, Panos; Mathew, Christopher G; Parkes, Miles; Satsangi, Jack

    2008-06-01

    We report results of a nonsynonymous SNP scan for ulcerative colitis and identify a previously unknown susceptibility locus at ECM1. We also show that several risk loci are common to ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (IL23R, IL12B, HLA, NKX2-3 and MST1), whereas autophagy genes ATG16L1 and IRGM, along with NOD2 (also known as CARD15), are specific for Crohn's disease. These data provide the first detailed illustration of the genetic relationship between these common inflammatory bowel diseases.

  17. Characterization of age-associated exhausted CD8⁺ T cells defined by increased expression of Tim-3 and PD-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Shin, Kwang-Soo; Kim, Ga-Young; Song, You Chan; Bae, Eun-Ah; Kim, Il-Kyu; Koh, Choong-Hyun; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2016-04-01

    Aging is accompanied by altered T-cell responses that result in susceptibility to various diseases. Previous findings on the increased expression of inhibitory receptors, such as programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), in the T cells of aged mice emphasize the importance of investigations into the relationship between T-cell exhaustion and aging-associated immune dysfunction. In this study, we demonstrate that T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (Tim-3), another exhaustion marker, is up-regulated on aged T cells, especially CD8(+) T cells. Tim-3-expressing cells also produced PD-1, but Tim-3(+) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells had a distinct phenotype that included the expression of CD44 and CD62L, from Tim-3(-) PD-1(+) cells. Tim-3(+) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells showed more evident properties associated with exhaustion than Tim-3(-) PD-1(+) CD8(+) T cells: an exhaustion-related marker expression profile, proliferative defects following homeostatic or TCR stimulation, and altered production of cytokines. Interestingly, these cells produced a high level of IL-10 and induced normal CD8(+) T cells to produce IL-10, which might contribute to immune dysregulation in aged mice. The generation of Tim-3-expressing CD8(+) T cells in aged mice seems to be mediated by encounters with antigens but not by specific infection, based on their high expression of CD49d and their unbiased TCR Vβ usage. In conclusion, we found that a CD8(+) T-cell population with age-associated exhaustion was distinguishable by its expression of Tim-3. These results provide clues for understanding the alterations that occur in T-cell populations with age and for improving dysfunctions related to the aging of the immune system.

  18. Effect of yoga regimen on lung functions including diffusion capacity in coronary artery disease patients: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Asha; Singh, Savita; Singh, KP; Pai, Preeti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung functions are found to be impaired in coronary artery disease (CAD), congestive heart failure, left ventricular dysfunction, and after cardiac surgery. Diffusion capacity progressively worsens as the severity of CAD increases due to reduction in lung tissue participating in gas exchange. Aims and Objectives: Pranayama breathing exercises and yogic postures may play an impressive role in improving cardio-respiratory efficiency and facilitating gas diffusion at the alveolo-capillary membrane. This study was done to see the effect of yoga regimen on lung functions particularly diffusion capacity in CAD patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 stable CAD patients below 65 years of age of both sexes were selected and randomized into two groups of 40 each. Group I CAD patients were given yoga regimen for 3 months which consisted of yogic postures, pranayama breathing exercises, dietary modification, and holistic teaching along with their conventional medicine while Group II CAD patients were put only on conventional medicine. Lung functions including diffusion capacity were recorded thrice in both the groups: 0 day as baseline, 22nd day and on 90th day by using computerized MS medisoft Cardio-respiratory Instrument, HYP’AIR Compact model of cardio-respiratory testing machine was manufactured by P K Morgan, India. The recorded parameters were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey's test in both the groups. Cardiovascular parameters were also compared before and after intervention in both the groups. Results: Statistically significant improvements were seen in slow vital capacity, forced vital capacity, peak expiratory flow rate, maximum voluntary ventilation, and diffusion factor/ transfer factor of lung for carbon monoxide after 3 months of yoga regimen in Group I. Forced expiratory volume in 1st sec (FEV1), and FEV1 % also showed a trend toward improvement although not statistically significant. HR, SBP and DBP also

  19. Hypothesis: age-associated changes in gait represent, in part, a tendency towards parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, R J; Lubel, D D; Charlett, A; Bowes, S G; O'Neill, C J; Weller, C; Dobbs, S M

    1992-05-01

    In 144 healthy, active, asymptomatic volunteers (aged 30-88 years), age explained 33% of the variance in free walking speed. This could not be ascribed simply to differences in physique at maturity, since height had a more important effect on speed (p less than 0.0001) than did leg length (p less than 0.01). Multiple linear regression was used to fit models for speed, by selection from four sets of variables: common physical, body sway, functional anatomy of spine and lower limbs, and psychometric. The best model (which included age) explained little more of the variance (41%) than did age alone. Moreover, incorporation of age into the alternative model, built in its absence, still contributed significantly (p less than 0.0001) to the variance explained. The effect of age on gait appeared to be complex, with an increment in double support time disproportionate to the reduction in speed. We formulate by exclusion, the hypothesis that age-associated changes in gait represent, in part, a tendency towards parkinsonism.

  20. Age associations with neural processing of reward anticipation in adolescents with bipolar disorders

    PubMed Central

    Urošević, Snežana; Luciana, Monica; Jensen, Jonathan B.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Thomas, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Reward/behavioral approach system hypersensitivity is implicated in bipolar disorders (BD) and in normative development during adolescence. Pediatric onset of BD is associated with a more severe illness course. However, little is known about neural processing of rewards in adolescents with BD or developmental (i.e., age) associations with activation of these neural systems. The present study aims to address this knowledge gap. The present sample included 21 adolescents with BD and 26 healthy adolescents, ages 13 to 19. Participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol using the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) task. Behavioral performance was similar between groups. Group differences in BOLD activation during target anticipation and feedback anticipation periods of the task were examined using whole-brain analyses, as were group differences in age effects. During both target anticipation and feedback anticipation, adolescents with BD, compared to adolescents without psychopathology, exhibited decreased engagement of frontal regions involved in cognitive control (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). Healthy adolescents exhibited age-related decreases, while adolescents with BD exhibited age-related increases, in activity of other cognitive control frontal areas (i.e., right inferior frontal gyrus), suggesting altered development in the BD group. Longitudinal research is needed to examine potentially abnormal development of cognitive control during reward pursuit in adolescent BD and whether early therapeutic interventions can prevent these potential deviations from normative development. PMID:27114896

  1. Combination Immunosuppressive Therapy Including Rituximab for Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Eva Johanna; Jung, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphopcytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening condition. It can occur either as primary form with genetic defects or secondary to other conditions, such as hematological or autoimmune diseases. Certain triggering factors can predispose individuals to the development of HLH. We report the case of a 25-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with HLH in the context of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) during a primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). During therapy with anakinra and dexamethasone, he was still symptomatic with high-spiking fevers, arthralgia, and sore throat. His laboratory values showed high levels of ferritin and C-reactive protein. His condition improved after the addition of rituximab and cyclosporine to his immunosuppressive regimen with prednisolone and anakinra. This combination therapy led to a sustained clinical and serological remission of his condition. While rituximab has been used successfully for HLH in the context of EBV-associated lymphoma, its use in autoimmune diseases is uncommon. We hypothesize that the development of HLH was triggered by a primary EBV infection and that rituximab led to elimination of EBV-infected B-cells, while cyclosporine ameliorated the cytokine excess. We therefore propose that this combination immunosuppressive therapy might be successfully used in HLH occurring in the context of autoimmune diseases. PMID:28018698

  2. Non-invasive imaging in coronary artery disease including anatomical and functional evaluation of ischaemia and viability assessment

    PubMed Central

    Pakkal, M; Raj, V; Mccann, G P

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease has an important impact on the morbidity and mortality statistics and health economics worldwide. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease is important in risk stratification and guides further management. Invasive coronary angiography is the traditional method of imaging the coronary arteries and remains the gold standard. It detects luminal stenosis but provides little information about the vessel wall or plaques. Besides, not all anatomical lesions are functionally significant. This has lent itself to a wide variety of imaging techniques to identify and assess a flow-limiting stenosis. The approach to diagnosis of coronary artery disease is broadly based on anatomical and functional imaging. Coronary CT and MRI of coronary arteries provide an anatomical assessment of coronary stenosis. Coronary calcium score and coronary CT assess subclinical atherosclerosis by assessing the atherosclerotic plaque burden. The haemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by stress radioisotope studies, stress echocardiography and stress MRI. The more recent literature also focuses on plaque assessment and identification of plaques that are likely to give rise to an acute coronary syndrome. There is an explosion of literature on the merits and limitations of the different imaging modalities. This review article will provide an overview of all the imaging modalities in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. PMID:22723535

  3. Correlations Between the Incidence of National Notifiable Infectious Diseases and Public Open Data, Including Meteorological Factors and Medical Facility Resources

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jin-Hwa; Lee, Ji-Hae; Je, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Myeong-Ji; Bae, Young Mee; Son, Hyeon Seok; Ahn, Insung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the incidence of national notifiable infectious diseases (NNIDs) and meteorological factors, air pollution levels, and hospital resources in Korea. Methods: We collected and stored 660 000 pieces of publicly available data associated with infectious diseases from public data portals and the Diseases Web Statistics System of Korea. We analyzed correlations between the monthly incidence of these diseases and monthly average temperatures and monthly average relative humidity, as well as vaccination rates, number of hospitals, and number of hospital beds by district in Seoul. Results: Of the 34 NNIDs, malaria showed the most significant correlation with temperature (r=0.949, p<0.01) and concentration of nitrogen dioxide (r=-0.884, p<0.01). We also found a strong correlation between the incidence of NNIDs and the number of hospital beds in 25 districts in Seoul (r=0.606, p<0.01). In particular, Geumcheon-gu was found to have the lowest incidence rate of NNIDs and the highest number of hospital beds per patient. Conclusions: In this study, we conducted a correlational analysis of public data from Korean government portals that can be used as parameters to forecast the spread of outbreaks. PMID:26265666

  4. Including a Service Learning Educational Research Project in a Biology Course-II: Assessing Community Awareness of Legionnaires' Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Shakra, Amal

    2012-01-01

    For a university service learning educational research project addressing Legionnaires' disease (LD), a Yes/No questionnaire on community awareness of LD was developed and distributed in an urban community in North Carolina, USA. The 456 questionnaires completed by the participants were sorted into yes and no sets based on responses obtained to…

  5. Cultured cells of the nervous system, including human neurones, in the study of the neuro-degenerative disorder, Alzheimer's disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    De Boni, U

    1985-01-01

    Human nervous-system cells in culture are a suitable model for the study of the degenerative changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer-diseased brain contains a factor which induces the formation of paired helical filaments (PHF) in cultured cells, similar to that seen in Alzheimer's disease. The excitotoxic amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, induce similar PHE formation in cultured cells. The neurotoxic element aluminium is present in high concentrations in the brain in several human neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. In cultured-cell systems, aluminium interacts with acidic nuclear proteins, decreases steroid binding, produces a form of neurofibrillary degeneration and alters nucleoside metabolism.

  6. Coronary Microvascular Disease in Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy Including an Overview on History, Pathology, and Other Proposed Pathogenic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Marcos A.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Malvestio, Lygia M.; Celes, Mara R.; Campos, Erica C.; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Cibele M.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the short and bewildered history of Brazilian scientist Carlos Chagas's discovery and subsequent developments, the anatomopathological features of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an overview on the controversies surrounding theories concerning its pathogenesis, and studies that support the microvascular hypothesis to further explain the pathological features and clinical course of CCC. It is our belief that knowledge of this particular and remarkable cardiomyopathy will shed light not only on the microvascular involvement of its pathogenesis, but also on the pathogenetic processes of other cardiomyopathies, which will hopefully provide a better understanding of the various changes that may lead to an end-stage heart disease with similar features. This review is written to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Chagas disease. PMID:20824217

  7. Pacheco's parrot disease in macaws of the Lisbon's Zoological Garden. Description of an outbreak, diagnosis and management, including vaccination.

    PubMed

    Barão Da Cunha, M; Correia, J J; Fagulha, T; Fevereiro, M; Peleteiro, M C; Vollrath, G; Kaleta, E F

    2007-11-01

    The Lisbon's Zoological Garden, Portugal, has maintained for many years a large collection of psittacine birds without any serious health problems. Unexpectedly, in April 1999, a total of nine macaws died after a short period of illness. Clinical signs consisted mainly of anorexia, ruffled feathers and yellowish droppings. A herpesvirus was isolated from brain, trachea, lung, liver, spleen, kidney and intestine of each of the examined dead birds, confirming that all animals succumbed during viraemia. Serotyping of the isolate in cross neutralization tests with reference sera prove that the outbreak was caused by serotype 3 of Pacheco's parrot disease herpesviruses. An autogenous, formalin-inactivated vaccine with adjuvant (aluminium hydroxid gel) was prepared from one of the isolates and injected intramuscularly 14 days and six weeks after the onset of mortality in an attempt to protect the remaining psittacine birds in the zoo from the disease. The autogenous vaccine was well tolerated and was able to rapidly stop virus spread and morbidity and mortality among the psittacine birds. Follow-up studies demonstrate that all nine blood samples from vaccinated birds obtained nine month' after the second vaccination contain neutralizing antibodies. Twenty five month' after vaccination two out of four serum samples were still antibody positive. No herpesvirus was isolated from faecal samples nine and twenty five months after the onset of the outbreak. These data prove that the autogenous vaccine played a major role in containing a severe outbreak of Pacheco's parrot disease in a large collection of psittacine birds.

  8. Multiple hypothesis correction is vital and undermines reported mtDNA links to diseases including AIDS, cancer, and Huntingdon's.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Iain G

    2016-09-01

    The ability to sequence mitochondrial genomes quickly and cheaply has led to an explosion in available mtDNA data. As a result, an expanding literature is exploring links between mtDNA features and susceptibility to, or prevalence of, a range of diseases. Unfortunately, this great technological power has not always been accompanied by great statistical responsibility. I will focus on one aspect of statistical analysis, multiple hypothesis correction, that is absolutely required, yet often absolutely ignored, for responsible interpretation of this literature. Many existing studies perform comparisons between incidences of a large number (N) of different mtDNA features and a given disease, reporting all those yielding p values under 0.05 as significant links. But when many comparisons are performed, it is highly likely that several p values under 0.05 will emerge, by chance, in the absence of any underlying link. A suitable correction (for example, Bonferroni correction, requiring p < 0.05/N) must, therefore, be employed to avoid reporting false positive results. The absence of such corrections means that there is good reason to believe that many links reported between mtDNA features and various diseases are false; a state of affairs that is profoundly negative both for fundamental biology and for public health. I will show that statistics matching those claimed to illustrate significant links can arise, with a high probability, when no such link exists, and that these claims should thus be discarded until results of suitable statistical reliability are provided. I also discuss some strategies for responsible analysis and interpretation of this literature.

  9. Age-associated chromosome 21 loss in Down syndrome: possible relevance to mosaicism and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Percy, M E; Markovic, V D; Dalton, A J; McLachlan, D R; Berg, J M; Rusk, A C; Somerville, M J; Chodakowski, B; Andrews, D F

    1993-03-01

    We previously observed low level mosaicism (2-4% normal cells) in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in 29% of a small group of elderly persons with Down syndrome (DS). An analysis of cytogenetic data on 154 trisomy 21 cases (age 1 day to 68 years) showed that the proportion of diploid cells in such cultures significantly increased (P < 0.005) with advancing age. Thus, the "occult" mosaicism in PBL of the elderly persons with DS is likely due to the accumulation of cells that have lost a chromosome 21. A consequence of chromosome 21 loss could be uniparental disomy of the 2n cells, a factor that might have significant biological consequences if some chromosome 21 genes are imprinted. Loss of a chromosome 21 from trisomic cells might result in tissue-specific mosaicism and "classical" mosaicism in different age groups. Chromosome 21 loss might also be relevant to the development of Alzheimer-type dementia in DS and in the general population.

  10. Structured regions of α-synuclein fibrils include the early-onset Parkinson’s disease mutation sites

    PubMed Central

    Comellas, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    α-Synuclein (AS) fibrils are the major component of Lewy bodies, the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, we use results from an extensive investigation employing solid-state NMR to present a detailed structural characterization and conformational dynamics quantification of full-length AS fibrils. Our results show that the core extends with a repeated structural motif. This result disagrees with the previously proposed fold of AS fibrils obtained with limited solid-state NMR data. Additionally, our results demonstrate that the three single point mutations associated with early-onset PD—A30P, E46K and A53T—are located in structured regions. We find that E46K and A53T mutations, located in rigid β-strands of the wild-type fibrils, are associated with major and minor structural perturbations, respectively. PMID:21718702

  11. The Gut-Brain Axis, Including the Microbiome, Leaky Gut and Bacterial Translocation: Mechanisms and Pathophysiological Role in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Cristiano A; Maes, Michael; Slyepchenko, Anastasiya; Berk, Michael; Solmi, Marco; Lanctôt, Krista L; Carvalho, André F

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is a progressive disorder manifested by gradual memory loss and subsequent impairment in mental and behavioral functions. Though the primary risk factor for AD is advancing age, other factors such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, obesity, vascular factors and depression play a role in its pathogenesis. The human gastrointestinal tract has a diverse commensal microbial population, which has bidirectional interactions with the human host that are symbiotic in health, and in addition to nutrition, digestion, plays major roles in inflammation and immunity. The most prevalent hypothesis for AD is the amyloid hypothesis, which states that changes in the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein leads to the accumulation of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide. Aβ then triggers an immune response that drives neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in AD. The specific role of gut microbiota in modulating neuro-immune functions well beyond the gastrointestinal tract may constitute an important influence on the process of neurodegeneration. We first review the main mechanisms involved in AD physiopathology. Then, we review the alterations in gut microbiota and gut-brain axis that might be relevant to mediate or otherwise affect AD pathogenesis, especially those associated with aging. We finally summarize possible mechanisms that could mediate the involvement of gut-brain axis in AD physiopathology, and propose an integrative model.

  12. The suppression of ghrelin signaling mitigates age-associated thermogenic impairment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aging is associated with severe thermogenic impairment, which contributes to obesity and diabetes in aging. We previously reported that ablation of the ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), attenuates age-associated obesity and insulin resistance. Ghrelin and obestatin are ...

  13. Guidelines for Communicable Disease Control Policies in Montana Schools: A Guide and Model Policy for Communicable Diseases Including HIV Infected Students and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    This guide was developed to help local school districts review existing policies or establish new policies to address communicable diseases. Based on current scientific and medical information about the safety in allowing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected students and staff to remain at school, it contains a suggested policy for local…

  14. The pro-domains of neurotrophins, including BDNF, are linked to Alzheimer's disease through a toxic synergy with Aβ

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung Yeon; Reighard, Charles P.; Crowther, Damian C.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a crucial role in learning and memory by promoting neuronal survival and modulating synaptic connectivity. BDNF levels are lower in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), suggesting a pathogenic involvement. The Drosophila orthologue of BDNF is the highly conserved Neurotrophin 1 (DNT1). BDNF and DNT1 have the same overall protein structure and can be cleaved, resulting in the conversion of a full-length polypeptide into separate pro- and mature-domains. While the BDNF mature-domain is neuroprotective, the role of the pro-domain is less clear. In flies and mammalian cells, we have identified a synergistic toxic interaction between the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ1–42) and the pro-domains of both DNT1 and BDNF. Specifically, we show that DNT1 pro-domain acquires a neurotoxic activity in the presence of Aβ1–42. In contrast, DNT1 mature-domain is protective against Aβ1–42 toxicity. Likewise, in SH-SY5Y cell culture, BDNF pro-domain is toxic only in the presence of Aβ1–42. Western blots indicate that this synergistic interaction likely results from the Aβ1–42-induced upregulation of the BDNF pro-domain receptor p75NTR. The clinical relevance of these findings is underlined by a greater than thirty fold increase in the ratio of BDNF pro- to mature-domains in the brains of individuals with AD. This unbalanced BDNF pro:mature-domain ratio in patients represents a possible biomarker of AD and may offer a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25954034

  15. Managing misaligned paternity findings in research including sickle cell disease screening in Kenya: ‘Consulting communities’ to inform policy☆

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Vicki; Kombe, Francis; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Molyneux, Sassy; Parker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The management of misaligned paternity findings raises important controversy worldwide. It has mainly, however, been discussed in the context of high-income countries. Genetic and genomics research, with the potential to show misaligned paternity, are becoming increasingly common in Africa. During a genomics study in Kenya, a dilemma arose over testing and sharing information on paternal sickle cell disease status. This dilemma may be paradigmatic of challenges in sharing misaligned paternity findings in many research and health care settings. Using a deliberative approach to community consultation to inform research practice, we explored residents' views on paternal testing and sharing misaligned paternity information. Between December 2009 and November 2010, 63 residents in Kilifi County were engaged in informed deliberative small group discussions, structured to support normative reflection within the groups, with purposive selection to explore diversity. Analysis was based on a modified framework analysis approach, drawing on relevant social science and bioethics literature. The methods generated in-depth individual and group reflection on morally important issues and uncovered wide diversity in views and values. Fundamental and conflicting values emerged around the importance of family interests and openness, underpinned by disagreement on the moral implications of marital infidelity and withholding truth. Wider consideration of ethical issues emerging in these debates supports locally-held reasoning that paternal sickle cell testing should not be undertaken in this context, in contrast to views that testing should be done with or without the disclosure of misaligned paternity information. The findings highlight the importance of facilitating wider testing of family members of affected children, contingent on the development and implementation of national policies for the management of this inherited disorder. Their richness also illustrates the potential for

  16. Role of Age-Associated Alterations of the Dermal Extracellular Matrix Microenvironment in Human Skin Aging: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Human skin is largely composed of a collagen-rich connective tissue, which provides structural and functional support. The collagen-rich connective tissue is produced, organized, and maintained by dermal fibroblasts. During aging, dermal collagen fibrils undergo progressive loss and fragmentation, leading to thin and structurally weakened skin. Age-related alterations of collagen fibrils impairs skin structure and function and creates a tissue microenvironment that promotes age-related skin diseases, such as delayed wound healing and skin cancer development. This mini-review describes cellular mechanisms that give rise to self-perpetuating, collagen fibril fragmentation that creates an age-associated dermal microenvironment, which contributes to decline of human skin function.

  17. Blood-based biomarkers of age-associated epigenetic changes in human islets associate with insulin secretion and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bacos, Karl; Gillberg, Linn; Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Eiberg, Hans; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Almgren, Peter; Groop, Leif; Eliasson, Lena; Vaag, Allan; Dayeh, Tasnim; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Aging associates with impaired pancreatic islet function and increased type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Here we examine whether age-related epigenetic changes affect human islet function and if blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect these changes and associate with future T2D. We analyse DNA methylation genome-wide in islets from 87 non-diabetic donors, aged 26–74 years. Aging associates with increased DNA methylation of 241 sites. These sites cover loci previously associated with T2D, for example, KLF14. Blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related methylation changes in 83 genes identified in human islets (for example, KLF14, FHL2, ZNF518B and FAM123C) and some associate with insulin secretion and T2D. DNA methylation correlates with islet expression of multiple genes, including FHL2, ZNF518B, GNPNAT1 and HLTF. Silencing these genes in β-cells alter insulin secretion. Together, we demonstrate that blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related DNA methylation changes in human islets, and associate with insulin secretion in vivo and T2D. PMID:27029739

  18. Blood-based biomarkers of age-associated epigenetic changes in human islets associate with insulin secretion and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bacos, Karl; Gillberg, Linn; Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Eiberg, Hans; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Almgren, Peter; Groop, Leif; Eliasson, Lena; Vaag, Allan; Dayeh, Tasnim; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-03-31

    Aging associates with impaired pancreatic islet function and increased type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk. Here we examine whether age-related epigenetic changes affect human islet function and if blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect these changes and associate with future T2D. We analyse DNA methylation genome-wide in islets from 87 non-diabetic donors, aged 26-74 years. Aging associates with increased DNA methylation of 241 sites. These sites cover loci previously associated with T2D, for example, KLF14. Blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related methylation changes in 83 genes identified in human islets (for example, KLF14, FHL2, ZNF518B and FAM123C) and some associate with insulin secretion and T2D. DNA methylation correlates with islet expression of multiple genes, including FHL2, ZNF518B, GNPNAT1 and HLTF. Silencing these genes in β-cells alter insulin secretion. Together, we demonstrate that blood-based epigenetic biomarkers reflect age-related DNA methylation changes in human islets, and associate with insulin secretion in vivo and T2D.

  19. Why industry propaganda and political interference cannot disguise the inevitable role played by human exposure to aluminum in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In the aluminum age, it is clearly unpalatable for aluminum, the globe's most successful metal, to be implicated in human disease. It is unpalatable because for approximately 100 years human beings have reaped the rewards of the most abundant metal of the Earth's crust without seriously considering the potential consequences for human health. The aluminum industry is a pillar of the developed and developing world and irrespective of the tyranny of human exposure to aluminum it cannot be challenged without significant consequences for businesses, economies, and governments. However, no matter how deep the dependency or unthinkable the withdrawal, science continues to document, if not too slowly, a burgeoning body burden of aluminum in human beings. Herein, I will make the case that it is inevitable both today and in the future that an individual's exposure to aluminum is impacting upon their health and is already contributing to, if not causing, chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This is the logical, if uncomfortable, consequence of living in the aluminum age.

  20. A Multiplex Immunoassay Using the Guthrie Specimen to Detect T-Cell Deficiencies Including Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease

    PubMed Central

    Janik, David K.; Lindau-Shepard, Barbara; Comeau, Anne Marie; Pass, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) fulfills many of the requirements for addition to a newborn screening panel. Two newborn screening SCID pilot studies are now underway using the T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) assay, a molecular technique. Here we describe an immunoassay with CD3 as a marker for T cells and CD45 as a marker for total leukocytes that can be used with the Guthrie specimen. METHODS The multiplexing capabilities of the Luminex platform were used. Antibody pairs were used to capture and detect CD3 and CD45 from a single 3-mm punch of the Guthrie specimen. The assay for each bio-marker was developed separately in identical buffers and then combined to create a multiplex assay. RESULTS Using calibrators made from known amounts of leukocytes, a detection limit of 0.25 × 106 cells/mL for CD3 and 0.125 × 106 cells/mL for CD45 was obtained. Affinity tests showed no cross-reactivity between the antibodies to CD3 and CD45. The multiplex assay was validated against 8 coded specimens of known clinical status and linked to results from the TREC assay that had identified them. All were correctly identified by the CD345 assay. CONCLUSIONS The performance parameters of the CD345 assay met the performance characteristics generally accepted for immunoassays. Our assay classifications of positive specimens concur with previous TREC results. This CD345 assay warrants evaluation as a viable alternative or complement to the TREC assay as a primary screening tool for detecting T-cell immunodeficiencies, including SCID, in Guthrie specimens. PMID:20660143

  1. A Comparison of Spatio-Temporal Disease Mapping Approaches Including an Application to Ischaemic Heart Disease in New South Wales, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Craig; Ryan, Louise M.

    2017-01-01

    The field of spatio-temporal modelling has witnessed a recent surge as a result of developments in computational power and increased data collection. These developments allow analysts to model the evolution of health outcomes in both space and time simultaneously. This paper models the trends in ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in New South Wales, Australia over an eight-year period between 2006 and 2013. A number of spatio-temporal models are considered, and we propose a novel method for determining the goodness-of-fit for these models by outlining a spatio-temporal extension of the Moran’s I statistic. We identify an overall decrease in the rates of IHD, but note that the extent of this health improvement varies across the state. In particular, we identified a number of remote areas in the north and west of the state where the risk stayed constant or even increased slightly. PMID:28165383

  2. A systematic review of the impact of including both waist and hip circumference in risk models for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and mortality.

    PubMed

    Cameron, A J; Magliano, D J; Söderberg, S

    2013-01-01

    Both a larger waist and narrow hips are associated with heightened risk of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and premature mortality. We review the risk of these outcomes for levels of waist and hip circumferences when terms for both anthropometric measures were included in regression models. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched (last updated July 2012) for studies reporting the association with the outcomes mentioned earlier for both waist and hip circumferences (unadjusted and with both terms included in the model). Ten studies reported the association between hip circumference and death and/or disease outcomes both unadjusted and adjusted for waist circumference. Five studies reported the risk associated with waist circumference both unadjusted and adjusted for hip circumference. With the exception of one study of venous thromboembolism, the full strength of the association between either waist circumference or hip circumference with morbidity and/or mortality was only apparent when terms for both anthropometric measures were included in regression models. Without accounting for the protective effect of hip circumference, the effect of obesity on risk of death and disease may be seriously underestimated. Considered together (but not as a ratio measure), waist and hip circumference may improve risk prediction models for cardiovascular disease and other outcomes.

  3. A Review of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Ochratoxin A Inhalational Exposure Associated with Human Illness and Kidney Disease including Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Janette H.; Hope, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) exposure via ingestion and inhalation has been described in the literature to cause kidney disease in both animals and humans. This paper reviews Ochratoxin A and its relationship to human health and kidney disease with a focus on a possible association with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) in humans. Prevention and treatment strategies for OTA-induced illness are also discussed, including cholestyramine, a bile-acid-binding resin used as a sequestrant to reduce the enterohepatic recirculation of OTA. PMID:22253638

  4. Ramelteon attenuates age-associated hypertension and weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Oxenkrug, Gregory F; Summergrad, Paul

    2010-06-01

    The neuroendocrine theory of aging suggests the common mechanisms of developmental (prereproductive) and aging (postreproductive) processes and identified a cluster of conditions (hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, menopause, late onset depression, vascular cognitive impairment, impairment of immune defense, and some forms of cancer) as age-associated neuroendocrine disorders (AAND). Obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes were later described as metabolic syndrome (MetS). Because melatonin attenuated development of MetS is age-dependent, that is, in young and old, but not in middle-aged rats, we studied the effect of the selective melatonin agonist, Ramelteon, on the two core symptoms of MetS/AAND: hypertension and body weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto male rats (WKY). SHR rats developed hypertension at the time of maximal weight gain that coincided with the onset of reproductive activity (8-10 weeks old). Chronic (but not acute) administration of Ramelteon (in drinking water, 8 mg/kg/day, from 4 to 12 weeks of age) attenuated age-associated increase of systolic blood pressure (tail-cuff method) by 45%, and age-associated body weight gain by 30%. Acute and chronic Ramelteon did not affect blood pressure and body weight in normotensive WKY rats. Ramelteon-induced attenuation of age-associated hypertension and weight gain suggests that Ramelteon might attenuate the other symptoms of MetS/AAND and might be useful in the treatment of MetS/AAND during puberty, menopause, and old age.

  5. Aging-associated inflammation promotes selection for adaptive oncogenic events in B cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Curtis J.; Casás-Selves, Matias; Kim, Jihye; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Aghili, Leila; Daniel, Ashley E.; Jimenez, Linda; Azam, Tania; McNamee, Eoin N.; Clambey, Eric T.; Klawitter, Jelena; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tan, Aik Choon; Dinarello, Charles A.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cancer is higher in the elderly; however, many of the underlying mechanisms for this association remain unexplored. Here, we have shown that B cell progenitors in old mice exhibit marked signaling, gene expression, and metabolic defects. Moreover, B cell progenitors that developed from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transferred from young mice into aged animals exhibited similar fitness defects. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of the oncogenes BCR-ABL, NRASV12, or Myc restored B cell progenitor fitness, leading to selection for oncogenically initiated cells and leukemogenesis specifically in the context of an aged hematopoietic system. Aging was associated with increased inflammation in the BM microenvironment, and induction of inflammation in young mice phenocopied aging-associated B lymphopoiesis. Conversely, a reduction of inflammation in aged mice via transgenic expression of α-1-antitrypsin or IL-37 preserved the function of B cell progenitors and prevented NRASV12-mediated oncogenesis. We conclude that chronic inflammatory microenvironments in old age lead to reductions in the fitness of B cell progenitor populations. This reduced progenitor pool fitness engenders selection for cells harboring oncogenic mutations, in part due to their ability to correct aging-associated functional defects. Thus, modulation of inflammation — a common feature of aging — has the potential to limit aging-associated oncogenesis. PMID:26551682

  6. An Age-Associated Decline in Thymic Output Differs in Dog Breeds According to Their Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Angela; Mella, Stephanie; Palmer, Donald B.; Aspinall, Richard; Catchpole, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The age associated decline in immune function is preceded in mammals by a reduction in thymic output. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence of a link between immune competence and lifespan. One approach to determining thymic output is to quantify signal joint T cell receptor excision circles (sj-TRECs), a method which has been developed and used in several mammalian species. Life expectancy and the rate of aging vary in dogs depending upon their breed. In this study, we quantified sj-TRECs in blood samples from dogs of selected breeds to determine whether there was a relationship between longevity and thymic output. In Labrador retrievers, a breed with a median expected lifespan of 11 years, there was an age-associated decline in sj-TREC values, with the greatest decline occurring before 5 years of age, but with sj-TREC still detectable in some geriatric animals, over 13 years of age. In large short-lived breeds (Burnese mountain dogs, Great Danes and Dogue de Bordeaux), the decline in sj-TREC values began earlier in life, compared with small long-lived breeds (Jack Russell terriers and Yorkshire terriers), and the presence of animals with undetectable sj-TRECs occurred at a younger age in the short-lived breeds. The study findings suggest that age-associated changes in canine sj-TRECs are related to breed differences in longevity, and this research highlights the use of dogs as a potential model of immunosenescence. PMID:27824893

  7. Age-associated differences in cardiovascular inflammatory gene induction during endotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Papaconstantinou, J

    2001-08-03

    Upon physiological stress, families of stress response genes are activated as natural defense mechanisms. Here, we show that induction of specific inflammatory genes is significantly dysregulated and altered in the heart of aged (24--26-month-old) versus young (4-month-old) mice experimentally challenged with a bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.5 mg/kg of body mass). Whereas the LPS-mediated induction of cardiac mRNA for tumor necrosis factor alpha or inducible nitric-oxide synthase showed no age-associated differences, the induction of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 was modestly extended with aging, and the induction of IL-6 was significantly prolonged with aging. This age-associated phenomenon occurred gradually from 4 to 17 months of age and became more evident after 23 months of age. The age-associated augmentation of the cardiac IL-6 induction was also dramatic at the protein level. Immunohistochemically, the LPS-induced cardiac IL-6 was localized mainly in the microvascular walls. Aged but not young mice showed a high mortality rate during these experiments. These results demonstrate that endotoxin-mediated induction of specific inflammatory genes in cardiovascular tissues is altered with aging, which may be causally related to the increased susceptibility of aged animals to endotoxic stress.

  8. Age-Associated Changes in the Spectral and Statistical Parameters of Surface Electromyogram of Tibialis Anterior

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Age-related neuromuscular change of Tibialis Anterior (TA) is a leading cause of muscle strength decline among the elderly. This study has established the baseline for age-associated changes in sEMG of TA at different levels of voluntary contraction. We have investigated the use of Gaussianity and maximal power of the power spectral density (PSD) as suitable features to identify age-associated changes in the surface electromyogram (sEMG). Eighteen younger (20–30 years) and 18 older (60–85 years) cohorts completed two trials of isometric dorsiflexion at four different force levels between 10% and 50% of the maximal voluntary contraction. Gaussianity and maximal power of the PSD of sEMG were determined. Results show a significant increase in sEMG's maximal power of the PSD and Gaussianity with increase in force for both cohorts. It was also observed that older cohorts had higher maximal power of the PSD and lower Gaussianity. These age-related differences observed in the PSD and Gaussianity could be due to motor unit remodelling. This can be useful for noninvasive tracking of age-associated neuromuscular changes. PMID:27610379

  9. Effect of excess iodine intake on thyroid diseases in different populations: A systematic review and meta-analyses including observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Ryoko; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background Although several reports concerning the association of iodine excess and thyroid disease have appeared, no systematic review of the association between iodine excess intake and thyroid diseases, especially hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, has yet been reported. Method We conducted a systematic search of Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases, Ichushi-Web and CiNii database for intervention trials and observational studies. Search terms were constructed from related words for excess AND iodine intake or excretion AND thyroid hormones or diseases AND study designs. After considering the qualitative heterogeneity among studies, a meta-analysis was conducted and odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated in random-effects models. A protocol was registered with PROSPERO (No. CRD42015028081). Results 50 articles were included, including three intervention trials, six case-control studies, six follow-up studies and 35 cross-sectional studies. Three cross-sectional studies in adults included in meta-analysis. Odds ratio of overt and subclinical hypothyroidism between excess and adequate populations were 2.78 (CI:1.47 to 5.27) and 2.03 (CI:1.58 to 2.62) in adults, respectively. Source of excess iodine status was mainly iodized salt or water in included studies. Conclusion Although universal salt iodization has improved goiter rates, chronic exposure to excess iodine from water or poorly monitored salt are risk factors for hypothyroidism in free-living populations. Monitoring of both iodine concentration in salt as well as the iodine concentration in local drinking water are essential to preventing thyroid diseases. Hypothyroidism should be also carefully monitored in areas with excess iodine. Because of the low quality and limited number of included studies, further evidence and review are required. PMID:28282437

  10. CCN1 contributes to skin connective tissue aging by inducing age-associated secretory phenotype in human skin dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2011-08-01

    Dermal connective tissue collagen is the major structural protein in skin. Fibroblasts within the dermis are largely responsible for collagen production and turnover. We have previously reported that dermal fibroblasts, in aged human skin in vivo, express elevated levels of CCN1, and that CCN1 negatively regulates collagen homeostasis by suppressing collagen synthesis and increasing collagen degradation (Quan et al. Am J Pathol 169:482-90, 2006, J Invest Dermatol 130:1697-706, 2010). In further investigations of CCN1 actions, we find that CCN1 alters collagen homeostasis by promoting expression of specific secreted proteins, which include matrix metalloproteinases and proinflammatory cytokines. We also find that CCN1-induced secretory proteins are elevated in aged human skin in vivo. We propose that CCN1 induces an "Age-Associated Secretory Phenotype", in dermal fibroblasts, which mediates collagen reduction and fragmentation in aged human skin.

  11. Associations between APOE polymorphisms and seven diseases with cognitive impairment including Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies in southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke-Liang; Sun, Yi-Min; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Qian-Hua; Ding, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of APOE polymorphisms on patients with cognitive impairments in The Chinese Han population. Materials and methods A total of 1027 cases with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), 40 cases with vascular dementia (VaD), 28 cases with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 54 cases with semantic dementia (SD), 44 cases with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 583 cases with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 32 cases with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (VCIND) were recruited consecutively from memory disorders clinics in Huashan Hospital between January 2010 and December 2014. The 1149 cognitively normal controls were recruited from the community epidemiologic investigations. The APOE genotypes were determined using the TaqMan assay. Results The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of APOE differed significantly between control and AD or MCI, with ε4 increasing the risk of AD and MCI in a dose-dependent pattern and ε2 decreasing the risk of AD, but not the risk of MCI. As for VaD, significant differences in the APOE genotype distribution were found compared with the controls. E4/4 increased the risk of VaD and ε4 increased the risk of VCIND in women. The allele distribution differed between bvFTD and controls, but genotype and allele frequencies of APOE did not affect the risk of bvFTD, SD, and DLB. Conclusion In The Chinese Han population, APOE ε4 increased the risk of AD and MCI in a dose-dependent manner and ε2 decreased the risk of AD as reported previously. APOE ε4 might increase risk in VaD and female patients with VCIND, but no effects of APOE on bvFTD, DLB, and SD were found. PMID:26981880

  12. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Technical report: prevention of pneumococcal infections, including the use of pneumococcal conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Overturf, G D

    2000-08-01

    Pneumococcal infections are the most common invasive bacterial infections in children in the United States. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections peaks in children younger than 2 years, reaching rates of 228/100,000 in children 6 to 12 months old. Children with functional or anatomic asplenia (including sickle cell disease [SCD]) and children with human immunodeficiency virus infection have pneumococcal infection rates 20- to 100-fold higher than those of healthy children during the first 5 years of life. Others at high risk of pneumococcal infections include children with congenital immunodeficiency; chronic cardiopulmonary disease; children receiving immunosuppressive chemotherapy; children with immunosuppressive neoplastic diseases; children with chronic renal insufficiency, including nephrotic syndrome; children with diabetes; and children with cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Children of Native American (American Indian and Alaska Native) or African American descent also have higher rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. Outbreaks of pneumococcal infection have occurred with increased frequency in children attending out-of-home care. Among these children, nasopharyngeal colonization rates of 60% have been observed, along with pneumococci resistant to multiple antibiotics. The administration of antibiotics to children involved in outbreaks of pneumococcal disease has had an inconsistent effect on nasopharyngeal carriage. In contrast, continuous penicillin prophylaxis in children younger than 5 years with SCD has been successful in reducing rates of pneumococcal disease by 84%. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have been recommended since 1985 for children older than 2 years who are at high risk of invasive disease, but these vaccines were not recommended for younger children and infants because of poor antibody response before 2 years of age. In contrast, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (Prevnar) induce proposed protective antibody responses (>.15

  13. Metallothionein Prevents Age-Associated Cardiomyopathy via Inhibiting NF-κB Pathway Activation and Associated Nitrative Damage to 2-OGD

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Weitao; Niu, Chao; Lv, Lingchun; Ni, Maowei; Ruan, Dandan; Chi, Lisha; Wang, Yang; Yu, Qing; Zhan, Kungao; Xuan, Yuanhu; Wang, Yuehui; Tan, Yi; Wei, Tiemin; Cai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Cardiac-specific metallothionein (MT) overexpression extends lifespan, but the mechanism underlying the effect of MT protection against age-associated cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remains elusive. To elucidate this, male wild-type and two lines of MT-transgenic (MT-TG) mice, MM and MT-1 (cardiac-specific overexpressing MT about 10- and 80-fold, respectively) at three representative ages (2–3, 9–10, and 18–20 months), were utilized. A stable human MT2A overexpressing cardiomyocytes (H9c2MT7) was also introduced. Results: Histomorphology and echocardiographic analysis revealed that age-associated cardiac hypertrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction were ameliorated in MT-TG mice. Also, aging-accompanied NF-κB activation, characterized by increased nuclear p65 translocation, elevated DNA-binding activity, and upregulation of inflammatory cytokines, was largely attenuated by MT overexpression. Treatment of H9c2 cardiomyocytes with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which mimicked an inflammatory environment, significantly increased NF-κB activity, and some age-related phenotypes appeared. The NF-κB activation was further proved to be pivotal for both age-associated and TNF-α-induced nitrative damage to cardiac 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (2-OGD) by virtue of NF-κB p65 gene silencing. MT inhibited NF-κB activation and associated nitrative damage to cardiac 2-OGD in both old MT-TG hearts and TNF-α-treated H9c2MT7 cardiomyocytes; these protective effects were abolished in H9c2MT7 cardiomyocytes by MT-specific gene silencing. Innovation and Conclusion: Together, these findings indicate that the protective effects of MT against age-associated CVD can be attributed mainly to its role in NF-κB inhibition and resultant alleviation of nitrative damage to 2-OGD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 936–952. PMID:27477335

  14. Inhibition of CaMKK2 Reverses Age-Associated Decline in Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Zachary J.; Cary, Rachel L.; Yang, Chang; Novack, Deborah V.; Voor, Michael J.; Sankar, Uma

    2016-01-01

    Decline in bone formation is a major contributing factor to the loss of bone mass associated with aging. We previously showed that the genetic ablation of the tissue-restricted and multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) stimulates trabecular bone mass accrual, mainly by promoting anabolic pathways and inhibiting catabolic pathways of bone remodeling. In this study, we investigated whether inhibition of this kinase using its selective cell-permeable inhibitor STO-609 will stimulate bone formation in 32 week old male WT mice and reverse age-associated of decline in bone volume and strength. Tri-weekly intraperitoneal injections of saline or STO-609 (10 μM) were performed for six weeks followed by metabolic labeling with calcein and alizarin red. New bone formation was assessed by dynamic histomorphometry whereas micro-computed tomography was employed to measure trabecular bone volume, microarchitecture and femoral mid-shaft geometry. Cortical and trabecular bone biomechanical properties were assessed using three-point bending and punch compression methods respectively. Our results reveal that as they progress from 12 to 32 weeks of age, WT mice sustain a significant decline in trabecular bone volume, microarchitecture and strength as well as cortical bone strength. However, treatment of the 32 week old WT mice with STO-609 stimulated apposition of new bone and completely reversed the age-associated decrease in bone volume, quality, as well as trabecular and cortical bone strength. We also observed that regardless of age, male Camkk2−/− mice possessed significantly elevated trabecular bone volume, microarchitecture and compressive strength as well as cortical bone strength compared to age-matched WT mice, implying that the chronic loss of this kinase attenuates age-associated decline in bone mass. Further, whereas STO-609 treatment and/or the absence of CaMKK2 significantly enhanced the femoral midshaft geometry, the

  15. Identification of ageing-associated naturally occurring peptides in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Bhat, Akshay; Klein, Julie; Jankowski, Vera; Mullen, William; Vlahou, Antonia; Dakna, Mohammed; Koeck, Thomas; Schanstra, Joost P.; Zürbig, Petra; Rudolph, Karl L.; Schumacher, Björn; Pich, Andreas; Mischak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    To assess normal and pathological peptidomic changes that may lead to an improved understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying ageing, urinary peptidomes of 1227 healthy and 10333 diseased individuals between 20 and 86 years of age were investigated. The diseases thereby comprised diabetes mellitus, renal and cardiovascular diseases. Using age as a continuous variable, 116 peptides were identified that significantly (p < 0.05; |ρ|≥0.2) correlated with age in the healthy cohort. The same approach was applied to the diseased cohort. Upon comparison of the peptide patterns of the two cohorts 112 common age-correlated peptides were identified. These 112 peptides predominantly originated from collagen, uromodulin and fibrinogen. While most fibrillar and basement membrane collagen fragments showed a decreased age-related excretion, uromodulin, beta-2-microglobulin and fibrinogen fragments showed an increase. Peptide-based in silico protease analysis was performed and 32 proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins, were predicted to be involved in ageing. Identified peptides, predicted proteases and patient information were combined in a systems biology pathway analysis to identify molecular pathways associated with normal and/or pathological ageing. While perturbations in collagen homeostasis, trafficking of toll-like receptors and endosomal pathways were commonly identified, degradation of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins was uniquely identified in pathological ageing. PMID:26431327

  16. Identification of ageing-associated naturally occurring peptides in human urine.

    PubMed

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Bhat, Akshay; Klein, Julie; Jankowski, Vera; Mullen, William; Vlahou, Antonia; Dakna, Mohammed; Koeck, Thomas; Schanstra, Joost P; Zürbig, Petra; Rudolph, Karl L; Schumacher, Björn; Pich, Andreas; Mischak, Harald

    2015-10-27

    To assess normal and pathological peptidomic changes that may lead to an improved understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying ageing, urinarypeptidomes of 1227 healthy and 10333 diseased individuals between 20 and 86 years of age were investigated. The diseases thereby comprised diabetes mellitus, renal and cardiovascular diseases. Using age as a continuous variable, 116 peptides were identified that significantly (p < 0.05; |ρ|≥0.2) correlated with age in the healthy cohort. The same approach was applied to the diseased cohort. Upon comparison of the peptide patterns of the two cohorts 112 common age-correlated peptides were identified. These 112 peptides predominantly originated from collagen, uromodulin and fibrinogen. While most fibrillar and basement membrane collagen fragments showed a decreased age-related excretion, uromodulin, beta-2-microglobulin and fibrinogen fragments showed an increase. Peptide-based in silico protease analysis was performed and 32 proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins, were predicted to be involved in ageing. Identified peptides, predicted proteases and patient information were combined in a systems biology pathway analysis to identify molecular pathways associated with normal and/or pathological ageing. While perturbations in collagen homeostasis, trafficking of toll-like receptors and endosomal pathways were commonly identified, degradation of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins was uniquely identified in pathological ageing.

  17. Age-associated molecular changes are deleterious and may modulate life span through diet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Goo; Kaya, Alaattin; Avanesov, Andrei S.; Podolskiy, Dmitriy I.; Song, Eun Ju; Go, Du-Min; Jin, Gwi-Deuk; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Eun Bae; Kim, Dae-Yong; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2017-01-01

    Transition through life span is accompanied by numerous molecular changes, such as dysregulated gene expression, altered metabolite levels, and accumulated molecular damage. These changes are thought to be causal factors in aging; however, because they are numerous and are also influenced by genotype, environment, and other factors in addition to age, it is difficult to characterize the cumulative effect of these molecular changes on longevity. We reasoned that age-associated changes, such as molecular damage and tissue composition, may influence life span when used in the diet of organisms that are closely related to those that serve as a dietary source. To test this possibility, we used species-specific culture media and diets that incorporated molecular extracts of young and old organisms and compared the influence of these diets on the life span of yeast, fruitflies, and mice. In each case, the “old” diet or medium shortened the life span for one or both sexes. These findings suggest that age-associated molecular changes, such as cumulative damage and altered dietary composition, are deleterious and causally linked with aging and may affect life span through diet. PMID:28232953

  18. Age-associated molecular changes are deleterious and may modulate life span through diet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Goo; Kaya, Alaattin; Avanesov, Andrei S; Podolskiy, Dmitriy I; Song, Eun Ju; Go, Du-Min; Jin, Gwi-Deuk; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Eun Bae; Kim, Dae-Yong; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2017-02-01

    Transition through life span is accompanied by numerous molecular changes, such as dysregulated gene expression, altered metabolite levels, and accumulated molecular damage. These changes are thought to be causal factors in aging; however, because they are numerous and are also influenced by genotype, environment, and other factors in addition to age, it is difficult to characterize the cumulative effect of these molecular changes on longevity. We reasoned that age-associated changes, such as molecular damage and tissue composition, may influence life span when used in the diet of organisms that are closely related to those that serve as a dietary source. To test this possibility, we used species-specific culture media and diets that incorporated molecular extracts of young and old organisms and compared the influence of these diets on the life span of yeast, fruitflies, and mice. In each case, the "old" diet or medium shortened the life span for one or both sexes. These findings suggest that age-associated molecular changes, such as cumulative damage and altered dietary composition, are deleterious and causally linked with aging and may affect life span through diet.

  19. SIRT1 in the brain—connections with aging-associated disorders and lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fanny; Wijaya, Laura; Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-01-01

    The silent mating type information regulation 2 proteins (sirtuins) 1 of class III histone deacetylases (HDACs) have been associated with health span and longevity. SIRT1, the best studied member of the mammalian sirtuins, has a myriad of roles in multiple tissues and organs. However, a significant part of SIRT1’s role that impinges on aging and lifespan may lie in its activities in the central nervous system (CNS) neurons. Systemically, SIRT1 influences energy metabolism and circadian rhythm through its activity in the hypothalamic nuclei. From a cell biological perspective, SIRT1 is a crucial component of multiple interconnected regulatory networks that modulate dendritic and axonal growth, as well as survival against stress. This neuronal cell autonomous activity of SIRT1 is also important for neuronal plasticity, cognitive functions, as well as protection against aging-associated neuronal degeneration and cognitive decline. We discuss recent findings that have shed light on the various activities of SIRT1 in the brain, which collectively impinge on aging-associated disorders and lifespan. PMID:25805970

  20. Age-associated pro-inflammatory adaptations of the mouse thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Hemmeryckx, Bianca; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Deloose, Eveline; Van Hove, Cor E; Fransen, Paul; Bult, Hidde; Lijnen, H Roger

    2013-10-01

    Arterial ageing may be associated with a reduction in vasodilation due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, whereas endothelial cell activation induces procoagulant changes. However, little is known on the effect of ageing on expression of anticoagulant endothelial markers such as endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR). To study age-associated alterations in smooth muscle cell (SMC) and endothelial cell (EC) structure and function, the aorta was isolated from 10-week- and 12- and 24-month-old C57BL/6J mice and analysed for its expression of genes involved in senescence, oxidative stress production, coagulation and matrix remodelling. In addition, vasorelaxation experiments were performed using 10-week- and 24-month-old thoracic aortic ring segments in organ chamber baths. The media thickness of the thoracic aorta progressively increased with age, associated with hypertrophy of vascular SMCs. Basal nitric oxide production and sensitivity to acetylcholine-mediated vasodilation in thoracic aorta rings was reduced with age, whereas no significant differences in ROS production could be demonstrated. Gene expression of tissue factor, EPCR and von Willebrand factor was not affected by ageing of the aorta, whereas that of thrombomodulin was mildly reduced and that of xanthine dehydrogenase, NADPH oxidase 4, tumour necrosis factor-α and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 significantly enhanced. In conclusion, a reduction in endothelial cell-mediated vasodilation in aged thoracic aortas of C57BL/6J mice was accompanied by a shift towards a pro-inflammatory state of the endothelium.

  1. Circuit mechanisms encoding odors and driving aging-associated behavioral declines in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Leinwand, Sarah G; Yang, Claire J; Bazopoulou, Daphne; Chronis, Nikos; Srinivasan, Jagan; Chalasani, Sreekanth H

    2015-01-01

    Chemosensory neurons extract information about chemical cues from the environment. How is the activity in these sensory neurons transformed into behavior? Using Caenorhabditis elegans, we map a novel sensory neuron circuit motif that encodes odor concentration. Primary neurons, AWCON and AWA, directly detect the food odor benzaldehyde (BZ) and release insulin-like peptides and acetylcholine, respectively, which are required for odor-evoked responses in secondary neurons, ASEL and AWB. Consistently, both primary and secondary neurons are required for BZ attraction. Unexpectedly, this combinatorial code is altered in aged animals: odor-evoked activity in secondary, but not primary, olfactory neurons is reduced. Moreover, experimental manipulations increasing neurotransmission from primary neurons rescues aging-associated neuronal deficits. Finally, we correlate the odor responsiveness of aged animals with their lifespan. Together, these results show how odors are encoded by primary and secondary neurons and suggest reduced neurotransmission as a novel mechanism driving aging-associated sensory neural activity and behavioral declines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10181.001 PMID:26394000

  2. 22q11.2q13 duplication including SOX10 causes sex-reversal and peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Falah, Nadia; Posey, Jennifer E; Thorson, Willa; Benke, Paul; Tekin, Mustafa; Tarshish, Brocha; Lupski, James R; Harel, Tamar

    2017-04-01

    Diagnosis of genetic syndromes may be difficult when specific components of a disorder manifest at a later age. We present a follow up of a previous report [Seeherunvong et al., (2004); AJMGA 127: 149-151], of an individual with 22q duplication and sex-reversal syndrome. The subject's phenotype evolved to include peripheral and central demyelination, Waardenburg syndrome type IV, and Hirschsprung disease (PCWH; MIM 609136). DNA microarray analysis defined the duplication at 22q11.2q13, including SOX10. Sequencing of the coding region of SOX10 did not reveal any mutations. Our data suggest that SOX10 duplication can cause disorders of sex development and PCWH, supporting the hypothesis that SOX10 toxic gain of function rather than dominant negative activity underlies PCWH.

  3. Differential diagnosis between Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis using integrated parameters including clinical manifestations, T-SPOT, endoscopy and CT enterography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyu; Fan, Rong; Wang, Zhengting; Hu, Shurong; Zhang, Maochen; Lin, Yun; Tang, Yonghua; Zhong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to evaluate clinical manifestations, T-SPOT, endoscopy and CT enterography to differentiate Crohn’s disease (CD) from intestinal tuberculosis (ITB). Methods: 128 in patients with suspected CD and ITB were prospectively enrolled in the study. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, endoscopic and CT enterographic data were collected. After treatment for 6 months, when a definite diagnosis was reached, the differential diagnostic value of each parameter was analyzed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze further, parameters of statistical significance to establish a mathematical regression equation. Receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted. Results: Clinical parameters helpful in differentiating CD from ITB included diarrhea, night sweat and perianal disease. Endoscopic parameters were useful in differentiating CD from ITB including transverse ulcers, longitudinal ulcers, rodent-like ulcers and patulous ileocecal valve. CT enterographic parameters aided the identification of the two conditions. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of a mathematical regression model established for 6 parameters of clinical endoscopy and CT enterography were 97.8%, 96.8%, 97.6%, 98.9% and 93.7% respectively, whereas those for T-SPOT were 96.8%, 91.3%, 92.7%, 78.9% and 98.8% respectively. Conclusions: T-SPOT is useful to exclude a diagnosis of ITB. Differentiating CD from ITB is a difficult clinical problem that requires a consideration of clinical, T-SPOT, endoscopic and CT enterographic parameters for accurate diagnosis. PMID:26770348

  4. Microbial-mammalian co-metabolites dominate the age-associated urinary metabolic phenotype in Taiwanese and American Populations

    PubMed Central

    Swann, Jonathan R.; Spagou, Konstantina; Lewis, Matthew; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Glei, Dana A.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Coe, Christopher L.; Goldman, Noreen; Ryff, Carol D.; Weinstein, Maxine; Holmes, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the metabolic processes associated with aging is key to developing effective management and treatment strategies for age-related diseases. We investigated the metabolic profiles associated with age in a Taiwanese and an American population. 1H NMR spectral profiles were generated for urine specimens collected from the Taiwanese Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study (SEBAS; n= 857; age 54-91 years) and the Mid-Life in the USA study (MIDUS II; n= 1148; age 35-86 years). Multivariate and univariate linear projection methods revealed some common age-related characteristics in urinary metabolite profiles in the American and Taiwanese populations, as well as some distinctive features. In both cases, two metabolites--4-cresyl sulfate (4CS) and phenylacetylglutamine (PAG)—were positively associated with age. In addition, creatine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) were negatively correlated with age in both populations (p<4×10-6). These age-associated gradients in creatine and HMB reflect decreasing muscle mass with age. The systematic increase in PAG and 4CS was confirmed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). Both are products of concerted microbial-mammalian host co-metabolism and indicate an age-related association with the balance of host-microbiome metabolism. PMID:23701591

  5. AMPK deficiency in chondrocytes accelerated the progression of instability-induced and ageing-associated osteoarthritis in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sheng; Lu, Wanli; Chen, Liang; Ge, Qiting; Chen, Dongyang; Xu, Zhihong; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Li, Jianxin; Ju, Huangxian; Cao, Yi; Qin, Jinzhong; Chen, Shuai; Teng, Huajian; Jiang, Qing

    2017-02-22

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative disease of the joints that is associated with both joint injury and ageing. Here, we investigated the role of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in maintaining a healthy state of articular cartilage and in OA development. Using cartilage-specific, tamoxifen-inducible AMPKα1 conditional knockout (AMPKα1 cKO), AMPKα2 conditional knockout (AMPKα2 cKO) and AMPKα1α2 conditional double knockout (AMPKα cDKO) mice, we found that compared with wild-type (WT) littermates, mutant mice displayed accelerated severity of surgically induced OA, especially AMPKα cDKO mice. Furthermore, male but not female AMPKα cDKO mice exhibited severely spontaneous ageing-associated OA lesions at 12 months of age. The chondrocytes isolated from AMPKα cDKO mice resulted in an enhanced interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-stimulated catabolic response. In addition, upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), MMP-13 and phospho-nuclear factor-κB (phospho-NF-κB) p65 and increased levels of apoptotic markers were detected in the cartilage of AMPKα cDKO mice compared with their WT littermates in vivo. Thus, our findings suggest that AMPK activity in chondrocytes is important in maintaining joint homeostasis and OA development.

  6. AMPK deficiency in chondrocytes accelerated the progression of instability-induced and ageing-associated osteoarthritis in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng; Lu, Wanli; Chen, Liang; Ge, Qiting; Chen, Dongyang; Xu, Zhihong; Shi, Dongquan; Dai, Jin; Li, Jianxin; Ju, Huangxian; Cao, Yi; Qin, Jinzhong; Chen, Shuai; Teng, Huajian; Jiang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive degenerative disease of the joints that is associated with both joint injury and ageing. Here, we investigated the role of the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in maintaining a healthy state of articular cartilage and in OA development. Using cartilage-specific, tamoxifen-inducible AMPKα1 conditional knockout (AMPKα1 cKO), AMPKα2 conditional knockout (AMPKα2 cKO) and AMPKα1α2 conditional double knockout (AMPKα cDKO) mice, we found that compared with wild-type (WT) littermates, mutant mice displayed accelerated severity of surgically induced OA, especially AMPKα cDKO mice. Furthermore, male but not female AMPKα cDKO mice exhibited severely spontaneous ageing-associated OA lesions at 12 months of age. The chondrocytes isolated from AMPKα cDKO mice resulted in an enhanced interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-stimulated catabolic response. In addition, upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), MMP-13 and phospho-nuclear factor-κB (phospho-NF-κB) p65 and increased levels of apoptotic markers were detected in the cartilage of AMPKα cDKO mice compared with their WT littermates in vivo. Thus, our findings suggest that AMPK activity in chondrocytes is important in maintaining joint homeostasis and OA development. PMID:28225087

  7. Phospholipase A2 – nexus of aging, oxidative stress, neuronal excitability, and functional decline of the aging nervous system? Insights from a snail model system of neuronal aging and age-associated memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Petra M.; Watson, Shawn N.; Wildering, Willem C.

    2014-01-01

    The aging brain undergoes a range of changes varying from subtle structural and physiological changes causing only minor functional decline under healthy normal aging conditions, to severe cognitive or neurological impairment associated with extensive loss of neurons and circuits due to age-associated neurodegenerative disease conditions. Understanding how biological aging processes affect the brain and how they contribute to the onset and progress of age-associated neurodegenerative diseases is a core research goal in contemporary neuroscience. This review focuses on the idea that changes in intrinsic neuronal electrical excitability associated with (per)oxidation of membrane lipids and activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes are an important mechanism of learning and memory failure under normal aging conditions. Specifically, in the context of this special issue on the biology of cognitive aging we portray the opportunities offered by the identifiable neurons and behaviorally characterized neural circuits of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis in neuronal aging research and recapitulate recent insights indicating a key role of lipid peroxidation-induced PLA2 as instruments of aging, oxidative stress and inflammation in age-associated neuronal and memory impairment in this model system. The findings are discussed in view of accumulating evidence suggesting involvement of analogous mechanisms in the etiology of age-associated dysfunction and disease of the human and mammalian brain. PMID:25538730

  8. Age-Associated Perceptions of Physical Activity Facilitators and Barriers Among Women in Rural Southernmost Illinois

    PubMed Central

    Carnahan, Leslie R.; Peacock, Nadine R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Women living in rural areas in the United States experience disproportionately high rates of diseases such as obesity and heart disease and are less likely than women living in urban areas to meet daily physical activity (PA) recommendations. The purpose of our research was to understand age-specific perceptions of barriers and facilitators to rural women engaging in PA and to identify strategies to promote PA among these women. Methods As part of a community health assessment to learn about women’s health issues, 110 adult women participated in 14 focus groups. The women were divided into 4 age groups, and focus groups were held in various community settings. We used qualitative analysis methods to explore themes in the women’s narratives, including themes related to PA knowledge, PA behavior, and access to PA facilities. Results Participants described multiple and often conflicting individual, social, and environmental barriers and facilitators to PA. Several barriers and facilitators were shared across age groups (eg, competing priorities and inadequate knowledge about PA’s role in disease prevention and disease management). Other barriers (eg, illness and injury) and facilitators (eg, PA as a social opportunity) differed by age group. Conclusion Rural women in southernmost Illinois have often contradictory barriers and facilitators to PA, and those barriers and facilitators are different at different points in a woman’s life. Our findings suggest the need for multilevel, multisector approaches to promote PA. Additionally, this research supports the need for tailored PA promotion programs for rural women to address the barriers these women face across their lifespan. PMID:27685431

  9. Clonal reversal of ageing-associated stem cell lineage bias via a pluripotent intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Wahlestedt, Martin; Erlandsson, Eva; Kristiansen, Trine; Lu, Rong; Brakebusch, Cord; Weissman, Irving L.; Yuan, Joan; Martin-Gonzalez, Javier; Bryder, David

    2017-01-01

    Ageing associates with significant alterations in somatic/adult stem cells and therapies to counteract these might have profound benefits for health. In the blood, haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) ageing is linked to several functional shortcomings. However, besides the recent realization that individual HSCs might be preset differentially already from young age, HSCs might also age asynchronously. Evaluating the prospects for HSC rejuvenation therefore ultimately requires approaching those HSCs that are functionally affected by age. Here we combine genetic barcoding of aged murine HSCs with the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This allows us to specifically focus on aged HSCs presenting with a pronounced lineage skewing, a hallmark of HSC ageing. Functional and molecular evaluations reveal haematopoiesis from these iPS clones to be indistinguishable from that associating with young mice. Our data thereby provide direct support to the notion that several key functional attributes of HSC ageing can be reversed. PMID:28224997

  10. Age-associated changes in the ecological niche: implications for mesenchymal stem cell aging.

    PubMed

    Asumda, Faizal Z

    2013-05-14

    Adult stem cells are critical for organ-specific regeneration and self-renewal with advancing age. The prospect of being able to reverse tissue-specific post-injury sequelae by harvesting, culturing and transplanting a patient's own stem and progenitor cells is exciting. Mesenchymal stem cells have emerged as a reliable stem cell source for this treatment modality and are currently being tested in numerous ongoing clinical trials. Unfortunately, the fervor over mesenchymal stem cells is mitigated by several lines of evidence suggesting that their efficacy is limited by natural aging. This article discusses the mechanisms and manifestations of age-associated deficiencies in mesenchymal stem cell efficacy. A consideration of recent experimental findings suggests that the ecological niche might be responsible for mesenchymal stem cell aging.

  11. Age-associated changes in the ecological niche: implications for mesenchymal stem cell aging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells are critical for organ-specific regeneration and self-renewal with advancing age. The prospect of being able to reverse tissue-specific post-injury sequelae by harvesting, culturing and transplanting a patient’s own stem and progenitor cells is exciting. Mesenchymal stem cells have emerged as a reliable stem cell source for this treatment modality and are currently being tested in numerous ongoing clinical trials. Unfortunately, the fervor over mesenchymal stem cells is mitigated by several lines of evidence suggesting that their efficacy is limited by natural aging. This article discusses the mechanisms and manifestations of age-associated deficiencies in mesenchymal stem cell efficacy. A consideration of recent experimental findings suggests that the ecological niche might be responsible for mesenchymal stem cell aging. PMID:23673056

  12. Diminished Schwann cell repair responses underlie age-associated impaired axonal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Michio W.; Brosius Lutz, Amanda; Cheng, Yung-Chih; Latremoliere, Alban; Duong, Kelly; Miller, Christine M.; Posada, Sean; Cobos, Enrique J.; Zhang, Alice X.; Wagers, Amy J.; Havton, Leif A.; Barres, Ben; Omura, Takao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system declines with age. Why this occurs, however, is unknown. We demonstrate that 24-month old mice exhibit an impairment of functional recovery after nerve injury compared to 2-month old animals. We find no difference in the intrinsic growth capacity between aged and young sensory neurons in vitro nor in their ability to activate growth-associated transcriptional programs after injury. Instead, using age-mismatched nerve transplants in vivo, we show that the extent of functional recovery depends on the age of the nerve graft, and not the age of the host. Molecular interrogation of the sciatic nerve reveals that aged Schwann cells (SCs) fail to rapidly activate a transcriptional repair program after injury. Functionally, aged SCs exhibit impaired de-differentiation, myelin clearance and macrophage recruitment. These results suggest that the age-associated decline in axonal regeneration results from diminished Schwann cell plasticity, leading to slower myelin clearance. PMID:25033179

  13. Specific Age-Associated DNA Methylation Changes in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiong; Bork, Simone; Goergens, Maria; Joussen, Sylvia; Pallua, Norbert; Ho, Anthony D.; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications of cytosine residues in the DNA play a critical role for cellular differentiation and potentially also for aging. In mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from human bone marrow we have previously demonstrated age-associated methylation changes at specific CpG-sites of developmental genes. In continuation of this work, we have now isolated human dermal fibroblasts from young (<23 years) and elderly donors (>60 years) for comparison of their DNA methylation profiles using the Infinium HumanMethylation27 assay. In contrast to MSC, fibroblasts could not be induced towards adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineage and this is reflected by highly significant differences between the two cell types: 766 CpG sites were hyper-methylated and 752 CpG sites were hypo-methylated in fibroblasts in comparison to MSC. Strikingly, global DNA methylation profiles of fibroblasts from the same dermal region clustered closely together indicating that fibroblasts maintain positional memory even after in vitro culture. 75 CpG sites were more than 15% differentially methylated in fibroblasts upon aging. Very high hyper-methylation was observed in the aged group within the INK4A/ARF/INK4b locus and this was validated by pyrosequencing. Age-associated DNA methylation changes were related in fibroblasts and MSC but they were often regulated in opposite directions between the two cell types. In contrast, long-term culture associated changes were very consistent in fibroblasts and MSC. Epigenetic modifications at specific CpG sites support the notion that aging represents a coordinated developmental mechanism that seems to be regulated in a cell type specific manner. PMID:21347436

  14. Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) / reproductive tract infections (RTI) including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) / human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections among the women of reproductive age group: a review.

    PubMed

    Nahar, A; Azad, A K

    1999-06-01

    Despite great improvements in preventing and treating sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and reproductive tract infections (RTIs), including HIV/AIDS, infections have been increasing significantly throughout the world. The problem of STDs, RTIs, and HIV/AIDS among women aged 15-49 years is increasing at an alarming rate. Certain biological risk factors and cultural practices enhance the vulnerability of women of reproductive age. Among these biological risks are age, gender, blood transfusion during pregnancy and childbirth, and the development of asymptomatic STDs/RTIs. These are exacerbated by cultural practices like douching with pharmaceutical products, use of intravaginal substances, and the practice of anal sex. STDs, RTIs, and HIV/AIDS affect female reproductive health in certain ways: mother-to-child transmission, effects on pregnancy (spontaneous abortion, premature birth, stillbirth, low birth weight, ectopic pregnancy), infertility, cancer, and rise in AIDS-related mortality. On the other hand, society will experience an increase in orphans, destabilization of the family unit, and a reduction in family income. Considering the impact of these diseases on the reproductive health of women and the community, measures should be taken to prevent and control the epidemic. The paper discusses certain interventions and diagnostic and preventive strategies against STDs, RTIs, and HIV/AIDS.

  15. [Structural analysis for psychosocial factors including health locus of control (HLC) and sense of coherence (SOC) associated with lifestyle-related diseases].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Nakamura, H; Nagase, H; Ogino, K; Ooshita, Y; Tsukahara, S

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify psychosocial characteristics associated with preventive health behavior for lifestyle-related diseases. The author performed objective health examinations and gave questionnaires to 289 men (39.7 +/- 11.8 years, mean +/- SD) and 80 women (32.8 +/- 10.4 years) engaged in office work. Psychosocial factors included lifestyle and perceived stress, as well as the health locus of control (HLC) and sense of coherence (SOC) as newly developed indicators for health behavior. The principal component analysis for men did not extract lifestyle from the psychosocial structures. Multiple regression analysis showed that internal HLC (IHLC), chance HLC (CHLC), professional HLC (PHLC) and stress significantly contributed to SOC. Principal component analysis using psychosocial factors in women showed two psychosocial structures, i.e. the second principal (high SOC, high lifestyle, and low stress) and the 4th principal components (high supernatural HLC, and high PHLC). Both components were negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure. SOC was recognized to be negatively associated with age, stress, and total cholesterol, and positively with IHLC, FHLC, lifestyle, and gamma-GTP using multiple regression analysis for women. These results indicated a distinguishable sex difference regarding the involvement of psychosocial factors including HLC and SOC in objective health. SOC seems likely to be involved not in objective health, but closely with stress, suggesting a direct influence on mental health. Lifestyle should be divided into more detailed categories such as smoking and salt intake. Structural analysis of women suggests that SOC is involved directly or indirectly through lifestyle in objective health, different from men. To further clarify causal relationships between psychosocial factors and risk factors for lifestyle-related diseases, a longitudinal study is necessary based on these results.

  16. A Comparison of Brunt Criteria, the Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) & a Proposed NAS-including fibrosis as Valid Diagnostic Scores for NASH

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rolón, Amarilys; Purcell, Dagmary; Rosado, Kathia; Toro, Doris H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can result in cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of NASH in Latino veterans with metabolic syndrome and compare histologic grading using Brunt Criteria, the NAFLD activity score (NAS), and a proposed NAS score including fibrosis. Methods Veterans with metabolic syndrome, hepatic steatosis and elevation of ALT/AST who underwent a liver biopsy from 2004-2010 were included in this study. Biopsies were evaluated by a single blinded Hepatopathologist. Steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis were graded per specimen. Each biopsy was evaluated using Brunt criteria, NAS and NAS plus fibrosis. Results Sixty patients were included in this study, 88.3% men with a mean age of 50.4 (± 12.8). 50.0% met criteria for NASH according to the Brunt system. When classifying biopsies using NAS, only 30.0% (18/60) had a score ≥5, while when adding fibrosis, the number of patients with a score ≥5 increased to 33 (55.0%). When evaluating the predictive ability of the two scoring systems, we found that NAS including fibrosis had a higher sensitivity than NAS (86.7% vs. 40.0%) and a lower specificity (76.7% vs. 80.0%). Conclusion In our population with metabolic syndrome and altered liver function tests, about 50-55% had steatohepatitis. There were significant differences between the scoring systems. When using NAS-plus-fibrosis more patients were recognized and the sensitivity increased. Further validation studies are required to evaluate this proposed NAS scoring System. PMID:26602577

  17. NAD+ and Sirtuins in Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Shin-ichiro; Guarente, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is a classical coenzyme mediating many redox reactions. NAD+ also plays an important role in the regulation of NAD+-consuming enzymes, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38/157 ectoenzymes. NAD+ biosynthesis, particularly mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and SIRT1 function together to regulate metabolism and circadian rhythm. NAD+ levels decline during the aging process and may be an Achilles’ heel, causing defects in nuclear and mitochondrial functions and resulting in many age-associated pathologies. Restoring NAD+ by supplementing NAD+ intermediates can dramatically ameliorate these age-associated functional defects, counteracting many diseases of aging, including neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the combination of sirtuin activation and NAD+ intermediate supplementation may be an effective anti-aging intervention, providing hope to aging societies worldwide. PMID:24786309

  18. NAD+ and sirtuins in aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Imai, Shin-ichiro; Guarente, Leonard

    2014-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is a classical coenzyme mediating many redox reactions. NAD(+) also plays an important role in the regulation of NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, including sirtuins, poly-ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs), and CD38/157 ectoenzymes. NAD(+) biosynthesis, particularly mediated by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), and SIRT1 function together to regulate metabolism and circadian rhythm. NAD(+) levels decline during the aging process and may be an Achilles' heel, causing defects in nuclear and mitochondrial functions and resulting in many age-associated pathologies. Restoring NAD(+) by supplementing NAD(+) intermediates can dramatically ameliorate these age-associated functional defects, counteracting many diseases of aging, including neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the combination of sirtuin activation and NAD(+) intermediate supplementation may be an effective antiaging intervention, providing hope to aging societies worldwide.

  19. First report of a de novo 18q11.2 microdeletion including GATA6 associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bui, Peter H; Dorrani, Naghmeh; Wong, Derek; Perens, Gregory; Dipple, Katrina M; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola

    2013-07-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 18 have been previously reported in many patients. Most cases involve the more distal regions of the long arm (18q21.1->qter). However, proximal interstitial deletions involving 18q11.2 are extremely rare. Here we report on a 14-month-old female with a 4.7 Mb (19,667,062-24,401,876 hg19) de novo interstitial deletion within chromosomal band 18q11.2, which includes GATA6 and 24 other RefSeq genes. The clinical features of our patient include complex congenital heart defects, a double outlet right ventricle, a subaortic ventricular septal defect, D-malposed great arteries, an atrial septal defect, a dysplastic aortic valve and patent ductus arteriosus. In addition, she had renal anomalies-a duplicated collecting system on the left and mild right hydronephrosis. These heart and renal defects are not reported in other patients with 18q proximal interstitial deletions. Heterozygous point mutations in GATA6, encoding for a zinc finger transcription factor, have been shown to cause congenital heart defects. Given the well-established biological role of GATA6 in cardiac development, a deletion of GATA6 is very likely responsible for our patient's complex congenital heart defects. This is the smallest and most proximal 18q11.2 deletion involving GATA6 that is associated with complex congenital heart disease and renal anomalies.

  20. The association of antidepressant drug usage with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease: A systematic review and meta‐analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moraros, John; Nwankwo, Chijioke; Patten, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    1 Objective To determine if antidepressant drug usage is associated with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD). 2 Method We conducted a systematic search of Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. An initial screen by abstracts and titles was performed, and relevant full articles were then reviewed and assessed for their methodologic quality. Crude effect estimates were extracted from the included articles and a pooled estimate was obtained using a random effects model. 3 Results Five articles were selected from an initial pool of 4,123 articles. Use of antidepressant drugs was associated with a significant twofold increase in the odds of some form of cognitive impairment or dementia (OR = 2.17). Age was identified as a likely modifier of the association between antidepressant use and some form of cognitive impairment or AD/dementia. Studies that included participants with an average age equal to or greater than 65 years showed an increased odds of some form of cognitive impairment with antidepressant drug usage (OR = 1.65), whereas those with participants less than age 65 revealed an even stronger association (OR = 3.25). 4 Conclusions Antidepressant drug usage is associated with AD/dementia and this is particularly evident if usage begins before age 65. This association may arise due to confounding by depression or depression severity. However, biological mechanisms potentially linking antidepressant exposure to dementia have been described, so an etiological effect of antidepressants is possible. With this confirmation that an association exists, clarification of underlying etiologic pathways requires urgent attention. PMID:28029715

  1. Relationship between response to induction chemotherapy and disease control in patients with advanced laryngeal carcinoma included in an organ preservation protocol.

    PubMed

    León, Xavier; Valero, Cristina; Rovira, Carlota; Rodriguez, Camilo; López, Montserrat; García-Lorenzo, Jacinto; Quer, Miquel

    2017-03-27

    The aim of the study is to analyze the relationship between the degree of response to induction chemotherapy and the disease control in patients with locally advanced laryngeal carcinomas candidates to total laryngectomy. This retrospective study includes 389 patients with T3-T4 laryngeal tumors candidates to total laryngectomy, diagnosed between 1985 and 2013, treated with induction chemotherapy in an organ preservation protocol. Five-year local recurrence-free survival for patients receiving conservative treatment with radiotherapy after a complete response to induction chemotherapy was 75.4%; for patients with partial response greater than 50%, it was 62.0%; and for patients with the absence of response, it was 32.7%. There were significant differences in local recurrence-free survival and laryngeal dysfunction-free survival according to the response to induction chemotherapy (P = 0.0001) at the expense of patients with absence of response to induction chemotherapy. Patients with partial response greater than 50% treated with radiotherapy had a tendency to have worse local recurrence-free survival and laryngeal dysfunction-free survival than patients with complete response, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. Patients with the absence of response after induction chemotherapy had significant differences in disease-specific survival according to the second treatment: for patients treated with surgery it was 70.2%, whereas for patients treated with radiotherapy, it was 28.2% (P = 0.0001). In patients with the absence of response to induction chemotherapy, conservative treatment with radiotherapy implies a significant decrease in survival.

  2. Failure of delayed nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity underlies age-associated long-term associative memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment associated with subtle changes in neuron and neuronal network function rather than widespread neuron death is a feature of the normal aging process in humans and animals. Despite its broad evolutionary conservation, the etiology of this aging process is not well understood. However, recent evidence suggests the existence of a link between oxidative stress in the form of progressive membrane lipid peroxidation, declining neuronal electrical excitability and functional decline of the normal aging brain. The current study applies a combination of behavioural and electrophysiological techniques and pharmacological interventions to explore this hypothesis in a gastropod model (Lymnaea stagnalis feeding system) that allows pinpointing the molecular and neurobiological foundations of age-associated long-term memory (LTM) failure at the level of individual identified neurons and synapses. Results Classical appetitive reward-conditioning induced robust LTM in mature animals in the first quartile of their lifespan but failed to do so in animals in the last quartile of their lifespan. LTM failure correlated with reduced electrical excitability of two identified serotonergic modulatory interneurons (CGCs) critical in chemosensory integration by the neural network controlling feeding behaviour. Moreover, while behavioural conditioning induced delayed-onset persistent depolarization of the CGCs known to underlie appetitive LTM formation in this model in the younger animals, it failed to do so in LTM-deficient senescent animals. Dietary supplementation of the lipophilic anti-oxidant α-tocopherol reversed the effect of age on CGCs electrophysiological characteristics but failed to restore appetitive LTM function. Treatment with the SSRI fluoxetine reversed both the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of age in senior animals. Conclusions The results identify the CGCs as cellular loci of age-associated appetitive learning and memory

  3. Age-Associated Induction of Cell Membrane CD47 Limits Basal and Temperature-Induced Changes in Cutaneous Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Natasha M.; Roberts, David D.; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We tested the hypothesis that the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), through binding to and activation of the cell receptor CD47, inhibits basal and thermal-mediated cutaneous blood flow. Background Data Abnormal and decreased cutaneous blood flow in response to temperature changes or vasoactive agents is a feature of cardiovascular disease and aging. The reasons for decreased cutaneous blood flow remain incompletely understood. Further, a role for matricellular proteins in the regulation skin blood flow has never been proposed. Methods C57BL/6 wild type, TSP1- and CD47-null 12 and 72 week old male mice underwent analysis of skin blood flow (SkBF) via laser Doppler in response to thermal stress and vasoactive challenge. Results Young and aged TSP1- and CD47-null mice displayed enhanced basal and thermal sensitive SkFB changes compared to age matched wild type controls. Nitric oxide-mediated increases in SkBF were also greater in null mice. TSP1 and CD47 were expressed in skin from young wild type mice, and both were significantly upregulated in aged animals. Tissue 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a potent vasodilator, was greater in skin samples from null mice compared to wild type regardless of age. Finally, treating wild type animals with a CD47 monoclonal antibody, that inhibits TSP1 activation of CD47, enhanced SkBF in both young and aged animals. Conclusions The above results suggest that secreted TSP1, via its cognate receptor CD47, acutely modulates SkBF. These data further support therapeutically targeting CD47 to mitigate age-associated loss of SkBF and maximize wound healing. PMID:23275312

  4. Preserved Suppression of Salient Irrelevant Stimuli During Visual Search in Age-Associated Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-López, Laura; Maseda, Ana; Buján, Ana; de Labra, Carmen; Amenedo, Elena; Millán-Calenti, José C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that older adults with age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) may show a significant decline in attentional resource capacity and inhibitory processes in addition to memory impairment. In the present paper, the potential attentional capture by task-irrelevant stimuli was examined in older adults with AAMI compared to healthy older adults using scalp-recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs). ERPs were recorded during the execution of a visual search task, in which the participants had to detect the presence of a target stimulus that differed from distractors by orientation. To explore the automatic attentional capture phenomenon, an irrelevant distractor stimulus defined by a different feature (color) was also presented without previous knowledge of the participants. A consistent N2pc, an electrophysiological indicator of attentional deployment, was present for target stimuli but not for task-irrelevant color stimuli, suggesting that these irrelevant distractors did not attract attention in AAMI older adults. Furthermore, the N2pc for targets was significantly delayed in AAMI patients compared to healthy older controls. Together, these findings suggest a specific impairment of the attentional selection process of relevant target stimuli in these individuals and indicate that the mechanism of top-down suppression of entirely task-irrelevant stimuli is preserved, at least when the target and the irrelevant stimuli are perceptually very different.

  5. Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening

    PubMed Central

    Holohan, Brody; De Meyer, Tim; Batten, Kimberly; Mangino, Massimo; Hunt, Steven C; Bekaert, Sofie; De Buyzere, Marc L; Rietzschel, Ernst R; Spector, Tim D; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length shortens with aging, and short telomeres have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies. Previous studies suggested a discrepancy in age-associated telomere shortening rate estimated by cross-sectional studies versus the rate measured in longitudinal studies, indicating a potential bias in cross-sectional estimates. Intergenerational changes in initial telomere length, such as that predicted by the previously described effect of a father’s age at birth of his offspring (FAB), could explain the discrepancy in shortening rate measurements. We evaluated whether changes occur in initial telomere length over multiple generations in three large datasets and identified paternal birth year (PBY) as a variable that reconciles the difference between longitudinal and cross-sectional measurements. We also clarify the association between FAB and offspring telomere length, demonstrating that this effect is substantially larger than reported in the past. These results indicate the presence of a downward secular trend in telomere length at birth over generational time with potential public health implications. PMID:25952108

  6. [Pineal gland glutathione peroxidase activity in rats and its age-associated change].

    PubMed

    Razygraev, A V

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity has been studied in the pineal gland (epiphysis) of young and aging female Wistar rats (2-4 and 17-19 month old). For comparison the same activity was studied in the pyramids of medulla oblongata and in the olfactory tubercle. These two brain structures represent white and gray matter respectively. The determination of the activity was performed with H2O2 as a substrate and with 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) for estimation of the decrease of restored form of glutathione concentration. The glutathione peroxidase activity was higher in the pineal gland than in the brain structures used. Pineal glutathione peroxidase activities (micromole of GSH per minute per milligram of protein, M +/- m) in young and old rats were 1,52 +/- 0,07 and 1,27 +/- 0,06 respectively (p<0,05). The potential reason for the declined enzymatic activity found in the aged rats is the age-associated decrease of the selenium content in the pineal gland. The decline found may be one of the reflections of the pineal gland functional involution.

  7. Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening.

    PubMed

    Holohan, Brody; De Meyer, Tim; Batten, Kimberly; Mangino, Massimo; Hunt, Steven C; Bekaert, Sofie; De Buyzere, Marc L; Rietzschel, Ernst R; Spector, Tim D; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-08-01

    Telomere length shortens with aging, and short telomeres have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies. Previous studies suggested a discrepancy in age-associated telomere shortening rate estimated by cross-sectional studies versus the rate measured in longitudinal studies, indicating a potential bias in cross-sectional estimates. Intergenerational changes in initial telomere length, such as that predicted by the previously described effect of a father's age at birth of his offspring (FAB), could explain the discrepancy in shortening rate measurements. We evaluated whether changes occur in initial telomere length over multiple generations in three large datasets and identified paternal birth year (PBY) as a variable that reconciles the difference between longitudinal and cross-sectional measurements. We also clarify the association between FAB and offspring telomere length, demonstrating that this effect is substantially larger than reported in the past. These results indicate the presence of a downward secular trend in telomere length at birth over generational time with potential public health implications.

  8. Age-associated Cognitive Decline: Insights into Molecular Switches and Recovery Avenues

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Arpita; Singh, Padmanabh; Thakur, Mahendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive decline is an inevitable phenomenon that predisposes individuals for neurological and psychiatric disorders eventually affecting the quality of life. Scientists have endeavored to identify the key molecular switches that drive cognitive decline with advancing age. These newly identified molecules are then targeted as recovery of cognitive aging and related disorders. Cognitive decline during aging is multi-factorial and amongst several factors influencing this trajectory, gene expression changes are pivotal. Identifying these genes would elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings as well as offer clues that make certain individuals resilient to withstand the inevitable age-related deteriorations. Our laboratory has focused on this aspect and investigated a wide spectrum of genes involved in crucial brain functions that attribute to senescence induced cognitive deficits. We have recently identified master switches in the epigenome regulating gene expression alteration during brain aging. Interestingly, these factors when manipulated by chemical or genetic strategies successfully reverse the age-related cognitive impairments. In the present article, we review findings from our laboratory and others combined with supporting literary evidences on molecular switches of brain aging and their potential as recovery targets. PMID:27114845

  9. Age-associated activation of epigenetically repressed genes in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett-Baker, Pamela E; Wilkowski, Jodi; Burke, David T

    2003-01-01

    Epigenetic control of gene expression is a consistent feature of differentiated mammalian cell types. Epigenetic expression patterns are mitotically heritable and are stably maintained in adult cells. However, unlike somatic DNA mutation, little is known about the occurrence of epigenetic change, or epimutation, during normal adult life. We have monitored the age-associated maintenance of two epigenetic systems--X inactivation and genomic imprinting--using the genes Atp7a and Igf2, respectively. Quantitative measurements of RNA transcripts from the inactive and active alleles were performed in mice from 2 to 24 months of age. For both genes, older animal cohorts showed reproducible increases in transcripts expressed from the silenced alleles. Loss of X chromosome silencing showed cohort mean increases of up to 2.2%, while imprinted-gene activation increased up to 6.7%. The results support the hypothesis that epigenetic loss of gene repression occurs in normal tissues and may be a contributing factor in progressive physiological dysfunction seen during mammalian aging. Quantitatively, the loss of epigenetic control may be one to two orders of magnitude greater than previously determined somatic DNA mutation. PMID:14704185

  10. Age-associated changes in rich-club organisation in autistic and neurotypical human brains

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Rees, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    Macroscopic structural networks in the human brain have a rich-club architecture comprising both highly inter-connected central regions and sparsely connected peripheral regions. Recent studies show that disruption of this functionally efficient organisation is associated with several psychiatric disorders. However, despite increasing attention to this network property, whether age-associated changes in rich-club organisation occur during human adolescence remains unclear. Here, analysing a publicly shared diffusion tensor imaging dataset, we found that, during adolescence, brains of typically developing (TD) individuals showed increases in rich-club organisation and inferred network functionality, whereas individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) did not. These differences between TD and ASD groups were statistically significant for both structural and functional properties. Moreover, this typical age-related changes in rich-club organisation were characterised by progressive involvement of the right anterior insula. In contrast, in ASD individuals, did not show typical increases in grey matter volume, and this relative anatomical immaturity was correlated with the severity of ASD social symptoms. These results provide evidence that rich-club architecture is one of the bases of functionally efficient brain networks underpinning complex cognitive functions in adult human brains. Furthermore, our findings suggest that immature rich-club organisation might be associated with some neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26537477

  11. Age-associated metabolic dysregulation in bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fan; Lee, Keith M.; McCarry, Brian E.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to age-associated inflammation. Metabolic processes such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and the urea cycle regulate inflammatory responses by macrophages. Metabolic profiles changes with age; therefore, we hypothesized that dysregulation of metabolic processes could contribute to macrophage hyporesponsiveness to LPS. We examined the intracellular metabolome of bone marrow-derived macrophages from young (6–8 wk) and old (18–22 mo) mice following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and tolerance. We discovered known and novel metabolites that were associated with the LPS response of macrophages from young mice, which were not inducible in macrophages from old mice. Macrophages from old mice were largely non-responsive towards LPS stimulation, and we did not observe a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The critical regulatory metabolites succinate, γ-aminobutyric acid, arginine, ornithine and adenosine were increased in LPS-stimulated macrophages from young mice, but not macrophages from old mice. A shift between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation was not observed during LPS tolerance in macrophages from either young or old mice. Metabolic bottlenecks may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the dysregulation of LPS responses with age.

  12. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    O'Brown, Zach K; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Higgins, John P; Kim, Stuart K

    2015-12-01

    Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator), IFNγ (a STAT1 activator), or TNFα (an NFκB activator) recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney.

  13. Age-associated increase of spontaneous mutant frequency and molecular nature of mutation in newborn and old lacZ-transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Ono, T; Ikehata, H; Nakamura, S; Saito, Y; Hosoi, Y; Takai, Y; Yamada, S; Onodera, J; Yamamoto, K

    2000-02-14

    Accumulation of mutation has long been hypothesized to be a cause of aging and contribute to many of the degenerative diseases, which appear in the senescent phase of life. To test this hypothesis, age-associated changes in spontaneous mutation in different tissues of the body as well as the molecular nature of such changes should be examined. This kind of approach has become feasible only lately with a development of new transgenic mice suitable for mutation assay. Here, using one of these transgenic mice harboring lacZ gene, we have shown that the age-associated increase in spontaneous mutant frequency is common to all tissues examined; spleen, liver, heart, brain, skin and testis, while the rates of increase in mutant frequency differed among the tissues. DNA sequencing of the 496 lacZ mutants recovered from the tissues of newborn and old mice has revealed that spectra of mutations are similar at the two age points with G:C to A:T transition at CpG site being a predominant type of mutation. Furthermore, some mutations in old tissues are complex type and not found in tissues of newborn mice. These results suggest that similar mechanisms may be operating for mutation induction in fetal and postnatal aging process. In addition, the appearance of complex types of mutations in the old tissues suggests a unique cause for these mutations in aging tissues.

  14. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Iashikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-05-22

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes.

  15. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes. PMID:26000717

  16. Research in Biological and Medical Sciences, Including Biochemistry, Communicable Disease and Immunology, Internal Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Physiology, Psychiatry, Surgery, and Veterinary Medicine. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: In-house laboratory independent research; Communicable diseases and immunology; Surgery, internal medicine , psychiatry, Biochemistry...surgery, military internal medicine , military psychiatry; Malaria prophylaxis; and Biosensor systems.

  17. MicroRNA Clusters in the Adult Mouse Heart: Age-Associated Changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Azhar, Gohar; Williams, Emmanuel D; Rogers, Steven C; Wei, Jeanne Y

    2015-01-01

    The microRNAs and microRNA clusters have been implicated in normal cardiac development and also disease, including cardiac hypertrophy, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and arrhythmias. Since a microRNA cluster has from two to dozens of microRNAs, the expression of a microRNA cluster could have a substantial impact on its target genes. In the present study, the configuration and distribution of microRNA clusters in the mouse genome were examined at various inter-microRNA distances. Three important microRNA clusters that are significantly impacted during adult cardiac aging, the miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25, were also examined in terms of their genomic location, RNA transcript character, sequence homology, and their relationship with the corresponding microRNA families. Multiple microRNAs derived from the three clusters potentially target various protein components of the cdc42-SRF signaling pathway, which regulates cytoskeleton dynamics associated with cardiac structure and function. The data indicate that aging impacted the expression of both guide and passenger strands of the microRNA clusters; nutrient stress also affected the expression of the three microRNA clusters. The miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 clusters are likely to impact the Cdc42-SRF signaling pathway and thereby affect cardiac morphology and function during pathological conditions and the aging process.

  18. Interferon-gamma - Inducible Inflammation: Contribution to Aging and Aging-Associated Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Oxenkrug, Gregory

    2011-12-01

    Aging is associated with the chronic, low grade, Th-1 type inflammation. The key Th-1 type, pro-inflammatory cytokine, interferon-gamma (IFNG), transcriptionally induces the rate-limiting enzyme of tryptophan (TRY) - kynurenine (KYN) pathway, indoleamine 2,3- dioxygenase (IDO). Activation of IDO shunts TRY metabolism from production of serotonin (substrate of antidepressant effect) and its derivatives: N-acetylserotonin (an agonist to the receptors of brain derived neurotropic factor), and melatonin (regulator of sleep and other circadian rhythms), towards production of KYN and its derivatives (anxiogenic, neurotoxic and pro-oxidant factors). Some of kynurenines up-regulate nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Concurrently with activation of IDO, IFNG induces guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the rate limiting enzyme of GTP conversion into BH2 (and increases formation of a stable derivative of BH2, neopterin, at the expense of production of BH4, the mandatory co-factor of NOS). Combination of increased NOS activity (by kynurenines) with decreased formation of BH4 leads to the uncoupling of NOS with consequent shift of arginine metabolism from biosynthesis of NO to formation of superoxide anion and other free radicals, and exacerbation of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment caused by kynurenines. Polymorphism of IFNG (+874) T/A gene, that encodes production of IFNG protein, impacts the IDO and GTPCH activity that might be assessed in humans by KYN/TRY ratio and neopterin concentrations in biological fluids (e.g., blood, urine and spinal fluid). The hypothesis of IFNG inducible IDO/GTPCH inflammation cascade helps to understand the increased association between aging, inflammation and aging-associated psychiatric and medical (insulin resistance, obesity) disorders. Evaluation of markers of IFNG-inducible inflammation cascade might be used to assess the severity of corresponding behavioral and cognitive changes and the efficacy of pharmacological

  19. Age-associated micronuclei, kinetochores and sex chromosome loss in men

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, J.; Hando, J.; Tucker, J.D.

    1995-11-01

    Studies on aneuploidy have shown a significant increase in the loss of chromosomes in both males and females with age and also a significant increase in micronucleus formation in lymphocytes with age. This study attempted (1) to ascertain whether the age-associated increase in Y chromosome loss and micronucleus formation are related. (2) to determine whether there is a correlation between Y chromosome-negative metaphase cells and Y chromosome-positive micronuclei from the same donors, and (3) to determine the relationships among the kinetochore status of micronuclei, Y chromosome-positive micronuclei, and age. Blood samples were obtained from thirty-five healthy males ranging in age from 22 to 79 years, and from the umbilical cords of eighteen newborn males. Two thousand binucleated cells were scored per sample. The kinetochore status of each micronucleus was recorded. Slides were then hybridized with the Y chromosome specific probe pHY10, labeled with biotinylated dUTP, and visualized with fluorescein conjugated avidin. All micronucleated cells were relocated and scored as Y+ or Y- depending on their Y probe status. A total of 303 micronuclei were scored, of which 41 (13.5%) contained the Y chromosome. ANOVA shows a significant increase in the number of Y chromosome-positive micronuclei with age (p<0.001). Of the 41 Y+ micronuclei 36 (87.8%) were kinetochore negative, suggesting a relationship between the absence of kinetochore function and micronucleus formation. Also, 500 metaphase spreads per sample were scored for the Y chromosome, showing an increase in Y-cells with age (p<0.001). A correlation analysis between Y chromosome-positive micronuclei and Y chromosome-negative metaphase cells resulted in a correlation coefficient of 0.71 (p.005).

  20. [History of the control of acute infectious diseases in Poland after the World War I--until the year 1924 (including big cities)].

    PubMed

    Berner, Włodzimierz

    2008-01-01

    Acute infectious diseases of high intensity, i.e. typhus fever, typhoid fever, dysentery, followed by scarlet fever, measles, malaria, relapsing fever, whooping cough, diphtheria, smallpox and Asiatic cholera spreading after the World War I in Poland posed one of the most significant problems in the reviving country. Their incidence resulted not only from bad living conditions of the population but also from poor personal and environmental hygiene and lack of access to bacteriologically healthy drinking water. The Polish-Bolshevik war (1919-1920) as well as repatriation of war prisoners and the Polish population from Russia (its territory was a reservoir of numerous infectious diseases) and the return of large groups of displaced people contributed to spread of epidemics. Morbidity rate of acute infectious diseases was the highest in the big Polish cities, especially in Warsaw, Lodz, Lvov, Cracow and Vilnius. The Bureau of Chief Emergency Commissar for fighting against epidemics, which closely cooperated with other Polish sanitary institutions and international organisations, rendered the greatest service to the control of infectious diseases. Until the year 1924, the largest foci of diseases were controlled and their incidence decreased, what was possible after formation of sanitary posts along the eastern border of Poland, organisation of infectious disease hospitals, bath and disinfection centres in the country, and implementation of protective vaccinations.

  1. The expanding universe of neurotrophic factors: therapeutic potential in aging and age-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Lanni, C; Stanga, S; Racchi, M; Govoni, S

    2010-01-01

    Multiple molecular, cellular, structural and functional changes occur in the brain during aging. Neural cells may respond to these changes adaptively by employing multiple mechanisms in order to maintain the integrity of nerve cell circuits and to facilitate responses to environmental demands. Otherwise, they may succumb to neurodegenerative cascades that result in disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. An important role in this balancement is played by neurotrophic factors, which are central to many aspects of nervous system function since they regulate the development, maintenance and survival of neurons and neuron-supporting cells such as glia and oligodendrocytes. A vast amount of evidence indicates that alterations in levels of neurotrophic factors or their receptors can lead to neuronal death and contribute to aging as well as to the pathogenesis of diseases of abnormal trophic support (such as neurodegenerative diseases and depression) and diseases of abnormal excitability (such as epilepsy and central pain sensitization). Cellular and molecular mechanisms by which neurotrophic factors may influence cell survival and excitability are also critically examined to provide novel concepts and targets for the treatment of physiological changes bearing detrimental functional alterations and of different diseases affecting the central nervous system during aging.

  2. CFTR gene mutations--including three novel nucleotide substitutions--and haplotype background in patients with asthma, disseminated bronchiectasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tzetis, M; Efthymiadou, A; Strofalis, S; Psychou, P; Dimakou, A; Pouliou, E; Doudounakis, S; Kanavakis, E

    2001-03-01

    In order to investigate the incidence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations and unclassified variants in chronic pulmonary disease in children and adults, we studied 20 patients with asthma, 19 with disseminated bronchiectasis (DB) of unknown aetiology, and 12 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and compared the results to 52 subjects from the general Greek population. Analysis of the whole coding region of the CFTR gene and its flanking intronic regions revealed that the proportion of CFTR mutations was 45% in asthma (P<0.05), 26.3% in DB (P>0.05), 16.7% in COPD (P>0.05), compared to 15.4% in the general population. Seventeen different molecular defects involved in disease predisposition were identified in 16 patients. Three potentially disease-causing mutations, T388 M, M1R and V11I, are novel, found so far only in three asthma patients. The hyperactive M470 allele was found more frequently in COPD patients (frequency 70.8%, P<0.01) than in the controls. The study of the TGmTnM470 V polyvariant CFTR allele revealed the presence of CFTR function-modulating haplotypes TG13/T5/M470, TG11/T5/M470, TG12/T5/V470 and TG12/T7, combined with M470 or V470, in six asthma patients, four DB patients (P<0.01), and two COPD patients (P<0.05). These results confirm the involvement of the CFTR gene in asthma, DB and possibly in COPD.

  3. ACTH-producing microadenoma of the pituitary in a young female infant with Cushing's disease: report of a case including immunocytologic and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, M S; Wilson, G J; Holland, F J; Kovacs, K

    1986-01-01

    A female infant, younger than any other case in the literature, with ACTH-producing microadenoma of the pituitary is reported. She had full-blown symptoms and signs as well as laboratory evidence of Cushing's disease. The tumor was investigated by histology, immunocytology (avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex technique), and electron microscopy. The possibility that the tumor was derived from the fetal intermediate lobe is discussed.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of outbreak-associated and wild-waterfowl-derived newcastle disease virus strains in Finland, including a novel class I genotype.

    PubMed

    Lindh, Erika; Ek-Kommonen, Christine; Väänänen, Veli-Matti; Alasaari, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti; Vapalahti, Olli; Huovilainen, Anita

    2012-11-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a highly contagious, severe disease of poultry caused by pathogenic strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV; or avian paramyxovirus-1). NDV is endemic in wild birds worldwide and one of the economically most important poultry pathogens. Most of the published strains are outbreak-associated strains, while the apathogenic NDV strains that occur in wild birds, posing a constant threat to poultry with their capability to convert into more virulent forms, have remained less studied. We screened for NDV RNA in cloacal and oropharyngeal samples from wild waterfowl in Finland during the years 2006 to 2010: 39 of 715 birds were positive (prevalence, 5.5%). The partial or full-length F genes of 37 strains were sequenced for phylogenetic purposes. We also characterized viruses derived from three NDV outbreaks in Finland and discuss the relationships between these outbreak-associated and the wild-bird-associated strains. We found that all waterfowl NDV isolates were lentogenic strains of class I or class II genotype I. We also isolated a genetically distinct class I strain (teal/Finland/13111/2008) grouping phylogenetically together with only strain HIECK87191, isolated in Northern Ireland in 1987. Together they seem to form a novel class I genotype genetically differing from other known NDVs by at least 12%.

  5. Differential effects of blueberry polyphenols on age-associated neuroinflammation and cognition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term effects of oxidative stress and inflammatory insults are thought to contribute to the decrements in cognitive performance seen in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various dark-colored berry fruits in reversing age-related de...

  6. The TWEAK–Fn14 dyad is involved in age-associated pathological changes in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Sato, Shuichi; Shin, Jonghyun; Zheng, Timothy S.; Burkly, Linda C.; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The levels of TWEAK receptor Fn14 are increased in skeletal muscle during aging. • Deletion of Fn14 attenuates age-associated skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. • Deletion of Fn14 inhibits proteolysis in skeletal muscle during aging. • TWEAK–Fn14 signaling activates transcription factor NF-κB in aging skeletal muscle. • TWEAK–Fn14 dyad is involved in age-associated fibrosis in skeletal muscle. - Abstract: Progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is a major clinical problem in the elderly. Recently, proinflammatory cytokine TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 were identified as key mediators of muscle wasting in various catabolic states. However, the role of the TWEAK–Fn14 pathway in pathological changes in skeletal muscle during aging remains unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the levels of Fn14 are increased in skeletal muscle of 18-month old (aged) mice compared with adult mice. Genetic ablation of Fn14 significantly increased the levels of specific muscle proteins and blunted the age-associated fiber atrophy in mice. While gene expression of two prominent muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases MAFBx and MuRF1 remained comparable, levels of ubiquitinated proteins and the expression of autophagy-related molecule Atg12 were significantly reduced in Fn14-knockout (KO) mice compared with wild-type mice during aging. Ablation of Fn14 significantly diminished the DNA-binding activity of transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), gene expression of various inflammatory molecules, and interstitial fibrosis in skeletal muscle of aged mice. Collectively, our study suggests that the TWEAK–Fn14 signaling axis contributes to age-associated muscle atrophy and fibrosis potentially through its local activation of proteolytic systems and inflammatory pathways.

  7. Age-associated oxidative modifications of mitochondrial α-subunit of F1 ATP synthase from mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Das, N; Jana, C K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern of age-associated oxidative post-translational modifications in the skeletal muscles of a mammalian species and to address whether the modifications result in the loss of function of the oxidatively modified protein(s). Accordingly, proteins in the mitochondrial matrix of the hind limb of C57BL/6Nnia mice were examined for modifications by carbonylation--an established marker of oxidative post-translational modifications--by Western blotting using anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl antibodies and tritiated sodium borohydride methods. An age-associated increase in carbonylation of mitochondrial matrix proteins was observed, but not all proteins were equally susceptible. A 55 kDa protein, identified as the α-subunit of the F1 complex of ATP synthase (ATP phosphohydrolase [H(+)-transporting]), had approximately 17% and 27% higher levels of protein carbonyls in adult and old animals, respectively, in comparison to the young controls as estimated using tritiated sodium borohydride. In addition, an age-associated decline in its activity was observed, with approximately 9% and 28% decrease in the activity in the adult and old animals, respectively, in comparison to young controls. It may be concluded that such oxidative post-translational modifications and the resultant attenuation of the protein activity may contribute to the age-related energy loss and muscular degeneracy.

  8. Age-Associated Alterations in Corpus Callosum White Matter Integrity in Bipolar Disorder Assessed Using Probabilistic Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Toteja, Nitin; Cokol, Perihan Guvenek; Ikuta, Toshikazu; Kafantaris, Vivian; Peters, Bart D.; Burdick, Katherine E.; John, Majnu; Malhotra, Anil K.; Szeszko, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Atypical age-associated changes in white matter integrity may play a role in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder, but no studies have examined the major white matter tracts using nonlinear statistical modeling across a wide age range in this disorder. The goal of this study was to identify possible deviations in the typical pattern of age-associated changes in white matter integrity in patients with bipolar disorder across the age range of 9 to 62 years. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in 57 (20M/37F) patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 57 (20M/37F) age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were computed for the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, two projection tracts, and five association tracts using probabilistic tractography. Results Overall, patients had lower fractional anisotropy and higher mean diffusivity compared to healthy volunteers across all tracts (while controlling for the effects of age and age2). In addition, there were greater age-associated increases in mean diffusivity in patients compared to healthy volunteers within the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum beginning in the second and third decades of life. Conclusions Our findings provide evidence for alterations in the typical pattern of white matter development in patients with bipolar disorder compared to healthy volunteers. Changes in white matter development within the corpus callosum may lead to altered inter-hemispheric communication that is considered integral to the neurobiology of the disorder. PMID:25532972

  9. Age-associated cardiomyopathy in heterozygous carrier mice of a pathological mutation of carnitine transporter gene, OCTN2.

    PubMed

    Xiaofei, E; Wada, Yasuhiko; Dakeishi, Miwako; Hirasawa, Fujiko; Murata, Katsuyuki; Masuda, Hirotake; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Nikaido, Hiroko; Koizumi, Akio

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether heterozygotes of juvenile visceral steatosis mice, a model for systemic carnitine deficiency, may develop age-associated cardiomyopathy. Tissue morphological observations were carried out by light and electron microscopy to compare the heterozygous and age-matched control mice at periods of 1 and 2 years. Possible effects of the pathological mutation on lipid and glucose levels was also evaluated in humans and mice. Except mild increases in serum cholesterol levels in male heterozygous mice and humans, no changes were found in other factors, indicating that none of the confounding factors seems to be profound. Results demonstrated that heterozygous mice had larger left ventriclular myocyte diameters than the control mice. Morphological changes in cardiac muscles by electron microscopy revealed age-associated changes of lipid deposition and abnormal mitochondria in heterozygous mice. Two out of 60 heterozygous cohort and one out of nine heterozygous trim-kill mice had cardiac hypertrophy at ages older than 2 years. The present study and our previous work suggest that the carrier state of OCTN2 pathological mutations might be a risk factor for age-associated cardiomyopathy.

  10. Drosophila modifier screens to identify novel neuropsychiatric drugs including aminergic agents for the possible treatment of Parkinson’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Terrell, Ashley; Lam, Hoa A.; Djapri, Christine; Jang, Jennifer; Hadi, Richard; Roberts, Logan; Shahi, Varun; Chou, Man-Ting; Biedermann, Traci; Huang, Brian; Lawless, George M.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the presynaptic function of aminergic cells may provide neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease as well as treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Model genetic organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster may enhance the detection of new drugs via modifier or “enhancer/suppressor” screens, but this technique has not been applied to processes relevant to psychiatry. To identify new aminergic drugs in vivo, we used a mutation in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT) as a sensitized genetic background, and performed a suppressor screen. We fed dVMAT mutant larvae ~1000 known drugs and quantitated rescue (suppression) of an amine-dependent locomotor deficit in the larva. To determine which drugs might specifically potentiate neurotransmitter release, we performed an additional secondary screen for drugs that require presynaptic amine storage to rescue larval locomotion. Using additional larval locomotion and adult fertility assays, we validated that at least one compound previously used clinically as an antineoplastic agent potentiates the presynaptic function of aminergic circuits. We suggest that structurally similar agents might be used to development treatments for Parkinson’s disease, depression and ADHD and that modifier screens in Drosophila provide a new strategy to screen for neuropsychiatric drugs. More generally, our findings demonstrate the power of physiologically based screens for identifying bioactive agents for select neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23229049

  11. HLA class I genotyping including HLA-B*51 allele typing in the Iranian patients with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuki, N; Ota, M; Katsuyama, Y; Yabuki, K; Ando, H; Yoshida, M; Onari, K; Nikbin, B; Davatchi, F; Chams, H; Ghaderi, A A; Ohno, S; Inoko, H

    2001-05-01

    It is well known that Behçet's disease (BD) is strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B51 in many ethnic groups. However, there has been no published report as yet with respect to this association among the Iranian people. Furthermore, since it is now known that the B51 antigen can be encoded by 21 alleles, B*5101-B*5121, we performed HLA-B*51 allele typing as well as HLA class I genotyping of 48 Iranian patients with this disease. As a result, the frequency of the B*51 allele was significantly higher (62.1%) in the patient group as compared with the ethnically matched control group (31.8%) (Pc=0.067, R.R.=3.51). In the genotyping of B*51 alleles, 33 out of the 36 B*51-positive patients possessed B*5101 and the remaining 3 carried B*5108. This study revealed that Iranian patients with BD also had a strong association with HLA-B51. In addition, this significantly high incidence of HLA-B*51 was found to be caused by an increase in both the HLA-B*5101 and HLA-B*5108 alleles. However, there was no significant difference in the HLA-B*51 allelic distribution between the patient and control groups.

  12. Long-term follow-up of cardiac function in patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with mediastinal irradiation and combination chemotherapy including doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    LaMonte, C.S.; Yeh, S.D.; Straus, D.J.

    1986-04-01

    Among 41 evaluable patients whose first treatment for advanced Hodgkin's disease had consisted of alternating cycles of mechlorethamine, vincristine, prednisone, and procarbazine (MOPP), and doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD), in addition to low-dose mediastinal irradiation, 19 underwent retrospective cardiac evaluation by routine posteroanterior and lateral chest x-ray, 12-lead ECG, M-mode echocardiogram, and ECG-gated left ventricular blood pool scan at rest and during exercise. Fifteen patients had unequivocally normal left ventricular function by all these parameters. Two patients had minimally reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) at rest with a normal increment with exercise. In two other patients with high normal resting LVEF and subnormal increment with exercise, the elevated resting values implied initial measurement in a nonbasal state. A twentieth patient (the oldest; one of two with active Hodgkin's disease at the time of evaluation and the stimulus for this study) had markedly reduced LVEF as determined by radionuclide cardiac angiography and had developed clinical congestive heart failure shortly before evaluation. Despite this patient, the study indicates that treatment with MOPP/ABVD and low-dose mediastinal irradiation entails low risk for cardiac complications.

  13. Endothelial Aging Associated with Oxidative Stress Can Be Modulated by a Healthy Mediterranean Diet

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Carmen; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; López-Miranda, José; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a condition which favors the development of atherosclerosis, which has been associated with a breakdown in repair processes that occurs in response to cell damage. The dysregulation of the biological systems associated with aging are produced partly through damage which accumulates over time. One major source of this injury is oxidative stress, which can impair biological structures and the mechanisms by which they are repaired. These mechanisms are based on the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, which in turn is associated with cardiovascular disease, carcinogenesis and aging. The dependent dysfunction of aging has been correlated with a reduction in the number and/or functional activity of endothelial progenitor cells, which could hinder the repair and regeneration of the endothelium. In addition, aging, inflammation and oxidative stress are endogenous factors that cause telomere shortening, which is dependent on oxidative cell damage. Moreover, telomere length correlates with lifestyle and the consumption of a healthy diet. Thus, diseases associated with aging and age may be caused by the long-term effects of oxidative damage, which are modified by genetic and environmental factors. Considering that diet is a very important source of antioxidants, in this review we will analyze the relationship between oxidative stress, aging, and the mechanisms which may be involved in a higher survival rate and a lower incidence of the diseases associated with aging in populations which follow a healthy diet. PMID:23615475

  14. [Effect of complex therapy including ATP-long on left ventricular diastolic function in patients with ischemic heart disease at rest and under isometric load].

    PubMed

    Amosova, E N; Bereza, N V; Potapkova, I V

    2002-01-01

    The study comprised 34 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) stable functional class I-II extertional angina with impaired relaxation type diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Instituted in all patients before and after the combined treatment involving the use of ATP-Long (group I) or ATP solution injectable i.m. (group II) was dopplercardiometry in rest and at the peak of isometric load. The course of ATP treatments administration was ten days in duration. The use in a combined treatment IHD patients of ATP-Long, a new metabolic-action type drug preparation of Ukraine, permits improving parameters of the diastole temporal patterns, as evidenced by results of the studies made.

  15. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    2016-01-01

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  16. The role of the intestinal microvasculature in inflammatory bowel disease: studies with a modified Caco-2 model including endothelial cells resembling the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer Y; Hermanns, Maria Iris; Cavelius, Christian; Kraegeloh, Annette; Jung, Thomas; Danzebrink, Rolf; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, Charles James

    The microvascular endothelium of the gut barrier plays a crucial role during inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. We have modified a commonly used intestinal cell model based on the Caco-2 cells by adding microvascular endothelial cells (ISO-HAS-1). Transwell filters were used with intestinal barrier-forming Caco-2 cells on top and the ISO-HAS-1 on the bottom of the filter. The goal was to determine whether this coculture mimics the in vivo situation more closely, and whether the model is suitable to evaluate interactions of, for example, prospective nanosized drug vehicles or contrast agents with this coculture in a physiological and inflamed state as it would occur in inflammatory bowel disease. We monitored the inflammatory responsiveness of the cells (release of IL-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and soluble E-selectin) after exposure to inflammatory stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β) and a nanoparticle (Ba/Gd: coprecipitated BaSO4 and Gd(OH)3), generally used as contrast agents. The barrier integrity of the coculture was evaluated via the determination of transepithelial electrical resistance and the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of NaFITC. The behavior of the coculture Caco-1/ISO-HAS-1 was compared to the respective monocultures Caco-2 and ISO-HAS-1. Based on transepithelial electrical resistance, the epithelial barrier integrity of the coculture remained stable during incubation with all stimuli, whereas the Papp decreased after exposure to the cytokine mixture (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL1-β, and Ba/Gd). Both the endothelial and epithelial monocultures showed a high inflammatory response in both the upper and lower transwell-compartments. However, in the coculture, inflammatory mediators were only detected on the epithelial side and not on the endothelial side. Thus in the coculture, based on the Papp, the epithelial barrier appears to prevent a potential inflammatory overreaction in the underlying endothelial cells

  17. Age-Associated Increases in Pulmonary Artery Systolic Pressure in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Borlaug, Barry A.; Kane, Garvan C.; Enders, Felicity T.; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Redfield, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    Background In contrast to the wealth of data on isolated systolic hypertension involving the systemic circulation in the elderly, much less is known about age-related change in pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and its prognostic impact in the general population. We sought to define the relationship between PASP and age, evaluate which factors influence PASP and determine if PASP is independently predictive of mortality in the community. Methods and Results A random sample of Olmsted County, MN general population (N=2042) underwent echocardiography and spirometry and was followed for a median of 9 years. PASP was measured from the tricuspid regurgitation velocity. Left ventricular diastolic pressure was estimated using Doppler echocardiography (E/e' ratio) and arterial stiffening was assessed using the brachial artery pulse pressure. Among 1413 (69%) subjects with measurable PASP (63±11y; 43% male), PASP (median, 25th-75th percentile) was 26 (24-30) mmHg and increased with age (r=0.31; p<0.001). Independent predictors of PASP were age, pulse pressure and mitral E/e' (all p≤0.003). Increasing PASP was associated with higher mortality (hazard ratio 2.73 per 10 mmHg; p<0.001). In subjects without cardiopulmonary disease (any heart failure, coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus or chronic obstructive lung disease), the age-adjusted hazard ratio was 2.74 per 10 mmHg (p=0.016). Conclusions We provide the first population-based evidence of age-related increase in pulmonary artery pressure, its association with increasing left heart diastolic pressures and systemic vascular stiffening, as well as its negative impact on survival. Pulmonary artery pressure may serve as a novel cardiovascular risk factor and potential therapeutic target. PMID:19433755

  18. RP1L1 variants are associated with a spectrum of inherited retinal diseases including retinitis pigmentosa and occult macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Alice E; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Mackay, Donna S; Wright, Genevieve A; Waseem, Naushin H; Michaelides, Michel; Holder, Graham E; Robson, Anthony G; Moore, Anthony T; Plagnol, Vincent; Webster, Andrew R

    2013-03-01

    In one consanguineous family with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a condition characterized by progressive visual loss due to retinal degeneration, homozygosity mapping, and candidate gene sequencing suggested a novel locus. Exome sequencing identified a homozygous frameshifting mutation, c.601delG, p.Lys203Argfs*28, in RP1L1 encoding RP 1-like1, a photoreceptor-specific protein. A screen of a further 285 unrelated individuals with autosomal recessive RP identified an additional proband, homozygous for a missense variant, c.1637G>C, p.Ser546Thr, in RP1L1. A distinct retinal disorder, occult macular dystrophy (OCMD) solely affects the central retinal cone photoreceptors and has previously been reported to be associated with variants in the same gene. The association between mutations in RP1L1 and the disorder OCMD was explored by screening a cohort of 28 unrelated individuals with the condition; 10 were found to harbor rare (minor allele frequency ≤0.5% in the 1,000 genomes dataset) heterozygous RP1L1 missense variants. Analysis of family members revealed many unaffected relatives harboring the same variant. Linkage analysis excluded the possibility of a recessive mode of inheritance, and sequencing of RP1, a photoreceptor protein that interacts with RP1L1, excluded a digenic mechanism involving this gene. These findings imply an important and diverse role for RP1L1 in human retinal physiology and disease.

  19. Significant Low Prevalence of Antibodies Reacting with Simian Virus 40 Mimotopes in Serum Samples from Patients Affected by Inflammatory Neurologic Diseases, Including Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Elisa; Pietrobon, Silvia; Masini, Irene; Rotondo, John Charles; Gentile, Mauro; Fainardi, Enrico; Casetta, Ilaria; Castellazzi, Massimiliano; Granieri, Enrico; Caniati, Maria Luisa; Tola, Maria Rosaria; Guerra, Giovanni; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Many investigations were carried out on the association between viruses and multiple sclerosis (MS). Indeed, early studies reported the detections of neurotropic virus footprints in the CNS of patients with MS. In this study, sera from patients affected by MS, other inflammatory (OIND) and non-inflammatory neurologic diseases (NIND) were analyzed for antibodies against the polyomavirus, Simian Virus 40 (SV40). An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with two synthetic peptides, which mimic SV40 antigens, was employed to detect specific antibodies in sera from patients affected by MS, OIND, NIND and healthy subjects (HS). Immunologic data indicate that in sera from MS patients antibodies against SV40 mimotopes are detectable with a low prevalence, 6%, whereas in HS of the same mean age, 40 yrs, the prevalence was 22%. The difference is statistically significant (P = 0.001). Significant is also the difference between MS vs. NIND patients (6% vs. 17%; P = 0.0254), whereas no significant difference was detected between MS vs OIND (6% vs 10%; P>0.05). The prevalence of SV40 antibodies in MS patients is 70% lower than that revealed in HS. PMID:25365364

  20. High frequency of cutaneous manifestations including vitiligo and alopecia areata in a prospective cohort of patients with chronic graft-vs-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Čeović, Romana; Desnica, Lana; Pulanić, Dražen; Serventi Seiwerth, Ranka; Ilić, Ivana; Grce, Magdalena; Mravak Stipetić, Marinka; Klepac Pulanić, Tajana; Bilić, Ervina; Bilić, Ernest; Milošević, Milan; Vrhovac, Radovan; Nemet, Damir; Pavletic, Steven Z

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine the frequency and the characteristics of cutaneous manifestations, especially vitiligo and alopecia areata, in patients with chronic graft-vs-host disease (cGVHD). Methods 50 patients with cGVHD were prospectively enrolled in the observational study protocol and evaluated by an experienced dermatologist. The evaluation was focused on the clinical spectrum of skin and adnexal involvement, and the cutaneous GVHD score was determined according to National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus criteria. The presence of vitiligo, alopecia, xerosis, nail changes, and dyspigmentation was also assessed. Results Out of 50 cGVHD patients, 28 (56%) had skin involvement, and 27 of them (96%) had hypo and/or hyperpigmentations. 11 patients (39%) had a mild cutaneous NIH cGVHD score, 22% moderate, and 39% severe. 15 (30%) patients had nail changes and 10 (20%) had vitiligo or alopecia areata. Univariate analysis showed that patients with vitiligo/alopecia areata received more lines of prior systemic immunosuppressive therapy (P = 0.043), had lower Karnofsky performance status (P = 0.028), and had a higher B-cell number (P = 0.005), platelet count (P = 0.022), and total protein (P = 0.024). Vitiligo and alopecia areata were associated with higher NIH skin score (P = 0.001), higher intensity of immunosuppressive treatment (P = 0.020), and total body irradiation conditioning (P = 0.040). Multivariate regression model showed that patients with higher NIH skin scoring were 3.67 times more likely to have alopecia and/or vitiligo (odds ratio 3.67; 95% confidence interval 1.26-10.73), controlled for all other factors in the model (age at study entry, number of B-cells, platelet count, and global NIH score). Conclusion These data indicate that vitiligo and alopecia areata occur more frequently in cGVHD than previously reported. PMID:27374824

  1. Aging-associated oxidized albumin promotes cellular senescence and endothelial damage

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Carlos; Alique, Matilde; Navalmoral, Estefanía; Noci, Maria-Victoria; Bohorquez-Magro, Lourdes; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of oxidized proteins with aging have been considered a cardiovascular risk factor. However, it is unclear whether oxidized albumin, which is the most abundant serum protein, induces endothelial damage. The results of this study indicated that with aging processes, the levels of oxidized proteins as well as endothelial microparticles release increased, a novel marker of endothelial damage. Among these, oxidized albumin seems to play a principal role. Through in vitro studies, endothelial cells cultured with oxidized albumin exhibited an increment of endothelial damage markers such as adhesion molecules and apoptosis levels. In addition, albumin oxidation increased the amount of endothelial microparticles that were released. Moreover, endothelial cells with increased oxidative stress undergo senescence. In addition, endothelial cells cultured with oxidized albumin shown a reduction in endothelial cell migration measured by wound healing. As a result, we provide the first evidence that oxidized albumin induces endothelial injury which then contributes to the increase of cardiovascular disease in the elderly subjects. PMID:27042026

  2. Age-associated differences in triceps surae muscle composition and strength – an MRI-based cross-sectional comparison of contractile, adipose and connective tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In human skeletal muscles, the aging process causes a decrease of contractile and a concomitant increase of intramuscular adipose (IMAT) and connective (IMCT) tissues. The accumulation of non-contractile tissues may contribute to the significant loss of intrinsic muscle strength typically observed at older age but their in vivo quantification is challenging. The purpose of this study was to establish MR imaging-based methods to quantify the relative amounts of IMCT, IMAT and contractile tissues in young and older human cohorts, and investigate their roles in determining age-associated changes in skeletal muscle strength. Methods Five young (31.6 ± 7.0 yrs) and five older (83.4 ± 3.2 yrs) Japanese women were subject to a detailed MR imaging protocol, including Fast Gradient Echo, Quantitative Fat/Water (IDEAL) and Ultra-short Echo Time (UTE) sequences, to determine contractile muscle tissue and IMAT within the entire Triceps Surae complex, and IMCT within both heads of the Gastrocnemius muscle. Specific force was calculated as the ratio of isometric plantarflexor force and the physiological cross-sectional area of the Triceps Surae complex. Results In the older cohort, total Triceps Surae volume was smaller by 17.5%, while the relative amounts of Triceps Surae IMAT and Gastrocnemius IMCT were larger by 55.1% and 48.9%, respectively. Differences of 38.6% and 42.1% in plantarflexor force and specific force were observed. After subtraction of IMAT and IMCT from total muscle volume, differences in intrinsic strength decreased to 29.6%. Conclusions Our data establishes that aging causes significant changes in skeletal muscle composition, with marked increases in non-contractile tissues. Such quantification of the remodeling process is likely to be of functional and clinical importance in elucidating the causes of the disproportionate age-associated decrease of force compared to that of muscle volume. PMID:24939372

  3. Phenotypic Parameters in Genotypically Selected Type 2B von Willebrand Disease Patients: A Large, Single-Center Experience Including a New Novel Mutation.

    PubMed

    Woods, Adriana Ines; Kempfer, Ana Catalina; Paiva, Juvenal; Sanchez-Luceros, Analia; Bermejo, Emilse; Chuit, Roberto; Alberto, Maria Fabiana; Blanco, Alicia Noemi; Lazzari, Maria Angela

    2017-02-01

    von Willebrand disease type 2B (VWD2B) expresses gain-of-function mutations that enhance binding of an individual's von Willebrand factor (VWF) to its platelet ligand, glycoprotein Ib (GPIb), and which are usually identified by increased ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA). We describe here the phenotypic profile of 38 genotypically selected VWD2B-affected family members (AFMs) belonging to 19 unrelated families. Major bleeding was observed in 68.4% of AFMs (previous to their diagnosis and registered by lifetime interviews), with a total of 46 episodes (1.21/patient), and was found to be highly related to the individual bleeding score and presence of thrombocytopenia, but otherwise unrelated to other laboratory parameters. Excessive muco-cutaneous bleeding symptoms were often reported, the most frequent of which comprised menorrhagia, epistaxis, easy bruising, and bleeding after teeth extraction/in oral cavity. Eight unaffected family members were also studied. The prevalence of VWD2B within families was 0.826, and the penetrance of mutations was complete, making it mandatory to study entire family sets to complete diagnostic profiles. Seven heterozygous missense mutations were found, the most common being p.V1316M. In the p.R1308C group, 75% of the AFMs showed absence of RIPA at 0.5 mg/mL, 66.6% of whom had VWF:RCo < 10 IU/dL, and 50% of whom had VWF:CB < 10 IU/dL. In the p.S1310F group, none of the AFMs had VWF:RCo/VWF:Ag < 0.6 (RCo/Ag), but 100% had VWF:CB/VWF:Ag < 0.6/(CB/Ag). Patients with p.P1266L and p.R1304V were characterized as atypical VWD2B. Two de novo mutations were found in four AFMs belonging to two families. We also describe a novel mutation: p.Y1258C. Of our patients, 70.5% had O blood group. In conclusion, a normal RCo/Ag and a negative RIPA at 0.5 mg/mL do not necessarily rule out a diagnosis of VWD2B.

  4. Polyphenols found in berry fruit improve age-associated changes in cognitive function and brain inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has demonstrated, in both human and animals, that cognitive functioning decreases with age, to include deficits in processing speed, executive function, memory, and spatial learning. The cause of these functional declines is not entirely understood; however, neuronal losses and the associat...

  5. Genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder in Canadian and UK populations corroborates disease loci including SYNE1 and CSMD1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for cases versus controls using single nucleotide polymorphism microarray data have shown promising findings for complex neuropsychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD). Methods Here we describe a comprehensive genome-wide study of bipolar disorder (BD), cross-referencing analysis from a family-based study of 229 small families with association analysis from over 950 cases and 950 ethnicity-matched controls from the UK and Canada. Further, loci identified in these analyses were supported by pathways identified through pathway analysis on the samples. Results Although no genome-wide significant markers were identified, the combined GWAS findings have pointed to several genes of interest that support GWAS findings for BD from other groups or consortia, such as at SYNE1 on 6q25, PPP2R2C on 4p16.1, ZNF659 on 3p24.3, CNTNAP5 (2q14.3), and CDH13 (16q23.3). This apparent corroboration across multiple sites gives much confidence to the likelihood of genetic involvement in BD at these loci. In particular, our two-stage strategy found association in both our combined case/control analysis and the family-based analysis on 1q21.2 (closest gene: sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 gene, S1PR1) and on 1q24.1 near the gene TMCO1, and at CSMD1 on 8p23.2, supporting several previous GWAS reports for BD and for schizophrenia. Pathway analysis suggests association of pathways involved in calcium signalling, neuropathic pain signalling, CREB signalling in neurons, glutamate receptor signalling and axonal guidance signalling. Conclusions The findings presented here show support for a number of genes previously implicated genes in the etiology of BD, including CSMD1 and SYNE1, as well as evidence for previously unreported genes such as the brain-expressed genes ADCY2, NCALD, WDR60, SCN7A and SPAG16. PMID:24387768

  6. Age-associated alterations in the somatic mutation and DNA methylation levels in plants.

    PubMed

    Dubrovina, A S; Kiselev, K V

    2016-03-01

    Somatic mutations of the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA and alterations in DNA methylation levels in mammals are well known to play important roles in ageing and various diseases, yet their specific contributions await further investigation. For plants, it has also been proposed that unrepaired DNA damage and DNA polymerase errors accumulate in plant cells and lead to increased somatic mutation rate and alterations in transcription, which eventually contribute to plant ageing. A number of studies also show that DNA methylation levels vary depending on the age of plant tissue and chronological age of a whole plant. Recent studies reveal that prolonged cultivation of plant cells in vitro induces single nucleotide substitutions and increases global DNA methylation level in a time-dependent fashion. Changes in DNA methylation are known to influence DNA repair and can lead to altered mutation rates, and, therefore, it is interesting to investigate both the genetic and epigenetic integrity in relationship to ageing in plants. This review will summarise and discuss the current studies investigating somatic DNA mutation and DNA methylation levels in relation to plant ageing and senescence. The analysis has shown that there still remains a lack of clarity concerning plant biological ageing and the role of the genetic and epigenetic instabilities in this process.

  7. Treatment approach, delivery, and follow-up evaluation for cardiac rhythm disease management patients receiving radiation therapy: Retrospective physician surveys including chart reviews at numerous centers

    SciTech Connect

    Gossman, Michael S.; Wilkinson, Jeffrey D.; Mallick, Avishek

    2014-01-01

    In a 2-part study, we first examined the results of 71 surveyed physicians who provided responses on how they address the management of patients who maintained either a pacemaker or a defibrillator during radiation treatment. Second, a case review study is presented involving 112 medical records reviewed at 18 institutions to determine whether there was a change in the radiation prescription for the treatment of the target cancer, the method of radiation delivery, or the method of radiation image acquisition. Statistics are provided to illustrate the level of administrative policy; the level of communication between radiation oncologists and heart specialists; American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging and classification; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines; tumor site; patient's sex; patient's age; device type; manufacturer; live monitoring; and the reported decisions for planning, delivery, and imaging. This survey revealed that 37% of patient treatments were considered for some sort of change in this regard, whereas 59% of patients were treated without regard to these alternatives when available. Only 3% of all patients were identified with an observable change in the functionality of the device or patient status in comparison with 96% of patients with normal behavior and operating devices. Documented changes in the patient's medical record included 1 device exhibiting failure at 0.3-Gy dose, 1 device exhibiting increased sensor rate during dose delivery, 1 patient having an irregular heartbeat leading to device reprogramming, and 1 patient complained of twinging in the chest wall that resulted in a respiratory arrest. Although policies and procedures should directly involve the qualified medical physicist for technical supervision, their sufficient involvement was typically not requested by most respondents. No treatment options were denied to any patient based on AJCC staging, classification, or NCCN practice standards.

  8. Treatment approach, delivery, and follow-up evaluation for cardiac rhythm disease management patients receiving radiation therapy: retrospective physician surveys including chart reviews at numerous centers.

    PubMed

    Gossman, Michael S; Wilkinson, Jeffrey D; Mallick, Avishek

    2014-01-01

    In a 2-part study, we first examined the results of 71 surveyed physicians who provided responses on how they address the management of patients who maintained either a pacemaker or a defibrillator during radiation treatment. Second, a case review study is presented involving 112 medical records reviewed at 18 institutions to determine whether there was a change in the radiation prescription for the treatment of the target cancer, the method of radiation delivery, or the method of radiation image acquisition. Statistics are provided to illustrate the level of administrative policy; the level of communication between radiation oncologists and heart specialists; American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging and classification; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines; tumor site; patient׳s sex; patient׳s age; device type; manufacturer; live monitoring; and the reported decisions for planning, delivery, and imaging. This survey revealed that 37% of patient treatments were considered for some sort of change in this regard, whereas 59% of patients were treated without regard to these alternatives when available. Only 3% of all patients were identified with an observable change in the functionality of the device or patient status in comparison with 96% of patients with normal behavior and operating devices. Documented changes in the patient׳s medical record included 1 device exhibiting failure at 0.3-Gy dose, 1 device exhibiting increased sensor rate during dose delivery, 1 patient having an irregular heartbeat leading to device reprogramming, and 1 patient complained of twinging in the chest wall that resulted in a respiratory arrest. Although policies and procedures should directly involve the qualified medical physicist for technical supervision, their sufficient involvement was typically not requested by most respondents. No treatment options were denied to any patient based on AJCC staging, classification, or NCCN practice standards.

  9. Tyrosine hydroxylase haploinsufficiency prevents age-associated arterial pressure elevation and increases half-life in mice.

    PubMed

    Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Grande, María T; Clemente-Lorenzo, Milagros; Murillo-Gómez, Cayetana; De Pablo, Flora; López-Novoa, José M; Hernández-Sánchez, Catalina

    2017-01-01

    Catecholamines are essential for the maintenance of physiological homeostasis under basal and stress conditions. We aim to determine the impact of deletion of a single allele of the tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) gene might have on aging arterial pressure and life-span. We found that Th haploinsufficiency prevents age-associated increase of arterial pressure (AP) in mature adult mice, and it results in the extension of the half-life of Th-heterozygous (TH-HET) mice respect to their wild-type (WT) littermates. Heart performance was similar in both genotypes. To further investigate the lack of increase in AP with age in TH-HET mice, we measured the AP response to intra-peritoneal administration of substances involved in AP regulation. The response to acetylcholine and the basal sympathetic tone were similar in both genotypes, while norepinephrine had a greater pressor effect in TH-HET mice, which correlated with altered adrenoreceptor expression in blood vessels and the heart. Furthermore, sympatho-adrenomedular response to stress was attenuated in TH-HET mice. Plasma catecholamine levels and urine glucose increased markedly in WT but not in TH-HET mice after stress. Our results showed that TH-HET mice are resistant to age-associated hypertension, present a reduction in the sympathetic response to stress and display an extended half-life.

  10. Targeted expression of catalase to mitochondria prevents age-associated reductions in mitochondrial function and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Young; Choi, Cheol Soo; Birkenfeld, Andreas L; Alves, Tiago C; Jornayvaz, Francois R; Jurczak, Michael J; Zhang, Dongyan; Woo, Dong Kyun; Shadel, Gerald S; Ladiges, Warren; Rabinovitch, Peter S; Santos, Janine H; Petersen, Kitt F; Samuel, Varman T; Shulman, Gerald I

    2010-12-01

    Aging-associated muscle insulin resistance has been hypothesized to be due to decreased mitochondrial function, secondary to cumulative free radical damage, leading to increased intramyocellular lipid content. To directly test this hypothesis, we examined both in vivo and in vitro mitochondrial function, intramyocellular lipid content, and insulin action in lean healthy mice with targeted overexpression of the human catalase gene to mitochondria (MCAT mice). Here, we show that MCAT mice are protected from age-induced decrease in muscle mitochondrial function (∼30%), energy metabolism (∼7%), and lipid-induced muscle insulin resistance. This protection from age-induced reduction in mitochondrial function was associated with reduced mitochondrial oxidative damage, preserved mitochondrial respiration and muscle ATP synthesis, and AMP-activated protein kinase-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. Taken together, these data suggest that the preserved mitochondrial function maintained by reducing mitochondrial oxidative damage may prevent age-associated whole-body energy imbalance and muscle insulin resistance.

  11. Decreased Default Mode Network connectivity correlates with age-associated structural and cognitive changes

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Piñeiro, Didac; Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Fernández-Cabello, Sara; Arenaza-Urquijo, Eider M.; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Solana, Elisabeth; Bargalló, Núria; Junqué, Carme; Ros, Emilio; Bartrés-Faz, David

    2014-01-01

    Ageing entails cognitive and motor decline as well as brain changes such as loss of gray (GM) and white matter (WM) integrity, neurovascular and functional connectivity alterations. Regarding connectivity, reduced resting-state fMRI connectivity between anterior and posterior nodes of the Default Mode Network (DMN) relates to cognitive function and has been postulated to be a hallmark of ageing. However, the relationship between age-related connectivity changes and other neuroimaging-based measures in ageing is fragmentarily investigated. In a sample of 116 healthy elders we aimed to study the relationship between antero-posterior DMN connectivity and measures of WM integrity, GM integrity and cerebral blood flow (CBF), assessed with an arterial spin labeling sequence. First, we replicated previous findings demonstrating DMN connectivity decreases in ageing and an association between antero-posterior DMN connectivity and memory scores. The results showed that the functional connectivity between posterior midline structures and the medial prefrontal cortex was related to measures of WM and GM integrity but not to CBF. Gray and WM correlates of anterio-posterior DMN connectivity included, but were not limited to, DMN areas and cingulum bundle. These results resembled patterns of age-related vulnerability which was studied by comparing the correlates of antero-posterior DMN with age-effect maps. These age-effect maps were obtained after performing an independent analysis with a second sample including both young and old subjects. We argue that antero-posterior connectivity might be a sensitive measure of brain ageing over the brain. By using a comprehensive approach, the results provide valuable knowledge that may shed further light on DMN connectivity dysfunctions in ageing. PMID:25309433

  12. Age-associated changes in basal c-fos transcription factor binding activity in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tsou, H; Azhar, G; Lu, X G; Kovacs, S; Peacocke, M; Wei, J Y

    1996-12-15

    The early response proto-oncogene c-fos is expressed at very low levels in the mammalian heart at baseline. To further investigate the mechanism of altered c-fos expression with age, we studied in the basal state the binding of five transcription proteins to their cognate sites in the c-fos promoter/enhancer region, in adult and old F344 rats. Our results show a reduced binding of E2F and AP1 proteins to the c-fos promoter in aging hearts. The major calcium/cyclic AMP response element (CRE) and SP1 binding was unchanged. The only increase seen with age was in the serum response element (SRE) binding proteins. SRE is the point of convergence of different signal transduction pathways (via MAP kinases and the Rho family of GTPases) at the c-fos promoter. Increased SRE binding may reflect a compensation for a decreased binding of other transcription proteins to the c-fos promoter, alteration in the phosphorylation status of SRF, or a change in the ternary complex factors Elk 1 or SAP 1. Other possibilities include defects in the signal transduction pathways with aging, which combine to produce an overall negative balance in the function of the c-fos promoter despite the increased SRE binding activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have shown decreased c-fos expression with age. This may be due partly to alterations in the basal levels of transcription factor binding.

  13. The Citrus Flavanone Naringenin Protects Myocardial Cells against Age-Associated Damage

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Cavallini, Chiara; Testai, Lara; Martelli, Alma; Calderone, Vincenzo; Martini, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the health-promoting effects of the citrus flavanone naringenin have been examined. The results have provided evidence for the modulation of some key mechanisms involved in cellular damage by this compound. In particular, naringenin has been revealed to have protective properties such as an antioxidant effect in cardiometabolic disorders. Very recently, beneficial effects of naringenin have been demonstrated in old rats. Because aging has been demonstrated to be directly related to the occurrence of cardiac disorders, in the present study, the ability of naringenin to prevent cardiac cell senescence was investigated. For this purpose, a cellular model of senescent myocardial cells was set up and evaluated using colorimetric, fluorimetric, and immunometric techniques. Relevant cellular senescence markers, such as X-gal staining, cell cycle regulator levels, and the percentage of cell cycle-arrested cells, were found to be reduced in the presence of naringenin. In addition, cardiac markers of aging-induced damage, including radical oxidative species levels, mitochondrial metabolic activity, mitochondrial calcium buffer capacity, and estrogenic signaling functions, were also modulated by the compound. These results suggested that naringenin has antiaging effects on myocardial cells. PMID:28386313

  14. Age-associated changes on axonal regeneration and functional outcome after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Roozbehi, Amrollah; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Bakhtiyari, Mehrdad; Mohammadi, Jamshid; Rad, Parastou; Delaviz, Hamdollah

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the association between aging and regenerative potential of spinal cord injury. Three groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats, including young (40 days), mature (5-6 months) and old (28-29 months) were spinally hemisected at the L1 level. The locomotor performance was assessed weekly for eight weeks after lesion using locomotors' rating scale developed by Basso, Bresnahan and Beattie (BBB). In the tracing study, retrograde labeled neuron was counted in the lateral vestibular nucleus for axonal regeneration. From 4-8 weeks, the functional recovery of the young and mature age rats was significantly increased in comparison to the old age group. At 8 weeks, young and mature animals achieved a plateau score of (mean ± SD), 17 ± 1.47 and 16.8 ± 0.70 respectively, and the old rats reached an average score of 13.8±1.63 (P<0.05). The mean number of labeled neurons in the vestibular nucleus in the young group (mean ± SD): 32.05 ± 1.03 increase significantly compared to the older age group 5.01 ± 1.31 (P<0.05). Current findings suggest that axonal repair and functional improvement decrease in aged animals after partial spinal cord injury. Thus, the aging process may affect the regenerative capacity of the injured central nervous system, and axonal regeneration is age dependent.

  15. Age-associated changes in the level of physical activity in elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Daisuke; Nishida, Yuusuke; Fujita, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify how light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity physical activity in older adults changes with age, subdividing physical activity according to intensity levels, by using an accelerometer. [Subjects] Older adults living independently in the community were included (n = 106, age: 65–85 years). [Methods] A triaxial accelerometer was used to measure the amount of light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity physical activity (1–2.9, 3–5.9, and ≥6 metabolic equivalents, respectively) and inactive time over 7 days. Light- and moderate-intensity physical activity levels were further subdivided into 1–1.9, 2–2.9, 3–3.9, and 4–5.9 metabolic equivalents, respectively. [Results] The amount of moderate-intensity physical activity at both sub-levels showed significant inverse correlations with age (r = −0.34, −0.33, respectively), but this was not seen with other levels. Both levels of moderate-intensity physical activity were independently predicted by age using multiple regression analysis adjusted for gender and body mass index. [Conclusion] These results suggest that understanding the reduction in moderate-intensity physical activity with age in older adults, subdivided according to intensity level, could be a useful index to increase the amount of higher intensity physical activity in stages, considering individual health conditions. PMID:26834332

  16. An Update on Methods for Revascularization and Expansion of the TASC Lesion Classification to Include Below-the-Knee Arteries: A Supplement to the Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC II)

    PubMed Central

    Jaff, *Michael R.; White, Christopher J.; Hiatt, William R.; Fowkes, Gerry R.; Dormandy, John; Razavi, Mahmood; Reekers, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) guidelines were last updated in 2007 (TASC II) and represented the collaboration of international vascular specialties involved in the management of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Since the publication of TASC II, there have been innovations in endovascular revascularization strategies for patients with PAD. The intent of this publication is to provide a complete anatomic lower limb TASC lesion classification, including the infrapopliteal segment, and an updated literature review of new endovascular techniques and practice patterns employed by vascular specialists today. PMID:26730266

  17. Late-onset intermittent fasting dietary restriction as a potential intervention to retard age-associated brain function impairments in male rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rumani; Lakhanpal, Dinesh; Kumar, Sushil; Sharma, Sandeep; Kataria, Hardeep; Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-08-01

    Lifelong dietary restriction (DR) is known to have many potential beneficial effects on brain function as well as delaying the onset of neurological diseases. In the present investigation, the effect of late-onset short-term intermittent fasting dietary restriction (IF-DR) regimen was studied on motor coordination and cognitive ability of ageing male rats. These animals were further used to estimate protein carbonyl content and mitochondrial complex I-IV activity in different regions of brain and peripheral organs, and the degree of age-related impairment and reversion by late-onset short-term IF-DR was compared with their levels in 3-month-old young rats. The results of improvement in motor coordination by rotarod test and cognitive skills by Morris water maze in IF-DR rats were found to be positively correlated with the decline in the oxidative molecular damage to proteins and enhanced mitochondrial complex IV activity in different regions of ageing brain as well as peripheral organs. The work was further extended to study the expression of synaptic plasticity-related proteins, such as synaptophysin, calcineurin and CaM kinase II to explore the molecular basis of IF-DR regimen to improve cognitive function. These results suggest that even late-onset short-term IF-DR regimen have the potential to retard age-associated detrimental effects, such as cognitive and motor performance as well as oxidative molecular damage to proteins.

  18. Age-associated Epstein–Barr virus-specific T cell responses in seropositive healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas Sierra, D; Vélez Colmenares, G; Orfao de Matos, A; Fiorentino Gómez, S; Quijano Gómez, S M

    2014-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is present in 95% of the world's adult population. The immune response participates in immune vigilance and persistent infection control, and this condition is maintained by both a good quality (functionality) and quantity of specific T cells throughout life. In the present study, we evaluated EBV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte responses in seropositive healthy individuals younger and older than 50 years of age. The assessment comprised the frequency, phenotype, functionality and clonotypic distribution of T lymphocytes. We found that in both age groups a similar EBV-specific T cell response was found, with overlapping numbers of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α+ T lymphocytes (CD4+ and CD8+) within the memory and effector cell compartments, in addition to monofunctional and multi-functional T cells producing interleukin (IL)-2 and/or interferon (IFN)-γ. However, individuals aged more than 50 years showed significantly higher frequencies of IL-2-producing CD4+ T lymphocytes in association with greater production of soluble IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 than subjects younger than 50 years. A polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)-variable beta region (Vβ) repertoire exists in both age groups under basal conditions and in response to EBV; the major TCR families found in TNF-α+/CD4+ T lymphocytes were Vβ1, Vβ2, Vβ17 and Vβ22 in both age groups, and the major TCR family in TNF-α+/CD8+ T cells was Vβ13·1 for individuals younger than 50 years and Vβ9 for individuals aged more than 50 years. Our findings suggest that the EBV-specific T cell response (using a polyclonal stimulation model) is distributed throughout several T cell differentiation compartments in an age-independent manner and includes both monofunctional and multi-functional T lymphocytes. PMID:24666437

  19. Using Modified Sample Entropy to Characterize Aging-Associated Microvascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous microvascular function can be assessed by skin blood flow (SBF) response to thermal stimuli. Usually, the activities of the regulatory mechanisms are quantified by means of spectral analysis of the response. However, spectral measures are unable to characterize the nonlinear dynamics of SBF signal. Sample entropy (SampEn) is a commonly used nonlinear measure of the degree of regularity of time series. However, SampEn value depends on the relationship between the frequency of the studied dynamics and sampling rate. Hence, when time series data are oversampled, SampEn may give misleading results. We modified the definition of SampEn by including a lag between successive data points of the vectors to be compared to address the oversampled issue. The lag could be chosen as the first minimum of the auto mutual information function of the time series. We tested the performance of modified SampEn using simulated signals and SBF data in the young and old groups. The results indicated that modified SampEn yields consistent results for different sampling rates in simulated data, but SampEn cannot. Blood flow data showed a higher degree of regularity during the maximal vasodilation period as compared to the baseline in both groups and a higher degree of regularity in the older group as compared to the young group. Furthermore, our results showed that during the second peak the more regular behavior of blood flow oscillations (BFO) is mainly attributed to enhanced cardiac oscillations. This study suggests that the modified SampEn approach may be useful for assessing microvascular function. PMID:27148065

  20. Chinese herbal medicine for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Age Associated Memory Impairment: a review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    May, Brian H; Yang, Angela W H; Zhang, Anthony L; Owens, Michael D; Bennett, Louise; Head, Richard; Cobiac, Lynne; Li, Chun Guang; Hugel, Helmut; Story, David F; Xue, Charlie C L

    2009-04-01

    This review assesses the effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Age Associated Memory Impairment (AAMI). Electronic searches of English and Chinese databases and hand searches of Chinese journal holdings were conducted. Randomised controlled trials comparing orally administered CHM with placebo, no intervention or other therapy were considered. Ginkgo biloba was excluded. Ten trials met inclusion criteria. Eight different CHM were investigated. Methodological quality was assessed using the Jadad scale and five studies scored three or above. Two studies compared CHM with placebo and eight with another intervention. This review found an overall benefit on some outcome measures for the eight CHMs involved in the 10 RCTs but methodological and data reporting issues were evident. Meta-analysis of three studies found the effects of the CHMs were at least equivalent to piracetam on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. No severe adverse events were reported.

  1. Stem cell transplantation improves aging-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ikehara, Susumu; Li, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process of damage accumulation, and has been viewed as experimentally and medically intractable. The number of patients with age-associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), osteoporosis, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, atherosclerosis, and cancer has increased recently. Aging-related diseases are related to a deficiency of the immune system, which results from an aged thymus and bone marrow cells. Intra bone marrow-bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) is a useful method to treat intractable diseases. This review summarizes findings that IBM-BMT can improve and treat aging-related diseases, including T2DM, osteoporosis and AD, in animal models. PMID:25364723

  2. Metformin against TGFβ-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT): from cancer stem cells to aging-associated fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cufí, Silvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A

    2010-11-15

    Transforming Growth Factor-b (TGFb) is a major driving force of the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal (EMT) genetic program, which becomes overactive in the pathophysiology of many age-related human diseases.  TGFb-driven EMT is sufficient to generate migrating cancer stem cells by directly linking the acquisition of cellular motility with the maintenance of tumor-initiating (stemness) capacity.  Chronic diseases exhibiting excessive fibrosis can be caused by repeated and sustained infliction of TGFb-driven EMT, which increases collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis.  Pharmacological prevention and/or reversal of TGFb-induced EMT may therefore have important clinical applications in the management of cancer metastasis as well as in the prevention and/or treatment of end-state organ failures.  Earlier studies from our group have revealed that clinically-relevant concentrations of the biguanide derivative metformin, the most widely used oral agent to lower blood glucose concentration in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, notably decreased both the self-renewal and the proliferation of trastuzumab-refractory breast cancer stem cell populations.  Given that: a.) tumor-initiating cancer stem cells display a significant enrichment in the expression of basal/mesenchymal or myoepithelial markers, including an increased secretion of TGFb; b.) metformin treatment impedes the ontogeny of generating the stem cell phenotype by transcriptionally repressing key drivers of the EMT genetic program (e.g. ZEB1, TWIST1, SNAIL2 [Slug], TGFbs), we recently hypothesized that prevention of TGFb-induced EMT might represent a common molecular mechanism underlying the anti-cancer stem cells and anti-fibrotic actions of metformin.  Remarkably, metformin exposure not only impedes TGFb-promoted loss of the epithelial marker E-cadherin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells but it prevents further TGF-induced cell scattering and accumulation of the mesenchymal marker vimentin in

  3. Age associated low mitochondrial biogenesis may be explained by lack of response of PGC-1α to exercise training.

    PubMed

    Derbré, Frederic; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Martinez-Bello, Vladimir Essau; Tresguerres, Jesus A F; Fuentes, Teresa; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette; Monsalve, Maria; Viña, Jose

    2012-06-01

    Low mitochondriogenesis is critical to explain loss of muscle function in aging and in the development of frailty. The aim of this work was to explain the mechanism by which mitochondriogenesis is decreased in aging and to determine to which extent it may be prevented by exercise training. We used aged rats and compared them with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α deleted mice (PGC-1α KO). PGC-1α KO mice showed a significant decrease in the mitochondriogenic pathway in muscle. In aged rats, we found a loss of exercise-induced expression of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), and of cytochrome C. Thus muscle mitochondriogenesis, which is activated by exercise training in young animals, is not in aged or PGC-1α KO ones. Other stimuli to increase PGC-1α synthesis apart from exercise training, namely cold induction or thyroid hormone treatment, were effective in young rats but not in aged ones. To sum up, the low mitochondrial biogenesis associated with aging may be due to the lack of response of PGC-1α to different stimuli. Aged rats behave as PGC-1α KO mice. Results reported here highlight the role of PGC-1α in the loss of mitochondriogenesis associated with aging and point to this important transcriptional coactivator as a target for pharmacological interventions to prevent age-associated sarcopenia.

  4. Mass spectrometry identification of age-associated proteins from the malaria mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Sikulu, Maggy T; Monkman, James; Dave, Keyur A; Hastie, Marcus L; Dale, Patricia E; Kitching, Roger L; Killeen, Gerry F; Kay, Brian H; Gorman, Jeffry J; Hugo, Leon E

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated proteomic changes occurring in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi during adult mosquito aging. These changes were evaluated using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and the identities of aging related proteins were determined using capillary high-pressure liquid chromatography (capHPLC) coupled with a linear ion-trap (LTQ)-Orbitrap XL hybrid mass spectrometry (MS). Here, we have described the techniques used to determine age associated proteomic changes occurring in heads and thoraces across three age groups; 1, 9 and 17 d old A. gambiae and 4 age groups; 1, 9, 17 and 34 d old A. stephensi. We have provided normalised spot volume raw data for all protein spots that were visible on 2D-DIGE images for both species and processed Orbitrap mass spectrometry data. For public access, mass spectrometry raw data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002153. A detailed description of this study has been described elsewhere [1].

  5. Deficiency and supplementation of PUFA in the diet have similar effects on the age-associated changes in rat-plasma cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Sara; Cavallini, Gabriella; Donati, Alessio; Metelli, Maria Rita; Tamburini, Ilaria; Pietrini, Pietro; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-12-01

    Levels of plasma cholesterol, particularly LDL cholesterol, increase with increasing age in humans and rodents. Feeding a fish oil-rich diet may exert hypocholesterolemic effects. The aim of this work was to examine the effects of a life-long administration of a PUFA-enriched diet and of a PUFA-deficient diet in male Sprague-Dawley rats on the age-associated increases in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Diet had small effects on body-weight, and had dramatic effects on liver phospholipids-fatty acids. Surprisingly, both diets counteracted the age-associated changes in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides similarly and benefits were already visible in adult rats.

  6. Deficiency of Prdm13, a dorsomedial hypothalamus-enriched gene, mimics age-associated changes in sleep quality and adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Akiko; Brace, Cynthia S; Rensing, Nick; Imai, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) controls a number of essential physiological responses. We have demonstrated that the DMH plays an important role in the regulation of mammalian aging and longevity. To further dissect the molecular basis of the DMH function, we conducted microarray-based gene expression profiling with total RNA from laser-microdissected hypothalamic nuclei and tried to find the genes highly and selectively expressed in the DMH. We found neuropeptide VF precursor (Npvf),PR domain containing 13 (Prdm13), and SK1 family transcriptional corepressor (Skor1) as DMH-enriched genes. Particularly, Prdm13, a member of the Prdm family of transcription regulators, was specifically expressed in the compact region of the DMH (DMC), where Nk2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2-1) is predominantly expressed. The expression of Prdm13 in the hypothalamus increased under diet restriction, whereas it decreased during aging. Prdm13 expression also showed diurnal oscillation and was significantly upregulated in the DMH of long-lived BRASTO mice. The transcriptional activity of the Prdm13 promoter was upregulated by Nkx2-1, and knockdown of Nkx2-1 suppressed Prdm13 expression in primary hypothalamic neurons. Interestingly, DMH-specific Prdm13-knockdown mice showed significantly reduced wake time during the dark period and decreased sleep quality, which was defined by the quantity of electroencephalogram delta activity during NREM sleep. DMH-specific Prdm13-knockdown mice also exhibited progressive increases in body weight and adiposity. Our findings indicate that Prdm13/Nkx2-1-mediated signaling in the DMC declines with advanced age, leading to decreased sleep quality and increased adiposity, which mimic age-associated pathophysiology, and provides a potential link to DMH-mediated aging and longevity control in mammals. PMID:25546159

  7. Age-associated changes in binding of human B lymphocytes to a VH3-restricted unconventional bacterial antigen.

    PubMed

    Silverman, G J; Sasano, M; Wormsley, S B

    1993-11-15

    We have recently demonstrated that there is a site on Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) that interacts with B cell Ig receptors in a manner comparable with known T cell superantigens, because this binding specificity is restricted to Fab with VH3 H chains and most VH3 Ig bind SpA. In the present studies, SpA was used as a phenotypic marker for VH3 expression by human lymphoid cells. As expected, this Fab-mediated binding specificity was completely inhibited by certain VH3 antibodies but not by antibodies from other VH families. In multiparameter flow cytometric analyses, this binding activity was demonstrated to be highly prevalent among B cells (14 to 54%), and was more common among IgM-bearing B cells compared with IgG-bearing B cells. In all studies, Fab-mediated binding of SpA was uniformly expressed by a greater proportion of CD5-positive B cells than CD5-negative B cells. The proportion of B lymphocytes with this VH3-restricted binding capacity was found to undergo age-associated changes, because a large proportion of the peripheral B cells of neonates (mean +/- SD, 46.0 +/- 2.9%) bind this site, but two 10-mo-old subjects and older children had significantly lower binding levels (29.0 +/- 3.5%) that were the same as binding levels by adult peripheral B lymphocytes (30.2 +/- 3.3%). In immunohistochemical studies, tonsilar B cells that bind this site on SpA were shown to be common in mantle zones and germinal centers of secondary follicles. We speculate that Fab-mediated SpA binding represents a fundamental and primitive binding capacity that is part of the human preimmune repertoire, and we discuss the implications for the observed age-dependent shift in Fab-mediated binding of SpA by peripheral blood B cells.

  8. Age-associated changes in integral cholesterol and cholesterol sulfate concentrations in human scalp hair and finger nail clippings.

    PubMed

    Brosche, T; Dressler, S; Platt, D

    2001-04-01

    In contrast to surface lipids originating from the sebaceous glands, membrane-forming integral lipids occur in keratinized tissues of skin, and skin appendages like fingernail plates or scalp hair. After removal of lipids of sebaceous origin by exhaustive solvent extraction, lyophilizing and hydrolyzing fingernail plate and scalp hair samples, fractions of integral cholesterol (CH) and cholesterol sulfate (CS) were quantified using gas chromatography. We studied these bound lipids and the serum lipids of 70 healthy subjects, aged 20.1 to 92.0 years. We observed higher amounts of CS in hair clippings of men than of women (775+/-241 vs 662+/-239 nmol/g hair, respectively). The highest amounts of CS were found in men with serum LDL-CH > 4.14 mmol/L; this subgroup also showed the highest CH values in fingernail clippings (2293+/-621 nmol/g nail). However, analysis of integral lipids of hair and fingernail plate clippings had little significance in detecting hypercholesterolemia in normal persons. An increase in integral CH levels in fingernail clippings with donor age was noted, independently of variations in serum CH or LDL-CH. This correlation proved to be significant in men (R=0.43), but not in women (R=0.38). In contrast, in women but not in men we found donor age correlated with internal CH of hair samples (R=0.43) and with CS of nail plates (R=-0.59), independently of serum CH or LDL-CH variations. This age-dependent decrease in CS levels might explain the previously observed higher incidence of brittle nails in women. Obviously, the metabolism of internal lipids CH and CS in fingernail and scalp hair differs between genders, and shows age-associated changes.

  9. Loss of Vhl in cartilage accelerated the progression of age-associated and surgically induced murine osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Tujun; Xie, Yangli; Yi, Lingxian; Huang, Junlan; Luo, Fengtao; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Liang; Liu, Chongyang; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of Vhl in maintaining the integrity of articular cartilage and in the development of experimental osteoarthritis (OA). Method Histology of articular cartilage and subchondral bone in both Vhl cKO and WT mice were analyzed by histopathology and micro-CT. Articular cartilage destruction and proteoglycan loss were scored in aged (12-month-old) mice as well as in mice with surgically induced OA. Apoptosis of cartilage in age-related and surgically induced OA was detected with TUNNEL assay. Expressions of VHL, Fas, LC-3, HIF-1α, HIF-2α, p-mTOR and MMP-13 in the knee joints were analyzed by immunostaining. Results No gross differences in cartilage were observed between Vhl cKO and WT mice at age 4 months. However, Vhl cKO mice displayed accelerated age-associated spontaneous OA and surgically induced OA. Cartilage destruction and proteoglycan loss were observed in the absence of Vhl. In addition, inactivation of Vhl resulted in up-regulation of HIF-2α and increased chondrocyte apoptosis and decreased expression of autophagy during OA development. Immunohistochemical staining also showed that Vhl deficiency led to increased expression of Fas, p-mTOR and MMP-13, and those genes were associated with cell apoptosis, autophagy and cartilage matrix breakdown, respectively. Conclusion Loss of Vhl in adult articular cartilage is associated with earlier dysregulation of cartilage homeostasis, characterized by an increased chondrocyte apoptosis, compromised chondrocyte autophagy, and an accelerated age-related and surgery-induced OA development. These results highlight the novel role of Vhl in maintaining joint homeostasis and OA development. PMID:24999110

  10. Increased superoxide in vivo accelerates age-associated muscle atrophy through mitochondrial dysfunction and neuromuscular junction degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Youngmok C.; Lustgarten, Michael S.; Liu, Yuhong; Muller, Florian L.; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Liang, Hanyu; Salmon, Adam B.; Brooks, Susan V.; Larkin, Lisa; Hayworth, Christopher R.; Richardson, Arlan; Van Remmen, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology of age-related muscle loss (sarcopenia). However, the underlying mechanisms by which oxidative stress contributes to sarcopenia have not been thoroughly investigated. To directly examine the role of chronic oxidative stress in vivo, we used a mouse model that lacks the antioxidant enzyme CuZnSOD (Sod1). Sod1−/− mice are characterized by high levels of oxidative damage and an acceleration of sarcopenia. In the present study, we demonstrate that muscle atrophy in Sod1−/− mice is accompanied by a progressive decline in mitochondrial bioenergetic function and an elevation of mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species. In addition, Sod1−/− muscle exhibits a more rapid induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and loss of myonuclei. Furthermore, aged Sod1−/− mice show a striking increase in muscle mitochondrial content near the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Despite the increase in content, the function of mitochondria is significantly impaired, with increased denervated NMJs and fragmentation of acetylcholine receptors. As a consequence, contractile force in aged Sod1−/− muscles is greatly diminished. Collectively, we show that Sod1−/− mice display characteristics of normal aging muscle in an accelerated manner and propose that the superoxide-induced NMJ degeneration and mitochondrial dysfunction are potential mechanisms of sarcopenia.—Jang, Y. C., Lustgarten, M. S., Liu, Y., Muller, F. L., Bhattacharya, A., Liang, H., Salmon, A. B., Brooks, S. V., Larkin, L., Hayworth, C. R., Richardson, A., and Van Remmen, H. Increased superoxide in vivo accelerates age-associated muscle atrophy through mitochondrial dysfunction and neuromuscular junction degeneration. PMID:20040516

  11. In vivo and in vitro analysis of age-associated changes and somatic cellular senescence in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Berkenkamp, Birgit; Susnik, Nathan; Baisantry, Arpita; Kuznetsova, Inna; Jacobi, Christoph; Sörensen-Zender, Inga; Broecker, Verena; Haller, Hermann; Melk, Anette; Schmitt, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a major clinical problem and advanced age is associated with ineffective renal regeneration and poor functional outcome. Data from kidney injury models suggest that a loss of tubular epithelial proliferation contributes to a decrease in renal repair capacity with aging, but aging can also lead to a higher severity of inflammation and damage which may influence repair. In this study we tested intrinsic age-dependent changes in tubular epithelial proliferation in young and old mice, by injecting low-dose lead acetate as a non-injurious mitogen. In parallel, we explored in vitro techniques of studying cellular senescence in primary tubular epithelial cells (PTEC). Lead acetate induced tubular epithelial proliferation at a significantly higher rate in young as compared to old mice. Old kidneys showed significantly more senescence as demonstrated by increased p16 (INK4a), senescence associated β-galactosidase, and γH2AX(+)/Ki-67(-) cells. This was paralleled in old kidneys by a higher number of Cyclin D1 positive tubular cells. This finding was corroborated by a positive correlation between Cyclin D1 positivity and age in human renal biopsies. When tubular cells were isolated from mouse kidneys they rapidly lost their age-associated differences under culture conditions. However, senescence was readily induced in PTEC by γ-irradiation representing a future model for study of cellular senescence in the renal epithelium. Together, our data indicate that the tubular epithelium of aged kidney has an intrinsically reduced proliferative capacity probably due to a higher load of senescent cells. Moreover, stress induced models of cellular senescence are preferable for study of the renal epithelium in vitro. Finally, the positive correlation of Cyclin D1 with age and cellular senescence in PTEC needs further evaluation as to a functional role of renal epithelial aging.

  12. Aging-associated oxidative stress leads to decrease in IAS tone via RhoA/ROCK downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jagmohan; Kumar, Sumit; Krishna, Chadalavada Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Internal anal sphincter (IAS) tone plays an important role in rectoanal incontinence (RI). IAS tone may be compromised during aging, leading to RI in certain patients. We examined the influence of oxidative stress in the aging-associated decrease in IAS tone (AADI). Using adult (4–6 mo old) and aging (24–30 mo old) rats, we determined the effect of oxidative stress on IAS tone and the regulatory RhoA/ROCK signal transduction cascade. We determined the effect of the oxidative stress inducer LY83583, which produces superoxide anions (O2·−), on basal and stimulated IAS tone before and after treatment of intact smooth muscle strips and smooth muscle cells with the O2·− scavenger SOD. Our data showed that AADI was associated with a decrease in RhoA/ROCK expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Oxidative stress with a LY83583-mediated decrease in IAS tone and relaxation of IAS smooth muscle cells was associated with a decrease in RhoA/ROCK signal transduction, which was reversible by SOD. In addition, LY83583 caused a significant decrease in IAS contraction produced by the RhoA activator and a known RhoA/ROCK agonist, U46619, that was also reversible by SOD. The inhibitory effects of LY83583 and the ROCK inhibitor Y27632 on the U46619-induced increase in IAS tone were similar. We conclude that an increase in oxidative stress plays an important role in AADI in the elderly and may be one of the underlying mechanisms of RI in certain aging patients. PMID:24742984

  13. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  14. Swedish children with celiac disease comply well with a gluten-free diet, and most include oats without reporting any adverse effects: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Tapsas, Dimitrios; Fälth-Magnusson, Karin; Högberg, Lotta; Hammersjö, Jan-Åke; Hollén, Elisabet

    2014-05-01

    The only known treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet (GFD), which initially meant abstention from wheat, rye, barley, and oats. Recently, oats free from contamination with wheat have been accepted in the GFD. Yet, reports indicate that all celiac disease patients may not tolerate oats. We hypothesized that celiac children comply well with a GFD and that most have included oats in their diet. A food questionnaire was used to check our patients; 316 questionnaires were returned. Mean time on the GFD was 6.9 years, and 96.8% of the children reported that they were trying to keep a strict GFD. However, accidental transgressions occurred in 263 children (83.2%). In 2 of 3 cases, mistakes took place when the patients were not at home. Symptoms after incidental gluten intake were experienced by 162 (61.6%) patients, mostly (87.5%) from the gastrointestinal tract. Small amounts of gluten (<4 g) caused symptoms in 38% of the cases, and 68% reported symptoms during the first 3 hours after gluten consumption. Oats were included in the diet of 89.4% of the children for a mean of 3.4 years. Most (81.9%) ate purified oats, and 45.3% consumed oats less than once a week. Among those who did not consume oats, only 5.9% refrained because of symptoms. General compliance with the GFD was good. Only the duration of the GFD appeared to influence adherence to the diet. Most patients did not report adverse effects after long-term consumption of oats.

  15. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  16. Including Jews in Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langman, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the lack of attention to Jews as an ethnic minority within multiculturalism both by Jews and non-Jews; why Jews and Jewish issues need to be included; and addresses some of the issues involved in the ethical treatment of Jewish clients. (Author)

  17. Nutritional therapies (including fosteum).

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W

    2009-03-01

    Nutrition is important in promoting bone health and in managing an individual with low bone mass or osteoporosis. In adult women and men, known losses of bone mass and microarchitecture occur, and nutrition can help minimize these losses. In every patient, a healthy diet with adequate protein, fruits, vegetables, calcium, and vitamin D is required to maintain bone health. Recent reports on nutritional remedies for osteoporosis have highlighted the importance of calcium in youth and continued importance in conjunction with vitamin D as the population ages. It is likely that a calcium intake of 1200 mg/d is ideal, and there are some concerns about excessive calcium intakes. However, vitamin D intake needs to be increased in most populations. The ability of soy products, particularly genistein aglycone, to provide skeletal benefit has been recently studied, including some data that support a new medical food marketed as Fosteum (Primus Pharmaceuticals, Scottsdale, AZ).

  18. Effect of Procysteine on aging-associated changes in hepatic GSH and SMase: evidence for transcriptional regulation of smpd3[S

    PubMed Central

    Deevska, Gergana; Sunkara, Manjula; Karakashian, Claudia; Peppers, Benjamin; Morris, Andrew J.; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana N.

    2014-01-01

    In hepatocytes, aging-associated decline in GSH has been linked to activation of neutral SMase (nSMase), accumulation of bioactive ceramide, and inflammation. In this study, we seek to test whether dietary supplementation with the cysteine precursor, L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), would correct the aging-associated differences in hepatic GSH, nSMase, and ceramide. Young and aged mice were placed on a diet that either lacked sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs) or had 0.5% OTC for 4 weeks. Mice fed standard chow were used as an additional control. SAA-deficient mice exhibited significant aging-associated differences in hepatic GSH, GSH/GSSG, ceramide, and nSMase. C24:1 ceramide, the major ceramide species in liver, was affected the most by aging, followed by the less abundant C16:0 ceramide. OTC supplementation eliminated the aging-associated differences in hepatic GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio. Surprisingly, however, instead of decreasing, the nSMase activity and ceramide increased in the OTC-fed mice irrespective of their age. These effects were due to elevated nSMase-2 mRNA and protein and appeared to be direct. Similar increases were seen in HepG2 cells following treatment with OTC. The OTC-fed aged mice also exhibited hepatic steatosis and triacylglyceride accumulation. These results suggest that OTC is a potent stimulant of nSMase-2 expression and that there may be unanticipated complications of OTC supplementation. PMID:25047167

  19. Sex-specific age associations of ankle proprioception test performance in older adults: results from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Uk; Simonsick, Eleanor; Deshpande, Nandini; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: this study was aimed to test the hypothesis that ankle proprioception assessed by custom-designed proprioception testing equipment changes with ageing in men and women. Methods: ankle proprioception was assessed in 289 participants (131 women) of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA); the participants aged 51–95 years and were blinded during testing. Results: the average minimum perceived ankle rotation was 1.11° (SE = 0.07) in women and 1.00° (SE = 0.06) in men, and it increased with ageing in both sexes (P < 0.001, for both). Ankle tracking performance, which is the ability to closely follow with the left ankle, a rotational movement induced on the right ankle by a torque motor, declines with ageing in both men and women (P = 0.018 and P = 0.011, respectively). Conclusions: a simple, standardised method for assessing ankle proprioception was introduced in this study using a customized test instrument, software and test protocol. Age-associated reduction in ankle proprioception was confirmed from two subtests of threshold and tracking separately for women and men. Findings in this study prompt future studies to determine whether these age-associated differences in the threshold for passive motion detection and movement tracking are evident in longitudinal study and how these specific deficits in ankle proprioception are related to age-associated chronic conditions such as knee or hip osteoarthritis and type II diabetes and affect daily activities such as gait. PMID:25637144

  20. Refraction, including prisms.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, R L

    1991-02-01

    The literature in the past year on refraction is replete with several isolated but very important topics that have been of interest to strabismologists and refractionists for many decades. The refractive changes in scleral buckling procedures include an increase in axial length as well as an increase in myopia, as would be expected. Tinted lenses in dyslexia show little positive effect in the nonasthmatic patients in one study. The use of spectacles or bifocals as a way to control increase in myopia is refuted in another report. It has been shown that in accommodative esotropia not all patients will be able to escape the use of bifocals in the teenage years, even though surgery might be performed. The hope that disposable contact lenses would cut down on the instance of giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis has been given some credence, and the conventional theory that sclerosis alone is the cause of presbyopia is attacked. Also, gas permeable bifocal contact lenses are reviewed and the difficulties of correcting presbyopia by this method outlined. The practice of giving an aphakic less bifocal addition instead of a nonaphakic, based on the presumption of increased effective power, is challenged. In the review of prisms, the majority of articles concern prism adaption. The most significant report is that of the Prism Adaptation Study Research Group (Arch Ophthalmol 1990, 108:1248-1256), showing that acquired esotropia in particular has an increased incidence of stable and full corrections surgically in the prism adaptation group versus the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Age-associated and cell-type-specific neurofibrillary pathology in transgenic mice expressing the human midsized neurofilament subunit.

    PubMed

    Vickers, J C; Morrison, J H; Friedrich, V L; Elder, G A; Perl, D P; Katz, R N; Lazzarini, R A

    1994-09-01

    Alterations in neurofilaments are a common occurrence in neurons of the human nervous system during aging and diseases associated with aging. Such pathologic changes may be attributed to species-specific properties of human neurofilaments as well as cell-type-specific regulation of this element of the cytoskeleton. The development of transgenic animals containing human neurofilament subunits offers an opportunity to study the effects of aging and other experimental conditions on the human-specific form of these proteins in a rodent model. The present study shows that mice from the transgenic line NF(M)27, which express the human midsized neurofilament subunit at low levels (2-25% of the endogenous NF-M), develop neurofilamentous accumulations in specific subgroups of neurons that are age dependent, affecting 78% of transgenic mice over 12 months of age. Similar accumulations do not occur in age-matched, wild-type littermates or in 3-month-old transgenic mice. In 12-month-old transgenic mice, somatic neurofilament accumulations resembling neurofibrillary tangles were present predominantly in layers III and V of the neocortex, as well as in select subpopulations of subcortical neurons. Intraperikaryal, spherical neurofilamentous accumulations were particularly abundant in cell bodies in layer II of the neocortex, and neurofilament-containing distentions of Purkinje cell proximal axons occurred in the cerebellum. These pathological accumulations contained mouse as well as human NF subunits, but could be distinguished by their content of phosphorylation-dependent NF epitopes. These cytoskeletal alterations closely resemble the cell-type-specific alterations in neurofilaments that occur during normal human aging and in diseases associated with aging, indicating that these transgenic animals may serve as models of some aspects of the pathologic features of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Berry fruit can improve age-associated neuronal and cognitive deficits: from the laboratory to the clinic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research has demonstrated, in both human and animals, that cognitive functioning decreases with age, to include deficits in processing speed, executive function, memory, and spatial learning. The cause of these functional declines is not entirely understood; however, neuronal losses and the associat...

  3. Reversal of age-associated decline in immune response to Pnu-imune vaccine by supplementation with the steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone.

    PubMed Central

    Garg, M; Bondada, S

    1993-01-01

    Recently, we reported that murine antibody responses to the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide (Pnu-Imune) vaccine declined with age. Here we present data to support the concept that age-associated immune defects are not only due to intrinsic defects in immune cells but are also due to extrinsic factors emanating from the neuroendocrine system. We found that supplementation with dehydroepiandrosterone, a steroid hormone known to be reduced in the aged, corrects the immune deficiency of aged mice and significantly enhanced their splenic immune responses to the Pnu-Imune vaccine. PMID:8478117

  4. HSF1-controlled and age-associated chaperone capacity in neurons and muscle cells of C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Kern, Andreas; Ackermann, Bianca; Clement, Albrecht M; Duerk, Heike; Behl, Christian

    2010-01-05

    Protein stability under changing conditions is of vital importance for the cell and under the control of a fine-tuned network of molecular chaperones. Aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases are directly associated with enhanced protein instability. Employing C. elegans expressing GFP-tagged luciferase as a reporter for evaluation of protein stability we show that the chaperoning strategy of body wall muscle cells and neurons is significantly different and that both are differently affected by aging. Muscle cells of young worms are largely resistant to heat stress, which is directly mediated by the stress response controlled through Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1. During recovery following heat stress the ability to refold misfolded proteins is missing. Young neurons are highly susceptible to chronic heat stress, but show a high potency to refold or disaggregate proteins during subsequent recovery. The particular proteome instability in neurons results from a delayed induction of the heat shock response. In aged neurons protein stability is increased during heat stress, whereas muscle cells show enhanced protein instability due to a deteriorated heat shock response. An efficient refolding activity is absent in both aged tissues. These results provide molecular insights into the differential protein stabilization capacity in different tissues and during aging.

  5. [Physical activity for prevention and therapy of internal diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Weisser, Burkhard; Preuss, Manuela; Predel, Hans-Georg

    2009-04-15

    There is a growing number of elderly people in Western societies. Therefore, the prevalence of age-associated diseases increases. For most of these conditions, exercise and physical activity play a major role in the prevention and therapy. However, it is well established that the level of physical activity is lowest in elderly people. Physical fitness continues to be the most important protective health factor and should be improved in the elderly population. Many exercise recommendations include only endurance programs, but strength and coordination also deliver positive therapeutic effects in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, lung diseases, neoplasms, and many other pathologic conditions including dementia. Age-specific recommendations should be included in exercise programs for health.

  6. CNS infections in patients with hematological disorders (including allogeneic stem-cell transplantation)—Guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO)

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, M.; Silling, G.; Schalk, E.; Heinz, W.; Panse, J.; Penack, O.; Christopeit, M.; Buchheidt, D.; Meyding-Lamadé, U.; Hähnel, S.; Wolf, H. H.; Ruhnke, M.; Schwartz, S.; Maschmeyer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are infrequently diagnosed in immunocompetent patients, but they do occur in a significant proportion of patients with hematological disorders. In particular, patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation carry a high risk for CNS infections of up to 15%. Fungi and Toxoplasma gondii are the predominant causative agents. The diagnosis of CNS infections is based on neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid examination and biopsy of suspicious lesions in selected patients. However, identification of CNS infections in immunocompromised patients could represent a major challenge since metabolic disturbances, side-effects of antineoplastic or immunosuppressive drugs and CNS involvement of the underlying hematological disorder may mimic symptoms of a CNS infection. The prognosis of CNS infections is generally poor in these patients, albeit the introduction of novel substances (e.g. voriconazole) has improved the outcome in distinct patient subgroups. This guideline has been developed by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) with the contribution of a panel of 14 experts certified in internal medicine, hematology/oncology, infectious diseases, intensive care, neurology and neuroradiology. Grades of recommendation and levels of evidence were categorized by using novel criteria, as recently published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. PMID:27052648

  7. CNS infections in patients with hematological disorders (including allogeneic stem-cell transplantation)-Guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO).

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Hieber, M; Silling, G; Schalk, E; Heinz, W; Panse, J; Penack, O; Christopeit, M; Buchheidt, D; Meyding-Lamadé, U; Hähnel, S; Wolf, H H; Ruhnke, M; Schwartz, S; Maschmeyer, G

    2016-07-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are infrequently diagnosed in immunocompetent patients, but they do occur in a significant proportion of patients with hematological disorders. In particular, patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation carry a high risk for CNS infections of up to 15%. Fungi and Toxoplasma gondii are the predominant causative agents. The diagnosis of CNS infections is based on neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid examination and biopsy of suspicious lesions in selected patients. However, identification of CNS infections in immunocompromised patients could represent a major challenge since metabolic disturbances, side-effects of antineoplastic or immunosuppressive drugs and CNS involvement of the underlying hematological disorder may mimic symptoms of a CNS infection. The prognosis of CNS infections is generally poor in these patients, albeit the introduction of novel substances (e.g. voriconazole) has improved the outcome in distinct patient subgroups. This guideline has been developed by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) with the contribution of a panel of 14 experts certified in internal medicine, hematology/oncology, infectious diseases, intensive care, neurology and neuroradiology. Grades of recommendation and levels of evidence were categorized by using novel criteria, as recently published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  8. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  9. Effects of age-associated regional changes in aortic stiffness on human hemodynamics revealed by computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Federica; Roccabianca, Sara; Dillon-Murphy, Desmond; Xiao, Nan; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2017-01-01

    Although considered by many as the gold standard clinical measure of arterial stiffness, carotid-to-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) averages material and geometric properties over a large portion of the central arterial tree. Given that such properties may evolve differentially as a function of region in cases of hypertension and aging, among other conditions, there is a need to evaluate the potential utility of cf-PWV as an early diagnostic of progressive vascular stiffening. In this paper, we introduce a data-driven fluid-solid-interaction computational model of the human aorta to simulate effects of aging-related changes in regional wall properties (e.g., biaxial material stiffness and wall thickness) and conduit geometry (e.g., vessel caliber, length, and tortuosity) on several metrics of arterial stiffness, including distensibility, augmented pulse pressure, and cyclic changes in stored elastic energy. Using the best available biomechanical data, our results for PWV compare well to findings reported for large population studies while rendering a higher resolution description of evolving local and global metrics of aortic stiffening. Our results reveal similar spatio-temporal trends between stiffness and its surrogate metrics, except PWV, thus indicating a complex dependency of the latter on geometry. Lastly, our analysis highlights the importance of the tethering exerted by external tissues, which was iteratively estimated until hemodynamic simulations recovered typical values of tissue properties, pulse pressure, and PWV for each age group. PMID:28253335

  10. Age-Associated Variability in Susceptibility of Swiss Webster Mice to MPV and Other Excluded Murine Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Kristina A; Smith, Peter C; Booth, Carmen J; Compton, Susan R

    2012-01-01

    Detection of mouse parvovirus (MPV) and other murine pathogens in research colonies is dependent on the transmissibility of the agents and the sensitivity of sentinels to those agents. Transmissibility is based on several agent-dependent properties including mode of transmission, infectivity, and environmental stability, whereas host susceptibility can vary according to mouse age, strain, and sex. In this study, 4-wk-old, 12-wk-old, and aged Swiss Webster female sentinel mice were compared for their ability to detect infectious agents by using a standardized health surveillance program, to determine whether sentinels should be replaced more frequently to improve the efficiency of detection of infectious agents within a murine colony. Both experimentally and naturally infected mice were used to transmit MPV and other infectious agents from index mice to sentinels. First, Swiss Webster mice were inoculated with MPV, and transmission to 4-, 12-, and 24-wk-old contact and soiled-bedding sentinels was determined. Second, mice naturally infected with 9 infectious agents were obtained from 2 local pet stores, and transmission to 4-wk-old contact sentinels and 4-, 12-, and 44-wk-old soiled-bedding sentinels was determined. For agents that were transmitted via soiled bedding (MPV, mouse hepatitis virus, murine norovirus, Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus, and pinworms), transmission did not differ in regard to the age of the sentinels. In conclusion, susceptibility to several infectious agents did not differ according to sentinel age in a health-surveillance protocol that used mice older than 12 wk. PMID:23294885

  11. [The prognostic significance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for phobic anxiety disorders, vegetative and cognitive impairments during conservative treatment including adaptol of some functional and organic diseases of nervous system].

    PubMed

    Zhivolupov, S A; Samartsev, I N; Marchenko, A A; Puliatkina, O V

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the efficacy of adaptol in the treatment of 45 patients with somatoform dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system and 30 patients with closed head injury. The condition of patients during the treatment was evaluated with clinical and neuropsychological scales. The serum level of BDNF before and after the treatment has been studied as well. Adaptol has been shown to enhance the production of BDNF, reduce significantly the intensity of anxiety, autonomic disorders and improve intellectual processes. The dose-dependent effect of the drug has been demonstrated. In conclusion, adaptol can be recommended for treatment of diseases that demand stimulation of neuroplasticity in the CNS.

  12. Soda and Cell Aging: Associations Between Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Healthy Adults From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Barbara A.; Needham, Belinda L.; Rehkopf, David H.; Adler, Nancy E.; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested whether leukocyte telomere length maintenance, which underlies healthy cellular aging, provides a link between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and the risk of cardiometabolic disease. Methods. We examined cross-sectional associations between the consumption of SSBs, diet soda, and fruit juice and telomere length in a nationally representative sample of healthy adults. The study population included 5309 US adults, aged 20 to 65 years, with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease, from the 1999 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Leukocyte telomere length was assayed from DNA specimens. Diet was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls. Associations were examined using multivariate linear regression for the outcome of log-transformed telomere length. Results. After adjustment for sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, sugar-sweetened soda consumption was associated with shorter telomeres (b = –0.010; 95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.020, −0.001; P = .04). Consumption of 100% fruit juice was marginally associated with longer telomeres (b = 0.016; 95% CI = −0.000, 0.033; P = .05). No significant associations were observed between consumption of diet sodas or noncarbonated SSBs and telomere length. Conclusions. Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened sodas might influence metabolic disease development through accelerated cell aging. PMID:25322305

  13. Age-Associated Methylation Suppresses SPRY1, Leading to a Failure of Re-quiescence and Loss of the Reserve Stem Cell Pool in Elderly Muscle.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Anne; Duddy, William J; Ouandaogo, Zamalou G; Negroni, Elisa; Mariot, Virginie; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Harmon, Brennan; Wielgosik, Aurore; Loiseau, Camille; Devaney, Joe; Dumonceaux, Julie; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Duguez, Stéphanie

    2015-11-10

    The molecular mechanisms by which aging affects stem cell number and function are poorly understood. Murine data have implicated cellular senescence in the loss of muscle stem cells with aging. Here, using human cells and by carrying out experiments within a strictly pre-senescent division count, we demonstrate an impaired capacity for stem cell self-renewal in elderly muscle. We link aging to an increased methylation of the SPRY1 gene, a known regulator of muscle stem cell quiescence. Replenishment of the reserve cell pool was modulated experimentally by demethylation or siRNA knockdown of SPRY1. We propose that suppression of SPRY1 by age-associated methylation in humans inhibits the replenishment of the muscle stem cell pool, contributing to a decreased regenerative response in old age. We further show that aging does not affect muscle stem cell senescence in humans.

  14. Age-associated expression of erythropoietin and its receptor in rat spiral ganglion neurons and its association with neuronal apoptosis and hearing alterations

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Cheng; Zhang, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the expression of erythropoietin (EPO) and the EPO receptor (EPOR) in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the inner ear of rats of various ages, and the associated neuronal apoptosis and hearing alterations. A total of 15 healthy rats (n=30 ears), were divided into three groups: i) A nominated infant group at post-natal day (PND) 12–14, ii) an adult group at PND 60 and iii) a 3-year postnatal aged group. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements were performed on all rats. EPO and EPOR expression in the inner ear was detected by immunohistochemistry. In situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays were performed to detect the apoptosis of SGNs. The average hearing thresholds of the ABR (decibels above normal hearing level) were 5.625±4.955 in the infant, 15.000±8.498 in the adult and 23.500±13.134 in the aged groups. Hearing thresholds for aged and adult rats increased significantly compared with infant rats. However, the difference in latencies of peak I was not significant (P>0.05). EPO in SGNs was detected during different developmental periods without significant alterations, but were reduced compared with Corti's organ or the stria vascularis. EPOR expression increased significantly from infant to adult stage, and this increased expression was maintained in the aged group. An age-associated increase in the apoptosis of SGNs was detected in all three groups (P=0.0347). The potential neuroprotective effects of EPO in SGNs may not be revealed during the aging process under natural conditions, and may be associated with spontaneous neuronal apoptosis and consequently, hearing diminution. However, the age-associated increase in EPOR in SGNs may exert a role in neuroprotection when necessary, for example in presbycusis. PMID:27959434

  15. Filobacterium rodentium gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of Filobacteriaceae fam. nov. within the phylum Bacteroidetes; includes a microaerobic filamentous bacterium isolated from specimens from diseased rodent respiratory tracts.

    PubMed

    Ike, Fumio; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kajita, Ayako; Matsushita, Satoru; Kokubo, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Strain SMR-CT, which was originally isolated from rats as the SMR strain, had been named 'cilia-associated respiratory bacillus' ('CAR bacillus'). 'CAR bacillus' was a Gram-stain-negative, filamentous argentophilic bacterium without flagella. SMR-CT grew at 37 °C under microaerobic conditions, showed gliding activity, hydrolysed urea and induced chronic respiratory diseases in rodents. The dominant cellular fatty acids detected were iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 47.7 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed SMR-CT and other strains of 'CAR bacillus' isolated from rodents all belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes. The nearest known type strain, with 86 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, was Chitinophaga pinensis DSM 2588T in the family Chitinophagaceae. Strain SMR-CT and closely related strains of 'CAR bacillus' rodent-isolates formed a novel family-level clade in the phylum Bacteroidetes with high bootstrap support (98-100 %). Based on these results, we propose a novel family, Filobacteriaceae fam. nov., in the order Sphingobacteriales as well as a novel genus and species, Filobacterium rodentium gen. nov., sp. nov., for strain SMR-CT. The type strain is SMR-CT ( = JCM 19453T = DSM 100392T).

  16. Refsum Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ... night blindness due to degeneration of the retina (retinitis pigmentosa). If the disease progresses, other symptoms may include ...

  17. Matricellular Proteins in Cardiac Adaptation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2015-01-01

    The term “matricellular proteins” describes a family of structurally unrelated extracellular macromolecules that, unlike structural matrix proteins, do not play a primary role in tissue architecture, but are induced following injury and modulate cell:cell and cell:matrix interactions. When released to the matrix, matricellular proteins associate with growth factors, cytokines and other bioactive effectors and bind to cell surface receptors transducing signaling cascades. Matricellular proteins are upregulated in the injured and remodeling heart and play an important role in regulation of inflammatory, reparative, fibrotic and angiogenic pathways. Thrombospondins (TSP)-1, -2 and -4, tenascin-C and –X, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), osteopontin, periostin and members of the CCN family (including CCN1 and CCN2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor) are involved in a variety of cardiac pathophysiologic conditions, including myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, aging-associated myocardial remodeling, myocarditis, diabetic cardiomyopathy and valvular disease. This review manuscript discusses the properties and characteristics of the matricellular proteins and presents our current knowledge on their role in cardiac adaptation and disease. Understanding the role of matricellular proteins in myocardial pathophysiology and identification of the functional domains responsible for their actions may lead to design of peptides with therapeutic potential for patients with heart disease. PMID:22535894

  18. Aging in the circadian system: considerations for health, disease prevention and longevity.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Erin M; Williams, Wilbur P; Kriegsfeld, Lance J

    2009-01-01

    The circadian system orchestrates internal physiology on a daily schedule to promote optimal health and maximize disease prevention. Chronic disruptions in circadian function are associated with an increase in a variety of disease states including, heart disease, ulcers and diabetes. With advanced age, the genes regulating circadian function at the cellular level become disorganized and the ability of the brain clock to entrain to local time diminishes. As a result, aged individuals exhibit a loss of temporal coordination among bodily systems, leading to deficits in homeostasis and sub-optimal functioning. Such disruptions in the circadian system appear to accelerate the aging process and contribute to senescence, with some systems being more vulnerable than others. This review explores aging-associated changes in circadian function and examines evidence linking such alterations to adverse health consequences in late life and promotion of the aging process.

  19. 16SrXII group phytoplasma strains, including 16SrXII-E (‘Candidatus Phytoplasma fragariae’) and a new 16SrXII subgroup, 16SrXII-H, are associated with diseased potatoes … in the Yunan and Inner Mongolia regions of China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is an important crop widely cultivated in China. Recently, potato diseases with characteristic symptoms of phytoplasmal infections were found in potato fields. In 2006 and 2007, samples exhibiting symptoms including rosette and upright growth, upward rolling, yellowing and purpling of leave...

  20. Age-associated increase of skin fibroblast-derived prostaglandin E2 contributes to reduced collagen levels in elderly human skin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Lei, Dan; Swindell, William R; Xia, Wei; Weng, Shinuo; Fu, Jianping; Worthen, Christal A; Okubo, Toru; Johnston, Andrew; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Production of type I collagen declines during aging, leading to skin thinning and impaired function. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a pleiotropic lipid mediator that is synthesized from arachidonic acid by the sequential actions of cyclooxygenases (COX) and PGE synthases (PTGES). PGE2 inhibits collagen production by fibroblasts in vitro. We report that PTGES1 and COX2 progressively increase with aging in sun-protected human skin. PTGES1 and COX2 mRNA was increased 3.4-fold and 2.7-fold, respectively, in the dermis of elderly (>80 years) versus young (21-30 years) individuals. Fibroblasts were the major cell source of both enzymes. PGE2 levels were increased 70% in elderly skin. Fibroblasts in aged skin display reduced spreading due to collagen fibril fragmentation. To investigate the relationship between spreading and PGE2 synthesis, fibroblasts were cultured on micropost arrays or hydrogels of varying mechanical compliance. Reduced spreading/mechanical force resulted in increased expression of both PTGES1 and COX2 and elevated levels of PGE2. Inhibition of PGE2 synthesis by diclofenac enhanced collagen production in skin organ cultures. These data suggest that reduced spreading/mechanical force of fibroblasts in aged skin elevates PGE2 production, contributing to reduced collagen production. Inhibition of PGE2 production may be therapeutically beneficial for combating age-associated collagen deficit in human skin. PMID:25905589

  1. Suppression of the aging-associated decline in physical performance by a combination of resveratrol intake and habitual exercise in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takatoshi; Haramizu, Satoshi; Ota, Noriyasu; Hase, Tadashi

    2009-08-01

    The decline in physical performance with increasing age is a crucial problem in our aging society. We examined the effects of resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound present in grapes, in combination with habitual exercise on the aging-associated decline in physical performance in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP1). The endurance capacity of SAMP1 mice undergoing an exercise regimen (SAMP1-Ex) decreased over 12 weeks whereas that of SAMP1 mice fed 0.2% (w/w) resveratrol along with exercise (SAMP1-ExRes) remained significantly higher. In the SAMP1-ExRes group, there was a significant increase in oxygen consumption and skeletal muscle mRNA levels of mitochondrial function-related enzymes. These results suggest that the intake of resveratrol, together with habitual exercise, is beneficial for suppressing the aging-related decline in physical performance and that these effects are attributable, at least in part, to improved mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle.

  2. Systemic Age-Associated DNA Hypermethylation of ELOVL2 Gene: In Vivo and In Vitro Evidences of a Cell Replication Process.

    PubMed

    Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Deelen, Joris; Pirazzini, Chiara; De Cecco, Marco; Giuliani, Cristina; Lanzarini, Catia; Ravaioli, Francesco; Marasco, Elena; van Heemst, Diana; Suchiman, H Eka D; Slieker, Roderick; Giampieri, Enrico; Recchioni, Rina; Mercheselli, Fiorella; Salvioli, Stefano; Vitale, Giovanni; Olivieri, Fabiola; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Dollé, Martijn E T; Sedivy, John M; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio; Slagboom, Pieternella E; Garagnani, Paolo

    2016-09-26

    Epigenetic remodeling is one of the major features of the aging process. We recently demonstrated that DNA methylation of ELOVL2 and FHL2 CpG islands is highly correlated with age in whole blood. Here we investigated several aspects of age-associated hypermethylation of ELOVL2 and FHL2 We showed that ELOVL2 methylation is significantly different in primary dermal fibroblast cultures from donors of different ages. Using epigenomic data from public resources, we demonstrated that most of the tissues show ELOVL2 and FHL2 hypermethylation with age. Interestingly, ELOVL2 hypermethylation was not found in tissues with very low replication rate. We demonstrated that ELOVL2 hypermethylation is associated with in vitro cell replication rather than with senescence. We confirmed intra-individual hypermethylation of ELOVL2 and FHL2 in longitudinally assessed participants from the Doetinchem Cohort Study. Finally we showed that, although the methylation of the two loci is not associated with longevity/mortality in the Leiden Longevity Study, ELOVL2 methylation is associated with cytomegalovirus status in nonagenarians, which could be informative of a higher number of replication events in a fraction of whole-blood cells. Collectively, these results indicate that ELOVL2 methylation is a marker of cell divisions occurring during human aging.

  3. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine ameliorates symptoms of premature aging associated with the deficiency of the circadian protein BMAL1

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Vykhovanets, Olena; Kondratova, Anna A.; Antoch, Marina P.

    2009-01-01

    Deficiency of the circadian clock protein BMAL1 leads to premature aging and increased levels of reactivate oxygen species in several tissues of mice. In order to investigate the role of oxidative stress in accelerated aging and development of age-related pathologies, we continuously administered the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine toBmal1-deficient mice through their entire lifespan by supplementing drinking water. We found that the life long treatment with antioxidant significantly increased average and maximal lifespan and reduced the rate of age-dependent weight loss and development of cataracts. At the same time, it had no effect on time of onset and severity of other age-related pathologies characteristic of Bmal1-/- mice, such as joint ossification, reduced hair regrowth and sarcopenia. We conclude that chronic oxidative stress affects longevity and contributes to the development of at least some age-associated pathology, although ROS-independent mechanisms may also play a role. Our bioinformatics analysis identified the presence of a conservative E box element in the promoter regions of several genes encoding major antioxidant enzymes. We speculate that BMAL1 controls antioxidant defense by regulating the expression of major antioxidant enzymes. PMID:20157581

  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    MedlinePlus

    ... Suicide and Self-Inflicted Injury Life Stages and Populations Age Groups Adolescent Health Child Health Infant Health ... Ethnicity Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population Health of Asian or Pacific Islander Population Health ...

  5. Novel regulatory factors of HSF-1 activation: facts and perspectives regarding their involvement in the age-associated attenuation of the heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Shamovsky, Ilya; Gershon, David

    2004-01-01

    An attenuated response to stress is characteristic of senescence. Heat shock (HS), a significant form of stress, is delayed and reduced in aging organisms. In the response to heat shock, heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) is activated by trimerization of its monomeric subunits. This then initiates the transcription of a series of heat shock genes (hsp genes) that encode chaperone proteins protective against heat stress. Using a promoter binding electromobility shift assay (EMSA), we have found no activation of this transcription factor in the brains of old (36 months) rats in response to exposure to 41 degrees C for 1h while strong activation is elicited in young (6 months) animals. Since brains of young and old rats had approximately the same amount of HSF-1 subunits, we anticipated the presence of auxiliary regulatory factors essential for the activation of HSF-1 and the initiation of heat shock gene transcription. We describe three novel auxiliary factors--the proteins I-HSF [HSF inhibitor] and elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1alpha) and a large non-coding RNA (HSR)--that participate in regulation and activation of HSF-1 in early stages of heat shock gene transcription. I-HSF inhibits trimerization of HSF-1 at normal temperatures. HSR and EF-1alpha form a complex with HSF-1 and facilitate its trimerization and binding to heat shock element (HSE) in the promoters of hsps. It is proposed that structural changes in any one or a combination of these factors in response to heat shock may contribute to the age-associated attenuation in the response to stress.

  6. Fifth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Fifth disease is a viral infection caused by parvovirus B19. The virus only infects humans; it's not the same parvovirus that dogs and cats can get. Fifth disease mostly affects children. Symptoms can include a low ...

  7. Legionnaires' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. You usually get it by breathing in mist from ... spread from person to person. Symptoms of Legionnaires' disease include high fever, chills, a cough, and sometimes ...

  8. Menkes Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... examining the genetic origins of Menkes disease and studying the effectiveness of early copper injections and gene-replacement therapies for treating the disease. Research also includes work on a universal newborn screening test for newborns. ​​​ ...

  9. Gaucher's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... interfere with your blood's ability to clot. An enzyme that breaks down these fatty substances doesn't ... people who have Gaucher's disease. Treatment often includes enzyme replacement therapy. An inherited disorder, Gaucher's disease is ...

  10. Telomere-driven diseases and telomere-targeting therapies.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Paula; Blasco, Maria A

    2017-04-03

    Telomeres, the protective ends of linear chromosomes, shorten throughout an individual's lifetime. Telomere shortening is proposed to be a primary molecular cause of aging. Short telomeres block the proliferative capacity of stem cells, affecting their potential to regenerate tissues, and trigger the development of age-associated diseases. Mutations in telomere maintenance genes are associated with pathologies referred to as telomere syndromes, including Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, pulmonary fibrosis, aplastic anemia, and liver fibrosis. Telomere shortening induces chromosomal instability that, in the absence of functional tumor suppressor genes, can contribute to tumorigenesis. In addition, mutations in telomere length maintenance genes and in shelterin components, the protein complex that protects telomeres, have been found to be associated with different types of cancer. These observations have encouraged the development of therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent telomere-associated diseases, namely aging-related diseases, including cancer. Here we review the molecular mechanisms underlying telomere-driven diseases and highlight recent advances in the preclinical development of telomere-targeted therapies using mouse models.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the limelight of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Beal, M. Flint; Thomas, Bobby

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with unknown etiology. It is marked by widespread neurodegeneration in the brain with profound loss of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Several theories of biochemical abnormalities have been linked to pathogenesis of PD of which mitochondrial dysfunction due to an impairment of mitochondrial complex I and subsequent oxidative stress seems to take the center stage in experimental models of PD and in postmortem tissues of sporadic forms of illness. Recent identification of specific gene mutations and their influence on mitochondrial functions has further reinforced the relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in disease pathogenesis. In both sporadic and familial forms of PD abnormal mitochondrial paradigms associated with disease include impaired functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, aging associated damage to mitochondrial DNA, impaired calcium buffering, and anomalies in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Here we provide an overview of specific mitochondrial functions affected in sporadic and familial PD that play a role in disease pathogenesis. We propose to utilize these gained insights to further streamline and focus the research to better understand mitochondria's role in disease development and exploit potential mitochondrial targets for therapeutic interventions in PD pathogenesis. PMID:19059336

  12. Class-specific regulation of anti-DNA antibody synthesis and the age-associated changes in (NZB x NZW)F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Sekigawa, I; Okada, T; Noguchi, K; Ueda, G; Hirose, S; Sato, H; Shirai, T

    1987-05-01

    Investigations of regulatory helper and suppressor T cells in the in vitro anti-DNA antibody synthesis in NZB x NZW (B/W) F1 hybrid mice were initiated by the development of an in vitro system in which G10-passed B cells from B/W F1 mice were cocultured with mitomycin C-treated T cells in the presence of Con A and either in the presence or in the absence of LPS. It was revealed that each IgG and IgM anti-DNA antibody synthesis was under the regulation of separate L3T4+ helper and Ly-2+ suppressor T cells. The function of these class-specific regulatory T cells was age-dependent. Although the helper effect of L3T4+ T cells on IgG antibody synthesis increased, the effect of L3T4+ T cells on IgM antibody production decreased in B/W F1 mice with aging. The IgG anti-DNA antibody production in the cocultures of L3T4+ T cells and B cells was suppressed by addition of Ly-2+ T cells from young but not aged B/W F1 mice, whereas the production of IgM anti-DNA antibodies was suppressed by Ly-2+ T cells from aged but not young B/W F1 mice. We also found that although IgM anti-DNA antibody-producing B cells were already present in 2-mo-old mice, B cells producing IgG antibodies under the influence of L3T4+ T cells appeared in mice at 7 mo of age. These data clearly indicate that separate class-specific regulatory T cells are involved in the production of IgM and IgG anti-DNA antibodies and that the total serum level of the antibodies is reflected by both their age-associated changes and the generation of antibody-forming B cells in B/W F1 mice.

  13. A high-salt diet further impairs age-associated declines in cognitive, behavioral, and cardiovascular functions in male Fischer brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Gaurav; Asghar, Mohammad; Patki, Gaurav; Bohat, Ritu; Jafri, Faizan; Allam, Farida; Dao, An T; Mowrey, Christopher; Alkadhi, Karim; Salim, Samina

    2013-09-01

    Aging-associated declines in cognitive, emotional, and cardiovascular function are well known. Environmental stress triggers critical changes in the brain, further compromising cardiovascular and behavioral health during aging. Excessive dietary salt intake is one such stressor. Here, we tested the effect of high salt (HS) on anxiety, learning-memory function, and blood pressure (BP) in male Fischer brown Norway (FBN) rats. Adult (A; 2 mo) and old (O; 20 mo) male rats were fed normal-salt (NS; 0.4% NaCl) or HS (8% NaCl) diets for 4 wk after being implanted with telemeter probes for conscious BP measurement. Thereafter, tests to assess anxiety-like behavior and learning-memory were conducted. The rats were then killed, and samples of plasma, urine, and brain tissue were collected. We found that systolic BP was higher in O-NS (117 ± 1.2 mm Hg) than in A-NS (105 ± 0.8 mm Hg) rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, BP was higher in O-HS (124 ± 1.4 mm Hg) than in O-NS (117 ± 1.2 mm Hg) rats (P < 0.05). Moreover, anxiety-like behavior (light-dark and open-field tests) was not different between A-NS and O-NS rats but was greater in O-HS rats than in A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). Short-term memory (radial arm water maze test) was similar in A-NS and O-NS rats but was significantly impaired in O-HS rats compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). Furthermore, oxidative stress variables (in plasma, urine, and brain) as well as corticosterone (plasma) were greater in O-HS rats when compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05). The antioxidant enzyme glyoxalase-1 expression was selectively reduced in the hippocampus and amygdala of O-HS rats compared with A-NS, O-NS, or A-HS rats (P < 0.05), whereas other antioxidant enzymes, glutathione reductase 1, manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD), and Cu/Zn SOD remained unchanged. We suggest that salt-sensitive hypertension and behavioral derangement are associated with a redox imbalance in the brain of aged FBN rats.

  14. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in osteoclastogenesis, skeletal aging and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Danielle A; Jiang, Jean X

    2015-07-01

    Osteoclasts are cells derived from bone marrow macrophages and are important in regulating bone resorption during bone homeostasis. Understanding what drives osteoclast differentiation and activity is important when studying diseases characterized by heightened bone resorption relative to formation, such as osteoporosis. In the last decade, studies have indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, are crucial components that regulate the differentiation process of osteoclasts. However, there are still many unanswered questions that remain. This review will examine the mechanisms by which ROS can be produced in osteoclasts as well as how it may affect osteoclast differentiation and activity through its actions on osteoclastogenesis signaling pathways. In addition, the contribution of ROS to the aging-associated disease of osteoporosis will be addressed and how targeting ROS may lead to the development of novel therapeutic treatment options.

  15. Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri; Terzakis, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects one million people in the United States. This article reviews the etiology and pathophysiology of PD, risk factors, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of this common disease. Implications for home care clinicians are included.

  16. Lyme Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George C.

    1991-01-01

    This overview of the public health significance of Lyme disease includes the microbiological specifics of the infectious spirochete, the entomology and ecology of the ticks which are the primary disease carrier, the clinical aspects and treatment stages, the known epidemiological patterns, and strategies for disease control and for expanded public…

  17. Treatment for pulmonary hypertension including lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Kengo F

    2011-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease characterized by sustained elevation in pulmonary arterial pressure and increased pulmonary vascular resistance, leading to right-sided ventricular failure. The untreated median survival period is 2-3 years from the time of diagnosis, with the cause of death usually being right-sided ventricular failure. However, outcomes have dramatically changed in recent years because of great advances in medical management of PH, including early diagnosis and new drugs such as prostaglandins, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. Long-term continuous intravenous prostacyclin therapy has shown excellent results in patients with PH. More recently, a molecular-targeted agent, imatinib mesylate, that acts by specifically inhibiting a certain enzyme that is characteristic of a particular cancer cell, rather than nonspecifically inhibiting and killing all rapidly dividing cells, has also been shown to have a potential role in the treatment of PH. This drug has been shown to reduce both pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in a variety of disease processes. We summarize here recent topics regarding PH and advances in treatments for PH, particularly pulmonary arterial hypertension, including lung transplantation.

  18. NAD(+), sirtuins, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent disease worldwide and there is intense interest in pharmaceutical approaches to reduce the burden of this chronic, aging-related condition. The sirtuin (SIRT) family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases have emerged as exciting targets for CVD management that can impact the cardiovascular system both directly and indirectly, the latter by modulating whole body metabolism. SIRT1-4 regulate the activities of a variety of transcription factors, coregulators, and enzymes that improve metabolic control in adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle, and pancreas, particularly during obesity and aging. SIRT1 and 7 can control myocardial development and resist stress- and aging-associated myocardial dysfunction through the deacetylation of p53 and forkhead box O1 (FoxO1). By modulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), FoxO1, and p53, and the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), SIRT1 also promotes vasodilatory and regenerative functions in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of the vascular wall. Given the array of potentially beneficial effects of SIRT activation on cardiovascular health, interest in developing specific SIRT agonists is well-substantiated. Because SIRT activity depends on cellular NAD+ availability, enzymes involved in NAD+ biosynthesis, including nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), may also be valuable pharmaceutical targets for managing CVD. Herein we review the actions of the SIRT proteins on the cardiovascular system and consider the potential of modulating SIRT activity and NAD+ availability to control CVD.

  19. Weight Loss in Adults with Down Syndrome and with Dementia in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V. P.; Metseagharun, T.; Haque, S.

    2004-01-01

    An association between weight loss and Alzheimer's disease has been established in the general population but little information is available regarding this association in people with intellectual disabilities. A 4-year longitudinal study of adults with Down syndrome with and without Alzheimer's disease was undertaken. Age-associated weight loss…

  20. Aging and endothelin: determinants of disease.

    PubMed

    Barton, Matthias

    2014-11-24

    Since the beginning of the 20th century human life expectancy has doubled to more than 80 years, and growth and aging of the world population now represent major challenges for healthcare providers, political decision makers, and societies. Cellular senescence is associated with a general, pro-inflammatory state, which represents the common denominator between aging and chronic diseases and their progression. Approaches to interfere with these changes and to allow healthy aging involve modulation of the cellular activity of modifiable molecular mediators (MMMs), such as signaling molecules and growth factors. ET-1 - the biologically predominant member of the endothelin peptide family - is an endothelial cell-derived peptide with a wide variety of developmental and physiological functions, which include embryogenesis, nociception, and natriuresis. In addition, ET-1 is a cytokine-like, multifunctional peptide with pro-inflammatory, mitogenic, and vasoconstrictor properties. If produced in excess amounts ET-1 promotes disease - mainly via activation of its ETA receptor. Because of its multiple disease-promoting functions ET-1 represents an ideal target MMM. Preclinical studies targeting either activity or production of ET-1 - utilizing ERAs, ARBs, or ACEIs, respectively - have demonstrated that partial regression of aging-associated changes in vasculature and kidney is possible. In this article I will review the molecular regulation of ET-1 and its role in the physiology of vascular homeostasis, aging, and cellular senescence. The clinical implications of activators of ET-1 overproduction, modalities for delaying or reversing aging-related cellular changes, as well as interventions to promote healthy aging and early disease prevention - particularly physical activity - are discussed.

  1. Smoking and older age associated with mumps in an outbreak in a group of highly-vaccinated individuals attending a youth club party, the Netherlands, 2012.

    PubMed

    Ladbury, G; Ostendorf, S; Waegemaekers, T; van Binnendijk, R; Boot, H; Hahne, S

    2014-04-24

    We describe a mumps outbreak in a highly-vaccinated population attending a party at a youth club. In a retrospective cohort study with 60 of approximately 100 participants responding, vaccination status was verified for 58/59 respondents, of whom 54 were vaccinated twice and four once. The attack rate was 22% (13 cases, all vaccinated), with smoking at the party (risk ratio (RR) 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6–6.0, p=0.001) and age ≥21 years (RR 4.7; 95% CI: 2.1–10.2, p<0.0001) as risk factors for disease in the binominal regression analysis. Mild upper respiratory illness was also highly prevalent in those who did not meet the mumps case definition (n=46) after the party, suggesting that mumps virus infection may cause mild disease in vaccinated individuals. Our investigation adds toevidence that crowded social events and smoking may facilitate spread of mumps virus among vaccinated populations, with waning immunity playing a role. The suggestion that mumps virus infection in vaccinated individuals may manifest as mild upper respiratory illness could have implications for transmission and warrants further investigation.

  2. Nutritional Considerations for Healthy Aging and Reduction in Age-Related Chronic Disease.

    PubMed

    Shlisky, Julie; Bloom, David E; Beaudreault, Amy R; Tucker, Katherine L; Keller, Heather H; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Fielding, Roger A; Cheng, Feon W; Jensen, Gordon L; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin N

    2017-01-01

    A projected doubling in the global population of people aged ≥60 y by the year 2050 has major health and economic implications, especially in developing regions. Burdens of unhealthy aging associated with chronic noncommunicable and other age-related diseases may be largely preventable with lifestyle modification, including diet. However, as adults age they become at risk of "nutritional frailty," which can compromise their ability to meet nutritional requirements at a time when specific nutrient needs may be high. This review highlights the role of nutrition science in promoting healthy aging and in improving the prognosis in cases of age-related diseases. It serves to identify key knowledge gaps and implementation challenges to support adequate nutrition for healthy aging, including applicability of metrics used in body-composition and diet adequacy for older adults and mechanisms to reduce nutritional frailty and to promote diet resilience. This review also discusses management recommendations for several leading chronic conditions common in aging populations, including cognitive decline and dementia, sarcopenia, and compromised immunity to infectious disease. The role of health systems in incorporating nutrition care routinely for those aged ≥60 y and living independently and current actions to address nutritional status before hospitalization and the development of disease are discussed.

  3. Should family planning include STD services?

    PubMed

    Finger, W R

    1994-05-01

    Recent reviews suggest that the addition of programs aimed at preventing and controlling sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), specifically human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), to existing family planning programs does not necessarily dilute overall program effectiveness. In Colombia, Mexico, and Jamaica, where condom distribution and/or information to prevent HIV transmission was integrated into the activities of family planning field workers, no negative effect on the image of condoms as a pregnancy prevention method was observed and there was a great demand on the part of family planning clients for information about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In Brazil, family planning staff are receiving training in HIV risk assessment and the counseling of women in partner negotiation skills. However, steps must be taken to reach men since it is their high-risk behavior that puts most women at risk of HIV. Both separate STD clinics for men and condom social marketing projects have yielded promising results. Obstacles to the addition of STD services to family planning programs include the need to treat male partners as well as female clients, a shortage of diagnostic tools and antibiotics for treatment, and the fact that the majority of women with STDs are asymptomatic. Indicative of the increased attention being given this approach, however, is the recent release of guidelines by the US Agency for International Development Office of Population on how family planning programs should approach integration. Suggested activities include condom promotion, behavior change, counseling, information, contraceptive development, and selected efforts at STD treatment.

  4. Arterial–Ventricular Coupling with Aging and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chantler, Paul D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2012-01-01

    Age is the dominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Understanding the coupling between the left ventricle (LV) and arterial system, termed arterial–ventricular coupling (EA/ELV), provides important mechanistic insights into the complex cardiovascular system and its changes with aging in the absence and presence of disease. EA/ELV can be indexed by the ratio of effective arterial elastance (EA; a measure of the net arterial load exerted on the LV) to left ventricular end-systolic elastance (ELV; a load-independent measure of left ventricular chamber performance). Age-associated alterations in arterial structure and function, including diameter, wall thickness, wall stiffness, and endothelial dysfunction, contribute to a gradual increase in resting EA with age. Remarkably there is a corresponding increase in resting ELV with age, due to alterations to LV remodeling (loss in myocyte number, increased collagen) and function. These age-adaptations at rest likely occur, at least, in response to the age-associated increase in EA and ensure that EA/ELV is closely maintained within a narrow range, allowing for optimal energetic efficiency at the expense of mechanical efficacy. This optimal coupling at rest is also maintained when aging is accompanied by the presence of hypertension, and obesity, despite further increases in EA and ELV in these conditions. In contrast, in heart failure patients with either reduced or preserved ejection fraction, EA/ELV at rest is impaired. During dynamic exercise, EA/ELV decreases, due to an acute mismatch between the arterial and ventricular systems as ELV increases disproportionate compared to EA (≈200 vs. 40%), to ensure that sufficient cardiac performance is achieved to meet the increased energetic requirements of the body. However, with advancing age the reduction in EA/ELV during acute maximal exercise is blunted, due to a blunted increase ELV. This impaired EA/ELV is further amplified in the presence of disease, and may

  5. Review: quantifying mitochondrial dysfunction in complex diseases of aging.

    PubMed

    Horan, Martin P; Pichaud, Nicolas; Ballard, J William O

    2012-10-01

    There is accumulating evidence that mitochondrial respiratory malfunction is associated with aging-associated complex diseases. However, progress in our understanding of these diseases has been hampered by the sensitivity and throughput of systems employed to quantify dysfunction and inherent limitations of the biological systems studied. In this review, we describe and contrast two methodologies that have been developed for measuring mitochondrial function to address the need for improved sensitivity and increased throughput. We then consider the utility of each methodology in studying three biological systems: isolated mitochondria, cultured cells, and cell fibers and tissues. Finally, we discuss the application of each methodology in the study of mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and aging-associated autophagy impairment and mitochondrial malfunction. We conclude that the methodologies are complementary, and researchers may need to examine multiple biological systems to unravel complex diseases of aging.

  6. Including lifestyle medicine in undergraduate medical curricula

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Edward; Pojednic, Rachele; Polak, Rani; Bush, Jennifer; Trilk, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Currently, there is no model to integrate the discipline of lifestyle medicine (LM) into undergraduate medical education. Furthermore, there are no guidelines, validated assessment tools, or evaluation or implementation plans in place. Background The World Health Organization predicts that by 2020, two-thirds of disease worldwide will be the result of poor lifestyle choices. Fewer than 50% of US primary care physicians routinely provide specific guidance on nutrition, physical activity, or weight control. Methods We are establishing a plan to integrate LM into medical school education in collaboration with the investing stakeholders, including medical school deans and students, medical curriculum developers and researchers, medical societies, governing bodies, and policy institutes. Three planning and strategy meetings are being held to address key areas of focus – with a particular interest in nutrition, physical activity, student self-care, and behavior change – to develop specific implementation guidelines and landmarks. Results After the first two meetings, the proposed areas of focus were determined to be: 1) supporting of deans and key personnel, 2) creation of federal and state policy commitments, 3) use of assessment as a driver of LM, 4) provision of high-quality evidence-based curricular material on an easily navigated site, and 5) engaging student interest. Implementation strategies for each focus area will be addressed in an upcoming planning meeting in early 2015. Conclusion This initiative is expected to have important public health implications by efficiently promoting the prevention and treatment of non-communicable chronic disease with a scalable and sustainable model to educate physicians in training and practice. PMID:25652118

  7. "Aspiration disease".

    PubMed

    Pradhan, D J; Ikins, P M

    1976-03-01

    Aspiration disease, a term used to define both an acute and chronic form of a disease entity, is described. Etiological factors, pathophysiology and therapy are discussed with emphasis on aspiration of gastric juice. A brief mention of a small clinical experience is included.

  8. Molecular circuitry of stem cell fate in skeletal muscle regeneration, ageing, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Almada, Albert E.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite cells are adult myogenic stem cells that function to repair damaged muscle. The enduring capacity for muscle regeneration requires efficient satellite cell expansion after injury, differentiation to produce myoblasts that can reconstitute damaged fibers, and self-renewal to replenish the muscle stem cell pool for subsequent rounds of injury and repair. Emerging studies indicate that misregulations of satellite cell fate and function contribute to age-associated muscle dysfunction and influence the severity of muscle diseases, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). It has also become apparent that satellite cell fate during muscle regeneration, aging, and in the context of DMD is governed by an intricate network of intrinsic and extrinsic regulators. Targeted manipulation of this network may offer unique opportunities for muscle regenerative medicine. PMID:26956195

  9. Principal Component Analysis of the Effects of Environmental Enrichment and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate on Age-Associated Learning Deficits in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Catuara-Solarz, Silvina; Espinosa-Carrasco, Jose; Erb, Ionas; Langohr, Klaus; Notredame, Cedric; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Dierssen, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals present increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology and AD-type dementia. Here, we investigated the use of green tea extracts containing (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), as co-adjuvant to enhance the effects of environmental enrichment (EE) in Ts65Dn mice, a segmental trisomy model of DS that partially mimics DS/AD pathology, at the age of initiation of cognitive decline. Classical repeated measures ANOVA showed that combined EE-EGCG treatment was more efficient than EE or EGCG alone to improve specific spatial learning related variables. Using principal component analysis (PCA) we found that several spatial learning parameters contributed similarly to a first PC and explained a large proportion of the variance among groups, thus representing a composite learning measure. This PC1 revealed that EGCG or EE alone had no significant effect. However, combined EE-EGCG significantly ameliorated learning alterations of middle age Ts65Dn mice. Interestingly, PCA revealed an increased variability along learning sessions with good and poor learners in Ts65Dn, and this stratification did not disappear upon treatments. Our results suggest that combining EE and EGCG represents a viable therapeutic approach for amelioration of age-related cognitive decline in DS, although its efficacy may vary across individuals. PMID:26696850

  10. Dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16(Ink⁴a) pathway provokes an aging-associated decline of submandibular gland function.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, Kimi; Katano, Satoshi; Iida, Mayu; Kimura, Hiromi; Okuma, Atsushi; Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Ohtani, Naoko; Hara, Eiji; Maruyama, Mitsuo

    2015-08-01

    Bmi-1 prevents stem cell aging, at least partly, by blocking expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(Ink4a) . Therefore, dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16(Ink4a) pathway is considered key to the loss of tissue homeostasis and development of associated degenerative diseases during aging. However, because Bmi-1 knockout (KO) mice die within 20 weeks after birth, it is difficult to determine exactly where and when dysregulation of the Bmi-1/p16(Ink4a) pathway occurs during aging in vivo. Using real-time in vivo imaging of p16(Ink4a) expression in Bmi-1-KO mice, we uncovered a novel function of the Bmi-1/p16(Ink4a) pathway in controlling homeostasis of the submandibular glands (SMGs), which secrete saliva into the oral cavity. This pathway is dysregulated during aging in vivo, leading to induction of p16(Ink4a) expression and subsequent declined SMG function. These findings will advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the aging-related decline of SMG function and associated salivary gland hypofunction, which is particularly problematic among the elderly.

  11. Hashimoto's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... autoimmune thyroid disease. This includes radiation from the atomic bomb in Japan, the nuclear accident at Chernobyl, ... symptoms as normal pregnancy , such as fatigue and weight gain. Yet untreated underactive thyroid during pregnancy may ...

  12. Vaginal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... that affect the vagina include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems ...

  13. Gaucher disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... with this type may live into adulthood. Symptoms Bleeding because of low platelet count is the most common symptom seen in Gaucher disease. Other symptoms may include: Bone pain and fractures Cognitive impairment (decreased thinking ability) Easy bruising Enlarged ...

  14. Unraveling a Multifactorial Late-Onset Disease: From Genetic Susceptibility to Disease Mechanisms for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y.; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.

    2012-01-01

    Aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases significantly influence the quality of life of affected individuals. Genetic approaches, combined with genomic technology, have provided powerful insights into common late-onset diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we discuss current findings on the genetics of AMD to highlight areas of rapid progress and new challenges. We also attempt to integrate available genetic and biochemical data with cellular pathways involved in aging to formulate an integrated model of AMD pathogenesis. PMID:19405847

  15. Age-Associated ALU Element Instability in White Blood Cells Is Linked to Lower Survival in Elderly Adults: A Preliminary Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Massimo; Gross, Cole; Tarperi, Cantor; Schena, Federico; Reggiani, Carlo; Naro, Fabio; Pedrinolla, Anna; Monaco, Lucia; Richardson, Russell S.; Donato, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Background ALU element instability could contribute to gene function variance in aging, and may partly explain variation in human lifespan. Objective To assess the role of ALU element instability in human aging and the potential efficacy of ALU element content as a marker of biological aging and survival. Design Preliminary cohort study. Methods We measured two high frequency ALU element subfamilies, ALU-J and ALU-Sx, by a single qPCR assay and compared ALU-J/Sx content in white blood cell (WBCs) and skeletal muscle cell (SMCs) biopsies from twenty-three elderly adults with sixteen healthy sex-balanced young adults; all-cause survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues; and cardiovascular disease (CVD)- and cancer-specific survival rates of elderly adults predicted by ALU-J/Sx content in both tissues, as planned subgroup analyses. Results We found greater ALU-J/Sx content variance in WBCs from elderly adults than young adults (P < 0.001) with no difference in SMCs (P = 0.94). Elderly adults with low WBC ALU-J/Sx content had worse four-year all-cause and CVD-associated survival than those with high ALU-J/Sx content (both P = 0.03 and hazard ratios (HR) ≥ 3.40), while WBC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on cancer-associated survival (P = 0.42 and HR = 0.74). SMC ALU-J/Sx content had no influence on all-cause, CVD- or cancer -associated survival (all P ≥ 0.26; HR ≤ 2.07). Conclusions These initial findings demonstrate that ALU element instability occurs with advanced age in WBCs, but not SMCs, and imparts greater risk of all-cause mortality that is likely driven by an increased risk for CVD and not cancer. PMID:28060910

  16. Modulation of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases via activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 by food-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Denzer, Isabel; Münch, Gerald; Friedland, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are early events in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mitochondria are important key players in cellular function based on mitochondrial energy production and their major role in cell physiology. Since neurons are highly depending on mitochondrial energy production due to their high energy demand and their reduced glycolytic capacity mitochondrial dysfunction has fatal consequences for neuronal function and survival. The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is the major regulator of cellular response to oxidative stress. Activation of Nrf2 induces the transcriptional regulation of antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent expression of a battery of cytoprotective and antioxidant enzymes and proteins. Moreover, activation of Nrf2 protects mitochondria from dysfunction and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, the Nrf2/ARE pathway has become an attractive target for the prevention and treatment of oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative diseases. Small food-derived inducers of the Nrf2/ARE pathway including l-sulforaphane from broccoli and isoliquiritigenin from licorice displayed promising protection of mitochondrial function in models of oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases and represent a novel approach to prevent and treat aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Transgenic Monkey Model of the Polyglutamine Diseases Recapitulating Progressive Neurological Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi; Minakawa, Eiko N.; Motohashi, Hideyuki H.; Takayama, Osamu; Popiel, H. Akiko; Puentes, Sandra; Owari, Kensuke; Nakatani, Terumi; Nogami, Naotake; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yonekawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Fujita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hikaru; Aizawa, Shu; Nagano, Seiichi; Yamada, Daisuke; Wada, Keiji; Kohsaka, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and the polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases, are becoming prevalent as a consequence of elongation of the human lifespan. Although various rodent models have been developed to study and overcome these diseases, they have limitations in their translational research utility owing to differences from humans in brain structure and function and in drug metabolism. Here, we generated a transgenic marmoset model of the polyQ diseases, showing progressive neurological symptoms including motor impairment. Seven transgenic marmosets were produced by lentiviral introduction of the human ataxin 3 gene with 120 CAG repeats encoding an expanded polyQ stretch. Although all offspring showed no neurological symptoms at birth, three marmosets with higher transgene expression developed neurological symptoms of varying degrees at 3–4 months after birth, followed by gradual decreases in body weight gain, spontaneous activity, and grip strength, indicating time-dependent disease progression. Pathological examinations revealed neurodegeneration and intranuclear polyQ protein inclusions accompanied by gliosis, which recapitulate the neuropathological features of polyQ disease patients. Consistent with neuronal loss in the cerebellum, brain MRI analyses in one living symptomatic marmoset detected enlargement of the fourth ventricle, which suggests cerebellar atrophy. Notably, successful germline transgene transmission was confirmed in the second-generation offspring derived from the symptomatic transgenic marmoset gamete. Because the accumulation of abnormal proteins is a shared pathomechanism among various neurodegenerative diseases, we suggest that this new marmoset model will contribute toward elucidating the pathomechanisms of and developing clinically applicable therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28374014

  18. Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents an update on the clinical aspects of human prion disease, including the wide spectrum of their presentations. Recent Findings Prion diseases, a group of disorders caused by abnormally shaped proteins called prions, occur in sporadic (Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease), genetic (genetic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, and fatal familial insomnia), and acquired (kuru, variant Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, and iatrogenic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease) forms. This article presents updated information on the clinical features and diagnostic methods for human prion diseases. New antemortem potential diagnostic tests based on amplifying prions in order to detect them are showing very high specificity. Understanding of the diversity of possible presentations of human prion diseases continues to evolve, with some genetic forms progressing slowly over decades, beginning with dysautonomia and neuropathy and progressing to a frontal-executive dementia with pathology of combined prionopathy and tauopathy. Unfortunately, to date, all human prion disease clinical trials have failed to show survival benefit. A very rare polymorphism in the prion protein gene recently has been identified that appears to protect against prion disease; this finding, in addition to providing greater understanding of the prionlike mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, might lead to potential treatments. Summary Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease is the most common form of human prion disease. Genetic prion diseases, resulting from mutations in the prion-related protein gene (PRNP), are classified based on the mutation, clinical phenotype, and neuropathologic features and can be difficult to diagnose because of their varied presentations. Perhaps most relevant to this Continuum issue on neuroinfectious diseases, acquired prion diseases are caused by accidental transmission to humans, but fortunately, they are the least common form and

  19. Reconsidering remineralization strategies to include nanoparticle hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Kutsch, V Kim; Chaiyabutr, Yada; Milicich, Graeme

    2013-03-01

    Dental caries is a transmissible biofilm-mediated disease of the teeth that is defined by prolonged periods of low pH resulting in net mineral loss from the teeth. Hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, and the carbonated forms of calcium phosphate form the main mineral content of dental hard tissues: enamel, dentin, and cementum. Active dental caries results when the biofilm pH on the tooth surface drops below the dissolution threshold for hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite. The clinical evidence of this net mineral loss is porosity, whitespot lesions, caries lesions, and/or cavitation. The potential to reverse this mineral loss through remineralization has been well documented, although previous remineralization strategies for dental hard tissues have focused on the use of fluorides and forms of calcium phosphate. This in-vitro study documented the deposition of nanoparticle hydroxyapatite on demineralized enamel surfaces after treatment with an experimental remineralization gel. This finding supports consideration of an additional approach to remineralization that includes pH neutralization strategies and nanoparticle hydroxyapatite crystals.

  20. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  1. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases Autoimmune diseases Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy Symptoms vary but might include pain, numbness, loss of sensation and muscle weakness. These symptoms can occur around the spinal ...

  2. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response in aging and age-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Marishka K.; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum(ER) is a multifunctional organelle within which protein folding, lipid biosynthesis, and calcium storage occurs. Perturbations such as energy or nutrient depletion, disturbances in calcium or redox status that disrupt ER homeostasis lead to the misfolding of proteins, ER stress and up-regulation of several signaling pathways coordinately called the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR is characterized by the induction of chaperones, degradation of misfolded proteins and attenuation of protein translation. The UPR plays a fundamental role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and thus is central to normal physiology. However, sustained unresolved ER stress leads to apoptosis. Aging linked declines in expression and activity of key ER molecular chaperones and folding enzymes compromise proper protein folding and the adaptive response of the UPR. One mechanism to explain age associated declines in cellular functions and age-related diseases is a progressive failure of chaperoning systems. In many of these diseases, proteins or fragments of proteins convert from their normally soluble forms to insoluble fibrils or plaques that accumulate in a variety of organs including the liver, brain or spleen. This group of diseases, which typically occur late in life includes Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, type II diabetes and a host of less well known but often equally serious conditions such as fatal familial insomnia. The UPR is implicated in many of these neurodegenerative and familial protein folding diseases as well as several cancers and a host of inflammatory diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis. This review will discuss age-related changes in the ER stress response and the role of the UPR in age-related diseases. PMID:22934019

  3. Immune Mechanisms in Inflammatory and Degenerative Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Victor L.; Caspi, Rachel R.

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that pathology of age-associated degenerative eye diseases such as adult macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, have strong immunological underpinnings. Attempts have been made to extrapolate to age-related degenerative disease insights from inflammatory processes associated with non-infectious uveitis, but these have not yet been sufficiently informative. Here we review recent findings on the immune processes underlying uveitis and those that have been shown to contribute to AMD, discussing in this context parallels and differences between overt inflammation and para-inflammation in the eye. We propose that mechanisms associated with ocular immune privilege, in combination with paucity of age-related antigen(s) within the target tissue, dampen what could otherwise be overt inflammation and result in the para-inflammation that characterizes age-associated neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25981967

  4. A novel neurotrophic drug for cognitive enhancement and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Prior, Marguerite; Dargusch, Richard; Roberts, Amanda; Riek, Roland; Eichmann, Cédric; Chiruta, Chandramouli; Akaishi, Tatsuhiro; Abe, Kazuho; Maher, Pamela; Schubert, David

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the major drug discovery paradigm for neurodegenerative diseases is based upon high affinity ligands for single disease-specific targets. For Alzheimer's disease (AD), the focus is the amyloid beta peptide (Aß) that mediates familial Alzheimer's disease pathology. However, given that age is the greatest risk factor for AD, we explored an alternative drug discovery scheme that is based upon efficacy in multiple cell culture models of age-associated pathologies rather than exclusively amyloid metabolism. Using this approach, we identified an exceptionally potent, orally active, neurotrophic molecule that facilitates memory in normal rodents, and prevents the loss of synaptic proteins and cognitive decline in a transgenic AD mouse model.

  5. Environmental Sustainability - Including Land and Water Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of environmental sustainability can be conducted in many ways with one of the most quantitative methods including Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). While historically LCIA has included a comprehensive list of impact categories including: ozone depletion, global c...

  6. Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Tamer M.; Ariganjoye, Rafiu O.; Alsaeed, Gihad I.

    2015-01-01

    We aim to describe an 8-year-old boy with an unusual clinical presentation of Gaucher disease (GD). Gaucher disease is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of the specific enzyme glucocerebrosidase with varying clinical features, but often involving the monocytes-macrophages systems. This child ran a progressive course with a devastating outcome. Three distinct GD subtypes have been described with varying clinical features based on the presence or absence of neurologic involvement. Gaucher disease diagnosis is obtained via: enzyme activity assay, gene mutation study, bone marrow aspiration in addition to multiple other tests that have been successfully used in diagnosis of cases of GD. Treatment modalities include enzyme replacement treatment, substrate reduction therapy, bone marrow transplantation, blood transfusion, and surgery are available management modalities for GD. Gaucher disease is a chronic disease requiring a multidisciplinary team approach with regular follow up with multiple subspecialties. PMID:26166597

  7. Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Playfer, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a common disabling disease of old age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease is based on clinical signs and has poor sensitivity, with about 25% of patients confidently diagnosed as having the disease actually having other conditions such as multi-system atrophy and other parkinsonism-plus syndromes. Benign essential tremor and arteriosclerotic pseudo-parkinsonism can easily be confused with Parkinson's disease. The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown. Speculative research highlights the role of oxidative stress and free radical mediated damage to dopaminergic cells. Parkinson's disease is the one neurodegenerative disorder in which drugs have been demonstrated to be of value. There is now a wide variety of drugs and formulations available, including anticholinergics, amantidine, L-dopa, dopamine agonists including apomorphine, selegiline and soon to be available catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors. Disabling side-effects of treatment, fluctuations, dyskinesias and psychiatric problems require strategic use of the drugs available. There is an increasing potential for neurosurgical intervention. PMID:9196696

  8. [Guideline (S2k, AWMF) of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Arbeitsmedizin und Umweltmedizin "Diagnostics and Expert Opinion in the Occupational Disease No. 4101 Silicosis (Including Coal Worker's Pneumoconiosis)"].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Heger, M; Bohle, R M; Hering, K G; Hofmann-Preiß, K; Nowak, D; Tannapfel, A; Teschler, H; Voshaar, T; Kraus, T

    2016-12-01

    During the last 1.5 years an update of the guideline on silicosis was made by an interdisciplinary working group. New medical and scientific knowledge and the experience in expert opinion practice were taken into account.By preparing the initial guideline in 2010 standardization of diagnostics and adaption of the "Moers convention" which was not based on medical knowledge was in the focus, whereas the current update deals with fine emendation and extension, especially of the compensation rate (adaption with the Reichenhall recommendation).The diagnosis of silicosis (including mixed dust pneumoconiosis) is based on a detailed occupational history, and predominantly on the typical radiological findings. However, at initial diagnosis the standardized LD-HRCT takes an important role because of its high sensitivity and specificity. Exceptional cases are those with characteristic findings in chest X-ray follow-up. Correspondingly, it is mentioned in the guideline: "The standardized appraisal of the Low-Dose-Volume HRCT requires application of the CT classification (ICOERD, International Classification of Occupational and Environmental Respiratory diseases). In order to diagnose silicosis in CT scan opacities with sharp borders in both central upper lung fields and their circumferencies have to be documented. By comparing with ILO standard radiographs at least profusion category 1 in the right and left upper lung fields has to be reached (total profusion category 2)."The pathologic minimal requirement for the diagnosis of silicosis which has undergone controversial discussion has now also been defined. Corresponding to Hnizdo et al. 2000 it is now mentioned: "Finding of less than 5 silicotic granuloma per lung lobe by palpation is regarded as insignificant." This is a convention and not a threshold based on detailed medical scientific and statistical studies; it is based on extended experience in the South African gold mines.This guideline also deals with silicotic hilar

  9. Metabolic Bone Disease in the Context of Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor: Differentiation from Skeletal Metastasis, the Molecular PET–CT Imaging Features, and Exploring the Possible Etiopathologies Including Parathyroid Adenoma (MEN1) and Paraneoplastic Humoral Hypercalcemia of Malignancy Due to PTHrP Hypersecretion

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Rohit; Basu, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    Three cases of metabolic bone disease in the setting of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) are illustrated with associated etiopathologies.  One of these cases harbored mixed lesions in the form of vertebral metastasis (biopsy proven) while the other skeletal lesions were caused due to metabolic bone disease related to multiple parathyroid adenomas. While the metastatic lesion was positive on 68Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), the lesions of metabolic bone disease were negative and the 18F-fluoride PET-CT demonstrated the features of metabolic bone scan. Similar picture of metabolic bone disease [18-sodium fluoride (18NaF)/68Ga-DOTATATE mismatch] was documented in the other two patients, while fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET-CT was variably positive, primarily showing tracer uptake in the metabolic skeletal lesions of the patient with hypersecretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) by the underlying tumor. Discordance between 18NaF PET-CT and 68Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT serves as a good marker for identification of metabolic bone disease and diagnosing such a clinical entity. In a patient of NET with metabolic bone disease and hypercalcemia, thus, two causes need to be considered: (i) Coexisting parathyroid adenoma in multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN-I) syndrome and (ii) humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM) related to hypersecretion of PTHrP by the tumor. The correct diagnosis of metabolic bone disease in metastatic NET can alter the management substantially. Interestingly, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) can emerge as a very promising treatment modality in patients of metabolic bone disease caused by HHM in the setting of NET. PMID:28217023

  10. [Fabry disease].

    PubMed

    Stephan, F; Haber, R

    2017-02-01

    Fabry disease, also known as Anderson-Fabry disease or angiokeratoma corporis diffusum universale, is an X-linked recessive form of sphingolipidosis caused by total or partial deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, alpha-galactosidase A. From the youngest age, it results in a gradual ubiquitous build-up of glycosphingolipids that are not degraded by the missing enzyme. Cutaneous, neurological, nephrologic, cardiac, gastrointestinal, ophthalmological, respiratory, cochleovestibular and haematological involvement are responsible for increased mortality and significant impairment of quality of life in subjects affected by the disease. Angiokeratomas are the most common cutaneous sign of this disease, although they are not specific to it and must be distinguished from angiokeratomas either occurring in isolation or associated with systemic diseases. Other cutaneous signs encountered in this disease include hyperhidrosis, oral lesions, lower limb oedemas, etc. The diagnosis is mainly clinical and should be considered in the presence of a personal and/or familial history; it is confirmed by assay of enzyme activity within leucocytes or by molecular studies. Management is multidisciplinary and involves symptomatic treatment as well as specific treatment, resulting in improved survival and enhanced quality of life for patients presenting the disease. Enzyme replacement therapy with alpha-galactosidase A forms the cornerstone of specific treatment and may be associated with other types of treatments such as galactose and molecular chaperones. Gene therapy is now also used extensively. At present, these marked therapeutic advances, which closely involve dermatologists, could help transform the prognosis for patients presenting Fabry disease.

  11. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  12. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  13. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  14. Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Breteler, Monique M B; de Strooper, Bart; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Salloway, Stephen; Van der Flier, Wiesje Maria

    2016-07-30

    Although the prevalence of dementia continues to increase worldwide, incidence in the western world might have decreased as a result of better vascular care and improved brain health. Alzheimer's disease, the most prevalent cause of dementia, is still defined by the combined presence of amyloid and tau, but researchers are gradually moving away from the simple assumption of linear causality as proposed in the original amyloid hypothesis. Age-related, protective, and disease-promoting factors probably interact with the core mechanisms of the disease. Amyloid β42, and tau proteins are established core cerebrospinal biomarkers; novel candidate biomarkers include amyloid β oligomers and synaptic markers. MRI and fluorodeoxyglucose PET are established imaging techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid PET is gaining traction in the clinical arena, but validity and cost-effectiveness remain to be established. Tau PET might offer new insights and be of great help in differential diagnosis and selection of patients for trials. In the search for understanding the disease mechanism and keys to treatment, research is moving increasingly into the earliest phase of disease. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease is defined as biomarker evidence of Alzheimer's pathological changes in cognitively healthy individuals. Patients with subjective cognitive decline have been identified as a useful population in whom to look for preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Moderately positive results for interventions targeting several lifestyle factors in non-demented elderly patients and moderately positive interim results for lowering amyloid in pre-dementia Alzheimer's disease suggest that, ultimately, there will be a future in which specific anti-Alzheimer's therapy will be combined with lifestyle interventions targeting general brain health to jointly combat the disease. In this Seminar, we discuss the main developments in Alzheimer's research.

  15. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Symptoms include abdominal ... become pregnant? Women with ulcerative colitis and inactive Crohn’s disease are as likely to become pregnant as women ...

  17. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  18. Alzheimer's Disease: The Death of the Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Lynn W.

    1987-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease, a form of dementia in middle-age and older adults is becoming more evident because of growing numbers of older people and better diagnosis and detection methods. Describes the behavioral and physical symptoms of the disease as well as specific suggestions for care of patients with Alzheimer's disease, including dealing with…

  19. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and inflammation in the central nervous system and digestive organs. Vascular System Some people with Behçet’s disease have blood clots ... colon that causes diarrhea, cramps, and weight loss. Digestive tract. The body system that breaks down food. The digestive tract includes ...

  20. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... after radioiodine therapy as a supplemental treatment. Side effects of both drugs include rash, joint pain, liver failure or a decrease in disease-fighting white blood cells. Methimazole isn't used to treat pregnant women in the first trimester because of the slight ...

  1. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  2. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules...

  3. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Grants by Random Selection Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules...

  4. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Included services. 1.9005 Section 1.9005 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  5. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  6. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  7. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  8. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  9. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  10. Server-Side Includes Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2002-01-01

    Describes server-side include (SSI) codes which allow Webmasters to insert content into Web pages without programming knowledge. Explains how to enable the codes on a Web server, provides a step-by-step process for implementing them, discusses tags and syntax errors, and includes examples of their use on the Web site for Southern Illinois…

  11. Diseases of Pacific Coast conifers. Agriculture handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Scharpf, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    The handbook provides basic information needed to identify the common diseases of Pacific Coast conifers. Hosts, distribution, disease cycles, and identifying characteristics are described for more than 150 diseases, including cankers, diebacks, galls, rusts, needle diseases, root diseases, mistletoes, and rots. Diseases in which abiotic factors are involved are also described. For some groups of diseases, a descriptive key to field identification is included.

  12. Thyroid Disease Definitions

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Thyroid Disease Definitions KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Definitions A A ... or injury. Signs of inflammation can include redness, heat, pain, or swelling. metabolism: Metabolism refers to the ...

  13. Diseases and Their Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Important diseases and their management practices of lentil were reviewed. The diseases reveiwed include Ascochyta blight (Ascochyta lentis), Anthracnose (Colletotrichum truncatum), White mold (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum), rust (Uromyces viciae-fabae), Botrytis gray mold (Botrytis cinerea and B. faba...

  14. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes. Images Dermatomyositis, heliotrope eyelids ...

  15. Sir-2.1 modulates 'calorie-restriction-mediated' prevention of neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jadiya, Pooja; Chatterjee, Manavi; Sammi, Shreesh Raj; Kaur, Supinder; Palit, Gautam; Nazir, Aamir

    2011-09-23

    The phenomenon of aging is known to modulate many disease conditions including neurodegenerative ailments like Parkinson's disease (PD) which is characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons. Recent studies have reported on such effects, as calorie restriction, in modulating aging in living systems. We reason that PD, being an age-associated neurodegenerative disease might be modulated by interventions like calorie restriction. In the present study we employed the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model (P(dat-1)::GFP) expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) specifically in eight dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons was induced by treatment of worms with 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), a selective catecholaminergic neurotoxin, followed by studies on effect of calorie restriction on the neurodegeneration. Employing confocal microscopy of the dopaminergic neurons and HPLC analysis of dopamine levels in the nematodes, we found that calorie restriction has a preventive effect on dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the worm model. We further studied the role of sirtuin, sir-2.1, in modulating such an effect. Studies employing RNAi induced gene silencing of nematode sir-2.1, revealed that presence of Sir-2.1 is necessary for achieving the protective effect of calorie restriction on dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Our studies provide evidence that calorie restriction affords, an sir-2.1 mediated, protection against the dopaminergic neurodegeneration, that might have implications for neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease.

  16. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 48533, August 15, 2014. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to the...

  17. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  18. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  19. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  20. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  1. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  2. Include Passive Solar in Your Renovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Gerald F.; Probasco, Jack F.

    1981-01-01

    A checklist covers potential energy saving modifications in a building scheduled for renovation, and includes suggestions for room utilization, landscaping, and building envelope, solar control, and active system modifications. (Author)

  3. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  4. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  5. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  6. Eddy Resolving Global Ocean Prediction including Tides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    tensor scheme reduced at supercritical slopes, and their scalar sisters, a Nycander scalar limited in shallow water , and the Jayne and St. Laurent [2001...NAVOCEANO) starting in FY14. The model will include shallow water and provide boundary conditions to finer resolution coastal models that may use HYCOM or a...latter out to 30 days in many deep water regions, including regions of high Navy interest such as the Western Pacific and the Arabian Sea/Gulf of

  7. Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Schiffmann, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipids that is caused by mutations of the GLA gene that codes for α-galactosidase A, leads to dysfunction of many cell types and includes a systemic vasculopathy. As a result, patients have a markedly increased risk of developing ischemic stroke, small-fiber peripheral neuropathy, cardiac dysfunction and chronic kidney disease. Virtually all complications of Fabry disease are non-specific in nature and clinically indistinguishable from similar abnormalities that occur in the context of more common disorders in the general population. Recent studies suggested a much higher incidence of mutations of the GLA gene, suggesting that this disorder is under-diagnosed. However, some of the gene variants may be benign. Although the etiology of Fabry disease has been known for many years, the mechanism by which the accumulating α-D-galactosyl moieties cause this multi organ disorder has only recently been studied and is yet to be completely elucidated. Specific therapy for Fabry disease has been developed in the last few years but its role in the management of the disorder is still being investigated. Fortunately, standard 'non-specific' medical and surgical therapy is effective in slowing deterioration or compensating for organ failure in patients with Fabry disease.

  8. Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Bates, Gillian P; Dorsey, Ray; Gusella, James F; Hayden, Michael R; Kay, Chris; Leavitt, Blair R; Nance, Martha; Ross, Christopher A; Scahill, Rachael I; Wetzel, Ronald; Wild, Edward J; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-04-23

    Huntington disease is devastating to patients and their families - with autosomal dominant inheritance, onset typically in the prime of adult life, progressive course, and a combination of motor, cognitive and behavioural features. The disease is caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat (of variable length) in HTT, the gene that encodes the protein huntingtin. In mutation carriers, huntingtin is produced with abnormally long polyglutamine sequences that confer toxic gains of function and predispose the protein to fragmentation, resulting in neuronal dysfunction and death. In this Primer, we review the epidemiology of Huntington disease, noting that prevalence is higher than previously thought, geographically variable and increasing. We describe the relationship between CAG repeat length and clinical phenotype, as well as the concept of genetic modifiers of the disease. We discuss normal huntingtin protein function, evidence for differential toxicity of mutant huntingtin variants, theories of huntingtin aggregation and the many different mechanisms of Huntington disease pathogenesis. We describe the genetic and clinical diagnosis of the condition, its clinical assessment and the multidisciplinary management of symptoms, given the absence of effective disease-modifying therapies. We review past and present clinical trials and therapeutic strategies under investigation, including impending trials of targeted huntingtin-lowering drugs and the progress in development of biomarkers that will support the next generation of trials. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/hPMENh.

  9. Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Burillo, Almudena; Bouza, Emilio

    2016-01-23

    Since first identified in early 1977, bacteria of the genus Legionella are recognised as a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia and a rare cause of hospital-acquired pneumonia. Legionella bacteria multisystem manifestations mainly affect susceptible patients as a result of age, underlying debilitating conditions, or immunosuppression. Water is the major natural reservoir for Legionella, and the pathogen is found in many different natural and artificial aquatic environments such as cooling towers or water systems in buildings, including hospitals. The term given to the severe pneumonia and systemic infection caused by Legionella bacteria is Legionnaires' disease. Over time, the prevalence of legionellosis or Legionnaires' disease has risen, which might indicate a greater awareness and reporting of the disease. Advances in microbiology have led to a better understanding of the ecological niches and pathogenesis of the condition. Legionnaires' disease is not always suspected because of its non-specific symptoms, and the diagnostic tests routinely available do not offer the desired sensitivity. However, effective antibiotics are available. Disease notification systems provide the basis for initiating investigations and limiting the scale and recurrence of outbreaks. This report reviews our current understanding of this disease.

  10. Drugs (including oxygen) in severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Albert, P; Calverley, P M A

    2008-05-01

    Access to comprehensive guidelines on the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is now available, and several treatment goals of therapy have been identified from these guidelines, which have since been studied in clinical trials. Drug therapy is a key component of an individual patient's management plan, particularly in more severe disease. During the past few years, a number of new drug treatments have become available, although these are not always appropriately prescribed; this is particularly the case for oxygen. For patients with a history of exacerbations, there is good evidence for the use of inhaled long-acting anticholinergic agents or combined inhaled steroids and long-acting beta-agonists. Evidence for prophylactic antibiotics and antioxidant agents is lacking. Nutritional and calorie supplementation have not been shown to improve exercise capacity. Statins may improve outcomes in COPD, but prospective trials are needed to confirm this. The evidence for the use of long-term oxygen therapy in hypoxaemic patients is robust. Ambulatory oxygen improves exercise capacity, but whether it is used appropriately is in doubt. Overall, short burst oxygen therapy does not offer a benefit and therefore cannot be recommended.

  11. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  12. Transmission line including support means with barriers

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

  13. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  14. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-03-13

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  15. The prion diseases of animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect several species of animals and include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids, and transmissible mink encephalopat...

  16. 47 CFR 65.820 - Included items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Included items. 65.820 Section 65.820 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE...) Cash working capital. The average amount of investor-supplied capital needed to provide funds for...

  17. Parachute Line Hook Includes Integral Loop Expander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, G. B.

    1983-01-01

    Parachute packing simplified with modified line hook. One person packs parachutes for test recovery vehicles faster than previously two-person team. New line hook includes expander that opens up two locking loops so parachute lines are pulled through them. Parachutes are packed at high pressure to be compressed into limited space available in test vehicles.

  18. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  19. Including the Excluded: One School for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EFA 2000 Bulletin, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue of "EFA 2000" focuses on the theme of inclusive education, i.e., including children with disabilities in general education classrooms. The cover story discusses a 1995 UNESCO survey of 63 countries that showed that integration of children with disabilities in regular schools is a declared policy in almost every country.…

  20. Effects of Including Humor in Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Robert F.; And Others

    Two 50-item multiple-choice forms of a grammar test were developed differing only in humor being included in 20 items of one form. One hundred twenty-six (126) eighth graders received the test plus alternate forms of a questionnaire. Humor inclusion did not affect grammar scores on matched humorous/nonhumorous items nor on common post-treatment…

  1. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  2. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  3. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  4. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  5. A group of VIPs, including Orville Wright

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    A group of VIPs, including Orville Wright, center. Left to right bottom row ?, Walter Reiser, Elton Miller, Orville Wright, Starr Truscutt, Addison Rothrock, Eastman Jacobs, Dr. Lewis Top row Gus Crowley, Ernie Johnson, Carlton Kemper, H.J.E. Reid, Smith DeFrance, Theodore Theodorsen.

  6. Cognitive and Disease-Modifying Effects of 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Inhibition in Male Tg2576 Mice, a Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sooy, Karen; Noble, June; McBride, Andrew; Binnie, Margaret; Yau, Joyce L. W.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Walker, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids has been linked to age-related cognitive decline and may play a role in Alzheimer's disease. In the brain, 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) amplifies intracellular glucocorticoid levels. We show that short-term treatment of aged, cognitively impaired C57BL/6 mice with the potent and selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitor UE2316 improves memory, including after intracerebroventricular drug administration to the central nervous system alone. In the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, UE2316 treatment of mice aged 14 months for 4 weeks also decreased the number of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the cerebral cortex, associated with a selective increase in local insulin-degrading enzyme (involved in Aβ breakdown and known to be glucocorticoid regulated). Chronic treatment of young Tg2576 mice with UE2316 for up to 13 months prevented cognitive decline but did not prevent Aβ plaque formation. We conclude that reducing glucocorticoid regeneration in the brain improves cognition independently of reduced Aβ plaque pathology and that 11β-HSD1 inhibitors have potential as cognitive enhancers in age-associated memory impairment and Alzheimer's dementia. PMID:26305888

  7. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Chomel, B

    2015-08-01

    Lyme disease is among the most frequently diagnosed zoonotic tick-borne diseases worldwide. The number of human cases has been on the increase since the first recognition of its aetiological agent. Lyme disease is caused by spirochete bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia, with B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (s.s.) found in the Americas, and B. afzelii and B. garinii, in addition to B. burgdorferi s.s., in Europe and Asia. Environmental factors, such as human encroachment onto habitats favourable to ticks and their hosts, reduced deforestation, increased human outdoor activities, and climatic factors favouring a wider distribution of tick vectors, have enhanced the impact of the disease on both humans and animals. Clinical manifestations in humans include, in the early phases, erythema migrans, followed several weeks later by neuro-borreliosis (meningo-radiculitis, meningitis or meningo-encephalitis), Lyme arthritis and/or Borrelia lymphocytoma. In dogs, acute signs include fever, general malaise, lameness, lymph node enlargement and polyarthritis, as well as neuro-borreliosis in the chronic form. Diagnosis is mainly serological in both humans and animals, based on either a two-tier approach (an immunoenzymatic test followed by a Western blot confirmatory test) in humans or C(6) peptide, only in dogs. Early treatment with antibiotics, such as doxycycline or amoxicillin, for three weeks usually reduces the risk of chronic disease. Tick control, including the use of tick repellents for both humans and animals, particularly dogs, is highly reliable in preventing transmission. Vaccines are not available to prevent human infection, whereas several vaccines are available to reduce transmission and the clinical manifestations of infection in dogs.

  8. Dynamic Analyses Including Joints Of Truss Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1991-01-01

    Method for mathematically modeling joints to assess influences of joints on dynamic response of truss structures developed in study. Only structures with low-frequency oscillations considered; only Coulomb friction and viscous damping included in analysis. Focus of effort to obtain finite-element mathematical models of joints exhibiting load-vs.-deflection behavior similar to measured load-vs.-deflection behavior of real joints. Experiments performed to determine stiffness and damping nonlinearities typical of joint hardware. Algorithm for computing coefficients of analytical joint models based on test data developed to enable study of linear and nonlinear effects of joints on global structural response. Besides intended application to large space structures, applications in nonaerospace community include ground-based antennas and earthquake-resistant steel-framed buildings.

  9. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  10. SKIRT: Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Maarten; Dejonghe, Herwig; Davies, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    SKIRT is a radiative transfer code based on the Monte Carlo technique. The name SKIRT, acronym for Stellar Kinematics Including Radiative Transfer, reflects the original motivation for its creation: it has been developed to study the effects of dust absorption and scattering on the observed kinematics of dusty galaxies. In a second stage, the SKIRT code was extended with a module to self-consistently calculate the dust emission spectrum under the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. This LTE version of SKIRT has been used to model the dust extinction and emission of various types of galaxies, as well as circumstellar discs and clumpy tori around active galactic nuclei. A new, extended version of SKIRT code can perform efficient 3D radiative transfer calculations including a self-consistent calculation of the dust temperature distribution and the associated FIR/submm emission with a full incorporation of the emission of transiently heated grains and PAH molecules.

  11. [Oats can be included in gluten-free diet].

    PubMed

    Hallert, C; Olsson, M; Störsrud, S; Lenner, R A; Kilander, A; Stenhammar, L

    1999-07-28

    In the management of coeliac disease, it has been widely accepted that oats must also be excluded from the diet, along with wheat, rye and barley. The article consists in a review of published reports, and an account of our experience of including oats in the gluten-free diets of adults. Oats were found to be safe and well tolerated by adults with coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis, though the risk of wheat contamination of commercial oat products remains a cause of concern. Similar findings were reported from a study of adolescents, but no such studies have been made of small children. Thus, the inclusion of oats, known to be a fibre-rich, naturally gluten-free food, would broaden the range of foodstuffs tolerable to coeliac patients, though for safety reasons they should be used only by adults until more information is available.

  12. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  13. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  14. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  15. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  16. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheet Hashimoto's disease fact sheet Illnesses and disabilities Lupus fact sheet What is Graves' disease? What are the symptoms of Graves' disease? Who gets Graves' disease? What causes Graves' disease? How do I find out if ...

  17. Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Linden T

    2016-05-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Lyme disease, focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  18. Inverse transonic airfoil design including viscous interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed for the analysis of specified transonic airfoils or for the design of airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution, including the effect of weak viscous interaction. The method uses the full potential equation, a stretched Cartesian coordinate system, and the Nash-MacDonald turbulent boundary layer method. Comparisons with experimental data for typical transonic airfoils show excellent agreement. An example shows the application of the method to design a thick aft-cambered airfoil, and the effects of viscous interaction on its performance are discussed.

  19. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  20. View of northeastern Italy including Venice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of northeastern Italy including the Venice (Venezia) area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The mountainous area is the Dolomite Alps. The most conspicuous stream northeast of Venice is the Piave River. The city near the center of the picture on the Brenta River is Bassano del Grappa. The large city of Padua (Padova) is on the western bank of the Grenta near the clock.

  1. Ocean management plan includes array of recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    When U.S. President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore appeared in Monterey, California in June 1998 for a National Oceans Conference, some of the salt water spray from the Pacific Ocean must have clung to them.As a follow-up to the conference, the Clinton Administration on September 2 issued an interagency report to help guide federal efforts in establishing a comprehensive ocean policy.The report, which touches upon a number of global issues including the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, contains nearly 150 recommendations.

  2. Including supplementary elements in a compositional biplot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daunis-i-Estadella, J.; Thió-Henestrosa, S.; Mateu-Figueras, G.

    2011-05-01

    The biplot is a widely and powerful methodology used with multidimensional data sets to describe and display the relationships between observations and variables in an easy way. Compositional data are vectors with positive components, whose sum is constant because they represent a relative contribution of different parts to a whole; due to this property standard biplots cannot be performed with compositional data, instead of a previous transformation of the data is performed. In this paper, we extend the compositional biplot defined by Aitchison and Greenacre (2002), in order to include in the display supplementary elements which are not used in the definition of the compositional biplot. Different types of supplementary elements are considered: supplementary parts of the composition, supplementary continuous variables external to the composition, supplementary categorical variables and supplementary observations. The projection of supplementary parts of the composition is done by means of the equivalence of clr and lr biplots. The other supplementary projections are done by classical methodology. An application example with a real geological data is included.

  3. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs.

  4. Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (Prion Diseases)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in animals include scrapie, which affects sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease, which affects elk and deer; ... in animals include scrapie, which affects sheep and goats; chronic wasting disease, which affects elk and deer; ...

  5. Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... research includes efforts to identify more of the mutant genes and proteins that cause the various disease ... research includes efforts to identify more of the mutant genes and proteins that cause the various disease ...

  6. The need to include animal protection in public health policies.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Aysha

    2013-11-01

    Many critical public health issues require non-traditional approaches. Although many novel strategies are used, one approach not widely applied involves improving the treatment of animals. Emerging infectious diseases are pressing public health challenges that could benefit from improving the treatment of animals. Other human health issues, that overlap with animal treatment issues, and that warrant further exploration, are medical research and domestic violence. The diverse nature of these health issues and their connection with animal treatment suggest that there may be other similar intersections. Public health would benefit by including the treatment of animals as a topic of study and policy development.

  7. The need to include animal protection in public health policies

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Aysha

    2013-01-01

    Many critical public health issues require non-traditional approaches. Although many novel strategies are used, one approach not widely applied involves improving the treatment of animals. Emerging infectious diseases are pressing public health challenges that could benefit from improving the treatment of animals. Other human health issues, that overlap with animal treatment issues, and that warrant further exploration, are medical research and domestic violence. The diverse nature of these health issues and their connection with animal treatment suggest that there may be other similar intersections. Public health would benefit by including the treatment of animals as a topic of study and policy development. PMID:23803712

  8. Polyamine intake, dietary pattern, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kuniyasu

    2010-09-01

    In addition to general lifestyle, a number of foods and dietary patterns, such as the Mediterranean diet (MD), are associated with lower incidences of chronic, age-related diseases, and mortality. We have shown that increased polyamine intake decreases age-associated pathology and increases longevity in mice. Several foods in the MD, such as fruits and legumes, are foods containing high amount of polyamines. Among age-associated conditions, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and individuals who adhere to a MD have a lower incidence of CVD. The possible contribution of increased polyamine intake to CVD prevention is discussed in this manuscript. Polyamines from food are distributed to all organs and tissues, and long-term intake increases polyamine concentration in blood. Because most polyamines are associated with red and white blood cells, they act to suppress synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines and of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1. Foods with anti-inflammatory properties such as n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are known to help prevent CVD. Additionally, suppression of de novo polyamine synthesis results from increased polyamines intake, normally synthesized from arginine. This in turn increases availability of arginine for synthesis of nitric oxide, which plays an important role in preserving normal vascular physiology.

  9. Simple model of membrane proteins including solvent.

    PubMed

    Pagan, D L; Shiryayev, A; Connor, T P; Gunton, J D

    2006-05-14

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two-dimensional model, similar to the one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three-dimensional model.

  10. Including eddies in global ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semtner, Albert J.; Chervin, Robert M.

    The ocean is a turbulent fluid that is driven by winds and by surface exchanges of heat and moisture. It is as important as the atmosphere in governing climate through heat distribution, but so little is known about the ocean that it remains a “final frontier” on the face of the Earth. Many ocean currents are truly global in extent, such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the “conveyor belt” that connects the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans by flows around the southern tips of Africa and South America. It has long been a dream of some oceanographers to supplement the very limited observational knowledge by reconstructing the currents of the world ocean from the first principles of physics on a computer. However, until very recently, the prospect of doing this was thwarted by the fact that fluctuating currents known as “mesoscale eddies” could not be explicitly included in the calculation.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF WATER CIRCULATION MODEL INCLUDING IRRIGATION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsuki, Shunji; Tanaka, Kenji; Kojiri, Toshiharu; Hamaguchi, Toshio

    It is well known that since agricultural water withdrawal has much affect on water circulation system, accurate analysis of river discharge or water balance are difficult with less regard for it. In this study, water circulation model composed of land surface model and distributed runoff model is proposed at 10km 10km resolution. In this model, irrigation water, which is estimated with land surface model, is introduced to river discharge analysis. The model is applied to the Chao Phraya River in Thailand, and reproduced seasonal water balance. Additionally, the discharge on dry season simulated with the model is improved as a result of including irrigation. Since the model, which is basically developed from global data sets, simulated seasonal change of river discharge, it can be suggested that our model has university to other river basins.

  12. Eigenstates of Moebius nanostructures including curvature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Gravesen, J.; Willatzen, M.

    2005-09-15

    Moebius-shell structures and their physical properties have recently received considerable attention experimentally and theoretically. In this work, eigenstates and associated eigenenergies are determined for a quantum-mechanical particle bounded to a Moebius shell including curvature contributions to the kinetic-energy operator. This is done using a parametrization of the Moebius shell-found by minimizing the elastic energy of the full structure-and employing differential-geometry methods. It is shown that inclusion of curvature contributions to the kinetic energy leads to splitting of the otherwise doubly degenerate groundstate and significantly alters the form of the groundstate and excited-state wavefunctions. Hence, we anticipate qualitative changes in the physical properties of Moebius-shell structures due to surface confinement and curvature effects.

  13. Education Program on Fossil Resources Including Coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usami, Masahiro

    Fossil fuels including coal play a key role as crucial energies in contributing to economic development in Asia. On the other hand, its limited quantity and the environmental problems causing from its usage have become a serious global issue and a countermeasure to solve such problems is very much demanded. Along with the pursuit of sustainable development, environmentally-friendly use of highly efficient fossil resources should be therefore, accompanied. Kyushu-university‧s sophisticated research through long years of accumulated experience on the fossil resources and environmental sectors together with the advanced large-scale commercial and empirical equipments will enable us to foster cooperative research and provide internship program for the future researchers. Then, this program is executed as a consignment business from the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry from 2007 fiscal year to 2009 fiscal year. The lecture that uses the textbooks developed by this program is scheduled to be started a course in fiscal year 2010.

  14. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOEpatents

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  15. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  16. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  17. Drapery assembly including insulated drapery liner

    DOEpatents

    Cukierski, Gwendolyn

    1983-01-01

    A drapery assembly is disclosed for covering a framed wall opening, the assembly including drapery panels hung on a horizontal traverse rod, the rod having a pair of master slides and means for displacing the master slides between open and closed positions. A pair of insulating liner panels are positioned behind the drapery, the remote side edges of the liner panels being connected with the side portions of the opening frame, and the adjacent side edges of the liner panels being connected with a pair of vertically arranged center support members adapted for sliding movement longitudinally of a horizontal track member secured to the upper horizontal portion of the opening frame. Pivotally arranged brackets connect the center support members with the master slides of the traverse rod whereby movement of the master slides to effect opening and closing of the drapery panels effects simultaneous opening and closing of the liner panels.

  18. The integrated disease network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Buchan, Natalie; Larminie, Chris; Pržulj, Nataša

    2014-11-01

    The growing body of transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and genomic data generated from disease states provides a great opportunity to improve our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving diseases and shared between diseases. The use of both clinical and molecular phenotypes will lead to better disease understanding and classification. In this study, we set out to gain novel insights into diseases and their relationships by utilising knowledge gained from system-level molecular data. We integrated different types of biological data including genome-wide association studies data, disease-chemical associations, biological pathways and Gene Ontology annotations into an Integrated Disease Network (IDN), a heterogeneous network where nodes are bio-entities and edges between nodes represent their associations. We also introduced a novel disease similarity measure to infer disease-disease associations from the IDN. Our predicted associations were systemically evaluated against the Medical Subject Heading classification and a statistical measure of disease co-occurrence in PubMed. The strong correlation between our predictions and co-occurrence associations indicated the ability of our approach to recover known disease associations. Furthermore, we presented a case study of Crohn's disease. We demonstrated that our approach not only identified well-established connections between Crohn's disease and other diseases, but also revealed new, interesting connections consistent with emerging literature. Our approach also enabled ready access to the knowledge supporting these new connections, making this a powerful approach for exploring connections between diseases.

  19. Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Crohn's disease is a chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is characterised by transmural, granulomatous inflammation that occurs in a discontinuous pattern, with a tendency to form fistulae. The cause is unknown but may depend on interactions between genetic predisposition, environmental triggers, and mucosal immunity. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical treatments to induce remission in adults with Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce and maintain remission in adults with small-bowel Crohn's disease? What are the effects of surgical interventions to induce remission in adults with colonic Crohn's disease? What are the effects of medical interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease; and to maintain remission following surgery? What are the effects of lifestyle interventions to maintain remission in adults with Crohn's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 93 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aminosalicylates, antibiotics, azathioprine/mercaptopurine, ciclosporin, corticosteroids (oral), enteral nutrition, fish oil, infliximab, methotrexate, probiotics, resection, segmental colectomy, smoking cessation, and strictureplasty. PMID:21524318

  20. Imaging of axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; Baraliakos, X

    2011-03-01

    New bone formation of the vertebral column is pathognomonic for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), while acute and/or chronic changes in the sacroiliac joints are relevant for diagnosis. The 'gold standard' for assessment of structural changes in AS are conventional radiographs, while MRI is useful to assess inflammation. Recent MRI studies have shown that the lower half of the thoracic spine is most commonly affected in AS. Scoring tools for spinal inflammation such as the ASspiMRI-a have been proposed, successfully used in large clinical trials and compared in a multireader experiment; none was finally preferred by OMERACT. Quantification of structural spinal AS changes is performed by the modified Stokes AS Spine Score (mSASSS), which evaluates lateral cervical and lumbar radiographs. Two years was identified as the shortest possible follow-up time based on the reliability and sensitivity to change of the mSASSS. A potential disadvantage of the mSASSS is that the thoracic spine is not included. Recent data based on the mSASSS have suggested that tumour necrosis factor blockers do not inhibit radiographic progression in AS. Since the mean radiographic change is reported to be less than 1 syndesmophyte over 2 years, the sensitivity to change of the mSASSS has been questioned. However, in one study where continuous non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use was compared with on-demand use, a difference between these two methods of drug intake was reported. The face and construct validity of the mSASSS has been criticised because a score of ´1´ contains a mixture of osteodestructive (erosions) and osteoproliferative changes (squaring and sclerosis). A new scoring system, the RASSS, which concentrates only on bone formation and which includes the lower part of the thoracic spine is currently being evaluated. The relationship between inflammation and new bone formation in AS has recently been investigated. Low sclerostin and DKK-1 serum levels, both inhibitors of bone

  1. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  2. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOEpatents

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  3. [Contracts including performance and management of uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Duru, G; Garassus, P; Auray, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Since many decades in France, the most important part of ambulatory health care expenditure is represented by drug consumption. By the fact, French patient is indeed the greatest world consumer of pharmaceuticals treatments. Therefore, the regulation authorities by successive strategies, attempt to limit or even restrict market access for new drugs in the health care sector secured by public social insurance coverage. Common objectives are to assess the reimbursement to scientific studies and to fix the price of therapeutics at an acceptable level for both industries and government. New trends try then to determine recently the drug price in a dual approach, as a component of global and effective contract, including performance and outcome. The first diffusion authorization is diffusion concerned, but this concept takes into account the eventual success of new produces in long-term survey. Signed for a fixed period as reciprocal partnership between regulation authorities and pharmaceutics industries, the contract integrates two dimensions of incertitude. The first one is represented by the strategy of new treatments development according to efficacy and adapted price, and the second one is linked to the result of diffusion and determines adapted rules if eventual non-respects of the previous engagement are registered. This paper discusses problems related to this new dimension of incertitude affected by conditional drug prices in market access strategy and the adapted follow-up of new treatment diffusion fixed by "outcome" contract between French regulation administration and pharmaceutics industries in our recent economic context.

  4. Articles including thin film monolayers and multilayers

    DOEpatents

    Li, DeQuan; Swanson, Basil I.

    1995-01-01

    Articles of manufacture including: (a) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, and a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, (b) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, and a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, (c) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, and a multifunctional organic ligand attached to the metal species, and (d) a base substrate having an oxide surface layer, a multidentate ligand, capable of binding a metal ion, attached to the oxide surface layer of the base substrate, a metal species attached to the multidentate ligand, a multifunctional organic ligand attached to the metal species, and a second metal species attached to the multifunctional organic ligand, are provided, such articles useful in detecting the presence of a selected target species, as nonliear optical materials, or as scavengers for selected target species.

  5. Extending Newtonian Dynamics to Include Stochastic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2009-01-01

    A paper presents further results of continuing research reported in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, the two most recent being Stochastic Representations of Chaos Using Terminal Attractors (NPO-41519), [Vol. 30, No. 5 (May 2006), page 57] and Physical Principle for Generation of Randomness (NPO-43822) [Vol. 33, No. 5 (May 2009), page 56]. This research focuses upon a mathematical formalism for describing post-instability motions of a dynamical system characterized by exponential divergences of trajectories leading to chaos (including turbulence as a form of chaos). The formalism involves fictitious control forces that couple the equations of motion of the system with a Liouville equation that describes the evolution of the probability density of errors in initial conditions. These stabilizing forces create a powerful terminal attractor in probability space that corresponds to occurrence of a target trajectory with probability one. The effect in configuration space (ordinary three-dimensional space as commonly perceived) is to suppress exponential divergences of neighboring trajectories without affecting the target trajectory. As a result, the post-instability motion is represented by a set of functions describing the evolution of such statistical quantities as expectations and higher moments, and this representation is stable.

  6. Design philosophy for reliable systems, including control

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    In the past, use of computers and software to manage physical plant has usually involved systems similar to the clockwork automata of the 17th century. The next generation of plant control will include intelligent systems - computer systems having knowledge of the plant and being capable of intelligent behavior, even though only some control functions will need such expertise. This report develops a framework for a universe of discourse usable by such non-human experts. It is based on the idea that a design has many features of a contract and may be described as a contract between humans and a machine, defining what each must do to attain a goal. Several points are discussed: the use of techniques in analytical redundancy and their place as analogues in administrative control for conventional techniques in physical control; the use of redundant computer systems to protect against hardware faults; the necessity to prove properties of software used in redundant hardware, because software faults are common modes across redundant hardware; and some issues in choosing a programming language for provable control software. Because proof of correctness is costly, it should be used only where necessary. This report concludes that the degree of reliability needed by the plant model used in analytic redundancy protection need not be nearly as reliable as the mechanism to detect discrepancy between plant and model.

  7. Optical design including characteristics of manufactured nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächter, Christoph; Müller, Martin; Förster, Erik; Oliva, Maria; Michaelis, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Micro- and nanostructures enable specific optical functionalities, which rely on diffractive effects or effective medium features, depending on pattern dimension and wavelength. Performance predictions of optical systems which make use of nanostructured materials require having an accurate description of these materials ready to hand within the optical design. At the one hand, nanostructure characteristics which result from rigorous electromagnetic modeling can be used for the optical design. At the other hand, manufactured nanostructures may deviate from their idealized geometry, which will affect the performance of the optical system, wherein these artificial structures will be used. Thus, detailed optical characterization of the micro- or nanostructure functionality is prerequisite for accurate optical design and performance prediction. To this end, several characterization techniques can be applied depending on the scope of the optical design, finally. We report on a general route to include all accessible and required optical information about the nanostructured material within a corresponding model of the nanostructure as a specific optical component which can be used within a ray-trace engine, finally. This is illustrated by a meta-material with asymmetric transmission properties in some more detail.

  8. [Kidney diseases in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kolesárova, Eva; Sirotiaková, Jana; Kozárová, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of important morphological, functional and hemodynamic changes occurring in the kidneys during physiological pregnancy is a prerequisite for proper diagnostics and therapy of renal diseases in pregnancy. Kidney diseases may be kidney diseases complicating pregnancy in previously healthy women, or pre-existing or superposed kidney diseases. Knowledge of renal insufficiency management in pregnancy, including haemodialysis treatment and management of pregnancy in patients who have undergone transplantation, is also important.

  9. Interventions to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections, Including HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Willard

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Treatment Guidelines were last updated in 2006. To update the “Clinical Guide to Prevention Services” section of the 2010 CDC STD Treatment Guidelines, we reviewed the recent science with reference to interventions designed to prevent acquisition of STDs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Major interval developments include (1) licensure and uptake of immunization against genital human papillomavirus, (2) validation of male circumcision as a potent prevention tool against acquisition of HIV and some other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), (3) failure of a promising HIV vaccine candidate to afford protection against HIV acquisition, (4) encouragement about the use of antiretroviral agents as preexposure prophylaxis to reduce risk of HIV and herpes simplex virus acquisition, (5) enhanced emphasis on expedited partner management and rescreening for persons infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, (6) recognition that behavioral interventions will be needed to address a new trend of sexually transmitted hepatitis C among men who have sex with men, and (7) the availability of a modified female condom. A range of preventive interventions is needed to reduce the risks of acquiring STI, including HIV infection, among sexually active people, and a flexible approach targeted to specific populations should integrate combinations of biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions. These would ideally involve an array of prevention contexts, including (1) communications and practices among sexual partners, (2) transactions between individual clients and their healthcare providers, and (3) comprehensive population-level strategies for prioritizing prevention research, ensuring accurate outcome assessment, and formulating health policy. PMID:22080271

  10. Including Tidal Effects in Tsunami Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcas, D.

    2015-12-01

    Recently a new tsunami forecast system SIFT (Short-term Inundation and Forecasting of Tsunamis) has been declared operational by the National Weather Service (NWS) Tsunami Warning Centers. The SIFT system assimilates real-time information from a network of observing systems deployed in the open ocean, to produce on-the-fly estimates of tsunami impact at specific coastal communities. These estimates are computed via the tsunami simulation code MOST (Method of Splitting Tsunami) and include forecast products such as tsunami arrival time, duration of the event, predicted tsunami currents, maximum sea surface elevation and expected inundation areas. These computations are performed under the assumption that the mean sea level remains constant at Mean High Water (MHW) during the entire tsunami event. This assumption produces conservative tsunami forecasts that tend to err on the side of caution with the possibility of substantial overestimates of the inundation areas. To avoid this problem and produce more accurate, operational tsunami forecasts, we investigate the effects of tsunami interaction with tides. The nonlinear dynamic interaction is simulated by first, simulating tidal elevations and currents with Oregon State University tidal model, to obtain boundary and initial conditions to force the MOST tsunami model. Tsunami boundary and initial conditions can be added to those for the tide to study the combined effect. Our results show that even at locations with strong tidal forcing, the tsunami/tide interaction effect has a weakly non-linear effect on the tsunami elevation waveform. This interaction, however, will have a significant effect on the extent of the inundation area. Based on these findings we propose a simple, linear correction to the standard MHW forecast for tsunami time series and inundation area, that can be performed on-the-fly by the SIFT system without the need for complex tidal models.

  11. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a clinical review including Korean cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Only 5th decade ago, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was only recognized as disease group of presenting features like peripheral lymphocytosis, organomegaly including of splenomegaly. As understanding of disease biology and molecular diagnostic tools are getting improved gradually, characterization of variation in CLL’s clinical courses was facilitated, resulting in better risk stratification and targeted treatments. Consequently multiple new targeted agents have been used in treatment of CLL, it makes improved clinical outcome. Rituximab containing chemoimmunotherapy (combination of rituximab, fludarabine, and cyclophosphamide) have shown better overall response rate and progression-free survival on fit patients’ group in front-line setting, result in standard first-line therapeutic option for CLL. Furthermore, after introducing that the B-cell receptor is crucial for the evolution and progression of CLL, emerging treatments targeting highly activated surface antigens and oncogenic signaling pathways have been associated with several successes in recent decades. These include new anti-CD 20 monoclonal antibody (obinutuzumab), the bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor (ibrutinib), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor (idelalisib), and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 inhibitor (ABT-199 and ABT-263). So, we discuss not only general pathophysiology of CLL, but also rapidly advancing treatment strategies that are being studied or approved for treatment of CLL. PMID:27044858

  12. Therapeutic potential of culinary-medicinal mushrooms for the management of neurodegenerative diseases: diversity, metabolite, and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Naidu, Murali; Wong, Kah-Hui; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Mushrooms have long been used not only as food but also for the treatment of various ailments. Although at its infancy, accumulated evidence suggested that culinary-medicinal mushrooms may play an important role in the prevention of many age-associated neurological dysfunctions, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Therefore, efforts have been devoted to a search for more mushroom species that may improve memory and cognition functions. Such mushrooms include Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, Sarcodon spp., Antrodia camphorata, Pleurotus giganteus, Lignosus rhinocerotis, Grifola frondosa, and many more. Here, we review over 20 different brain-improving culinary-medicinal mushrooms and at least 80 different bioactive secondary metabolites isolated from them. The mushrooms (either extracts from basidiocarps/mycelia or isolated compounds) reduced beta amyloid-induced neurotoxicity and had anti-acetylcholinesterase, neurite outgrowth stimulation, nerve growth factor (NGF) synthesis, neuroprotective, antioxidant, and anti-(neuro)inflammatory effects. The in vitro and in vivo studies on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the bioactive effects of mushrooms are also discussed. Mushrooms can be considered as useful therapeutic agents in the management and/or treatment of neurodegeneration diseases. However, this review focuses on in vitro evidence and clinical trials with humans are needed.

  13. Compact Radar Transceiver with Included Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLinden, Matthew; Rincon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) is an eight-channel phased array radar system that employs solid-state radar transceivers, a microstrip patch antenna, and a reconfigurable waveform generator and processor unit. The original DBSAR transceiver design utilizes connectorized electronic components that tend to be physically large and heavy. To achieve increased functionality in a smaller volume, PCB (printed circuit board) transceivers were designed to replace the large connectorized transceivers. One of the most challenging problems designing the transceivers in a PCB format was achieving proper performance in the calibration path. For a radar loop-back calibration path, a portion of the transmit signal is coupled out of the antenna feed and fed back into the receiver. This is achieved using passive components for stability and repeatability. Some signal also leaks through the receive path. As these two signal paths are correlated via an unpredictable phase, the leakage through the receive path during transmit must be 30 dB below the calibration path. For DBSAR s design, this requirement called for a 100-dB isolation in the receiver path during transmit. A total of 16 solid-state L-band transceivers on a PCB format were designed. The transceivers include frequency conversion stages, T/R switching, and a calibration path capable of measuring the transmit power-receiver gain product during transmit for pulse-by-pulse calibration or matched filtering. In particular, this calibration path achieves 100-dB isolation between the transmitted signal and the low-noise amplifier through the use of a switching network and a section of physical walls achieving attenuation of radiated leakage. The transceivers were designed in microstrip PCBs with lumped elements and individually packaged components for compactness. Each transceiver was designed on a single PCB with a custom enclosure providing interior walls and compartments to isolate transceiver

  14. Periodontal Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Small Text Medium Text Large Text Periodontal Diseases Periodontal diseases are disorders of the gums, or gingiva, and other tissues around the teeth. Periodontal diseases vary in severity, from the reversible, recurring mild ...

  15. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Parkinson's Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Parkinson's Disease A A ... symptoms of something called Parkinson's disease. What Is Parkinson's Disease? You may have seen the actor Michael ...

  16. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Lyme Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Lyme Disease A A A ... Northwest, and the northern midwestern states. What Is Lyme Disease? People get Lyme disease through tick bites. The ...

  17. Sandhoff Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and improve diagnosis) to effectively evaluate brain biochemistry and disease progression, and expanding the use of ... disease and improve diagnosis) to effectively evaluate brain biochemistry and disease progression, and expanding the use of ...

  18. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    The dilemma of designing an advanced undergraduate laboratory lies in the desire to teach and reinforce basic principles and techniques while at the same time exposing students to the excitement of research. We report here on a one-semester, project-based biochemistry laboratory that combines the best features of a cookbook approach (high success rate, achievement of defined goals) with those of an investigative, discovery-based approach (student involvement in the experimental design, excitement of real research). Individual modules may be selected and combined to meet the needs of different courses and different institutions. The central theme of this lab is protein purification and design. This laboratory accompanies the first semester of biochemistry (Structure and Function of Macromolecules, a course taken mainly by junior and senior chemistry and biological chemistry majors). The protein chosen as the object of study is the enzyme lysozyme, which is utilized in all projects. It is suitable for a student lab because it is easily and inexpensively obtained from egg white and is extremely stable, and its high isoelectric point (pI = 11) allows for efficient separation from other proteins by ion-exchange chromatography. Furthermore, a literature search conducted by the resourceful student reveals a wealth of information, since lysozyme has been the subject of numerous studies. It was the first enzyme whose structure was determined by crystallography (1). Hendrickson et al. (2) have previously described an intensive one-month laboratory course centered around lysozyme, although their emphasis is on protein stability rather than purification and engineering. Lysozyme continues to be the focus of much exciting new work on protein folding and dynamics, structure and activity (3 - 5). This lab course includes the following features: (i) reinforcement of basic techniques, such as preparation of buffers, simple enzyme kinetics, and absorption spectroscopy; (ii

  19. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease: Reconsidering the Role of Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy H.; Bigbee, Matthew J.; Boynton, Grace E.; Wakeham, Colin M.; Rosenheim, Hilary M.; Staral, Christopher J.; Morrissey, James L.; Hund, Amanda K.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the most common neurodegenerative diseases with age as the greatest risk factor. As the general population experiences extended life span, preparation for the prevention and treatment of these and other age-associated neurological diseases are warranted. Since epidemiological studies suggested that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use decreased risk for AD and PD, increasing attention has been devoted to understanding the costs and benefits of the innate neuroinflammatory response to functional recovery following pathology onset. This review will provide a general overview on the role of neuroinflammation in these neurodegenerative diseases and an update on NSAID treatment in recent experimental animal models, epidemiological analyses, and clinical trials. PMID:27713331

  20. 76 FR 35026 - Hutchinson Technology, Inc., Including On-Site Workers Leased From Doherty, Including Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Doherty, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through Aramark Business..., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid Through Aramark Business Facilities, LLC... wages reported under a separate unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name Aramark...

  1. Promoting Social Inclusion Counting with Everyone: Learning Communities and INCLUD-ED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatt, Suzanne; Ojala, Mikko; Soler, Marta

    2011-01-01

    The scientific community has provided a wide range of evidence that family and community involvement in schools benefits not only students' learning but also their surrounding community. The INCLUD-ED project has conducted case studies of successful schools around Europe that have strong community participation. Some of them are engaged in the…

  2. [Oral manifestations in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Jensen, Siri Beier

    2010-11-01

    Systemic diseases may affect the oral tissues, i.e. oral mucosa, salivary glands, teeth or bone, and oral manifestations will frequently present early, i.e. in association with (non-fulminant) systemic disease. Thus, recognition and proper diagnosis is essential to initiate appropriate treatment schedules. Key examples of systemic disease groups with oral manifestations include dermatological, inflammatory connective tissue diseases, haematological and inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases, as well as neurological and endocrine diseases.

  3. Gum Disease and Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ...

  4. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ... Gum Disease Risk Factors Gum Disease Symptoms Gum Disease Prevention Gum Disease and Other Diseases Gum Disease and ...

  5. The role of free radicals in the aging brain and Parkinson's Disease: convergence and parallelism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hemant; Lim, Hyung-Woo; More, Sandeep Vasant; Kim, Byung-Wook; Koppula, Sushruta; Kim, In Su; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2012-01-01

    Free radical production and their targeted action on biomolecules have roles in aging and age-related disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). There is an age-associated increase in oxidative damage to the brain, and aging is considered a risk factor for PD. Dopaminergic neurons show linear fallout of 5-10% per decade with aging; however, the rate and intensity of neuronal loss in patients with PD is more marked than that of aging. Here, we enumerate the common link between aging and PD at the cellular level with special reference to oxidative damage caused by free radicals. Oxidative damage includes mitochondrial dysfunction, dopamine auto-oxidation, α-synuclein aggregation, glial cell activation, alterations in calcium signaling, and excess free iron. Moreover, neurons encounter more oxidative stress as a counteracting mechanism with advancing age does not function properly. Alterations in transcriptional activity of various pathways, including nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, mitogen activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and reduced activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione with aging might be correlated with the increased incidence of PD.

  6. Diseases of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Densmore, Christine L; Green, David Earl

    2007-01-01

    The development and refinement of amphibian medicine comprise an ongoing science that reflects the unique life history of these animals and our growing knowledge of amphibian diseases. Amphibians are notoriously fastidious in terms of captive care requirements, and the majority of diseases of amphibians maintained in captivity will relate directly or indirectly to husbandry and management. Investigators have described many infectious and noninfectious diseases that occur among various species of captive and wild amphibians, and there is considerable overlap in the diseases of captive versus free-ranging populations. In this article, some of the more commonly reported infectious and noninfectious diseases as well as their etiological agents and causative factors are reviewed. Some of the more common amphibian diseases with bacterial etiologies include bacterial dermatosepticemia or "red leg syndrome," flavobacteriosis, mycobacteriosis, and chlamydiosis. The most common viral diseases of amphibians are caused by the ranaviruses, which have an impact on many species of anurans and caudates. Mycotic and mycotic-like organisms cause a number of diseases among amphibians, including chytridiomycosis, zygomycoses, chromomycoses, saprolegniasis, and ichthyophoniasis. Protozoan parasites of amphibians include a variety of amoeba, ciliates, flagellates, and sporozoans Common metazoan parasites include various myxozoans, helminths (particularly trematodes and nematodes), and arthropods. Commonly encountered noninfectious disease etiologies for amphibians include neoplasia, absolute or specific nutritional deficiencies or overloads, chemical toxicities, and inadequate husbandry or environmental management.

  7. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  8. Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Perry G.; Ebbert, Mark T. W.; Kauwe, John S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that lacks disease-altering treatments. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of Alzheimer's disease, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset Alzheimer's disease are largely understood with variants in three different genes leading to disease. In contrast, while several common alleles associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease, including APOE, have been identified using association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23984328

  9. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413... services are included in the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011: (a) Renal...

  10. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity.

  11. Beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

  12. Celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Scherer, John R

    2008-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder caused by the continued ingestion of gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye, by predisposed individuals. With the development of highly sensitive serologic tests, this has become an increasingly recognized disease with prevalence as high as 1% in certain patient populations, such as Caucasian females. Almost all celiac patients carry the human leukocyte antigen DQ2/DQ8 gene. Much has recently been discovered about the role of the innate immune system in exposing genetically vulnerable patients to the pathogenic gliadin fraction of gluten. The "classical" presentation of chronic diarrhea and malabsorption is now a rarity. Due to earlier detection and increased awareness, celiac disease now presents with a myriad of "atypical" signs and symptoms such as iron-deficiency anemia and osteoporosis. Associated conditions include T-cell lymphoma, dermatitis herpetiformis, autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes. Diagnosis requires serologic confirmation with either antiendomysial or antitransglutaminase antibodies as well as histologic confirmation from endoscopic small bowel biopsy. The only effective treatment necessitates a lifelong, continual adherence to a gluten-free diet.

  13. Cardiovascular disease in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Santos; Nurmohamed, Michael T; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD), including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis, are prevalent conditions worldwide, with a considerable burden on healthcare systems. They are associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. In this review, we focused on the epidemiology, traditional CV risk factors, genetics, and the link between chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis, and CV disease. Remarkably, patients with IRD have higher vulnerability to atheromatous plaques. The risk of unstable plaques is higher in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls. Active disease is a characteristic ascribed to vulnerability and rupture of plaques and a cause of thrombosis in IRD. Management of CV risk in patients with IRD includes optimal control of disease activity. CV risk stratification by applying risk charts is also essential. Imaging techniques might be useful to determine the actual CV risk of patients with IRD who are included in the category of intermediate or moderate CV risk.

  14. Including Young Children With "New" Chronic Illnesses in an Early Childhood Education Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauvre, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Presents suggestions for successfully including young children with "new" life-threatening, chronic illnesses -- various types of cancer, heart, liver, and kidney diseases -- in early childhood education classes. (BB)

  15. Paget disease of the bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may indicate Paget disease include: Bone scan Bone x-ray Elevated markers of bone breakdown (for example, N-telopeptide) This disease may ... of Paget disease. Alternative Names Osteitis deformans Images ... X-ray References Ralston SH. Paget disease of bone. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  16. Oxidative Stress Induced Mitochondrial Failure and Vascular Hypoperfusion as a Key Initiator for the Development of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Palacios, Hector H; Gasimov, Eldar; Obrenovich, Mark E; Morales, Ludis; Leszek, Jerzy; Bragin, Valentin; Solís Herrera, Arturo; Gokhman, Dmitry

    2010-01-19

    Mitochondrial dysfunction may be a principal underlying event in aging, including age-associated brain degeneration. Mitochondria provide energy for basic metabolic processes. Their decay with age impairs cellular metabolism and leads to a decline of cellular function. Alzheimer disease (AD) and cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) are two leading causes of age-related dementia. Increasing evidence strongly supports the theory that oxidative stress, largely due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), induces mitochondrial damage, which arises from chronic hypoperfusion and is primarily responsible for the pathogenesis that underlies both disease processes. Mitochondrial membrane potential, respiratory control ratios and cellular oxygen consumption decline with age and correlate with increased oxidant production. The sustained hypoperfusion and oxidative stress in brain tissues can stimulate the expression of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) and brain endothelium probably increase the accumulation of oxidative stress products, which therefore contributes to blood brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and brain parenchymal cell damage. Determining the mechanisms behind these imbalances may provide crucial information in the development of new, more effective therapies for stroke and AD patients in the near future.

  17. Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory ... small intestine called the ileum. The cause of Crohn's disease is unknown. It may be due to an ...

  18. Pneumococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsroom Blogs Image Library News Conferences Press Releases Radio Public Service Announcements Real Stories, Real People Share ... National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) Pneumococcal Disease Radio Public Service Announcement National Foundation for Infectious Diseases ( ...

  19. Alzheimer disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000760.htm Alzheimer disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer disease is one form of dementia. It affects memory, ...

  20. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... they can't breathe deeply. Pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis are examples of lung tissue disease. Lung circulation ... tuberculosis Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Patient Instructions Chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  1. Huntington's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited disease that causes certain nerve cells in the brain to waste away. ... express emotions. If one of your parents has Huntington's disease, you have a 50 percent chance of getting ...

  2. Kawasaki Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Kawasaki Disease? Kawasaki (KAH-wah-SAH-ke) disease is a ... condition involves inflammation of the blood vessels. In Kawasaki disease, the walls of the blood vessels throughout the ...

  3. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect

    ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education

    2011-04-14

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  4. Launch Lock Assemblies Including Axial Gap Amplification Devices and Spacecraft Isolation Systems Including the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Tim Daniel (Inventor); Hindle, Timothy (Inventor); Young, Ken (Inventor); Davis, Torey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments of a launch lock assembly are provided, as are embodiments of a spacecraft isolation system including one or more launch lock assemblies. In one embodiment, the launch lock assembly includes first and second mount pieces, a releasable clamp device, and an axial gap amplification device. The releasable clamp device normally maintains the first and second mount pieces in clamped engagement; and, when actuated, releases the first and second mount pieces from clamped engagement to allow relative axial motion there between. The axial gap amplification device normally residing in a blocking position wherein the gap amplification device obstructs relative axial motion between the first and second mount pieces. The axial gap amplification device moves into a non-blocking position when the first and second mount pieces are released from clamped engagement to increase the range of axial motion between the first and second mount pieces.

  5. TRIM proteins and diseases.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2017-01-07

    Ubiquitination is one of the posttranslational modifications that regulates a number of intracellular events including signal transduction, protein quality control, transcription, cell cycle, apoptosis and development. The ubiquitin system functions as a garbage machine to degrade target proteins and as a regulator for several signalling pathways. Biochemical reaction of ubiquitination requires several enzymes including E1, E2 and E3, and E3 ubiquitin ligases play roles as receptors for recognizing target proteins. Most of the tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases. Recent studies have shown that some TRIM proteins function as important regulators for a variety of diseases including cancer, inflammatory diseases, infectious diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders, chromosomal abnormalities and developmental diseases. In this review, we summarize the involvement of TRIM proteins in the aetiology of various diseases.

  6. Parkinson's disease and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Vaserman, Nathalie

    2005-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with an increased risk of falls. The risk is greatest in patients with advanced disease. Because Parkinson's disease usually occurs late in life, the risk factors related to the neurological impairments add to those associated with aging. The incidence of fractures is high in patients with Parkinson's disease, with femoral neck fractures in older women being particularly common. Risk factors for fractures include a low body mass index, limited exposure to sunlight, an inadequate vitamin D intake with low 25-OH vitamin D levels, and bone loss. Several studies found decreased bone mineral density values at the femoral neck and lumbar spine in patients with Parkinson's disease. Although this decrease is ascribable in part to factors unrelated with Parkinson's disease, such as older age and female gender, Parkinson's disease itself also plays a role, most notably in patients with severe neurological impairments (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV).

  7. Osteoporosis and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:20978554

  8. Biophysical Insights into How Surfaces, Including Lipid Membranes, Modulate Protein Aggregation Related to Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Yates, Elizabeth A.; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-01-01

    There are a vast number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Huntington’s disease (HD), associated with the rearrangement of specific proteins to non-native conformations that promotes aggregation and deposition within tissues and/or cellular compartments. These diseases are commonly classified as protein-misfolding or amyloid diseases. The interaction of these proteins with liquid/surface interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon with potential implications for protein-misfolding diseases. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that significant conformational changes can be induced in proteins encountering surfaces, which can play a critical role in nucleating aggregate formation or stabilizing specific aggregation states. Surfaces of particular interest in neurodegenerative diseases are cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominately comprised of lipid components. The two-dimensional liquid environments provided by lipid bilayers can profoundly alter protein structure and dynamics by both specific and non-specific interactions. Importantly for misfolding diseases, these bilayer properties can not only modulate protein conformation, but also exert influence on aggregation state. A detailed understanding of the influence of (sub)cellular surfaces in driving protein aggregation and/or stabilizing specific aggregate forms could provide new insights into toxic mechanisms associated with these diseases. Here, we review the influence of surfaces in driving and stabilizing protein aggregation with a specific emphasis on lipid membranes. PMID:23459674

  9. 38 CFR 3.309 - Disease subject to presumptive service connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (including hypertensive heart disease) and their complications (including myocardial infarction, congestive..., acute, subacute, and old myocardial infarction; atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease...

  10. 38 CFR 3.309 - Disease subject to presumptive service connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (including hypertensive heart disease) and their complications (including myocardial infarction, congestive..., acute, subacute, and old myocardial infarction; atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease...

  11. 38 CFR 3.309 - Disease subject to presumptive service connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (including hypertensive heart disease) and their complications (including myocardial infarction, congestive..., acute, subacute, and old myocardial infarction; atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease...

  12. 38 CFR 3.309 - Disease subject to presumptive service connection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (including hypertensive heart disease) and their complications (including myocardial infarction, congestive..., acute, subacute, and old myocardial infarction; atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease...

  13. [Heart and Steinert's disease].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O

    2011-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (Steinert disease) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by myotonia and multiorgan damage. This latter is the most frequent of the adult-onset muscular dystrophies. Heart involvement is often associated, including cardiomyopathies, atrioventricular block, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  14. Disease modification in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Henchcliffe, Claire; Severt, W Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related, progressive, multisystem neurodegenerative disorder resulting in significant morbidity and mortality, as well as a growing social and financial burden in an aging population. The hallmark of PD is loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, leading to bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor. Current pharmacological treatment is therefore centred upon dopamine replacement to alleviate symptoms. However, two major problems complicate this approach: (i) motor symptoms continue to progress, requiring increasing doses of medication, which result in both short-term adverse effects and intermediate- to long-term motor complications; (ii) dopamine replacement does little to treat non-dopaminergic motor and non-motor symptoms, which are an important source of morbidity, including dementia, sleep disturbances, depression, orthostatic hypotension, and postural instability leading to falls. It is critical, therefore, to develop a broader and more fundamental therapeutic approach to PD, and major research efforts have focused upon developing neuroprotective interventions. Despite many encouraging preclinical data suggesting the possibility of addressing the underlying pathophysiology by slowing cell loss, efforts to translate this into the clinical realm have largely proved disappointing in the past. Barriers to finding neuroprotective or disease-modifying drugs in PD include a lack of validated biomarkers of progression, which hampers clinical trial design and interpretation; difficulties separating symptomatic and neuroprotective effects of candidate neuroprotective therapies; and possibly fundamental flaws in some of the basic preclinical models and testing. However, three recent clinical trials have used a novel delayed-start design in an attempt to overcome some of these roadblocks. While not examining markers of cell loss and function, which would determine neuroprotective effects, this trial design

  15. Combination DMARD therapy including corticosteroids in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Möttönen, T T; Hannonen, P J; Boers, M

    1999-01-01

    A number of reports indicating the growing acceptance of simultaneous therapy with multiple disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), as well as the use of more aggressive treatment measures in the early phases of disease to combat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), have appeared during the last decade. However, only a few randomized controlled clinical trials have been conducted on the use of DMARD combinations in early RA. We review these trials in this article. In two separate one-year studies combination therapy with sulphasalazine (SSZ) and methotrexate (MTX) seemed to offer no benefits compared to either drug used as monotherapy. On the other hand, the DMARD combinations so far proven to be superior to single DMARDs have initially also included a corticosteroid component. In the COBRA study (Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis) the combination of SSZ (2 gm/day), MTX (7.5 mg/week for 40 weeks), and prednisolone (Prd) (initially 60 mg/day, tapered in 6 weekly steps to 7.5 mg/day and stopped after 28 weeks) compared to SSZ alone (2 gm/day) resulted in significantly better clinical outcomes at week 28. Although the difference in clinical response between the treatment arms was lost at week 58, the progression of joint damage remained statistically significantly slower at week 80 in the patients initially assigned to the combination therapy. Furthermore, in the FIN-RACo trial (Finnish Rheumatoid Arthritis Combination Therapy Trial), therapy using a "tailored-steps" strategy with SSZ (1-2 gm/day), MTX (7.5-1.5 mg/week), hydroxychloroquine (300 mg/day), and Prd (up to 10 mg/day) yielded a significantly increased remission rate and less peripheral joint damage at two years than the single DMARD treatment strategy (initially SSZ 2 gm/day), with or without Prd. Adverse effects in both study arms were comparable. Two additional preliminary reports (in abstract form) suggest that intensive local therapy in the form of intra-articular injections added to single or

  16. A retrospective classification of diagnoses in terms of DSM-5 for patients included in randomized controlled trials of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761(®).

    PubMed

    Hoerr, Robert; Zaudig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    When the early trials of Ginkgo biloba extract EGb 761(®) were conducted, different terms were used to denote ageing-associated neurocognitive disorders. With the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), a taxonomy covering dementia and pre-dementia stages of such disorders became available. DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for neurocognitive disorders (NCDs) were applied to patients with any type of ageing-associated cognitive impairment, including dementia, enrolled in randomized controlled clinical trials of EGb 761(®), taking into account the reported inclusion and exclusion criteria and patient characteristics at baseline. For 23 of 31 trials (74 %), the inclusion diagnoses could be classified as NCD in accordance with DSM-5. Thirteen trials enrolled patients with major NCD, four trials enrolled patients with mild NCD and six trials enrolled patients with NCD, who could not be classified unambiguously as having mild or major NCD. Although various terms were formerly used for neurocognitive disorders, the patients enrolled in the majority of clinical trials with EGb 761(®) could be classified retrospectively using modern DSM-5 diagnostic criteria.

  17. Expanding the Repertoire of Biomarkers for Alzheimer’s Disease: Targeted and Non-targeted Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Galasko, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The first biofluid markers developed for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) used targeted approaches for discovery. These initial biomarkers were directed at key protein constituents of the hallmark brain lesions in AD. Biomarkers for plaques targeted the amyloid beta protein (Aβ) and for tangles, the microtubule-associated protein tau. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of Aβ and tau have excellent diagnostic utility and can be used to monitor aspects of therapeutic development. Recent research has extended our current concepts of AD, which now include a slow buildup of pathology during a long pre-symptomatic period, a complex cascade of pathological pathways in the brain that may accelerate once symptoms develop, the potential of aggregated proteins to spread across brain pathways, and interactions with vascular and other age-associated brain pathologies. There are many potential roles for biomarkers within this landscape. A more diverse set of biomarkers would provide a better picture of the staging and state of pathological events in the brain across the stages of AD. The aim of this review is to focus on methods of biomarker discovery that may help to expand the currently accepted biomarkers. Opportunities and approaches for targeted and non-targeted (or −omic) biomarker discovery are highlighted, with examples from recent studies. How biomarker discoveries can be developed and integrated to become useful tools in diagnostic and therapeutic efforts is discussed. PMID:26733934

  18. Hippocampal atrophy and ventricular enlargement in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Liana G; Green, Amity E; Babakchanian, Sona; Hwang, Kristy S; Chou, Yi-Yu; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia worldwide. Hippocampal atrophy and ventricular enlargement have been associated with AD but also with normal aging. We analyzed 1.5-T brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 46 cognitively normal elderly individuals (NC), 33 mild cognitive impairment and 43 AD patients. Hippocampal and ventricular analyses were conducted with 2 novel semiautomated segmentation approaches followed by the radial distance mapping technique. Multiple linear regression was used to assess the effects of age and diagnosis on hippocampal and ventricular volumes and radial distance. In addition, 3-dimensional map correction for multiple comparisons was made with permutation testing. As expected, most significant hippocampal atrophy and ventricular enlargement were seen in the AD versus NC comparison. Mild cognitive impairment patients showed intermediate levels of hippocampal atrophy and ventricular enlargement. Significant effects of age on hippocampal volume and radial distance were seen in the pooled sample and in the NC and AD groups considered separately. Age-associated differences were detected in all hippocampal subfields and in the frontal and body/occipital horn portions of the lateral ventricles. Aging affects both the hippocampus and lateral ventricles independent of AD pathology, and should be included as covariate in all structural, hippocampal, and ventricular analyses when possible.

  19. Diet and Chronic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that improve insulin sensitivity usually lead to improvements in risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity include chromium and polyphenols found in c...

  20. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe enough, blocked blood flow can cause tissue death and can sometimes lead to amputation of the foot or leg. The main risk factor for PAD is smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases ...

  1. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... acquired CJD. CJD belongs to a family of human and animal diseases known as the transmissible spongiform ... CJD is the most common of the known human TSEs. Other human TSEs include kuru, fatal familial ...

  2. Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine thyroid function include: Free T4 test Serum TSH T3 Thyroid autoantibodies Imaging studies and fine needle biopsy are generally not needed to diagnose Hashimoto thyroiditis. This disease may also change the results of the following ...

  3. Von Willebrand disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... done to diagnose this disease include: Bleeding time Blood typing Factor VIII level Platelet function analysis Platelet count Ristocetin cofactor test Von Willebrand factor specific tests ... invasive procedure. Blood plasma or certain factor VIII preparations may also ...

  4. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  5. Columnaris Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium, Flavobacterium columnare. The disease was first described in 1917-1919 in the United States and the bacterium was not successfully isolated and grown in the laboratory until 1944. Columnaris disease continues to be a prevalent disease of...

  6. The prevalence and social patterning of chronic diseases among older people in a population undergoing health transition. A 10/66 Group cross-sectional population-based survey in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Very little of the increased attention towards chronic diseases in countries with low and middle incomes has been directed towards older people, who contribute 72% of all deaths, and 14% of all Disability Adjusted Life Years linked to this group of conditions in those regions. We aimed to study the prevalence of physical, mental and cognitive diseases and impairments among older people in the Dominican Republic, their social patterning, and their relative contributions to disability. Methods A cross-sectional catchment area one-phase survey of chronic disease diagnoses, physical impairments, risk factors and associated disability among 2011 people aged 65 years and over (of whom 1451 gave fasting blood samples) in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Results The most prevalent diagnoses were hypertension (73.0%), anaemia (35.0%), diabetes (17.5%), depression (13.8%) and dementia (11.7%), with 39.6% meeting criteria for metabolic syndrome. After direct standardization (for age and sex) the prevalences of stroke (standardized morbidity ratio [SMR] 100) and hypertension (SMR 108) were similar to those in the United States of America National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES reference SMR 100), while those of diabetes (SMR 83) and metabolic syndrome (SMR 72) were somewhat lower. Anaemia was three times more common than in the USA (SMR 310). Diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, obesity and the metabolic syndrome were associated with affluence and female sex. Arthritis, anaemia, dementia and stroke were strongly age-associated and these conditions were also the main independent contributors to disability. Conclusions The prevalence of many chronic diseases is similar in predominately low socioeconomic status neighbourhoods in the Dominican Republic to that in the USA. Prevalence of age-associated conditions is likely to increase with demographic ageing. There is also scope for increases in cardiovascular disease prevalence, if, as observed in

  7. Optogenetics for neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vann, Kiara T; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating conditions that lead to progressive degeneration of neurons. Neurodegeneration may result in ataxia, dementia, and muscle atrophies, etc. Despite enormous research efforts that have been made, there is lack of effective therapeutic interventions for most of these diseases. Optogenetics is a recently developed novel technique that combines optics and genetics to modulate the activity of specific neurons. Optogenetics has been implemented in various studies including neuropsychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the recent advance in using this technique for the studies of common neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27186317

  8. The potential protective effect of tramiprosate (homotaurine) against Alzheimer's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Caltagirone, Carlo; Ferrannini, Luigi; Marchionni, Niccolò; Nappi, Giuseppe; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Trabucchi, Marco

    2012-12-01

    Due to the progressive aging of the population and to the age-associated increase in its incidence, Alzheimer's disease (AD) will become in near future one of the major challenges that healthcare systems will have to face with in developed countries. Since the pathophysiological process of AD is thought to begin many years before the clinical diagnosis of dementia, in theory there is an opportunity for preventive therapeutic interventions. In recent years, there has been a growing interest, supported by a large number of experimental and epidemiological studies, in the beneficial effects of some natural compounds in preventing various age-related pathologic conditions, including brain aging and neurodegeneration. Homotaurine, a small aminosulfonate compound that is present in different species of marine red algae, has been shown, in both in vitro and in vivo models, to provide a relevant neuroprotective effect by its specific anti- amyloid activity and by its γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor affinity. The therapeutic efficacy of homotaurine in AD has been investigated in a pivotal Phase III clinical study that did not reach its pre-defined primary endpoints. However, post-hoc analyses have shown positive and significant effects of homotaurine on secondary endpoints and subgroups of patients, including a reduction in hippocampal volume loss and lower decline in memory function in the overall cohort, as well as a reduction in global cognitive decline in APOE4 allele carriers, suggesting a disease-modifying effects. In this review, we will examine the pre-clinical and clinical evidence supporting the potential role of homotaurine as a promising candidate for both primary and secondary prevention of AD.

  9. The Role of Free Radicals in the Aging Brain and Parkinson’s Disease: Convergence and Parallelism

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Hemant; Lim, Hyung-Woo; More, Sandeep Vasant; Kim, Byung-Wook; Koppula, Sushruta; Kim, In Su; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2012-01-01

    Free radical production and their targeted action on biomolecules have roles in aging and age-related disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). There is an age-associated increase in oxidative damage to the brain, and aging is considered a risk factor for PD. Dopaminergic neurons show linear fallout of 5–10% per decade with aging; however, the rate and intensity of neuronal loss in patients with PD is more marked than that of aging. Here, we enumerate the common link between aging and PD at the cellular level with special reference to oxidative damage caused by free radicals. Oxidative damage includes mitochondrial dysfunction, dopamine auto-oxidation, α-synuclein aggregation, glial cell activation, alterations in calcium signaling, and excess free iron. Moreover, neurons encounter more oxidative stress as a counteracting mechanism with advancing age does not function properly. Alterations in transcriptional activity of various pathways, including nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, glycogen synthase kinase 3β, mitogen activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, and reduced activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione with aging might be correlated with the increased incidence of PD. PMID:22949875

  10. Rare Diseases Research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Extensive public-private partnerships, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the rare diseases community, which is seeing a renewed industry interest in smaller niche markets, have resulted in an increase of interventions for rare diseases. Significant collaborative efforts are required among the pharmaceutical industry, foundations, patient-advocacy groups, academic and government investigators and funding programs, regulatory scientists, and reimbursement agencies to meet the unmet diagnostic and treatment needs for approximately 25 million people in the United States with 7,000 rare diseases. The expanding role and outreach activities of patient-advocacy groups have increased public awareness. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as a disorder or condition with a prevalence of < 200,000 people. In 2011, the NIH provided > $3.5 billion for rare diseases research, including $750 million for orphan product development activities, nearly 11.4% of the NIH research budget. Several research institutes and centers of the NIH, including the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, have initiated varied translational research efforts to address the absence of preclinical and clinical data required for regulatory review purposes. Clinicians can expect to see significant increases in requests from patients and their families to participate in patient registries and natural history or observational studies to gather specific information from a larger pool of patients on the progression of the disease or response to treatments. An expanding emphasis on rare diseases provides hope for the millions of patients with rare diseases. PMID:23880676

  11. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  12. Myopathy in Addison's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mor, F; Green, P; Wysenbeek, A J

    1987-01-01

    Since the first description of primary adrenocortical insufficiency by Thomas Addison in 1855 several large series of patients with Addison's disease have been published. The common signs and symptoms include: weakness, hyperpigmentation, weight loss, gastrointestinal complaints, and hypotension. It is rare for patients with Addison's disease to present with musculoskeletal symptoms including flexion contractures, hyperkalaemic neuromyopathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, migratory myalgia, sciatica-like pain, and low back pain. Myopathy has not been previously described in Addison's disease. Herein we report a patient presenting with severe hyponatraemia and myopathy which resolved after steroid replacement therapy. PMID:3813679

  13. Neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Heneka, Michael T; Carson, Monica J; El Khoury, Joseph; Landreth, Gary E; Brosseron, Frederic; Feinstein, Douglas L; Jacobs, Andreas H; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Vitorica, Javier; Ransohoff, Richard M; Herrup, Karl; Frautschy, Sally A; Finsen, Bente; Brown, Guy C; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Yamanaka, Koji; Koistinaho, Jari; Latz, Eicke; Halle, Annett; Petzold, Gabor C; Town, Terrence; Morgan, Dave; Shinohara, Mari L; Perry, V Hugh; Holmes, Clive; Bazan, Nicolas G; Brooks, David J; Hunot, Stéphane; Joseph, Bertrand; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Garaschuk, Olga; Boddeke, Erik; Dinarello, Charles A; Breitner, John C; Cole, Greg M; Golenbock, Douglas T; Kummer, Markus P

    2015-04-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis is not restricted to the neuronal compartment, but includes strong interactions with immunological mechanisms in the brain. Misfolded and aggregated proteins bind to pattern recognition receptors on microglia and astroglia, and trigger an innate immune response characterised by release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to disease progression and severity. Genome-wide analysis suggests that several genes that increase the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease encode factors that regulate glial clearance of misfolded proteins and the inflammatory reaction. External factors, including systemic inflammation and obesity, are likely to interfere with immunological processes of the brain and further promote disease progression. Modulation of risk factors and targeting of these immune mechanisms could lead to future therapeutic or preventive strategies for Alzheimer's disease.

  14. [Bone disease in Gaucher's disease].

    PubMed

    Roca Espiau, Mercedes

    2011-09-01

    The exposition aims, is to review the pathophysiological mechanisms of bone marrow involvement and the patterns of marrow infiltration by Gaucher cells. We have reviewed the different methods of assessment of bone marrow infiltration and its temporal development. Qualitative methods include simple radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and radioisotope. The simple radiography is the basic element, but its sensitivity is limited and only allows for assessing changes and trabecular bone remodeling MRI allows us to appreciate the bone marrow infiltration, detection of complications and response to therapy. Radioisotopes can contribute to the differential diagnosis of osteomyelitis and bone crises. Among the quantitative methods are the QCSI (quantitative chemical shift imaging) and the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), as well as new quantitative techniques of CT, MRI and ultrasound densitometry. The QCSI performed an assessment of fat content of bone marrow in the spine. DEXA quantifies bone density by measuring the attenuation coefficient. The semiquantitative methods have various "scores" to establish criteria for generalized bone disease endpoints of disease progression and response to therapy.

  15. How should clinical data be included in experimental studies of cancer immunology?

    PubMed

    Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Bruserud, Øystein

    2004-08-01

    Patients diagnosed with the same malignant disease are often heterogeneous with regard to age, complications, malignant cell morphology and tumor histology, disease stage, prognostic parameters, and previous therapy. Many of these factors can affect immunocompetent cells or influence the malignant cell susceptibility to immunotherapy. Summaries of relevant clinical information should therefore be included in cancer immunology studies to increase the present as well as the future scientific impact. Guidelines for selection of relevant information are suggested in the article.

  16. Kimura disease

    PubMed Central

    AlGhamdi, Fares E.; Al-Khatib, Talal A.; Marzouki, Hani Z.; AlGarni, Mohammed A

    2016-01-01

    Kimura disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that mainly manifests as a lump in the cervical region. Although the underlying pathophysiology is not clear yet, the diagnosis can be established based on specific histopathological characteristics. The first case of this disease was described in China, as well as the majority of subsequent cases that were also described in the Far East countries made Kimura disease traditionally a disease of adult patients of Asian descent. This report describes the occurrence of Kimura disease in pediatric non-Asian patient with a similar clinicopathologic presentation. PMID:26905356

  17. Laser surgery and medicine including photodynamic therapy in China today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junheng

    2000-10-01

    The development of laser medicine in China is correlated with the development of laser science in China. After the first Chinese laser, ruby laser came into being in 1961, Chinese medical scientists began to do the studies about laser medicine in the middle 1960s. For example, ruby laser was adopted for the retina coagulation experiment in 1965. Since 1970s, through the free choice of utilizing Co2, He-Ne, Nd:YAG argon, ruby lasers, laser surgery and medicine has been widely applied to the treatment for diseases of the eyes, ENT, dermatology, surgery, gynecology, tumors and diseases suitable to physical therapy or acupuncture with satisfactory effects. In June 1977, a nation-wide laser medicine symposium was held at Wuhan, Hubei Province with 200 participants including medical doctors and laser technologies from 23 provinces and municipal towns. Till the end of seventies, utilization of lasers has been extended to Nd glass laser, N laser and tunable dye lasers. The scope covered most of the clinical sections. After Dr. Thomas J. Dougherty developed the PDT for cancers in Roswell Park Memorial Institute in Buffalo in late 1970s and Professor Yoshihiro Hayata successfully applied the PDT in clinical treatment for lung cancer in 1980, Chinese pharmacists successfully produced the Chinese HpD and the first case of PDT, a lower eyelid basal cell carcinoma patient was treated with the Chinese laser equipment in 1981 in Beijing. Its success brought attention establishing a research group supported by the government in 1982. The members of the group consisted the experts on preclinical and clinical research, pharmaceutical chemistry, laser physicists and technologists. A systemic research on PDT was then carried out and obvious result was achieved. The step taken for PDT also accelerated the researchers on other kinds of laser medicine and surgery because the medical doctors had begun to master the knowledge about laser science. The prosperous situation of rapid

  18. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  19. The Potential of Chitosan and Its Derivatives in Prevention and Treatment of Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kerch, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Age-related, diet-related and protein conformational diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases are common in the elderly population. The potential of chitosan, chitooligosaccharides and their derivatives in prevention and treatment of age-related dysfunctions is reviewed and discussed in this paper. The influence of oxidative stress, low density lipoprotein oxidation, increase of tissue stiffness, protein conformational changes, aging-associated chronic inflammation and their pathobiological significance have been considered. The chitosan-based functional food also has been reviewed. PMID:25871293

  20. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly

  1. Wilson Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Wilson disease is a rare inherited disorder that prevents your body from getting rid of extra copper. You need ... copper into bile, a digestive fluid. With Wilson disease, the copper builds up in your liver, and ...

  2. Raynaud's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Raynaud's disease is a rare disorder of the blood vessels, usually in the fingers and toes. It causes the ... secondary Raynaud's, which is caused by injuries, other diseases, or certain medicines. People in colder climates are ...

  3. Addison Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure and water and salt balance. Addison disease happens if the adrenal glands don't make ... problem with your immune system usually causes Addison disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks your own tissues, ...

  4. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  5. Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a type of movement disorder. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't ... coordination As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple ...

  6. Endocrine Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond ... In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are ...

  7. Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... the back of the eye Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision Diabetic eye problems ... defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and ...

  8. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infections Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  9. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine. People with celiac disease cannot eat gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. ... Treatment Doctors treat celiac disease by prescribing a gluten-free diet. Symptoms significantly improve for most people ...

  10. Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune disease in which people can't eat gluten because it will damage their small intestine. If you have celiac disease and eat foods with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small ...

  11. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Versions PDF Version (198 KB) Additional Links Hyperthyroidism Pregnancy and Thyroid Disease Thyroid Tests This content is provided as a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. ...

  12. Hashimoto's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease often leads to reduced thyroid function, or hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is a disorder that occurs when the thyroid ... Hashimoto’s disease is the most common cause of hypothyroidism in the United States. 1 Read more in ...

  13. Tickborne Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... for tickborne diseases ranges from studying the basic biology of the microbes that cause these diseases to ... Nucleotide Polymorphism Phylogenetics & Ontology Proteomics & Protein Analysis Systems Biology Data Portals Software Applications BCBB Mobyle Interface Designer ( ...

  14. Fifth disease

    MedlinePlus

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and ...

  15. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  16. Lyme disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... up the bacteria when they bite mice or deer that are infected with B burgdorferi . You can ... syndrome Images Lyme disease organism, Borrelia burgdorferi Tick, deer engorged on the skin Lyme disease - Borrelia burgdorferi ...

  17. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurological disorders such as Behcet's disease. The National Human Genome Research Institute, another Institute of the National ... neurological disorders such as Behcet's disease. The National Human Genome Research Institute, another Institute of the National ...

  18. Hirschsprung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... approximately one in 5,000 newborns. Children with Down syndrome and other medical problems, such as congenital heart ... For example, about one in 100 children with Down syndrome also has Hirschsprung disease. Hirschsprung disease is congenital, ...

  19. Farber's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... The disease occurs when both parents carry and pass on the defective gene that regulates the protein ... The disease occurs when both parents carry and pass on the defective gene that regulates the protein ...

  20. Canavan disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... if your child has any symptoms of Canavan disease. Prevention Genetic counseling is recommended for people who want to have children and have a family history of Canavan disease. Counseling should be considered if both parents are ...