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Sample records for age-associated vascular endothelial

  1. Habitually exercising older men do not demonstrate age-associated vascular endothelial oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Gary L; Donato, Anthony J; LaRocca, Thomas J; Eskurza, Iratxe; Silver, Annemarie E; Seals, Douglas R

    2011-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that older men who perform habitual aerobic exercise do not demonstrate age-associated vascular endothelial oxidative stress compared with their sedentary peers. Older exercising men (n=13, 62±2 years) had higher (P<0.05) physical activity (79±7 vs. 30±6 MET hours per week) and maximal exercise oxygen consumption (42±1 vs. 29±1 mL kg(-1) per minute) vs. sedentary men (n=28, 63±1 years). Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of vascular endothelial function, was greater (P<0.05) in the exercising vs. sedentary older men (6.3±0.5 vs. 4.9±0.4%Δ) and not different than young controls (n=20, 25±1 years, 7.1±0.5%Δ). In vascular endothelial cells sampled from the brachial artery, nitrotyrosine, a marker of oxidative stress, was 51% lower in the exercising vs. sedentary older men (0.38±0.06 vs. 0.77±0.10 AU). This was associated with lower endothelial expression of the oxidant enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (p47(phox) subunit, 0.33±0.05 vs. 0.61±0.09 AU) and the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) (p65 subunit, 0.36±0.05 vs. 0.72±0.09 AU). Expression of the antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD) (0.57±0.13 vs. 0.30±0.04 AU) and activity of endothelium-bound extracellular SOD were greater (6.4±0.5 vs. 5.0±0.6 U mL(-1) per minute) in the exercising men (both P<0.05), but differences no longer were significant after correcting for adiposity and circulating metabolic factors. Overall, values for the young controls differed with those for the sedentary, but not the exercising older men. Older men who exercise regularly do not demonstrate vascular endothelial oxidative stress, and this may be a key molecular mechanism underlying their reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. Ex vivo characterization of age-associated impedance changes of single vascular endothelial cells using micro electrical impedance spectroscopy with a cell trap.

    PubMed

    Park, Yangkyu; Cha, Jung-Joon; Seo, Seungwan; Yun, Joho; Woo Kim, Hyeon; Park, Changju; Gang, Giseok; Lim, Juhun; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to characterize aging of single vascular endothelial cells, which are indicators of senescence, using micro electrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS) for the first time. The proposed μEIS was equipped with two barriers under the membrane actuator near the sensing electrodes, increasing its cell-trapping capability and minimizing the interference between the target cell and subsequent cells. The cell-trapping capability in μEIS with barriers was considerably improved (90%) with a capture time of 5 s or less, compared to μEIS without barriers (30%). Cells were extracted from transgenic zebrafish to minimize an initial discrepancy originating from genetic differences. In order to estimate useful parameters, cytoplasm resistance and membrane capacitance were estimated by fitting an electrical equivalent circuit to the data of ex vivo sensor output. The estimated cytoplasm resistance and membrane capacitance in the younger vascular endothelial cells were 20.16 ± 0.79 kΩ and 17.46 ± 0.76 pF, respectively, whereas those in the older cells were 17.81 ± 0.98 kΩ and 20.08 ± 1.38 pF, respectively. Discrimination of each group with different aging showed statistical significance in terms of cytoplasm resistance (p < 0.001) and membrane capacitance (p < 0.001). Considering both of the sensor and cellular level, the optimal frequency was determined as 1 MHz at which the electrical impedance of each group was clearly discriminated (p < 0.001). PMID:26865907

  3. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  4. Age-associated vascular inflammation promotes monocytosis during atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Wong, Christine; Song, Yang; Shen, Hua; Mori, Daniel; Rotllan, Noemi; Price, Nathan; Dobrian, Anca D; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Goldstein, Daniel R

    2016-08-01

    Aging leads to a proinflammatory state within the vasculature without disease, yet whether this inflammatory state occurs during atherogenesis remains unclear. Here, we examined how aging impacts atherosclerosis using Ldlr(-/-) mice, an established murine model of atherosclerosis. We found that aged atherosclerotic Ldlr(-/-) mice exhibited enhanced atherogenesis within the aorta. Aging also led to increased LDL levels, elevated blood pressure on a low-fat diet, and insulin resistance after a high-fat diet (HFD). On a HFD, aging increased a monocytosis in the peripheral blood and enhanced macrophage accumulation within the aorta. When we conducted bone marrow transplant experiments, we found that stromal factors contributed to age-enhanced atherosclerosis. To delineate these stromal factors, we determined that the vasculature exhibited an age-enhanced inflammatory response consisting of elevated production of CCL-2, osteopontin, and IL-6 during atherogenesis. In addition, in vitro cultures showed that aging enhanced the production of osteopontin by vascular smooth muscle cells. Functionally, aged atherosclerotic aortas displayed higher monocyte chemotaxis than young aortas. Hence, our study has revealed that aging induces metabolic dysfunction and enhances vascular inflammation to promote a peripheral monocytosis and macrophage accumulation within the atherosclerotic aorta. PMID:27135421

  5. Salt controls endothelial and vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Schmitz, Boris; Brand, Eva

    2015-03-01

    High salt (NaCl) intake promotes the development of vascular diseases independent of a rise in blood pressure, whereas reduction of salt consumption has beneficial effects for the arterial system. This article summarizes our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of high salt-induced alterations of the endothelial phenotype, the impact of the individual endothelial genotype, and the overall vascular phenotype. We focus on the endothelial Na(+) channel (EnNaC)-controlled nanomechanical properties of the endothelium, since high Na(+) leads to an EnNaC-induced Na(+)-influx and subsequent stiffening of endothelial cells. The mechanical stiffness of the endothelial cell (i.e., the endothelial phenotype) plays a crucial role as it controls the production of the endothelium-derived vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) which directly affects the tone of the vascular smooth muscle cells. In contrast to soft endothelial cells, stiff endothelial cells release reduced amounts of NO, the hallmark of endothelial dysfunction. This endothelium-born process is followed by the development of arterial stiffness (i.e., the vascular phenotype), predicting the development of vascular end-organ damage such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and renal impairment. In this context, we outline the potential clinical implication of direct (amiloride) and indirect (spironolactone) EnNaC inhibition on vascular function. However, interindividual differences exist in the response to high salt intake which involves different endothelial genotypes. Thus, selected genes and genetic variants contributing to the development of salt-induced endothelial dysfunction and hypertension are discussed. In this review, we focus on the role of salt in endothelial and vascular (dys)function and the link between salt-induced changes of the endothelial and vascular phenotype and its clinical implications.

  6. Mitochondria, endothelial cell function, and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Yu-Xuan; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are perhaps the most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems in eukaryotic cells. The role of mitochondria goes beyond their capacity to create molecular fuel and includes the generation of reactive oxygen species, the regulation of calcium, and the activation of cell death. In endothelial cells, mitochondria have a profound impact on cellular function under both healthy and diseased conditions. In this review, we summarize the basic functions of mitochondria in endothelial cells and discuss the roles of mitochondria in endothelial dysfunction and vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular dysfunction, pulmonary artery hypertension, and hypertension. Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in endothelial cells and vascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants and calorie restriction. PMID:24834056

  7. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  8. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  9. You're Only as Old as Your Arteries: Translational Strategies for Preserving Vascular Endothelial Function with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction develops with age and increases the risk of age-associated vascular disorders. Nitric oxide insufficiency, oxidative stress, and chronic low-grade inflammation, induced by upregulation of adverse cellular signaling processes and imbalances in stress resistance pathways, mediate endothelial dysfunction with aging. Healthy lifestyle behaviors preserve endothelial function with aging by inhibiting these mechanisms, and novel nutraceutical compounds that favorably modulate these pathways hold promise as a complementary approach for preserving endothelial health. PMID:24985329

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  11. MicroRNA-34a Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Senescence by SIRT1 Downregulation and Promotes the Expression of Age-Associated Pro-inflammatory Secretory Factors.

    PubMed

    Badi, Ileana; Burba, Ilaria; Ruggeri, Clarissa; Zeni, Filippo; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scopece, Alessandro; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial aging is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cells altered physiology together with low-grade chronic inflammation. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) has been recently implicated in cardiac, endothelial, and endothelial progenitor cell senescence; however, its contribution to aging-associated vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype has not been explored so far. We found that miR-34a was highly expressed in aortas isolated from old mice. Moreover, its well-known target, the longevity-associated protein SIRT1, was significantly downregulated during aging in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. Increased miR-34a as well as decreased SIRT1 expression was also observed in replicative-senescent human aortic smooth muscle cells. miR-34a overexpression in proliferative human aortic smooth muscle cells caused cell cycle arrest along with enhanced p21 protein levels and evidence of cell senescence. Furthermore, miR-34a ectopic expression induced pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype molecules. Finally, SIRT1 protein significantly decreased upon miR-34a overexpression and restoration of its levels rescued miR-34a-dependent human aortic smooth muscle cells senescence, but not senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors upregulation. Taken together, our findings suggest that aging-associated increase of miR-34a expression levels, by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells senescence and inflammation through SIRT1 downregulation and senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors induction, respectively, may lead to arterial dysfunctions.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation oa Endothelial Cell And Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Park, Changwon; Kim, Tae Min; Malik, Asrar B.

    2013-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of the vascular system is critical for embryonic development and postnatal life. Defects in endothelial cell development and vessel formation and function lead to embryonic lethality and are important in the etiology of vascular diseases. Here we review the underlying molecular mechanisms of endothelial cell differentiation, plasticity, and the development of the vasculature. This review focuses on the interplay among transcription factors and signaling molecules that specify the differentiation of vascular endothelial cells. We also discuss recent progress on reprogramming of somatic cells towards distinct endothelial cell lineages and its promise in regenerative vascular medicine. PMID:23661712

  13. Enhanced vascularization of cultured skin substitutes genetically modified to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Supp, D M; Supp, A P; Bell, S M; Boyce, S T

    2000-01-01

    Cultured skin substitutes have been used as adjunctive therapies in the treatment of burns and chronic wounds, but they are limited by lack of a vascular plexus. This deficiency leads to greater time for vascularization compared with native skin autografts and contributes to graft failure. Genetic modification of cultured skin substitutes to enhance vascularization could hypothetically lead to improved wound healing. To address this hypothesis, human keratinocytes were genetically modified by transduction with a replication incompetent retrovirus to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor, a specific and potent mitogen for endothelial cells. Cultured skin substitutes consisting of collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates inoculated with human fibroblasts and either vascular endothelial growth factor-modified or control keratinocytes were prepared, and were cultured in vitro for 21 d. Northern blot analysis demonstrated enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA in genetically modified keratinocytes and in cultured skin substitutes prepared with modified cells. Furthermore, the vascular endothelial growth factor-modified cultured skin substitutes secreted greatly elevated levels of vascular endothelial growth factor protein throughout the entire culture period. The bioactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor protein secreted by the genetically modified cultured skin substitutes was demonstrated using a microvascular endothelial cell growth assay. Vascular endothelial growth factor-modified and control cultured skin substitutes were grafted to full-thickness wounds on athymic mice, and elevated vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA expression was detected in the modified grafts for at least 2 wk after surgery. Vascular endothelial growth factor-modified grafts exhibited increased numbers of dermal blood vessels and decreased time to vascularization compared with controls. These results indicate that genetic modification of

  14. Assessing vascular endothelial function using frequency and rank order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Hsu, Po-Chun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Liu, An-Bang; Lin, Zong-Lin; Tang, Chieh-Ju; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2013-08-01

    Using frequency and rank order statistics (FROS), this study analyzed the fluctuations in arterial waveform amplitudes recorded from an air pressure sensing system before and after reactive hyperemia (RH) induction by temporary blood flow occlusion to evaluate the vascular endothelial function of aged and diabetic subjects. The modified probability-weighted distance (PWD) calculated from the FROS was compared with the dilatation index (DI) to evaluate its validity and sensitivity in the assessment of vascular endothelial function. The results showed that the PWD can provide a quantitative determination of the structural changes in the arterial pressure signals associated with regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure by intact vascular endothelium after the application of occlusion stress. Our study suggests that the use of FROS is a reliable noninvasive approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial degeneration in aging and diabetes.

  15. Mussel-inspired immobilization of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for enhanced endothelialization of vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Kim, Seok Joo; Kang, Jae Kyeong; Park, Jong-Chul; Jang, Wonhee; Shin, Heungsoo

    2012-07-01

    Most polymeric vascular prosthetic materials have low patency rate for replacement of small diameter vessels (<5 mm), mainly due to failure to generate healthy endothelium. In this study, we present polydopamine-mediated immobilization of growth factors on the surface of polymeric materials as a versatile tool to modify surface characteristics of vascular grafts potentially for accelerated endothelialization. Polydopamine was deposited on the surface of biocompatible poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) elastomer, on which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was subsequently immobilized by simple dipping. Surface characteristics and composition were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Immobilization of VEGF on the polydopamine-deposited PLCL films was effective (19.8 ± 0.4 and 197.4 ± 19.7 ng/cm(2) for DPv20 and DPv200 films, respectively), and biotin-mediated labeling of immobilized VEGF revealed that the fluorescence intensity increased as a function of the concentration of VEGF solution. The effect of VEGF on adhesion of HUVECs was marginal, which may have been masked by polydopamine layer that also enhanced cell adhesion. However, VEGF-immobilized substrate significantly enhanced proliferation of HUVECs for over 7 days of in vitro culture and also improved their migration. In addition, immobilized VEGF supported robust cell to cell interactions with strong expression of CD 31 marker. The same process was effective for immobilization of basic fibroblast growth factor, demonstrating the robustness of polydopamine layer for secondary ligation of growth factors as a simple and novel surface modification strategy for vascular graft materials. PMID:22617001

  16. Implantation of Vascular Grafts Lined with Genetically Modified Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, James M.; Birinyi, Louis K.; Salomon, Robert N.; Libby, Peter; Callow, Allan D.; Mulligan, Richard C.

    1989-06-01

    The possibility of using the vascular endothelial cell as a target for gene replacement therapy was explored. Recombinant retroviruses were used to transduce the lacZ gene into endothelial cells harvested from mongrel dogs. Prosthetic vascular grafts seeded with the genetically modified cells were implanted as carotid interposition grafts into the dogs from which the original cells were harvested. Analysis of the graft 5 weeks after implantation revealed genetically modified endothelial cells lining the luminal surface of the graft. This technology could be used in the treatment of atherosclerosis disease and the design of new drug delivery systems.

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is a Secreted Angiogenic Mitogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, David W.; Cachianes, George; Kuang, Wun-Jing; Goeddel, David V.; Ferrara, Napoleone

    1989-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was purified from media conditioned by bovine pituitary folliculostellate cells (FC). VEGF is a heparin-binding growth factor specific for vascular endothelial cells that is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo. Complementary DNA clones for bovine and human VEGF were isolated from cDNA libraries prepared from FC and HL60 leukemia cells, respectively. These cDNAs encode hydrophilic proteins with sequences related to those of the A and B chains of platelet-derived growth factor. DNA sequencing suggests the existence of several molecular species of VEGF. VEGFs are secreted proteins, in contrast to other endothelial cell mitogens such as acidic or basic fibroblast growth factors and platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor. Human 293 cells transfected with an expression vector containing a bovine or human VEGF cDNA insert secrete an endothelial cell mitogen that behaves like native VEGF.

  18. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor B, a novel growth factor for endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, B; Pajusola, K; Kaipainen, A; von Euler, G; Joukov, V; Saksela, O; Orpana, A; Pettersson, R F; Alitalo, K; Eriksson, U

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a novel growth factor for endothelial cells, vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B), with structural similarities to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placenta growth factor. VEGF-B was particularly abundant in heart and skeletal muscle and was coexpressed with VEGF in these and other tissues. VEGF-B formed cell-surface-associated disulfide-linked homodimers and heterodimerized with VEGF when coexpressed. Conditioned medium from transfected 293EBNA cells expressing VEGF-B stimulated DNA synthesis in endothelial cells. Our results suggest that VEGF-B has a role in angiogenesis and endothelial cell growth, particularly in muscle. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8637916

  20. Primary hypertension is a disease of premature vascular aging associated with neuro-immuno-metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Mieczysław; Feber, Janusz; Niemirska, Anna; Michałkiewicz, Jacek

    2016-02-01

    There is an increasing amount of data indicating that primary hypertension (PH) is not only a hemodynamic phenomenon but also a complex syndrome involving abnormal fat tissue distribution, over-activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), metabolic abnormalities, and activation of the immune system. In children, PH usually presents with a typical phenotype of disturbed body composition, accelerated biological maturity, and subtle immunological and metabolic abnormalities. This stage of the disease is potentially reversible. However, long-lasting over-activity of the SNS and immuno-metabolic alterations usually lead to an irreversible stage of cardiovascular disease. We describe an intermediate phenotype of children with PH, showing that PH is associated with accelerated development, i.e., early premature aging of the immune, metabolic, and vascular systems. The associations and determinants of hypertensive organ damage, the principles of treatment, and the possibility of rejuvenation of the cardiovascular system are discussed. PMID:25724169

  1. Synergism of matrix stiffness and vascular endothelial growth factor on mesenchymal stem cells for vascular endothelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wingate, Kathryn; Floren, Michael; Tan, Yan; Tseng, Pi Ou Nancy; Tan, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for vascular tissue regeneration. Research has demonstrated that individual factors in the cell microenvironment such as matrix elasticity and growth factors regulate MSC differentiation to vascular lineage. However, it is not well understood how matrix elasticity and growth factors combine to direct the MSC fate. This study examines the combined effects of matrix elasticity and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on both MSC differentiation into endothelial lineage and MSC paracrine signaling. MSCs were seeded in soft nanofibrous matrices with or without VEGF, and in Petri dishes with or without VEGF. Only MSCs seeded in three-dimensional soft matrices with VEGF showed significant increases in the expression of endothelial markers (vWF, eNOS, Flt-1, and Flk-1), while eliminating the expression of smooth muscle marker (SM-α-actin). MSCs cultured in VEGF alone on two-dimensional dishes showed increased expression of both early-stage endothelial and smooth muscle markers, indicating immature vascular differentiation. Furthermore, MSCs cultured in soft matrices with VEGF showed faster upregulation of endothelial markers compared with MSCs cultured in VEGF alone. Paracrine signaling studies found that endothelial cells cultured in the conditioned media from MSCs differentiated in the soft matrix and VEGF condition exhibited increased migration and formation of capillary-like structures. These results demonstrate that VEGF and soft matrix elasticity act synergistically to guide MSC differentiation into mature endothelial phenotype while enhancing paracrine signaling. Therefore, it is critical to control both mechanical and biochemical factors to safely regenerate vascular tissues with MSCs.

  2. Synergism of Matrix Stiffness and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor on Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Vascular Endothelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, Kathryn; Floren, Michael; Tan, Yan; Tseng, Pi Ou Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for vascular tissue regeneration. Research has demonstrated that individual factors in the cell microenvironment such as matrix elasticity and growth factors regulate MSC differentiation to vascular lineage. However, it is not well understood how matrix elasticity and growth factors combine to direct the MSC fate. This study examines the combined effects of matrix elasticity and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on both MSC differentiation into endothelial lineage and MSC paracrine signaling. MSCs were seeded in soft nanofibrous matrices with or without VEGF, and in Petri dishes with or without VEGF. Only MSCs seeded in three-dimensional soft matrices with VEGF showed significant increases in the expression of endothelial markers (vWF, eNOS, Flt-1, and Flk-1), while eliminating the expression of smooth muscle marker (SM-α-actin). MSCs cultured in VEGF alone on two-dimensional dishes showed increased expression of both early-stage endothelial and smooth muscle markers, indicating immature vascular differentiation. Furthermore, MSCs cultured in soft matrices with VEGF showed faster upregulation of endothelial markers compared with MSCs cultured in VEGF alone. Paracrine signaling studies found that endothelial cells cultured in the conditioned media from MSCs differentiated in the soft matrix and VEGF condition exhibited increased migration and formation of capillary-like structures. These results demonstrate that VEGF and soft matrix elasticity act synergistically to guide MSC differentiation into mature endothelial phenotype while enhancing paracrine signaling. Therefore, it is critical to control both mechanical and biochemical factors to safely regenerate vascular tissues with MSCs. PMID:24702044

  3. KRIT1 Protein Depletion Modifies Endothelial Cell Behavior via Increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Kuebel, Julia M.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.; Glading, Angela J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1+/− mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1. PMID:25320085

  4. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced pulmonary vascular endothelial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Hennig, B; Jay, M; Yoneda, K; McClain, C J

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied whether human recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) could increase pulmonary edema formation and pulmonary vascular permeability. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-albumin were administered rTNF-alpha or saline. Animals were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities were determined. rTNF-alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios by 151% (P less than 0.02) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I activity ratios by 376% (P less than 0.01) compared with values for saline controls. Electron microscopy of lung sections demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. To demonstrate that rTNF-alpha could directly increase pulmonary vascular endothelial permeability in vitro, we studied albumin transfer across cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. rTNF-alpha induced time-dependent dose-response increments in transendothelial albumin flux in the absence of granulocyte effector cells. These observations suggest that rTNF-alpha can provoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in vivo as well as in vitro. Images PMID:2925247

  5. Endothelial Cilia Are Essential for Developmental Vascular Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Sowjanya; Yu, Jianxin A.; Li, Jade; Li, Yuanyuan; Weinstein, Brant M.; Nicoli, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The cilium is a signaling platform of the vertebrate cell. It has a critical role in polycystic kidney disease and nephronophthisis. Cilia have been detected on endothelial cells, but the function of these organelles in the vasculature remains incompletely defined. In this study, using genetic and chemical genetic tools in the model organism zebrafish, we reveal an essential role of cilia in developmental vascular integrity. Embryos expressing mutant intraflagellar transport genes, which are essential and specific for cilia biogenesis, displayed increased risk of developmental intracranial hemorrhage, whereas the morphology of the vasculature remained normal. Moreover, cilia were present on endothelial cells in the developing zebrafish vasculature. We further show that the involvement of cilia in vascular integrity is endothelial autonomous, because endothelial-specific re-expression of intraflagellar transport genes in respective mutants rescued the intracranial hemorrhage phenotype. Finally, whereas inhibition of Hedgehog signaling increased the risk of intracranial hemorrhage in ciliary mutants, activation of the pathway rescued this phenotype. In contrast, embryos expressing an inactivating mutation in pkd2, one of two autosomal dominant cystic kidney disease genes, did not show increased risk of developmental intracranial hemorrhage. These results suggest that Hedgehog signaling is a major mechanism for this novel role of endothelial cilia in establishing vascular integrity. PMID:25214579

  6. Albumin-derived advanced glycation end-products trigger the disruption of the vascular endothelial cadherin complex in cultured human and murine endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Otero, K; Martínez, F; Beltrán, A; González, D; Herrera, B; Quintero, G; Delgado, R; Rojas, A

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) junctions regulate in large part the integrity and barrier function of the vascular endothelium. Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), the irreversibly formed reactive derivatives of non-enzymic glucose-protein condensation reactions, are strongly implicated in endothelial dysfunction that distinguishes diabetes- and aging-associated vascular complications. The aim of the present study was to determine whether AGEs affect EC lateral junction proteins, with particular regard to the vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) complex. Our results indicate that AGE-modified BSA (AGE-BSA), a prototype of advanced glycated proteins, disrupts the VE-cadherin complex when administered to ECs. AGE-BSA, but not unmodified BSA, was found to induce decreases in the levels of VE-cadherin, beta-catenin and gamma-catenin in the complex and in total cell extracts, as well as a marked reduction in the amount of VE-cadherin present at the cell surface. In contrast, the level of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), which is located at lateral junctions, was not altered. Supplementation of the cellular antioxidative defences abolished these effects. Finally, the loss of components of the VE-cadherin complex was correlated with increases in vascular permeability and in EC migration. These findings suggest that some of the AGE-induced biological effects on the endothelium could be mediated, at least in part, by the weakening of intercellular contacts caused by decreases in the amount of VE-cadherin present. PMID:11672430

  7. Total Chemical Synthesis of Biologically Active Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2011-09-15

    The 204-residue covalent-dimer vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, see picture) with full mitogenic activity was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments by one-pot native chemical ligations. The covalent structure of the synthetic VEGF was confirmed by precise mass measurement, and the three-dimensional structure of the synthetic protein was determined by high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

  8. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature. PMID:27031698

  9. Critical Endothelial Regulation by LRP5 during Retinal Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Li, Qing; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Hokama, Madoka; Sardi, Sylvia H.; Nagao, Masashi; Warman, Matthew L.; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular abnormalities in the eye are the leading cause of many forms of inherited and acquired human blindness. Loss-of-function mutations in the Wnt-binding co-receptor LRP5 leads to aberrant ocular vascularization and loss of vision in genetic disorders such as osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome. The canonical Wnt-β-catenin pathway is known to regulate retinal vascular development. However, it is unclear what precise role LPR5 plays in this process. Here, we show that loss of LRP5 function in mice causes retinal hypovascularization during development as well as retinal neovascularization in adulthood with disorganized and leaky vessels. Using a highly specific Flk1-CreBreier line for vascular endothelial cells, together with several genetic models, we demonstrate that loss of endothelium-derived LRP5 recapitulates the retinal vascular defects in Lrp5-/- mice. In addition, restoring LRP5 function only in endothelial cells in Lrp5-/- mice rescues their retinal vascular abnormalities. Furthermore, we show that retinal vascularization is regulated by LRP5 in a dosage dependent manner and does not depend on LRP6. Our study provides the first direct evidence that endothelium-derived LRP5 is both necessary and sufficient to mediate its critical role in the development and maintenance of retinal vasculature. PMID:27031698

  10. Design of biomimetic vascular grafts with magnetic endothelial patterning.

    PubMed

    Fayol, Delphine; Le Visage, Catherine; Ino, Julia; Gazeau, Florence; Letourneur, Didier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The development of small diameter vascular grafts with a controlled pluricellular organization is still needed for effective vascular tissue engineering. Here, we describe a technological approach combining a tubular scaffold and magnetically labeled cells to create a pluricellular and organized vascular graft, the endothelialization of which could be monitored by MRI prior to transplantation. A novel type of scaffold was developed with a tubular geometry and a porous bulk structure enabling the seeding of cells in the scaffold pores. A homogeneous distribution of human mesenchymal stem cells in the macroporous structure was obtained by seeding the freeze-dried scaffold with the cell suspension. The efficient covering of the luminal surface of the tube was then made possible thanks to the implementation of a magnetic-based patterning technique. Human endothelial cells or endothelial progenitors were magnetically labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles and successfully attracted to the 2-mm lumen where they attached and formed a continuous endothelium. The combination of imaging modalities [fluorescence imaging, histology, and 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] evidenced the integrity of the vascular construct. In particular, the observation of different cell organizations in a vascular scaffold within the range of resolution of single cells by 4.7 T MRI is reported. PMID:23295155

  11. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels. PMID:26571019

  12. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels.

  13. Vascular Endothelial Function & Self-Reported Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Muskaan; Bliwise, Donald; Veledar, Emir; Cunningham, Lynn; Vazquez, Jennifer; Brigham, Kenneth; Quyyumi, Arshed

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the relationship between self-reported sleep characteristics and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in a community-based population. Prior studies document that sleep apnea may be related to endothelial dysfunction but disagree whether subjective reports of sleep may also reflect such associations. Methods In 684 subjects (32% male) between 37 and 60 years enrolled in the Emory-Georgia Tech Predictive Health Institute study, we measured reported sleep characteristics using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) along with cardiovascular risk factors. Endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery FMD. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to adjust for various cardiovascular risk factors including age, race, gender, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, and body mass index. Results Lower brachial artery FMD values were correlated with higher ESS scores (p = 0.0275), even after adjustment for risk factors (p = 0.03). Total PSQI score was unrelated to brachial artery FMD. However, lower sleep quality (PSQI component 1) was associated with lower brachial artery FMD (multivariate p = 0.038), and participants who coughed or snored during sleep also had lower brachial artery FMD (6.24±3.42%) compared to those who did not (6.92±4.30%) (p = 0.056). This difference remained significant after adjustment for risk factors (p = 0.03). Conclusion In a community-based population, our analysis indicates a significant association between sleepiness and snoring assessed by questionnaires and endothelial function. Simple subjective reports about individuals’ sleep may be highly revealing indicators of endothelial function impairment and thus important indicators of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:23842206

  14. ADP Signaling in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Connie Ng; Kou, Ruqin; Johnson, Rosalyn P.; Li, Gordon K.; Michel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    ADP responses underlie therapeutic approaches to many cardiovascular diseases, and ADP receptor antagonists are in widespread clinical use. The role of ADP in platelet biology has been extensively studied, yet ADP signaling pathways in endothelial cells remain incompletely understood. We found that ADP promoted phosphorylation of the endothelial isoform of nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1179 and Ser635 and dephosphorylation at Ser116 in cultured endothelial cells. Although eNOS activity was stimulated by both ADP and ATP, only ADP signaling was significantly inhibited by the P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS 2179 or by knockdown of P2Y1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA). ADP activated the small GTPase Rac1 and promoted endothelial cell migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rac1 blocked ADP-dependent eNOS Ser1179 and Ser635 phosphorylation, as well as eNOS activation. We analyzed pathways known to regulate eNOS, including phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, ERK1/2, Src, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ) using the inhibitors wortmannin, PD98059, PP2, and STO-609, respectively. None of these inhibitors altered ADP-modulated eNOS phosphorylation. In contrast, siRNA-mediated knockdown of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibited ADP-dependent eNOS Ser635 phosphorylation and eNOS activity but did not affect eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation. Importantly, the AMPK enzyme inhibitor compound C had no effect on ADP-stimulated eNOS activity, despite completely blocking AMPK activity. CaMKKβ knockdown suppressed ADP-stimulated eNOS activity, yet inhibition of CaMKKβ kinase activity using STO-609 failed to affect eNOS activation by ADP. These data suggest that the expression, but not the kinase activity, of AMPK and CaMKKβ is necessary for ADP signaling to eNOS. PMID:19783664

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factors: A comparison between invertebrates and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kipryushina, Yulia O; Yakovlev, Konstantin V; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2015-12-01

    This review aims to summarize recent data concerning the structure and role of the members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) families in the context of early development, organogenesis and regeneration, with a particular emphasis on the role of these factors in the development of invertebrates. Homologs of VEGF and/or VEGFR have been found in all Eumetazoa, in both Radiata and Bilateria, where they are expressed in the descendants of different germ layers and play a pivotal role in the development of animals with and without a vascular system. VEGF is a well-known angiogenesis regulator, but this factor also control cell migration during neurogenesis and the development of branching organs (the trachea) in invertebrate and vertebrate species. A possible explanation for the origin of Vegf/Vegfr in the animal kingdom and a pathway of Vegf/Vegfr evolution are discussed.

  16. In vitro differentiation of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells to endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Andrea; Bernardini, Chiara; Bertocchi, Martina; Zannoni, Augusta; Bianchi, Francesca; Avallone, Giancarlo; Mangano, Chiara; Sarli, Giuseppe; Calzà, Laura; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2015-09-01

    Recent findings suggest that progenitor and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are associated with vascular niches. Cells displaying mesenchymal properties and differentiating to whole components of a functional blood vessel, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells, can be defined as vascular stem cells (VSCs). Recently, we isolated a population of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells (pAVPCs), which have MSC- and pericyte-like properties. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether pAVPCs possess VSC-like properties and assess their differentiation potential toward endothelial and smooth muscle lineages. pAVPCs, maintained in a specific pericyte growth medium, were cultured in high-glucose DMEM + 10% FBS (long-term medium, LTM) or in human endothelial serum-free medium + 5% FBS and 50 ng/ml of hVEGF (endothelial differentiation medium, EDM). After 21 days of culture in LTM, pAVPCs showed an elongated fibroblast-like morphology, and they seem to organize in cord-like structures. qPCR analysis of smooth muscle markers [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and smooth muscle myosin (SMM) heavy chain] showed a significant increment of the transcripts, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of α-SMA and SMM proteins. After 21 days of culture in EDM, pAVPCs displayed an endothelial cell-like morphology and revealed the upregulation of the expression of endothelial markers (CD31, vascular endothelial-cadherin, von Willebrand factor, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase) showing the CD31-typical pattern. In conclusion, pAVPCs could be defined as a VSC-like population considering that, if they are maintained in a specific pericyte medium, they express MSC markers, and they have, in addition to the classical mesenchymal trilineage differentiation potential, the capacity to differentiate in vitro toward the smooth muscle and the endothelial cell phenotypes.

  17. Vascular Accessibility of Endothelial Targeted Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khoshnejad, Makan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Pulsipher, Katherine W; Dai, Chuanyun; Hood, Elizabeth D; Arguiri, Evguenia; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Dmochowski, Ivan J; Greineder, Colin F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2016-03-16

    Targeting nanocarriers to the endothelium, using affinity ligands to cell adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, holds promise to improve the pharmacotherapy of many disease conditions. This approach capitalizes on the observation that antibody-targeted carriers of 100 nm and above accumulate in the pulmonary vasculature more effectively than free antibodies. Targeting of prospective nanocarriers in the 10-50 nm range, however, has not been studied. To address this intriguing issue, we conjugated monoclonal antibodies (Ab) to ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 or their single chain antigen-binding fragments (scFv) to ferritin nanoparticles (FNPs, size 12 nm), thereby producing Ab/FNPs and scFv/FNPs. Targeted FNPs retained their typical symmetric core-shell structure with sizes of 20-25 nm and ∼4-5 Ab (or ∼7-9 scFv) per particle. Ab/FNPs and scFv/FNPs, but not control IgG/FNPs, bound specifically to cells expressing target molecules and accumulated in the lungs after intravenous injection, with pulmonary targeting an order of magnitude higher than free Ab. Most intriguing, the targeting of Ab/FNPs to ICAM-1, but not PECAM-1, surpassed that of larger Ab/carriers targeted by the same ligand. These results indicate that (i) FNPs may provide a platform for targeting endothelial adhesion molecules with carriers in the 20 nm size range, which has not been previously reported; and (ii) ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 (known to localize in different domains of endothelial plasmalemma) differ in their accessibility to circulating objects of this size, common for blood components and nanocarriers. PMID:26718023

  18. Conserved signaling through vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) receptor family members in murine lymphatic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Coso, Sanja; Zeng, Yiping; Sooraj, Dhanya; Williams, Elizabeth D

    2011-10-15

    Lymphatic vessels guide interstitial fluid, modulate immune responses by regulating leukocyte and antigen trafficking to lymph nodes, and in a cancer setting enable tumor cells to track to regional lymph nodes. The aim of the study was to determine whether primary murine lymphatic endothelial cells (mLECs) show conserved vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathways with human LECs (hLECs). LECs were successfully isolated from murine dermis and prostate. Similar to hLECs, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family ligands activated MAPK and pAkt intracellular signaling pathways in mLECs. We describe a robust protocol for isolation of mLECs which, by harnessing the power of transgenic and knockout mouse models, will be a useful tool to study how LEC phenotype contributes to alterations in lymphatic vessel formation and function.

  19. Rac regulates vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated motility.

    PubMed

    Soga, N; Connolly, J O; Chellaiah, M; Kawamura, J; Hruska, K A

    2001-01-01

    During angiogenesis endothelial cells migrate towards a chemotactic stimulus. Understanding the mechanism of endothelial cell migration is critical to the therapeutic manipulation of angiogenesis and ultimately cancer prevention. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent chemotactic stimulus of endothelial cells during angiogenesis. The endothelial cell signal transduction pathway of VEGF represents a potential target for cancer therapy, but the mechanisms of post-receptor signal transduction including the roles of rho family GTPases in regulating the cytoskeletal effects of VEGF in endothelial cells are not understood. Here we analyze the mechanisms of cell migration in the mouse brain endothelial cell line (bEND3). Stable transfectants containing a tetracycline repressible expression vector were used to induce expression of Rac mutants. Endothelial cell haptotaxis was stimulated by constitutively active V12Rac on collagen and vitronectin coated supports, and chemotaxis was further stimulated by VEGF. Osteopontin coated supports were the most stimulatory to bEND3 haptotaxis, but VEGF was not effective in further increasing migration on osteopontin coated supports. Haptotaxis on support coated with collagen, vitronectin, and to a lesser degree osteopontin was inhibited by N17 Rac. N17 Rac expression blocked stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis by VEGF. As part of the chemotactic stimulation, VEGF caused a loss of actin organization at areas of cell-cell contact and increased stress fiber expression in endothelial cells which were directed towards pores in the transwell membrane. N17 Rac prevented the stimulation of cell-cell contact disruption and the stress fiber stimulation by VEGF. These data demonstrate two pathways of regulating endothelial cell motility, one in which Rac is activated by matrix/integrin stimulation and is a crucial modulator of endothelial cell haptotaxis. The other pathway, in the presence of osteopontin, is Rac independent

  20. Rac regulates vascular endothelial growth factor stimulated motility.

    PubMed

    Soga, N; Connolly, J O; Chellaiah, M; Kawamura, J; Hruska, K A

    2001-01-01

    During angiogenesis endothelial cells migrate towards a chemotactic stimulus. Understanding the mechanism of endothelial cell migration is critical to the therapeutic manipulation of angiogenesis and ultimately cancer prevention. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent chemotactic stimulus of endothelial cells during angiogenesis. The endothelial cell signal transduction pathway of VEGF represents a potential target for cancer therapy, but the mechanisms of post-receptor signal transduction including the roles of rho family GTPases in regulating the cytoskeletal effects of VEGF in endothelial cells are not understood. Here we analyze the mechanisms of cell migration in the mouse brain endothelial cell line (bEND3). Stable transfectants containing a tetracycline repressible expression vector were used to induce expression of Rac mutants. Endothelial cell haptotaxis was stimulated by constitutively active V12Rac on collagen and vitronectin coated supports, and chemotaxis was further stimulated by VEGF. Osteopontin coated supports were the most stimulatory to bEND3 haptotaxis, but VEGF was not effective in further increasing migration on osteopontin coated supports. Haptotaxis on support coated with collagen, vitronectin, and to a lesser degree osteopontin was inhibited by N17 Rac. N17 Rac expression blocked stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis by VEGF. As part of the chemotactic stimulation, VEGF caused a loss of actin organization at areas of cell-cell contact and increased stress fiber expression in endothelial cells which were directed towards pores in the transwell membrane. N17 Rac prevented the stimulation of cell-cell contact disruption and the stress fiber stimulation by VEGF. These data demonstrate two pathways of regulating endothelial cell motility, one in which Rac is activated by matrix/integrin stimulation and is a crucial modulator of endothelial cell haptotaxis. The other pathway, in the presence of osteopontin, is Rac independent

  1. The endothelial glycocalyx: a review of the vascular barrier.

    PubMed

    Alphonsus, C S; Rodseth, R N

    2014-07-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx is an important part of the vascular barrier. The glycocalyx is intimately linked to the homoeostatic functions of the endothelium. Damage to the glycocalyx precedes vascular pathology. In the first part of this paper, we have reviewed the structure, physiology and pathology of the endothelial glycocalyx, based on a literature search of the past five years. In the second part, we have systematically reviewed interventions to protect or repair the glycocalyx. Glycocalyx damage can be caused by hypervolaemia and hyperglycaemia and can be prevented by maintaining a physiological concentration of plasma protein, particularly albumin. Other interventions have been investigated in animal models: these require clinical research before their introduction into medical practice.

  2. Stereoselectivity of ectonucleotidases on vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, N J; Pearson, J D; Gordon, J L

    1983-01-01

    We have investigated the stereoselectivity of ectonucleotidases (nucleoside triphosphatase, EC 3.6.1.15; nucleoside diphosphatase, EC 3.6.1.6; 5'-nucleotidase, EC 3.1.3.5) on pig aortic endothelial cells using two classes of nucleotide analogue. In experiments with nucleotide enantiomers in which the natural D-ribofuranosyl moiety is replaced by an L-ribofuranosyl moiety, the rate of catabolism of 100 microM-L-ATP was one-fifth that of D-ATP, the rate of catabolism of 100 microM-L-ADP was one-fifteenth that of D-ADP and there was no detectable catabolism of 100 microM-L-AMP. Each of the L-enantiomers inhibited, apparently competitively, the catabolism of the corresponding D-enantiomer; Ki values were approx. 0.6 mM, 1.0 mM and 3.9 mM for L-ATP, L-ADP and L-AMP respectively. Experiments with adenosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate and with D- and L-enantiomers of adenosine 5'-[beta, gamma-methylene]triphosphate revealed modest ectopyrophosphatase activity, undetectable in experiments with natural nucleotides, which was also stereoselective. Use of phosphorothioate nucleotide analogues demonstrated that ATP catabolism was virtually stereospecific with respect to the geometry of the thiol group substituted on the beta-phosphate: the Rp isomer was degraded, whereas there was little or no breakdown of the Sp isomer. ADP catabolism was also stereospecific with respect to the geometry of the thiol group substituted on the alpha-phosphate: the Sp isomer but not the Rp isomer was degraded. The geometry of thiol-group substitution on the alpha-phosphate had no effect on ATP catabolism to ADP. There was no detectable catabolism of analogues with thiol-group substitution on the terminal phosphate. Each of the phosphorothioate analogues that was catabolized broke down at a rate similar to that of the natural nucleotide from which it was derived. These results demonstrate that the ectonucleotidases on pig aortic endothelial cells exhibit a high degree of stereoselectivity

  3. Tumor vascular permeability factor stimulates endothelial cell growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, D T; Heuvelman, D M; Nelson, R; Olander, J V; Eppley, B L; Delfino, J J; Siegel, N R; Leimgruber, R M; Feder, J

    1989-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor (VPF) is an Mr 40-kD protein that has been purified from the conditioned medium of guinea pig line 10 tumor cells grown in vitro, and increases fluid permeability from blood vessels when injected intradermally. Addition of VPF to cultures of vascular endothelial cells in vitro unexpectedly stimulated cellular proliferation. VPF promoted the growth of new blood vessels when administered into healing rabbit bone grafts or rat corneas. The identity of the growth factor activity with VPF was established in four ways: (a) the molecular weight of the activity in preparative SDS-PAGE was the same as VPF (Mr approximately 40 kD); (b) multiple isoforms (pI greater than or equal to 8) for both VPF and the growth-promoting activity were observed; (c) a single, unique NH2-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained; (d) both growth factor and permeability-enhancing activities were immunoadsorbed using antipeptide IgG that recognized the amino terminus of VPF. Furthermore, 125I-VPF was shown to bind specifically and with high affinity to endothelial cells in vitro and could be chemically cross-linked to a high-molecular weight cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating a mechanism whereby VPF can interact directly with endothelial cells. Unlike other endothelial cell growth factors, VPF did not stimulate [3H]thymidine incorporation or promote growth of other cell types including mouse 3T3 fibroblasts or bovine smooth muscle cells. VPF, therefore, appears to be unique in its ability to specifically promote increased vascular permeability, endothelial cell growth, and angio-genesis. Images PMID:2478587

  4. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Amie J; Khambata, Rayomand S; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J; Baliga, Reshma S; Lumsden, Natalie G; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J; Simone, Michela I; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J; MacAllister, Raymond J; Selwood, David L; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders.

  5. Modulation of Human Vascular Endothelial Cell Behaviors by Nanotopographic Cues

    PubMed Central

    Liliensiek, S.J.; Wood, J.A.; Yong, J.; Auerbach, R.; Nealey, P.F.; Murphy, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Basement membranes possess a complex three dimensional topography in the nanoscale and submicron range which have been shown to profoundly modulate a large menu of fundamental cell behaviors. Using the topographic features found in native vascular endothelial basement membranes as a guide, polyurethane substrates were fabricated containing anisotropically ordered ridge and groove structures and isotropically ordered pores from 200 nm to 2000 nm in size. We investigated the impact of biomimetic length-scale topographic cues on orientation/elongation, proliferation and migration on four human vascular endothelial cell-types from large and small diameter vessels. We found that all cell-types exhibited orientation and alignment with the most pronounced response on anisotropically ordered ridges ≥ 800 nm. HUVEC cells were the only cell-type examined to demonstrate a decrease in proliferation in response to the smallest topographic features regardless of surface order. On anisotropically ordered surfaces all cell types migrated preferentially parallel to the long axis of the ridges, with the greatest increase in cell migration being observed on the 1200 nm pitch. In contrast, cells did not exhibit any preference in direction or increase in migration speed on isotropically ordered surfaces. Overall, our data demonstrate that surface topographic features impact vascular endothelial cell behavior and that the impact of features varies with the cell behavior being considered, topographic feature scale, surface order, and the anatomic origin of the cell being investigated. PMID:20400175

  6. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Amie J.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Lumsden, Natalie G.; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J.; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J.; Simone, Michela I.; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F.; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J.; MacAllister, Raymond J.; Selwood, David L.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor–C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25105365

  7. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles increase inflammatory responses in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Newsome, Bradley; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Numerous risk factors for endothelial cell inflammation and the development of atherosclerosis have been identified, including inhalation of ultrafine particles. Recently, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) such as titanium (TiO2) NPs have attracted much attention due to their wide range of applications. However, there are also great concerns surrounding potential adverse health effects in vascular systems. Although TiO2 NPs are known to induce oxidative stress and inflammation, the associated signaling pathways have not been well studied. The focus of this work, therefore, deals with examination of the cellular signaling pathways responsible for TiO2 NP-induced endothelial oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, primary vascular endothelial cells were treated with TiO2 NPs for 2-16h at concentrations of 0-50 μg/mL. TiO2 NP exposure increased cellular oxidative stress and DNA binding of NF-κB. Further, phosphorylation of Akt, ERK, JNK and p38 was increased in cells exposed to TiO2 NPs. TiO2 NPs also significantly increased induction of mRNA and protein levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Pretreatment with inhibitors for NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), oxidative stress (epigallocatechin gallate and apocynin), Akt (LY294002), ERK (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) and p38 (SB203580) significantly attenuated TiO2 NP-induced MCP-1 and VCAM-1 gene expression. These data indicate that TiO2 NPs can induce endothelial inflammatory responses via redox-sensitive cellular signaling pathways.

  8. Preparation and features of polycaprolactone vascular grafts with the incorporated vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sevostyanova, V. V. Khodyrevskaya, Y. I.; Glushkova, T. V.; Antonova, L. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.

    2015-10-27

    The development of tissue-engineered small-diameter vascular grafts is an urgent issue in cardiovascular surgery. In this study, we assessed how the incorporation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects morphological and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone (PCL) vascular grafts along with its release kinetics. Vascular grafts were prepared using two-phase electrospinning. In pursuing our aims, we performed scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated the preservation of a highly porous structure and improvement of PCL/VEGF scaffold mechanical properties as compared to PCL grafts. A prolonged VEGF release testifies the use of this construct as a scaffold for tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

  9. Preparation and features of polycaprolactone vascular grafts with the incorporated vascular endothelial growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevostyanova, V. V.; Khodyrevskaya, Y. I.; Glushkova, T. V.; Antonova, L. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.

    2015-10-01

    The development of tissue-engineered small-diameter vascular grafts is an urgent issue in cardiovascular surgery. In this study, we assessed how the incorporation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects morphological and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone (PCL) vascular grafts along with its release kinetics. Vascular grafts were prepared using two-phase electrospinning. In pursuing our aims, we performed scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated the preservation of a highly porous structure and improvement of PCL/VEGF scaffold mechanical properties as compared to PCL grafts. A prolonged VEGF release testifies the use of this construct as a scaffold for tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

  10. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  11. Neuropilin-1 mediates vascular permeability independently of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Lise; Prahst, Claudia; Ruckdeschel, Tina; Savant, Soniya; Weström, Simone; Fantin, Alessandro; Riedel, Maria; Héroult, Mélanie; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2016-04-26

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) regulates developmental and pathological angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, and vascular permeability, acting as a coreceptor for semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) and the 165-amino acid isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A165). NRP1 is also the receptor for the CendR peptides, a class of cell- and tissue-penetrating peptides with a specific R-x-x-R carboxyl-terminal motif. Because the cytoplasmic domain of NRP1 lacks catalytic activity, NRP1 is mainly thought to act through the recruitment and binding to other receptors. We report here that the NRP1 intracellular domain mediates vascular permeability. Stimulation with VEGF-A165, a ligand-blocking antibody, and a CendR peptide led to NRP1 accumulation at cell-cell contacts in endothelial cell monolayers, increased cellular permeability in vitro and vascular leakage in vivo. Biochemical analyses, VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) silencing, and the use of a specific VEGFR blocker established that the effects induced by the CendR peptide and the antibody were independent of VEGFR-2. Moreover, leakage assays in mice expressing a mutant NRP1 lacking the cytoplasmic domain revealed that this domain was required for NRP1-induced vascular permeability in vivo. Hence, these data define a vascular permeability pathway mediated by NRP1 but independent of VEGFR-2 activation.

  12. Protective effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in cultured brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Deng, Jiangshan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Zhao, Yuwu

    2015-08-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with type 1 diabetes receiving treatment with insulin. Clinical studies have demonstrated that hypoglycemic edema is involved in the initiation of hypoglycemic brain damage. However, the mechanisms of this edema are poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent regulator of blood vessel function, has been observed an important candidate hormone induced by hypoglycemia to protect neurons by restoring plasma glucose. Whether VEGF has a protective effect against hypoglycemia-induced damage in brain endothelial cells is still unknown. To investigate the effects of hypoglycemia on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells and assess the protective effect of exogenous VEGF on endothelial cells during hypoglycemia, confluent monolayers of the brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3 were treated with normal (5.5 mM glucose), hypoglycemic (0, 0.5, 1 mM glucose) medium or hypoglycemic medium in the presence of VEGF. The results clearly showed that hypoglycemia significantly downregulated the expression of claudin-5 in bEnd.3 cells, without affecting ZO-1 and occludin expression and distribution. Besides, transendothelial permeability significantly increased under hypoglycemic conditions compared to that under control conditions. Moreover, the hypoglycemic medium in presence of VEGF decreased endothelial permeability via the inhibition of claudin-5 degradation and improved hypoglycemia-induced cell toxicity. Furthermore, Glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and apoptosis regulator Bcl-2 expression were significantly upregulated. Taken together, hypoglycemia can significantly increase paraendocellular permeability by downregulating claudin-5 expression. We further showed that VEGF protected brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia by enhancing glucose passage, reducing endothelial cell death, and ameliorating paraendocellular permeability.

  13. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  14. Crocetin prevents AGEs-induced vascular endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Min; Yang, Min; Zhou, Chenghua; Liu, Juan; Li, Wenna; Qian, Zhiyu

    2006-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are causally correlated with diabetic vascular complications. AGEs triggered oxidative reaction then accelerated endothelial cell apoptosis is a critical event in the process of vascular complications. Crocetin, a carotenoid has been previously shown to have strong antioxidant activates. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the role of crocetin on the prevention of AGEs-mediated cell apoptosis in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BEC) and the mechanisms involved. Exposure of BEC to 200 microg/ml AGEs for 48 h results in a significant increase in apoptotic rate, compared with control. AGEs-induced DNA fragmentation preferentially occurred in the S phase cells. Crocetin prevented AGEs-induced BEC apoptosis, which correlates with crocetin attenuation of AGEs mediated increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) level (P<0.01 versus AGEs group). These results demonstrate that crocetin prevents AGEs-induced BEC apoptosis through ROS inhibition and [Ca2+]i stabilization and suggest that crocetin may exert a beneficial effect in preventing diabetes-associated vascular complications. PMID:16899372

  15. Tissue Engineered Perivascular Endothelial Cell Implants Regulate Vascular Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, Aruna; Nugent, Matthew A.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    1995-08-01

    Molecular biomaterial engineering permits in vivo transplantation of cells and tissues, offering the promise of restoration of physiologic control rather than pharmacologic dosing with isolated compounds. We engrafted endothelial cells on Gelfoam biopolymeric matrices with retention of viability, normal growth kinetics, immunoreactivity, and biochemical activity. The production of heparan sulfate proteoglycan and inhibition of basic fibroblast growth factor binding and activity by engrafted cells were indistinguishable from endothelial cells grown in culture. Perivascular implantation of Gelfoam-endothelial cell scaffolds around balloon-denuded rat carotid arteries reduced intimal hyperplasia 88.1%, far better than the isolated administration of heparin, the most effective endothelial mimic compound. In concert with a reduction in intimal area, cell proliferation was reduced by >90%. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports of extravascular cell implants controlling vasculoproliferative disease. Tissue engineered cells offer the potential for potent methods of vascular growth regulation and insight into the complex autocrine-paracrine control mechanisms within the blood vessel wall.

  16. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor in human preterm lung.

    PubMed

    Lassus, P; Ristimäki, A; Ylikorkala, O; Viinikka, L; Andersson, S

    1999-05-01

    Endothelial cell damage is characteristic for respiratory distress syndrome and development of chronic lung disease. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial mitogen that takes part in the growth and repair of vascular endothelial cells. We measured VEGF in 189 tracheal aspirate samples (TAF), and in 24 plasma samples from 44 intubated preterm infants (gestational age, 27.3 +/- 2.0 wk; birth weight, 962 +/- 319 g) during their first postnatal week. VEGF in TAF increased from 25 +/- 12 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) on Day 1 to 526 +/- 120 pg/ml on Day 7 (mean concentrations, 106 +/- 25 pg/ml on Days 1 to 3 and 342 +/- 36 pg/ml on Days 4 to 7). In plasma, mean concentration of VEGF during the first week was 48 +/- 6 pg/ml, with no increase observed. In TAF, higher VEGF was found in patients born to mothers with premature rupture of the membranes, or chorionamnionitis, whereas preeclampsia of the mother was associated with lower VEGF (all p < 0.05). In TAF, no correlations existed between VEGF and gestational age or birth weight, but a correlation existed between lecithin/sphengomyelin ratio and VEGF (p < 0.05). During Days 4 to 7 patients developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) had lower VEGF in TAF than did those surviving without BPD (235 +/- 31 versus 383 +/- 50; p < 0.05). VEGF increased rapidly in the lungs of the preterm infant during the first days of life. VEGF may be indicative of pulmonary maturity and may participate in pulmonary repair after acute lung injury.

  18. Involvement of Rho-kinase in experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhvanit I; Singh, Manjeet

    2006-02-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of fasudil (Rho-kinase inhibitor) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and hyperhomocyteinemia (HHcy) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED). Streptozotocin (55 mg kg(-1), i.v., once only) and methionine (1.7% w/w, p.o., daily for 4 weeks) were administered to rats to produce DM (serum glucose >140 mg dl(-1)) and HHcy (serum homocysteine >10 microM) respectively. VED was assessed using isolated aortic ring, electron microscopy of thoracic aorta, and serum concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration was estimated to assess oxidative stress. Atorvastatin has been employed in the present study as standard agent to improve vascular endothelial dysfunction. Fasudil (15 mg kg(-1) and 30 mg kg(-1), p.o., daily) and atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1), p.o., daily) treatments significantly attenuated increase in serum glucose and homocysteine but their concentrations remained markedly higher than sham control value. Fasudil and atorvastatin treatments markedly prevented DM and HHcy-induced (i) attenuation of acetylcholine induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, (ii) impairment of vascular endothelial lining, (iii) decrease in serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, and (iv) increase in serum TBARS. It may be concluded that fasudil prevented DM and HHcy-induced VED partially by decreasing serum glucose and homocysteine concentration due to inhibition of Rho-kinase. Moreover, inhibition of Rho-kinase by fasudil and consequent prevention of oxidative stress may have directly improved VED in diabetic and hyperhomocysteinemic rats. The Rho-kinase appears to be a pivotal target site involved in DM and HHcy-induced VED. PMID:16444602

  19. Fibroblast-Endothelial Partners for Vascularization Strategies in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Gomez-Lazaro, Maria; Ramalho, Carla; Soares, Raquel; Guerreiro, Susana G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based approaches have emerged as a promising therapy to achieve successful vascularization in tissue engineering. Since fibroblasts activation and migration is required for physiological events relying on angiogenesis, we hypothesize herein that different fibroblasts exhibit distinct capacity to promote capillary-like structures assembly, by mature and progenitor endothelial cells (ECs). Outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) were isolated from human umbilical cord blood samples and characterized by immunofluorescence and imaging flow cytometry for endothelial markers. Coculture systems were established using either human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) or OECs with fibroblasts, being evaluated at 7, 14, and 21 days of culture. Two types of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were used, namely neonatal human foreskin fibroblasts-1 (HFF-1) and juvenile HDF. OECs expressed EC markers and formed capillary-like structures. HFF-1 exhibited higher expression of transglutaminase-2, while HDF exhibited a higher expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and podoplanin, which were not observed for HFF-1. Formation of capillary-like structures was only observed in cocultures with HDF and not with HFF-1. No significant differences were found between HDF and OECs or HUVECs cocultures. These findings suggest that HDF is a preferential cell source for promoting vascularization, either using mature or progenitor ECs, probably due to their higher expression of α-SMA and podoplanin, and increased synthesis of extracellular matrix. This work opens new research possibilities regarding the use of specific fibroblast populations cocultured with ECs, as efficient partners for vascular development in regenerative medicine strategies. PMID:25340984

  20. Role of vascular endothelial progenitor cells in construction of new vascular loop.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Kuihua; Bai, Lun; Xu, Jianmei

    2013-11-01

    Since bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been detected in adult peripheral blood, the mode of vasculogenesis in the adult tissue has caught attention in field of vascularization research. To confirm the role of EPCs in construction of new vascular loop, we took the biomaterial scaffold implanted into adult rat as an experimental model to observe and examine the actions of the EPCs in neovascularization of the material by immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, by establishing a chemotactic migration model for vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and EPCs, the migrations of ECs and EPCs were explored in simulations. The results of 20,000 simulations showed that the number of the vascular loops assisted by the EPCs was 2-5 times that of the vascular sprouts being naturally joined. Based on the results of experiments and simulations, we conclude that the EPCs are able to assist the angiogenic sprouts in joining under the condition of plenty of the EPCs being mobilized, which aggregate at sites close to sprout tips, forming a cell cord and differentiating to ECs in situ, and become vessel segments between neighboring sprouts. This suggests that there is a difference between the adult and embryo in the manner of vasculogenesis and that a small number of EPCs can play an important role to make the new blood vessels achieve rapid functionalization.

  1. Mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for efficient delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Fan, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Xiao, Yin

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we, for the first time, investigated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor. We have found that mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds have significantly higher loading efficiency and more sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor than non-mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds. In addition, vascular endothelial growth factor delivery from mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds has improved the viability of endothelial cells. The study has suggested that mesopore structures in mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds play an important role in improving the loading efficiency, decreasing the burst release, and maintaining the bioactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor, indicating that mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds are an excellent carrier of vascular endothelial growth factor for potential bone tissue engineering applications.

  2. Novel role of lactosylceramide in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Kolmakova, Antonina; Chatterjee, Subroto

    2005-10-14

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in angiogenesis associated with coronary heart disease, vascular complications in diabetes, inflammatory vascular diseases, and tumor metastasis. The mechanism of VEGF-driven angiogenesis involving glycosphingolipids such as lactosylceramide (LacCer), however, is not known. To demonstrate the involvement of LacCer in VEGF-induced angiogenesis, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of LacCer synthase expression (GalT-V) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This gene silencing markedly inhibited VEGF-induced platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) expression and angiogenesis. Second, we used D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP), an inhibitor of LacCer synthase and glucosylceramide synthase, that significantly mitigated VEGF-induced PECAM-1 expression and angiogenesis. Interestingly, these phenotypic changes were reversed by LacCer but not by structurally related compounds such as glucosylceramide, digalactosylceramide, and ceramide. In a human mesothelioma cell line (REN) that lacks the endogenous expression of PECAM-1, VEGF/LacCer failed to stimulate PECAM-1 expression and tube formation/angiogenesis. In REN cells expressing human PECAM-1 gene/protein, however, both VEGF and LacCer-induced PECAM-1 protein expression and tube formation/angiogenesis. In fact, VEGF-induced but not LacCer-induced angiogenesis was mitigated by SU-1498, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Also, VEGF/LacCer-induced PECAM-1 expression and angiogenesis was mitigated by protein kinase C and phospholipase A2 inhibitors. These results indicate that LacCer generated in VEGF-treated endothelial cells may serve as an important signaling molecule for PECAM-1 expression and in angiogenesis. This finding and the reagents developed in our report may be useful as anti-angiogenic drugs for further studies in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16151023

  3. Purinergic regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rumjahn, S M; Yokdang, N; Baldwin, K A; Thai, J; Buxton, I L O

    2009-01-01

    P2Y purine nucleotide receptors (P2YRs) promote endothelial cell tubulogenesis through breast cancer cell-secreted nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK). We tested the hypothesis that activated P2Y1 receptors transactivate vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-2) in angiogenic signaling. P2Y1R stimulation (10 μM 2-methyl-thio-ATP (2MS-ATP)) of angiogenesis is suppressed by the VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, SU1498 (1 μM). Phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 by 0.0262 or 2.62 nM VEGF was comparable with 0.01 or 10 μM 2MS-ATP stimulation of the P2Y1R. 2MS-ATP, and VEGF stimulation increased tyrosine phosphorylation at tyr1175. 2MS-ATP (0.1–10 μM) also stimulated EC tubulogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of sub-maximal VEGF (70 pM) in the presence of increasing concentrations of 2MS-ATP yielded additive effects at 2MS-ATP concentrations <3 μM, whereas producing saturated and less than additive effects at ⩾3 μM. We propose that the VEGF receptor can be activated in the absence of VEGF, and that the P2YR–VEGFR2 interaction and resulting signal transduction is a critical determinant of vascular homoeostasis and tumour-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:19367276

  4. Endothelial microparticles mediate inflammation-induced vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Paula; Montes de Oca, Addy; Madueño, Juan Antonio; Merino, Ana; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Mariano; Carracedo, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of endothelial cells (ECs) with TNF-α causes an increase in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and the production of endothelial microparticles (EMPs). BMP-2 is known to produce osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). It was found that EMPs from TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells (HUVECs) contained a significant amount of BMP-2 and were able to enhance VSMC osteogenesis and calcification. Calcium content was greater in VSMCs exposed to EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs than EMPs from nontreated HUVECs (3.56 ± 0.57 vs. 1.48 ± 0.56 µg/mg protein; P < 0.05). The increase in calcification was accompanied by up-regulation of Cbfa1 (osteogenic transcription factor) and down-regulation of SM22α (VSMC lineage marker). Inhibition of BMP-2 by small interfering RNA reduced the VSMC calcification induced by EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs. Similar osteogenic capability was observed in EMPs from both patients with chronic kidney disease and senescent cells, which also presented a high level of BMP-2 expression. Labeling of EMPs with CellTracker shows that EMPs are phagocytized by VSMCs under all conditions (with or without high phosphate, control, and EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs). Our data suggest that EC damage results in the release of EMPs with a high content of calcium and BMP-2 that are able to induce calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs.

  5. Endothelial microparticles mediate inflammation-induced vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Buendía, Paula; Montes de Oca, Addy; Madueño, Juan Antonio; Merino, Ana; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Aljama, Pedro; Ramírez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Mariano; Carracedo, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of endothelial cells (ECs) with TNF-α causes an increase in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and the production of endothelial microparticles (EMPs). BMP-2 is known to produce osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). It was found that EMPs from TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells (HUVECs) contained a significant amount of BMP-2 and were able to enhance VSMC osteogenesis and calcification. Calcium content was greater in VSMCs exposed to EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs than EMPs from nontreated HUVECs (3.56 ± 0.57 vs. 1.48 ± 0.56 µg/mg protein; P < 0.05). The increase in calcification was accompanied by up-regulation of Cbfa1 (osteogenic transcription factor) and down-regulation of SM22α (VSMC lineage marker). Inhibition of BMP-2 by small interfering RNA reduced the VSMC calcification induced by EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs. Similar osteogenic capability was observed in EMPs from both patients with chronic kidney disease and senescent cells, which also presented a high level of BMP-2 expression. Labeling of EMPs with CellTracker shows that EMPs are phagocytized by VSMCs under all conditions (with or without high phosphate, control, and EMPs from TNF-α-treated HUVECs). Our data suggest that EC damage results in the release of EMPs with a high content of calcium and BMP-2 that are able to induce calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. PMID:25342130

  6. Capture of endothelial cells under flow using immobilized vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Randall J.; Koobatian, Maxwell T.; Shahini, Aref; Swartz, Daniel D.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of immobilized vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to capture endothelial cells (EC) with high specificity under fluid flow. To this end, we engineered a surface consisting of heparin bound to poly-L-lysine to permit immobilization of VEGF through the C-terminal heparin-binding domain. The immobilized growth factor retained its biological activity as shown by proliferation of EC and prolonged activation of KDR signaling. Using a microfluidic device we assessed the ability to capture EC under a range of shear stresses from low (0.5 dyne/cm2) to physiological (15 dyne/cm2). Capture was significant for all shear stresses tested. Immobilized VEGF was highly selective for EC as evidenced by significant capture of human umbilical vein and ovine pulmonary artery EC but no capture of human dermal fibroblasts, human hair follicle derived mesenchymal stem cells, or mouse fibroblasts. Further, VEGF could capture EC from mixtures with non-EC under low and high shear conditions as well as from complex fluids like whole human blood under high shear. Our findings may have far reaching implications, as they suggest that VEGF could be used to promote endothelialization of vascular grafts or neovascularization of implanted tissues by rare but continuously circulating EC. PMID:25771020

  7. Endothelial dysfunction impairs vascular neurotransmission in tail arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana B; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study intends to clarify if endothelium dysfunction impairs vascular sympathetic neurotransmission. Electrically-evoked tritium overflow (100 pulses/5 Hz) was evaluated in arteries (intact and denuded) or exhibiting some degree of endothelium dysfunction (spontaneously hypertensive arteries), pre-incubated with [(3)H]-noradrenaline in the presence of enzymes (nitric oxide synthase (NOS); nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase; xanthine oxidase; cyclooxygenase; adenosine kinase) inhibitors and a nucleoside transporter inhibitor. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with L-NIO dihydrochloride reduced tritium overflow in intact arteries whereas inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase with Nω-Propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride was devoid of effect showing that only endothelial nitric oxide synthase is involved in vascular sympathetic neuromodulation. Inhibition of enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species or prostaglandins production with apocynin and allopurinol or indomethacin, respectively, failed to alter tritium overflow. A facilitation or reduction of tritium overflow was observed in the presence of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or of 5-iodotubericidin, respectively, but only in intact arteries. These effects can be ascribed to a tonic inhibitory effect mediated by A1 receptors. In denuded and hypertensive arteries, 7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c] pyrimidine (SCH 58261) reduced tritium overflow, suggesting the occurrence of a tonic activation of A2A receptors. When endogenous adenosine bioavailability was increased by the nucleoside transporter inhibitor, S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine, tritium overflow increased in intact, denuded and hypertensive arteries. Among the endothelium-derived substances studied that could alter vascular sympathetic transmission only adenosine/adenosine receptor mediated mechanisms were clearly impaired by endothelium injury/dysfunction.

  8. Endothelial dysfunction impairs vascular neurotransmission in tail arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana B; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study intends to clarify if endothelium dysfunction impairs vascular sympathetic neurotransmission. Electrically-evoked tritium overflow (100 pulses/5 Hz) was evaluated in arteries (intact and denuded) or exhibiting some degree of endothelium dysfunction (spontaneously hypertensive arteries), pre-incubated with [(3)H]-noradrenaline in the presence of enzymes (nitric oxide synthase (NOS); nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase; xanthine oxidase; cyclooxygenase; adenosine kinase) inhibitors and a nucleoside transporter inhibitor. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with L-NIO dihydrochloride reduced tritium overflow in intact arteries whereas inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase with Nω-Propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride was devoid of effect showing that only endothelial nitric oxide synthase is involved in vascular sympathetic neuromodulation. Inhibition of enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species or prostaglandins production with apocynin and allopurinol or indomethacin, respectively, failed to alter tritium overflow. A facilitation or reduction of tritium overflow was observed in the presence of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or of 5-iodotubericidin, respectively, but only in intact arteries. These effects can be ascribed to a tonic inhibitory effect mediated by A1 receptors. In denuded and hypertensive arteries, 7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c] pyrimidine (SCH 58261) reduced tritium overflow, suggesting the occurrence of a tonic activation of A2A receptors. When endogenous adenosine bioavailability was increased by the nucleoside transporter inhibitor, S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine, tritium overflow increased in intact, denuded and hypertensive arteries. Among the endothelium-derived substances studied that could alter vascular sympathetic transmission only adenosine/adenosine receptor mediated mechanisms were clearly impaired by endothelium injury

  9. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids and 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid on Endothelial and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Imig, J D

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial and vascular smooth cells generate cytochrome P450 (CYP) arachidonic acid metabolites that can impact endothelial cell function and vascular homeostasis. The objective of this review is to focus on the physiology and pharmacology of endothelial CYP metabolites. The CYP pathway produces two types of eicosanoid products: epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), formed by CYP epoxygenases, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), formed by CYP hydroxylases. Advances in CYP enzymes, EETs, and 20-HETE by pharmacological and genetic means have led to a more complete understanding of how these eicosanoids impact on endothelial cell function. Endothelial-derived EETs were initially described as endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors. It is now well recognized that EETs importantly contribute to numerous endothelial cell functions. On the other hand, 20-HETE is the predominant CYP hydroxylase synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells. Like EETs, 20-HETE acts on endothelial cells and impacts importantly on endothelial and vascular function. An important aspect for EETs and 20-HETE endothelial actions is their interactions with hormonal and paracrine factors. These include interactions with the renin-angiotensin system, adrenergic system, puringeric system, and endothelin. Alterations in CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, or EETs contribute to endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases such as ischemic injury, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Recent advances have led to the development of potential therapeutics that target CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, or EETs. Thus, future investigation is required to obtain a more complete understanding of how CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, and EETs regulate endothelial cell function.

  10. Identification of Vascular Lineage-Specific Genes by Transcriptional Profiling of Isolated Blood Vascular and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Satoshi; Hong, Young-Kwon; Harvey, Natasha; Schacht, Vivien; Matsuda, Kant; Libermann, Towia; Detmar, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In mammals, the lymphatic vascular system develops by budding of lymphatic progenitor endothelial cells from embryonic veins to form a distinct network of draining vessels with important functions in the immune response and in cancer metastasis. However, the lineage-specific molecular characteristics of blood vascular versus lymphatic endothelium have remained poorly defined. We isolated lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and blood vascular endothelial cells (BVECs) by immunomagnetic isolation directly from human skin. Cultured LECs but not BVECs expressed the lymphatic markers Prox1 and LYVE-1 and formed LYVE-1-positive vascular tubes after implantation in vivo. Transcriptional profiling studies revealed increased expression of several extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules in BVECs, including versican, collagens, laminin, and N-cadherin, and of the growth factor receptors endoglin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1/Flt-1. Differential immunostains of human skin confirmed the blood vessel-specific expression of these genes. During embryonic development, endoglin expression was gradually down-regulated on lymphatic endothelium whereas vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 was absent from lymphatics. We also identified several genes with specific expression in LECs. These results demonstrate that some lineage-specific genes are only expressed during distinct developmental stages and they identify new molecular markers for blood vascular and lymphatic endothelium with important implications for future studies of vascular development and function. PMID:12547715

  11. Damage of vascular endothelial barrier induced by explosive blast and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Min; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, injuries induced by explosive blast have got more and more attention owing to weapon development and frequent terrorist activities. Tear, bleeding and edema of tissues and organs are the main manifestations of blast shock wave damage. Vascular endothelial barrier is the main defense of tissues and organs' integrity. This article aims to discuss possible mechanisms of endothelial barrier damage induced by explosive blast and main manifestations of blood brain barrier, bloodeair barrier, and intestinal vascular barrier impairments. In addition, the main regulatory factors of vascular permeability are also summarized so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and cure of vascular endothelial barrier damage resulting from explosive blast. PMID:27321288

  12. Damage of vascular endothelial barrier induced by explosive blast and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Min; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, injuries induced by explosive blast have got more and more attention owing to weapon development and frequent terrorist activities. Tear, bleeding and edema of tissues and organs are the main manifestations of blast shock wave damage. Vascular endothelial barrier is the main defense of tissues and organs' integrity. This article aims to discuss possible mechanisms of endothelial barrier damage induced by explosive blast and main manifestations of blood brain barrier, bloodeair barrier, and intestinal vascular barrier impairments. In addition, the main regulatory factors of vascular permeability are also summarized so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and cure of vascular endothelial barrier damage resulting from explosive blast.

  13. Molecular Docking and Interactions of Pueraria Tuberosa with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors.

    PubMed

    Asthana, S; Agarwal, T; Singothu, S; Samal, A; Banerjee, I; Pal, K; Pramanik, K; Ray, S S

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa is known for its therapeutic potentials in cardiovascular disorders, but its effect in angiogenesis has not been studied so far. In this study, a computational approach has been applied to elucidate the role of the phytochemicals in inhibition of angiogenesis through modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, major factors responsible for angiogenesis. Metabolite structures retrieved from PubChem and KNApSAcK - 3D databases, were docked using AutoDock4.2 tool. Hydrogen bond and molecular docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and toxicity predictions were carried out using UCSF Chimera, LigPlot(+) and PreADMET server, respectively. From the docking analysis, it was observed that puerarone and tuberostan had significant binding affinity for the intracellular kinase domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 respectively. It is important to mention that both the phytochemicals shared similar interaction profile as that of standard inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Also, both puerarone and tuberostan interacted with Lys861/Lys868 (adenosine 5'-triphosphate binding site of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-2), thus providing a clue that they may enforce their inhibitory effect by blocking the adenosine 5'-triphosphate binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Moreover, these molecules exhibited good drug-likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties without any carcinogenic and toxic effects. The interaction pattern of the puerarone and tuberostan may provide a hint for a novel drug design for vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors with better specificity to treat angiogenic disorders. PMID:26664060

  14. Molecular Docking and Interactions of Pueraria Tuberosa with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, S.; Agarwal, T.; Singothu, S.; Samal, A.; Banerjee, I.; Pal, K.; Pramanik, K.; Ray, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Pueraria tuberosa is known for its therapeutic potentials in cardiovascular disorders, but its effect in angiogenesis has not been studied so far. In this study, a computational approach has been applied to elucidate the role of the phytochemicals in inhibition of angiogenesis through modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, major factors responsible for angiogenesis. Metabolite structures retrieved from PubChem and KNApSAcK – 3D databases, were docked using AutoDock4.2 tool. Hydrogen bond and molecular docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and toxicity predictions were carried out using UCSF Chimera, LigPlot+ and PreADMET server, respectively. From the docking analysis, it was observed that puerarone and tuberostan had significant binding affinity for the intracellular kinase domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 respectively. It is important to mention that both the phytochemicals shared similar interaction profile as that of standard inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Also, both puerarone and tuberostan interacted with Lys861/Lys868 (adenosine 5’-triphosphate binding site of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptors-2), thus providing a clue that they may enforce their inhibitory effect by blocking the adenosine 5’-triphosphate binding domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Moreover, these molecules exhibited good drug-likeness, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties without any carcinogenic and toxic effects. The interaction pattern of the puerarone and tuberostan may provide a hint for a novel drug design for vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors with better specificity to treat angiogenic disorders. PMID:26664060

  15. Histamine Induces Vascular Hyperpermeability by Increasing Blood Flow and Endothelial Barrier Disruption In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ashina, Kohei; Tsubosaka, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Omori, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Koji; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Murata, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a mediator of allergic inflammation released mainly from mast cells. Although histamine strongly increases vascular permeability, its precise mechanism under in vivo situation remains unknown. We here attempted to reveal how histamine induces vascular hyperpermeability focusing on the key regulators of vascular permeability, blood flow and endothelial barrier. Degranulation of mast cells by antigen-stimulation or histamine treatment induced vascular hyperpermeability and tissue swelling in mouse ears. These were abolished by histamine H1 receptor antagonism. Intravital imaging showed that histamine dilated vasculature, increased blood flow, while it induced hyperpermeability in venula. Whole-mount staining showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier formation of venula indicated by changes in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) localization at endothelial cell junction. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis (NOS) by L-NAME or vasoconstriction by phenylephrine strongly inhibited the histamine-induced blood flow increase and hyperpermeability without changing the VE-cadherin localization. In vitro, measurements of trans-endothelial electrical resistance of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) showed that histamine disrupted endothelial barrier. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) or Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), NOS attenuated the histamine-induced barrier disruption. These observations suggested that histamine increases vascular permeability mainly by nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vascular dilation and subsequent blood flow increase and maybe partially by PKC/ROCK/NO-dependent endothelial barrier disruption.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor signalling in endothelial cell survival: A role for NF{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, Jennifer . E-mail: Jennifer.grosjean@imperial.ac.uk; Kiriakidis, Serafim; Reilly, Kerri; Feldmann, Marc; Paleolog, Ewa

    2006-02-17

    Angiogenesis is the development of blood capillaries from pre-existing vessels. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of vessel growth and regression, and acts as an endothelial survival factor by protecting endothelial cells from apoptosis. Many genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis are regulated by the nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) transcription factor family. This study aimed to address the hypothesis that VEGF-mediated survival effects on endothelium involve NF{kappa}B. Using an NF{kappa}B-luciferase reporter adenovirus, we observed activation of NF{kappa}B following VEGF treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and found to involve nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B sub-unit p65. However, NF{kappa}B activation occurred without degradation of inhibitory I{kappa}B proteins (I{kappa}B{alpha}, I{kappa}B{beta}, and I{kappa}B{epsilon}). Instead, tyrosine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} was observed following VEGF treatment, suggesting NF{kappa}B activation was mediated by degradation-independent dissociation of I{kappa}B{alpha} from NF{kappa}B. Adenovirus-mediated over-expression of either native I{kappa}B{alpha}, or of I{kappa}B{alpha} in which tyrosine residue 42 was mutated to phenylalanine, inhibited induction of NF{kappa}B-dependent luciferase activity in response to VEGF. Furthermore, VEGF-induced upregulation of mRNA for the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cell survival following serum withdrawal was reduced following I{kappa}B{alpha} over-expression. This study highlights that different molecular mechanisms of NF{kappa}B activation may be involved downstream of stimuli which activate the endothelial lining of blood vessels.

  17. Heterogeneity of vascular endothelial cells with relevance to diagnosis of vascular tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, I.; Bicknell, R.; Harris, A. L.; Jones, M.; Gatter, K. C.; Mason, D. Y.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the distribution of factor VIII related antigen, CD31, CD34 and CD36 in normal and malignant human vascular tissues using a panel of well characterised monoclonal antibodies. METHODS: Frozen and fixed material from a wide range of normal tissues and routinely processed material from 43 benign and malignant vascular tumours were examined. Single immunocytochemical labelling was performed using the APAAP technique. Double staining involved the sequential use of APAAP with the peroxidase method. RESULTS: Human vascular endothelium was antigenically heterogeneous. One of the most restricted markers was factor VIII related antigen, despite its having been widely used in diagnostic pathology as a marker of vascular endothelium and of the tumours which arise from it. Three antibodies against factor VIII related antigen, CD31 (JC70) and CD34 (QBend 10) were identified as immunostaining routinely processed, formalin fixed, paraffin wax sections. Each antibody gave different staining when tested on a range of vascular tumours, both benign and malignant. CONCLUSIONS: A small panel of three reagents (factor VIII related antigen, CD31 (JC70) and CD34 (QBend 10)) should be used by diagnostic pathologists who want to show the presence of cells of endothelial origin in routine material. Images PMID:1371777

  18. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. II. Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Mooteri, S.N.; Podolski, J.L.; Drab, E.A.; Saclarides, T.J.

    1996-02-01

    Although the aminothiol WR-1065 protects normal tissues, its direct effect on the damage and restoration of the vascular endothelium is not clear. In endothelial cells, WR-1065 attenuates both the DNA damage and the G{sub 1}-phase arrest induced by radiation. After the destruction of nearby endothelial cells, the survivors rearrange their cytoskeleton, migrate and replicate. To determine the effect of radiation on morphology and migration, portions of bovine aortic endothelial cell cultures were denuded with a pipette tip and irradiated ({sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays). The following observations were noted after 5 Gy: within 10 min, there was increased formation of protein-mixed disulfides including actin-mixed disulfide; after 30 min, {alpha}{sub 5}{Beta}{sub 1}, the integrin receptor for fibronectin, was up-regulated on the apical membrane surface. Within 5 h, actin-containing stress fibers reorganized, although there was no change in the total filamentous (F-)actin content within the cells. Compared to controls after 24 h, the irradiated cells had migrated 15% farther (P < 0.01), and at the leading edge covered twice the surface area (P < 0.0001). The addition of 2 mM WR-1065 for 2 h before 5 Gy inhibited the increased expression of {alpha}{sub 5}{Beta}{sub 1}, promoted retention of stress fibers and prevented the enhanced cell migration and spreading. These results indicate that WR-1065 prevents radiation-induced morphological responses. This effect appears to be mediated by an impact on both adhesion molecule expression and cytoskeletal reorganization. 61 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Biomechanics and Intracellular Dynamics of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the internal mechanical properties of living cells is essential to gain insight to basic cellular functions ranging from cellular signal transduction, intracellular traffics to cell motility. Vascular endothelial cells form a single cell layer that lines all blood vessels and serves to regulate exchanges between the blood stream and the surrounding tissues. Endothelial cells are one of the most studied cell types because of their roles in cardiovascular diseases and the linkage between their growth control and strategies of cancer treatments. This talk reports the application of a novel methodology by which scientists can explore cellular functions and study cytoskeleton dynamics of living cells at the subcellular level with minimal invasion. The methodology is based on the realization that optical tweezers can be used to measure the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton in the vicinity of organelles and cellular structures. Optical tweezers is a technique based on the physics that dielectric materials, such as silica beads, latex particles or protein aggregates are attracted to and thus trapped at the focal point of a tightly focused laser beam in an aqueous medium. It has been shown that viscoelasticity can be determined from the movements of the trapped object in an oscillating optical tweezers. Applying the oscillating tweezers to intracellular cellular structures, we were able to determine the frequency dependent mechanical properties of the interior of cultured bovine endothelial cells. In contrast to the viscoelastic behavior expected of a network of cytoskelatal proteins, we found unusually large fluctuations in both elastic and loss moduli of the cell interior. More surprisingly, both mechanical moduli showed rhythmic behavior with a periodicity in the range of 20 - 30 seconds in healthy living cells. The rhythm could be altered by drug treatments, and the amplitude of the fluctuations diminished when cells were depleted of nutrients

  20. Endothelial progenitor cell recruitment in a microfluidic vascular model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Abaci, Hasan E; Xu, Yu; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    During vessel injury, endothelial progenitors cells (EPCs) are recruited from bone marrow and directed to the hypoxic injury site. The hypoxic conditions in the damaged blood vessel promote TNF-α, which upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). EPCs attach to endothelial cell lining using ICAM-1. Here we aimed to examine EPC attachment to ECs in an injured-blood vessel conditions. We first determined ICAM-1 expression in stimulated HUVECs. We stimulated HUVECs with 21% oxygen (atmospheric), atmospheric with TNF-α-supplemented media, 1% oxygen (hypoxia), and hypoxia with TNF-α-supplemented media and found the highest ECFC attachment on HUVECs stimulated with TNF-α and hypoxia, correlating with the highest ICAM-1 expression. We next designed, fabricated and tested a three-dimensional microbioreactor (3D MBR) system with precise control and monitoring of dissolve oxygen and media flow rate in the cellular environment. We utilized a step-wise seeding approach, producing monolayer of HUVECs on all four walls. When stimulated with both TNF-α and hypoxia, ECFC retention on HUVECs was significantly increased under low shear stress compared to static controls. Overall, the 3D MBR system mimics the pathological oxygen tension and shear stress in the damaged vasculature, providing a platform to model vascular-related disorders. PMID:26693599

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 directly regulates murine neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Charles-Félix; Fontaine, Romain H.; Soueid, Jihane; Tammela, Tuomas; Makinen, Taija; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Bonnaud, Fabien; Miguez, Andres; Benhaim, Lucile; Xu, Yunling; Barallobre, Maria-José; Moutkine, Imane; Lyytikkä, Johannes; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Zalc, Bernard; Richardson, William; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alitalo, Kari; Eichmann, Anne; Thomas, Jean-Léon

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are slowly dividing astrocytes that are intimately associated with capillary endothelial cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain. Functionally, members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family can stimulate neurogenesis as well as angiogenesis, but it has been unclear whether they act directly via VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) expressed by neural cells, or indirectly via the release of growth factors from angiogenic capillaries. Here, we show that VEGFR-3, a receptor required for lymphangiogenesis, is expressed by NSCs and is directly required for neurogenesis. Vegfr3:YFP reporter mice show VEGFR-3 expression in multipotent NSCs, which are capable of self-renewal and are activated by the VEGFR-3 ligand VEGF-C in vitro. Overexpression of VEGF-C stimulates VEGFR-3-expressing NSCs and neurogenesis in the SVZ without affecting angiogenesis. Conversely, conditional deletion of Vegfr3 in neural cells, inducible deletion in subventricular astrocytes, and blocking of VEGFR-3 signaling with antibodies reduce SVZ neurogenesis. Therefore, VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 signaling acts directly on NSCs and regulates adult neurogenesis, opening potential approaches for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21498572

  2. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N.; Touyz, Rhian M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2∙−) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47phox, p67phox, and p22phox and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2∙− production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  3. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2 (∙-)) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47(phox), p67(phox), and p22(phox) and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2 (∙-) production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  4. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes vascular hyperpermeability by reducing endothelial glycocalyx and ATP production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Chung; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Li, Chien-Feng; Sun, Ding-Ping; Wang, Li-Yun; Hsing, Chung-Hsi

    2015-05-27

    Prolonged treatment with a large dose of propofol may cause diffuse cellular cytotoxicity; however, the detailed underlying mechanism remains unclear, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Previous studies showed that a propofol overdose induces endothelial injury and vascular barrier dysfunction. Regarding the important role of endothelial glycocalyx on the maintenance of vascular barrier integrity, we therefore hypothesized that a propofol overdose-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction is caused by impaired endothelial glycocalyx. In vivo, we intraperitoneally injected ICR mice with overdosed propofol, and the results showed that a propofol overdose significantly induced systemic vascular hyperpermeability and reduced the expression of endothelial glycocalyx, syndecan-1, syndecan-4, perlecan mRNA and heparan sulfate (HS) in the vessels of multiple organs. In vitro, a propofol overdose reduced the expression of syndecan-1, syndecan-4, perlecan, glypican-1 mRNA and HS and induced significant decreases in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)/NADH ratio and ATP concentrations in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Oligomycin treatment also induced significant decreases in the NAD+/NADH ratio, in ATP concentrations and in syndecan-4, perlecan and glypican-1 mRNA expression in HMEC-1 cells. These results demonstrate that a propofol overdose induces a partially ATP-dependent reduction of endothelial glycocalyx expression and consequently leads to vascular hyperpermeability due to the loss of endothelial barrier functions.

  5. Immunologic ignorance of vascular endothelial cells expressing minor histocompatibility antigen.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Beatrice; Krebs, Philippe; Tian, Yinghua; Engeler, Daniel; Scandella, Elke; Miller, Simone; Palmer, Douglas C; Restifo, Nicholas P; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2008-05-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) presenting minor histocompatibility antigen (mhAg) are major target cells for alloreactive effector CD8(+) T cells during chronic transplant rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The contribution of ECs to T-cell activation, however, is still a controversial issue. In this study, we have assessed the antigen-presenting capacity of ECs in vivo using a transgenic mouse model with beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) expression confined to the vascular endothelium (Tie2-LacZ mice). In a GVHD-like setting with adoptive transfer of beta-gal-specific T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, beta-gal expression by ECs was not sufficient to either activate or tolerize CD8(+) T cells. Likewise, transplantation of fully vascularized heart or liver grafts from Tie2-LacZ mice into nontransgenic recipients did not suffice to activate beta-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells, indicating that CD8(+) T-cell responses against mhAg cannot be initiated by ECs. Moreover, we could show that spontaneous activation of beta-gal-specific CD8(+) T cells in Tie2-LacZ mice was exclusively dependent on CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs), demonstrating that mhAgs presented by ECs remain immunologically ignored unless presentation by DCs is granted.

  6. Endothelial-mural cell signaling in vascular development and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gaengel, Konstantin; Genové, Guillem; Armulik, Annika; Betsholtz, Christer

    2009-05-01

    Mural cells are essential components of blood vessels and are necessary for normal development, homeostasis, and organ function. Alterations in mural cell density or the stable attachment of mural cells to the endothelium is associated with several human diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, venous malformation, and hereditary stroke. In addition mural cells are implicated in regulating tumor growth and have thus been suggested as potential antiangiogenic targets in tumor therapy. In recent years our knowledge of mural cell function and endothelial-mural cell signaling has increased dramatically, and we now begin to understand the mechanistic basis of the key signaling pathways involved. This is mainly thanks to sophisticated in vivo experiments using a broad repertoire of genetic technologies. In this review, we summarize the five currently best understood signaling pathways implicated in mural cell biology. We discuss PDGFB/PDGFRbeta- dependent pericyte recruitment, as well as the role of angiopoietins and Tie receptors in vascular maturation. In addition, we highlight the effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling on adherens junction assembly and vascular stability, as well as the role of TGF-beta-signaling in mural cell differentiation. We further reflect recent data suggesting an important function for Notch3 signaling in mural cell maturation.

  7. Rhubarb Antagonizes Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-induced Vascular Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yun-Liang; Zhang, Sheng; Tian, Zhao-Tao; Lin, Zhao-Fen; Chen, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intact endothelial structure and function are critical for maintaining microcirculatory homeostasis. Dysfunction of the latter is an underlying cause of various organ pathologies. In a previous study, we showed that rhubarb, a traditional Chinese medicine, protected intestinal mucosal microvascular endothelial cells in rats with metastasizing septicemia. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of rhubarb on matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9)-induced vascular endothelial (VE) permeability. Methods: Rhubarb monomers were extracted and purified by a series of chromatography approaches. The identity of these monomers was analyzed by hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), carbon-13 NMR, and distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We established a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer on a Transwell insert. We measured the HUVEC permeability, proliferation, and the secretion of VE-cadherin into culture medium using fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay, 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, in response to treatment with MMP9 and/or rhubarb monomers. Results: A total of 21 rhubarb monomers were extracted and identified. MMP9 significantly increased the permeability of the HUVEC monolayer, which was significantly reduced by five individual rhubarb monomer (emodin, 3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid, 1-O-caffeoyl-2-(4-hydroxyl-O-cinnamoyl)-β-D-glucose, daucosterol linoleate, and rhein) or a combination of all five monomers (1 μmol/L for each monomer). Mechanistically, the five-monomer mixture at 1 μmol/L promoted HUVEC proliferation. In addition, MMP9 stimulated the secretion of VE-cadherin into the culture medium, which was significantly inhibited by the five-monomer mixture. Conclusions: The rhubarb mixture of emodin, 3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2

  8. [The effects of microgravity on blood vessels and vascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Tang, Na-Ping; Li, Hua; Qiu, Yun-Liang; Zhou, Guo-Mina; Wang, Yan; Ma, Jing; Mei, Qi-Bing

    2014-10-01

    The dysfunction of vascular system is one of the main causes of orthostatic intolerance induced by microgravity. Vascular endothelial cell is a single layer on the inner wall of the blood vessel and is the important component of the blood vessel wall. Vascular endothelial cell plays a pivotal role in the regulation of vascular functions, such as serving as a permeability barrier, regulating vasoconstriction and vasodilatation. Recent studies have demonstrated that microgravity may have different effects on vascular sys- tem and vascular endothelial cells in different parts of the body, such as increasing vasoconstrictor reactivity and decreasing vasodilator reactivity of cerebral arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor and vasodilator reactivity of carotid and abdominal aortic arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor reactivity and increasing vasodilator reactivity of pulmonary arteries, decreasing vasoconstrictor reactivity of mesenteric arteries and veins and lower extremity arteries. In addition, microgravity can promote the growth of vascular endothelial cells in the large vessels and inhibit the growth of microvascular endothelial cells. This paper summarized the research progress in the effects of microgravity on blood vessels and vascular endothelial cells.

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor: an attractive target in the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Jie; Qu, Yi; Yu, Dan; Tong, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia or ischemia results in cell death and cerebral edema, as well as other cellular reactions such as angiogenesis and the reestablishment of functional microvasculature to promote recovery from brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor is expressed in the central nervous system after hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and is involved in the process of brain repair via the regulation of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and cerebral edema, which all require vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. In this review, we focus on the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the response to hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and discuss potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26981109

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor: an attractive target in the treatment of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; Zhou, Hui; Lu, Jie; Qu, Yi; Yu, Dan; Tong, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia or ischemia results in cell death and cerebral edema, as well as other cellular reactions such as angiogenesis and the reestablishment of functional microvasculature to promote recovery from brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor is expressed in the central nervous system after hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and is involved in the process of brain repair via the regulation of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, and cerebral edema, which all require vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. In this review, we focus on the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor signaling pathway in the response to hypoxic/ischemic brain injury, and discuss potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:26981109

  11. Nitric Oxide Directly Promotes Vascular Endothelial Insulin Transport

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Aileen X.; Aylor, Kevin; Barrett, Eugene J.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance strongly associates with decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction. In the vasculature, NO mediates multiple processes that affect insulin delivery, including dilating both resistance and terminal arterioles in skeletal muscle in vivo. However, whether NO directly regulates vascular endothelial cell (EC) insulin uptake and its transendothelial transport (TET) is unknown. We report in this article that l-NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) pretreatment blocked, whereas l-arginine and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) each enhanced, EC uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled insulin. SNP also partly or fully reversed the inhibition of EC insulin uptake caused by l-NAME, wortmannin, the Src inhibitor PP1, and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, SNP promoted [125I]TyrA14insulin TET by ∼40%. Treatment with insulin with and without SNP did not affect EC cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, and the cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP did not affect FITC-insulin uptake. In contrast, treatment with insulin and SNP significantly increased EC protein S-nitrosylation, the colocalization of S-nitrosothiol (S-NO) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 and inhibited PTP1B activity. Moreover, a high-fat diet significantly inhibited EC insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and FITC-insulin uptake that was partially reversed by SNP in rats. Finally, inhibition of S-nitrosylation by knockdown of thioredoxin-interacting protein completely eliminated SNP-enhanced FITC-insulin uptake. We conclude that NO directly promotes EC insulin transport by enhancing protein S-nitrosylation. NO also inhibits PTP1B activity, thereby enhancing insulin signaling. PMID:23863813

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor regulates angiogenesis and vascular permeability in Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Cornali, E.; Zietz, C.; Benelli, R.; Weninger, W.; Masiello, L.; Breier, G.; Tschachler, E.; Albini, A.; Stürzl, M.

    1996-01-01

    Abundant vasculature with increased permeability is a prominent histological feature of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a multifocal, cytokine-regulated tumor. Here we report on the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in AIDS-KS angiogenesis and vascular permeability. We demonstrate that different cytokines, which were previously shown to be active in KS development, modulate VEGF expression in KS spindle cells and cooperate with VEGF on the functional level. Northern blot analysis as well as studies on single cells using in situ hybridization revealed that VEGF expression in cultivated AIDS-KS spindle cells is up-regulated by platelet-derived growth factor-B and interleukin-1 beta. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of cell culture supernatants demonstrated that the VEGF protein is secreted by stimulated AIDS-KS spindle cells in sufficiently high amounts to activate proliferation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor did not increase VEGF expression but acted synergistically with VEGF in the induction of angiogenic KS-like lesions in a mouse model in vivo. Angiogenesis and cellularity of KS-like lesions were clearly increased when both factors were injected simultaneously into the flanks of mice, compared with separate injection of each factor. A comparable angiogenic reaction as obtained by simultaneous injection of basic fibroblast growth factor and VEGF was observed when cell culture supernatants of AIDS-KS spindle cells were used for these experiments. Finally, analysis of primary human AIDS-KS lesions revealed that high amounts of VEGF mRNA and protein were present in KS spindle cells in vivo. These data provide evidence that VEGF, in concert with platelet-derived growth factor-B, interleukin-1 beta, and basic fibroblast growth factor, is a key mediator of angiogenesis and vascular permeability in KS lesions in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8

  13. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Signaling and Regulates Angiogenesis in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingshan; Niu, Honglin; Li, Aiying; Nie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of 1-O-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a compound extracted from Inula britannica L., on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling and angiogenesis in endothelial cells (ECs). We showed that ABL promotes VEGF-induced cell proliferation, growth, migration, and tube formation in cultured human ECs. Furthermore, the modulatory effect of ABL on VEGF-induced Akt, MAPK p42/44, and p38 phosphorylation, as well as on upstream VEGFR-2 phosphorylation, were associated with VEGF-dependent Matrigel angiogenesis in vivo. In addition, animals treated with ABL (26 mg/kg/day) recovered blood flow significantly earlier than control animals, suggesting that ABL affects ischemia-mediated angiogenesis and arteriogenesis in vivo. Finally, we demonstrated that ABL strongly reduced the levels of VEGFR-2 on the cell surface, enhanced VEGFR-2 endocytosis, which consistent with inhibited VE-cadherin, a negative regulator of VEGF signaling associated with VEGFR-2 complex formation, but did not alter VE-cadherin or VEGFR-2 expression in ECs. Our results suggest that ABL may serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for various cardiovascular diseases, including chronic ischemia, by regulating VEGF signaling and modulating angiogenesis. PMID:26863518

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor in central nervous system injuries - a vascular growth factor getting nervous?

    PubMed

    Sköld, Mattias K; Kanje, Martin

    2008-11-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is recognized as a central factor in growth, survival and permeability of blood vessels in both physiological and pathological conditions. It is as such of importance for vascular responses in various central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Accumulating evidence suggest that VEGF may also act as a neuroprotective and neurotrophic factor supporting neuronal survival and neuronal regeneration. Findings of neuropilins as shared co-receptors between molecules with such seemingly different functions as the axon guidance molecules semaphorins and VEGF has further boosted the interest in the role of VEGF in neural tissue injury and repair mechanisms. Thus, VEGF most likely act in parallel or concurrent on cells in both the vascular and nervous system. The present review gives a summary of known or potential aspects of the VEGF system in the healthy and diseased nervous system. The potential benefits but also problems and pitfalls in intervening in the actions of such a multifunctional factor as VEGF in the disordered CNS are also covered.

  15. Essential Role of Transglutaminase 2 in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Vascular Leakage in the Retina of Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Ju; Jung, Se-Hui; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Sungeun; Hwang, JongYun; Kim, Soo-Youl; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is predominantly caused by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular leakage; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we designed an in vivo transglutaminase (TGase) activity assay in mouse retina and demonstrated that hyperglycemia induced vascular leakage by activating TGase2 in diabetic retina. VEGF elevated TGase2 activity through sequential elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in endothelial cells. The TGase inhibitors cystamine and monodansylcadaverin or TGase2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented VEGF-induced stress fiber formation and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin disruption, which play a critical role in modulating endothelial permeability. Intravitreal injection of two TGase inhibitors or TGase2 siRNA successfully inhibited hyperglycemia-induced TGase activation and microvascular leakage in the retinas of diabetic mice. C-peptide or ROS scavengers also inhibited TGase activation in diabetic mouse retinas. The role of TGase2 in VEGF-induced vascular leakage was further supported using diabetic TGase2(-/-) mice. Thus, our findings suggest that ROS-mediated activation of TGase2 plays a key role in VEGF-induced vascular leakage by stimulating stress fiber formation and VE-cadherin disruption. PMID:27207524

  16. Analysis of vascular endothelial dysfunction genes and related pathways in obesity through systematic bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jing; Sun, Ling; Xu, Qiuqin; Hou, Miao; Ding, Yueyue; Huang, Jie; Chen, Ye; Cao, Lei; Zhang, Jianmin; Qian, Weiguo; Lv, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become an increasingly serious health problem and popular research topic. It is associated with many diseases, especially cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related endothelial dysfunction. This study analyzed genes related to endothelial dysfunction and obesity and then summarized their most significant signaling pathways. Genes related to vascular endothelial dysfunction and obesity were extracted from a PubMed database, and analyzed by STRING, DAVID, and Gene-Go Meta-Core software. 142 genes associated with obesity were found to play a role in endothelial dysfunction in PubMed. A significant pathway (Angiotensin system maturation in protein folding and maturation) associated with obesity and endothelial dysfunction was explored. The genes and the pathway explored may play an important role in obesity. Further studies about preventing vascular endothelial dysfunction obesity should be conducted through targeting these loci and pathways.

  17. Roles of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pronto-Laborinho, Ana Catarina; Pinto, Susana; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal devastating neurodegenerative disorder, involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons in spinal cord, brainstem, and motor cortex. Riluzole is the only drug approved in ALS but it only confers a modest improvement in survival. In spite of a high number of clinical trials no other drug has proved effectiveness. Recent studies support that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), originally described as a key angiogenic factor, also plays a key role in the nervous system, including neurogenesis, neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and axon guidance. VEGF has been used in exploratory clinical studies with promising results in ALS and other neurological disorders. Although VEGF is a very promising compound, translating the basic science breakthroughs into clinical practice is the major challenge ahead. VEGF-B, presenting a single safety profile, protects motor neurons from degeneration in ALS animal models and, therefore, it will be particularly interesting to test its effects in ALS patients. In the present paper the authors make a brief description of the molecular properties of VEGF and its receptors and review its different features and therapeutic potential in the nervous system/neurodegenerative disease, particularly in ALS. PMID:24987705

  18. Roles of vascular endothelial growth factor in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pronto-Laborinho, Ana Catarina; Pinto, Susana; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal devastating neurodegenerative disorder, involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons in spinal cord, brainstem, and motor cortex. Riluzole is the only drug approved in ALS but it only confers a modest improvement in survival. In spite of a high number of clinical trials no other drug has proved effectiveness. Recent studies support that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), originally described as a key angiogenic factor, also plays a key role in the nervous system, including neurogenesis, neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and axon guidance. VEGF has been used in exploratory clinical studies with promising results in ALS and other neurological disorders. Although VEGF is a very promising compound, translating the basic science breakthroughs into clinical practice is the major challenge ahead. VEGF-B, presenting a single safety profile, protects motor neurons from degeneration in ALS animal models and, therefore, it will be particularly interesting to test its effects in ALS patients. In the present paper the authors make a brief description of the molecular properties of VEGF and its receptors and review its different features and therapeutic potential in the nervous system/neurodegenerative disease, particularly in ALS. PMID:24987705

  19. Pancreatitis with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Morgan, Charity J; Choueiri, Toni K; Rocha, Pedro; Naik, Gurudatta; Sonpavde, Guru

    2015-04-01

    A trial-level meta-analysis was conducted to determine the relative risk (RR) of pancreatitis associated with multi-targeted vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Eligible studies included randomized phase 2 and 3 trials comparing arms with and without an FDA-approved VEGFR TKI (sunitinib, sorafenib, pazopanib, axitinib, vandetanib, cabozantinib, ponatinib, regorafenib). Statistical analyses calculated the RR and 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 10,578 patients from 16 phase III trials and 6 phase II trials were selected. The RR for all grade and high-grade pancreatitis for the TKI vs. no TKI- arms was 1.95 (p=0.042, 95% CI: 1.02 to 3.70) and 1.89 (p=0.069, 95% CI: 0.95 to 373), respectively. No differential impact of malignancy type or specific TKI agent was seen on RR of all grade of high grade pancreatitis. Better patient selection and monitoring may mitigate the risk of severe pancreatitis.

  20. Direct Antiangiogenic Actions of Cadmium on Human Vascular Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Woods, J. M.; Leone, M.; Klosowska, K.; Lamar, P. C.; Shaknovsky, T. J.; Prozialeck, W. C.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a primary target of cadmium (Cd) toxicity, but little is known regarding a potential mechanism whereby Cd may inhibit angiogenesis. Recent findings showing that Cd can disrupt cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion suggested that Cd might inhibit angiogenesis by altering the function of VE-cadherin, a molecule that is essential for angiogenesis. To address this issue, endothelial cells (ECs) were exposed to Cd in the presence of serum and subjected to angiogenesis-related cell migration and tube formation assays. Initial examination of cytotoxicity showed that ECs are rather resistant to the acute cytotoxic effects of Cd even at concentrations up to 1mM. However, 10μM Cd decreased migration of ECs. Cd concentrations of 500nM and greater significantly reduced organization of microvascular ECs into tubes. These antiangiogenic effects were evident even when ECs were preincubated with Cd and then washed to remove free Cd, indicating that Cd acted directly on the cells rather than on the extracellular matrix. Immunolocalization studies showed that Cd caused the redistribution of VE-cadherin from cell-cell contacts. These findings indicate that Cd acts in an angiostatic manner on ECs, and that this effect may involve alterations in the localization and function of VE cadherin. PMID:18243643

  1. Stem cell-derived vascular endothelial cells and their potential application in regenerative medicine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although a 'vascular stem cell' population has not been identified or generated, vascular endothelial and mural cells (smooth muscle cells and pericytes) can be derived from currently known pluripotent stem cell sources, including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. We rev...

  2. Phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor-induced penile erection.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A; Crone, Julie K; Burnett, Arthur L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced penile erection is mediated by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through its phosphorylation. We assessed the role of constitutively activated eNOS in VEGF-induced penile erection using wild-type (WT) and eNOS-knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice with and without vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. Adult WT and eNOS(-/-) mice were subjected to sham operation or bilateral castration to induce vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. At the time of surgery, animals were injected intracavernosally with a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing human VEGF145 (10(9) particle units) or with empty virus (Ad.Null). After 7 days, erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Total and phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) as well as total and phosphorylated eNOS were quantitatively assessed in mice penes using Western immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In intact WT mice, VEGF145 significantly increased erectile responses, and in WT mice after castration, it completely recovered penile erection. However, VEGF145 failed to increase erectile responses in intact eNOS(-/-) mice and only partially recovered erectile function in castrated eNOS(-/-) mice. In addition, VEGF145 significantly increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine 1177 by approximately 2-fold in penes of both intact and castrated WT mice. The data provide a molecular explanation for VEGF stimulatory effect on penile erection, which involves phosphorylated eNOS (Serine 1177) mediation. PMID:14522830

  3. Vascular endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) regulates advanced metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    DeLisser, Horace; Liu, Yong; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Thor, Ann; Briasouli, Paraskevei; Handumrongkul, Chakrapong; Wilfong, Jonathon; Yount, Garret; Nosrati, Mehdi; Fong, Sylvia; Shtivelman, Emma; Fehrenbach, Melane; Cao, Gaoyuan; Moore, Dan H.; Nayak, Shruti; Liggitt, Denny; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Debs, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Most patients who die from cancer succumb to treatment-refractory advanced metastatic progression. Although the early stages of tumor metastasis result in the formation of clinically silent micrometastatic foci, its later stages primarily reflect the progressive, organ-destructive growth of already advanced metastases. Early-stage metastasis is regulated by multiple factors within tumor cells as well as by the tumor microenvironment (TME). In contrast, the molecular determinants that control advanced metastatic progression remain essentially uncharacterized, precluding the development of therapies targeted against it. Here we show that the TME, functioning in part through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), drives advanced metastatic progression and is essential for progression through its preterminal end stage. PECAM-1–KO and chimeric mice revealed that its metastasis-promoting effects are mediated specifically through vascular endothelial cell (VEC) PECAM-1. Anti–PECAM-1 mAb therapy suppresses both end-stage metastatic progression and tumor-induced cachexia in tumor-bearing mice. It reduces proliferation, but not angiogenesis or apoptosis, within advanced tumor metastases. Because its antimetastatic effects are mediated by binding to VEC rather than to tumor cells, anti–PECAM-1 mAb appears to act independently of tumor type. A modified 3D coculture assay showed that anti–PECAM-1 mAb inhibits the proliferation of PECAM-1–negative tumor cells by altering the concentrations of secreted factors. Our studies indicate that a complex interplay between elements of the TME and advanced tumor metastases directs end-stage metastatic progression. They also suggest that some therapeutic interventions may target late-stage metastases specifically. mAb-based targeting of PECAM-1 represents a TME-targeted therapeutic approach that suppresses the end stages of metastatic progression, until now a refractory clinical entity. PMID:20926749

  4. Phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor-induced penile erection.

    PubMed

    Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A; Crone, Julie K; Burnett, Arthur L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced penile erection is mediated by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through its phosphorylation. We assessed the role of constitutively activated eNOS in VEGF-induced penile erection using wild-type (WT) and eNOS-knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice with and without vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. Adult WT and eNOS(-/-) mice were subjected to sham operation or bilateral castration to induce vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. At the time of surgery, animals were injected intracavernosally with a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing human VEGF145 (10(9) particle units) or with empty virus (Ad.Null). After 7 days, erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Total and phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) as well as total and phosphorylated eNOS were quantitatively assessed in mice penes using Western immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In intact WT mice, VEGF145 significantly increased erectile responses, and in WT mice after castration, it completely recovered penile erection. However, VEGF145 failed to increase erectile responses in intact eNOS(-/-) mice and only partially recovered erectile function in castrated eNOS(-/-) mice. In addition, VEGF145 significantly increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine 1177 by approximately 2-fold in penes of both intact and castrated WT mice. The data provide a molecular explanation for VEGF stimulatory effect on penile erection, which involves phosphorylated eNOS (Serine 1177) mediation.

  5. CD8 T Cell-Initiated Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Promotes Central Nervous System Vascular Permeability under Neuroinflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Dickerson, Jonathan W.; Chen, Yi; McDole, Jeremiah R.; Tripathi, Pulak; Pirko, Istvan; Seroogy, Kim B.; Johnson, Aaron J.

    2010-01-01

    Dysregulation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark feature of numerous neurologic disorders as diverse as multiple sclerosis, stroke, epilepsy, viral hemorrhagic fevers, cerebral malaria, and acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis. CD8 T cells are one immune cell type that have been implicated in promoting vascular permeability in these conditions. Our laboratory has created a murine model of CD8 T cell-mediated CNS vascular permeability using a variation of the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus system traditionally used to study multiple sclerosis. Previously, we demonstrated that CD8 T cells have the capacity to initiate astrocyte activation, cerebral endothelial cell tight junction protein alterations and CNS vascular permeability through a perforin-dependent process. To address the downstream mechanism by which CD8 T cells promote BBB dysregulation, in this study, we assess the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in this model. We demonstrate that neuronal expression of VEGF is significantly upregulated prior to, and coinciding with, CNS vascular permeability. Phosphorylation of fetal liver kinase-1 is significantly increased early in this process indicating activation of this receptor. Specific inhibition of neuropilin-1 significantly reduced CNS vascular permeability and fetal liver kinase-1 activation, and preserved levels of the cerebral endothelial cell tight junction protein occludin. Our data demonstrate that CD8 T cells initiate neuronal expression of VEGF in the CNS under neuroinflammatory conditions, and that VEGF may be a viable therapeutic target in neurologic disease characterized by inflammation-induced BBB disruption. PMID:20008293

  6. Papillary endothelial hyperplasia in association with vascular malformation of the hand.

    PubMed

    Alves, Kristin; Bauer, Andrea; Jupiter, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Vascular malformations are uncommonly encountered in the hand. This case report involves the unique case of a rapidly enlarging mass associated with a known vascular malformation. Final pathology revealed dense reactive fibrous tissue, with prominent blood vessels, consistent with a venous malformation and associated papillary endothelial hyperplasia. The intraoperative finding of two separately identifiable masses, one fibrotic and one vascular, has not previously been reported.

  7. Neutrophil Elastase-Generated Fragment of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A Stimulates Macrophage and Endothelial Progenitor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kurtagic, Elma; Rich, Celeste B.; Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Nugent, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Elastase released from neutrophils as part of the innate immune system has been implicated in chronic diseases such as emphysema and cardiovascular disease. We have previously shown that neutrophil elastase targets vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF) for partial degradation to generate a fragment of VEGF (VEGFf) that has distinct activities. Namely, VEGFf binds to VEGF receptor 1 but not to VEGF receptor 2 and shows altered signaling compared to intact VEGF. In the present study we investigated the chemotactic function of VEGF and VEGFf released from cells by neutrophil elastase. We found that endothelial cells migrated in response to intact VEGF but not VEGFf whereas RAW 264.7 macrophages/monocytes and embryonic endothelial progenitor cells were stimulated to migrate by either VEGF or VEGFf. To investigate the role of elastase-mediated release of VEGF from cells/extracellular matrices, a co-culture system was established. High or low VEGF producing cells were co-cultured with macrophages, endothelial or endothelial progenitor cells and treated with neutrophil elastase. Elastase treatment stimulated macrophage and endothelial progenitor cell migration with the response being greater with the high VEGF expressing cells. However, elastase treatment led to decreased endothelial cell migration due to VEGF cleavage to VEGF fragment. These findings suggest that the tissue response to NE-mediated injury might involve the generation of diffusible VEGF fragments that stimulate inflammatory cell recruitment. PMID:26672607

  8. Prognostic value of vascularity and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, R; Carlile, J; Pendleton, N; Schor, A

    2001-01-01

    Aims—High expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumours has been found to be associated with poor prognosis in some studies, but not in others. The aims of this study were to determine the prognostic value of VEGF in operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its possible association with vascularity. Methods—Sections from 81 NSCLC archival specimens were stained with antibodies to von Willebrand factor (vWF) and VEGF. Vascularity was measured by the average density of vWF positive vessels. VEGF expression in tumour cells was assessed by consensus of two independent observers according to three indices, namely: (1) percentage of area stained, (2) intensity of staining, and (3) final score (product of area and intensity). Results—VEGF immunoreactivity was present in all tumours and adjacent normal lung tissue. None of the three VEGF indices was associated with vascularity or the clinical parameters examined. Mean survival times were shorter in patients with high VEGF expression, but the difference was not significant. This applied to the full cohort of patients, or when analysed separately according to tumour type or stage. However, high VEGF expression was associated with poor survival in patients with high vascularity (p = 0.02). VEGF had no discriminant value among patients with low vascularity. Vascularity had no prognostic value, except for late stage patients (UICC stages II and IIIa combined; n = 36), where high vascularity was associated with longer survival (p = 0.01). Conclusions—VEGF on its own has no prognostic value in NSCLC, but may become a useful indicator when combined with vascularity. VEGF may play a physiological role in the normal lung. Key Words: non-small cell lung cancer • vascular endothelial growth factor • vascularity • prognosis PMID:11215279

  9. UBIAD1-mediated vitamin K2 synthesis is required for vascular endothelial cell survival and development

    PubMed Central

    Hegarty, Jeffrey M.; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-organ animals, such as vertebrates, require the development of a closed vascular system to ensure the delivery of nutrients to, and the transport of waste from, their organs. As a result, an organized vascular network that is optimal for tissue perfusion is created through not only the generation of new blood vessels but also the remodeling and maintenance of endothelial cells via apoptotic and cell survival pathways. Here, we show that UBIAD1, a vitamin K2/menaquinone-4 biosynthetic enzyme, functions cell-autonomously to regulate endothelial cell survival and maintain vascular homeostasis. From a recent vascular transgene-assisted zebrafish forward genetic screen, we have identified a ubiad1 mutant, reddish/reh, which exhibits cardiac edema as well as cranial hemorrhages and vascular degeneration owing to defects in endothelial cell survival. These findings are further bolstered by the expression of UBIAD1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human heart tissue, as well as the rescue of the reh cardiac and vascular phenotypes with either zebrafish or human UBIAD1. Furthermore, we have discovered that vitamin K2, which is synthesized by UBIAD1, can also rescue the reh vascular phenotype but not the reh cardiac phenotype. Additionally, warfarin-treated zebrafish, which have decreased active vitamin K, display similar vascular degeneration as reh mutants, but exhibit normal cardiac function. Overall, these findings reveal an essential role for UBIAD1-generated vitamin K2 to maintain endothelial cell survival and overall vascular homeostasis; however, an alternative UBIAD1/vitamin K-independent pathway may regulate cardiac function. PMID:23533172

  10. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  11. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  12. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were determined by Griess reagent method and enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay. The protein levels of eNOS and p-eNOS at Serine-1177 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HAECs was measured by laser confocal imaging microscopy. Results showed that Jujuboside B reduced the tension of rat thoracic aorta rings with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME, KN93, EGTA, SKF96365, iberiotoxin and glibenclamide significantly attenuated Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation in endothelium-intact tissues. In contrast, indometacin and 4-DAMP had no such effects. Jujuboside B also promoted NO generation and increased eNOS activity, which were attenuated by L-NAME, EGTA and SKF96365. Moreover, Jujuboside B increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration dose-dependently, which was inhibited by EGTA and SKF96365. Besides, Jujuboside B induced a rapid Ca2+ influx instantaneously after depleting intracellular Ca2+ store, which was significantly inhibited by SKF96365. In conclusion, this study preliminarily confirmed that Jujuboside B reduced vascular tension endothelium-dependently. The underlying mechanisms involved that Jujuboside B increased extracellular Ca2+ influx through endothelial transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channels, phosphorylated eNOS and promoted NO generation in vascular endothelial cells. In addition, Jujuboside B-induced vasodilation involved

  13. Exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor induces malformed and hyperfused vessels during embryonic neovascularization.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, C J; Little, C D

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and specific endothelial mitogen that is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo [Leung, D. W., Cachianes, G., Kuang, W.-J., Goeddel, D. V. & Ferrara, N. (1989) Science 246 1306-1309]. To determine if VEGF also influences the behavior of primordial endothelial cells, we used an in vivo vascular assay based on the de novo formation of vessels. Japanese quail embryos injected with nanomolar quantities of the 165-residue form of VEGF at the onset of vasculogenesis exhibited profoundly altered vessel development. In fact, the overall patterning of the vascular network was abnormal in all VEGF-injected embryos. The malformations were attributable to two specific endothelial cell activities: (i) inappropriate neovascularization in normally avascular areas and (ii) the unregulated, excessive fusion of vessels. In the first instance, supernumerary vessels directly linked the inflow channel of the heart to the aortic outflow channel. The second aberrant activity led to the formation of vessels with abnormally large lumens. Ultimately, unregulated vessel fusion generated massive vascular sacs that obliterated the identity of individual vessels. These observations show that exogenous VEGF has an impact on the behavior of primordial endothelial cells engaged in vasculogenesis, and they strongly suggest that endogenous VEGF is important in vascular patterning and regulation of vessel size (lumen formation). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7543999

  14. RhoC maintains vascular homeostasis by regulating VEGF-induced signaling in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Luke H.; Sinha, Sutapa; Wang, Ying; Bhattacharya, Resham; Dutta, Shamit; Gong, Xun; Bedell, Victoria M.; Suresh, Sandip; Chun, Changzoon; Ramchandran, Ramani; Ekker, Stephen C.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are controlled by vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A). Dysregulation of these physiological processes contributes to the pathologies of heart disease, cancer and stroke. Rho GTPase proteins play an integral role in VEGF-mediated formation and maintenance of blood vessels. The regulatory functions of RhoA and RhoB in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are well defined, whereas the purpose of RhoC remains poorly understood. Here, we describe how RhoC promotes vascular homeostasis by modulating endothelial cell migration, proliferation and permeability. RhoC stimulates proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by stabilizing nuclear β-catenin, which promotes transcription of cyclin D1 and subsequently drives cell cycle progression. RhoC negatively regulates endothelial cell migration through MAPKs and downstream MLC2 signaling, and decreases vascular permeability through downregulation of the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ)–Ca2+–eNOS cascade in HUVECs. Using a VEGF-inducible zebrafish (Danio rerio) model, we observed significantly less vascular permeability in RhoC morpholino (MO)-injected zebrafish than control MO-injected zebrafish. Taken together, our findings suggest that RhoC is a key regulator of vascular homeostasis in endothelial cells. PMID:26136364

  15. Impaired endothelial proliferation and mesenchymal transition contribute to vascular rarefaction following acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Basile, David P; Friedrich, Jessica L; Spahic, Jasmina; Knipe, Nicole; Mang, Henry; Leonard, Ellen C; Changizi-Ashtiyani, Saeed; Bacallao, Robert L; Molitoris, Bruce A; Sutton, Timothy A

    2011-03-01

    Acute kidney injury induces the loss of renal microvessels, but the fate of endothelial cells and the mechanism of potential vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated protection is unknown. Cumulative cell proliferation was analyzed in the kidney of Sprague-Dawley rats following ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury by repetitive administration of BrdU (twice daily) and colocalization in endothelial cells with CD31 or cablin. Proliferating endothelial cells were undetectable for up to 2 days following I/R and accounted for only ∼1% of BrdU-positive cells after 7 days. VEGF-121 preserved vascular loss following I/R but did not affect proliferation of endothelial, perivascular cells or tubular cells. Endothelial mesenchymal transition states were identified by localizing endothelial markers (CD31, cablin, or infused tomato lectin) with the fibroblast marker S100A4. Such structures were prominent within 6 h and sustained for at least 7 days following I/R. A Tie-2-cre transgenic crossed with a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter mouse was used to trace the fate of endothelial cells and demonstrated interstititial expansion of YFP-positive cells colocalizing with S100A4 and smooth muscle actin following I/R. The interstitial expansion of YFP cells was attenuated by VEGF-121. Multiphoton imaging of transgenic mice revealed the alteration of YFP-positive vascular cells associated with blood vessels characterized by limited perfusion in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that vascular dropout post-AKI results from endothelial phenotypic transition combined with an impaired regenerative capacity, which may contribute to progressive chronic kidney disease. PMID:21123492

  16. Hydrogen-Rich Medium Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Vascular Endothelial Permeability via Rho-Associated Coiled-Coil Protein Kinase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keliang; Wang, Weina; Chen, Hongguang; Han, Huanzhi; Liu, Daquan; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. In recent years, molecular hydrogen, as an effective free radical scavenger, has been shown a selective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect, and it is beneficial in the treatment of sepsis. Rho-associated coiled-coil protein kinase (ROCK) participates in junction between normal cells, and regulates vascular endothelial permeability. In this study, we used lipopolysaccharide to stimulate vascular endothelial cells and explored the effects of hydrogen-rich medium on the regulation of adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability. We found that hydrogen-rich medium could inhibit adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells and decrease levels of adhesion molecules, whereas the levels of transepithelial/endothelial electrical resistance values and the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin were increased after hydrogen-rich medium treatment. Moreover, hydrogen-rich medium could lessen the expression of ROCK, as a similar effect of its inhibitor Y-27632. In addition, hydrogen-rich medium could also inhibit adhesion of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells. In conclusion, hydrogen-rich medium could regulate adhesion of monocytes/polymorphonuclear neutrophils to endothelial cells and vascular endothelial permeability, and this effect might be related to the decreased expression of ROCK protein.

  17. Tracing behavior of endothelial cells promotes vascular network formation.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Noriko; Sekine, Hidekazu; Bise, Ryoma; Okano, Teruo; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    The in vitro formation of network structures derived from endothelial cells in grafts before transplantation contributes to earlier engraftment. In a previous study, endothelial cells migrated to form a net-shaped structure in co-culture. However, the specific network formation behavior of endothelial cells during migration remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the tracing behavior and cell cycle of endothelial cells using Fucci-labeled (Fluorescent Ubiquitination-based Cell Cycle Indicator) endothelial cells. Here, we observed the co-culture of Fucci-labeled human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) together with normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) using time-lapse imaging and analyzed by multicellular concurrent tracking. In the G0/G1 period, HUVECs migrate faster than in the S/G2/M period, because G0/G1 is the mobile phase and S/G2/M is the proliferation phase in the cell cycle. When HUVECs are co-cultured, they tend to move randomly until they find existing tracks that they then follow to form clusters. Extracellular matrix (ECM) staining showed that collagen IV, laminin and thrombospondin deposited in accordance with endothelial cell networks. Therefore the HUVECs may migrate on the secreted ECM and exhibit tracing behavior, where the HUVECs migrate toward each other. These results suggested that ECM and a cell phase contributed to form a network by accelerating cell migration.

  18. Peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes for regulation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Jia, Xiaoling; Yang, Yang; Yang, Qingmao; Gao, Chao; Zhao, Yunhui; Fan, Yubo; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of biomaterials used in small vascular repair depends greatly on their ability to interact with vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Rapid endothelialization of the vascular grafts is a promising way to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. In this work, modification of electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) by three different peptides for regulation of VECs were studied in order to obtain ideal bioactive biomaterials as small diameter vascular grafts. QK (a mimetic peptide to vascular endothelial growth factor), Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV, a specific adhesive peptide to VECs) and Val-Ala-Pro-Gly (VAPG, a specific adhesive peptide to vascular smooth muscle cells) were investigated. Surface properties of the modified membranes and the response of VECs were verified. It was found that protein adsorption and platelet adhesion were effectively suppressed with the introduction of QK, REDV or VAPG peptides on the PELCL electrospun membranes. Both QK- and REDV-modified electrospun membranes could accelerate the proliferation of VECs in the first 9days, and the QK-modified electrospun membrane promoted cell proliferation more significantly than the REDV-modified one. The REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VECs adhesion than QK- and VAPG-modified membranes. It was suggested that QK- or REDV-modified PELCL electrospun membranes may have great potential applications in cardiovascular biomaterials for rapid endothelialization in situ. PMID:27524062

  19. Peptide-modified PELCL electrospun membranes for regulation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fang; Jia, Xiaoling; Yang, Yang; Yang, Qingmao; Gao, Chao; Zhao, Yunhui; Fan, Yubo; Yuan, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of biomaterials used in small vascular repair depends greatly on their ability to interact with vascular endothelial cells (VECs). Rapid endothelialization of the vascular grafts is a promising way to prevent thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. In this work, modification of electrospun membranes of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PELCL) by three different peptides for regulation of VECs were studied in order to obtain ideal bioactive biomaterials as small diameter vascular grafts. QK (a mimetic peptide to vascular endothelial growth factor), Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV, a specific adhesive peptide to VECs) and Val-Ala-Pro-Gly (VAPG, a specific adhesive peptide to vascular smooth muscle cells) were investigated. Surface properties of the modified membranes and the response of VECs were verified. It was found that protein adsorption and platelet adhesion were effectively suppressed with the introduction of QK, REDV or VAPG peptides on the PELCL electrospun membranes. Both QK- and REDV-modified electrospun membranes could accelerate the proliferation of VECs in the first 9days, and the QK-modified electrospun membrane promoted cell proliferation more significantly than the REDV-modified one. The REDV-modified PELCL membrane was the most favorable for VECs adhesion than QK- and VAPG-modified membranes. It was suggested that QK- or REDV-modified PELCL electrospun membranes may have great potential applications in cardiovascular biomaterials for rapid endothelialization in situ.

  20. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Tetsuo; Futamura, Kyoko; Orihara, Kanami; Emi-Sugie, Maiko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17). Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33--an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders.

  1. [Cellular interplay of bone cells and vascular endothelial cells in bone].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoka; Tsuchiya, Erika; Abe, Miki; Amizuka, Norio

    2016-05-01

    During endochondral bone development, the longitudinal vascular invasion into cartilage primordium initially takes place, by which mineralized cartilage matrix would be exposed into bone. Thereafter, osteogenic cells differentiate into mature osteoblasts to deposit new bone onto the exposed mineralized cartilage. New bone formation at the chondro-osseous junction appears to be achieved by the process of modeling, but not by bone remodeling based on cellular coupling between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Recently, a specific vessel subtype in bone was reported:Vascular endothelial cells close to the chondro-oseous junction showed intense CD31/Endomucin(CD31(hi)Emcn(hi), type H), while the endothelial cells of sinusoidal vessels in diaphysis revealed only weak CD31/Endomucin(CD31(lo)Emcnlo, type L). It is suggested crucial roles of endothelial HIF in controlling bone angiogenesis, type H vessel abundance, endothelial growth factor expression and osteogenesis.

  2. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  3. Different contributions of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of vascular endothelial cadherin to lipopolysaccharide-induced vascular hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lianyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Shijin; Tan, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a common pathogenic process in cases of severe trauma and sepsis. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cad) is a key regulatory molecule involved in this process, although the detailed mechanism through which this molecule acts remains unclear. We assessed the role of clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad in LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability in the human vascular endothelial cell line CRL-2922 and determined that vascular permeability and VE-cad localization at the plasma membrane were negatively correlated after LPS treatment. Additionally, the loss of VE-cad at the plasma membrane was caused by both clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was dominant early after LPS treatment, and caveolae-mediated endocytosis was dominant hours after LPS treatment. The caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad was activated through the LPS-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-Src signaling pathway. Structural changes in the actin cytoskeleton, specifically from polymerization to depolymerization, were important reasons for the switching of the VE-cad endocytosis pathway from clathrin-mediated to caveolae-mediated. Our findings suggest that clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad contribute to LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability, although they contribute via different mechanism. The predominant means of endocytosis depends on the time since LPS treatment.

  4. The matricellular protein CCN1 regulates TNF-α induced vascular endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Wu, Gongxiong; Dai, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the epidemic obesity and associated diabetes, the incidence of atherosclerosis is increasing worldwide. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the hardening and narrowing of arteries with plaques that consist of inflammatory cells, dead endothelial cells, lipids, and often hyper proliferated vascular smooth muscle cells. During the development of atherosclerosis, vascular endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis induced by the adipokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), is an early event in the plaque formation. However, TNF-α alone is not sufficient to induce apoptosis of endothelial cells. Recent studies suggested that the matricellular protein CCN family member 1 (CCN1) involves in endothelial cell dysfunction besides its well-known angiogenic function during tissue repair by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration. Herein, we explored the possibility and mechanism of CCN1 in TNF-α induced endothelial cells apoptosis. Both mRNA and protein levels of CCN1 are found up-regulated in endothelial cells after TNF-α treatment. In addition, overexpression of CCN1 promoted endothelial cell apoptosis in the presence of TNF-α. Furthermore, CCN1 directly up-regulated the expression of TNF-α-target genes, and this up-regulation required the activation of P53 and NF-κB both in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, CNN1 regulates TNF-α induced endothelial cells apoptosis that may underlie poor response to TNF-α therapy and hence may be a better therapeutic target for preventing vascular dysfunction in obesity.

  5. Arsenite induces endothelial cell permeability increase through a reactive oxygen species-vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Shi, Honglian

    2010-11-15

    As a potent environmental oxidative stressor, arsenic exposure has been reported to exacerbate cardiovascular diseases and increase vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is not well understood. In this paper, we test our hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression may play an important role in an arsenic-caused increase of endothelial cell monolayer permeability. The mouse brain vascular endothelial cell bEnd3 monolayer was exposed to arsenite for 1, 3, and 6 days. The monolayer permeability, VEGF protein release, and ROS generation were determined. In addition, VE-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), two membrane structure proteins, were immunostained to elucidate the effects of arsenite on the cell-cell junction. The roles of ROS and VEGF in arsenite-induced permeability was determined by inhibiting ROS with antioxidants and immuno-depleting VEGF with a VEGF antibody. We observed that arsenite increased bEnd3 monolayer permeability, elevated the production of cellular ROS, and increased VEGF release. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also found in cells treated with arsenite. Furthermore, both antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine and tempol) and the VEGF antibody treatments significantly lowered the arsenite-induced permeability of the bEnd3 monolayer as well as VEGF expression. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also diminished by N-acetyl cysteine and the VEGF antibody. Our data suggest that the increase in VEGF expression caused by ROS may play an important role in the arsenite-induced increase in endothelial cell permeability.

  6. Arsenite induces endothelial cell permeability increase through a reactive oxygen species-vascular endothelial growth factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Shi, Honglian

    2010-11-15

    As a potent environmental oxidative stressor, arsenic exposure has been reported to exacerbate cardiovascular diseases and increase vascular endothelial cell monolayer permeability. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect is not well understood. In this paper, we test our hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression may play an important role in an arsenic-caused increase of endothelial cell monolayer permeability. The mouse brain vascular endothelial cell bEnd3 monolayer was exposed to arsenite for 1, 3, and 6 days. The monolayer permeability, VEGF protein release, and ROS generation were determined. In addition, VE-cadherin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), two membrane structure proteins, were immunostained to elucidate the effects of arsenite on the cell-cell junction. The roles of ROS and VEGF in arsenite-induced permeability was determined by inhibiting ROS with antioxidants and immuno-depleting VEGF with a VEGF antibody. We observed that arsenite increased bEnd3 monolayer permeability, elevated the production of cellular ROS, and increased VEGF release. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also found in cells treated with arsenite. Furthermore, both antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine and tempol) and the VEGF antibody treatments significantly lowered the arsenite-induced permeability of the bEnd3 monolayer as well as VEGF expression. VE-cadherin and ZO-1 disruptions were also diminished by N-acetyl cysteine and the VEGF antibody. Our data suggest that the increase in VEGF expression caused by ROS may play an important role in the arsenite-induced increase in endothelial cell permeability. PMID:20954712

  7. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  8. Changes in endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability after systemic lipopolysaccharide administration in the subfornical organ.

    PubMed

    Morita-Takemura, Shoko; Nakahara, Kazuki; Tatsumi, Kouko; Okuda, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Isonishi, Ayami; Wanaka, Akio

    2016-09-15

    The subfornical organ (SFO) has highly permeable fenestrated vasculature and is a key site for immune-to-brain communications. Recently, we showed the occurrence of continuous angiogenesis in the SFO. In the present study, we found that systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduced the vascular permeability and endothelial cell proliferation. In LPS-administered mice, the SFO vasculature showed a significant decrease in the immunoreactivity of plasmalemma vesicle associated protein-1, a marker of endothelial fenestral diaphragms. These data suggest that vasculature undergoes structural change to decrease vascular permeability in response to systemic LPS administration. PMID:27609286

  9. Reciprocal interactions between endothelial cells and macrophages in angiogenic vascular niches

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Caroline; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; De Palma, Michele

    2013-07-01

    The ability of macrophages to promote vascular growth has been associated with the secretion and local delivery of classic proangiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and proteases). More recently, a series of studies have also revealed that physical contact of macrophages with growing blood vessels coordinates vascular fusion of emerging sprouts. Interestingly, the interactions between macrophages and vascular endothelial cells (ECs) appear to be bidirectional, such that activated ECs also support the expansion and differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages from myeloid progenitors. Here, we discuss recent findings suggesting that dynamic angiogenic vascular niches might also exist in vivo, e.g. in tumors, where sprouting blood vessels and immature myeloid cells like monocytes engage in heterotypic interactions that are required for angiogenesis. Finally, we provide an account of emerging mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication that rely on secreted microvesicles, such as exosomes, which can offer a vehicle for the rapid exchange of molecules and genetic information between macrophages and ECs engaged in angiogenesis. -- Highlights: • Macrophages promote angiogenesis by secreting proangiogenic factors. • Macrophages modulate angiogenesis via cell-to-cell contacts with endothelial cells. • Endothelial cells promote the differentiation of proangiogenic macrophages. • Macrophages and endothelial cells may cooperate to form angiogenic vascular niches.

  10. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein–coupled receptor–dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II–induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II–induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  11. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Anna; Zhang, Yi; Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein-coupled receptor-dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  12. Vascularization of hollow channel-modified porous silk scaffolds with endothelial cells for tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Wray, Lindsay S; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Xu, Ling; Zou, Duohong; Wang, Shaoyi; Zhang, Maolin; Dong, Jiachen; Li, Guanglong; Kaplan, David L; Jiang, Xinquan

    2015-07-01

    Despite the promise for stem cell-based tissue engineering for regenerative therapy, slow and insufficient vascularization of large tissue constructs negatively impacts the survival and function of these transplanted cells. A combination of channeled porous silk scaffolds and prevascularization with endothelial cells was investigated to test the ability of this tissue engineering strategy to support rapid and extensive vascularization process. We report that hollow channels promote in vitro prevascularization by facilitating endothelial cell growth, VEGF secretion, and capillary-like tube formation. When implanted in vivo, the pre-established vascular networks in the hollow channel scaffolds anastomose with host vessels and exhibit accelerated vascular infiltration throughout the whole tissue construct, which provides timely and sufficient nutrients to ensure the survival of the transplanted stem cells. This tissue engineering strategy can promote the effective application of stem cell-based regeneration to improve future clinical applications.

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor as a key inducer of angiogenesis in the asthmatic airways.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Norbert; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by structural airway changes, which are known as airway remodeling, including smooth muscle hypertrophy, goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and angiogenesis. Vascular remodeling in asthmatic lungs results from increased angiogenesis, which is mainly mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF is a key regulator of blood vessel growth in the airways of asthma patients by promoting proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and inducing vascular leakage and permeability. In addition, VEGF induces allergic inflammation, enhances allergic sensitization, and has a role in Th2 type inflammatory responses. Specific inhibitors of VEGF and blockers of its receptors might be useful to control chronic airway inflammation and vascular remodeling, and might be a new therapeutic approach for chronic inflammatory airway disease like asthma.

  14. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    SciTech Connect

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F.; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  15. GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zilin; Cheng, Liang; Liang, Hongliang; Duan, Weixun; Hu, Jing; Zhi, Weiwei; Yang, Jinbao; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhao, Minggao; Liu, Jincheng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of estrogen receptors on diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction is critical, but ambiguous. Individuals with diabetic vascular disease may require estrogen receptor-specific targeted therapy in the future. The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) has beneficial effects on vascular function. However, its fundamental mechanisms are unclear. The RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway contributes to diabetic vascular complications, whereas estrogen can suppress Rho-kinase function. Thus, we assumed that GPER inhibits diabetes-mediated RhoA activation to prevent vascular dysfunction. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms involved in this process. Vascular endothelial cells and ex vivo cultured ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6 mouse aortae were treated with high glucose (HG) alone or in combination with GPER agonist (G1). G1 treatment was also administered to OVX db/db mice for 8 weeks. An ex-vivo isovolumic myograph was used to analyze the endothelium-dependent vasodilation and endothelium-independent contraction of mouse aortae. Apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation were attenuated in G1-pretreated vascular endothelial cells. G1 significantly decreased the phosphorylation of inhibitory endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase residue threonine 495 (eNOS Thr495), inhibited RhoA expression, and increased NO production. Additionally, G1 rescued the impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and inhibited RhoA activation in the thoracic aorta of OVX db/db mice and ex-vivo cultured OVX C57BL/6 mouse aortae treated with HG. Estrogens acting via GPER could protect vascular endothelium, and GPER activation might elicit ERα-independent effect to inhibit RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway. Additionally, GPER activation might reduce vascular smooth muscle contraction by inhibiting RhoA activation. Thus, the results of the present study suggest a new therapeutic paradigm for end-stage vascular dysfunction by inhibiting RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway via GPER activation. PMID:26785611

  16. Serine Protease Activation Essential for Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiayi; Guihard, Pierre J.; Blazquez-Medela, Ana M.; Guo, Yina; Moon, Jeremiah H.; Jumabay, Medet; Boström, Kristina I.; Yao, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Endothelial cells have the ability to undergo endothelial-mesenchymal transitions (EndMTs), by which they acquire a mesenchymal phenotype and stem-cell like characteristics. We previously found that EndMTs ocurred in the endothelium deficient in matrix Gla protein (MGP) enabling endothelial cells to contribute cells to vascular calcification. However, the mechanism responsible for initiating EndMTs is not fully understood. Objective To determine the role of specific serine proteases and sex determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2) in the initiation of EndMTs. Methods and Results In this study, we used in vivo and in vitro models of vascular calcification to demonstrate that serine proteases and Sox2 are essential for the initiation of EndMTs in MGP-deficient endothelium. We showed that expression of a group of specific serine proteases was highly induced in endothelial cells at sites of vascular calcification in Mgp null aortas. Treatment with serine protease inhibitors decreased both stem-cell marker expression and vascular calcification. In human aortic endothelial cells, this group of serine proteases also induced EndMTs, and the activation of proteases was mediated by Sox2. Knockdown of the serine proteases or Sox2 diminished EndMTs and calcification. Endothelial-specific deletion of Sox2 decreased expression of stem-cell markers and aortic calcification in MGP-deficient mice. Conclusions Our results suggest that Sox2-mediated activation of specific serine proteases is essential for initiating EndMTs, and thus, may provide new therapeutic targets for treating vascular calcification. PMID:26265629

  17. The effect of astaxanthin on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels and peroxidation reactions in the aqueous humor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hirotaka; Arai, Kiyomi; Hayashi, Shimmin; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Jiro; Chikuda, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We explored the effect of astaxanthin on vascular endothelial growth factor in the aqueous humor, by measuring vascular endothelial growth factor levels and oxidation-related parameters, including O2 (•-) scavenging activity, H2O2 level, and total hydroperoxide level in the aqueous humor, obtained from 35 patients before and after astaxanthin administration. We evaluated the relationship between vascular endothelial growth factor and the oxidation-related parameters as well as the patient's diabetic status, age, and sex. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels did not change significantly but O2 (•-) scavenging activity and total hydroperoxide level significantly (p<0.05) increased and decreased, respectively. Both pre- and post- astaxanthin intake, vascular endothelial growth factor and total hydroperoxide levels were positively correlated (Pearson: r = 0.42, p<0.05; r = 0.55, p<0.01, respectively). Analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor levels and O2 (•-) scavenging activities gave a negative correlation but only pre-astaxanthin intake (r = -0.37, p<0.05). Differences in levels pre- and post-astaxanthin only showed association between vascular endothelial growth factor and total hydroperoxide (r = 0.49, p<0.01) analyzed by multiple linear regression. Using multivariate analysis, pre-astaxanthin vascular endothelial growth factor level was associated with two factors of total hydroperoxide and O2 (•-) scavenging activity (r = 0.49, p<0.05), and post-astaxanthin vascular endothelial growth factor level with two factors of total hydroperoxide and sex (r = 0.60, p<0.01). Astaxanthin intake may have affected vascular endothelial growth factor level through its antioxidant effects by increasing O2 (•-) scavenging activity and suppressing peroxide production. PMID:27499573

  18. The effect of astaxanthin on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels and peroxidation reactions in the aqueous humor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hirotaka; Arai, Kiyomi; Hayashi, Shimmin; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Jiro; Chikuda, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We explored the effect of astaxanthin on vascular endothelial growth factor in the aqueous humor, by measuring vascular endothelial growth factor levels and oxidation-related parameters, including O2 (•-) scavenging activity, H2O2 level, and total hydroperoxide level in the aqueous humor, obtained from 35 patients before and after astaxanthin administration. We evaluated the relationship between vascular endothelial growth factor and the oxidation-related parameters as well as the patient's diabetic status, age, and sex. Vascular endothelial growth factor levels did not change significantly but O2 (•-) scavenging activity and total hydroperoxide level significantly (p<0.05) increased and decreased, respectively. Both pre- and post- astaxanthin intake, vascular endothelial growth factor and total hydroperoxide levels were positively correlated (Pearson: r = 0.42, p<0.05; r = 0.55, p<0.01, respectively). Analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor levels and O2 (•-) scavenging activities gave a negative correlation but only pre-astaxanthin intake (r = -0.37, p<0.05). Differences in levels pre- and post-astaxanthin only showed association between vascular endothelial growth factor and total hydroperoxide (r = 0.49, p<0.01) analyzed by multiple linear regression. Using multivariate analysis, pre-astaxanthin vascular endothelial growth factor level was associated with two factors of total hydroperoxide and O2 (•-) scavenging activity (r = 0.49, p<0.05), and post-astaxanthin vascular endothelial growth factor level with two factors of total hydroperoxide and sex (r = 0.60, p<0.01). Astaxanthin intake may have affected vascular endothelial growth factor level through its antioxidant effects by increasing O2 (•-) scavenging activity and suppressing peroxide production.

  19. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor accelerates early vascularization and improves healing of genetically modified cultured skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Supp, Dorothy M; Boyce, Steven T

    2002-01-01

    Cultured skin substitutes (CSS) lack a vascular plexus, leading to slower vascularization after grafting than split-thickness skin autograft. CSS containing keratinocytes genetically modified to overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were previously shown to exhibit enhanced vascularization up to 2 weeks after grafting to athymic mice. The present study examines whether enhanced vascularization compared with controls persists after stable engraftment is achieved and analyzes VEGF expression, wound contraction, and engraftment. Control and VEGF-modified (VEGF+) CSS were grafted onto full-thickness wounds in athymic mice. VEGF expression was detected in VEGF+ CSS 14 weeks after grafting. Graft contraction was significantly lower in VEGF+ CSS compared with controls, suggesting more stable engraftment and better tissue development. Positive HLA-ABC staining, indicating persistence of human cells, was seen in 86.7% (13/15) of grafted VEGF+ CSS, compared with 58.3% (7/12) of controls. Differences in dermal vascularization between control and VEGF+ grafts were significant 1 week after surgery, but not at later times. However, the distribution of vessels was different, with more vessels in the upper dermis of VEGF+ grafts. These results suggest that VEGF overexpression in genetically modified CSS acts to accelerate early graft vascularization and can contribute to improved healing of full-thickness skin wounds.

  20. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides perturb lymphocyte slow rolling on brain vascular endothelial cells: implications for inflammatory demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Clayton W; Foster, Scott C; Itakura, Asako; Matsumoto, Steven G; Asari, Akira; McCarty, Owen J T; Sherman, Larry S

    2013-04-24

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases like multiple sclerosis are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the central nervous system. The glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan and its receptor, CD44, are implicated in the initiation and progression of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Digestion of hyaluronan tethered to brain vascular endothelial cells by a hyaluronidase blocks the slow rolling of lymphocytes along activated brain vascular endothelial cells and delays the onset of EAE. These effects could be due to the elimination of hyaluronan or the generation of hyaluronan digestion products that influence lymphocytes or endothelial cells. Here, we found that hyaluronan dodecasaccharides impaired activated lymphocyte slow rolling on brain vascular endothelial cells when applied to lymphocytes but not to the endothelial cells. The effects of hyaluronan dodecasaccharides on lymphocyte rolling were independent of CD44 and a receptor for degraded hyaluronan, Toll-like receptor-4. Subcutaneous injection of hyaluronan dodecasaccharides or tetrasaccharides delayed the onset of EAE in a manner similar to subcutaneous injection of hyaluronidase. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides can therefore act directly on lymphocytes to modulate the onset of inflammatory demyelinating disease.

  1. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage.

    PubMed

    Wenceslau, Camilla F; McCarthy, Cameron G; Webb, R Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma. PMID:27532003

  2. Formyl Peptide Receptor Activation Elicits Endothelial Cell Contraction and Vascular Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Wenceslau, Camilla F.; McCarthy, Cameron G.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2016-01-01

    The major pathophysiological characteristic of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis is the loss of control of vascular tone and endothelial barrier dysfunction. These changes are attributed to pro-inflammatory mediators. It has been proposed that in patients and rats without infection, cell components from damaged tissue are the primary instigators of vascular damage. Mitochondria share several characteristics with bacteria, and when fragments of mitochondria are released into the circulation after injury, they are recognized by the innate immune system. N-Formyl peptides are common molecular signatures of bacteria and mitochondria and are known to play a role in the initiation of inflammation by activating the formyl peptide receptor (FPR). We have demonstrated that infusion of mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (F-MIT) leads to sepsis-like symptoms, including vascular leakage. We have also observed that F-MIT, via FPR activation, elicits changes in cytoskeleton-regulating proteins in endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that these FPR-mediated changes in cytoskeleton can cause endothelial cell contraction and, consequently vascular leakage. Here, we propose that endothelial FPR is a key contributor to impaired barrier function in SIRS and sepsis patients following trauma. PMID:27532003

  3. Contact-mediated and humoral communication between vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.F.

    1986-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) co-exist in close apposition to each other in all blood vessels except capillaries. Investigations of the metabolic interactions that may occur between these cells are essential to an understanding of vascular homeostasis and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The authors have developed two in vitro models of co-temporal vascular cell communication. The first facilitates reversible microcarrier-mediated gap junctional communication between EC and SMC monolayers. When either EC or SMC were prelabelled with /sup 3/H-uridine, intracellular nucleotide rapidly transferred across the region of heterocellular attachment to the complementary cell population. Cytoplasmic continuity between EC and SMC allowed metabolic cooperation via ions and small molecules (<1.5 KD). Thus, vascular reactivity, particularly in the microcirculation where myoendothelial gap junctions have been observed, may involve cytoplasmic second messengers transported from EC to SMC. In the second model, humoral communication was established between separated cultures of EC and SMC which shared the same culture medium. Endothelial-specific stimulation of SMC growth and lipoprotein metabolism via soluble factors was demonstrated. Two mechanisms of stimulation of SMC lipoprotein metabolism were identified; one endothelial derived mitogen-dependent, the other mitogen-independent which was mediated via low molecular weight endothelial cell products.

  4. Effect of salicylic acid on invasion of human vascular endothelial cells by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Sung-Han; Cho, Jae Hyun; Bang, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hong Bin; Kim, Nam Joong; Oh, Myoung-don; Choe, Kang Won

    2007-02-01

    Invasion of vascular endothelial cells by Staphylococcus aureus is associated with diverse complications and recurrent infection. Little is known about the effect of salicylic acid, the major metabolite of aspirin, on the interaction between S. aureus and vascular endothelial cells. We examined the adhesion of S. aureus strain 8325-4 cultured with or without salicylic acid to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the ability of the strain to invade these cells. Strain 8325-4 cells grown in salicylic acid were significantly less adherent to and invasive in HUVECs. Production of cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 was lower from the HUVECs infected with clinical isolates of S. aureus cultured in salicylic acid compared with those unexposed to salicylic acid. This study raises the possibility of using salicylic acid as an adjuvant therapeutic agent in the treatment of S. aureus bacteremia to prevent its complications or recurrence.

  5. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and nutritional compounds in early type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert P

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in patients with type 1 diabetes. Vascular endothelial dysfunction is an early pathophysiological precursor of cardiovascular disease. There is extensive evidence that hyperglycemia causes acute perturbations in endothelial function likely due to increases in oxidative damage. Interestingly, oscillating hyperglycemia may cause more damage than persistent hyperglycemia. Many, but not all, studies indicate that vascular endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the course of type 1 diabetes and is present even in adolescents. Ascorbic acid has been shown to diminish the acute effects of hyperglycemia on endothelial function in type 1 diabetes and in conjunction with euglycemia to restore endothelial function to normal values in adults with well-controlled diabetes. In vitro and in vivo animal evidence suggests potential benefit from two other small molecule antioxidants, nicotinamide and taurine. Early studies suggested that folate supplementation may improve endothelial function in adolescents with type 1 diabetes but this has not been confirmed by more recent studies. Epidemiological evidence suggests a possible role for vitamin D therapy although intervention studies in type 2 diabetes have yielded varying results and have not been done in type 1 diabetes. Further exploration of these and other compounds is clearly appropriate if we are to reduce cardiovascular risk in type 1 diabetes.

  6. Endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor induce interleukin-1 gene expression in adult human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Libby, P; Ordovas, J M; Auger, K R; Robbins, A H; Birinyi, L K; Dinarello, C A

    1986-08-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) can induce potentially pathogenic functions of vascular endothelial cells. This mediator was formerly thought to be produced primarily by activated macrophages. We report here that bacterial endotoxin and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor cause accumulation of IL-1 beta mRNA in adult human vascular endothelial cells. IL-1 alpha mRNA was also detected when endothelial cells were exposed to endotoxin under "superinduction" conditions in the presence of cycloheximide. Metabolic labeling of these cells during endotoxin stimulation demonstrated increased synthesis and secretion of immunoprecipitable IL-1 protein that comigrated electrophoretically with the predominant monocyte species. In parallel with increased IL-1 mRNA and protein, endothelial cells exposed to endotoxin also release biologically active IL-1 that was neutralized by anti-IL-1-antibody. Because bloodborne agents must traverse the endothelium before entering tissues, endothelial IL-1 production induced by microbial products or other injurious stimuli could initiate local responses to invasion. Endothelial cells are both a source of and target for IL-1; accordingly, this novel autocrine mechanism might play an early role in the pathogenesis of vasculitis, allograft rejection, and arteriosclerosis.

  7. Regulation of Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Vascular Assembly through Distinct mTORC2 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Amato, Katherine R.; Song, Wenqiang; Youngblood, Victoria; Lee, Keunwook; Boothby, Mark; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, metabolism, and cytoskeleton dynamics. mTOR functions in two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, whose activities and substrate specificities are regulated by complex specific cofactors, including Raptor and Rictor, respectively. Little is known regarding the relative contribution of mTORC1 versus mTORC2 in vascular endothelial cells. Using mouse models of Raptor or Rictor gene targeting, we discovered that Rictor ablation inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial cell proliferation and assembly in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo, whereas the loss of Raptor had only a modest effect on endothelial cells (ECs). Mechanistically, the loss of Rictor reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and NDRG1 without affecting the mTORC1 pathway. In contrast, the loss of Raptor increased the phosphorylation of AKT despite inhibiting the phosphorylation of S6K1, a direct target of mTORC1. Reconstitution of Rictor-null cells with myristoylated AKT (Myr-AKT) rescued vascular assembly in Rictor-deficient endothelial cells, whereas PKCα rescued proliferation defects. Furthermore, tumor neovascularization in vivo was significantly decreased upon EC-specific Rictor deletion in mice. These data indicate that mTORC2 is a critical signaling node required for VEGF-mediated angiogenesis through the regulation of AKT and PKCα in vascular endothelial cells. PMID:25582201

  8. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A165b Is Protective and Restores Endothelial Glycocalyx in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Oltean, Sebastian; Qiu, Yan; Ferguson, Joanne K; Stevens, Megan; Neal, Chris; Russell, Amy; Kaura, Amit; Arkill, Kenton P; Harris, Kirstie; Symonds, Clare; Lacey, Katja; Wijeyaratne, Lihini; Gammons, Melissa; Wylie, Emma; Hulse, Richard P; Alsop, Chloe; Cope, George; Damodaran, Gopinath; Betteridge, Kai B; Ramnath, Raina; Satchell, Simon C; Foster, Rebecca R; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Donaldson, Lucy F; Barratt, Jonathan; Baelde, Hans J; Harper, Steven J; Bates, David O; Salmon, Andrew H J

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of ESRD in high-income countries and a growing problem across the world. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is thought to be a critical mediator of vascular dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy, yet VEGF-A knockout and overexpression of angiogenic VEGF-A isoforms each worsen diabetic nephropathy. We examined the vasculoprotective effects of the VEGF-A isoform VEGF-A165b in diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of VEGF-A165b mRNA was upregulated in diabetic individuals with well preserved kidney function, but not in those with progressive disease. Reproducing this VEGF-A165b upregulation in mouse podocytes in vivo prevented functional and histologic abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy. Biweekly systemic injections of recombinant human VEGF-A165b reduced features of diabetic nephropathy when initiated during early or advanced nephropathy in a model of type 1 diabetes and when initiated during early nephropathy in a model of type 2 diabetes. VEGF-A165b normalized glomerular permeability through phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 in glomerular endothelial cells, and reversed diabetes-induced damage to the glomerular endothelial glycocalyx. VEGF-A165b also improved the permeability function of isolated diabetic human glomeruli. These results show that VEGF-A165b acts via the endothelium to protect blood vessels and ameliorate diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A165b Is Protective and Restores Endothelial Glycocalyx in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oltean, Sebastian; Qiu, Yan; Ferguson, Joanne K.; Stevens, Megan; Neal, Chris; Russell, Amy; Kaura, Amit; Arkill, Kenton P.; Harris, Kirstie; Symonds, Clare; Lacey, Katja; Wijeyaratne, Lihini; Gammons, Melissa; Wylie, Emma; Hulse, Richard P.; Alsop, Chloe; Cope, George; Damodaran, Gopinath; Betteridge, Kai B.; Ramnath, Raina; Satchell, Simon C.; Foster, Rebecca R.; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Donaldson, Lucy F.; Barratt, Jonathan; Baelde, Hans J.; Harper, Steven J.; Bates, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of ESRD in high-income countries and a growing problem across the world. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is thought to be a critical mediator of vascular dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy, yet VEGF-A knockout and overexpression of angiogenic VEGF-A isoforms each worsen diabetic nephropathy. We examined the vasculoprotective effects of the VEGF-A isoform VEGF-A165b in diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of VEGF-A165b mRNA was upregulated in diabetic individuals with well preserved kidney function, but not in those with progressive disease. Reproducing this VEGF-A165b upregulation in mouse podocytes in vivo prevented functional and histologic abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy. Biweekly systemic injections of recombinant human VEGF-A165b reduced features of diabetic nephropathy when initiated during early or advanced nephropathy in a model of type 1 diabetes and when initiated during early nephropathy in a model of type 2 diabetes. VEGF-A165b normalized glomerular permeability through phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 in glomerular endothelial cells, and reversed diabetes-induced damage to the glomerular endothelial glycocalyx. VEGF-A165b also improved the permeability function of isolated diabetic human glomeruli. These results show that VEGF-A165b acts via the endothelium to protect blood vessels and ameliorate diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25542969

  10. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and mechanotransduction in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K

    2006-04-01

    Endothelial cells are known to respond to mechanical forces such as fluid shear stress and cyclic stretch, but elucidating the mechanism for mechanosensing has been difficult. Experimental data indicate that there are probably several sensing mechanisms. We have recently proposed a novel mechanoresponse mechanism that involves platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1). When endothelial cells are stimulated by fluid shear stress, PECAM-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated and activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signalling cascade. The same signalling events occurred when we applied pulling force directly on PECAM-1 on the endothelial cell surface using magnetic beads coated with antibodies against the external domain of PECAM-1. These results appear to indicate that PECAM-1 is a mechanotransduction molecule. To our knowledge, this is the first mammalian molecule that is shown to respond to mechanical force directly exerted to it. PMID:16594905

  11. c-Met–mediated endothelial plasticity drives aberrant vascularization and chemoresistance in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Menggui; Liu, Tianrun; Ma, Peihong; Mitteer, R. Alan; Zhang, Zhenting; Kim, Hyun Jun; Yeo, Eujin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Peiqiang; Li, Chunsheng; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Botao; Roccograndi, Laura; O’Rourke, Donald M.; Dahmane, Nadia; Gong, Yanqing; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant vascularization is a hallmark of cancer progression and treatment resistance. Here, we have shown that endothelial cell (EC) plasticity drives aberrant vascularization and chemoresistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). By utilizing human patient specimens, as well as allograft and genetic murine GBM models, we revealed that a robust endothelial plasticity in GBM allows acquisition of fibroblast transformation (also known as endothelial mesenchymal transition [Endo-MT]), which is characterized by EC expression of fibroblast markers, and determined that a prominent population of GBM-associated fibroblast-like cells have EC origin. Tumor ECs acquired the mesenchymal gene signature without the loss of EC functions, leading to enhanced cell proliferation and migration, as well as vessel permeability. Furthermore, we identified a c-Met/ETS-1/matrix metalloproteinase–14 (MMP-14) axis that controls VE-cadherin degradation, Endo-MT, and vascular abnormality. Pharmacological c-Met inhibition induced vessel normalization in patient tumor–derived ECs. Finally, EC-specific KO of Met inhibited vascular transformation, normalized blood vessels, and reduced intratumoral hypoxia, culminating in suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival in GBM-bearing mice after temozolomide treatment. Together, these findings illustrate a mechanism that controls aberrant tumor vascularization and suggest that targeting Endo-MT may offer selective and efficient strategies for antivascular and vessel normalization therapies in GBM, and possibly other malignant tumors. PMID:27043280

  12. The endothelial transcription factor ERG promotes vascular stability and growth through Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Birdsey, Graeme M; Shah, Aarti V; Dufton, Neil; Reynolds, Louise E; Osuna Almagro, Lourdes; Yang, Youwen; Aspalter, Irene M; Khan, Samia T; Mason, Justin C; Dejana, Elisabetta; Göttgens, Berthold; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan; Gerhardt, Holger; Adams, Ralf H; Randi, Anna M

    2015-01-12

    Blood vessel stability is essential for embryonic development; in the adult, many diseases are associated with loss of vascular integrity. The ETS transcription factor ERG drives expression of VE-cadherin and controls junctional integrity. We show that constitutive endothelial deletion of ERG (Erg(cEC-KO)) in mice causes embryonic lethality with vascular defects. Inducible endothelial deletion of ERG (Erg(iEC-KO)) results in defective physiological and pathological angiogenesis in the postnatal retina and tumors, with decreased vascular stability. ERG controls the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by promoting β-catenin stability, through signals mediated by VE-cadherin and the Wnt receptor Frizzled-4. Wnt signaling is decreased in ERG-deficient endothelial cells; activation of Wnt signaling with lithium chloride, which stabilizes β-catenin levels, corrects vascular defects in Erg(cEC-KO) embryos. Finally, overexpression of ERG in vivo reduces permeability and increases stability of VEGF-induced blood vessels. These data demonstrate that ERG is an essential regulator of angiogenesis and vascular stability through Wnt signaling. PMID:25584796

  13. Arginase inhibition restores NOS coupling and reverses endothelial dysfunction and vascular stiffness in old rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Bugaj, Lukasz J.; Oh, Young Jun; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Soucy, Kevin G.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Webb, Alanah; Camara, Andre; Sikka, Gautam; Nyhan, Daniel; Shoukas, Artin A.; Ilies, Monica; Christianson, David W.; Champion, Hunter C.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that upregulation of arginase contributes to impaired endothelial function in aging. In this study, we demonstrate that arginase upregulation leads to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling and that in vivo chronic inhibition of arginase restores nitroso-redox balance, improves endothelial function, and increases vascular compliance in old rats. Arginase activity in old rats was significantly increased compared with that shown in young rats. Old rats had significantly lower nitric oxide (NO) and higher superoxide (O2−) production than young. Acute inhibition of both NOS, with NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and arginase, with 2(S)-amino- 6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH), significantly reduced O2− production in old rats but not in young. In addition, the ratio of eNOS dimer to monomer in old rats was significantly decreased compared with that shown in young rats. These results suggest that eNOS was uncoupled in old rats. Although the expression of arginase 1 and eNOS was similar in young and old rats, inducible NOS (iNOS) was significantly upregulated. Furthermore, S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 was significantly elevated in old rats. These findings support our previously published finding that iNOS nitrosylates and activates arginase 1 (Santhanam et al., Circ Res 101: 692–702, 2007). Chronic arginase inhibition in old rats preserved eNOS dimer-to-monomer ratio and significantly reduced O2− production and enhanced endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation to ACh. In addition, ABH significantly reduced vascular stiffness in old rats. These data indicate that iNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of arginase 1 and the increase in arginase activity lead to eNOS uncoupling, contributing to the nitroso-redox imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular stiffness observed in vascular aging. We suggest that arginase is a viable target for therapy in age-dependent vascular stiffness. PMID:19661445

  14. Homocysteine injures vascular endothelial cells by inhibiting mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fengyong; Qi, Xiujing; Gao, Zheng; Yang, Xingju; Zheng, Xingfeng; Duan, Chonghao; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of homocysteine (Hcy) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary embolism (PE) and the associated molecular mechanisms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Hcy contents were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry using Annexin-V staining. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was assessed with an enzyme activity assay, and the expression levels of COX 17 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were measured using a microplate reader with a fluorescence probe. The results demonstrated that, compared with the control group, the serum Hcy levels were significantly elevated in the PE group, suggesting that Hcy may be an indicator for PE. Following treatment with Hcy, the apoptosis rate was markedly elevated in HUVECs. Moreover, Hcy decreased COX activity and downregulated the expression of COX 17 in HUVECs. Furthermore, Hcy increased the ROS levels in these endothelial cells. However, all the above-mentioned physiopathological changes induced by Hcy in HUVECs could be restored by folic acid. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that Hcy inhibited COX activity, downregulated COX 17 expression, increased intracellular ROS levels and enhanced apoptosis in endothelial cells.

  15. Base structure consisting of an endothelialized vascular-tree network and hepatocytes for whole liver engineering.

    PubMed

    Shirakigawa, Nana; Takei, Takayuki; Ijima, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    Reconstructed liver has been desired as a liver substitute for transplantation. However, reconstruction of a whole liver has not been achieved because construction of a vascular network at an organ scale is very difficult. We focused on decellularized liver (DC-liver) as an artificial scaffold for the construction of a hierarchical vascular network. In this study, we obtained DC-liver and the tubular network structure in which both portal vein and hepatic vein systems remained intact. Furthermore, endothelialization of the tubular structure in DC-liver was achieved, which prevented blood leakage from the tubular structure. In addition, hepatocytes suspended in a collagen sol were injected from the surroundings using a syringe as a suitable procedure for liver cell inoculation. In summary, we developed a base structure consisting of an endothelialized vascular-tree network and hepatocytes for whole liver engineering.

  16. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  17. Strategies and Techniques to Enhance the In Situ Endothelialization of Small-Diameter Biodegradable Polymeric Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Fisher, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the lack of success in small-diameter (<6 mm) prosthetic vascular grafts, a variety of strategies have evolved utilizing a tissue-engineering approach. Much of this work has focused on enhancing the endothelialization of these grafts. A healthy, confluent endothelial layer provides dynamic control over homeo-stasis, influencing and preventing thrombosis and smooth muscle cell proliferation that can lead to intimal hyperplasia. Strategies to improve endothelialization of biodegradable polymeric grafts have encompassed both chemical and physical modifications to graft surfaces, many focusing on the recruitment of endothelial and endothelial progenitor cells. This review aims to provide a compilation of current and developing strategies that utilize in situ endothelialization to improve vascular graft outcomes, providing a context for the future directions of vascular tissue-engineering strategies that do not require preprocedural cell seeding. PMID:23252992

  18. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA in non-small-cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fontanini, G; Boldrini, L; Chinè, S; Pisaturo, F; Basolo, F; Calcinai, A; Lucchi, M; Mussi, A; Angeletti, C A; Bevilacqua, G

    1999-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to be strictly related to vascular permeability and endothelial cell growth under physiological and pathological conditions. In tumour development and progression, VEGF plays a pivotal role in the development of the tumoral vascular network, and useful information in the progression of human cancer can be obtained by analysing the vascular endothelial growth factor expression of the tumours. In this study, we investigated the vascular endothelial growth factor transcript expression in non-small-cell lung carcinomas to evaluate the significance of this factor in a group of cancers in which the vascular pattern has been shown to significantly affect progression. Surgical samples of 42 patients with NSCLC were studied using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and in situ hybridization. Thirty-three out of 42 cases (78.6%) showed VEGF transcript expression predominantly as transcripts for the secretory forms of VEGF (isoforms 121 and 165). In situ hybridization, performed on 24 out of 42 samples, showed that the VEGF transcript expression was in several cases present in the cytoplasm both of neoplastic and normal cells, even if the VEGF mRNA was less expressed in the corresponding non-tumoral part. The VEGF 121 expression was associated with hilar and/or mediastinal nodal involvement (P = 0.02), and, taken together, the VEGF isoforms were shown to significantly influence overall (P = 0.02) and disease-free survival (P = 0.03). As a regulator of tumour angiogenesis, VEGF may represent a useful indicator of progression and poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung carcinomas.

  19. MicroRNA-147b Regulates Vascular Endothelial Barrier Function by Targeting ADAM15 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Victor; Beard, Richard S.; Reynolds, Jason J.; Haines, Ricci; Guo, Mingzhang; Rubin, Matthew; Guido, Jenny; Wu, Mack H.; Yuan, Sarah Y.

    2014-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase15 (ADAM15) has been shown to be upregulated and mediate endothelial hyperpermeability during inflammation and sepsis. This molecule contains multiple functional domains with the ability to modulate diverse cellular processes including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix degradation, and ectodomain shedding of transmembrane proteins. These characteristics make ADAM15 an attractive therapeutic target in various diseases. The lack of pharmacological inhibitors specific to ADAM15 prompted our efforts to identify biological or molecular tools to alter its expression for further studying its function and therapeutic implications. The goal of this study was to determine if ADAM15-targeting microRNAs altered ADAM15-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction during septic challenge by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). An in silico analysis followed by luciferase reporter assay in human vascular endothelial cells identified miR-147b with the ability to target the 3′ UTR of ADAM15. Transfection with a miR-147b mimic led to decreased total, as well as cell surface expression of ADAM15 in endothelial cells, while miR-147b antagomir produced an opposite effect. Functionally, LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, evidenced by a reduction in transendothelial electric resistance and increase in albumin flux across endothelial monolayers, was attenuated in cells treated with miR-147b mimics. In contrast, miR-147b antagomir exerted a permeability-increasing effect in vascular endothelial cells similar to that caused by LPS. Taken together, these data suggest the potential role of miR147b in regulating endothelial barrier function by targeting ADAM15 expression. PMID:25333931

  20. Occludin S490 Phosphorylation Regulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Retinal Neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuwen; Dreffs, Alyssa; Díaz-Coránguez, Monica; Runkle, E Aaron; Gardner, Thomas W; Chiodo, Vince A; Hauswirth, William W; Antonetti, David A

    2016-09-01

    Occludin is a transmembrane tight junction protein that contributes to diverse cellular functions, including control of barrier properties, cell migration, and proliferation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces phosphorylation of occludin at S490, which is required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Herein, we demonstrate that occludin S490 phosphorylation also regulates VEGF-induced retinal endothelial cell proliferation and neovascularization. Using a specific antibody, phospho-occludin was located in centrosomes in endothelial cell cultures, animal models, and human surgical samples of retinal neovessels. Occludin S490 phosphorylation was found to increase with endothelial tube formation in vitro and in vivo during retinal neovascularization after induction of VEGF expression. More important, expression of occludin mutated at S490 to Ala, completely inhibited angiogenesis in cell culture models and in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest a novel role for occludin in regulation of endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. These findings may lead to methods of regulating pathological neovascularization by specifically targeting endothelial cell proliferation. PMID:27423695

  1. Is exercise training an effective therapy targeting endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall inflammation?

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fernando; Alves, Alberto Jorge; Duarte, José Alberto; Oliveira, José

    2010-06-11

    There is an increasing evidence that endothelial dysfunction and vascular wall inflammation are present in all stages of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis does not have to necessarily progress to an acute clinical event. Several therapeutic strategies exist, such as exercise training, which mitigates endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Exercise training consistently improves the nitric oxide bioavailability, and the number of endothelial progenitor cells, and also diminishes the level of inflammatory markers, namely pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein. However, the mechanisms by which exercise improves endothelial function in coronary artery disease patients are not fully clarified. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the positive effect of exercise on the disease progression. They include the decrease in cytokine production by the adipose tissue, skeletal muscles, endothelial cells, and blood mononuclear cells, and also, the increase in the bioavailability of nitric oxide, antioxidant defences, and regenerative capacity of endothelium. This study aims to provide a critical review of the literature linking exercise, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction in coronary artery patients, and to discuss the potential mechanisms behind the exercise-training improvement of endothelial function and inflammatory status.

  2. Endothelial targeting of nanocarriers loaded with antioxidant enzymes for protection against vascular oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Elizabeth D.; Chorny, Michael; Greineder, Colin F.; Alferiev, Ivan; Levy, Robert J.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial-targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD), is promising strategy for protecting organs and tissues from inflammation and oxidative stress. Here we describe Protective Antioxidant Carriers for Endothelial Targeting (PACkET), the first carriers capable of targeted endothelial delivery of both catalase and SOD. PACkET formed through controlled precipitation loaded ~30% enzyme and protected it from proteolytic degradation, whereas attachment of PECAM monoclonal antibodies to surface of the enzyme-loaded carriers, achieved without adversely affecting their stability and functionality, provided targeting. Isotope tracing and microscopy showed that PACkET exhibited specific endothelial binding and internalization in vitro. Endothelial targeting of PACkET was validated in vivo by specific (vs IgG-control) accumulation in the pulmonary vasculature after intravenous injection achieving 33% of injected dose at 30 min. Catalase loaded PACkET protects endothelial cells from killing by H2O2 and alleviated the pulmonary edema and leukocyte infiltration in mouse model of endotoxin-induced lung injury, whereas SOD-loaded PACkET mitigated cytokine-induced endothelial pro-inflammatory activation and endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. These studies indicate that PACkET offers a modular approach for vascular targeting of therapeutic enzymes. PMID:24480537

  3. Vascular Permeation of Platelet Factor 4 after Endothelial Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Itzhak D.; Stemerman, Michael B.; Handin, Robert I.

    1980-08-01

    Antibody to platelet factor 4 was used to demonstrate permeation of this factor into the blood vessel wall after endothelial injury in rabbits. The presence of platelet factor 4 antigen in the vessel wall after removal of the endothelium was shown by immunofluorescence 10 and 30 minutes after injury but not 240 minutes afterward. This study demonstrates that factors carried by platelets can enter the vessel wall and that the movement of these platelet products into the vasculature is a short-lived, self-limiting process.

  4. Induction of cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 mRNA expression in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yukiko; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-08-22

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is expressed in vascular endothelial cells and plays a crucial role in angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the expression of CRIM1 mRNA in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CRIM1 mRNA levels were not altered in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-stimulated monolayer HUVECs or in cells in collagen gels without VEGF. In contrast, the expression of CRIM1 mRNA was elevated in VEGF-stimulated cells in collagen gels. The increase in CRIM1 mRNA expression was observed even at 2h when HUVECs did not form tubular structures in collagen gels. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2, Akt and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were activated by VEGF in HUVECs. The VEGF-induced expression of CRIM1 mRNA was significantly abrogated by PD98059 or PF562271, but was not affected by LY294002. These results demonstrate that CRIM1 is an early response gene in the presence of both angiogenic stimulation (VEGF) and environmental (extracellular matrix) factors, and Erk and FAK might be involved in the upregulation of CRIM1 mRNA expression in vascular endothelial cells.

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Maintains Normal Vascular Permeability by Preserving Endothelial Surface Glycocalyx in Intact Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Fan, Jie; Tarbell, John, M.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was found to protect the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity-dependent shedding of ESG in cultured endothelial cell studies. We aimed to further test that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels. Methods We quantified the ESG in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery and measured the vascular permeability to albumin in the presence and absence of 1 μM S1P. We also measured permeability to albumin in the presence of MMP inhibitors and compared the measured permeability with those predicted by a transport model for the inter-endothelial cleft. Results We found that in the absence of S1P, the fluorescence intensity of the FITC-anti-heparan sulfate labeled ESG was ~10% of that in the presence of S1P, while the measured permeability to albumin was ~6.5 fold that in the presence of S1P. Similar results were observed with MMP inhibition. The predictions by the mathematical model further confirmed that S1P maintains microvascular permeability by preserving ESG. Conclusions Our results show that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels, consistent with parallel observation in cultured endothelial monolayers. PMID:27015105

  6. Allicin inhibits lymphangiogenesis through suppressing activation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weicang; Du, Zheyuan; Nimiya, Yoshiki; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Kim, Daeyoung; Zhang, Guodong

    2016-03-01

    Allicin, the most abundant organosulfur compound in freshly crushed garlic tissues, has been shown to have various health-promoting effects, including anticancer actions. A better understanding of the effects and mechanisms of allicin on tumorigenesis could facilitate development of allicin or garlic products for cancer prevention. Here we found that allicin inhibited lymphangiogenesis, which is a critical cellular process implicated in tumor metastasis. In primary human lymphatic endothelial cells, allicin at 10 μM inhibited capillary-like tube formation and cell migration, and it suppressed phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and focal adhesion kinase. Using a Matrigel plug assay in mice, addition of 10 μg allicin in Matrigel plug inhibited 40-50% of vascular endothelial growth factor-C-induced infiltration of lymphatic endothelial cells and leukocytes. S-Allylmercaptoglutathione, a major cellular metabolite of allicin, had no effect on lymphangiogenic responses in lymphatic endothelial cells. Together, these results demonstrate the antilymphangiogenic effect of allicin in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel mechanism for the health-promoting effects of garlic compounds. PMID:26895668

  7. Engineering interaction between bone marrow derived endothelial cells and electrospun surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Furqan; Dutta, Naba K; Zannettino, Andrew; Vandyke, Kate; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2014-04-14

    The aim of this investigation was to understand and engineer the interactions between endothelial cells and the electrospun (ES) polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) nanofiber surfaces and evaluate their potential for endothelialization. Elastomeric PVDF-HFP samples were electrospun to evaluate their potential use as small diameter artificial vascular graft scaffold (SDAVG) and compared with solvent cast (SC) PVDF-HFP films. We examined the consequences of fibrinogen adsorption onto the ES and SC samples for endothelialisation. Bone marrow derived endothelial cells (BMEC) of human origin were incubated with the test and control samples and their attachment, proliferation, and viability were examined. The nature of interaction of fibrinogen with SC and ES samples was investigated in detail using ELISA, XPS, and FTIR techniques. The pristine SC and ES PVDF-HFP samples displayed hydrophobic and ultrahydrophobic behavior and accordingly, exhibited minimal BMEC growth. Fibrinogen adsorbed SC samples did not significantly enhance endothelial cell binding or proliferation. In contrast, the fibrinogen adsorbed electrospun surfaces showed a clear ability to modulate endothelial cell behavior. This system also represents an ideal model system that enables us to understand the natural interaction between cells and their extracellular environment. The research reported shows potential of ES surfaces for artificial vascular graft applications. PMID:24564790

  8. Vascular endothelium: functioning in norm, changes in atherosclerosis and current dietary approaches to improve endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Revin, Victor V; Sobenin, Igor A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium represents not only a simple cellular monolayer that lines the vascular tree in humans and other vertebrates. Depending on the location, the endothelium shows significant morphological and functional heterogeneity through differentiated expression of pro- and anticoagulant factors, presence and frequency of intercellular contacts, variable contractility, cell shape, and volume. Altogether, these properties are crucial for adjustment of the endothelial function and further maintenance of the adequate homeostasis in response in local microenvironmental changes. Endothelial cells (ECs) play a critical role in coordinated regulation of blood flow. This is achieved due to the capacity of ECs to create the active anti-thrombotic surface that supports blood fluidity and transfer of blood cells and biomolecules. However, in certain vascular regions that can occur in inflamed sites or in sites with high hydrodynamic shear stress, ECs could lost their anti-thrombotic properties and switch their normal quiescent phenotype towards the prothrombotic, proadhesion, and proinflammatory state. In such an athero-prone site, the proper endothelial function is impaired that increases risk for formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. The endothelial dysfunction not only precedes atherosclerosis but greatly contributes to atherogenesis in all disease stages. Healthy lifestyle and regular intake of correct antioxidant-rich diet such as fresh fruits, vegetables, olive oil, red wine, and tea have beneficial effects on endothelial function and could therefore reduce the cardiovascular risk. PMID:25723463

  9. PECAM-1 engagement counteracts ICAM-1-induced signaling in brain vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Couty, Jean-Pierre; Rampon, Christine; Leveque, Mathilde; Laran-Chich, Marie-Pierre; Bourdoulous, Sandrine; Greenwood, John; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier

    2007-10-01

    Interactions between leukocytes and vascular endothelial cells are mediated by a complex set of membrane adhesion molecules which transduce bi-directional signals in both cell types. Endothelium of the cerebral blood vessels, which constitute the blood-brain barrier, strictly controls adhesion and trafficking of leukocytes into the brain. Investigating signaling pathways triggered by the engagement of adhesion molecules expressed on brain endothelial cells, we previously documented the role of ICAM-1 in activation of the tyrosine phosphorylation of several actin-binding proteins and subsequent rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. In the present study, we show that, whereas PECAM-1 is known to control positively the trans-endothelial migration of leukocytes via homophilic interactions between leukocytes and endothelial cells, PECAM-1 engagement on brain endothelial surface unexpectedly counteracts the ICAM-1-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin and rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. We present evidence that the PECAM-1-associated tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 is required for ICAM-1 signaling, suggesting that its activity might crucially contribute to the regulation of ICAM-1 signaling by PECAM-1. Our findings reveal a novel activity for PECAM-1 which, by counteracting ICAM-1-induced activation, could directly contribute to limit activation and maintain integrity of brain vascular endothelium. PMID:17662049

  10. CD44 regulates vascular endothelial barrier integrity via a PECAM-1 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kelly M; Michaud, Michael; Canosa, Sandra; Madri, Joseph A

    2013-07-01

    Vascular integrity is a critical parameter in normal growth and development. Loss of appropriate vascular barrier function is present in various immune- and injury-mediated pathological conditions. CD44 is an adhesion molecule expressed by multiple cell types, including endothelial cells (EC). The goal of the present study was to examine how loss of CD44 affected vascular permeability. Using C57BL/6 WT and CD44-KO mice, we found no significant permeability to Evan's Blue in either strain at baseline. However, there was significantly increased histamine-induced permeability in CD44-deficient mice compared to WT counterparts. Similar results were observed in vitro, where CD44-deficient endothelial monolayers were also impermeable to 40kD-FITC dextran in the absence of vasoactive challenge, but exhibited enhanced and prolonged permeability following histamine. However, CD44-KO monolayers have reduced baseline barrier strength by electrical resistance, which correlated with increased permeability, at baseline, to smaller molecular weight 4-kD FITC-dextran, suggesting weakly formed endothelial junctions. The CD44-KO EC displayed several characteristics consistent with impaired barrier function/dysfunctional EC junctions, including differential expression, phosphorylation, and localization of endothelial junction proteins, increased matrix metalloprotease expression, and altered cellular morphology. Reduced platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) expression by CD44-KO EC in vivo and in vitro was also observed. Reconstitution of murine CD44 or PECAM-1 restored these defects to near WT status, suggesting CD44 regulates vascular permeability and integrity through a PECAM-1 dependent mechanism.

  11. Control of proliferation of human vascular endothelial cells. Characterization of the response of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and thrombin.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, D; Brown, K D; Birdwell, C R; Zetter, B R

    1978-06-01

    Because the response of human endothelial cells to growth factors and conditioning agents has broad implications for our understanding of wound healing angiogenesis, and human atherogenesis, we have investigated the responses of these cells to the fibroblast (FGF) and epidermal growth factors (EGF), as well as to the protease thrombin, which has been previously shown to potentiate the growth response of other cell types of FGF and EGF. Because the vascular endothelial cells that form the inner lining of blood vessels may be expected to be exposed to high thrombin concentrations after trauma or in pathological states associated with thrombosis, they are of particular interest with respect to the physiological role of this protease in potentiating cell proliferation. Our results indicate that human vascular endothelial cells respond poorly to either FGF or thrombin alone. In contrast, when cells are maintained in the presence of thrombin, their proliferative response to FGF is greatly increased even in cultures seeded at a density as low as 3 cells/mm2. Human vascular endothelial cells also respond to EGF and thrombin, although their rate of proliferation is much slower than when maintained with FGF and thrombin. In contrast, bovine vascular endothelial cells derived from vascular territories as diverse as the bovine heart, aortic arch, and umbilical vein respond maximally to FGF alone and neither respond to nor bind EGF. Furthermore, the response of bovine vascular endothelial cells to FGF was not potentiated by thrombin, indicating that the set of factors controlling the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells could be species-dependent. The requirement of cultured human vascular endothelial cells for thrombin could explain why the human cells, in contrast to bovine endothelial cells, are so difficult to maintain in tissue culture. Our results demonstrate that by using FGF and thrombin one can develop cultures of human vascular endothelial cells capable of

  12. High fat diet exacerbates vascular endothelial dysfunction in rats exposed to continuous hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Tang, Feng; Ga, Qin; Wuren, Tana; Wang, Ya-Ping; Rondina, Matthew T; Ge, Ri-Li

    2015-02-13

    Independently, a high fat diet and hypoxia are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and often occur concurrently in patients. Nevertheless, the effects of a high fat diet on vascular endothelial function combined with hypoxia, a situation occurring with increasing frequency in many parts of the world, remain largely unknown. We investigated the effects of a high fat diet on vascular endothelial function in rats exposed to continuous hypoxia for 4 weeks. Seventy two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: a hypoxia group fed regular chow, a combined hypoxia and high fat diet (HFD) group, and for comparison, rats maintained in normoxia, regular chow conditions were set as baseline (BL) group. The experimental data of BL group were obtained at beginning of hypoxia given in the other groups. Continuous hypoxia was induced in a hypobaric chamber maintained at an altitude of 5000 m. Compared to hypoxic conditions alone, hypoxia plus a HFD prevented adaptive changes in plasma nitric oxide (NOx) levels and caused earlier and more severe changes in aortic endothelial structures. Functionally, hypoxia plus a HFD resulted in impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation responses to acetylcholine and altered the bioavailability of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) substrate L-Arginine. At the molecular level, hypoxia plus a HFD blunted increases in endothelial NOS (eNOS) mRNA and protein in aortic endothelial tissue. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that in the setting of hypoxia, a high fat diet leads to earlier and more severe VED than hypoxia alone. These data have important implications for populations residing at high-altitude, as dietary patterns shift towards increased fat intake. PMID:25603049

  13. Nanoarchitecture of scaffolds and endothelial cells in engineering small diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Krishna Kumar; Subramanian, Anuradha; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of functional small diameter blood vessels still remains a challenge, as the synthetic vascular grafts fail to mimic the complex structural architecture and dynamic functions of blood vessels and also lack with the lack of non-thrombogenicity. Although, the existence of nanofibrous extracellular matrix components in the native tissue promotes many physical and molecular signals to the endothelial cells for the regulation of morphogenesis, homeostasis, and cellular functions in vascular tissue, poor understanding of the structural architecture on the functional activation of appropriate genes limits the development of successful vascular graft design. Hence, the present review outlines the functional contributions of various nanofibrous extracellular matrix components in native blood vessels. Further, the review focuses on the role of nanofiber topography of biomaterial scaffolds in endothelial cell fate processes such as adhesion, proliferation, migration, and infiltration with the expression of vasculature specific genes; thereby allowing the reader to envisage the communication between the nano-architecture of scaffolds and endothelial cells in engineering small diameter vascular grafts. PMID:25641941

  14. Nanoarchitecture of scaffolds and endothelial cells in engineering small diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Krishna Kumar; Subramanian, Anuradha; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of functional small diameter blood vessels still remains a challenge, as the synthetic vascular grafts fail to mimic the complex structural architecture and dynamic functions of blood vessels and also lack with the lack of non-thrombogenicity. Although, the existence of nanofibrous extracellular matrix components in the native tissue promotes many physical and molecular signals to the endothelial cells for the regulation of morphogenesis, homeostasis, and cellular functions in vascular tissue, poor understanding of the structural architecture on the functional activation of appropriate genes limits the development of successful vascular graft design. Hence, the present review outlines the functional contributions of various nanofibrous extracellular matrix components in native blood vessels. Further, the review focuses on the role of nanofiber topography of biomaterial scaffolds in endothelial cell fate processes such as adhesion, proliferation, migration, and infiltration with the expression of vasculature specific genes; thereby allowing the reader to envisage the communication between the nano-architecture of scaffolds and endothelial cells in engineering small diameter vascular grafts.

  15. Bioactive baculovirus nanohybrids for stent based rapid vascular re-endothelialization

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arghya; Elias, Cynthia B.; Shum-Tim, Dominique; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Present study, for the first time, reports the development of a nanohybridized baculovirus based stent that can locally promote vascular re-endothelialization by efficient delivery of pro-angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) genes. In vitro data demonstrated rapid expression of functionally active Vegf by the bioactive stent-transduced vascular cells. In vivo site-specific transgene expression was observed at the stented regions of balloon-denuded canine femoral artery, which eventually lead to significant endothelial recovery at the injured sites. A significant reduction in neointima formation (2.23 ± 0.56 mm2 vs 2.78 ± 0.49 mm2 and 3.11 ± 0.23 mm2, p < 0.05; n = 8) and percent stenosis was observed in treated stent group compared to negative control and bare metal stent groups. These findings collectively implicate the potential of this newly developed baculovirus based biotherapeutic stent to ameliorate damaged vascular biology and attenuate re-narrowing of stented artery by inhibiting neointima formation. PMID:23917680

  16. Controlling shape and position of vascular formation in engineered tissues by arbitrary assembly of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Kuroda, Masatoshi; Muraoka, Megumi; Itoga, Kazuyoshi; Okano, Teruo; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Cellular self-assembly based on cell-to-cell communication is a well-known tissue organizing process in living bodies. Hence, integrating cellular self-assembly processes into tissue engineering is a promising approach to fabricate well-organized functional tissues. In this research, we investigated the capability of endothelial cells (ECs) to control shape and position of vascular formation using arbitral-assembling techniques in three-dimensional engineered tissues. To quantify the degree of migration of ECs in endothelial network formation, image correlation analysis was conducted. Positive correlation between the original positions of arbitrarily assembled ECs and the positions of formed endothelial networks indicated the potential for controlling shape and position of vascular formations in engineered tissues. To demonstrate the feasibility of controlling vascular formations, engineered tissues with vascular networks in triangle and circle patterns were made. The technique reported here employs cellular self-assembly for tissue engineering and is expected to provide fundamental beneficial methods to supply various functional tissues for drug screening and regenerative medicine.

  17. Angiogenic Type I Collagen Extracellular Matrix Integrated with Recombinant Bacteriophages Displaying Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Junghyo; Korkmaz Zirpel, Nuriye; Park, Hyun-Ji; Han, Sewoon; Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Shin, Jisoo; Cho, Seung-Woo; Nam, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Seok

    2016-01-21

    Here, a growth-factor-integrated natural extracellular matrix of type I collagen is presented that induces angiogenesis. The developed matrix adapts type I collagen nanofibers integrated with synthetic colloidal particles of recombinant bacteriophages that display vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The integration is achieved during or after gelation of the type I collagen and the matrix enables spatial delivery of VEGF into a desired region. Endothelial cells that contact the VEGF are found to invade into the matrix to form tube-like structures both in vitro and in vivo, proving the angiogenic potential of the matrix.

  18. Catechin averts experimental diabetes mellitus-induced vascular endothelial structural and functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Khanna, Deepa; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED), an initial event that could lead to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. Previous studies showed that catechin, a key component of green tea, possesses vascular beneficial effects. We investigated the effect of catechin hydrate in diabetes mellitus-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities (VEA). Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p., once) administration to rats produced diabetes mellitus, which subsequently induced VEA in 8 weeks by markedly attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated aortic ring preparation, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentrations and impairing aortic endothelial integrity. These abnormalities in diabetic rats were accompanied with elevated aortic superoxide anion generation and serum lipid peroxidation in addition to hyperglycemia. Catechin hydrate treatment (50 mg/kg/day p.o., 3 weeks) markedly prevented diabetes mellitus-induced VEA and vascular oxidative stress. Intriguingly, in vitro incubation of L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, or Wortmannin (100 nM), a selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), markedly prevented catechin hydrate-induced improvement in acetylcholine-provoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in the diabetic rat aorta. Moreover, catechin hydrate treatment considerably reduced the elevated level of serum glucose in diabetic rats. In conclusion, catechin hydrate treatment prevents diabetes mellitus-induced VED through the activation of endothelial PI3K signal and subsequent activation of eNOS and generation of nitric oxide. In addition, reduction in high glucose, vascular oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation might additionally contribute to catechin hydrate-associated prevention of diabetic VEA. PMID:24048981

  19. Restoring Akt1 activity in outgrowth endothelial cells from South Asian men rescues vascular reparative potential.

    PubMed

    Cubbon, Richard M; Yuldasheva, Nadira Y; Viswambharan, Hema; Mercer, Ben N; Baliga, Vivek; Stephen, Sam L; Askham, Jonathan; Sukumar, Piruthivi; Skromna, Anna; Mughal, Romana S; Walker, Andrew M N; Bruns, Alexander; Bailey, Marc A; Galloway, Stacey; Imrie, Helen; Gage, Matthew C; Rakobowchuk, Mark; Li, Jing; Porter, Karen E; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Beech, David J; Kearney, Mark T

    2014-10-01

    Recent data suggest reduced indices of vascular repair in South Asian men, a group at increased risk of cardiovascular events. Outgrowth endothelial cells (OEC) represent an attractive tool to study vascular repair in humans and may offer potential in cell-based repair therapies. We aimed to define and manipulate potential mechanisms of impaired vascular repair in South Asian (SA) men. In vitro and in vivo assays of vascular repair and angiogenesis were performed using OEC derived from SA men and matched European controls, prior defining potentially causal molecular mechanisms. SA OEC exhibited impaired colony formation, migration, and in vitro angiogenesis, associated with decreased expression of the proangiogenic molecules Akt1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Transfusion of European OEC into immunodeficient mice after wire-induced femoral artery injury augmented re-endothelialization, in contrast with SA OEC and vehicle; SA OEC also failed to promote angiogenesis after induction of hind limb ischemia. Expression of constitutively active Akt1 (E17KAkt), but not green fluorescent protein control, in SA OEC increased in vitro angiogenesis, which was abrogated by a NOS antagonist. Moreover, E17KAkt expressing SA OEC promoted re-endothelialization of wire-injured femoral arteries, and perfusion recovery of ischemic limbs, to a magnitude comparable with nonmanipulated European OEC. Silencing Akt1 in European OEC recapitulated the functional deficits noted in SA OEC. Reduced signaling via the Akt/eNOS axis is causally linked with impaired OEC-mediated vascular repair in South Asian men. These data prove the principle of rescuing marked reparative dysfunction in OEC derived from these men.

  20. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 mediates allogeneic CD8(+) T cell-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Li; Jian, Zhang; Ping, Zou; Weiming, Li

    2009-12-01

    Vascular endothelial-cells injury plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and transplant-associated endothelial injury syndrome. Vascular endothelial cells are an exposed target tissue for immune-mediated injury during GVHD. Early endothelial injury syndromes share common features with acute GVHD. Chronic GVHD leads to a rarefaction of microvessels caused by the infiltration of alloreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this context, allogeneic reactive cytotoxic T cell may contribute to apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. The involvement of proteinase-activated receptor (PAR-1) in regulation of apoptosis has been recently recognized in many cell types. We hypothesized that apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells induced by allogeneic cytotoxic T cell are mediated via the PAR-1. Allogeneic CD8(+) T cell, PAR-1 agonist peptide (SFLLRN) induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) as assessed by AnnexinV-FITC labeling. To ascertain the mechanism of endothelial apoptosis, we determined that allogeneic CD8(+) T cell, SFLLRN enhanced cleavage of caspase-3 and led to p38MAPK activation as assessed by Western blot. The effects of allogeneic CD8(+) T cell and SFLLRN on apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells were largely prevented by a cleavage-blocking anti-human PAR-1-antibody (ATAP2) and a specific inhibitor of p38MAPK. In concert, these observations provide strong evidence that allogeneic CD8(+) T cell induces apoptosis of human vascular endothelial cells through PAR-1-dependent modulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway via alterations of p38MAPK and caspase-3. PMID:19082770

  1. In Vivo FRET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Cells Highlights a Role of Low PKA Activity in Vascular Hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kamioka, Yuji; Yano, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-09-15

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a pathological hallmark of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated roles of various signaling molecules in vascular hyperpermeability; however, the activities of such signaling molecules have not been examined in live tumor tissues for technical reasons. Here, by in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy with transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer, we examined the activity of protein kinase A (PKA), which maintains endothelial barrier function. The level of PKA activity was significantly lower in the intratumoral endothelial cells than the subcutaneous endothelial cells. PKA activation with a cAMP analogue alleviated the tumor vascular hyperpermeability, suggesting that the low PKA activity in the endothelial cells may be responsible for the tumor-tissue hyperpermeability. Because the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a canonical inducer of vascular hyperpermeability and a molecular target of anticancer drugs, we examined the causality between VEGF receptor activity and the PKA activity. Motesanib, a kinase inhibitor for VEGF receptor, activated tumor endothelial PKA and reduced the vascular permeability in the tumor. Conversely, subcutaneous injection of VEGF decreased endothelial PKA activity and induced hyperpermeability of subcutaneous blood vessels. Notably, in cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, VEGF activated PKA rather than decreasing its activity, highlighting the remarkable difference between its actions in vitro and in vivo These data suggested that the VEGF receptor signaling pathway increases vascular permeability, at least in part, by reducing endothelial PKA activity in the live tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5266-76. ©2016 AACR.

  2. In Vivo FRET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Cells Highlights a Role of Low PKA Activity in Vascular Hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kamioka, Yuji; Yano, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-09-15

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a pathological hallmark of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated roles of various signaling molecules in vascular hyperpermeability; however, the activities of such signaling molecules have not been examined in live tumor tissues for technical reasons. Here, by in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy with transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer, we examined the activity of protein kinase A (PKA), which maintains endothelial barrier function. The level of PKA activity was significantly lower in the intratumoral endothelial cells than the subcutaneous endothelial cells. PKA activation with a cAMP analogue alleviated the tumor vascular hyperpermeability, suggesting that the low PKA activity in the endothelial cells may be responsible for the tumor-tissue hyperpermeability. Because the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a canonical inducer of vascular hyperpermeability and a molecular target of anticancer drugs, we examined the causality between VEGF receptor activity and the PKA activity. Motesanib, a kinase inhibitor for VEGF receptor, activated tumor endothelial PKA and reduced the vascular permeability in the tumor. Conversely, subcutaneous injection of VEGF decreased endothelial PKA activity and induced hyperpermeability of subcutaneous blood vessels. Notably, in cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, VEGF activated PKA rather than decreasing its activity, highlighting the remarkable difference between its actions in vitro and in vivo These data suggested that the VEGF receptor signaling pathway increases vascular permeability, at least in part, by reducing endothelial PKA activity in the live tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5266-76. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27488524

  3. Maternal diabetes: effects on embryonic vascular development--a vascular endothelial growth factor-A-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Madri, Joseph A; Enciso, Josephine; Pinter, Emese

    2003-01-01

    Major congenital malformations, many of which result from abnormal cardiovascular patterning, remain the leading cause in infant mortality and morbidity. Targeted mutations of several genes (including VEGF and VEGF receptors) and certain teratogenic agents (including excess alpha-D-glucose) give rise to embryonic lethal phenotypes associated with failure in the formation of a functional vitelline circulation and aberrant organogenesis. Our work to date has demonstrated that yolk sac vasculopathy and failure of endocardial cushion epithelial-mesenchymal transformation occurs in hyperglycemic conditions in murine whole conceptus culture and in embryos from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. These cardiovascular abnormalities are associated with changes in expression and phosphorylation state of adhesion molecules such as platelet endothelial growth factor-1 and expression of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A). Further understanding of the effects of maternal diabetes on yolk sac and embryonic vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and organogenesis may lead to novel approaches in treating and preventing major birth defects.

  4. Adherence of Candida to cultured vascular endothelial cells: mechanisms of attachment and endothelial cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Rotrosen, D; Edwards, J E; Gibson, T R; Moore, J C; Cohen, A H; Green, I

    1985-12-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of hematogenous Candida infections, we developed an in vitro model of Candida adherence to and penetration of human endothelial cells. We enhanced or inhibited adherence in order to probe mechanisms of attachment. Adherence of Candida albicans showed a linear relation to Candida inoculum (range, 10(2)-10(5) cfu, r = .99, P less than .01) and exceeded that of less virulent Candida species and that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (P less than .01). Candida immune serum blocked attachment (greater than 95% inhibition; P less than .001), however, this activity was abolished by immunoprecipitation of immune serum with C. albicans mannan (P less than .001) and was unaffected by immunoprecipitation with S. cerevisiae mannan or by adsorption with particulate chitin. Adherence was diminished by exposing C. albicans to heat (greater than 99% inhibition; P less than .01), UV light (98% inhibition; P less than .01), or sodium periodate (greater than 72% inhibition; P less than .01). An extract from heat-exposed C. albicans blocked adherence (greater than 51% inhibition; P less than .001). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that viable or killed Candida organisms were attached to endothelial cells, were enveloped by membrane processes from the endothelial cell surface, and were incorporated into the endothelial cells within phagosomes. Cytochalasin B blocked incorporation without blocking surface attachment. PMID:3905987

  5. Vascular progenitor cells isolated from human embryonic stem cells give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle like cells and form vascular networks in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lino S; Gerecht, Sharon; Shieh, Hester F; Watson, Nicki; Rupnick, Maria A; Dallabrida, Susan M; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert

    2007-08-01

    We report that human embryonic stem cells contain a population of vascular progenitor cells that have the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like and smooth muscle (SM)-like cells. Vascular progenitor cells were isolated from EBs grown in suspension for 10 days and were characterized by expression of the endothelial/hematopoietic marker CD34 (CD34+ cells). When these cells are subsequently cultured in EGM-2 (endothelial growth medium) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (50 ng/mL), they give rise to endothelial-like cells characterized by a cobblestone cell morphology, expression of endothelial markers (platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1, CD34, KDR/Flk-1, vascular endothelial cadherin, von Willebrand factor), incorporation of acetylated low-density lipoprotein, and formation of capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. In contrast, when CD34+ cells are cultured in EGM-2 supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (50 ng/mL), they give rise to SM-like cells characterized by spindle-shape morphology, expression of SM cell markers (alpha-SM actin, SM myosin heavy chain, calponin, caldesmon, SM alpha-22), and the ability to contract and relax in response to common pharmacological agents such as carbachol and atropine but rarely form capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. Implantation studies in nude mice show that both cell types contribute to the formation of human microvasculature. Some microvessels contained mouse blood cells, which indicates functional integration with host vasculature. Therefore, the vascular progenitors isolated from human embryonic stem cells using methods established in the present study could provide a means to examine the mechanisms of endothelial and SM cell development, and they could also provide a potential source of cells for vascular tissue engineering.

  6. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O.; Herbert, Karl E.; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R.; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J.; Goodall, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  7. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O; Herbert, Karl E; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J; Goodall, Alison H; Bevington, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A: a multifunctional molecular player in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Bao, Shisan; Hambly, Brett D; Gillies, Mark C

    2009-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), first described as "vascular permeability factor", is a critical molecule in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy at several levels. Previous studies have outlined the importance of VEGF-A in mediating vascular pathology in both experimental models and clinical diabetic retinopathy, which are characterized by retinal vascular leakage, preretinal neovascularisation and neuronal degeneration. Paradoxically, recent reports have emphasized the potential neurotrophic effects of VEGF-A on the quiescent vasculature, as well as its direct and indirect protective effects on retinal neurons. VEGF-A has also been identified as an important signalling regulator in the normal central nervous system. Consequently, anti-VEGF therapy for diabetic retinopathy has become a controversal issue. This review outlines recently developed concepts relating to the role of VEGF-A in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, with particular emphasis on its implications for clinical practice. PMID:19646547

  9. NOVEL ATYPICAL PKC INHIBITORS PREVENT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Titchenell, Paul M.; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Keil, Jason M.; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Charles D.; Antonetti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contribute to the loss of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and subsequent macular edema in various retinal pathologies. VEGF signaling requires conventional PKC (PKCβ) activity; however, PKCβ inhibition only partially prevents VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and does not affect pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced permeability suggesting the involvement of alternative signaling pathways. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling in VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and identify a novel class of inhibitors of aPKC that prevent BRB breakdown in vivo. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of aPKC isoforms were used to assess their contribution to endothelial permeability in culture. A chemical library was screened using an in vitro kinase assay to identify novel small molecule inhibitors and further medicinal chemistry was performed to delineate a novel pharmacophore. We demonstrate that aPKC isoforms are both sufficient and required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Furthermore, these specific, potent, non-competitive, small molecule inhibitors prevented VEGF-induced tight junction internalization and retinal endothelial permeability in response to VEGF in both primary culture and in rodent retina. These data suggest that aPKC inhibition with 2-amino-4-phenyl-thiophene derivatives may be developed to preserve the BRB in retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy or uveitis and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of brain tumors. PMID:22721706

  10. Electrostatic endothelial cell seeding technique for small-diameter (<6 mm) vascular prostheses: feasibility testing.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, G L; Rittgers, S E

    1997-01-01

    Multiple studies have indicated the importance of surface charge in the adhesion of multiple cardiovascular cell lines including platelets and endothelial cells on the substrate materials (1,4,7-10,12-15). It is the purpose of this article to report a feasibility study conducted using an electrostatic endothelial cell seeding technique. The feasibility study was conducted using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a static pool apparatus, a voltage source, and a parallel plate capacitor. The HUVEC concentration and seeding times were constant at 560,000 HUVEC/ml and 30 min, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy examination of the endothelial cell adhesion indicated that an induced temporary positive surface charge on e-PTFE graft material enhances the number and the maturation (flattening) of HUVECs adhered. The results indicated that the total number of endothelial cells adhered (70.9 mm2) was increased from 9198 +/- 1194 HUVECs on the control (no induced surface charge) e-PTFE to 22,482 +/- 4814 HUVECs (2.4 x control) on the maximum induced positive surface charge. The total number of cells in the flattened phase of adhesion increased from 837 +/- 275 to 6785 +/- 1012 HUVECs (8.1x) under identical conditions. Thus, the results of the feasibility study support the premise that electrostatic interaction is an important factor in both the endothelial cell adhesion and spreading processes and suggest that the electrostatic seeding technique may lead to an increased patency of small diameter (<6 mm) vascular prostheses.

  11. Polymorphisms in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) predict sunitinib-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eechoute, K; van der Veldt, A A M; Oosting, S; Kappers, M H W; Wessels, J A M; Gelderblom, H; Guchelaar, H-J; Reyners, A K L; van Herpen, C M L; Haanen, J B; Mathijssen, R H J; Boven, E

    2012-10-01

    Hypertension is an important side effect of sunitinib treatment. In a retrospective study in 255 patients, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, endothelin-1 (ET-1), and endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were multivariately tested against hypertension grades and changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and mean arterial BP (MAP). Next, the association between hypertension and survival in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) was studied. Greater elevations in SBP and MAP were associated with the presence of a haplotype in VEGFA (P = 0.014 and P = 0.036, respectively). The tendency to develop grade 3 hypertension was associated with this haplotype and also with a SNP in eNOS (P = 0.031 and P = 0.045, respectively). In mRCC patients, sunitinib-induced hypertension was found to confer a survival benefit, with the mean overall survival being prolonged by 7.2 months (P = 0.035 and P = 0.026 for SBP and DBP elevations, respectively). Genetic polymorphisms in VEGFA and eNOS independently predict rise in BP and/or development of severe hypertension in sunitinib-treated patients. Grade 3 hypertension was found to be an independent factor for overall survival in patients with mRCC. PMID:22948895

  12. A novel adipocytokine, chemerin exerts anti-inflammatory roles in human vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamawaki, Hideyuki; Kameshima, Satoshi; Usui, Tatsuya; Okada, Muneyoshi; Hara, Yukio

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is a novel adipocytokine with almost unknown function in vasculature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin activates Akt/eNOS/NO pathways in endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-induced VCAM-1 via suppressing NF-{kappa}B and p38 signal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is anti-inflammatory through producing NO in vascular endothelium. -- Abstract: Chemerin is a recently identified adipocytokine which plays a role on inflammation and adipocytes metabolism. However, its function in vasculature is largely unknown. We examined the effects of chemerin on vascular endothelial inflammatory states. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with chemerin (300 ng/ml, 20 min) induced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177). Consistently, chemerin increased intracellular cyclic GMP content. Pretreatment with chemerin (1-300 ng/ml, 24 h) significantly inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B p65 (Ser536) and p38 as well as vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} (5 ng/ml, 20 min-6 h). Inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B or p38 significantly inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression. Chemerin also inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in rat isolated aorta. Moreover, chemerin significantly inhibited monocytes adhesion to TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of chemerin on TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 was reversed by a NOS inhibitor. Conversely, an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1. The present results for the first time demonstrate that chemerin plays anti-inflammatory roles by preventing TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocytes adhesion in vascular

  13. Endothelial Dysfunction and Diabetes: Effects on Angiogenesis, Vascular Remodeling, and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi Krishna; Bir, Shyamal C.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by inappropriate hyperglycemia due to lack of or resistance to insulin. Patients with DM are frequently afflicted with ischemic vascular disease or wound healing defect. It is well known that type 2 DM causes amplification of the atherosclerotic process, endothelial cell dysfunction, glycosylation of extracellular matrix proteins, and vascular denervation. These complications ultimately lead to impairment of neovascularization and diabetic wound healing. Therapeutic angiogenesis remains an attractive treatment modality for chronic ischemic disorders including PAD and/or diabetic wound healing. Many experimental studies have identified better approaches for diabetic cardiovascular complications, however, successful clinical translation has been limited possibly due to the narrow therapeutic targets of these agents or the lack of rigorous evaluation of pathology and therapeutic mechanisms in experimental models of disease. This paper discusses the current body of evidence identifying endothelial dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis during diabetes. PMID:22611498

  14. Inhibitor-κB kinase attenuates Hsp90-dependent endothelial nitric oxide synthase function in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Konopinski, Ryszard; Krishnan, Manickam; Roman, Linda; Bera, Alakesh; Hongying, Zheng; Habib, Samy L.; Mohan, Sumathy

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) is the predominant isoform that generates NO in the blood vessels. Many different regulators, including heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), govern eNOS function. Hsp90-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS is a critical event that determines eNOS activity. In our earlier study we demonstrated an inhibitor-κB kinase-β (IKKβ)-Hsp90 interaction in a high-glucose environment. In the present study we further define the putative binding domain of IKKβ on Hsp90. Interestingly, IKKβ binds to the middle domain of Hsp90, which has been shown to interact with eNOS to stimulate its activity. This new finding suggests a tighter regulation of eNOS activity than was previously assumed. Furthermore, addition of purified recombinant IKKβ to the eNOS-Hsp90 complex reduces the eNOS-Hsp90 interaction and eNOS activity, indicating a competition for Hsp90 between eNOS and IKKβ. The pathophysiological relevance of the IKKβ-Hsp90 interaction has also been demonstrated using in vitro vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling and an Ins2Akita in vivo model. Our study further defines the preferential involvement of α- vs. β-isoforms of Hsp90 in the IKKβ-eNOS-Hsp90 interaction, even though both Hsp90α and Hsp90β stimulate NO production. These studies not only reinforce the significance of maintaining a homeostatic balance of eNOS and IKKβ within the cell system that regulates NO production, but they also confirm that the IKKβ-Hsp90 interaction is favored in a high-glucose environment, leading to impairment of the eNOS-Hsp90 interaction, which contributes to endothelial dysfunction and vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:25652452

  15. Trans Fatty Acids Induce Vascular Inflammation and Reduce Vascular Nitric Oxide Production in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Naomi G.; Pham, Matilda; Rizzo, Norma O.; Cheng, Andrew M.; Maloney, Ezekiel; Kim, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which are consumed by eating foods made from partially hydrogenated vegetable oils, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. This relation can be explained by many factors including TFA's negative effect on endothelial function and reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. In this study we investigated the effects of three different TFA (2 common isomers of C18 found in partially hydrogenated vegetable oil and a C18 isomer found from ruminant-derived—dairy products and meat) on endothelial NF-κB activation and nitric oxide (NO) production. Human endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of Elaidic (trans-C18:1 (9 trans)), Linoelaidic (trans-C18:2 (9 trans, 12 trans)), and Transvaccenic (trans-C18:1 (11 trans)) for 3 h. Both Elaidic and Linoelaidic acids were associated with increasing NF-κB activation as measured by IL-6 levels and phosphorylation of IκBα, and impairment of endothelial insulin signaling and NO production, whereas Transvaccenic acid was not associated with these responses. We also measured superoxide production, which has been hypothesized to be necessary in fatty acid-dependent activation of NF-κB. Both Elaidic acid and Linoelaidic acid are associated with increased superoxide production, whereas Transvaccenic acid (which did not induce inflammatory responses) did not increase superoxide production. We observed differential activation of endothelial superoxide production, NF-κB activation, and reduction in NO production by different C18 isomers suggesting that the location and number of trans double bonds effect endothelial NF-κB activation. PMID:22216328

  16. DNA Aptamer Assembly as a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Vidhya; Monsalve, Adam; Sautina, Larysa; Segal, Mark S.; Dobson, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Controlling receptor-mediated processes in cells is paramount in many research areas. The activity of small molecules and growth factors is difficult to control and can lead to off-target effects through the activation of nonspecific receptors as well as binding affinity to nonspecific cell types. In this study, we report the development of a molecular trigger in the form of a divalent nucleic acid aptamer assembly toward vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2). The assembly binds to VEGFR2 and functions as a receptor agonist with targeted receptor binding, promoting receptor phosphorylation, activation of the downstream Akt pathway, upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and endothelial cell capillary tube formation. The agonist action we report makes this aptamer construct a promising strategy to control VEGFR2-mediated cell signaling. PMID:26125598

  17. DNA Aptamer Assembly as a Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Agonist.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Vidhya; Monsalve, Adam; Sautina, Larysa; Segal, Mark S; Dobson, Jon; Allen, Josephine B

    2015-10-01

    Controlling receptor-mediated processes in cells is paramount in many research areas. The activity of small molecules and growth factors is difficult to control and can lead to off-target effects through the activation of nonspecific receptors as well as binding affinity to nonspecific cell types. In this study, we report the development of a molecular trigger in the form of a divalent nucleic acid aptamer assembly toward vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2). The assembly binds to VEGFR2 and functions as a receptor agonist with targeted receptor binding, promoting receptor phosphorylation, activation of the downstream Akt pathway, upregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and endothelial cell capillary tube formation. The agonist action we report makes this aptamer construct a promising strategy to control VEGFR2-mediated cell signaling.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor A: just one of multiple mechanisms for sex-specific vascular development within the testis?

    PubMed

    Sargent, Kevin M; McFee, Renee M; Spuri Gomes, Renata; Cupp, Andrea S

    2015-11-01

    Testis development from an indifferent gonad is a critical step in embryogenesis. A hallmark of testis differentiation is sex-specific vascularization that occurs as endothelial cells migrate from the adjacent mesonephros into the testis to surround Sertoli-germ cell aggregates and induce seminiferous cord formation. Many in vitro experiments have demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is a critical regulator of this process. Both inhibitors to VEGFA signal transduction and excess VEGFA isoforms in testis organ cultures impaired vascular development and seminiferous cord formation. However, in vivo models using mice which selectively eliminated all VEGFA isoforms: in Sertoli and germ cells (pDmrt1-Cre;Vegfa(-/-)); Sertoli and Leydig cells (Amhr2-Cre;Vegfa(-/-)) or Sertoli cells (Amh-Cre;Vegfa(-/-) and Sry-Cre;Vegfa(-/-)) displayed testes with observably normal cords and vasculature at postnatal day 0 and onwards. Embryonic testis development may be delayed in these mice; however, the postnatal data indicate that VEGFA isoforms secreted from Sertoli, Leydig or germ cells are not required for testis morphogenesis within the mouse. A Vegfa signal transduction array was employed on postnatal testes from Sry-Cre;Vegfa(-/-) versus controls. Ptgs1 (Cox1) was the only upregulated gene (fivefold). COX1 stimulates angiogenesis and upregulates, VEGFA, Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGD2. Thus, other gene pathways may compensate for VEGFA loss, similar to multiple independent mechanisms to maintain SOX9 expression. Multiple independent mechanism that induce vascular development in the testis may contribute to and safeguard the sex-specific vasculature development responsible for inducing seminiferous cord formation, thus ensuring appropriate testis morphogenesis in the male.

  19. The Neurorepellent Slit2 Inhibits Postadhesion Stabilization of Monocytes Tethered to Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mukovozov, Ilya; Huang, Yi-Wei; Zhang, Qiuwang; Liu, Guang Ying; Siu, Allan; Sokolskyy, Yaroslav; Patel, Sajedabanu; Hyduk, Sharon J; Kutryk, Michael J B; Cybulsky, Myron I; Robinson, Lisa A

    2015-10-01

    The secreted neurorepellent Slit2, acting through its transmembrane receptor, Roundabout (Robo)-1, inhibits chemotaxis of varied cell types, including leukocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, toward diverse attractants. The role of Slit2 in regulating the steps involved in recruitment of monocytes in vascular inflammation is not well understood. In this study, we showed that Slit2 inhibited adhesion of monocytic cells to activated human endothelial cells, as well as to immobilized ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Microfluidic live cell imaging showed that Slit2 inhibited the ability of monocytes tethered to endothelial cells to stabilize their actin-associated anchors and to resist detachment in response to increasing shear forces. Transfection of constitutively active plasmids revealed that Slit2 inhibited postadhesion stabilization of monocytes on endothelial cells by preventing activation of Rac1. We further found that Slit2 inhibited chemotaxis of monocytes toward CXCL12 and CCL2. To determine whether Slit2 and Robo-1 modulate pathologic monocyte recruitment associated with vascular inflammation and cardiovascular disease, we tested PBMC from patients with coronary artery disease. PBMC from these patients had reduced surface levels of Robo-1 compared with healthy age- and sex-matched subjects, and Slit2 failed to inhibit chemotaxis of PBMC of affected patients, but not healthy control subjects, toward CCL2. Furthermore, administration of Slit2 to atherosclerosis-prone LDL receptor-deficient mice inhibited monocyte recruitment to nascent atherosclerotic lesions. These results demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits chemotaxis of monocytes, as well as their ability to stabilize adhesions and resist detachment forces. Slit2 may represent a powerful new tool to inhibit pathologic monocyte recruitment in vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  20. Adrenomedullin blockade induces regression of tumor neovessels through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sauze, Samantha; Berenguer-Daizé, Caroline; Sigaud, Romain; Delfino, Christine; Cayol, Mylène; Metellus, Philippe; Chinot, Olivier; Mabrouk, Kamel; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which adrenomedullin (AM) blockade suppresses tumor neovessels are not well defined. Herein, we show that AM blockade using anti-AM and anti-AM receptors antibodies targets vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and induces regression of unstable nascent tumor neovessels. The underlying mechanism involved, and shown in vitro and in vivo in mice, is the disruption of the molecular engagement of the endothelial cell-specific junctional molecules vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)/β-catenin complex. AM blockade increases endothelial cell permeability by inhibiting cell-cell contacts predominantly through disruption of VE-cadherin/β-catenin/Akt signalling pathway, thereby leading to vascular collapse and regression of tumor neovessels. At a molecular level, we show that AM blockade induces tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at a critical tyrosine, Tyr731, which is sufficient to prevent the binding of β-catenin to the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin leading to the inhibition of cell barrier function. Furthermore, we demonstrate activation of Src kinase by phosphorylation on Tyr416, supporting a role of Src to phosphorylate Tyr731-VE-cadherin. In this model, Src inhibition impairs αAM and αAMR-induced Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation state is dependent on Src activation. We found that AM blockade induces β-catenin phosphorylation on Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 sites in both ECs and VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data suggest that AM blockade selectively induces regression of unstable tumor neovessels, through disruption of VE-cadherin signalling. Targeting AM system may present a novel therapeutic target to selectively disrupt assembly and induce regression of nascent tumor neovessels, without affecting normal stabilized vasculature. PMID:25924235

  1. Adrenomedullin blockade induces regression of tumor neovessels through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signalling.

    PubMed

    Khalfaoui-Bendriss, Ghizlane; Dussault, Nadège; Fernandez-Sauze, Samantha; Berenguer-Daizé, Caroline; Sigaud, Romain; Delfino, Christine; Cayol, Mylène; Metellus, Philippe; Chinot, Olivier; Mabrouk, Kamel; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2015-04-10

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which adrenomedullin (AM) blockade suppresses tumor neovessels are not well defined. Herein, we show that AM blockade using anti-AM and anti-AM receptors antibodies targets vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and induces regression of unstable nascent tumor neovessels. The underlying mechanism involved, and shown in vitro and in vivo in mice, is the disruption of the molecular engagement of the endothelial cell-specific junctional molecules vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)/β-catenin complex. AM blockade increases endothelial cell permeability by inhibiting cell-cell contacts predominantly through disruption of VE-cadherin/β-catenin/Akt signalling pathway, thereby leading to vascular collapse and regression of tumor neovessels. At a molecular level, we show that AM blockade induces tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at a critical tyrosine, Tyr731, which is sufficient to prevent the binding of β-catenin to the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin leading to the inhibition of cell barrier function. Furthermore, we demonstrate activation of Src kinase by phosphorylation on Tyr416, supporting a role of Src to phosphorylate Tyr731-VE-cadherin. In this model, Src inhibition impairs αAM and αAMR-induced Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation state is dependent on Src activation. We found that AM blockade induces β-catenin phosphorylation on Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 sites in both ECs and VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data suggest that AM blockade selectively induces regression of unstable tumor neovessels, through disruption of VE-cadherin signalling. Targeting AM system may present a novel therapeutic target to selectively disrupt assembly and induce regression of nascent tumor neovessels, without affecting normal stabilized vasculature. PMID:25924235

  2. Identification of inhibitors for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor by using dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Fang, Zheng; He, Wei; Wang, Zhixiang; Gan, Haifeng; Tian, Qitao; Guo, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The novel analysis method consisting of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and HRMS analysis was firstly applied in the discovery of potential inhibitors towards cancer drug targets. With vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR-2) as a target, dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs) were prepared by reacting aldehydes with amines. Four sensitive binders targeted VEGFR-2 were directly isolated from the library. Antitumor activity test in vitro and inhibition experiments toward angiogenesis were also carried out.

  3. Protective effects of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide-induced monocytic adhesion and vascular endothelial permeability through regulation of vascular endothelial cadherin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Wang, W N; Han, H Z; Xie, K L; Wang, G L; Yu, Y H

    2015-06-11

    We observed the effect of hydrogen-rich medium on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), hyaline leukocyte conglutination, and permeability of the endothelium. Endotheliocytes were inoculated on 6-well plates and randomly divided into 4 groups: control, H2, LPS, LPS+H2, H2, and LPS+H2 in saturated hydrogen-rich medium. We applied Wright's stain-ing to observe conglutination of hyaline leukocytes and HUVECs, flow cytometry to determine the content of vascular cell adhesion protein 1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the E-selectin concentration in the cell liquor, the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) to test the permeability of endothelial cells, and Western blot and immunofluorescence to test the expression and distribution of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. Compared with control cells, there was an increase in endothelium-hyaline leukocyte conglutination, a reduction in VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin, and the TEER value increased obviously. Compared with LPS, there was an obvious reduction in the conglutination of LPS+H2 cells, a reduction in VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin levels, and a reduction in the TEER-resistance value, while the expression of VE-cadherin increased. Fluorescence results showed that, compared with control cells, the VE-cadherin in LPS cells was in-complete at the cell joints. Compared with LPS cells, the VE-cadherin in LPS+H2 cells was even and complete at the cell joints. Liquid rich in hydrogen could reduce LPS-induced production of adhesion molecules and endothelium-hyaline leukocyte conglutination, and influence the expression and distribution of VE-cadherin to regulate the permeability of the endothelium.

  4. Improving hemocompatibility and accelerating endothelialization of vascular stents by a copper-titanium film.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hengquan; Pan, Changjiang; Zhou, Shijie; Li, Junfeng; Huang, Nan; Dong, Lihua

    2016-12-01

    Bio-inorganic films and drug-eluting coatings are usually used to improve the hemocompatibility and inhibit restenosis of vascular stent; however, above bio-performances couldn't combine together with single materials. In the present study, we reported a simple approach to fabricate a metal film with the aim of imparting the stent with good blood compatibility and accelerating endothelialization. The films with various ratios of Cu and Ti were prepared through the physical vapor deposition. Phase structure and element composition were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The releasing volume of copper ion in Cu/Ti film was determined by immersing test. The hemolysis ratio, platelet adhesion and clotting time were applied to evaluate the hemocompatibility. The proliferative behaviors of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells under certain copper concentration were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that copper-titanium films exhibited good hemocompatibility in vitro; however, the increase of Cu/Ti ratio could lead to increasing hemolysis ratio. Endothelial cells displayed more proliferative than smooth muscle cells when the copper concentration was <7.5μg/ml, however both cells tended to apoptosis to some degree when the copper concentration was increased. The complete endothelialization of the film with low copper in vivo was observed at the 2nd week, indicating that the copper-titanium film with the lower copper concentration could promote endothelialization. Therefore, the inorganic copper-titanium film could be potential biomaterials to improve blood compatibility and accelerating endothelialization of vascular stents. PMID:27612815

  5. Improving hemocompatibility and accelerating endothelialization of vascular stents by a copper-titanium film.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hengquan; Pan, Changjiang; Zhou, Shijie; Li, Junfeng; Huang, Nan; Dong, Lihua

    2016-12-01

    Bio-inorganic films and drug-eluting coatings are usually used to improve the hemocompatibility and inhibit restenosis of vascular stent; however, above bio-performances couldn't combine together with single materials. In the present study, we reported a simple approach to fabricate a metal film with the aim of imparting the stent with good blood compatibility and accelerating endothelialization. The films with various ratios of Cu and Ti were prepared through the physical vapor deposition. Phase structure and element composition were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The releasing volume of copper ion in Cu/Ti film was determined by immersing test. The hemolysis ratio, platelet adhesion and clotting time were applied to evaluate the hemocompatibility. The proliferative behaviors of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells under certain copper concentration were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Results indicated that copper-titanium films exhibited good hemocompatibility in vitro; however, the increase of Cu/Ti ratio could lead to increasing hemolysis ratio. Endothelial cells displayed more proliferative than smooth muscle cells when the copper concentration was <7.5μg/ml, however both cells tended to apoptosis to some degree when the copper concentration was increased. The complete endothelialization of the film with low copper in vivo was observed at the 2nd week, indicating that the copper-titanium film with the lower copper concentration could promote endothelialization. Therefore, the inorganic copper-titanium film could be potential biomaterials to improve blood compatibility and accelerating endothelialization of vascular stents.

  6. Direct cytotoxic action of Shiga toxin on human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Obrig, T G; Del Vecchio, P J; Brown, J E; Moran, T P; Rowland, B M; Judge, T K; Rothman, S W

    1988-01-01

    To help explain a role of the Shiga toxin family in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans, it has been hypothesized that these toxins cause direct damage to the vascular endothelium. We now report that Shiga toxin purified from Shigella dysenteriae 1 does indeed have a direct cytotoxic effect on vascular endothelial cells in cultures. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in confluent monolayers were reduced 50% by 10(-8) M Shiga toxin after a lag period of 48 to 96 h. In comparison, nonconfluent HUVEC were reduced 50% by 10(-10) M Shiga toxin within a 24-h period. These data suggest that dividing endothelial cells are more sensitive to Shiga toxin than are quiescent cells in confluent monolayers. Both confluent and nonconfluent HUVEC specifically bound 125I-Shiga toxin. However, in response to the toxin, rates of incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein were more severely reduced in nonconfluent cells than in confluent cells. Toxin inhibition of protein synthesis preceded detachment of cells from the substratum. The specific binding of 125I-Shiga toxin to human endothelial cells and the cytotoxic response were both toxin dose dependent and neutralized by anti-Shiga toxin antibody. Heat-denatured Shiga toxin was without the cytotoxic effect. In addition, the complete culture system contained less than 0.1 ng of bacterial endotoxin per ml, as measured by the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test. PMID:3044997

  7. PINK1 and its familial Parkinson's disease-associated mutation regulate brain vascular endothelial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yunfu, Wang; Guangjian, Liu; Ping, Zhong; Yanpeng, Sun; Xiaoxia, Fang; Wei, Hu; Jiang, Yuan; Jingquan, Hu; Songlin, Wang; Hongyan, Zhang; Yong, Liu; Shi, Chen

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating disorder that affects movement. Inflammation-mediated endothelial dysfunction has been found to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases, including PD. More than 40 PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) mutations have been found in PD patients. The effects of PINK1 in vascular inflammation are as yet unknown. In this study, our findings revealed that PINK1 can be increased by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α in primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). We found that wild-type PINK1 prevents expression of the adhesion molecule vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), thus inhibiting the attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. However, PINK1G309D, the loss-of-function mutation associated with early-onset familial PD, promotes expression of VCAM-1 and exacerbates attachment of monocytes to brain endothelial cells. Mechanism studies revealed that overexpression of wild-type PINK1 inhibits the VCAM-1 promoter by inhibiting the transcriptional activity of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1). However, PINK1G309D promotes the VCAM-1 promoter by increasing the transcriptional activity of IRF-1. PMID:24385196

  8. A novel compound, NP-184, inhibits the vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Ting; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chung, Ching-Hu; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Huang, Tur-Fu

    2010-03-25

    Angiogenesis is observed in many diseases, such as tumor progression, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis; it is a process that involves proliferation, migration, differentiation and tube formation of endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in angiogenesis by induction of these endothelial functions. Thus, inhibition of these critical angiogenic steps is a practical therapeutic strategy for those diseases. NP-184 is a substituted benzimidazole analogue which exhibits a potent anti-thrombotic activity. In this report, NP-184 inhibited the viability of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) in a concentration-dependent manner, and caused cell apoptosis as examined by cell-cycle analysis and Annexin V staining with flow cytometry. NP-184 also concentration-dependently inhibited the HUVEC migration, tube formation on Matrigel, and rat aortic ring sprouting stimulated by VEGF. Regarding the intracellular signal transduction, NP-184 concentration-dependently interfered with the activation of AKT, ERK and the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. In vivo study showed that NP-184 dose-dependently reduced angiogenesis in Matrigel plug assay. These results indicate that NP-184 is a potential candidate for developing the treatment of angiogenesis related-diseases. PMID:20067787

  9. PCB 77 dechlorination products modulate pro-inflammatory events in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eske, Katryn; Newsome, Bradley; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are associated with detrimental health outcomes including cardiovascular diseases. Remediation of these compounds is a critical component of environmental policy. Although remediation efforts aim to completely remove toxicants, little is known about the effects of potential remediation byproducts. We previously published that Fe/Pd nanoparticles effectively dechlorinate PCB 77 to biphenyl, thus eliminating PCB-induced endothelial dysfunction using primary vascular endothelial cells. Herein, we analyzed the toxic effects of PCB congener mixtures (representative mixtures of commercial PCBs based on previous dechlorination data) produced at multiple time points during the dechlorination of PCB 77 to biphenyl. Compared with pure PCB 77, exposing endothelial cells to lower chlorinated PCB byproducts led to improved cellular viability, decreased superoxide production, and decreased nuclear factor kappa B activation based on duration of remediation. Presence of the parent compound, PCB 77, led to significant increases in mRNA and protein inflammatory marker expression. These data implicate that PCB dechlorination reduces biological toxicity to vascular endothelial cells.

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor and angiogenesis in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, K J; Koukourakis, M I; Giatromanolaki, A; Cox, G; Turley, H; Steward, W P; Gatter, K; Harris, A L

    2000-01-01

    High microvessel density, an indirect measure of angiogenesis, has been shown to correlate with increased tumour size, lymph node involvement and poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumour cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) expression correlate with angiogenesis and a poor outcome in this disease. In a retrospective study VEGF and PD-ECGF expression and microvessel density were evaluated immunohistochemically in surgically resected specimens (T1–3, N0–2) from 223 patients with operable NSCLC using the VG1, P-GF.44C and JC70 monoclonal antibodies respectively. High VEGF immunoreactivity was seen in 104 (46.6%) and PD-ECGF in 72 (32.3%) cases and both were associated with high vascular grade tumours (P = 0.009 and P = 0.05 respectively). Linear regression analysis revealed a weak positive correlation between VEGF and PD-ECGF expression in cancer cells (r = 0.21;P = 0.002). Co-expression of VEGF and PD-ECGF was not associated with a higher microvessel density than VEGF or PD-ECGF only expressing tumours. Furthermore a proportion of high vascular grade tumours expressed neither growth factor. Univariate analysis revealed tumour size, nodal status, microvessel density and VEGF and PD-ECGF expression as significant prognostic factors. Tumour size (P< 0.02) and microvessel density (P< 0.04) remained significant on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, VEGF and PD-ECGF are important angiogenic growth factors and have prognostic significance in NSCLC. Furthermore the study underlines the prognostic significance of microvessel density in operable NSCLC. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10780522

  11. SIRT1-mediated epigenetic downregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 prevents vascular endothelial replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yan-Zhen; Gao, Peng; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Hao, De-Long; Lian, Li-Shan; Li, Yong-Jun; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-10-01

    The inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has been shown to exert beneficial effects in age-related vascular diseases. Limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms regarding the negatively regulated expression of PAI-1 in the vascular system. In this study, we observed an inverse correlation between SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, and PAI-1 expression in human atherosclerotic plaques and the aortas of old mice, suggesting that internal negative regulation exists between SIRT1 and PAI-1. SIRT1 overexpression reversed the increased PAI-1 expression in senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aortas of old mice, accompanied by decreased SA-β-gal activity in vitro and improved endothelial function and reduced arterial stiffness in vivo. Moreover, the SIRT1-mediated inhibition of PAI-1 expression exerted an antisenescence effect in HUVECs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SIRT1 is able to bind to the PAI-1 promoter, resulting in a decrease in the acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16) on the PAI-1 promoter region. Thus, our findings suggest that the SIRT1-mediated epigenetic inhibition of PAI-1 expression exerts a protective effect in vascular endothelial senescence.

  12. Successful silencing of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Hecke, Anneke; Brooks, Hilary; Meryet-Figuière, Matthieu; Minne, Stephanie; Konstantinides, Stavros; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Lebleu, Bernard; Schäfer, Katrin

    2006-05-01

    Clinical as well as experimental evidence suggests that vascular overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, the primary physiological inhibitor of both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator, may be involved in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the feasibility, efficacy and functional effects of PAI-1 gene silencing in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA. Double-stranded 21 bp-RNA molecules targeted at sequences within the human PAI-1 gene were constructed. Successful siRNA transfection of HUVEC was confirmed using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. One of five candidate siRNA sequences reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Suppression of PAI-1 mRNA was detected up to 72 hours after transfection. Moreover, siRNA treatment reduced the activity of PAI-1 released from HUVEC, and prevented the oxLDL- or LPS-induced upregulation of PAI-1 secretion. Importantly, siRNA treatment did not affect the expression of other endothelial-cell markers. Moreover, downregulation of PAI-1 significantly enhanced the ability of endothelial cells to adhere to vitronectin, and this effect could be reversed upon addition of recombinant PAI-1. SiRNA-mediated reduction of PAI-1 expression may be a promising strategy for dissecting the effects of PAI-1 on vascular homeostasis.

  13. SIRT1-mediated epigenetic downregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 prevents vascular endothelial replicative senescence

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yan-Zhen; Gao, Peng; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Hao, De-Long; Lian, Li-Shan; Li, Yong-Jun; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    The inactivation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has been shown to exert beneficial effects in age-related vascular diseases. Limited information is available on the molecular mechanisms regarding the negatively regulated expression of PAI-1 in the vascular system. In this study, we observed an inverse correlation between SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, and PAI-1 expression in human atherosclerotic plaques and the aortas of old mice, suggesting that internal negative regulation exists between SIRT1 and PAI-1. SIRT1 overexpression reversed the increased PAI-1 expression in senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and aortas of old mice, accompanied by decreased SA-β-gal activity in vitro and improved endothelial function and reduced arterial stiffness in vivo. Moreover, the SIRT1-mediated inhibition of PAI-1 expression exerted an antisenescence effect in HUVECs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SIRT1 is able to bind to the PAI-1 promoter, resulting in a decrease in the acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (H4K16) on the PAI-1 promoter region. Thus, our findings suggest that the SIRT1-mediated epigenetic inhibition of PAI-1 expression exerts a protective effect in vascular endothelial senescence. PMID:25040736

  14. Protective effects of diltiazem against vascular endothelial cell injury induced by angiotensin-II and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Li, Minggao; Li, Jing; Meng, Guo; Liu, Xin

    2015-04-01

    To provide pharmacological data for future clinical studies, this study investigated the protective effects of diltiazem on vascular endothelial cell (VEC) injury induced by angiotensin-II (AngII), hypoxia, and a combination of both treatments. The concentration of intracellular free calcium and the mitochondrial membrane potential in VEC were assessed as indicators of cell injury. An in vivo hypoxic animal model was used to test the protective effect of diltiazem on vascular endothelial tissues. Our study showed that AngII and hypoxia decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in VEC, which was significantly inhibited by diltiazem. Diltiazem protected against VEC injury induced by the increased concentration of intracellular free calcium, which was associated with AngII and hypoxia. Diltiazem reduced the apoptosis of rat VEC under a sustained hypoxic condition. In addition, it reduced AngII and endothelin I levels in rat vascular endothelial tissues. Our study confirmed that AngII and hypoxia induced VEC injury by regulating the levels of mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular free calcium. Diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker, protected VEC from AngII- and hypoxia-induced injury. PMID:25661249

  15. Selective induction of endothelial P2Y6 nucleotide receptor promotes vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Riegel, Ann-Kathrin; Faigle, Marion; Zug, Stephanie; Rosenberger, Peter; Robaye, Bernard; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    During a systemic inflammatory response endothelial-expressed surface molecules have been strongly implicated in orchestrating immune responses. Previous studies have shown enhanced extracellular nucleotide release during acute inflammatory conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that endothelial nucleotide receptors could play a role in vascular inflammation. To address this hypothesis, we performed screening experiments and exposed human microvascular endothelia to inflammatory stimuli, followed by measurements of P2Y or P2X transcriptional responses. These studies showed a selective induction of the P2Y6 receptor (> 4-fold at 24 hours). Moreover, studies that used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, or immunofluorescence confirmed time- and dose-dependent induction of P2Y6 with tumor necrosis factor α or Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Studies that used MRS 2578 as P2Y6 receptor antagonist showed attenuated nuclear factor κB reporter activity and proinflammatory gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. Moreover, pharmacologic or genetic in vivo studies showed attenuated inflammatory responses in P2Y6−/− mice or after P2Y6 antagonist treatment during LPS-induced vascular inflammation. These studies show an important contribution of P2Y6 signaling in enhancing vascular inflammation during systemic LPS challenge and implicate the P2Y6 receptor as a therapeutic target during systemic inflammatory responses. PMID:21173118

  16. Fenofibrate attenuates nicotine-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chakkarwar, Vishal Arvind

    2011-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of fenofibrate on nicotine-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg/kg/day, i.p., 4 weeks) was administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy of thoracic aorta. The expression of mRNA for p22phox and eNOS was assessed by using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentration (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion concentration were estimated to assess oxidative stress. Moreover, the serum lipid profile was assessed by estimating serum cholesterol, triglycerides and high density lipoprotein. The administration of nicotine induces VED by increased oxidative stress, altered lipid profile and impaired the integrity of vascular endothelium as assessed in terms of decrease in expression of mRNA for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine produced oxidative stress, assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation and increase in expression of mRNA for p22phox. Nicotine altered the lipid profile by increasing the serum cholesterol, triglycerides and decreasing the high density lipoprotein. However, treatment with fenofibrate (32 mg/kg, p.o.) markedly prevented nicotine-induced VED by decreasing oxidative stress and improving integrity of vascular endothelium, normalising the altered lipid profile, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic

  17. Factor VIIa binding to endothelial cell protein C receptor protects vascular barrier integrity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    SUNDARAM, J.; KESHAVA, S.; GOPALAKRISHNAN, R.; ESMON, C. T.; PENDURTHI, U. R.; RAO, L . V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Recent studies have shown that factor VIIa binds to endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR), a cellular receptor for protein C and activated protein C. At present, the physiologic significance of FVIIa interaction with EPCR in vivo remains unclear. Objective: To investigate whether exogenously administered FVIIa, by binding to EPCR, induces a barrier protective effect in vivo. Methods Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced vascular leakage in the lung and kidney, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular leakage in the skin, were used to evaluate the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Wild-type, EPCR-deficient, EPCR-overexpressing and hemophilia A mice were used in the studies. Results Administration of FVIIa reduced LPS-induced vascular leakage in the lung and kidney; the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect was attenuated in EPCR-deficient mice. The extent of VEGF-induced vascular leakage in the skin was highly dependent on EPCR expression levels. Therapeutic concentrations of FVIIa attenuated VEGF-induced vascular leakage in control mice but not in EPCR-deficient mice. Blockade of FVIIa binding to EPCR with a blocking mAb completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Similarly, administration of protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist blocked the FVIIa-induced barrier protective effect. Hemophilic mice showed increased vascular permeability, and administration of therapeutic concentrations of FVIIa improved barrier integrity in these mice. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that FVIIa binding to EPCR leads to a barrier protective effect in vivo. This finding may have clinical relevance, as it indicates additional advantages of using FVIIa in treating hemophilic patients. PMID:24977291

  18. ER Alpha Rapid Signaling Is Required for Estrogen Induced Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Schnitzler, Gavin R.; Ueda, Kazutaka; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Diomede, Olga I.; Andrade, Tiffany; Karas, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen promotes the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs), which likely underlies its ability to accelerate re-endothelialization and reduce adverse remodeling after vascular injury. In previous studies, we have shown that the protective effects of E2 (the active endogenous form of estrogen) in vascular injury require the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). ERα transduces the effects of estrogen via a classical DNA binding, “genomic” signaling pathway and via a more recently-described “rapid” signaling pathway that is mediated by a subset of ERα localized to the cell membrane. However, which of these pathways mediates the effects of estrogen on endothelial cells is poorly understood. Here we identify a triple point mutant version of ERα (KRR ERα) that is specifically defective in rapid signaling, but is competent to regulate transcription through the “genomic” pathway. We find that in ECs expressing wild type ERα, E2 regulates many genes involved in cell migration and proliferation, promotes EC migration and proliferation, and also blocks the adhesion of monocytes to ECs. ECs expressing KRR mutant ERα, however, lack all of these responses. These observations establish KRR ERα as a novel tool that could greatly facilitate future studies into the vascular and non-vascular functions of ERα rapid signaling. Further, they support that rapid signaling through ERα is essential for many of the transcriptional and physiological responses of ECs to E2, and that ERα rapid signaling in ECs, in vivo, may be critical for the vasculoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogen. PMID:27035664

  19. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:27262216

  20. Cord blood-circulating endothelial progenitors for treatment of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, M; Vanneaux, V; Delmau, C; Gluckman, E; Rodde-Astier, I; Larghero, J; Uzan, G

    2011-04-01

    Adult peripheral blood (PB) endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are produced in the bone marrow and are able to integrate vascular structures in sites of neoangiogenesis. EPCs thus represent a potential therapeutic tool for ischaemic diseases. However, use of autologous EPCs in cell therapy is limited by their rarity in adult PB. Cord blood (CB) contains more EPCs than PB, and they are functional after expansion. They form primary colonies that give rise to secondary colonies, each yielding more than 10(7) cells after few passages. The number of endothelial cells obtained from one unit of CB is compatible with potential clinical application. EPC colonies can be securely produced, expanded and cryopreserved in close culture devices and endothelial cells produced in these conditions are functional as shown in different in vitro and in vivo assays. As CB EPC-derived endothelial cells would be allogeneic to patients, it would be of interest to prepare them from ready-existing CB banks. We show that not all frozen CB units from a CB bank are able to generate EPC colonies in culture, and when they do so, number of colonies is lower than that obtained with fresh CB units. However, endothelial cells derived from frozen CB have the same phenotypical and functional properties than those derived from fresh CB. This indicates that CB cryopreservation should be improved to preserve integrity of stem cells other than haematopoietic ones. Feasibility of using CB for clinical applications will be validated in porcine models of ischaemia.

  1. Mononuclear Phagocyte-Derived Microparticulate Caspase-1 Induces Pulmonary Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Srabani; Wewers, Mark D; Sarkar, Anasuya

    2015-01-01

    Lung endothelial cell apoptosis and injury occurs throughout all stages of acute lung injury (ALI/ARDS) and impacts disease progression. Lung endothelial injury has traditionally been focused on the role of neutrophil trafficking to lung vascular integrin receptors induced by proinflammatory cytokine expression. Although much is known about the pathogenesis of cell injury and death in ALI/ARDS, gaps remain in our knowledge; as a result of which there is currently no effective pharmacologic therapy. Enzymes known as caspases are essential for completion of the apoptotic program and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesized that caspase-1 may serve as a key regulator of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) apoptosis in ALI/ARDS. Our recent experiments confirm that microparticles released from stimulated monocytic cells (THP1) induce lung endothelial cell apoptosis. Microparticles pretreated with the caspase-1 inhibitor, YVAD, or pan-caspase inhibitor, ZVAD, were unable to induce cell death of HPMVEC, suggesting the role of caspase-1 or its substrate in the induction of HPMVEC cell death. Neither un-induced microparticles (control) nor direct treatment with LPS induced apoptosis of HPMVEC. Further experiments showed that caspase-1 uptake into HPMVEC and the induction of HPMVEC apoptosis was facilitated by caspase-1 interactions with microparticulate vesicles. Altering vesicle integrity completely abrogated apoptosis of HPMVEC suggesting an encapsulation requirement for target cell uptake of active caspase-1. Taken together, we confirm that microparticle centered caspase-1 can play a regulator role in endothelial cell injury. PMID:26710067

  2. Lessons From Anti–Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Anti–Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor Trials in Patients With Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu-Emerson, Christine; Duda, Dan G.; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Taylor, Jennie W.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults, remains a significant unmet need in oncology. Historically, cytotoxic treatments provided little durable benefit, and tumors recurred within several months. This has spurred a substantial research effort to establish more effective therapies for both newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM. In this context, antiangiogenic therapy emerged as a promising treatment strategy because GBMs are highly vascular tumors. In particular, GBMs overexpress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a proangiogenic cytokine. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated promising radiographic response rates, delayed tumor progression, and a relatively safe profile for anti-VEGF agents. However, randomized phase III trials conducted to date have failed to show an overall survival benefit for antiangiogenic agents alone or in combination with chemoradiotherapy. These results indicate that antiangiogenic agents may not be beneficial in unselected populations of patients with GBM. Unfortunately, biomarker development has lagged behind in the process of drug development, and no validated biomarker exists for patient stratification. However, hypothesis-generating data from phase II trials that reveal an association between increased perfusion and/or oxygenation (ie, consequences of vascular normalization) and survival suggest that early imaging biomarkers could help identify the subset of patients who most likely will benefit from anti-VEGF agents. In this article, we discuss the lessons learned from the trials conducted to date and how we could potentially use recent advances in GBM biology and imaging to improve outcomes of patients with GBM who receive antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:25713439

  3. Geraniol Suppresses Angiogenesis by Downregulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Christine; Scheuer, Claudia; Parakenings, Julia; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2015-01-01

    Geraniol exerts several direct pharmacological effects on tumor cells and, thus, has been suggested as a promising anti-cancer compound. Because vascularization is a major precondition for tumor growth, we analyzed in this study the anti-angiogenic action of geraniol. In vitro, geraniol reduced the migratory activity of endothelial-like eEND2 cells. Western blot analyses further revealed that geraniol downregulates proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and upregulates cleaved caspase-3 (Casp-3) expression in eEND2 cells. Moreover, geraniol blocked vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGFR-2 signal transduction, resulting in a suppression of downstream AKT and ERK signaling pathways. In addition, geraniol significantly reduced vascular sprout formation in a rat aortic ring assay. In vivo, geraniol inhibited the vascularization of CT26 tumors in dorsal skinfold chambers of BALB/c mice, which was associated with a smaller tumor size when compared to vehicle-treated controls. Immunohistochemical analyses confirmed a decreased number of Ki67-positive cells and CD31-positive microvessels with reduced VEGFR-2 expression within geraniol-treated tumors. Taken together, these findings indicate that geraniol targets multiple angiogenic mechanisms and, therefore, is an attractive candidate for the anti-angiogenic treatment of tumors. PMID:26154255

  4. TWIST1 Integrates Endothelial Responses to Flow in Vascular Dysfunction and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Marwa M.; Kim, Hyejeong Rosemary; Xing, Rouyu; Hsiao, Sarah; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Feng, Shuang; Bowden, Neil P.; Maguire, Richard; Ariaans, Markus; Francis, Sheila E.; Weinberg, Peter D.; van der Heiden, Kim; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Chico, Timothy J.A.; Ridger, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Blood flow–induced shear stress controls endothelial cell (EC) physiology during atherosclerosis via transcriptional mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The mechanosensitive transcription factor TWIST is expressed during embryogenesis, but its role in EC responses to shear stress and focal atherosclerosis is unknown. Objective: To investigate whether TWIST regulates endothelial responses to shear stress during vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis and compare TWIST function in vascular development and disease. Methods and Results: The expression and function of TWIST1 was studied in EC in both developing vasculature and during the initiation of atherosclerosis. In zebrafish, twist was expressed in early embryonic vasculature where it promoted angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In adult porcine and murine arteries, TWIST1 was expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions as evidenced by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and en face staining. Moreover, studies of experimental murine carotid arteries and cultured EC revealed that TWIST1 was induced by low shear stress via a GATA4-dependent transcriptional mechanism. Gene silencing in cultured EC and EC-specific genetic deletion in mice demonstrated that TWIST1 promoted atherosclerosis by inducing inflammation and enhancing EC proliferation associated with vascular leakiness. Conclusions: TWIST expression promotes developmental angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In addition to its role in development, TWIST is expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions of adult arteries where it promotes atherosclerosis by inducing EC proliferation and inflammation. Thus, pleiotropic functions of TWIST control vascular disease and development. PMID:27245171

  5. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress frequency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji

    2013-01-01

    Local shear stress sensed by arterial endothelial cells is occasionally altered by changes in global hemodynamic parameters, e.g., heart rate and blood flow rate, as a result of normal physiological events, such as exercise. In a recently study (41), we demonstrated that during the adaptive response to increased shear magnitude, porcine endothelial cells exhibited an unique phenotype featuring a transient increase in permeability and the upregulation of a set of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. In the present study, we characterize the adaptive response of these cells to an increase in shear frequency, another important hemodynamic parameter with implications in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal-level sinusoidal shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm2 at 1 Hz, and the frequency was then elevated to 2 Hz. Endothelial permeability increased slowly after the frequency step-up, but the increase was relatively small. Using microarrays, we identified 37 genes that are sensitive to the frequency step-up. The acute increase in shear frequency upregulates a set of cell-cycle regulation and angiogenesis-related genes. The overall adaptive response to the increased frequency is distinctly different from that to a magnitude step-up. However, consistent with the previous study, our data support the notion that endothelial function during an adaptive response is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. Our studies may also provide insights into the beneficial effects of exercise on vascular health: transient increases in frequency may facilitate endothelial repair, whereas similar increases in shear magnitude may keep excessive inflammation and oxidative stress at bay. PMID:23851277

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factors: multitasking functionality in metabolism, health and disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Harrison, Michael A; Tomlinson, Darren C; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) bind to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs). The VEGF and VEGFR gene products regulate diverse regulatory pathways in mammalian development, health and disease. The interaction between a particular VEGF and its cognate VEGFR activates multiple signal transduction pathways which regulate different cellular responses including metabolism, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and survival. The family of VEGF isoforms regulate vascular physiology and promote tissue homeostasis. VEGF dysfunction is implicated in major chronic disease states including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. More recent studies implicate a strong link between response to VEGF and regulation of vascular metabolism. Understanding how this family of multitasking cytokines regulates cell and animal function has implications for treating many different diseases.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factors: multitasking functionality in metabolism, health and disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Harrison, Michael A; Tomlinson, Darren C; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) bind to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases (VEGFRs). The VEGF and VEGFR gene products regulate diverse regulatory pathways in mammalian development, health and disease. The interaction between a particular VEGF and its cognate VEGFR activates multiple signal transduction pathways which regulate different cellular responses including metabolism, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and survival. The family of VEGF isoforms regulate vascular physiology and promote tissue homeostasis. VEGF dysfunction is implicated in major chronic disease states including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. More recent studies implicate a strong link between response to VEGF and regulation of vascular metabolism. Understanding how this family of multitasking cytokines regulates cell and animal function has implications for treating many different diseases. PMID:25868665

  8. Gene therapy inhibiting neointimal vascular lesion: in vivo transfer of endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    von der Leyen, H E; Gibbons, G H; Morishita, R; Lewis, N P; Zhang, L; Nakajima, M; Kaneda, Y; Cooke, J P; Dzau, V J

    1995-01-01

    It is postulated that vascular disease involves a disturbance in the homeostatic balance of factors regulating vascular tone and structure. Recent developments in gene transfer techniques have emerged as an exciting therapeutic option to treat vascular disease. Several studies have established the feasibility of direct in vivo gene transfer into the vasculature by using reporter genes such as beta-galactosidase or luciferase. To date no study has documented therapeutic effects with in vivo gene transfer of a cDNA encoding a functional enzyme. This study tests the hypothesis that endothelium-derived nitric oxide is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular lesion formation. After denudation by balloon injury of the endothelium of rat carotid arteries, we restored endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase (ec-NOS) expression in the vessel wall by using the highly efficient Sendai virus/liposome in vivo gene transfer technique. ec-NOS gene transfection not only restored NO production to levels seen in normal untreated vessels but also increased vascular reactivity of the injured vessels. Neointima formation at day 14 after balloon injury was inhibited by 70%. These findings provide direct evidence that NO is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular lesion formation in vivo (by inhibiting smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration) and suggest the possibility of ec-NOS transfection as a potential therapeutic approach to treat neointimal hyperplasia. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:7532305

  9. Gene Therapy Inhibiting Neointimal Vascular Lesion: In vivo Transfer of Endothelial Cell Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Leyen, Heiko E.; Gibbons, Gary H.; Morishita, Ryuichi; Lewis, Neil P.; Zhang, Lunan; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Cooke, John P.; Dzau, Victor J.

    1995-02-01

    It is postulated that vascular disease involves a disturbance in the homeostatic balance of factors regulating vascular tone and structure. Recent developments in gene transfer techniques have emerged as an exciting therapeutic option to treat vascular disease. Several studies have established the feasibility of direct in vivo gene transfer into the vasculature by using reporter genes such as β-galactosidase or luciferase. To date no study has documented therapeutic effects with in vivo gene transfer of a cDNA encoding a functional enzyme. This study tests the hypothesis that endothelium-derived nitric oxide is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular lesion formation. After denudation by balloon injury of the endothelium of rat carotid arteries, we restored endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase (ec-NOS) expression in the vessel wall by using the highly efficient Sendai virus/liposome in vivo gene transfer technique. ec-NOS gene transfection not only restored NO production to levels seen in normal untreated vessels but also increased vascular reactivity of the injured vessel. Neointima formation at day 14 after balloon injury was inhibited by 70%. These findings provide direct evidence that NO is an endogenous inhibitor of vascular lesion formation in vivo (by inhibiting smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration) and suggest the possibility of ec-NOS transfection as a potential therapeutic approach to treat neointimal hyperplasia.

  10. Inhibited growth of colon cancer carcinomatosis by antibodies to vascular endothelial and epidermal growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, R M; Ahmad, S A; Liu, W; Reinmuth, N; Jung, Y D; Tseng, W W; Drazan, K E; Bucana, C D; Hicklin, D J; Ellis, L M

    2001-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate colon cancer growth and metastasis. Previous studies utilizing antibodies against the VEGF receptor (DC101) or EGF receptor (C225) have demonstrated independently that these agents can inhibit tumour growth and induce apoptosis in colon cancer in in vivo and in vitro systems. We hypothesized that simultaneous blockade of the VEGF and EGF receptors would enhance the therapy of colon cancer in a mouse model of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Nude mice were given intraperitoneal injection of KM12L4 human colon cancer cells to generate peritoneal metastases. Mice were then randomized into one of four treatment groups: control, anti-VEGFR (DC101), anti-EGFR (C225), or DC101 and C225. Relative to the control group, treatment with DC101 or with DC101+C225 decreased tumour vascularity, growth, proliferation, formation of ascites and increased apoptosis of both tumour cells and endothelial cells. Although C225 therapy did not change any of the above parameters, C225 combined with DC101 led to a significant decrease in tumour vascularity and increases in tumour cell and endothelial cell apoptosis (vs the DC101 group). These findings suggest that DC101 inhibits angiogenesis, endothelial cell survival, and VEGF-mediated ascites formation in a murine model of colon cancer carcinomatosis. The addition of C225 to DC101 appears to lead to a further decrease in angiogenesis and ascites formation. Combination anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR therapy may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the management of colon peritoneal carcinomatosis. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506500

  11. Zinc nutrition and apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells: implications in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hennig, B; Meerarani, P; Ramadass, P; Toborek, M; Malecki, A; Slim, R; McClain, C J

    1999-10-01

    Little is known about the requirements and function of zinc in maintaining endothelial cell integrity, especially during stressful conditions, such as the inflammatory response in cardiovascular disease. There is evidence that zinc requirements of the vascular endothelium are increased during inflammatory conditions such as atherosclerosis, where apoptotic cell death is also prevalent. Apoptosis is a morphologically distinct mechanism of programmed cell death which involves the activation of a cell-intrinsic suicide program, and there is evidence that factors such as inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor [TNF]) and pure or oxidized lipids are necessary to induce the cell death pathway. Because of its constant exposure to blood components, including prooxidants, diet-derived fats, and their derivatives, the endothelium is very susceptible to oxidative stress and to apoptotic injury mediated by blood lipid components, prooxidants, and cytokines. Thus, it is likely that the cellular lipid environment, primarily polyunsaturated fatty acids, can potentiate the overall endothelial cell injury by increasing cellular oxidative stress and cytokine release in proximity to the endothelium, which then could further induce apoptosis and disrupt endothelial barrier function. Our data suggest that zinc deficiency exacerbates the detrimental effects of specific fatty acids (e.g., linoleic acid) and inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF, on vascular endothelial functions. We propose that a major mechanism of zinc protection against disruption of endothelial cell integrity during inflammatory conditions, is by the ability of zinc to inhibit the pathways of signal transduction leading to apoptosis and especially mechanisms that lead to upregulation of caspase genes. PMID:10501286

  12. In vitro modeling of endothelial interaction with macrophages and pericytes demonstrates Notch signaling function in the vascular microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Ian W; Du, Jing; Cong, Zhuangzhuang; Cho, Bennet S; Klein, Alyssa M; Dieck, Chelsea L; Chaudhri, Reyhaan A; Cuervo, Henar; Herts, James H; Kitajewski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by complex interactions between endothelial cells and support cells of the vascular microenvironment, such as tissue myeloid cells and vascular mural cells. Multicellular interactions during angiogenesis are difficult to study in animals and challenging in a reductive setting. We incorporated stromal cells into an established bead-based capillary sprouting assay to develop assays that faithfully reproduce major steps of vessel sprouting and maturation. We observed that macrophages enhance angiogenesis, increasing the number and length of endothelial sprouts, a property we have dubbed "angiotrophism." We found that polarizing macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory profile further increased their angiotrophic stimulation of vessel sprouting, and this increase was dependent on macrophage Notch signaling. To study endothelial/pericyte interactions, we added vascular pericytes directly to the bead-bound endothelial monolayer. These pericytes formed close associations with the endothelial sprouts, causing increased sprout number and vessel caliber. We found that Jagged1 expression and Notch signaling are essential for the growth of both endothelial cells and pericytes and may function in their interaction. We observed that combining endothelial cells with both macrophages and pericytes in the same sprouting assay has multiplicative effects on sprouting. These results significantly improve bead-capillary sprouting assays and provide an enhanced method for modeling interactions between the endothelium and the vascular microenvironment. Achieving this in a reductive in vitro setting represents a significant step toward a better understanding of the cellular elements that contribute to the formation of mature vasculature.

  13. Exercise training improves vascular endothelial function in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Pleiner, Johannes; Wiesinger, Günther F; Sieder, Anna E; Quittan, Michael; Nuhr, Martin J; Francesconi, Claudia; Seit, Hans-Peter; Francesconi, Mario; Schmetterer, Leopold; Wolzt, Michael

    2002-10-01

    OBJECTIVE-Impaired endothelial function of resistance and conduit arteries can be detected in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied whether a persistent improvement of endothelial function can be achieved by regular physical training. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-The study included 26 patients with type 1 diabetes of 20 +/- 10 years' duration and no overt angiopathy; 18 patients (42 +/- 10 years old) participated in a bicycle exercise training program, and 8 patients with type 1 diabetes (33 +/- 11 years old) served as control subjects. Vascular function of conduit arteries was assessed by flow-mediated and endothelium-independent dilation of the brachial artery and of resistance vessels by the response of ocular fundus pulsation amplitudes to intravenous N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) at baseline, after 2 and 4 months of training, and 8 months after cessation of regular exercise. RESULTS-Training increased peak oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) by 13% after 2 months and by 27% after 4 months (P = 0.04). Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery increased from 6.5 +/- 1.1 to 9.8 +/- 1.1% (P = 0.04) by training. L-NMMA administration decreased fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) by 9.1 +/- 0.9% before training and by 13.4 +/- 1.5% after 4 months of training (P = 0.02). VO(2max), FMD, and FPA were unchanged in the control group. Vascular effects from training were abrogated 8 months after cessation of exercise. CONCLUSIONS-Our study demonstrates that aerobic exercise training can improve endothelial function in different vascular beds in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes, who are at considerable risk for diabetic angiopathy. However, the beneficial effect on vascular function is not maintained in the absence of exercise.

  14. Novel vascular endothelial growth factor blocker improves cellular viability and reduces hypobaric hypoxia-induced vascular leakage and oedema in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Deepika; Nehra, Sarita; Chaudhary, Kamal; CVS, Siva Prasad

    2015-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important cerebral angiogenic and permeability factor under hypoxia. There is a need to find effective molecules that may ameliorate hypoxia-induced cerebral oedema. In silico identification of novel candidate molecules that block VEGF-A site were identified and validated with a Ramachandran plot. The active site residues of VEGF-A were detected by Pocketfinder, CASTp, and DogSiteScorer. Based on in silico data, three VEGF-A blocker (VAB) candidate molecules (VAB1, VAB2, and VAB3) were checked for improvement in cellular viability and regulation of VEGF levels in N2a cells under hypoxia (0.5% O2 ). Additionally, the best candidate molecule's efficacy was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats for its ameliorative effect on cerebral oedema and vascular leakage under hypobaric hypoxia 7260 m. All experimental results were compared with the commercially available VEGF blocker sunitinib. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A blocker 1 was found most effective in increasing cellular viability and maintaining normal VEGF levels under hypoxia (0.5% oxygen) in N2a cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A blocker 1 effectively restored VEGF levels, decreased cerebral oedema, and reduced vascular leakage under hypobaric hypoxia when compared to sunitinib-treated rats. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A blocker 1 may be a promising candidate molecule for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia-induced vasogenic oedema by regulating VEGF levels.

  15. Ten-fold augmentation of endothelial uptake of vascular endothelial growth factor with ultrasound after systemic administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, D.; Wong, J.; Griffin, B.; Ellis, S. G.; Porter, T.; Sen, S.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study, the feasibility of delivering and enhancing the uptake of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into the intact endothelium by using ultrasound (US) facilitation was determined. BACKGROUND: A limitation of tissue-targeted drug delivery is the need for direct arterial cannulation. We postulate a mechanism by which agents injected intravenously may be targeted to a tissue using US and ultrasonic contrast agents. METHODS: We used a rat model to test the ability of US and an ultrasonic contrast agent perflurocarbon exposed sonicated dextrose albumin (PESDA) to increase uptake of VEGF in the myocardium. Continuous wave Doppler US (0.6 W/cm2 at 1 MHz for 15 min) was applied to the chest wall overlying the myocardium during intravenous injection with either VEGF (100 microg/kg) alone or a combination of VEGF and PESDA (0.1%). Control rats had VEGF infused without US or PESDA. The VEGF uptake was measured quantitatively in the heart, lung, liver and kidneys by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ng/g of tissue) and morphologically by fluorescence microscopy. RESULTS: There was an eight-fold increase in VEGF uptake in the heart by US alone (16.86 +/- 1.56 vs. 2.11 +/- 0.953 ng/g of tissue, p < 0.0001) and a 13-fold increase with US + PESDA (26.78 +/- 2.88 vs. 2.11 +/- 0.953 ng/g of tissue, p < 0.0001) compared with control rats. Fluorescence microscopy revealed deposition of VEGF in the endothelium of small intramyocardial arterioles. CONCLUSIONS: These results show a marked increase in endothelial VEGF uptake with US and US + PESDA. Thus, US may be used to augment endothelial VEGF uptake 10-fold to 13-fold.

  16. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-01

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD.

  17. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-01

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD. PMID:16247462

  18. Endothelial Cell Migration and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Are the Result of Loss of Breast Tissue Polarity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Amy; Cuevas, Ileana; Kenny, Paraic A; Miyake, Hiroshi; Mace, Kimberley; Ghajar, Cyrus; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina; Boudreau, Nancy

    2009-05-26

    Recruiting a new blood supply is a rate-limiting step in tumor progression. In a three-dimensional model of breast carcinogenesis, disorganized, proliferative transformed breast epithelial cells express significantly higher expression of angiogenic genes compared with their polarized, growth-arrested nonmalignant counterparts. Elevated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by malignant cells enhanced recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) in heterotypic cocultures. Significantly, phenotypic reversion of malignant cells via reexpression of HoxD10, which is lost in malignant progression, significantly attenuated VEGF expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor 1{alpha}-independent fashion and reduced EC migration. This was due primarily to restoring polarity: forced proliferation of polarized, nonmalignant cells did not induce VEGF expression and EC recruitment, whereas disrupting the architecture of growth-arrested, reverted cells did. These data show that disrupting cytostructure activates the angiogenic switch even in the absence of proliferation and/or hypoxia and restoring organization of malignant clusters reduces VEGF expression and EC activation to levels found in quiescent nonmalignant epithelium. These data confirm the importance of tissue architecture and polarity in malignant progression.

  19. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jarel K; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P; Yoder, Mervin C; Brey, Eric M

    2015-09-18

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating.

  20. Systemic Hypoxia Changes the Organ-Specific Distribution of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Its Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Hugo H.; Risau, Werner

    1998-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in physiological blood vessel formation and pathological angiogenesis such as tumor growth and ischemic diseases. Hypoxia is a potent inducer of VEGF in vitro. Here we demonstrate that VEGF is induced in vivo by exposing mice to systemic hypoxia. VEGF induction was highest in brain, but also occurred in kidney, testis, lung, heart, and liver. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that a distinct subset of cells within a given organ, such as glial cells and neurons in brain, tubular cells in kidney, and Sertoli cells in testis, responded to the hypoxic stimulus with an increase in VEGF expression. Surprisingly, however, other cells at sites of constitutive VEGF expression in normal adult tissues, such as epithelial cells in the choroid plexus and kidney glomeruli, decreased VEGF expression in response to the hypoxic stimulus. Furthermore, in addition to VEGF itself, expression of VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1), but not VEGFR-2, was induced by hypoxia in endothelial cells of lung, heart, brain, kidney, and liver. VEGF itself was never found to be up-regulated in endothelial cells under hypoxic conditions, consistent with its paracrine action during normoxia. Our results show that the response to hypoxia in vivo is differentially regulated at the level of specific cell types or layers in certain organs. In these tissues, up- or down-regulation of VEGF and VEGFR-1 during hypoxia may influence their oxygenation after angiogenesis or modulate vascular permeability.

  1. PTEN modulates vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling and angiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhua; Kontos, Christopher D

    2002-03-29

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is activated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and many of the angiogenic cellular responses of VEGF are regulated by the lipid products of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. The tumor suppressor PTEN has been shown to down-regulate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling, yet the effects of PTEN on VEGF-mediated signaling and angiogenesis are unknown. Inhibition of endogenous PTEN in cultured endothelial cells by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant negative PTEN mutant (PTEN-C/S) enhanced VEGF-mediated Akt phosphorylation, and this effect correlated with decreases in caspase-3 cleavage, caspase-3 activity, and DNA degradation after induction of apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Overexpression of PTEN-C/S also enhanced VEGF-mediated endothelial cell proliferation and migration. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type PTEN inhibited the anti-apoptotic, proliferative, and chemotactic effects of VEGF. Moreover, PTEN-C/S increased the length of vascular sprouts in the rat aortic ring assay and modulated VEGF-mediated tube formation in an in vitro angiogenesis assay, whereas PTEN-wild type inhibited these effects. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that PTEN potently modulates VEGF-mediated signaling and function and that PTEN is a viable target in therapeutic approaches to promote or inhibit angiogenesis.

  2. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Jarel K.; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P.; Yoder, Mervin C.; Brey, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating. PMID:26393602

  3. Anti-apoptosis effects of vascular endothelial cadherin in experimental corneal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gao-Qin; Wu, Hong-Ya; Xu, Jing; Wang, Meng-Jiao; Lu, Pei-Rong; Zhang, Xue-Guang

    2015-01-01

    AIM To explore the effects and mechanism of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) on experimental corneal neovascularization (CRNV). METHODS Mouse corneas were burned with sodium hydroxide to build a CRNV model. The burned corneas were locally administrated with anti-mouse VE-cadherin neutralizing antibody. Annexin V and cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) double staining was used to measure vascular endothelial cell apoptosis with the use of flow cytometry (FCM). The protein expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), caspase-3, and protein kinase C (PKC) in the burned corneas were examined by Western blot. Human retinal endothelial cell (HREC) proliferation was detected using a Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8) assay in vitro. RESULTS The amount of CRNV peaked two weeks after the alkali burn. FCM confirmed that VE-cadherin neutralizing antibody treatment increased CD31 positive cell apoptosis. Western blot revealed that the intracorneal protein expression of Nox2 and caspase-3 were up-regulated, while PKC was down-regulated in the VE-cadherin neutralizing antibody administrated group. CCK-8 assay showed that VE-cadherin neutralizing antibody markedly inhibited HREC proliferation. CONCLUSION VE-cadherin exhibited an anti-apoptosis effect through enhanced PKC signaling and an enhanced cell proliferation pathway. PMID:26682152

  4. Protective effect of sitagliptin and rosuvastatin combination on vascular endothelial dysfunction in type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nade, Vandana S; Kawale, L A; Patel, K M

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to evaluate the protective effects of sitagliptin, glimepiride, rosuvastatin and their combinations on oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in the aortic tissues in fructose-fed type-2 diabetic rats. Sitagliptin (20 mg/kg, p.o.), glimepiride (2 mg/kg, p.o.), rosuvastatin (5 mg/kg, p.o.) and their combinations were administered for 6 w after induction of diabetes by fructose (66%, w/v solution, p.o. for 8 w) in wistar rats. The effects were examined on body weight, serum glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, blood pressure, heart rate, nitric oxide and antioxidant defensive enzymes. After completion of treatment schedule, the blood pressure was determined by invasive method and vascular reactivity was tested with adrenaline, noradrenaline and phenylephrine. Endothelial dysfunction was determined by acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside-induced vasorelaxation studies on isolated rat aortas. Long term treatments significantly decreased body weight gain, serum glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol levels; normalize the heart rate, and blood pressure in fructose fed rats. The treatments significantly improved vascular reactivity to catecholamines with reduction in elevated blood pressure in type-2 diabetic rats. The significant improvement in the relaxant response to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was obtained on isolated aortas. All the treatments were effective in restoring defensive antioxidant enzymes. Sitagliptin and rosuvastatin were able to reverse endothelial dysfunction in type-2 diabetes, but better ameliorating potential was found when used in combination. PMID:25767324

  5. Update on vascular endothelial Ca2+ signalling: A tale of ion channels, pumps and transporters

    PubMed Central

    Moccia, Francesco; Berra-Romani, Roberto; Tanzi, Franco

    2012-01-01

    A monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs) lines the lumen of blood vessels and forms a multifunctional transducing organ that mediates a plethora of cardiovascular processes. The activation of ECs from as state of quiescence is, therefore, regarded among the early events leading to the onset and progression of potentially lethal diseases, such as hypertension, myocardial infarction, brain stroke, and tumor. Intracellular Ca2+ signals have long been know to play a central role in the complex network of signaling pathways regulating the endothelial functions. Notably, recent work has outlined how any change in the pattern of expression of endothelial channels, transporters and pumps involved in the modulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels may dramatically affect whole body homeostasis. Vascular ECs may react to both mechanical and chemical stimuli by generating a variety of intracellular Ca2+ signals, ranging from brief, localized Ca2+ pulses to prolonged Ca2+ oscillations engulfing the whole cytoplasm. The well-defined spatiotemporal profile of the subcellular Ca2+ signals elicited in ECs by specific extracellular inputs depends on the interaction between Ca2+ releasing channels, which are located both on the plasma membrane and in a number of intracellular organelles, and Ca2+ removing systems. The present article aims to summarize both the past and recent literature in the field to provide a clear-cut picture of our current knowledge on the molecular nature and the role played by the components of the Ca2+ machinery in vascular ECs under both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:22905291

  6. Curcumin ingestion and exercise training improve vascular endothelial function in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Choi, Youngju; Miyaki, Asako; Tanabe, Yoko; Sugawara, Jun; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2012-10-01

    Vascular endothelial function is declines with aging and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle modification, particularly aerobic exercise and dietary adjustment, has a favorable effect on vascular aging. Curcumin is a major component of turmeric with known anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. We investigated the effects of curcumin ingestion and aerobic exercise training on flow-mediated dilation as an indicator endothelial function in postmenopausal women. A total of 32 postmenopausal women were assigned to 3 groups: control, exercise, and curcumin groups. The curcumin group ingested curcumin orally for 8 weeks. The exercise group underwent moderate aerobic exercise training for 8 weeks. Before and after each intervention, flow-mediated dilation was measured. No difference in baseline flow-mediated dilation or other key dependent variables were detected among the groups. Flow-mediated dilation increased significantly and equally in the curcumin and exercise groups, whereas no changes were observed in the control group. Our results indicated that curcumin ingestion and aerobic exercise training can increase flow-mediated dilation in postmenopausal women, suggesting that both can potentially improve the age-related decline in endothelial function.

  7. C-peptide protects against hyperglycemic memory and vascular endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Mahendra Prasad; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Jung, Se-Hui; Kim, Yong Ho; Hwang, Jong Yun; Han, Eun-Taek; Park, Won Sun; Hong, Seok-Ho; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2016-10-01

    C-peptide exerts protective effects against diabetic complications; however, its role in inhibiting hyperglycemic memory (HGM) has not been elucidated. We investigated the beneficial effect of C-peptide on HGM-induced vascular damage in vitro and in vivo using human umbilical vein endothelial cells and diabetic mice. HGM induced apoptosis by persistent generation of intracellular ROS and sustained formation of ONOO(-) and nitrotyrosine. These HGM-induced intracellular events were normalized by treatment with C-peptide, but not insulin, in endothelial cells. C-peptide also inhibited persistent upregulation of p53 and activation of mitochondrial adaptor p66(shc) after glucose normalization. Further, C-peptide replacement therapy prevented persistent generation of ROS and ONOO(-) in the aorta of diabetic mice whose glucose levels were normalized by the administration of insulin. C-peptide, but not insulin, also prevented HGM-induced endothelial apoptosis in the murine diabetic aorta. This study highlights a promising role for C-peptide in preventing HGM-induced intracellular events and diabetic vascular damage.

  8. Endothelial PECAM-1 and its function in vascular physiology and atherogenic pathology.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-06-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) is highly expressed in vascular cells such as endothelial cells (ECs) and blood-borne cells like platelets and leukocytes. In ECs, this molecule controls junctional and adhesive properties. In physiological conditions, PECAM-1 supports the endothelial barrier function. In inflammation that is observed in vessels affected by atherosclerosis, the function of PECAM-1 is impaired, an event that leads to increased adhesion of neutrophils and other leukocytes to ECs, decreased vascular integrity, and higher leukocyte transmigration to the intima media. PECAM-1 has six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains that support attraction and adhesion of leukocytes to ECs. The cytoplasmic tail of PECAM-1 contains two tyrosine residues (Tyr-663 and Tyr-686) that could be phosphorylated by Src family protein kinases is involved in the intracellular signaling. Actually, those tyrosines are the part of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs) that inhibit inflammation. However, in atherosclerosis, the PECAM-1-dependent immune suppression is disturbed. This in turn facilitates recruitment of leukocytes and supports proatherogenic inflammation. PMID:27079772

  9. The Effect of Quercus salicina Leaf Extracts on Vascular Endothelial Function: Role of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hye-Won; Park, Gye-Choon; Yi, Eunyoung; Yoon, Goo; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium is reported as a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases. Many evidences suggest that polyphenols are associated with a decreased global mortality and might be involved in protection against cardiovascular risk. This beneficial effect of polyphenol may be due to many actions as antioxidant that increases bioavailability of nitric oxide, vasodilation or anti-hypertensive properties. To identify new natural medicine candidate for cardiovascular protection, plant extracts used in traditional medicine were evaluated by vascular reactivity system. Porcine coronary artery rings were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of changes in isometric tension. Screening results indicated that the ethanolic extract of leaf from Quercus salicina (QSE) has been found to exhibit potent vasorelaxant activity. QSE dose-dependently induced endothelium-dependent relaxations, which were abolished by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine). In addition, QSE strongly and dose-dependently activate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cell. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated that QSE is a powerful endothelium-dependentvasodilator and that this effect involves increased nitric oxide bioavailability. In conclusion, QSE could be a cardiovascular protective herbal medicine candidate associated with cardiovascular diseases and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27433730

  10. Dexamethasone induces caveolin-1 in vascular endothelial cells: implications for attenuated responses to VEGF.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Junsuke; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Shoji, Kazuyo; Yoneda, Kozo; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Moriue, Tetsuya; Kubota, Yasuo; Kosaka, Hiroaki

    2013-04-15

    Steroids exert direct actions on cardiovascular cells, although underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We examined if steroids modulate abundance of caveolin-1, a regulatory protein of cell-surface receptor pathways that regulates the magnitudes of endothelial response to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, induces caveolin-1 at both levels of protein and mRNA in a time- and dose-dependent manner in pharmacologically relevant concentrations in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. Aldosterone, a mineralocorticoid, but not the sex steroids 17β-estradiol, testosterone, or progesterone, elicits similar caveolin-1 induction. Caveolin-1 induction by dexamethasone and that by aldosterone were abrogated by RU-486, an inhibitor of glucocorticoid receptor, and by spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor inhibitor, respectively. Dexamethasone attenuates VEGF-induced responses at the levels of protein kinases Akt and ERK1/2, small-G protein Rac1, nitric oxide production, and migration. When induction of caveolin-1 by dexamethasone is attenuated either by genetically by transient transfection with small interfering RNA or pharmacologically by RU-486, kinase responses to VEGF are rescued. Dexamethasone also increases expression of caveolin-1 protein in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells, associated with attenuated tube formation responses of these cells when cocultured with normal fibroblasts. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that intraperitoneal injection of dexamethasone induces endothelial caveolin-1 protein in thoracic aorta and in lung artery in healthy male rats. Thus steroids functionally attenuate endothelial responses to VEGF via caveolin-1 induction at the levels of signal transduction, migration, and tube formation, identifying a novel point of cross talk between nuclear and cell-surface receptor signaling pathways. PMID:23426970

  11. Understanding the effects of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone in physiological fatty tissue for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-11-01

    Engineering of large vascularized adipose tissue constructs is still a challenge for the treatment of extensive high-graded burns or the replacement of tissue after tumor removal. Communication between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells is important for homeostasis and the maintenance of adipose tissue mass but, to date, is mainly neglected in tissue engineering strategies. Thus, new co-culture strategies are needed to integrate adipocytes and endothelial cells successfully into a functional construct. This review focuses on the cross-talk of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells and considers their influence on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone. In addition, the properties and challenges with regard to these two cell types for vascularized tissue engineering are highlighted.

  12. Understanding the effects of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone in physiological fatty tissue for vascularized adipose tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra J

    2015-11-01

    Engineering of large vascularized adipose tissue constructs is still a challenge for the treatment of extensive high-graded burns or the replacement of tissue after tumor removal. Communication between mature adipocytes and endothelial cells is important for homeostasis and the maintenance of adipose tissue mass but, to date, is mainly neglected in tissue engineering strategies. Thus, new co-culture strategies are needed to integrate adipocytes and endothelial cells successfully into a functional construct. This review focuses on the cross-talk of mature adipocytes and endothelial cells and considers their influence on fatty acid metabolism and vascular tone. In addition, the properties and challenges with regard to these two cell types for vascularized tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26340984

  13. Vascular effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in dyslipidemic ApoE-/- mice and cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Lenz, Anke G; Stoeger, Tobias; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan; Roursgaard, Martin; Mikkelsen, Lone; Møller, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidences indicate that pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is associated with increased risk of lung diseases, whereas the effect on the vascular system is less studied. We investigated vascular effects of 2 types of multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice, wild-type mice, and cultured cells. The ApoE(-/-) mice had accelerated plaque progression in aorta after 5 intracheal instillations of MWCNT (25.6 μg/mouse weekly for 5 weeks). The exposure was associated with pulmonary inflammation, lipid peroxidation, and increased expression of inflammatory, oxidative stress, DNA repair, and vascular activation response genes. The level of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung tissue was unaltered, probably due to increased DNA repair capacities. Despite upregulation of inflammatory genes in the liver, effects on systemic cytokines and lipid peroxidation were minimal. The exposure to MWCNTs in cultured human endothelial cells increased the expression of cell adhesion molecules (ICAM1 and VCAM1). In cocultures, there was increased adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells after exposure to MWCNT. The exposure to both types of MWCNT was also associated with increased lipid accumulation in monocytic-derived foam cells, which was dependent on concomitant oxidative stress because the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine inhibited the lipid accumulation. Collectively, our results indicate that exposure to MWCNT is associated with accelerated progression of atherosclerosis, which could be related to both increased adherence of monocytes onto the endothelium and oxidative stress-mediated transformation of monocytes to foam cells.

  14. The mechanism of vascular leakage induced by leukotriene E4. Endothelial contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Joris, I.; Majno, G.; Corey, E. J.; Lewis, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    This study identifies the microvascular target of leukotriene E4 (LTE4) by vascular labeling with carbon black and establishes the mechanism of its action at the cellular level by electron microscopy. LTE4 and its tripeptide precursor, leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were injected subcutaneously in guinea pigs. With LTE4, venular labeling was intense at 1000 and 100 ng and slight at 10 ng, with extinction at 1 ng. LTC4 induced a ring of labeled venules around a blank central area, suggestive of vasospasm. The nonpeptidyl leukotriene LTB4 induced no labeling. Histamine (1000 ng) induced an area of vascular labeling about equal to that by 1000 ng LTE4, but the labeling of individual venules was more intense. By electron microscopy, LTE4 was found to induce gaps in the endothelium of the venules; the endothelial cells adjacent to the gaps bulged into the lumen and showed wrinkled nuclei, consistent with cellular contraction. This ultrastructural evidence suggests that LTE4 increases vascular permeability by contraction of endothelial cells selectively, in the postcapillary venules, as was previously demonstrated for other inflammatory mediators, including histamine, serotonin, and bradykinin. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3028143

  15. Vascular endothelial growth factor trap-eye (Aflibercept) for the management of diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ahmadreza; Sepah, Yasir Jamal; Sadiq, Mohammad Ali; Nasir, Humzah; Kherani, Salima; Sophie, Raafay; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2013-12-15

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common cause of visual loss among working age individuals. Diabetic macular edema (DME) is an important complication of DR that affects around one third of the patients with DR. Several treatments have been approved for DME ranging from blood pressure and glycemic control to photocoagulation and more recently the use of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antagonists. The index review discusses aflibercept (EYLEA(®)-Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, New York, NY, and Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals, Berlin, Germany) in the context of other VEGF antagonists currently available for the treatment of DME. A systematic search of literature was conducted on PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar with no limitation on language or year of publication. Pre-clinical studies of aflibercept have shown a higher affinity of this molecule for vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) along with a longer duration of action as compared to other VEGF antagonists. Recent clinical trials have shown visual outcome results for aflibercept to be similarly favorable as compared to other available agents with the added benefit of fewer required injections and less frequent monitoring. Aflibercept presents a potential exciting new addition to the armamentarium of current VEGF antagonists available for the treatment of DME and other retinal vascular diseases. However, further studies are indicated to confirm the role, safety, and efficacy of aflibercept for DME.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor trap-eye (Aflibercept) for the management of diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ahmadreza; Sepah, Yasir Jamal; Sadiq, Mohammad Ali; Nasir, Humzah; Kherani, Salima; Sophie, Raafay; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2013-12-15

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common cause of visual loss among working age individuals. Diabetic macular edema (DME) is an important complication of DR that affects around one third of the patients with DR. Several treatments have been approved for DME ranging from blood pressure and glycemic control to photocoagulation and more recently the use of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antagonists. The index review discusses aflibercept (EYLEA(®)-Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, New York, NY, and Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals, Berlin, Germany) in the context of other VEGF antagonists currently available for the treatment of DME. A systematic search of literature was conducted on PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar with no limitation on language or year of publication. Pre-clinical studies of aflibercept have shown a higher affinity of this molecule for vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) along with a longer duration of action as compared to other VEGF antagonists. Recent clinical trials have shown visual outcome results for aflibercept to be similarly favorable as compared to other available agents with the added benefit of fewer required injections and less frequent monitoring. Aflibercept presents a potential exciting new addition to the armamentarium of current VEGF antagonists available for the treatment of DME and other retinal vascular diseases. However, further studies are indicated to confirm the role, safety, and efficacy of aflibercept for DME. PMID:24379921

  17. A poly(L-lactic acid) nanofibre mesh scaffold for endothelial cells on vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    François, Sébastien; Chakfé, Nabil; Durand, Bernard; Laroche, Gaétan

    2009-09-01

    The absence of neoendothelium covering the intimal surface of small-diameter PET vascular prostheses is known to be one cause of failure following implantation in humans. Protein coatings currently used to seal porous textile structures have not shown evidence of in vivo neoendothelium formation. In this study, we covered the inner wall of textile prostheses with a biodegradable synthetic scaffold made of poly(l-lactic) acid (PLLA) nanofibres obtained by an air-spinning process we developed that produces nanofibres by stretching a solution of polymer with a high-speed compressed air jet. The air spinning was designed to process a scaffold that would support good endothelial cell proliferation. Our innovative process enabled us to very rapidly cover textile samples with PLLA nanofibres to determine the influence of air pressure, polymer solution flow rate and polymer concentration on fibre quality. High air pressure was shown to induce a significant number of ruptures. High polymer flow rate stimulated the formation of polymer droplets, and the fibre diameter mean increased for the 4% and 7% polymer concentrations. The adherence and proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells was assessed to compare prosthesis samples with or without the PLLA nanofibre scaffold and PET film. The PLLA nanofibres displayed a significantly better proliferation rate, and enabled endothelial cells to proliferate in the monolayer. Our novel approach therefore opens the door to the development of partially degradable textile prostheses with a blood/textile interface that supports endothelial cell proliferation. PMID:19345622

  18. The effect and action mechanism of resveratrol on the vascular endothelial cell by high glucose treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xun; Tian, Jie; Bai, Quanhao; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Sarfraz, Maliha; Zhao, Bojun

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect and action mechanism of resveratrol on the vascular endothelial cell by high glucose treatment. Primarily cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pretreated by resveratrol (0.2 μmol/L) and holding for 6 h, and then cultured in Dulbecco Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) within 0.45 mmol/L of palmimte acid and 32.8 mmol/L of glucose, which is holding for 12 h. The cells were collected to analyze the expression of E-selected element. Supernatant of cultured cells, induced by 100 nmol/L insulin for 30 min, was used to analyze the nitric oxide content. Compared with normal control cells, the secretion of nitric oxide is stimulated by insulin decrease, however, the expression of E-selected element increased in HUVEC. Resveratrol treatment increased the secretion of nitric oxide stimulated by insulin and decreased the expression of E-selected element and partly counteracts the impairment of high glucose and palmitate acid on the function of endothelial cells. Resveratrol can improve and protect the function of high glucose and fatty acid cultured endothelial cell, and therefore may be a promising medicine in the prevention or therapy of diabetic macrovascular diseases. PMID:26858561

  19. [Medical significance of endothelial glycocalyx. Part 2: Its role in vascular diseases and in diabetic complications].

    PubMed

    Frati Munari, Alberto C

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx is a layer composed by glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to the vascular endothelial luminal surface. Shredding of glycocalyx appears as an essential initial step in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and microangiopathic complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in chronic venous disease. Atherosclerosis risk factors, as hypercholesterolemia (LDL), hyperglycemia, inflammation, salt excess and altered shear stress can damage glycocalyx. This lead to endothelial dysfunction and allows LDL and leukocytes to filtrate to the subendothelial space initiating atheroma plaque formation. Degradation of glycocalyx in diabetes mellitus is mainly due to oxidative stress and enables protein filtration (albuminuria) and endothelial disorder of microangiopathy. Chronic venous hypertension brings to altered shears stress which results in shredded glycocalyx, this allows leukocytes to migrate into venous wall and initiate inflammation leading to morphologic and functional venous changes of the chronic venous disease. Treatment with glycosaminoglycans (sulodexide) prevents or recovers the damaged glycocalyx and several of its consequences. This drug improves chronic venous disease and promotes healing of chronic venous ulcers. It has also been useful in peripheral arterial obstructive disease and in diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria. PMID:24836779

  20. [Medical significance of endothelial glycocalyx. Part 2: Its role in vascular diseases and in diabetic complications].

    PubMed

    Frati Munari, Alberto C

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx is a layer composed by glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to the vascular endothelial luminal surface. Shredding of glycocalyx appears as an essential initial step in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and microangiopathic complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in chronic venous disease. Atherosclerosis risk factors, as hypercholesterolemia (LDL), hyperglycemia, inflammation, salt excess and altered shear stress can damage glycocalyx. This lead to endothelial dysfunction and allows LDL and leukocytes to filtrate to the subendothelial space initiating atheroma plaque formation. Degradation of glycocalyx in diabetes mellitus is mainly due to oxidative stress and enables protein filtration (albuminuria) and endothelial disorder of microangiopathy. Chronic venous hypertension brings to altered shears stress which results in shredded glycocalyx, this allows leukocytes to migrate into venous wall and initiate inflammation leading to morphologic and functional venous changes of the chronic venous disease. Treatment with glycosaminoglycans (sulodexide) prevents or recovers the damaged glycocalyx and several of its consequences. This drug improves chronic venous disease and promotes healing of chronic venous ulcers. It has also been useful in peripheral arterial obstructive disease and in diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria.

  1. Elucidating the origins of the vascular system: a fate map of the vascular endothelial and red blood cell lineages in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Mills, K R; Kruep, D; Saha, M S

    1999-05-15

    Required to supply nutrients and oxygen to the growing embryo, the vascular system is the first functional organ system to develop during vertebrate embryogenesis. Although there has been substantial progress in identifying the genetic cascade regulating vascular development, the initial stages of vasculogenesis, namely, the origin of vascular endothelial cells within the early embryo, remain unclear. To address this issue we constructed a fate map for specific vascular structures, including the aortic arches, endocardium, dorsal aorta, cardinal veins, and lateral abdominal veins, as well as for the red blood cells at the 16-cell stage and the 32-cell stage of Xenopus laevis. Using genetic markers to identify these cell types, our results suggest that vascular endothelial cells can arise from virtually every blastomere of the 16-cell-stage and the 32-cell-stage embryo, with different blastomeres preferentially, though not exclusively, giving rise to specific vascular structures. Similarly, but more surprisingly, every blastomere in the 16-cell-stage embryo and all but those in the most animal tier of the 32-cell-stage embryo serve as progenitors for red blood cells. Taken together, our results suggest that during normal development, both dorsal and ventral blastomeres contribute significantly to the vascular endothelial and red blood cell lineages.

  2. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increases Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Transcription In Huvec Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koai, Esther; Rios, Tibisay Rincon; Edwards, John

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that VEGF increases eNOS protein, the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. To determine if VEGF alters eNOS transcription, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were transfected with reporters under the control of the eNOS promoter and stimulated with VEGF165. VEGF significantly increased eNOS-mRNA after 2 hours exposure. VEGF significantly increased eNOS reporter activity as early as one hour (268±32%), but this increase returned to baseline after 6 hours. Using deletion constructs, the VEGF response region was initially localized to within the −722/−494 region. GMSA indicated that VEGF increased DNA binding to both a cAMP-like and AP1-like response elements. Site-specific mutations and heterologous constructs indicated that the site centered at AP1-like site was both necessary and sufficient to meditate VEGF transcriptional activation. These results indicate that VEGF rapidly activates eNOS transcription prior to a rise eNOS-mRNA, an effect mediated by a cis-trans interaction localized to an AP1-like site within the eNOS promoter.

  3. Dual delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor coacervate displays strong angiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Awada, Hassan K; Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2014-05-01

    Controlled delivery of multiple growth factors (GFs) holds great potential for the clinical treatment of ischemic diseases and might be more therapeutically effective to reestablish vasculature than the provision of a single GF. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are two potent angiogenic factors. However, due to rapid degradation and dilution in the body, their clinical potential will rely on an effective mode of delivery. A coacervate, composed of heparin and a biodegradable polycation, which protects GFs from proteolysis and potentiates their bioactivities, is developed. Here, the coacervate incorporates VEGF and HGF and sustains their release for at least three weeks. Their strong angiogenic effects on endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation in vitro are confirmed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that coacervate-based delivery of these factors has stronger effects than free application of both factors and to coacervate delivery of each GF separately.

  4. Effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on inflammation in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gojova, Andrea; Lee, Jun-Tae; Jung, Heejung S.; Guo, Bing; Barakat, Abdul I.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2010-01-01

    Because vascular endothelial cell inflammation is critical in the development of cardiovascular pathology, we hypothesized that direct exposure of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to ultrafine particles induces an inflammatory response. To test the hypothesis, we incubated HAECs for 4 h with different concentrations (0.001–50 μg/ml) of CeO2 nanoparticles and subsequently measured mRNA levels of the three inflammatory markers intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), interleukin (IL)-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Ceria nanoparticles caused very little inflammatory response in HAECs, even at the highest dose. This material is apparently rather benign in comparison with Y2O3 and ZnO nanoparticles that we have studied previously. These results suggest that inflammation in HAECs following acute exposure to metal oxide nanoparticles depends strongly on particle composition. PMID:19558244

  5. P2y receptor-mediated angiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Rumjahn, Sharif M; Baldwin, Karla A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2007-01-01

    Pathological as well as physiological angiogenesis is known to be regulated by such factors as nucleotides and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Activated P2Y nucleotide receptors have been observed to associate and transactivate VEGF Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), suggesting a cooperation between nucleotide and VEGF signaling in angiogenesis. P2YR mediated VEGFR2 signaling therefore may be important in describing the angiogenic signaling of nucleotides such as ATP. Here, we provide evidence that supports the notion of P2YR-VEGFR2 signaling. The significant angiogenic effect of P2Y1/2 receptor agonists (100 microM ATP and 10 microM 2MS-ATP) on endothelial cell tubulogenesis was suppressed back to near control levels upon addition of 1 microM SU1498 (specific VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor). We believe that this P2YR-VEFGR2 signaling is an important component of pathological, as well as physiological angiogenesis.

  6. Activation of adenosine A2A receptors by polydeoxyribonucleotide increases vascular endothelial growth factor and protects against testicular damage induced by experimental varicocele in rats.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Arena, Salvatore; Bonvissuto, Giulio; Bitto, Alessandra; Polito, Francesca; Irrera, Natasha; Arena, Francesco; Fragalà, Eugenia; Romeo, Carmelo; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Fazzari, Carmine; Marini, Herbert; Implatini, Alessandra; Grimaldi, Silvia; Cantone, Noemi; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2011-03-15

    In rat experimental varicocele, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production, thereby enhancing testicular function. This may point to a new therapeutic approach in human varicocele.

  7. Chronic Sleep Fragmentation Induces Endothelial Dysfunction and Structural Vascular Changes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X.; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Li, Richard C.; Wang, Yang; Gozal, David

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep fragmentation (SF) is a common occurrence and constitutes a major characteristic of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). SF has been implicated in multiple OSA-related morbidities, but it is unclear whether SF underlies any of the cardiovascular morbidities of OSA. We hypothesized that long-term SF exposures may lead to endothelial dysfunction and altered vessel wall structure. Methods and Results: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed normal chow and exposed to daylight SF or control sleep (CTL) for 20 weeks. Telemetric blood pressure and endothelial function were assessed weekly using a modified laser-Doppler hyperemic test. Atherosclerotic plaques, elastic fiber disruption, lumen area, wall thickness, foam cells, and macrophage recruitment, as well as expression of senescence-associated markers were examined in excised aortas. Increased latencies to reach baseline perfusion levels during the post-occlusive period emerged in SF mice with increased systemic BP values starting at 8 weeks of SF and persisting thereafter. No obvious atherosclerotic plaques emerged, but marked elastic fiber disruption and fiber disorganization were apparent in SF-exposed mice, along with increases in the number of foam cells and macrophages in the aorta wall. Senescence markers showed reduced TERT and cyclin A and increased p16INK4a expression, with higher IL-6 plasma levels in SF-exposed mice. Conclusions: Long-term sleep fragmentation induces vascular endothelial dysfunction and mild blood pressure increases. Sleep fragmentation also leads to morphologic vessel changes characterized by elastic fiber disruption and disorganization, increased recruitment of inflammatory cells, and altered expression of senescence markers, thereby supporting a role for sleep fragmentation in the cardiovascular morbidity of OSA. Citation: Carreras A, Zhang SX, Peris E, Qiao Z, Gileles-Hillel A, Li RC, Wang Y, Gozal D. Chronic sleep fragmentation induces endothelial dysfunction and

  8. Subclinical vascular endothelial dysfunctions and myocardial changes with type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Eltayeb, Azza A; Ahmad, Faisal-Alkhateeb; Sayed, Douaa M; Osama, Amany M

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction, accelerated thickening of arterial intima, and changes in ventricular functions contribute to increased cardiovascular morbidity in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). This study aimed to investigate the functional-structural changes in the arteries and myocardium together with affection of highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), circulating endothelial cells (CECs), and vitamin C levels in children with T1DM. Also, to test the association with early atherosclerotic changes. The study included 30 children with a diagnosis of T1DM and 30 healthy subjects matched by sex, age, and body mass index. Serum lipids, HbA1c, hsCRP, vitamin C, and CECs were detected. Corrected QT interval (QTc), cardiac dimensions, and left ventricular (LV) functions were assessed using conventional echocardiography. Noninvasive ultrasound was used to measure brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) responses and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). The QTc interval was significantly higher in the diabetic patients than in the control subjects (P < 0.001). The findings showed LV diastolic dysfunction as reflected by significantly lower early peak flow velocity, decreased E/A ratio, increased early filling deceleration time (DcT), and prolonged isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT) (P < 0.001 for each). The children with diabetes had a significantly lower FMD response, increased IMT, lower vitamin C level, higher hsCRP, and higher CEC compared with the control subjects (P < 0.001 for each). A positive correlation between CEC and HbA1c was found (P = 0.004). An alteration in myocardial function and endothelial dysfunction may begin early with the association of early atherosclerotic changes. These changes are accelerated when glycemic control is poor. The authors recommend early and close observation of children with diabetes for any alterations in cardiac and vascular endothelial function. Vitamin C supplementation may reduce the risk of complications.

  9. Spironolactone Prevents Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Uncoupling and Vascular Dysfunction Induced by β-Adrenergic Overstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Victorio, Jamaira A.; Clerici, Stefano P.; Palacios, Roberto; Alonso, María J.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Rossoni, Luciana V.

    2016-01-01

    Sustained stimulation of β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs) and activation of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system are common features of cardiovascular diseases with rising sympathetic activation, including essential hypertension, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. In this study, we investigated the role of AT1 receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the vascular alterations caused by β-AR overstimulation. β-AR overstimulation with associated cardiac hypertrophy and increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in aorta were modeled in rats by 7-day isoproterenol treatment. The increased vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine in this model was blunted by the MR antagonist spironolactone, but not by the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, despite the blunting of cardiac hypertrophy with both drugs. Spironolactone, but not losartan, restored NO bioavailability in association with lower endothelial nitric oxide synthase–derived superoxide production, increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase dimerization, and aortic HSP90 upregulation. MR genomic and nongenomic functions were activated in aortas from isoproterenol-treated rats. Isoproterenol did not modify plasma levels of MR ligands aldosterone and corticosterone but rather increased perivascular adipose tissue–derived corticosterone in association with increased expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1. The anticontractile effect of aortic perivascular adipose tissue was impaired by β-AR overstimulation and restored by MR blockade. These results suggest that activation of vascular MR signaling contributes to the vascular dysfunction induced by β-AR overstimulation associated with endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. These findings reveal an additional explanation for the protective effects of MR antagonists in cardiovascular disorders with sympathetic activation. PMID:27432866

  10. Stretching exercises enhance vascular endothelial function and improve peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kazuki; Kamiya, Kentaro; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Yokoyama, Misako; Nakamura-Ogura, Misao; Tabata, Minoru; Kamekawa, Daisuke; Akiyama, Ayako; Kato, Michitaka; Noda, Chiharu; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Masuda, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the acute effects of a single session of stretching exercises on vascular endothelial function and peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction. This study evaluated 32 patients (mean age, 66 ± 9 years) who received phase I cardiac rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction. Five types of stretching exercises were performed on the floor: wrist dorsiflexion, close-legged trunk flexion, open-legged trunk flexion, open-legged lateral trunk bending, and cross-legged trunk flexion. Each exercise entailed a 30-second stretching followed by a 30-second relaxation, and was repeated twice. Low- and high-frequency components (LF and HF) of heart rate variability (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz; HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) were analyzed, and HF and LF/HF were used as indices of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous activities, respectively. Reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) index was measured and used as a parameter for vascular endothelial function. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (tcPO2) on the right foot and chest was also measured, and the Foot-tcPO2/Chest-tcPO2 ratio was used as a parameter for peripheral circulation. The HF, RH-PAT index, and Foot-tcPO2/Chest-tcPO2 ratio were significantly higher after the exercises than before (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.05, respectively). There was no significant difference in the LF/HF ratio measured before and after stretching exercises. These findings demonstrate that stretching exercises improve vascular endothelial function and peripheral circulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  11. Higher Levels of Adiponectin in Vascular Endothelial Cells are Associated with Greater Brachial Artery Flow-mediated Dilation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Luttrell, Meredith J.; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived protein, exerts anti-atherosclerotic effects on the vascular endothelium. Recently adiponectin protein has been reported in murine vascular endothelial cells, however, whether adiponectin is present in human vascular endothelial cells remains unexplored. We sought to examine 1) adiponectin protein in vascular endothelial cells collected from older adults free of overt cardiovascular disease; 2) the relation between endothelial cell adiponectin and in vivo vascular endothelial function; and 3) the relation between endothelial cell adiponectin, circulating (plasma) adiponectin and related factors. We measured vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation using ultrasonography), vascular endothelial cell adiponectin (biopsy coupled with quantitative immunofluorescence) and circulating adiponectin (Mercodia, ELISA) in older, sedentary, non-smoking, men and women (55 – 79 years). We found that higher endothelial cell adiponectin was related with greater flow-mediated dilation (r=0.43, P<0.05) and greater flow-mediated dilation normalized for shear stress (r=0.56, P<0.01), but was not related with vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide (r=0.04, P=0.9). Vascular endothelial cell adiponectin was not related with circulating adiponectin (r=−0.14, P=0.6). Endothelial cell and circulating adiponectin were differentially associated with adiposity, metabolic and other factors, but both were inversely associated with renal function (r=0.44 to 0.62, P ≤ 0.04). In conclusion, higher endothelial cell adiponectin levels are associated with higher vascular endothelial function, independent of circulating adiponectin levels in older adults. PMID:25572013

  12. Endothelial PPAR-γ provides vascular protection from IL-1β-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mukohda, Masashi; Stump, Madeliene; Ketsawatsomkron, Pimonrat; Hu, Chunyan; Quelle, Frederick W; Sigmund, Curt D

    2016-01-01

    Loss of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ function in the vascular endothelium enhances atherosclerosis and NF-κB target gene expression in high-fat diet-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice. The mechanisms by which endothelial PPAR-γ regulates inflammatory responses and protects against atherosclerosis remain unclear. To assess functional interactions between PPAR-γ and inflammation, we used a model of IL-1β-induced aortic dysfunction in transgenic mice with endothelium-specific overexpression of either wild-type (E-WT) or dominant negative PPAR-γ (E-V290M). IL-1β dose dependently decreased IκB-α, increased phospho-p65, and increased luciferase activity in the aorta of NF-κB-LUC transgenic mice. IL-1β also dose dependently reduced endothelial-dependent relaxation by ACh. The loss of ACh responsiveness was partially improved by pretreatment of the vessels with the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone or in E-WT. Conversely, IL-1β-induced endothelial dysfunction was worsened in the aorta from E-V290M mice. Although IL-1β increased the expression of NF-κB target genes, NF-κB p65 inhibitor did not alleviate endothelial dysfunction induced by IL-1β. Tempol, a SOD mimetic, partially restored ACh responsiveness in the IL-1β-treated aorta. Notably, tempol only modestly improved protection in the E-WT aorta but had an increased protective effect in the E-V290M aorta compared with the aorta from nontransgenic mice, suggesting that PPAR-γ-mediated protection involves antioxidant effects. IL-1β increased ROS and decreased the phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (Ser(1177))-to-endothelial nitric oxide synthase ratio in the nontransgenic aorta. These effects were completely abolished in the aorta with endothelial overexpression of WT PPAR-γ but were worsened in the aorta with E-V290M even in the absence of IL-1β. We conclude that PPAR-γ protects against IL-1β-mediated endothelial dysfunction through a reduction of oxidative stress

  13. Intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor injection in unrecognised early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kianersi, Farzan; Ghanbari, Heshmatollah; Naderi Beni, Zahra; Naderi Beni, Afsaneh

    2016-10-01

    The use of intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor medications has widened considerably to include indications affecting females of reproductive age. Our patient was inadvertently exposed to bevacizumab within the first trimester when placental growth and fetal organogenesis take place and patient suffered pregnancy loss. There is insufficient information to suggest that such use is safe, nor is there definitive evidence to suggest that it causes harm. We advise that ophthalmologists discuss pregnancy with women of childbearing age undergoing intraocular anti-VEGF injections and in pregnant woman counselling is needed to explain the potential risks and benefits. PMID:27251054

  14. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  15. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  16. CXCL12-producing vascular endothelial niches control acute T cell leukemia maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Lauren A.; Tikhonova, Anastasia N.; Hu, Hai; Trimarchi, Thomas; King, Bryan; Gong, Yixiao; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Tsirigos, Aris; Littman, Dan R.; Ferrando, Adolfo; Morrison, Sean J.; Fooksman, David R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of the microenvironment in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), or any acute leukemia, is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that T-ALL cells are in direct, stable contact with CXCL12-producing bone marrow stroma. Cxcl12 deletion from vascular endothelial, but not perivascular, cells impeded tumor growth, suggesting a vascular niche for T-ALL. Moreover, genetic targeting of CXCR4 in murine T-ALL after disease onset led to rapid, sustained disease remission, and CXCR4 antagonism suppressed human T-ALL in primary xenografts. Loss of CXCR4 targeted key T-ALL regulators, including the MYC pathway, and decreased leukemia initiating cell activity in vivo. Our data identify a T-ALL niche, and suggest targeting CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling as a powerful therapeutic approach for T-ALL. PMID:26058075

  17. Protection against vascular endothelial dysfunction by polyphenols in sea buckthorn berries in rats with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Suo, Yourui; Chen, Dongli; Tong, Li

    2016-07-19

    Chronic hyperlipemia increases the incidence of vascular endothelial dysfunction and can even induce cardiovascular disease. Sea buckthorn contains a host of bioactives such as flavonoids and polyphenols that can prevent the development of cardiovascular disease. The current study isolated active ingredients, polyphenols, from sea buckthorn berries (SVP) and orally administered SVP at a dose of 7-28 mg/kg. This treatment significantly reduced serum lipids, it enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and it decreased the level of serum TNF-α and IL-6. SVP also alleviate vascular impairment by decreasing the expression of eNOS, ICAM-1, and LOX-1 mRNA and proteins in aortas of rats with hyperlipidemia. Based on these findings, SVP has antioxidant action and it protects endothelium. PMID:27237219

  18. Local ischemia and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor following ocular dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Thayil, Seema M; Albini, Thomas A; Nazari, Hossein; Moshfeghi, Andrew A; Parel, Jean-Marie A; Rao, Narsing A; Karakousis, Petros C

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intraocular tuberculosis remains poorly understood partly due to the lack of adequate animal models that accurately simulate human disease. Using a recently developed model of ocular tuberculosis following aerosol infection of guinea pigs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we studied the microbiological, histological, and clinical features of intraocular tuberculosis infection. Viable tubercle bacilli were cultivated from all eyes by Day 56 after aerosol delivery of ∼200 bacilli to guinea pig lungs. Choroidal tuberculous granulomas showed reduced oxygen tension, as evidenced by staining with the hypoxia-specific probe pimonidazole, and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptors. Fundoscopic examination of M. tuberculosis-infected guinea pig eyes revealed altered vascular architecture and chorioretinal hemorrhage by Day 56 after infection. This model may be useful in further elucidating the pathogenesis of ocular tuberculosis, as well as in developing tools for diagnosis and assessment of antituberculosis treatment responses in the eye.

  19. A new strategy of promoting vascularization of skin substitutes by capturing endothelial progenitor cells automatically.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shi-zhao; Xiao, Shi-chu; Luo, Peng-fei; Huang, Guo-feng; Li, Heng-yu; Zhu, Shi-hui; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2011-10-01

    How to promote vascularization of a skin substitute is the key to successful skin transplantation. Current methods are mainly through releasing angiogenesis-related factors (ARF) or seeding angiogenesis-related cells (ARC), but the efficacy of these methods is not satisfactory, because angiogenesis needs participation of multiple factors, extracellular matrix and related cells. The latest research has demonstrated that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) originating from bone marrow and existing in peripheral blood are the key element participating in revascularization of adult tissues. They directly participate in both stem cell vasculogenesis of ischemic tissues and local angiogenesis. We therefore hypothesize whether it is possible to construct a new skin substitute and use it to mobilize EPCs in bone marrow to peripheral circulation and capture EPCs automatically as a simple and effective method of promoting vascularization of the skin substitute for the sake of improving its post-transplant survival. PMID:21840131

  20. IL-4 Causes Hyperpermeability of Vascular Endothelial Cells through Wnt5A Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Skaria, Tom; Burgener, Julia; Bachli, Esther; Schoedon, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular leakage due to endothelial barrier dysfunction is a prominent feature of T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine mediated allergic inflammation. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a potent Th2 cytokine, known to impair the barrier function of endothelial cells. However, the effectors mediating IL-4 induced cytoskeleton remodeling and consequent endothelial barrier dysfunction remain poorly defined. Here we have used whole genome transcriptome profiling and gene ontology analyses to identify the genes and processes regulated by IL-4 signaling in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). The study revealed Wnt5A as an effector that can mediate actin cytoskeleton remodeling in IL-4 activated HCAEC through the regulation of LIM kinase (LIMK) and Cofilin (CFL). Following IL-4 treatment, LIMK and CFL were phosphorylated, thereby indicating the possibility of actin stress fiber formation. Imaging of actin showed the formation of stress fibers in IL-4 treated live HCAEC. Stress fiber formation was notably decreased in the presence of Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1). Non-invasive impedance measurements demonstrated that IL-4 increased the permeability and impaired the barrier function of HCAEC monolayers. Silencing Wnt5A significantly reduced permeability and improved the barrier function of HCAEC monolayers upon IL-4 treatment. Our study identifies Wnt5A as a novel marker of IL-4 activated vascular endothelium and demonstrates a critical role for Wnt5A in mediating IL-4 induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Wnt5A could be a potential therapeutic target for reducing microvascular leakage and edema formation in Th2 driven inflammatory diseases. PMID:27214384

  1. Angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction is temporally linked with increases in interleukin-6 and vascular macrophage accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Gomolak, Jessica R.; Didion, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is associated with vascular hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction and activation of a number of inflammatory molecules, however the linear events involved in the development of hypertension and endothelial dysfunction produced in response to Ang II are not well defined. The goal of this study was to examine the dose- and temporal-dependent development of endothelial dysfunction in response to Ang II. Blood pressure and responses of carotid arteries were examined in control (C57Bl/6) mice and in mice infused with 50, 100, 200, 400, or 1000 ng/kg/min Ang II for either 14 or 28 Days. Infusion of Ang II was associated with graded and marked increases in systolic blood pressure and plasma Ang II concentrations. While low doses of Ang II (i.e., 50 and 100 ng/kg/min) had little to no effect on blood pressure or endothelial function, high doses of Ang II (e.g., 1000 ng/kg/min) were associated with large increases in arterial pressure and marked impairment of endothelial function. In contrast, intermediate doses of Ang II (200 and 400 ng/kg/min) while initially having no effect on systolic blood pressure were associated with significant increases in pressure over time. Despite increasing blood pressure, 200 ng/kg/min had no effect on endothelial function, whereas 400 ng/kg/min produced modest impairment on Day 14 and marked impairment of endothelial function on Day 28. The degree of endothelial dysfunction produced by 400 and 1000 ng/kg/min Ang II was reflective of parallel increases in plasma IL-6 levels and vascular macrophage content, suggesting that increases in arterial blood pressure precede the development of endothelial dysfunction. These findings are important as they demonstrate that along with increases in arterial pressure that increases in IL-6 and vascular macrophage accumulation correlate with the impairment of endothelial function produced by Ang II. PMID:25400581

  2. Long-term Successful Weight Loss Improves Vascular Endothelial Function in Severely Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bigornia, Sherman J.; Mott, Melanie M.; Hess, Donald T.; Apovian, Caroline M.; McDonnell, Marie E.; Duess, Mai-Ann; Kluge, Matthew A.; Fiscale, Antonino J.; Vita, Joseph A.; Gokce, Noyan

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Although short-term weight loss improves vascular endothelial function, longer term outcomes have not been widely investigated. We examined brachial artery endothelium-dependent vasodilation and metabolic parameters in 29 severely obese subjects who lost ≥10% body weight (age 45 ± 13 years; BMI 48 ± 9 kg/m2) at baseline and after 12 months of dietary and/or surgical intervention. We compared these parameters to 14 obese individuals (age 49 ± 11 years; BMI 39 ± 7 kg/m2) who failed to lose weight. For the entire group, mean brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was impaired at 6.7 ± 4.1%. Following sustained weight loss, FMD increased significantly from 6.8 ± 4.2 to 10.0 ± 4.7%, but remained blunted in patients without weight decline from 6.5 ± 4.0 to 5.7 ± 4.1%, P = 0.013 by ANOVA. Endothelium-independent, nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD) was unaltered. BMI fell by 13 ± 7 kg/m2 following successful weight intervention and was associated with reduced total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP). Vascular improvement correlated most strongly with glucose levels (r = −0.51, P = 0.002) and was independent of weight change. In this cohort of severely obese subjects, sustained weight loss at 1 year improved vascular function and metabolic parameters. The findings suggest that reversal of endothelial dysfunction and restoration of arterial homeostasis could potentially reduce cardiovascular risk. The results also demonstrate that metabolic changes in association with weight loss are stronger determinants of vascular phenotype than degree of weight reduction. PMID:20057371

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Picciotti, P M; Fetoni, A R; Paludetti, G; Wolf, F I; Torsello, A; Troiani, D; Ferraresi, A; Pola, R; Sergi, B

    2006-04-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss has been associated with alterations in cochlear blood flow. Our study analyzed the expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and its functional receptors, Flt-1 and Flk-1, in the cochlear structures of noise-exposed and unexposed guinea pigs. VEGF is a prototypical angiogenic agent, with multiple functions on vascular biology, ranging from vascular permeability to endothelial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Acoustic trauma was induced by a continuous pure tone of 6 kHz, at 120 dB SPL for 30 min. Auditory function was evaluated by electrocochleographic recordings at 2-20 kHz for 7 days. Noise-induced cochlear morphological changes were studied by immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The expression of VEGF and its receptors was examined by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. The hearing threshold shift reached a level of 60 dB SPL on day 1 after trauma and underwent a partial recovery over time, reaching a value of about 20 dB SPL on day 7. Outer hair cell loss was more prominent in the area located 14-16 mm from the apex. Increased cochlear VEGF expression was observed in noise-exposed animals, in particular at the level of stria vascularis, spiral ligament, and spiral ganglion cells. No changes were observed in the expression of VEGF-receptors. Our data suggest a role for VEGF in the regulation of the vascular network in the inner ear after acoustic trauma and during auditory recovery, with potentially important clinical and therapeutic implications.

  4. F-actin-rich contractile endothelial pores prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte diapedesis through local RhoA signalling.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Niels; Schimmel, Lilian; Oort, Chantal; van Rijssel, Jos; Yin, Taofei; Ma, Bin; van Unen, Jakobus; Pitter, Bettina; Huveneers, Stephan; Goedhart, Joachim; Wu, Yi; Montanez, Eloi; Woodfin, Abigail; van Buul, Jaap D

    2016-01-27

    During immune surveillance and inflammation, leukocytes exit the vasculature through transient openings in the endothelium without causing plasma leakage. However, the exact mechanisms behind this intriguing phenomenon are still unknown. Here we report that maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity during leukocyte diapedesis requires local endothelial RhoA cycling. Endothelial RhoA depletion in vitro or Rho inhibition in vivo provokes neutrophil-induced vascular leakage that manifests during the physical movement of neutrophils through the endothelial layer. Local RhoA activation initiates the formation of contractile F-actin structures that surround emigrating neutrophils. These structures that surround neutrophil-induced endothelial pores prevent plasma leakage through actomyosin-based pore confinement. Mechanistically, we found that the initiation of RhoA activity involves ICAM-1 and the Rho GEFs Ect2 and LARG. In addition, regulation of actomyosin-based endothelial pore confinement involves ROCK2b, but not ROCK1. Thus, endothelial cells assemble RhoA-controlled contractile F-actin structures around endothelial pores that prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte extravasation.

  5. F-actin-rich contractile endothelial pores prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte diapedesis through local RhoA signalling

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Niels; Schimmel, Lilian; Oort, Chantal; van Rijssel, Jos; Yin, Taofei; Ma, Bin; van Unen, Jakobus; Pitter, Bettina; Huveneers, Stephan; Goedhart, Joachim; Wu, Yi; Montanez, Eloi; Woodfin, Abigail; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2016-01-01

    During immune surveillance and inflammation, leukocytes exit the vasculature through transient openings in the endothelium without causing plasma leakage. However, the exact mechanisms behind this intriguing phenomenon are still unknown. Here we report that maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity during leukocyte diapedesis requires local endothelial RhoA cycling. Endothelial RhoA depletion in vitro or Rho inhibition in vivo provokes neutrophil-induced vascular leakage that manifests during the physical movement of neutrophils through the endothelial layer. Local RhoA activation initiates the formation of contractile F-actin structures that surround emigrating neutrophils. These structures that surround neutrophil-induced endothelial pores prevent plasma leakage through actomyosin-based pore confinement. Mechanistically, we found that the initiation of RhoA activity involves ICAM-1 and the Rho GEFs Ect2 and LARG. In addition, regulation of actomyosin-based endothelial pore confinement involves ROCK2b, but not ROCK1. Thus, endothelial cells assemble RhoA-controlled contractile F-actin structures around endothelial pores that prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte extravasation. PMID:26814335

  6. Deregulation of Flk-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 in fibroblast growth factor receptor-1-deficient vascular stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Peetra; Rolny, Charlotte; Jakobsson, Lars; Wikner, Charlotte; Wu, Yan; Hicklin, Daniel J; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2004-03-15

    We have employed embryoid bodies derived from murine embryonal stem cells to study effects on vascular development induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and FGF receptor-1, in comparison to the established angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and its receptor VEGF receptor-2. Exogenous FGF-2 promoted formation of morphologically distinct, long slender vessels in the embryoid bodies, whereas VEGF-A-treated bodies displayed a compact plexus of capillaries. FGF-2 stimulation of embryonal stem cells under conditions where VEGF-A/VEGFR-2 function was blocked, led to formation of endothelial cell clusters, which failed to develop into vessels. FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies responded to VEGF-A by establishment of the characteristic vascular plexus, but FGF-2 had no effect on vascular development in the absence of FGFR-1. The FGFR-1(-/-) embryoid bodies displayed considerably increased basal level of vessel formation, detected by immunohistochemical staining for platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)/CD31. This basal vascularization was blocked by neutralizing antibodies against VEGFR-2 or VEGF-A and biochemical analyses indicated changes in regulation of VEGFR-2 in the absence of FGFR-1 expression. We conclude that VEGF-A/VEGFR-2-dependent vessel formation occurs in the absence of FGF-2/FGFR-1, which, however, serve to modulate vascular development. PMID:15020678

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Platelet (PF-4) Factor 4 Inputs Modulate Human Microvascular Endothelial Signaling in a Three-Dimensional Matrix Migration Context*

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ta-Chun; Tedford, Nathan C.; Reddy, Raven J.; Rimchala, Tharathorn; Wells, Alan; White, Forest M.; Kamm, Roger D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of angiogenesis is under complex regulation in adult organisms, particularly as it often occurs in an inflammatory post-wound environment. As such, there are many impacting factors that will regulate the generation of new blood vessels which include not only pro-angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, but also angiostatic factors. During initial postwound hemostasis, a large initial bolus of platelet factor 4 is released into localized areas of damage before progression of wound healing toward tissue homeostasis. Because of its early presence and high concentration, the angiostatic chemokine platelet factor 4, which can induce endothelial anoikis, can strongly affect angiogenesis. In our work, we explored signaling crosstalk interactions between vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet factor 4 using phosphotyrosine-enriched mass spectrometry methods on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured under conditions facilitating migratory sprouting into collagen gel matrices. We developed new methods to enable mass spectrometry-based phosphorylation analysis of primary cells cultured on collagen gels, and quantified signaling pathways over the first 48 h of treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor in the presence or absence of platelet factor 4. By observing early and late signaling dynamics in tandem with correlation network modeling, we found that platelet factor 4 has significant crosstalk with vascular endothelial growth factor by modulating cell migration and polarization pathways, centered around P38α MAPK, Src family kinases Fyn and Lyn, along with FAK. Interestingly, we found EphA2 correlational topology to strongly involve key migration-related signaling nodes after introduction of platelet factor 4, indicating an influence of the angiostatic factor on this ambiguous but generally angiogenic signal in this complex environment. PMID:24023389

  8. Characterization of nicardipine hydrochloride-induced cell injury in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Masanori; Kawai, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Toyoda, Hiromu

    2015-02-01

    Nicardipine hydrochloride (NIC), a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocking agent, has been widely used for the treatment of hypertension. Especially, nicardipine hydrochloride injection is used as first-line therapy for emergency treatment of abnormally high blood pressure. Although NIC has an attractive pharmacological profile, one of the dose-limiting factors of NIC is severe peripheral vascular injury after intravenous injection. The goal of this study was to better understand and thereby reduce NIC-mediated vascular injury. Here, we investigated the mechanism of NIC-induced vascular injury using human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). NIC decreased cell viability and increased percent of dead cells in a dose-dependent manner (10-30 μg/mL). Although cell membrane injury was not significant over 9 hr exposure, significant changes of cell morphology and increases in vacuoles in HMVECs were observed within 30 min of NIC exposure (30 μg/mL). Autophagosome labeling with monodansylcadaverine revealed increased autophagosomes in the NIC-treated cells, whereas caspase 3/7 activity was not increased in the NIC-treated cells (30 μg/mL). Additionally, NIC-induced reduction of cell viability was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagosome formation. These findings suggest that NIC causes severe peripheral venous irritation via induction of autophagic cell death and that inhibition of autophagy could contribute to the reduction of NIC-induced vascular injury.

  9. Aldosterone-Induced Vascular Remodeling and Endothelial Dysfunction Require Functional Angiotensin Type 1a Receptors.

    PubMed

    Briet, Marie; Barhoumi, Tlili; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Coelho, Suellen C; Ouerd, Sofiane; Rautureau, Yohann; Coffman, Thomas M; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the role of angiotensin type 1a receptors (AGTR1a) in vascular injury induced by aldosterone activation of mineralocorticoid receptors in Agtr1a(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with aldosterone for 14 days while receiving 1% NaCl in drinking water. Aldosterone increased systolic blood pressure (BP) by ≈30 mm Hg in WT mice and ≈50 mm Hg in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Aldosterone induced aortic and small artery remodeling, impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in WT mice, and enhanced fibronectin and collagen deposition and vascular inflammation. None of these vascular effects were observed in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Aldosterone effects were prevented by the AGTR1 antagonist losartan in WT mice. In contrast to aldosterone, norepinephrine caused similar BP increase and mesenteric artery remodeling in WT and Agtr1a(-/-) mice. Agtr1a(-/-) mice infused with aldosterone did not increase sodium excretion in response to a sodium chloride challenge, suggesting that sodium retention could contribute to the exaggerated BP rise induced by aldosterone. Agtr1a(-/-) mice had decreased mesenteric artery expression of the calcium-activated potassium channel Kcnmb1, which may enhance myogenic tone and together with sodium retention, exacerbate BP responses to aldosterone/salt in Agtr1a(-/-) mice. We conclude that although aldosterone activation of mineralocorticoid receptors raises BP more in Agtr1a(-/-) mice, AGTR1a is required for mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation to induce vascular remodeling and inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.

  10. [The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in angiogenesis and diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Valiatti, Fabiana Borba; Crispim, Daisy; Benfica, Camila; Valiatti, Bruna Borba; Kramer, Caroline K; Canani, Luís Henrique

    2011-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a DM microvascular complication, is the leading cause of blindness. Angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in the pathogenesis of DR. VEGF-A is a potent, multifunctional cytokine that acts through the receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 expressed in the vascular endothelium and causing increased vascular permeability and neovascularization stimulation in both physiological and pathological processes. The expression of VEGFR-1 is upregulated by hypoxia and is less responsive to VEGF compared to VEGFR-2 which is the main mediator mitogenic, angiogenic, and increased vascular permeability. VEGF polymorphisms have been studied in DR susceptibility and progression. Significant association between the polymorphism 634C / G and the presence of RD is reported mainly in relation to allele C. The homozygous CC is associated to proliferative RD and to increased vitreous and serum levels of VEGF suggesting that the presence of the C allele is an independent risk factor for RD. The knowledge of VEGF lead to the development of anti-VEGF drugs (pegaptanib, ranibizumab and bevacizumab) aiming to prevent pathological neovascularization. The anti-VEGF therapy is a reality in practice medical treatment of DR. PMID:21584427

  11. Effects of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor 165 on Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Wu, Hao; E, Lingling; Wang, Dongsheng; Feng, Fukui; Dong, Yuwan; Liu, Hongchen; Wang, Lili

    2013-01-01

    To study the relationship between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and formation and repair of engineering bone, second-generation bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of New Zealand white rabbits that were separated in vitro were transfected with VEGF 165 gene vectors by adenovirus to detect gene expressions. Transfected BMSCs and β-tricalcium phosphate material were complexed and implanted at the femoral injury sites of the study group (n = 12), and the control group (n = 12) were implanted with engineering bones that were not transfected with VEGF. Femoral recoveries of the two groups were observed on the 15th, 30th, 45th and 60th days, and their vascularization and ossification statuses were observed by immunohistochemical methods. The BMSCs transfected with VEGF highly expressed VEGF genes and excreted VEGF. The two groups both experienced increased vascularization and bone volume after implantation (t = 7.92, P<0.05), and the increases of the study group were significantly higher than those of the control group (t = 6.92, P<0.05). VEGF is clinically applicable because it can accelerate the formation and repair of engineering bone by promoting vascularization and ossification. PMID:24376611

  12. Direct endothelial junction restoration results in significant tumor vascular normalization and metastasis inhibition in mice

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Maharjan, Sony; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Son, Jimin; Lee, Keunho; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Rho, Seung-Sik; Ahn, Sunjoo; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels are leaky and immature, which causes inadequate blood supply to tumor tissues resulting in hypoxic microenvironment and promotes metastasis. Here we have explored tumor vessel modulating activity of Sac-1004, a recently developed molecule in our lab, which directly potentiates VE-cadherin-mediated endothelial cell junction. Sac-1004 could enhance vascular junction integrity in tumor vessels and thereby inhibit vascular leakage and enhance vascular perfusion. Improved perfusion enabled Sac-1004 to have synergistic anti-tumor effect on cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. Interestingly, characteristics of normalized blood vessels namely reduced hypoxia, improved pericyte coverage and decreased basement membrane thickness were readily observed in tumors treated with Sac-1004. Remarkably, Sac-1004 was also able to inhibit lung and lymph node metastasis in MMTV and B16BL6 tumor models. This was in correlation with a reduction in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells with considerable diminution in expression of related transcription factors. Moreover, cancer stem cell population dropped substantially in Sac-1004 treated tumor tissues. Taken together, our results showed that direct restoration of vascular junction could be a significant strategy to induce normalization of tumor blood vessels and reduce metastasis. PMID:24811731

  13. Direct endothelial junction restoration results in significant tumor vascular normalization and metastasis inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Maharjan, Sony; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Son, Jimin; Lee, Keunho; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Rho, Seung-Sik; Ahn, Sunjoo; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-05-15

    Tumor blood vessels are leaky and immature, which causes inadequate blood supply to tumor tissues resulting in hypoxic microenvironment and promotes metastasis. Here we have explored tumor vessel modulating activity of Sac-1004, a recently developed molecule in our lab, which directly potentiates VE-cadherin-mediated endothelial cell junction. Sac-1004 could enhance vascular junction integrity in tumor vessels and thereby inhibit vascular leakage and enhance vascular perfusion. Improved perfusion enabled Sac-1004 to have synergistic anti-tumor effect on cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. Interestingly, characteristics of normalized blood vessels namely reduced hypoxia, improved pericyte coverage and decreased basement membrane thickness were readily observed in tumors treated with Sac-1004. Remarkably, Sac-1004 was also able to inhibit lung and lymph node metastasis in MMTV and B16BL6 tumor models. This was in correlation with a reduction in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells with considerable diminution in expression of related transcription factors. Moreover, cancer stem cell population dropped substantially in Sac-1004 treated tumor tissues. Taken together, our results showed that direct restoration of vascular junction could be a significant strategy to induce normalization of tumor blood vessels and reduce metastasis. PMID:24811731

  14. A high vascular count and overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor are associated with unfavourable prognosis in operated small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fontanini, G; Faviana, P; Lucchi, M; Boldrini, L; Mussi, A; Camacci, T; Mariani, M A; Angeletti, C A; Basolo, F; Pingitore, R

    2002-01-01

    It has been widely demonstrated that neo-angiogenesis and its mediators (i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor), represent useful indicators of poor prognosis in non small cell lung carcinoma. In order to verify whether neovascularization and vascular endothelial growth factor may be considered useful markers of clinical outcome also in the small cell lung cancer subgroup, we retrospectively investigated a series of 75 patients with small cell lung carcinoma treated by surgery between 1980 and 1990. Immunohistochemically-detected microvessels and vascular endothelial growth factor expressing cells were significantly associated with poor prognosis, as well as with nodal status and pathological stage. In fact, patients whose tumours had vascular count and vascular endothelial growth factor expression higher than median value of the entire series (59 vessels per 0.74 mm2 and 50% of positive cells, respectively), showed a shorter overall and disease-free survival (P=0.001, P=0.001; P=0.008, P=0.03). Moreover, the presence of hilar and/or mediastinal nodal metastasis and advanced stage significantly affected overall and disease-free interval (P=0.00009, P=0.00001; P=0.0001, P=0.00001). At multivariate analysis, only vascular endothelial growth factor expression retained its influence on overall survival (P=0.001), suggesting that angiogenic phenomenon may have an important role in the clinical behaviour of this lung cancer subgroup. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 558–563. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600130 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11870537

  15. Anti-TNF-α Activity of Portulaca oleracea in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, An Sook; Kim, Jin Sook; Lee, Yun Jung; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, a main complication of diabetes. The present study investigated whether an aqueous extract of Portulaca oleracea (AP) prevents the TNF-α-induced vascular inflammatory process in the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC). The stimulation of TNF-α induced overexpression of adhesion molecules affects vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 and E-selectin for example. However, AP significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced over-expression of these adhesion molecules in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, pretreatment with AP dose-dependently reduced an increase of the adhesion of HL-60 cells to TNF-α-induced HUVEC. Furthermore, we observed that stimulation of TNF-α significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, pretreatment with AP markedly blocked TNF-α-induced ROS production in a dose-dependent manner. The western blot and immunofluorescence analysis showed that AP inhibited the translocation of p65 NF-κB to the nucleus. In addition, AP suppressed the TNF-α-induced degradation of IκB-α and attenuated the TNF-α-induced NF-κB binding. AP also effectively reduced TNF-α-induced mRNA expressions of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and interleukin (IL)-8 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, AP prevents the vascular inflammatory process through the inhibition of intracellular ROS production and NF-κB activation as well as the reduction of adhesion molecule expression in TNF-α-induced HUVEC. These results suggested that AP might have a potential therapeutic effect by inhibiting the vascular inflammation process in vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. PMID:22754320

  16. TRAF6 inhibits proangiogenic signals in endothelial cells and regulates the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Sarah; Datta, Dipak; Flaxenburg, Jesse A.; Pal, Soumitro; Briscoe, David M.

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-receptor associated factors (TRAFs) function in the angiogenesis response. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 regulates basal and inducible expression of VEGF in endothelial cells (EC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 is an endogenous inhibitor of EC proliferation and migration in EC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRAF6 inhibits VEGF expression in part via its ability to regulate Src signaling. -- Abstract: TNF-family molecules induce the expression Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in endothelial cells (EC) and elicit signaling responses that result in angiogenesis. However, the role of TNF-receptor associated factors (TRAFs) as upstream regulators of VEGF expression or as mediators of angiogenesis is not known. In this study, HUVEC were cotransfected with a full-length VEGF promoter-luciferase construct and siRNAs to TRAF 1, -2, -3, -5, -6, and promoter activity was measured. Paradoxically, rather than inhibiting VEGF expression, we found that knockdown of TRAF6 resulted in a 4-6-fold increase in basal VEGF promoter activity compared to control siRNA-transfected EC (P < 0.0001). In addition, knockdown of TRAF 1, -2, -3 or -5 resulted in a slight increase or no change in VEGF promoter activation. Using [{sup 3}H]thymidine incorporation assays as well as the in vitro wound healing assay, we also found that basal rates of EC proliferation and migration were increased following TRAF6 knockdown; and this response was inhibited by the addition of a blocking anti-VEGF antibody into cell cultures. Using a limited protein array to gain insight into TRAF6-dependent intermediary signaling responses, we observed that TRAF6 knockdown resulted in an increase in the activity of Src family kinases. In addition, we found that treatment with AZD-0530, a pharmacological Src inhibitor, reduced the regulatory effect of TRAF6 knockdown on VEGF promoter activity. Collectively, these findings define a novel pro-angiogenic signaling

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Semaphorin Induce Neuropilin-1 Endocytosis via Separate Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Salikhova, Anna; Wang, Ling; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Liu, Miaoliang; Simons, Michael; Leenders, William P. J.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Horowitz, Arie

    2009-01-01

    The neuropilin (Nrp)1 receptor is essential for both nervous and vascular system development. Nrp1 is unusually versatile, because it transmits both chemoattractive and repulsive signals in response to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and class 3 semaphorins, respectively. Both Nrp1 and VEGF receptor 2 undergo ligand-dependent endocytosis. We sought to establish the endocytic pathway of Nrp1 and to determine whether uptake is required for its signaling. Whereas Nrp1 underwent clathrin-dependent endocytosis in response to VEGFA165 treatment, semaphorin 3C (sema3C) induced lipid raft–dependent endocytosis. The myosin VI PDZ (postsynaptic density 95, Disk large, Zona occludens-1) adaptor protein synectin was essential for Nrp1 trafficking. Sema3C failed to inhibit migration of synectin−/− endothelial cells, mirroring the lower migratory response of these cells to VEGFA165. These results show that the endocytic pathway of Nrp1 is determined by its ligand and that the trafficking of Nrp1 is essential for its signaling. PMID:18723443

  18. HMBOX1 interacts with MT2A to regulate autophagy and apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, HanLin; Su, Le; Yue, HongWei; Yin, XiaoLei; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, ShangLi; Kung, HsiangFu; Xu, ZhiGang; Miao, JunYing

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that Homeobox containing 1 (HMBOX1) was required for bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) and mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation into vascular endothelial cells (VECs). However, the function of HMBOX1 in VECs is still unknown. In this study, we found that HMBOX1 was abundantly expressed in the cytoplasm of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Knockdown of HMBOX1 induced apoptosis and inhibited autophagy. Overexpression of HMBOX1 inhibited apoptosis induced by fibroblast growth factor 2 deprivation and promoted autophagy. Metallothionein 2A (MT2A) was identified as an interaction protein with HMBOX1 by yeast two-hybrid assay, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Overexpression of HMBOX1 elevated intracellular free zinc level. Knockdown of MT2A inhibited this phenomenon. Moreover, N,N,N = ,N = -tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), a zinc chelator, reversed the anti-apoptosis and pro-autophagy effects of HMBOX1. In conclusion, HMBOX1 regulated intracellular free zinc level by interacting with MT2A to inhibit apoptosis and promote autophagy in VECs. PMID:26456220

  19. Direct binding of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor to CD44v6

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Yvonne; Koschut, David; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Dietz, Marina S.; Karathanasis, Christos; Richert, Ludovic; Wagner, Moritz G.; Mély, Yves; Heilemann, Mike; Niemann, Hartmut H.; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    CD44v6, a member of the CD44 family of transmembrane glycoproteins is a co-receptor for two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Met and VEGFR-2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2). CD44v6 is not only required for the activation of these RTKs but also for signalling. In order to understand the role of CD44v6 in Met and VEGFR-2 activation and signalling we tested whether CD44v6 binds to their ligands, HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), respectively. FACS analysis and cellular ELISA showed binding of HGF and VEGF only to cells expressing CD44v6. Direct binding of CD44v6 to HGF and VEGF was demonstrated in pull-down assays and the binding affinities were determined using MicroScale Thermophoresis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CD44v6 to HGF is in the micromolar range in contrast with the high-affinity binding measured in the case of VEGF and CD44v6, which is in the nanomolar range. These data reveal a heparan sulfate-independent direct binding of CD44v6 to the ligands of Met and VEGFR-2 and suggest different roles of CD44v6 for these RTKs. PMID:26181364

  20. Association of Chemerin and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) with Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhua; Teng, Jian; Li, Jixia; Sun, Fang; Yuan, Dong; Chang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a common complication of diabetes, caused by diabetic microvascular lesions. The pathogenesis of DN is complicated, involving genetics, physics, chemistry, and environmental factors. Chemerin is a fat cell factor that participates in regulating inflammation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes vascular endothelial cell proliferation, differentiation, and angiogenesis. The relationship role of Chemerin and VEGF in DN is not fully understood. MATERIAL AND METHODS SD rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: the control group and the DN group. Streptozotocin was used to construct the DN model. Serum creatinine (Scr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and urine microalbumin (UAlb) were detected. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to test Chemerin and VEGF mRNA and protein expression in kidney tissue. ELISA was performed to test TGF-β1, TNF-α, and INF-γ levels. The correlation of Chemerin and VEGF with renal function and inflammatory factors was analyzed. RESULTS DN group rats showed obviously increased Scr and BUN levels, and elevated TGF-β1, TNF-α, and INF-γ secretion (P<0.05). Compared with controls, Chemerin and VEGF were clearly overexpressed in the DN group (P<0.05). Chemerin and VEGF expression were positively correlated with inflammatory factors and renal function. CONCLUSIONS Chemerin and VEGF play important roles in DN by regulating inflammatory factors and renal function. They may be treated as indicators of DN. PMID:27612613

  1. AMP-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE ACTIVATION AS A STRATEGY FOR PROTECTING VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ming-Hui; Wu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in the regulation of cellular and organismal metabolism. AMPK has a heterotrimeric structure, consisting of a catalytic α-subunit and regulatory β- and γ-subunits, each of which has two or more isoforms that are differentially expressed in various tissues and that arise from distinct genes. The AMPK system acts as a sensor of cellular energy status that is conserved in all eukaryotic cells. In addition, AMPK is activated by physiological stimuli and oxidants. 2. The importance of AMPK in cardiovascular functions is best demonstrated by recent studies showing that widely used drugs, including statins, metformin and rosiglitazone, execute cardiovascular protective effects at least partly through the activation of AMPK. As a consequence, AMPK has been proposed as a candidate target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of both Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome owing to its central role in the regulation of energy balance; it may also have a role in weight control. 3. In the present brief review, we summarize the recent progress of AMPK signalling and regulation focusing on vascular endothelial cells. We further hypothesize that AMPK is a dual sensor for energy and redox status within a cell and AMPK may be a therapeutic target for protecting vascular endothelial function. PMID:18177481

  2. Association of Chemerin and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) with Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuhua; Teng, Jian; Li, Jixia; Sun, Fang; Yuan, Dong; Chang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a common complication of diabetes, caused by diabetic microvascular lesions. The pathogenesis of DN is complicated, involving genetics, physics, chemistry, and environmental factors. Chemerin is a fat cell factor that participates in regulating inflammation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes vascular endothelial cell proliferation, differentiation, and angiogenesis. The relationship role of Chemerin and VEGF in DN is not fully understood. Material/Methods SD rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: the control group and the DN group. Streptozotocin was used to construct the DN model. Serum creatinine (Scr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and urine microalbumin (UAlb) were detected. Real-time PCR and Western blot were used to test Chemerin and VEGF mRNA and protein expression in kidney tissue. ELISA was performed to test TGF-β1, TNF-α, and INF-γ levels. The correlation of Chemerin and VEGF with renal function and inflammatory factors was analyzed. Results DN group rats showed obviously increased Scr and BUN levels, and elevated TGF-β1, TNF-α, and INF-γ secretion (P<0.05). Compared with controls, Chemerin and VEGF were clearly overexpressed in the DN group (P<0.05). Chemerin and VEGF expression were positively correlated with inflammatory factors and renal function. Conclusions Chemerin and VEGF play important roles in DN by regulating inflammatory factors and renal function. They may be treated as indicators of DN. PMID:27612613

  3. Immortalized functional endothelial progenitor cell lines from umbilical cord blood for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sobhan, Praveen K; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Varghese, Saneesh; Pillai, Prakash Rajappan; Sivaraman, Divya Mundackal; James, Jackson; George, Roshin Elizabeth; Elizabeth, K E; Santhoshkumar, T R; Pillai, M Radhakrishna

    2012-11-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in multiple biological processes such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. This makes them a promising cell of choice for studying a variety of biological processes, toxicity assays, biomaterial-cell interaction studies, as well as in tissue-engineering applications. In this study, we report the generation of two clones of SV40-immortalized EPCs from umbilical cord blood. These cells retained most of the functional features of mature endothelial cells and showed no indication of senescence after repeated culture for more than 240 days. Extensive functional characterization of the immortalized cells by western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence studies substantiated that these cells retained their ability to synthesize nitric oxide, von Willebrand factor, P-Selectin etc. These cells achieved unlimited proliferation potential subsequent to inactivation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, but failed to form colonies on soft agar. We also show their enhanced growth and survival on vascular biomaterials compared to parental cultures in late population doubling. These immortalized EPCs can be used as a cellular model system for studying the biology of these cells, gene manipulation experiments, cell-biomaterial interactions, as well as a variety of tissue-engineering applications.

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  5. Prognostic value of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Mineta, H; Miura, K; Ogino, T; Takebayashi, S; Misawa, K; Ueda, Y; Suzuki, I; Dictor, M; Borg, Å; Wennerberg, J

    2000-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been identified as the substance that increases the permeability and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells. We examined the clinical significance of VEGF expression in 60 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using the methods of Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), comparatively, and analysed the relationship between VEGF status in Western blot and tumour size, lymph-node status, histologic grade and disease-free survival (DFS) rate. Western blot analysis revealed high VEGF expressors (tumour/normal tissue density ≥ 3-fold) in 26 patients (43%) and low VEGF expressors (< 3-fold) in 34 patients (57%). The results of the Western blot analysis correlated significantly with those of the RT-PCR (P= 0.00007) or immunohistochemistry (P= 0.00006). High VEGF expressors are associated with the progression of lymph-node spread (P= 0.0009), which are correlated with poor DFS. The 2-year DFS rate of high VEGF expressors (30%) was significantly lower than that of low VEGF expressors (78%) (P= 0.0008). Multivariate analysis showed VEGF expression and stage were independent predictors for the DFS (P= 0.045 and 0.041, respectively). VEGF expression may play an important role in progression of HNSCC. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952783

  6. Immortalized Functional Endothelial Progenitor Cell Lines from Umbilical Cord Blood for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sobhan, Praveen K.; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Varghese, Saneesh; Pillai, Prakash Rajappan; Sivaraman, Divya Mundackal; James, Jackson; George, Roshin Elizabeth; Elizabeth, K.E.; Pillai, M. Radhakrishna

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in multiple biological processes such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. This makes them a promising cell of choice for studying a variety of biological processes, toxicity assays, biomaterial–cell interaction studies, as well as in tissue-engineering applications. In this study, we report the generation of two clones of SV40-immortalized EPCs from umbilical cord blood. These cells retained most of the functional features of mature endothelial cells and showed no indication of senescence after repeated culture for more than 240 days. Extensive functional characterization of the immortalized cells by western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence studies substantiated that these cells retained their ability to synthesize nitric oxide, von Willebrand factor, P-Selectin etc. These cells achieved unlimited proliferation potential subsequent to inactivation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, but failed to form colonies on soft agar. We also show their enhanced growth and survival on vascular biomaterials compared to parental cultures in late population doubling. These immortalized EPCs can be used as a cellular model system for studying the biology of these cells, gene manipulation experiments, cell–biomaterial interactions, as well as a variety of tissue-engineering applications. PMID:22889128

  7. Suppression of Glioblastoma Angiogenicity and Tumorigenicity by Inhibition of Endogenous Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Huang, H.-J. Su; Nagane, Motoo; Ji, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Degui; Shih, Charles C.-Y.; Arap, Wadih; Huang, Chun-Ming; Cavenee, Webster K.

    1996-08-01

    The development of new capillary networks from the normal microvasculature of the host appears to be required for growth of solid tumors. Tumor cells influence this process by producing both inhibitors and positive effectors of angiogenesis. Among the latter, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has assumed prime candidacy as a major positive physiological effector. Here, we have directly tested this hypothesis in the brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most highly vascularized human cancers. We introduced an antisense VEGF expression construct into glioblastoma cells and found that (i) VEGF mRNA and protein levels were markedly reduced, (ii) the modified cells did not secrete sufficient factors so as to be chemoattractive for primary human microvascular endothelial cells, (iii) the modified cells were not able to sustain tumor growth in immunodeficient animals, and (iv) the density of in vivo blood vessel formation was reduced in direct relation to the reduction of VEGF secretion and tumor formation. Moreover, revertant cells that recovered the ability to secrete VEGF regained each of these tumorigenic properties. These results suggest that VEGF plays a major angiogenic role in glioblastoma.

  8. Peptide-modified zwitterionic porous hydrogels for endothelial cell and vascular engineering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Yeh; Wang, Yi-Ren; Lin, Che-Wei; Wang, Shih-Wen; Chien, Hsiu-Wen; Cheng, Nai-Chen; Tsai, Wei-Bor; Yu, Jiashing

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogels allow control of gel composition and mechanics, and permit incorporation of cells and a wide variety of molecules from nanoparticles to micromolecules. Peptide-linked hydrogels should tune the basic polymer into a more bioactive template to influence cellular activities. In this study, we first introduced the generation of 2D poly-(sulfobetaine methacrylate [SBMA]) hydrogel surfaces. By incorporating with functional peptide RGD and vascular endothelial growth factor-mimicking peptide KLTWQELYQLKYKG (QK) peptides, endothelial cells attached to the surface well and proliferated in a short-term culturing. However, the mechanical property, which plays a crucial role directing the cellular functions and supporting the structures, decreased when peptides graft onto hydrogels. Manipulating the mechanical property was thus necessary, and the most related factor was the monomer concentration. From our results, the higher amount of SBMA caused greater stiffness in hydrogels. Following the 2D surface studies, we fabricated 3D porous hydrogels for cell scaffolds by several methods. The salt/particle leaching method showed a more reliable way than gas-foaming method to fabricate homogeneous and open-interconnected pores within the hydrogel. Using the salt/particle leaching method, we can control the pore size before leaching. Morphology of endothelial cells within scaffolds was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and histological analysis was conducted in vitro and in vivo to test the biocompatibility of SB hydrogel and its potential as a therapeutic reagent for ischemic tissue repair in mice. PMID:25469315

  9. Peptide-Modified Zwitterionic Porous Hydrogels for Endothelial Cell and Vascular Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Yeh; Wang, Yi-Ren; Lin, Che-Wei; Wang, Shih-Wen; Chien, Hsiu-Wen; Cheng, Nai-Chen; Tsai, Wei-Bor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hydrogels allow control of gel composition and mechanics, and permit incorporation of cells and a wide variety of molecules from nanoparticles to micromolecules. Peptide-linked hydrogels should tune the basic polymer into a more bioactive template to influence cellular activities. In this study, we first introduced the generation of 2D poly-(sulfobetaine methacrylate [SBMA]) hydrogel surfaces. By incorporating with functional peptide RGD and vascular endothelial growth factor-mimicking peptide KLTWQELYQLKYKG (QK) peptides, endothelial cells attached to the surface well and proliferated in a short-term culturing. However, the mechanical property, which plays a crucial role directing the cellular functions and supporting the structures, decreased when peptides graft onto hydrogels. Manipulating the mechanical property was thus necessary, and the most related factor was the monomer concentration. From our results, the higher amount of SBMA caused greater stiffness in hydrogels. Following the 2D surface studies, we fabricated 3D porous hydrogels for cell scaffolds by several methods. The salt/particle leaching method showed a more reliable way than gas-foaming method to fabricate homogeneous and open-interconnected pores within the hydrogel. Using the salt/particle leaching method, we can control the pore size before leaching. Morphology of endothelial cells within scaffolds was also investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and histological analysis was conducted in vitro and in vivo to test the biocompatibility of SB hydrogel and its potential as a therapeutic reagent for ischemic tissue repair in mice. PMID:25469315

  10. Asef controls vascular endothelial permeability and barrier recovery in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinyong; Tian, Yufeng; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Meng, Fanyong; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in injured lungs may reflect a compensatory response to diminish acute lung injury (ALI). HGF-induced activation of Rac1 GTPase stimulates endothelial barrier protective mechanisms. This study tested the involvement of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in HGF-induced endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeletal dynamics and barrier protection in vitro and in a two-hit model of ALI. HGF induced membrane translocation of Asef and stimulated Asef Rac1-specific nucleotide exchange activity. Expression of constitutively activated Asef mutant mimicked HGF-induced peripheral actin cytoskeleton enhancement. In contrast, siRNA-induced Asef knockdown or expression of dominant-negative Asef attenuated HGF-induced Rac1 activation evaluated by Rac-GTP pull down and FRET assay with Rac1 biosensor. Molecular inhibition of Asef attenuated HGF-induced peripheral accumulation of cortactin, formation of lamellipodia-like structures, and enhancement of VE-cadherin adherens junctions and compromised HGF-protective effect against thrombin-induced RhoA GTPase activation, Rho-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling, and EC permeability. Intravenous HGF injection attenuated lung inflammation and vascular leak in the two-hit model of ALI induced by excessive mechanical ventilation and thrombin signaling peptide TRAP6. This effect was lost in Asef−/− mice. This study shows for the first time the role of Asef in HGF-mediated protection against endothelial hyperpermeability and lung injury. PMID:25518936

  11. Cadmium induces NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent pyroptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Lu, Yonghui; Cao, Zhengwang; Ma, Qinlong; Pi, Huifeng; Fang, Yiliang; Yu, Zhengping; Hu, Houxiang; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-03-30

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important and common environmental pollutant that has been linked to cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Increasing evidence demonstrates that Cd impairs the cardiovascular system by targeting vascular endothelial cells, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we observed that Cd treatment led to cell death and the generation of inflammatory cytokines. The Cd-induced cell death was identified as pyroptosis, a novel pro-inflammatory form of cell death depending on caspase-1 activation. In addition, exposure of HUVECs to Cd resulted in NLRP3 inflammasome activation as evidenced by cleavage of caspase-1 and downstream interleukin (IL)-1β production. Moreover, knockdown of NLRP3 by small interfering RNA efficiently suppressed Cd-induced caspase-1 cleavage, IL-1β production and pyroptosis in HUVECs. Additional experiments demonstrated that treatment with Cd significantly increased the levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and intracellular ROS in HUVECs. Accordingly, pre-treatment with mtROS scavenger or total ROS scavenger reduced Cd-induced activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and pyroptotic cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome, activated by the generation of mtROS, mediates Cd-induced pyroptosis in HUVECs. Our results provide novel insights into Cd-induced cytotoxicity and the underlying mechanism by which Cd induces endothelial injury.

  12. Endothelial cell cytotoxicity in inflammatory vascular diseases--the possible role of oxidised lipoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Blake, D R; Winyard, P; Scott, D G; Brailsford, S; Blann, A; Lunec, J

    1985-01-01

    One of the proposed mechanisms of vascular damage in connective tissue disease is the direct action of a cytotoxic serum factor inducing endothelial cell damage. The nature of this serum factor is unclear, but has been suggested to be a lipoprotein. Sera from patients with (1) systemic necrotising arteritis (polyarteritis nodosa, Wegener's granulomatosis, and necrotising arteritis associated with rheumatoid synovitis), (2) systemic or joint restricted rheumatoid disease, and (3) large vessel/giant cell arteritis have been examined for cytotoxicity to human cultured endothelial cells and azide-resistant ferroxidase-like activity (indicative of the oxidised lipoprotein content). Stored sera from patients with necrotising arteritis showed a significantly enhanced tendency to develop oxidised lipoprotein, which correlated closely with human endothelial cell cytotoxicity. Fresh sera also contained this factor, but to a lesser extent. It is argued that the cytotoxic factor detected in previous clinical studies is in part an in-vitro artefact, although its accelerated development in certain patient groups might suggest an excess of pro-oxidants that have developed in vivo. PMID:3977420

  13. Fluid shear stress modulates cell migration induced by sphingosine 1-phosphate and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shannon K; Wacker, Bradley K; Kaneda, Megan M; Elbert, Donald L

    2005-08-01

    The rational design of drug delivery systems requires the ability to predict the environment-specific responses of target cells to the delivered drug. Here we describe the in vitro effects of fluid shear stress, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) on the migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Endothelial cell migration into a scrape wound was enhanced in S1P- or VEGF-stimulated HUVEC by the addition of fluid shear stress. In both cases, scrape wound closure rates were near a maximal value that was not exceeded when cells were exposed to all three factors. We also found that cell migration into a scrape wound due to S1P stimulation was correlated with the S1P1 mRNA concentration, in systems where cell migration was not already near maximal. The present work represents our initial steps toward predicting cell migration based upon the activation state of the receptors and enzymes involved in the chemokinetic response. These results also illustrate the importance of context-dependent analysis of cell signaling cascades.

  14. Carbon black nanoparticles and vascular dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells and artery segments.

    PubMed

    Vesterdal, Lise K; Mikkelsen, Lone; Folkmann, Janne K; Sheykhzade, Majid; Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Exposure to small size particulates is regarded as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We investigated effects of exposure to nanosized carbon black (CB) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and segments of arteries from rodents. The CB exposure was associated with increased surface expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVECs at 100μg/ml. CB exposure was also associated with increased reactive oxygen species production and damage to the cell membranes in the form of increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage, whereas it did not alter the mitochondrial enzyme activity (WST-1) or the nitric oxide level in HUVECs. Incubation of aorta segments with 10μg/ml of CB increased the endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation, induced by acetylcholine, and shifted the endothelium-independent vasorelaxation, induced by sodium nitroprusside, towards a decreased sensitivity. In mesenteric arteries, the exposure to 10μg/ml was associated with a reduced pressure-diameter relationship. Incubation with 100μg/ml CB significantly decreased both acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside responses as well as decreased the receptor-dependent vasoconstriction caused by phenylephrine. In conclusion, nanosized CB exposure activates endothelial cells and generates oxidative stress, which is associated with vasomotor dysfunction.

  15. Asef controls vascular endothelial permeability and barrier recovery in the lung.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinyong; Tian, Yufeng; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Meng, Fanyong; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Birukova, Anna A

    2015-02-15

    Increased levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in injured lungs may reflect a compensatory response to diminish acute lung injury (ALI). HGF-induced activation of Rac1 GTPase stimulates endothelial barrier protective mechanisms. This study tested the involvement of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor Asef in HGF-induced endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeletal dynamics and barrier protection in vitro and in a two-hit model of ALI. HGF induced membrane translocation of Asef and stimulated Asef Rac1-specific nucleotide exchange activity. Expression of constitutively activated Asef mutant mimicked HGF-induced peripheral actin cytoskeleton enhancement. In contrast, siRNA-induced Asef knockdown or expression of dominant-negative Asef attenuated HGF-induced Rac1 activation evaluated by Rac-GTP pull down and FRET assay with Rac1 biosensor. Molecular inhibition of Asef attenuated HGF-induced peripheral accumulation of cortactin, formation of lamellipodia-like structures, and enhancement of VE-cadherin adherens junctions and compromised HGF-protective effect against thrombin-induced RhoA GTPase activation, Rho-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling, and EC permeability. Intravenous HGF injection attenuated lung inflammation and vascular leak in the two-hit model of ALI induced by excessive mechanical ventilation and thrombin signaling peptide TRAP6. This effect was lost in Asef(-/-) mice. This study shows for the first time the role of Asef in HGF-mediated protection against endothelial hyperpermeability and lung injury. PMID:25518936

  16. Magnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles induce vascular endothelial cell dysfunction and inflammation by disturbing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, XueQin; Miao, YiMing; Chen, ZhiQiang; Qiang, PengFei; Cui, LiuQing; Jing, Hongjuan; Guo, YuQi

    2016-03-01

    Despite the considerable use of magnetic ferroferric oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) worldwide, their safety is still an important topic of debate. In the present study, we detected the toxicity and biological behavior of bare-Fe3O4NPs (B-Fe3O4NPs) on human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Our results showed that B-Fe3O4NPs did not induce cell death within 24h even at concentrations up to 400 μg/ml. The level of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) were decreased after exposure to B-Fe3O4NPs, whereas the levels of proinflammatory cytokines were elevated. Importantly, B-Fe3O4NPs increased the accumulation of autophagosomes and LC3-II in HUVECs through both autophagy induction and the blockade of autophagy flux. The levels of Beclin 1 and VPS34, but not phosphorylated mTOR, were increased in the B-Fe3O4NP-treated HUVECs. Suppression of autophagy induction or stimulation of autophagy flux, at least partially, attenuated the B-Fe3O4NP-induced HUVEC dysfunction. Additionally, enhanced autophagic activity might be linked to the B-Fe3O4NP-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results demonstrated that B-Fe3O4NPs disturb the process of autophagy in HUVECs, and eventually lead to endothelial dysfunction and inflammation.

  17. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington’s epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington’s theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality. PMID:25973327

  18. Soluble Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Decoy Receptor FP3 Exerts Potent Antiangiogenic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yu, De-Chao; Lee, Jung-Sun; Yoo, Ji Young; Shin, Hyewon; Deng, Hongxin; Wei, Yuquan; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2012-01-01

    The binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to its receptors stimulates tumor growth; therefore, modulation of VEGF would be a viable approach for antiangiogenic therapy. We constructed a series of soluble decoy receptors containing different VEGF receptor 1 (FLT1) and VEGF receptor 2 (KDR) extracellular domains fused with the Fc region of human immunoglobulin (Ig) and evaluated their antiangiogenic effects and antitumor effects. Results of in vitro binding and cell proliferation assays revealed that decoy receptor FP3 had the highest affinity to VEGF-A and -B. Compared with bevacizumab, FP3 more effectively inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) migration and vessel sprouting from rat aortic rings. FP3 significantly reduced phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2, critical proteins in the VEGF-mediated survival pathway in endothelial cells. Moreover, FP3 inhibited tumor growth in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), breast cancer (MCF-7), and colorectal cancer (LoVo) tumor models, and reduced microvessel density in tumor tissues. The FP3-mediated inhibition of tumor growth was significantly higher than that of bevacizumab at the same dose. FP3 also demonstrated synergistic antitumor effects when combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Taken together, FP3 shows a high affinity for VEGF and produced antiangiogenic effects, suggesting its potential for treating angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer. PMID:22273580

  19. Inhibition of the proliferation and acceleration of migration of vascular endothelial cells by increased cysteine-rich motor neuron 1

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yukiko; Morimoto, Mayuka; Toda, Ken-ichi; Shinya, Tomohiro; Sato, Keizo; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-03

    Cysteine-rich motor neuron 1 (CRIM1) is upregulated only in extracellular matrix gels by angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It then plays a critical role in the tube formation of endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of increased CRIM1 on other endothelial functions such as proliferation and migration. Knock down of CRIM1 had no effect on VEGF-induced proliferation or migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), indicating that basal CRIM1 is not involved in the proliferation or migration of endothelial cells. Stable CRIM1-overexpressing endothelial F-2 cells, termed CR1 and CR2, were constructed, because it was difficult to prepare monolayer HUVECs that expressed high levels of CRIM1. Proliferation was reduced and migration was accelerated in both CR1 and CR2 cells, compared with normal F-2 cells. Furthermore, the transient overexpression of CRIM1 resulted in decreased proliferation and increased migration of bovine aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, neither proliferation nor migration of COS-7 cells were changed by the overexpression of CRIM1. These results demonstrate that increased CRIM1 reduces the proliferation and accelerates the migration of endothelial cells. These CRIM1 effects might contribute to tube formation of endothelial cells. CRIM1 induced by angiogenic factors may serve as a regulator in endothelial cells to switch from proliferating cells to morphological differentiation. - Highlights: • CRIM1 was upregulated only in tubular endothelial cells, but not in monolayers. • Increased CRIM1 reduced the proliferation of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 accelerated the migration of endothelial cells. • Increased CRIM1 had no effect on the proliferation or migration of COS-7 cells.

  20. Protein Kinase Cβ Phosphorylates Occludin Regulating Tight Junction Trafficking in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor–Induced Permeability In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Frey, Tiffany; Lin, Chengmao; Antonetti, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–induced breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier requires protein kinase C (PKC)β activation. However, the molecular mechanisms related to this process remain poorly understood. In this study, the role of occludin phosphorylation and ubiquitination downstream of PKCβ activation in tight junction (TJ) trafficking and endothelial permeability was investigated. Treatment of bovine retinal endothelial cells and intravitreal injection of PKCβ inhibitors as well as expression of dominant-negative kinase was used to determine the contribution of PKCβ to endothelial permeability and occludin phosphorylation at Ser490 detected with a site-specific antibody. In vitro kinase assay was used to demonstrate direct occludin phosphorylation by PKCβ. Ubiquitination was measured by immunoblotting after occludin immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopy revealed organization of TJ proteins. The results reveal that inhibition of VEGF-induced PKCβ activation blocks occludin Ser490 phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and TJ trafficking in retinal vascular endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo and prevents VEGF-stimulated vascular permeability. Occludin Ser490 is a direct target of PKCβ, and mutating Ser490 to Ala (S490A) blocks permeability downstream of PKCβ. Therefore, PKCβ activation phosphorylates occludin on Ser490, leading to ubiquitination required for VEGF-induced permeability. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism for PKCβ targeted inhibitors in regulating vascular permeability. PMID:22438576

  1. Endothelial RSPO3 Controls Vascular Stability and Pruning through Non-canonical WNT/Ca(2+)/NFAT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Beate; Korn, Claudia; Wojtarowicz, Jessica; Mogler, Carolin; Augustin, Iris; Boutros, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2016-01-11

    The WNT signaling enhancer R-spondin3 (RSPO3) is prominently expressed in the vasculature. Correspondingly, embryonic lethality of Rspo3-deficient mice is caused by vessel remodeling defects. Yet the mechanisms underlying vascular RSPO3 function remain elusive. Inducible endothelial Rspo3 deletion (Rspo3-iECKO) resulted in perturbed developmental and tumor vascular remodeling. Endothelial cell apoptosis and vascular pruning led to reduced microvessel density in Rspo3-iECKO mice. Rspo3-iECKO mice strikingly phenocopied the non-canonical WNT signaling-induced vascular defects of mice deleted for the WNT secretion factor Evi/Wls. An endothelial screen for RSPO3 and EVI/WLS co-regulated genes identified Rnf213, Usp18, and Trim30α. RNF213 targets filamin A and NFAT1 for proteasomal degradation attenuating non-canonical WNT/Ca(2+) signaling. Likewise, USP18 and TRIM5α inhibited NFAT1 activation. Consequently, NFAT protein levels were decreased in endothelial cells of Rspo3-iECKO mice and pharmacological NFAT inhibition phenocopied Rspo3-iECKO mice. The data identify endothelial RSPO3-driven non-canonical WNT/Ca(2+)/NFAT signaling as a critical maintenance pathway of the remodeling vasculature.

  2. ACTIVATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE AND HEME OXYGENASE-1 EXPRESSION BY ELECTROPHILIC NITRO-FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Rudolph, Volker; Cole, Marsha P.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Batthyany, Carlos; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species mediate a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction, with secondary oxidized and nitrated byproducts of these reactions contributing to the pathogenesis of numerous vascular diseases. While oxidized lipids and lipoproteins exacerbate inflammatory reactions in the vasculature, in stark contrast the nitration of polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex lipids yield electrophilic products that exhibit pluripotent anti-inflammatory signaling capabilities acting via both cGMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Herein we report that nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) treatment increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in the vasculature, thus transducing vascular protective effects associated with enhanced NO production. Administration of OA-NO2 via osmotic pump results in a significant increase in eNOS and HO-1 mRNA in mouse aortas. Moreover, HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that NO2-FAs are rapidly metabolized in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and treatment with NO2-FAs stimulated the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179. These post-translational modifications of eNOS, in concert with elevated eNOS gene expression, contributed to an increase in endothelial NO production. In aggregate, OA-NO2-induced eNOS and HO-1 expression by vascular cells can induce beneficial effects on endothelial function and provide a new strategy for treating various vascular inflammatory and hypertensive disorders. PMID:19857569

  3. The inhibitory effect of simvastatin and aspirin on histamine responsiveness in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Absi, Mais; Bruce, Jason I; Ward, Donald T

    2014-04-01

    Statins and aspirin deliver well-established cardiovascular benefits resulting in their increased use as combined polypills to decrease risk of stroke and heart disease. However, the direct endothelial effect of combined statin/aspirin cotreatment remains unclear. Histamine is an inflammatory mediator that increases vascular permeability, and so we examined the effect of treating human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) for 24 h with 1 μM simvastatin and 100 μM aspirin on histamine responsiveness. Subsequent histamine (1 μM) challenge increased intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)i) concentration, an effect that was significantly inhibited by combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment but not when then the compounds were given separately, even at 10-fold higher concentrations. In contrast, the Ca(2+)i mobilization response to ATP challenge (10 μM) was not inhibited by combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment. The H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine significantly inhibited both histamine-induced Ca(2+)i mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, whereas ranitidine (H2 receptor antagonist) was without effect. However, combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment failed to decrease H1 receptor protein expression ruling out receptor downregulation as the mechanism of action. Histamine-induced ERK activation was also inhibited by atorvastatin pretreatment, while simvastatin further inhibited histamine-induced vascular endothelial cadherin phosphorylation as well as altered HUVEC morphology and inhibited actin polymerization. Therefore, in addition to the known therapeutic benefits of statins and aspirin, here we provide initial cellular evidence that combined statin/aspirin treatment inhibits histamine responsiveness in HUVECs.

  4. Role of retinal vascular endothelial cells in development of CMV retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, N A; Zhang, J; Ishimoto, S

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis is known to occur in association with retinal microangiopathy in individuals with marked immunodeficiency, glial cells are believed to be the initial target cells in the development of retinitis. Moreover, it has been hypothesized that CMV gains access to the retinal glia because of altered vascular permeability. In an attempt to address the hypothesis, we studied 30 autopsy eyes of AIDS patients with systemic CMV infection, with or without clinically apparent CMV retinitis. METHODS: The autopsy eyes were processed in three ways. First, dual immunohistochemical studies were done by using anti-CMV antibodies for immediate early, early, and late antigens. The retinal cell types infected with the virus were then determined by using anti-GFAP, anti-VonWillebrand's factor, neuronal specific enolase, and leukocyte marker CD68. Second, selected eyes were processed for in situ hybridization with DNA probe specific to CMV. Third, an eye with clinically apparent CMV retinitis was submitted for electron microscopic examination. RESULTS: At the site of retinal necrosis in those eyes with a clinical diagnosis of CMV retinitis, the immunohistochemical, in situ hybridization, and ultrastructural examinations revealed that CMV was present primarily in the Müller cells and in perivascular glial cells. Adjacent to these infected cells, focal areas of positive staining for CMV antigen were seen in the glial cells, neuronal cells, and retinal pigment epithelial cells. At these sites most of the retinal capillaries were devoid of endothelial cells. Few vessels located at the advancing margin of retinal necrosis showed the presence of viral proteins in the endothelial cells. CONCLUSIONS: The present results indicate that retinal vascular endothelial cells could be the initial target in the development of viral retinitis, with subsequent spread of the infection to perivascular glia, Müller cells, and other retinal cells, including the

  5. Provocation of pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in rabbits by human recombinant interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Yoneda, K; Cohen, D A; McClain, C J

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied the effects of human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) or rIL-1 alpha on circulating granulocytes, their sequestration within the pulmonary microvasculature, pulmonary edema formation, and changes in pulmonary vascular permeability to 125I-labeled albumin. rIL-1 beta administration induced significant (P less than 0.03) but transient granulocytopenia followed by significant (P less than 0.04) neutrophilia and significant (P less than 0.04) pulmonary leukostasis compared with saline-infused rabbits. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-labeled rabbit serum albumin and administered saline, rIL-1 beta, or rIL-1 alpha were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities determined. Both rIL-1 beta and rIL-1 alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios (P less than 0.025 and P less than 0.01, respectively) compared with saline controls. rIL-1 beta increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I radioactivity ratios (P less than 0.025). Electron microscopic analysis of lung sections obtained from rIL-1 beta-infused animals demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. The observation that human rIL-1 can evoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury and lung edema in rabbits supports the hypothesis that IL-1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Images PMID:3261716

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) in mechanically stimulated vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Osawa, M; Masuda, M; Harada, N; Lopes, R B; Fujiwara, K

    1997-03-01

    Fluid flow triggers signal transducing events, modulates gene expression, and remodels cytoskeletal structures in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). However, the primary steps of mechanoreception are still unknown. We have recently reported that a glycoprotein is rapidly tyrosine-phosphorylated in bovine ECs exposed to fluid flow or osmotic shock. Here were cloned a 3.4 kb cDNA encoding this protein and found that this was bovine PECAM-1. The tyrosine-phosphorylation level of PECAM-1 immunoprecipitated from mechanically stimulated bovine or human ECs increased. The PECAM-1 phosphorylation was not induced by reagents that triggered Ca2+ mobilization in ECs. An autophosphorylatable band comigrating with c-Src was co-immunoprecipitated with anti-PECAM-1, and c-Src phosphorylated and bound to a GST fusion protein containing the PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain. A spliced mRNA form lacking amino acid residues 703-721 in the cytoplasmic domain was also expressed in bovine ECs, c-Src neither phosphorylated nor bound to the fusion protein containing the spliced PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain which lacked one (Tyr 713) of the six tyrosine residues in the PECAM-1 cytoplasmic domain. These results suggest that the YSEI motif containing Tyr 713 is the Src phosphorylation/binding site. Our study is the first demonstration of inducible tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and suggests involvement of PECAM-1 and Src family kinases in the sensing/signal transduction of mechanical stimuli in ECs. PMID:9084985

  7. Angiomodulin, a marker of cancer vasculature, is upregulated by vascular endothelial growth factor and increases vascular permeability as a ligand of integrin αvβ3

    PubMed Central

    Komiya, Eriko; Sato, Hiroki; Watanabe, Naoko; Ise, Marii; Higashi, Shouichi; Miyagi, Yohei; Miyazaki, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Angiomodulin (AGM) is a member of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) superfamily and often called IGFBP-rP1 or IGFBP-7. AGM was originally identified as a tumor-derived cell adhesion factor, which was highly accumulated in blood vessels of human cancer tissues. AGM is also overexpressed in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and activates fibroblasts. However, some studies have shown tumor-suppressing activity of AGM. To understand the roles of AGM in cancer progression, we here investigated the expression of AGM in benign and invasive breast cancers and its functions in cancer vasculature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that AGM was highly expressed in cancer vasculature even in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as compared to normal vasculature, while its expression in CAFs was more prominent in invasive carcinomas than DCIS. In vitro analyses showed that AGM was strongly induced by vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) in vascular endothelial cells. Although AGM stimulated neither the growth nor migration of endothelial cells, it supported efficient adhesion of endothelial cells. Integrin αvβ3 was identified as a novel major receptor for AGM in vascular endothelial cells. AGM retracted endothelial cells by inducing actin stress fibers and loosened their VE-cadherin-mediated intercellular junction. Consequently, AGM increased vascular permeability both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, AGM and integrin αvβ3 were highly expressed and colocalized in cancer vasculature. These results suggest that AGM cooperates with VEGF to induce the aberrant functions of cancer vasculature as a ligand of integrin αvβ3. PMID:24737780

  8. AMPK activation as a strategy for reversing the endothelial lipotoxicity underlying the increased vascular risk associated with insulin resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2005-01-01

    The endotheliopathy associated with insulin resistance syndrome appears to result largely from excessive free fatty acid (FFA) exposure that boosts endothelial production of diacylglycerol, thereby activating protein kinase C. This endothelial "lipotoxicity" can be alleviated by very-low-fat diets and by appropriate weight loss. In addition, pharmacological activation of endothelial AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), as with the drug metformin, has the potential to decrease the FFA content of endothelial cells by stimulating fat oxidation; AMPK may also suppress endothelial de novo synthesis of diacylglycerol by inhibiting glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. These considerations may rationalize the superior impact of metformin therapy on the macrovascular health of diabetics. More generally, metformin - or, preferably, better tolerated activators of AMPK - may have considerable potential for promoting vascular health in the large proportion of the adult population afflicted with insulin resistance syndrome. PMID:15823720

  9. Characterization and optimization of vascular endothelial growth factor(165) (rhVEGF(165)) expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, W; Kim, S; Lee, S; Jeon, E; Lee, Y; Yun, Y R; Suh, C K; Kim, H W; Jang, J H

    2013-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors(165) (VEGF(165)) is the most potent and widely used pro-angiogenic factor. Here we determined optimal culture condition of recombinant human VEGF(165) (rhVEGF(165)) in Escherichia coli (E. coli). rhVEGF(165) expression was the highest in 0.25% of L-arabinose induction concentration, at 20 °C induction temperature, and for 5 h induction time under the control of araBAD promoter using pBADHisA vector. In biological activity test, rhVEGF(165) significantly increased the proliferative activity of CPAE cells (p<0.001) and upregulated the expressions of endothelial cell growth-related genes, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1), endothelial-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (TEK), kinase insert domain protein receptor (KDR), and tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like and EGF-like domains 1 (TIE1) in calf pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells. PMID:23108225

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 promotes the development of the lymphatic vasculature.

    PubMed

    Dellinger, Michael T; Meadows, Stryder M; Wynne, Katherine; Cleaver, Ondine; Brekken, Rolf A

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is highly expressed by lymphatic endothelial cells and has been shown to stimulate lymphangiogenesis in adult mice. However, the role VEGFR2 serves in the development of the lymphatic vascular system has not been defined. Here we use the Cre-lox system to show that the proper development of the lymphatic vasculature requires VEGFR2 expression by lymphatic endothelium. We show that Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice possess significantly fewer dermal lymphatic vessels than Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice. Although Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice exhibit lymphatic hypoplasia, the lymphatic network is functional and contains all of the key features of a normal lymphatic network (initial lymphatic vessels and valved collecting vessels surrounded by smooth muscle cells (SMCs)). We also show that Lyve-1(Cre) mice display robust Cre activity in macrophages and in blood vessels in the yolk sac, liver and lung. This activity dramatically impairs the development of blood vessels in these tissues in Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) embryos, most of which die after embryonic day14.5. Lastly, we show that inactivation of Vegfr2 in the myeloid lineage does not affect the development of the lymphatic vasculature. Therefore, the abnormal lymphatic phenotype of Lyve-1(wt/Cre);Vegfr2(flox/flox) mice is due to the deletion of Vegfr2 in the lymphatic vasculature not macrophages. Together, this work demonstrates that VEGFR2 directly promotes the expansion of the lymphatic network and further defines the molecular mechanisms controlling the development of the lymphatic vascular system.

  11. Sequestration of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Induces Late Restrictive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wieck, Minna M.; Spurrier, Ryan G.; Levin, Daniel E.; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Hiatt, Michael J.; Reddy, Raghava; Hou, Xiaogang; Navarro, Sonia; Lee, Jooeun; Lundin, Amber; Driscoll, Barbara; Grikscheit, Tracy C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome is a restrictive lung disease characterized by surfactant deficiency. Decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which demonstrates important roles in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of restrictive lung diseases. Current animal models investigating VEGF in the etiology and outcomes of RDS require premature delivery, hypoxia, anatomically or temporally limited inhibition, or other supplemental interventions. Consequently, little is known about the isolated effects of chronic VEGF inhibition, started at birth, on subsequent developing lung structure and function. Objectives To determine whether inducible, mesenchyme-specific VEGF inhibition in the neonatal mouse lung results in long-term modulation of AECII and whole lung function. Methods Triple transgenic mice expressing the soluble VEGF receptor sFlt-1 specifically in the mesenchyme (Dermo-1/rtTA/sFlt-1) were generated and compared to littermate controls at 3 months to determine the impact of neonatal downregulation of mesenchymal VEGF expression on lung structure, cell composition and function. Reduced tissue VEGF bioavailability has previously been demonstrated with this model. Measurements and Main Results Triple transgenic mice demonstrated restrictive lung pathology. No differences in gross vascular development or protein levels of vascular endothelial markers was noted, but there was a significant decrease in perivascular smooth muscle and type I collagen. Mutants had decreased expression levels of surfactant protein C and hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha without a difference in number of type II pneumocytes. Conclusions These data show that mesenchyme-specific inhibition of VEGF in neonatal mice results in late restrictive disease, making this transgenic mouse a novel model for future investigations on the consequences of neonatal RDS and potential interventions. PMID:26863115

  12. Soluble Vascular Endothelial Cadherin as a New Biomarker of Irradiation in Highly Irradiated Baboons with Bone Marrow Protection.

    PubMed

    Hérodin, Francis; Voir, Diane; Vilgrain, Isabelle; Courçon, Marie; Drouet, Michel; Boittin, François-Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Vascular endothelial cadherin is the main component of adherens junctions enabling cohesion of the endothelial monolayer in vessels. The extracellular part of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) can be cleaved, releasing soluble fragments in blood (sVE-cadherin). In some diseases with endothelial dysfunction, a correlation between increased blood sVE-cadherin levels and disease state has been proposed. Irradiation is known to induce endothelial damage, but new serum biomarkers are needed to evaluate endothelial damage after irradiation. Here, the authors investigated whether sVE-cadherin may be an interesting biomarker of irradiation in highly irradiated baboons with bone marrow protection. sVE-cadherin was detected in the plasma of young as well as old baboons. Plasma sVE-cadherin levels significantly decrease a few days after irradiation but recover in the late time after irradiation. Kinetic analysis of plasma sVE-cadherin levels suggests a correlation with white blood cell counts in both the acute phase of irradiation and during hematopoietic recovery, suggesting that plasma sVE-cadherin levels may be partly linked to the disappearance and recovery of white blood cells. Interestingly, after hematopoietic recovery was completed, sVE-cadherin levels were found to exceed control values, suggesting that plasma sVE-cadherin may represent a new biomarker of endothelial damage or neovascularization in the late time after irradiation. PMID:27115227

  13. Effects of 4-hydroxynonenal on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell redox signaling and function in health and disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Sarah J.; Cheng, Xinghua; Mann, Giovanni E.

    2013-01-01

    4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) is a lipid hydroperoxide end product formed from the oxidation of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The relative abundance of HNE within the vasculature is dependent not only on the rate of lipid peroxidation and HNE synthesis but also on the removal of HNE adducts by phase II metabolic pathways such as glutathione-S-transferases. Depending on its relative concentration, HNE can induce a range of hormetic effects in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, including kinase activation, proliferation, induction of phase II enzymes and in high doses inactivation of enzymatic processes and apoptosis. HNE also plays an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders and in utero diseases such as pre-eclampsia. This review examines the known production, metabolism and consequences of HNE synthesis within vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, highlighting alterations in mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum function and their association with various vascular pathologies. PMID:24024167

  14. Benfotiamine attenuates nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sharma, Ramica; Singh, Manjeet

    2008-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 4 weeks) and uric acid (150 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 3 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of thoracic aorta. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of nicotine and uric acid produced VED by impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine and uric acid produced oxidative stress, which was assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with benfotiamine (70 mg kg(-1)day(-1), p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1)day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) markedly prevented nicotine and uric acid-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces the oxidative stress and consequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent nicotine and uric acid-induced experimental VED. PMID:18951979

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  16. Clarification of mural cell coverage of vascular endothelial cells by live imaging of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Izumi, Nanae; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Kelsh, Robert N.; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells (MCs) consisting of vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes cover the endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate vascular stability and homeostasis. Here, we clarified the mechanism by which MCs develop and cover ECs by generating transgenic zebrafish lines that allow live imaging of MCs and by lineage tracing in vivo. To cover cranial vessels, MCs derived from either neural crest cells or mesoderm emerged around the preformed EC tubes, proliferated and migrated along EC tubes. During their migration, the MCs moved forward by extending their processes along the inter-EC junctions, suggesting a role for inter-EC junctions as a scaffold for MC migration. In the trunk vasculature, MCs derived from mesoderm covered the ventral side of the dorsal aorta (DA), but not the posterior cardinal vein. Furthermore, the MCs migrating from the DA or emerging around intersegmental vessels (ISVs) preferentially covered arterial ISVs rather than venous ISVs, indicating that MCs mostly cover arteries during vascular development. Thus, live imaging and lineage tracing enabled us to clarify precisely how MCs cover the EC tubes and to identify the origins of MCs. PMID:26952986

  17. Functions of Müller cell-derived vascular endothelial growth factor in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Zhu, Meili; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Müller cells are macroglia and play many essential roles as supporting cells in the retina. To respond to pathological changes in diabetic retinopathy (DR), a major complication in the eye of diabetic patients, retinal Müller glia produce a high level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A). As VEGF is expressed by multiple retinal cell-types and Müller glia comprise only a small portion of cells in the retina, it has been a great challenge to reveal the function of VEGF or other globally expressed proteins produced by Müller cells. With the development of conditional gene targeting tools, it is now possible to dissect the function of Müller cell-derived VEGF in vivo. By using conditional gene targeting approach, we demonstrate that Müller glia are a major source of retinal VEGF in diabetic mice and Müller cell-derived VEGF plays a significant role in the alteration of protein expression and peroxynitration, which leads to retinal inflammation, neovascularization, vascular leakage, and vascular lesion, key pathological changes in DR. Therefore, Müller glia are a potential cellular target for the treatment of DR, a leading cause of blindness. PMID:26069721

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor and dexamethasone release from nonfouling sensor coatings affect the foreign body response

    PubMed Central

    Norton, L.W.; Koschwanez, H.E.; Wisniewski, N.A.; Klitzman, B.; Reichert, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and dexamethasone (DX) release from hydrogel coatings were examined as a means to modify tissue inflammation and induce angiogenesis. Antibiofouling hydrogels for implantable glucose sensor coatings were prepared from 2-hydro-xyethyl methacrylate, N-vinyl pyrrolidinone, and polyethylene glycol. Microdialysis sampling was used to test the effect of the hydrogel coating on glucose recovery. VEGF-releasing hydrogel-coated fibers increased vascularity and inflammation in the surrounding tissue after 2 weeks of implantation compared to hydrogel-coated fibers. DX-releasing hydrogel-coated fibers reduced inflammation compared to hydrogel-coated fibers and had reduced capsule vascularity compared to VEGF-releasing hydrogel-coated fibers. Hydrogels that released both VEGF and DX simultaneously also showed reduced inflammation at 2 weeks implantation; however, no enhanced vessel formation was observed indicating that the DX diminished the VEGF effect. At 6 weeks, there were no detectable differences between drug-releasing hydrogel-coated fibers and control fibers. From this study, hydrogel drug release affected initial events of the foreign body response with DX inhibiting VEGF, but once the drug depot was exhausted these effects disappeared. PMID:17236219

  19. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  20. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  1. Clarification of mural cell coverage of vascular endothelial cells by live imaging of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ando, Koji; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Izumi, Nanae; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Fukui, Hajime; Kelsh, Robert N; Mochizuki, Naoki

    2016-04-15

    Mural cells (MCs) consisting of vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes cover the endothelial cells (ECs) to regulate vascular stability and homeostasis. Here, we clarified the mechanism by which MCs develop and cover ECs by generating transgenic zebrafish lines that allow live imaging of MCs and by lineage tracing in vivo To cover cranial vessels, MCs derived from either neural crest cells or mesoderm emerged around the preformed EC tubes, proliferated and migrated along EC tubes. During their migration, the MCs moved forward by extending their processes along the inter-EC junctions, suggesting a role for inter-EC junctions as a scaffold for MC migration. In the trunk vasculature, MCs derived from mesoderm covered the ventral side of the dorsal aorta (DA), but not the posterior cardinal vein. Furthermore, the MCs migrating from the DA or emerging around intersegmental vessels (ISVs) preferentially covered arterial ISVs rather than venous ISVs, indicating that MCs mostly cover arteries during vascular development. Thus, live imaging and lineage tracing enabled us to clarify precisely how MCs cover the EC tubes and to identify the origins of MCs.

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling regulates the segregation of artery and vein via ERK activity during vascular development

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hee; Schmitt, Christopher E.; Woolls, Melissa J.; Holland, Melinda B.; Kim, Jun-Dae; Jin, Suk-Won

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► VEGF-A signaling regulates the segregation of axial vessels. ► VEGF-A signaling is mediated by PKC and ERK in this process. ► Ectopic activation of ERK is sufficient to rescue defects in vessel segregation. -- Abstract: Segregation of two axial vessels, the dorsal aorta and caudal vein, is one of the earliest patterning events occur during development of vasculature. Despite the importance of this process and recent advances in our understanding on vascular patterning during development, molecular mechanisms that coordinate the segregation of axial vessels remain largely elusive. In this report, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor-A (Vegf-A) signaling regulates the segregation of dorsal aorta and axial vein during development. Inhibition of Vegf-A pathway components including ligand Vegf-A and its cognate receptor Kdrl, caused failure in segregation of axial vessels in zebrafish embryos. Similarly, chemical inhibition of Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (Map2k1)/Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (Erk) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3 K), which are downstream effectors of Vegf-A signaling pathway, led to the fusion of two axial vessels. Moreover, we find that restoring Erk activity by over-expression of constitutively active MEK in embryos with a reduced level of Vegf-A signaling can rescue the defects in axial vessel segregation. Taken together, our data show that segregation of axial vessels requires the function of Vegf-A signaling, and Erk may function as the major downstream effector in this process.

  3. Vascular niches: endothelial cells as tissue- and site-specific multifunctional team players in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Géraud, Cyrill; Koch, Philipp-S; Goerdt, Sergij

    2014-08-01

    The cardiovascular system is a circulatory system that transports the blood and reaches out to almost every site of the body. Endothelial cells (EC) as the innermost cell layer of blood vessels constitute a huge interface between the blood and nearly all other tissues and cells. Although blood vessels and their EC were considered as rather inert and passive conduits early in the history of vascular discoveries, progress in vascular research now suggests that EC are actively involved in a plethora of physiological or pathophysiological processes. Endothelial heterogeneity and the concept of vascular niches are in the spotlight of current research in vascular biology. Endothelial heterogeneity comprises morphologic, molecular and functional features. It allows EC to adapt to the organ- and site-specific requirements exhibited by different segments of the vascular tree. In organ-specific vascular niches, EC mutually interact with neighboring cells. EC-derived cytokines, called angiokines, acting in a paracrine (angiocrine) fashion have been shown to be decisively involved in various biological processes ranging from stem cell maintenance to organ regeneration as well as cancer progression and metastasis. In summary, EC should always be considered as teammates in the maintenance and regulation of complex multicellular network interactions in health and disease.

  4. p73 is required for endothelial cell differentiation, migration and the formation of vascular networks regulating VEGF and TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Alonso, R; Martin-Lopez, M; Gonzalez-Cano, L; Garcia, S; Castrillo, F; Diez-Prieto, I; Fernandez-Corona, A; Lorenzo-Marcos, M E; Li, X; Claesson-Welsh, L; Marques, M M; Marin, M C

    2015-01-01

    Vasculogenesis, the establishment of the vascular plexus and angiogenesis, branching of new vessels from the preexisting vasculature, involves coordinated endothelial differentiation, proliferation and migration. Disturbances in these coordinated processes may accompany diseases such as cancer. We hypothesized that the p53 family member p73, which regulates cell differentiation in several contexts, may be important in vascular development. We demonstrate that p73 deficiency perturbed vascular development in the mouse retina, decreasing vascular branching, density and stability. Furthermore, p73 deficiency could affect non endothelial cells (ECs) resulting in reduced in vivo proangiogenic milieu. Moreover, p73 functional inhibition, as well as p73 deficiency, hindered vessel sprouting, tubulogenesis and the assembly of vascular structures in mouse embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell cultures. Therefore, p73 is necessary for EC biology and vasculogenesis and, in particular, that DNp73 regulates EC migration and tube formation capacity by regulation of expression of pro-angiogenic factors such as transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factors. DNp73 expression is upregulated in the tumor environment, resulting in enhanced angiogenic potential of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Our results demonstrate, by the first time, that differential p73-isoform regulation is necessary for physiological vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and DNp73 overexpression becomes a positive advantage for tumor progression due to its pro-angiogenic capacity. PMID:25571973

  5. p73 is required for endothelial cell differentiation, migration and the formation of vascular networks regulating VEGF and TGFβ signaling.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alonso, R; Martin-Lopez, M; Gonzalez-Cano, L; Garcia, S; Castrillo, F; Diez-Prieto, I; Fernandez-Corona, A; Lorenzo-Marcos, M E; Li, X; Claesson-Welsh, L; Marques, M M; Marin, M C

    2015-08-01

    Vasculogenesis, the establishment of the vascular plexus and angiogenesis, branching of new vessels from the preexisting vasculature, involves coordinated endothelial differentiation, proliferation and migration. Disturbances in these coordinated processes may accompany diseases such as cancer. We hypothesized that the p53 family member p73, which regulates cell differentiation in several contexts, may be important in vascular development. We demonstrate that p73 deficiency perturbed vascular development in the mouse retina, decreasing vascular branching, density and stability. Furthermore, p73 deficiency could affect non endothelial cells (ECs) resulting in reduced in vivo proangiogenic milieu. Moreover, p73 functional inhibition, as well as p73 deficiency, hindered vessel sprouting, tubulogenesis and the assembly of vascular structures in mouse embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell cultures. Therefore, p73 is necessary for EC biology and vasculogenesis and, in particular, that DNp73 regulates EC migration and tube formation capacity by regulation of expression of pro-angiogenic factors such as transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factors. DNp73 expression is upregulated in the tumor environment, resulting in enhanced angiogenic potential of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Our results demonstrate, by the first time, that differential p73-isoform regulation is necessary for physiological vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and DNp73 overexpression becomes a positive advantage for tumor progression due to its pro-angiogenic capacity.

  6. Dual mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor upregulation by hypoxia in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    von Marschall, Z; Cramer, T; Hocker, M; Finkenzeller, G; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in regulation of tumour associated angiogenesis. In the current study we analysed expression of VEGF and its receptors in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigated the molecular mechanisms of VEGF regulation by hypoxia.
METHODS—VEGF, kinase domain region (KDR)/fetal liver kinase 1 (flk-1), and flt-1 expression were examined by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation in 15 human HCC tissues. Expression of VEGF and regulation by hypoxia were assessed in three human HCC cell lines using a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and a series of 5' deletion reporter gene constructs of the human VEGF promoter in transient transfection assays.
RESULTS—We observed over expression of VEGF mRNA and protein in HCC compared with cirrhosis or normal liver. Expression of VEGF in tumour cells was strongly increased in areas directly adjacent to necrotic/hypoxic regions. Both VEGF receptors were detected in vascular endothelia of HCC while only KDR/flk-1 receptors were detected in endothelial cells of cirrhotic livers. Expression of VEGF was observed in all human HCC cell lines examined. Hypoxia (1% oxygen) resulted in profound upregulation of VEGF mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, hypoxia treatment resulted in a doubling of VEGF mRNA stability. Deletion analysis of the human VEGF 5' flanking region −2018 and +50 demonstrated induction of VEGF promoter activity under hypoxic conditions which was significantly decreased following deletion of the region −1286 and −789 suggesting a substantial contribution of the −975 putative hypoxia inducible factor 1 binding site to hypoxia mediated transcriptional activation of the VEGF gene.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest hypoxia as a central stimulus of angiogenesis in human HCC through upregulation of VEGF gene expression by at least two distinct molecular mechanisms: activation of

  7. Endothelial Estrogen Receptor-α Does Not Protect Against Vascular Stiffness Induced by Western Diet in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Camila; Lastra, Guido; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I; Haertling, Dominic; DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Jia, Guanghong; Chen, Dongqing; Barron, Brady J; Garro, Mona; Padilla, Jaume; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Sowers, James R

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of a diet high in fat and refined carbohydrates (Western diet [WD]) is associated with obesity and insulin resistance, both major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In women, obesity and insulin resistance abrogate the protection against CVD likely afforded by estrogen signaling through estrogen receptor (ER)α. Indeed, WD in females results in increased vascular stiffness, which is independently associated with CVD. We tested the hypothesis that loss of ERα signaling in the endothelium exacerbates WD-induced vascular stiffening in female mice. We used a novel model of endothelial cell (EC)-specific ERα knockout (EC-ERαKO), obtained after sequential crossing of the ERα double floxed mice and VE-Cadherin Cre-recombinase mice. Ten-week-old females, EC-ERαKO and aged-matched genopairs were fed either a regular chow diet (control diet) or WD for 8 weeks. Vascular stiffness was measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity and ex vivo in aortic explants by atomic force microscopy. In addition, vascular reactivity was assessed in isolated aortic rings. Initial characterization of the model fed a control diet did not reveal changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity, aortic vasoreactivity, or vascular stiffness in the EC-ERαKO mice. Interestingly, ablation of ERα in ECs reduced WD-induced vascular stiffness and improved endothelial-dependent dilation. In the setting of a WD, endothelial ERα signaling contributes to vascular stiffening in females. The precise mechanisms underlying the detrimental effects of endothelial ERα in the setting of a WD remain to be elucidated. PMID:26872089

  8. Endothelial Estrogen Receptor-α Does Not Protect Against Vascular Stiffness Induced by Western Diet in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Camila; Lastra, Guido; Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I; Haertling, Dominic; DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Jia, Guanghong; Chen, Dongqing; Barron, Brady J; Garro, Mona; Padilla, Jaume; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A; Sowers, James R

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of a diet high in fat and refined carbohydrates (Western diet [WD]) is associated with obesity and insulin resistance, both major risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In women, obesity and insulin resistance abrogate the protection against CVD likely afforded by estrogen signaling through estrogen receptor (ER)α. Indeed, WD in females results in increased vascular stiffness, which is independently associated with CVD. We tested the hypothesis that loss of ERα signaling in the endothelium exacerbates WD-induced vascular stiffening in female mice. We used a novel model of endothelial cell (EC)-specific ERα knockout (EC-ERαKO), obtained after sequential crossing of the ERα double floxed mice and VE-Cadherin Cre-recombinase mice. Ten-week-old females, EC-ERαKO and aged-matched genopairs were fed either a regular chow diet (control diet) or WD for 8 weeks. Vascular stiffness was measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity and ex vivo in aortic explants by atomic force microscopy. In addition, vascular reactivity was assessed in isolated aortic rings. Initial characterization of the model fed a control diet did not reveal changes in whole-body insulin sensitivity, aortic vasoreactivity, or vascular stiffness in the EC-ERαKO mice. Interestingly, ablation of ERα in ECs reduced WD-induced vascular stiffness and improved endothelial-dependent dilation. In the setting of a WD, endothelial ERα signaling contributes to vascular stiffening in females. The precise mechanisms underlying the detrimental effects of endothelial ERα in the setting of a WD remain to be elucidated.

  9. Effect of rosiglitazone in sodium arsenite-induced experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tajpreet; Goel, Rajesh Kumar; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2010-04-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma agonist in sodium arsenite-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. The rats were administered sodium arsenite (1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks) to induce VED. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. Further, the integrity of the aortic endothelium was assessed histologically using haematoxylin-eosin staining. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, aortic reactive oxygen species and reduced form of glutathione. The administration of sodium arsenite produced VED by impairing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, diminishing the integrity of vascular endothelium and decreasing the serum nitrite/nitrate concentration. In addition, sodium arsenite was noted to produce oxidative stress as it increased serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and aortic reactive oxygen species and consequently decreased glutathione. Treatment with rosiglitazone (3 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks and 5 mg/kg/day, p.o., 2 weeks) significantly prevented sodium arsenite-induced VED by enhancing acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation, improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the nitrite/nitrate concentration and decreasing the oxidative stress. However, the vascular protective effect of rosiglitazone was markedly abolished by co-administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N-Omega-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester (L-NAME) (25 mg/kg/day, i.p., 2 weeks). Thus, it may be concluded that rosiglitazone reduces oxidative stress, activates eNOS and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent sodium arsenite-induced VED in rats. PMID:20422371

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor and diabetes: the agonist versus antagonist paradox.

    PubMed

    Duh, E; Aiello, L P

    1999-10-01

    careful consideration of the potential risks, benefits, and interactions of the opposing regimens. Using vascular endothelial growth factor as a classic example of growth factor involvement, we discuss the current preclinical and clinical data supporting these approaches and the implications arising from the probable coexistence of these two therapeutic modalities. PMID:10512352

  11. Gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for enhanced expression and perfusion in the ischemic swine heart.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Barbara; Strange, Robert; Navare, Sagar; Stratton, Michael; Burcus, Nina; Murray, Len; Lundberg, Cathryn; Bulysheva, Anna; Li, Fanying; Heller, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia can damage heart muscle and reduce the heart's pumping efficiency. This study used an ischemic swine heart model to investigate the potential for gene electro transfer of a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for improving perfusion and, thus, for reducing cardiomyopathy following acute coronary syndrome. Plasmid expression was significantly greater in gene electro transfer treated tissue compared to injection of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Higher gene expression was also seen in ischemic versus non-ischemic groups with parameters 20 Volts (p<0.03), 40 Volts (p<0.05), and 90 Volts (p<0.05), but not with 60 Volts (p<0.09) while maintaining a pulse width of 20 milliseconds. The group with gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor had increased perfusion in the area at risk compared to control groups. Troponin and creatine kinase increased across all groups, suggesting equivalent ischemia in all groups prior to treatment. Echocardiography was used to assess ejection fraction, cardiac output, stroke volume, left ventricular end diastolic volume, and left ventricular end systolic volume. No statistically significant differences in these parameters were detected during a 2-week time period. However, directional trends of these variables were interesting and offer valuable information about the feasibility of gene electro transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic heart. The results demonstrate that gene electro transfer can be applied safely and can increase perfusion in an ischemic area. Additional study is needed to evaluate potential efficacy.

  12. RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) AND VANADIUM-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) and vanadium-induced gene expression profiles in human vascular endothelial cells.
    Srikanth S. Nadadur, Urmila P. Kodavanti, Mary Jane Selgrade and Daniel L. Costa, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, N...

  13. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN HUMAN AND RAT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) AND VANADIUM (V)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression profiles in human and rat vascular endothelial cells exposed to residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or vanadium (V).
    Srikanth S. Nadadur, Darrell W. Winsett and Daniel L. Costa, US EPA, ORD, NHEERL (ETD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch), Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

  14. Salt Sensitivity and Hypertension: A Paradigm Shift from Kidney Malfunction to Vascular Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoon Young; Park, Hyeong Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex trait determined by both genetic and environmental factors and is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence and concomitant increase in the risk for cardiovascular disease. With the recent large increase of dietary salt intake in most developed countries, the prevalence of hypertension increases tremendously which is about 30% of the world population. There is substantial evidence that suggests some people can effectively excrete high dietary salt intake without an increase in arterial BP, and another people cannot excrete effectively without an increase in arterial BP. Salt sensitivity of BP refers to the BP responses for changes in dietary salt intake to produce meaningful BP increases or decreases. The underlying mechanisms that promote salt sensitivity are complex and range from genetic to environmental influences. The phenotype of salt sensitivity is therefore heterogeneous with multiple mechanisms that potentially link high salt intake to increases in blood pressure. Moreover, excess salt intake has functional and pathological effects on the vasculature that are independent of blood pressure. Epidemiologic data demonstrate the role of high dietary salt intake in mediating cardiovascular and renal morbidity and mortality. Almost five decades ago, Guyton and Coleman proposed that whenever arterial pressure is elevated, pressure natriuresis enhances the excretion of sodium and water until blood volume is reduced sufficiently to return arterial pressure to control values. According to this hypothesis, hypertension can develop only when something impairs the excretory ability of sodium in the kidney. However, recent studies suggest that nonosmotic salt accumulation in the skin interstitium and the endothelial dysfunction which might be caused by the deterioration of vascular endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL) and the epithelial sodium channel on the endothelial luminal surface (EnNaC) also play an important role in

  15. Tumour-derived SPARC drives vascular permeability and extravasation through endothelial VCAM1 signalling to promote metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tichet, Mélanie; Prod'Homme, Virginie; Fenouille, Nina; Ambrosetti, Damien; Mallavialle, Aude; Cerezo, Michael; Ohanna, Mickaël; Audebert, Stéphane; Rocchi, Stéphane; Giacchero, Damien; Boukari, Fériel; Allegra, Maryline; Chambard, Jean-Claude; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Michiels, Jean-François; Borg, Jean-Paul; Deckert, Marcel; Tartare-Deckert, Sophie

    2015-04-30

    Disruption of the endothelial barrier by tumour-derived secreted factors is a critical step in cancer cell extravasation and metastasis. Here, by comparative proteomic analysis of melanoma secretomes, we identify the matricellular protein SPARC as a novel tumour-derived vascular permeability factor. SPARC deficiency abrogates tumour-initiated permeability of lung capillaries and prevents extravasation, whereas SPARC overexpression enhances vascular leakiness, extravasation and lung metastasis. SPARC-induced paracellular permeability is dependent on the endothelial VCAM1 receptor and p38 MAPK signalling. Blocking VCAM1 impedes melanoma-induced endothelial permeability and extravasation. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by high levels of SPARC detected in tumour from human pulmonary melanoma lesions. Our study establishes tumour-produced SPARC and VCAM1 as regulators of cancer extravasation, revealing a novel targetable interaction for prevention of metastasis.

  16. Transmural endothelialization of vascular prostheses is regulated in vitro by Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 and heparan-like molecule.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, P; Barritault, D; Caruelle, J P; Tardieu, M

    1997-10-01

    Endothelialization of vascular prostheses may result from transmural migration of endothelial cells. Angiogenesis is controlled by growth factors like Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) and regulators like heparan-like molecules. To that end, we used heparan-like molecules named RGTA for ReGeneraTing Agent. The RGTA11 used was a chemically derived dextran obtained by successive substitutions with carboxymethyl, benzylamide, and benzylamide sulfonate groups on glucose residues. This agent was further selected for its ability to bind, stabilize and protect FGF2. We defined firstly the angiogenic capability of FGF2 in combination with RGTA11 on bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) cultured on collagen I gels. Secondly, the role of FGF2 and RGTA11 in transmural endothelialization was assessed in a three-dimensional in vitro model using a polyethylene terephtalate prosthesis included in collagen gel. BAEC seeded on the external face can migrate to the luminal face of the prosthesis. Microscopic and histological evaluations were performed at 4 and 7 days. Results showed that the addition of RGTA11 alone did not promote angiogenesis while FGF2 alone did. However, RGTA11 combined with FGF2 produced a significant acceleration in angiogenesis compared to FGF2 alone. This combination magnifies and enhances the angiogenic processes leading to endothelialization of luminal face through transmural cellular migration. Our data demonstrates that in vitro transmural endothelialization of porous vascular prostheses by BAEC cultured on collagen I gels is upregulated by RGTA11 combined with FGF2. PMID:9422495

  17. The non-canonical role of vascular endothelial growth factor-C axis in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chu-An

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown in many clinical studies that the level of vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) positively correlates with lymph node metastasis. Nevertheless, beyond the canonical role of VEGF-C in stimulating lymphangiogenesis and thus promoting lymph node/distant metastasis, emerging evidence indicates that expression of VEGF-C contributes to various aspects of carcinogenicity via autocrine regulation. The newly identified functions of VEGF-C include but are not limited to proliferation, migration, invasion, and chemo-resistance. Besides tumor cell autocrine regulation, VEGF-C can also modulate the immune system such that tumor cells more easily escape immune surveillance. Therefore, understanding the functional roles and regulatory mechanisms related to the VEGF-C axis may lead to alternative strategies for cancer treatment. This mini-review will focus on summarizing recent discoveries regarding the unconventional functions of VEGF-C in cancer progression. PMID:25888649

  18. Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Connexin Gene Knockdown in Vascular Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Good, Miranda E; Begandt, Daniela; DeLalio, Leon J; Johnstone, Scott R; Isakson, Brant E

    2016-01-01

    Global knockout of vascular connexins can result in premature/neonatal death, severe developmental complications, or compensatory up-regulation of different connexin isoforms. Thus, specific connexin gene knockdown using RNAi-mediated technologies is a technique that allows investigators to efficiently monitor silencing effects of single or multiple connexin gene products. The present chapter describes the transient knockdown of connexins in vitro and ex vivo for cells of the blood vessel wall. In detail, different transfection methods for primary endothelial cells and ex vivo thoracodorsal arteries are described. Essential controls for validating transfection efficiency as well as targeted gene knockdown are explained. These protocols provide researchers with the ability to modify connexin gene expression levels in a multitude of experimental setups. PMID:27207287

  19. Acute exercise improves endothelial function despite increasing vascular resistance during stress in smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Cherie R; McCully, Kevin K; Dishman, Rod K

    2011-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of acute exercise on flow mediated dilation (FMD) and reactivity to neurovascular challenges among female smokers and nonsmokers. FMD was determined by arterial diameter, velocity, and blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography after forearm occlusion. Those measures and blood pressure and heart rate were also assessed in response to forehead cold and the Stroop Color-Word Conflict Test (CWT) before and after 30 min of rest or an acute bout of cycling exercise (∼50% VO₂ peak). Baseline FMD and stress responses were not different between smokers and nonsmokers. Compared to passive rest, exercise increased FMD and decreased arterial velocity and blood flow responses during the Stroop CWT and forehead cold in both groups. Overall, acute exercise improved endothelial function among smokers and nonsmokers despite increasing vascular resistance and reducing limb blood flow during neurovascular stress. PMID:21457274

  20. Cancer-secreted miR-105 destroys vascular endothelial barriers to promote metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiying; Fong, Miranda Y.; Min, Yongfen; Somlo, George; Liu, Liang; Palomares, Melanie R.; Yu, Yang; Chow, Amy; O’Connor, Sean Timothy Francis; Chin, Andrew R.; Yen, Yun; Wang, Yafan; Marcusson, Eric G.; Chu, Peiguo; Wu, Jun; Wu, Xiwei; Li, Arthur Xuejun; Li, Zhuo; Gao, Hanlin; Ren, Xiubao; Boldin, Mark P.; Lin, Pengnian Charles; Wang, Shizhen Emily

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer-secreted miRNAs are emerging mediators of cancer–host crosstalk. Here we show that miR-105, which is characteristically expressed and secreted by metastatic breast cancer cells, is a potent regulator of migration through targeting the tight junction protein ZO-1. In endothelial monolayers, exosome-mediated transfer of cancer-secreted miR-105 efficiently destroys tight junctions and the integrity of these natural barriers against metastasis. Overexpression of miR-105 in non-metastatic cancer cells induces metastasis and vascular permeability in distant organs, whereas inhibition of miR-105 in highly metastatic tumors alleviates these effects. MiR-105 can be detected in the circulation at the pre-metastatic stage, and its levels in the blood and tumor are associated with ZO-1 expression and metastatic progression in early-stage breast cancer. PMID:24735924

  1. Evaluation and Comparison of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression between Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dineshkumar, Thayalan; Priyadharsini, Nataraj; Gnanaselvi, U Punitha; Sathishkumar, Srinivasan; Srikanth, R P; Nagarathinam, A E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with an aggressive clinical behavior suggesting a change in its terminology from a cyst to a tumor and has now been renamed as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). The purpose of this study was to assess and compare angiogenesis in ameloblastoma and OKC. Materials and Methods: Angiogenesis was assessed by studying the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The study samples included 15 ameloblastomas and 15 KCOTs. The immunoreactivity was statistically evaluated using Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: VEGF expression was higher in ameloblastoma than KCOTs. However, a non-significant difference of VEGF expression was noted between ameloblastoma and KCOTs (P = 0.345). Conclusion: The results suggest that tumor angiogenesis may play a significant role in aggressive biologic behavior of KCOT. Thus, angiogenesis could be a potent target for developing anatiangiogenic therapeutic strategies. PMID:25709368

  2. Effects of vascular endothelial growth factor on survival of surgical flaps: a review of experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Fang, Taolin; Lineaweaver, William C; Chen, Michael B; Kisner, Carson; Zhang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Partial or complete necrosis of skin flaps remains a significant problem in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Growth factors have shown promise in improving flap survival through increased angiogenesis and blood supply to the flap. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most widely investigated and successful one. But the mechanisms of the effects are still not very clear. In the course of a series of experiments, we indicated that tissue survival of surgical flaps could be improved by both preoperative (sustained phase effect) and intraoperative (acute phase effect) application of VEGF. We reviewed both experimental and clinical investigations on the use of VEGF with surgical flaps to summarize the evidence of both phases of VEGF activity in promotion of flaps survival in detail. With the combinations of acute and sustained phases of effects, VEGF protein and gene, VEGF morphologic actions, and VEGF histochemical modulations suggest a pattern of VEGF activity that can be superimposed on classic descriptive mechanisms of tissue survival of flaps.

  3. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Delivery Systems for Cardiac Repair: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Yarza, Teresa; Formiga, Fabio R.; Tamayo, Esther; Pelacho, Beatriz; Prosper, Felipe; Blanco-Prieto, María J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and its leading role in the angiogenic process, this has been seen as a promising molecule for promoting neovascularization in the infarcted heart. However, even though several clinical trials were initiated, no therapeutic effects were observed, due in part to the short half life of this factor when administered directly to the tissue. In this context, drug delivery systems appear to offer a promising strategy to overcome limitations in clinical trials of VEGF. The aim of this paper is to review the principal drug delivery systems that have been developed to administer VEGF in cardiovascular disease. Studies published in the last 5 years are reviewed and the main features of these systems are explained. The tissue engineering concept is introduced as a therapeutic alternative that holds promise for the near future. PMID:22737191

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor-expressing neural stem cell for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Lan; Oh, Jinsoo; Yun, Yeomin; Lee, Hye Yeong; You, Youngsang; Che, Lihua; Lee, Minhyung; Kim, Keung Nyun; Ha, Yoon

    2015-05-01

    Previously, we determined that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improves the survival of neural stem cells (NSCs) transplanted into an ischemic environment and effectively enhances angiogenesis. Here, we applied NSCs expressing VEGF (SV-VEGF-NSCs) to treat neuropathic pain. In this study, our goal was to verify the therapeutic effect of SV-VEGF-NSCs by transplanting the cells in a sciatic nerve injury model. We compared the amount of VEGF secreted from DsRed-NSCs (control) or SV-VEGF-NSCs and observed that SV-VEGF-NSCs have a much higher expression level of VEGF. We next investigated whether transplantation with SV-VEGF-NSCs aids functional recovery and pain reduction. We confirmed that transplantation with SV-VEGF-NSCs enhances functional recovery, pain reduction, and remyelination as well as the number of blood vessels compared with the control groups. Our results show that VEGF aids functional recovery and pain reduction in a sciatic nerve injury model. PMID:25793634

  5. Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B): Monoclonal antibody inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Spratlin, Jennifer

    2011-04-01

    Angiogenesis, a well-recognized characteristic of malignancy, has been exploited more than any other pathway targeted by biologic anti-neoplastic therapies. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is the critical receptor involved in malignant angiogenesis with its activation inducing a number of other cellular modifications resulting in tumor growth and metastases. Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B; ImClone Systems Corporation, Branchburg, NJ) is a fully human monoclonal antibody developed to specifically inhibit VEGFR-2. Ramucirumab is currently being investigated in multiple clinical trials across a variety of tumor types. Herein, angiogenesis inhibition in cancer is reviewed and up-to-date information on the clinical development of ramucirumab is presented.

  6. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as an Anti-angiogenic Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2012-01-01

    New blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) is fundamental to tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic dissemination. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway plays pivotal roles in regulating tumor angiogenesis. VEGF as a therapeutic target has been validated in various types of human cancers. Different agents including antibodies, aptamers, peptides, and small molecules have been extensively investigated to block VEGF and its pro-angiogenic functions. Some of these agents have been approved by FDA and some are currently in clinical trials. Combination therapies are also being pursued for better tumor control. By providing comprehensive real-time information, molecular imaging of VEGF pathway may accelerate the drug development process. Moreover, the imaging will be of great help for patient stratification and therapeutic effect monitoring, which will promote effective personalized molecular cancer therapy. This review summarizes the current status of tumor therapeutic agents targeting to VEGF and the applications of VEGF related molecular imaging. PMID:20426765

  7. Endophthalmitis Associated with Intravitreal Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Injections

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Harry W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agents has led to a dramatic increase in the number of intravitreal injections. Endophthalmitis remains a rare but potentially vision-threatening complication of intravitreal injections. Recent large series have estimated this risk to be about one in 3,000 injections or less. Bevacizumab, which is generally prepared by a compounding pharmacy, is associated with additional risks of contamination. Although endophthalmitis cannot be prevented in all cases, certain risk reduction strategies have been proposed, including the use of an eyelid speculum, povidone iodine, avoidance of needle contact with the eyelid margin or eyelashes, and avoidance of routine post-injection antibiotics. Despite these precautions, some patients will develop endophthalmitis following intravitreal anti-VEGF injections, and outcomes may be poor despite prompt and appropriate therapy. PMID:24579059

  8. Serum level of vascular endothelial growth factor decreased in chronic ketamine abusers

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ni; Zhang, Minling; Xu, Ke; Ke, Xiaoyin; Ding, Yi; Wang, Daping; Liu, Yuping; Ning, Yuping; Deng, Xuefeng; He, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the serum level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a group of chronic ketamine abusers in comparison to healthy controls. Methods Eighty-one ketamine abusers who were hospitalized for the treatment of ketamine dependence and 39 healthy controls were recruited. Serum VEGF level was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Psychopathological symptoms were assessed using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Results Serum level of VEGF was significantly lower in chronic ketamine abusers compared to healthy controls (64.6 ± 42.1 vs. 92.4 ± 59.4 pg/ml, F = 7.243, p = 0.008). Conclusions Serum level of VEGF decreased in chronic ketamine abusers compared to healthy controls. PMID:26003336

  9. Relationship between Vitreous Levels of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M.; Mohammad, Ghulam; Nawaz, Mohd. Imtiaz; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Van den Eynde, Kathleen; Mousa, Ahmed; De Hertogh, Gert; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2013-01-01

    To investigate which matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are more likely to be involved in the angiogenic process in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), we measured the levels of MMPs in the vitreous fluid from patients with PDR and controls and correlated these levels with the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Vitreous samples from 32 PDR and 24 nondiabetic patients were studied by mosaic multiplex MMPs enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), single ELISA, Western blot and zymography analysis. Epiretinal membranes from 11 patients with PDR were studied by immunohistochemistry. MMP-8 and MMP-13 were not detected. ELISA, Western blot and gelatin ymography assays revealed significant increases in the expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-9 and VEGF in vitreous samples from PDR patients compared to nondiabetic controls, whereas MMP-2 and MMP-3 were not upregulated in vitreous samples from PDR patients. Significant correlations existed between ELISA and zymography assays for the quantitation of MMP-2 (r=0.407; p=0.039) and MMP-9 (r=0.711; p<0.001). Significant correlations were observed between levels of VEGF and levels of MMP-1 (r=0.845; P<0.001) and MMP-9 (r=0.775; p<0.001), and between levels of MMP-1 and MMP-9 (r=0.857; p<0.001). In epiretinal membranes, cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for MMP-9 was present in vascular endothelial cells and stromal monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils. Our findings suggest that among the MMPs measured, MMP-1 and MMP-9 may contribute to the angiogenic switch in PDR. PMID:24392031

  10. Coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia associated with impaired vascular endothelial function in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Jokura, Hiroko; Watanabe, Isamu; Umeda, Mika; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that habitual coffee consumption lowers the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Postprandial hyperglycemia is a direct and independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We previously demonstrated that coffee polyphenol ingestion increased secretion of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which has been shown to exhibit anti-diabetic and cardiovascular effects. We hypothesized coffee polyphenol consumption may improve postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function by increasing GLP-1 release and/or reducing oxidative stress. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized, acute, crossover, intervention study in healthy male adults, measuring blood parameters and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after ingestion of a meal with or without coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). Nineteen subjects consumed a test meal with either a placebo- or CPE-containing beverage. Blood biomarkers and FMD were measured at fasting and up to 180 minutes postprandially. The CPE beverage led to a significantly lower peak postprandial increase in blood glucose and diacron-reactive oxygen metabolite, and significantly higher postprandial FMD than the placebo beverage. Postprandial blood GLP-1 increase tended to be higher after ingestion of the CPE beverage, compared with placebo. Subclass analysis revealed that the CPE beverage significantly improved postprandial blood GLP-1 response and reduced blood glucose increase in the subjects with a lower insulinogenic index. Correlation analysis showed postprandial FMD was negatively associated with blood glucose increase after ingestion of the CPE beverage. In conclusion, these results suggest that coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function, which is associated with increased GLP-1 secretion and decreased oxidative stress in healthy humans.

  11. Theiler's virus infection in nude mice: viral RNA in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1988-01-01

    Infection of athymic (nu/nu) mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in an acute encephalitis which resembles poliomyelitis. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to delineate the presence of viral proteins and RNA in the nervous systems of nude mice infected with the Daniels strain of Theiler's virus. This system permits the analysis of a viral infection in the absence of an effective immune response. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigen was found in the processes and cell bodies of neurons and glial cells. Besides the presence of viral antigen in these cell types, by in situ hybridization, Theiler's virus RNA was also found in cells associated with vascular endothelium in the brains and spinal cords of these infected mice. Theiler's virus RNA-positive endothelial cells were observed not only near the primary lesions but also away from demonstrable lesions in normal-appearing regions in the central nervous system. Earlier work had suggested an intra-axonal dissemination for this virus (M. C. Dal Canto and H. L. Lipton, Am. J. Pathol. 106:20-29, 1982). Our findings are consistent with this model but also suggest an additional mechanism for virus spread within the central nervous system, i.e., by infecting vascular cells and crossing the blood-brain barrier. Lastly, after Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection, not only glial cells but also endothelial cells express major histocompatibility complex class II (la) antigen on their surface (M. Rodriguez, M. L. Pierce, and E. A. Howie, J. Immunol. 138:3438-3442, 1987). Our demonstration of Theiler's virus-infected endotheliumlike cells may explain interactions of virus products in stimulating antigen presentation. Images PMID:2843661

  12. Theiler's virus infection in nude mice: viral RNA in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1988-10-01

    Infection of athymic (nu/nu) mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in an acute encephalitis which resembles poliomyelitis. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to delineate the presence of viral proteins and RNA in the nervous systems of nude mice infected with the Daniels strain of Theiler's virus. This system permits the analysis of a viral infection in the absence of an effective immune response. By immunohistochemistry, viral antigen was found in the processes and cell bodies of neurons and glial cells. Besides the presence of viral antigen in these cell types, by in situ hybridization, Theiler's virus RNA was also found in cells associated with vascular endothelium in the brains and spinal cords of these infected mice. Theiler's virus RNA-positive endothelial cells were observed not only near the primary lesions but also away from demonstrable lesions in normal-appearing regions in the central nervous system. Earlier work had suggested an intra-axonal dissemination for this virus (M. C. Dal Canto and H. L. Lipton, Am. J. Pathol. 106:20-29, 1982). Our findings are consistent with this model but also suggest an additional mechanism for virus spread within the central nervous system, i.e., by infecting vascular cells and crossing the blood-brain barrier. Lastly, after Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection, not only glial cells but also endothelial cells express major histocompatibility complex class II (la) antigen on their surface (M. Rodriguez, M. L. Pierce, and E. A. Howie, J. Immunol. 138:3438-3442, 1987). Our demonstration of Theiler's virus-infected endotheliumlike cells may explain interactions of virus products in stimulating antigen presentation.

  13. Association Between Peripheral Vascular Endothelial Function and Progression of Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hsiu; Su, Wei-Wen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Cheng, Shih-Tsung; Su, Cheng-Wen; Ho, Wang-Jing

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between Humphrey visual field progression and peripheral vascular endothelial function in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG), assessed by noninvasive endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).Forty OAG patients, among which 22 had normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and 18 had primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) were enrolled. Each enrolled patient underwent a thorough ophthalmological examination including the Humphrey visual field test and measurement of FMD via high-resolution 2-dimensional ultrasonographic imaging of the brachial artery. Blood samples were evaluated for biochemistry and lipid profiles as well as levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). The annual change of threshold sensitivity of the visual field in each test location were analyzed with pointwise linear regression. The correlation between long-term visual field progression and FMD was evaluated.A mean follow-up of 7.47 ± 1.84 years revealed a faster progression rate over the superior visual field in all 40 OAG patients (superior field -0.24 ± 0.67 dB/y, inferior field -0.10 ± 0.59 dB/y, P = 0.37). However, only the annual sensitivity change of the inferior peripheral field showed correlation with baseline FMD. There was no significant difference in the change slope of visual field between NTG and POAG patients.A correlation between baseline brachial artery FMD and visual field progression was observed in the inferior peripheral field in patients with NTG and POAG. This result suggests that peripheral vascular endothelial dysfunction may be related to glaucoma progression.

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A Is Associated with Chronic Mountain Sickness in the Andean Population

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Jose R.; Alvarez, Giancarlo; León-Velarde, Fabiola; Ju Preciado, Hugo F.; Macarlupu, Jose-Luis; Rivera-Ch, Maria; Rodriguez, Jorge; Favier, Judith; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Espinoza, Jose R., Giancarlo Alvarez, Fabiola León-Velarde, Hugo F. Ju Preciado, Jose-Luis Macarlupu, Maria Rivera-Ch, Jorge Rodriguez, Judith Favier, Anne-Paule Gimenez-Roqueplo, and Jean-Paul Richalet. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A is associated with chronic mountain sickness in Andean population. High Alt Med Biol. 15:146–154, 2014.—A study of chronic mountain sickness (CMS) with a candidate gene—vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA)—was carried out in a Peruvian population living at high altitude in Cerro de Pasco (4380 m). The study was performed by genotyping of 11 tag SNPs encompassing 2.2 kb of region of VEGFA gene in patients with a diagnosis of CMS (n=131; 49.1±12.7 years old) and unrelated healthy controls (n=84; 47.2±13.4 years old). The VEGFA tag SNP rs3025033 was found associated with CMS (p<0.05), individuals with AG genotype have 2.5 more risk of CMS compared to those with GG genotype (p<0.02; OR, 2.54; 95% CI: 1.10–5.88). Pairwise Fst and Nei's distance indicate genetic differentiation between Cerro de Pasco population and HapMap3 population (Fst>0.36, p<0.01), suggesting selection is operating on the VEGF gene. Our results suggest that VEGFA is associated with CMS in long-term residents at high altitude in the Peruvian Andes. PMID:24971768

  15. Serial analysis of the vascular endothelial transcriptome under static and shear stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian Jiao; Peters, David G

    2008-07-15

    We have utilized serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) to analyze the response of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) to laminar shear stress (LSS). Primary cultures of HCAECs were exposed to 15 dyn/cm(2) LSS for 24 h in a parallel plate flow chamber and compared with identical same passage cells cultured under static conditions. The expression levels of a number of functional categories of genes were reduced by shear stress including those encoding proteins involved in cell proliferation (CDC10, CDC20, CDC23, CCND1, CCNB1), angiogenesis (ANGPTL4, CTGF, CYR61, ENG, EPAS1, EGFR, LGALS3, PGK1, and SPARC), extracellular matrix and cell-matrix adhesion (EFEMP1, LOXL2, P4HB, FBN1, FN1, ITGA5, ITGAE, ITGAV, ILK, LAMR1) and ATP synthesis (ATP5G3, ATP5J2, ATP5L, ATP5D). We also observed an increase in the LSS-responsive expression of genes encoding stress response proteins, including HMOX1, which is significant since HMOX1 may have anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory vascular effects. The autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) genes PKD1 and PKD2 were also elevated by LSS. ADPKD is associated with vascular malfunction, including the impairment of vasoreactive processes. To our knowledge, this is the first SAGE-based analysis of the shear stress-responsive endothelial cell transcriptome. These immortal data provide a resource for further analyses of the molecular mechanisms underlying the biological response to LSS and contribute to the expanding collection of publicly available SAGE data. PMID:18505769

  16. Association Between Peripheral Vascular Endothelial Function and Progression of Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hsiu; Su, Wei-Wen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Cheng, Shih-Tsung; Su, Cheng-Wen; Ho, Wang-Jing

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between Humphrey visual field progression and peripheral vascular endothelial function in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG), assessed by noninvasive endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).Forty OAG patients, among which 22 had normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and 18 had primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) were enrolled. Each enrolled patient underwent a thorough ophthalmological examination including the Humphrey visual field test and measurement of FMD via high-resolution 2-dimensional ultrasonographic imaging of the brachial artery. Blood samples were evaluated for biochemistry and lipid profiles as well as levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). The annual change of threshold sensitivity of the visual field in each test location were analyzed with pointwise linear regression. The correlation between long-term visual field progression and FMD was evaluated.A mean follow-up of 7.47 ± 1.84 years revealed a faster progression rate over the superior visual field in all 40 OAG patients (superior field -0.24 ± 0.67 dB/y, inferior field -0.10 ± 0.59 dB/y, P = 0.37). However, only the annual sensitivity change of the inferior peripheral field showed correlation with baseline FMD. There was no significant difference in the change slope of visual field between NTG and POAG patients.A correlation between baseline brachial artery FMD and visual field progression was observed in the inferior peripheral field in patients with NTG and POAG. This result suggests that peripheral vascular endothelial dysfunction may be related to glaucoma progression. PMID:26962832

  17. Chronic and non-healing wounds: The story of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kehua; Ma, Yan; Brogan, Michael S

    2015-10-01

    The pathophysiology of the chronicity and non-healing status of wounds remains unknown. This paper presents the following hypothesis: abnormal patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) are the culprits of wound chronicity and non-healing. More specifically, for patients with poor circulation, the decreased VEGFR-2 level is the cause of poor wound healing; for patients with non-compromised circulation, for example, patients with concurrent chronic wounds and active autoimmune diseases, the increased VEGFR-1 level is related to the non-healing status of wounds. The hypothesis is supported by the following facts. VEGFR-1 is the main contributor for inflammation and VEGFR-2 facilitates angiogenesis; soluble VEGFR-1 (sVEGFR-1) inactivates both VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. Patients with auto-immune disease have abnormally increased VEGFR-1 and decreased sVEGFR. Wounds in patients with active autoimmune diseases have poor response to electric stimulation which facilitates chronic wound healing in patients without active autoimmune diseases via increasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. Patients with chronic wounds (including diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers) but no active autoimmune diseases have decreased VEGFR-2 levels. We thus believe that abnormal patterns of VEGFRs are the culprits of wound chronicity and non-healing. For wounds with compromised circulation, VEGFR-2 decrease contributes to its chronicity; whereas for wounds with non-compromised circulation, VEGFR-1 increase is the leading cause of the non-healing status of chronic wounds. Treatments and research in wound care should be tailored to target these changes based on circulation status of wounds. Complete elucidation of changes of VEGFRs in chronic and non-healing wounds will enhance our understandings in tissue healing and thus better our selection of appropriate treatments for chronic and non-healing wounds.

  18. Calcium regulation of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 release from cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, C; Kaji, T; Sakamoto, M; Kozuka, H; Koizumi, F

    1994-04-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) produced by vascular endothelial cells converts plasminogen to plasmin which degrades fibrin. Since t-PA activity is greatly potentiated in the presence of fibrin (1,2), the activator is implicated in intravascular fibrinolysis. On the other hand, endothelial cells also produce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (3). The inhibitor associated with vascular endothelium rapidly inhibits t-PA, while that released into the liquid phase has a little anti-activator activity (4). However, clinical studies have shown that elevation of plasma PAI-1 level is a risk factor of thrombosis (5,6). It is thus suggested that the balance between t-PA and PAI-1 is important for the regulation of fibrinolysis. The release of t-PA and PAI-1 from vascular endothelial cells is regulated by physiological factors including thrombin (3,7), histamine (8), vasoconstrictor peptide endothelins (9,10) and cytokines (11). In addition, the regulation of the t-PA release and that of the PAI-1 release are not necessarily coupled. It has been shown that activated protein kinase C and cyclic AMP are involved in the stimulation and suppression, respectively, of the endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 production (12,13). However, the role of intracellular calcium in the regulation of endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 release has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of calcium ionophore A23187 on the release of t-PA antigen (t-PA:Ag) and PAI-1 antigen (PAI-1:Ag) from cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein.

  19. Boldine Ameliorates Vascular Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction: Therapeutic Implication for Hypertension and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Yeh Siiang; Ling, Wei Chih; Murugan, Dharmani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, are a rich source of antioxidants. Boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxy-aporphine], an aporphine alkaloid, is a potent antioxidant found in the leaves and bark of the Chilean boldo tree. Boldine has been extensively reported as a potent “natural” antioxidant and possesses several health-promoting properties like anti-inflammatory, antitumor promoting, antidiabetic, and cytoprotective. Boldine exhibited significant endothelial protective effect in animal models of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. In isolated thoracic aorta of spontaneously hypertensive rats, streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, and db/db mice, repeated treatment of boldine significantly improved the attenuated acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxations. The endothelial protective role of boldine correlated with increased nitric oxide levels and reduction of vascular reactive oxygen species via inhibition of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits, p47phox and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2, and angiotensin II–induced bone morphogenetic protein-4 oxidative stress cascade with downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and bone morphogenetic protein-4 expression. Taken together, it seems that boldine may exert protective effects on the endothelium via several mechanisms, including protecting nitric oxide from degradation by reactive oxygen species as in oxidative stress–related diseases. The present review supports a complimentary therapeutic role of the phytochemical, boldine, against endothelial dysfunctions associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus by interfering with the oxidative stress–mediated signaling pathway. PMID:25469805

  20. Endothelial Mineralocorticoid Receptors Differentially Contribute to Coronary and Mesenteric Vascular Function Without Modulating Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Katelee Barrett; Bender, Shawn B; Hong, Kwangseok; Yang, Yan; Aronovitz, Mark; Jaisser, Frederic; Hill, Michael A; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2015-11-01

    Arteriolar vasoreactivity tightly regulates tissue-specific blood flow and contributes to systemic blood pressure (BP) but becomes dysfunctional in the setting of cardiovascular disease. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is known to regulate BP via the kidney and by vasoconstriction in smooth muscle cells. Although endothelial cells (EC) express MR, the contribution of EC-MR to BP and resistance vessel function remains unclear. To address this, we created a mouse with MR specifically deleted from EC (EC-MR knockout [EC-MR-KO]) but with intact leukocyte MR expression and normal renal MR function. Telemetric BP studies reveal no difference between male EC-MR-KO mice and MR-intact littermates in systolic, diastolic, circadian, or salt-sensitive BP or in the hypertensive responses to aldosterone±salt or angiotensin II±l-nitroarginine methyl ester. Vessel myography demonstrated normal vasorelaxation in mesenteric and coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice. After exposure to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation was prevented in EC-MR-KO mice in mesenteric vessels but not in coronary vessels. Mesenteric vessels from angiotensin II-exposed EC-MR-KO mice showed increased maximum responsiveness to acetylcholine when compared with MR-intact vessels, a difference that is lost with indomethacin+l-nitroarginine methyl ester pretreatment. These data support that EC-MR plays a role in regulating endothelial function in hypertension. Although there was no effect of EC-MR deletion on mesenteric vasoconstriction, coronary arterioles from EC-MR-KO mice showed decreased constriction to endothelin-1 and thromboxane agonist at baseline and also after exposure to hypertension. These data support that EC-MR participates in regulation of vasomotor function in a vascular bed-specific manner that is also modulated by risk factors, such as hypertension.

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression in ovarian serous carcinomas and its effect on tumor proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Gayatri; Crasta, Julian A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an endothelial mitogen, acts through VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) on the endothelial cells. During neoplastic transformation, it is hypothesized that the tumor expresses VEGF and also acquire VEGF receptor, enabling VEGF action in an autocrine and paracrine manner with varied effects on the tumor growth and progression. This study on ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) was done to determine the expression of VEGF and to correlate it with tumor proliferation. Material and Methods: Forty cases of OSCs were included. Immunohistochemistry was performed for VEGF and Ki-67. The VEGF slides were assigned an immunohistochemical score based on the staining intensity (a) and the percentage of tumor cells staining (b). The sum of both (a) and (b) ranged from 0-6. VEGF was considered positive when the score was more than 2. For Ki-67, maximally immunostained areas were selected; 500 cells counted and positive fraction determined. Mann Whitney test was used to determine the difference in the median value of Ki-67 between VEGF positive tumors and VEGF negative tumors. Results: Of the 40 cases, 32 cases had a VEGF score of >2 (positive) and 8 cases had VEGF score <2 (negative). The Ki-67 score ranged from 2-98%, with mean of 51%. The median Ki-67 index was much higher in VEGF positive cases as compared to VEGF negative tumors (57.5% vs. 40%). However, the difference in the two categories did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.45, Mann Whitney test). Conclusion: Ovarian serous carcinomas express VEGF in a significant number of cases (80% in the present study) although its potential mitogenic effect on tumor cells was not confirmed. PMID:24455566

  2. Olive oil compounds inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamy, Sylvie Ouanouki, Amira; Béliveau, Richard; Desrosiers, Richard R.

    2014-03-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) triggers crucial signaling processes that regulate tumor angiogenesis and, therefore, represents an attractive target for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. Several epidemiological studies have confirmed that abundant consumption of foods from plant origin is associated with reduced risk of developing cancers. In the Mediterranean basin, the consumption of extra virgin olive oil is an important constituent of the diet. Compared to other vegetable oils, the presence of several phenolic antioxidants in olive oil is believed to prevent the occurrence of a variety of pathological processes, such as cancer. While the strong antioxidant potential of these molecules is well characterized, their antiangiogenic activities remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether tyrosol (Tyr), hydroxytyrosol (HT), taxifolin (Tax), oleuropein (OL) and oleic acid (OA), five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil, can affect in vitro angiogenesis. We found that HT, Tax and OA were the most potent angiogenesis inhibitors through their inhibitory effect on specific autophosphorylation sites of VEGFR-2 (Tyr951, Tyr1059, Tyr1175 and Tyr1214) leading to the inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) signaling. Inhibition of VEGFR-2 by these olive oil compounds significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC proliferation and migration as well as their morphogenic differentiation into capillary-like tubular structures in Matrigel. Our study demonstrates that HT, Tax and OA are novel and potent inhibitors of the VEGFR-2 signaling pathway. These findings emphasize the chemopreventive properties of olive oil and highlight the importance of nutrition in cancer prevention. - Highlights: • We investigated five compounds contained in extra virgin olive oil on angiogenesis. • Hydroxytyrosol, taxifolin and oleic acid are the best angiogenesis inhibitors. • Olive oil compounds affect endothelial cell functions essential for

  3. Effect of surface chemistry on the integrin induced pathway in regulating vascular endothelial cells migration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Gao, Min; Ma, Yunlong; Yu, Hongchi; Cui, Fu-zhai; Gregersen, Hans; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2015-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is essential for reendothelialization after implantation of cardiovascular biomaterials. Reendothelialization is largely determined by surface properties of implants. In this study, surfaces modified with various chemical functional groups (CH3, NH2, COOH, OH) prepared by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used as model system. Expressions and distributions of critical proteins in the integrin-induced signaling pathway were examined to explore the mechanisms of surface chemistry regulating EC migration. The results showed that SAMs modulated cell migration were in the order CH3>NH2>OH>COOH, determined by differences in the expressions of focal adhesion components and Rho GTPases. Multiple integrin subunits showed difference in a surface chemistry-dependent manner, which induced a stepwise activation of signaling cascades associated with EC migration. This work provides a broad overview of surface chemistry regulated endothelial cell migration and establishes association among the surface chemistry, cell migration behavior and associated integrin signaling events. Understanding the relationship between these factors will help us to understand the surface/interface behavior between biomaterials and cells, reveal molecular mechanism of cells sensing surface characterization, and guide surface modification of cardiovascular implanted materials. PMID:25575348

  4. Interleukin-1beta induced vascular permeability is dependent on induction of endothelial tissue factor (TF) activity.

    PubMed

    Puhlmann, Markus; Weinreich, David M; Farma, Jeffrey M; Carroll, Nancy M; Turner, Ewa M; Alexander, H Richard

    2005-09-30

    IL-1beta is a pleotropic cytokine that may mediate increased procoagulant activity and permeability in endothelial tissue during inflammatory conditions. The procoagulant effects of IL-1beta are mediated through induction of tissue factor (TF) but its alterations on vascular permeability are not well characterized. We found that IL-1beta induced a rapid and dose-dependent increase in TF activity in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs) under routine culture conditions. However, IL-1beta caused a rapid and marked increase in permeability across confluent EC monolayers using a two-compartment in vitro model only in the presence of factor VIII-deficient plasma that was completely abrogated by neutralizing anti-TF antibody pre-treatment. In vitro permeability was associated with loss of EC surface expression of VE-cadherin and contraction of F-actin cytoskeletal elements that resulted in EC intercellular gap formation. These data demonstrate that IL-1beta induces marked changes in permeability across activated endothelium via a TF dependent mechanism and suggest that modulation of TF activity may represent a strategy to treat various acute and chronic inflammatory conditions mediated by this cytokine.

  5. On the Mechanism by Which Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate Their Oxygen Consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Emilio; Brown, Guy Charles; Foxwell, Neale; Moncada, Salvador

    1999-02-01

    Two enzymes, soluble guanylyl cyclase and cytochrome c oxidase, have been shown to be exquisitely sensitive to nitric oxide (NO) at low physiological concentrations. Activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase by endogenous NO and the consequent increase in the second messenger cyclic GMP are now known to control a variety of biological functions. Cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is inhibited by NO. However, it is not clear whether NO produced by the constitutive NO synthase interacts with cytochrome c oxidase, nor is it known what the biological consequences of such an interaction might be. We now show that NO generated by vascular endothelial cells under basal and stimulated conditions modulates the respiration of these cells in response to acute changes in oxygen concentration. This action occurs at the cytochrome c oxidase and depends on influx of calcium. Thus, NO plays a physiological role in adjusting the capacity of this enzyme to use oxygen, allowing endothelial cells to adapt to acute changes in their environment.

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptors: Molecular mechanisms of activation and therapeutic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Nader

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis-associated eye diseases are among the most common cause of blindness in the United States and worldwide. Recent advances in the development of angiogenesis-based therapies for treatment of angiogenesis-associated diseases have provided new hope in a wide variety of human diseases ranging from eye diseases to cancer. One group of growth factor receptors critically implicated in angiogenesis is vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), a subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 are closely related receptor tyrosine kinases and have both common and specific ligands. VEGFR-1 is a kinase-impaired RTK and its kinase activity is suppressed by a single amino acid substitution in its kinase domain and by its carboxyl terminus. VEGFR-2 is highly active kinase, stimulates a variety of signaling pathways and broad biological responses in endothelial cells. The mechanisms that govern VEGFR-2 activation, its ability to recruit signaling proteins and to undergo downregulation are highly regulated by phosphorylation activation loop tyrosines and its carboxyl terminus. Despite their differential potentials to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation and kinase activation, both VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 are required for normal embryonic development and pathological angiogenesis. VEGFR-1 regulates angiogenesis by mechanisms that involve ligand trapping, receptor homodimerization and heterodimerization. This review highlights recent insights into the mechanism of activation of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, and focuses on the signaling pathways employed by VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 that regulate angiogenesis and their therapeutic potentials in angiogenesis-associated diseases. PMID:16713597

  7. P2y Receptor-Mediated Angiogenesis via Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rumjahn, Sharif M.; Baldwin, Karla A; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological as well as physiological angiogenesis is known to be regulated by such factors as nucleotides and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Activated P2Y nucleotide receptors have been observed to associate and transactivate VEGF Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), suggesting a cooperation between nucleotide and VEGF signaling in angiogenesis. P2YR mediated VEGFR2 signaling therefore may be important in describing the angiogenic signaling of nucleotides such as ATP. Here, we provide evidence that supports the notion of P2YR-VEGFR2 signaling. The significant angiogenic effect of P2Y1/2 receptor agonists (100 μM ATP and 10 μM 2MS-ATP) on endothelial cell tubulogenesis was suppressed back to near control levels upon addition of 1 μM SU1498 (specific VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor). We believe that this P2YR-VEFGR2 signaling is an important component of pathological, as well as physiological angiogenesis. PMID:18605230

  8. Bisphenol A Disrupts Transcription and Decreases Viability in Aging Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H. Sofia; Monteiro, Sara; Neves, Elsa; Brito, Luísa; Boavida Ferreira, Ricardo; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely utilized endocrine disruptor capable of mimicking endogenous hormones, employed in the manufacture of numerous consumer products, thereby interfering with physiological cellular functions. Recent research has shown that BPA alters epigenetic cellular mechanisms in mammals and may be correlated to enhanced cellular senescence. Here, the effects of BPA at 10 ng/mL and 1 µg/mL, concentrations found in human samples, were analyzed on HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) transcriptional analysis of the Long Interspersed Element-1 (LINE-1) retroelement showed that BPA induces global transcription deregulation in both cell lines, although with more pronounced effects in HUVEC cells. Whereas there was an increase in global transcription in HT29 exclusively after 24 h of exposure, this chemical had prolonged effects on HUVEC. Immunoblotting revealed that this was not accompanied by alterations in the overall content of H3K9me2 and H3K4me3 epigenetic marks. Importantly, cell viability assays and transcriptional analysis indicated that prolonged BPA exposure affects aging processes in senescent HUVEC. To our knowledge this is the first report that BPA interferes with senescence in primary vascular endothelial cells, therefore, suggesting its association to the etiology of age-related human pathologies, such as atherosclerosis. PMID:25207595

  9. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A Regulates the Secretion of Different Angiogenic Factors in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Frezzetti, Daniela; Gallo, Marianna; Roma, Cristin; D'Alessio, Amelia; Maiello, Monica R; Bevilacqua, Simona; Normanno, Nicola; De Luca, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is one of the main mediators of angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, it has been described an autocrine feed-forward loop in NSCLC cells in which tumor-derived VEGFA promoted the secretion of VEGFA itself, amplifying the proangiogenic signal. In order to investigate the role of VEGFA in lung cancer progression, we assessed the effects of recombinant VEGFA on proliferation, migration, and secretion of other angiogenic factors in A549, H1975, and HCC827 NSCLC cell lines. We found that VEGFA did not affect NSCLC cell proliferation and migration. On the other hand, we demonstrated that VEGFA not only produced a strong and persistent increase of VEGFA itself but also significantly induced the secretion of a variety of angiogenic factors, including follistatin (FST), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin (IL)-8, leptin (LEP), platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), and platelet-derived growth factor bb (PDGF-BB). PI3K/AKT, RAS/ERK, and STAT3 signalling pathways were found to mediate the effects of VEGFA in NSCLC cell lines. We also observed that VEGFA regulation mainly occurred at post-transcriptional level and that NSCLC cells expressed different isoforms of VEGFA. Collectively, our data suggested that VEGFA contributes to lung cancer progression by inducing a network of angiogenic factors, which might offer potential for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26542886

  10. Human vascular tissue models formed from human induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Whisler, Jordan A.; Valdez, Jorge; Velazquez, Jeremy; Molenda, James A.; Vickerman, Vernella; Lewis, Rachel; Daigh, Christine; Hansen, Tyler D.; Mann, David A.; Thomson, James A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Kamm, Roger D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a strategy to model blood vessel development using a well-defined iPSC-derived endothelial cell type (iPSC-EC) cultured within engineered platforms that mimic the 3D microenvironment. The iPSC-ECs used here were first characterized by expression of endothelial markers and functional properties that included VEGF responsiveness, TNF-α-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules (MCAM/CD146; ICAM1/CD54), thrombin-dependent barrier function, shear stress-induced alignment, and 2D and 3D capillary-like network formation in Matrigel. The iPSC-ECs also formed 3D vascular networks in a variety of engineering contexts, yielded perfusable, interconnected lumen when co-cultured with primary human fibroblasts, and aligned with flow in microfluidics devices. iPSC-EC function during tubule network formation, barrier formation, and sprouting was consistent with that of primary ECs, and the results suggest a VEGF-independent mechanism for sprouting, which is relevant to therapeutic anti-angiogenesis strategies. Our combined results demonstrate the feasibility of using a well-defined, stable source of iPSC-ECs to model blood vessel formation within a variety of contexts using standard in vitro formats. PMID:25190668

  11. Vascular endothelial cells express a functional fas-receptor due to lack of hemodynamic forces.

    PubMed

    Freyberg, M A; Kaiser, D; Graf, R; Friedl, P

    2001-10-01

    The fas system is present in atherosclerotic lesions. However, its role in the initiation and progression is still unclear. Here we show that in endothelial cells (EC) the expression of the fas receptor is regulated by flow conditions. The EC of the vascular system are regularly exposed to a range of hemodynamic forces with great impact on cellular structures and functions. Recently it was reported that in endothelial cells the lack of hemodynamic forces as well as irregular flow conditions trigger apoptosis by induction of a mechanosensitive autocrine loop of thrombospondin-1 and the alpha(V)beta(3) integrin/integrin-associated protein complex. Here we show that EC cultivated under regular laminar flow conditions are devoid of the fas-receptor whereas cultivation under static conditions as well as under turbulence leads to its expression. Stimulation of the fas-receptor by its ligand increases the amount of apoptotic cells by twofold; the increase can be prevented by blocking the fas-receptor. The availability of the expressed fas receptor for stimulation by its ligand hints at a role as a tool for progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:11483857

  12. Vascular smooth muscle, endothelial regulation and effects of aspirin in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, M A

    1998-04-27

    Dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) is at the center of occlusive disorders of the cardiovascular system such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease and hypoxia. In addition to circulating biogenic amines and various neurotransmitters originating from the central nervous system and endocrine system, various autocoids of arachidonic acid metabolism in the blood as well as in the endothelium play an important regulatory role in the maintenance of the tone and the contractile function of VSM. A monolayer of endothelial cells lining the heart and large blood vessels is responsible for producing and releasing both endocrine and paracrine substances such as endothelins, nitric oxide, prostaglandins and prostacyclins. Aspirin, (acetylsalicylic acid/ASA) an ancient remedy against fever and pain, is emerging as an effective drug not only against occlusive disorders but also against various cancers and the AIDs virus. During pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) and in occlusive disorders, aspirin provides relief through inhibition of cyclooxygenase, an enzyme required for the metabolism of arachidonic acid to produce prostaglandins and prostacyclins in platelets and in endothelial cells. Because of its unique molecular constitution, synergistic ability and solubility in the lipidic environment, various mechanisms of aspirin's actions are being currently investigated. In this review, the effect of aspirin on the regulation of VSM in the presence and absence of endothelium are discussed.

  13. Dengue virus NS1 triggers endothelial permeability and vascular leak that is prevented by NS1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beatty, P Robert; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Glasner, Dustin R; Hopkins, Kaycie; Harris, Eva

    2015-09-01

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1 to DENV4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause up to ~100 million cases of dengue annually worldwide. Severe disease is thought to result from immunopathogenic processes involving serotype cross-reactive antibodies and T cells that together induce vasoactive cytokines, causing vascular leakage that leads to shock. However, no viral proteins have been directly implicated in triggering endothelial permeability, which results in vascular leakage. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is secreted and circulates in patients' blood during acute infection; high levels of NS1 are associated with severe disease. We show that inoculation of mice with DENV NS1 alone induces both vascular leakage and production of key inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, simultaneous administration of NS1 with a sublethal dose of DENV2 results in a lethal vascular leak syndrome. We also demonstrate that NS1 from DENV1, DENV2, DENV3, and DENV4 triggers endothelial barrier dysfunction, causing increased permeability of human endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. These pathogenic effects of physiologically relevant amounts of NS1 in vivo and in vitro were blocked by NS1-immune polyclonal mouse serum or monoclonal antibodies to NS1, and immunization of mice with NS1 from DENV1 to DENV4 protected against lethal DENV2 challenge. These findings add an important and previously overlooked component to the causes of dengue vascular leak, identify a new potential target for dengue therapeutics, and support inclusion of NS1 in dengue vaccines. PMID:26355030

  14. Electrospun poly(L-lactic acid-co-ɛ-caprolactone) fibers loaded with heparin and vascular endothelial growth factor to improve blood compatibility and endothelial progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Jing; An, Qingzhu; Li, Dawei; Liu, Peixi; Zhu, Wei; Mo, Xiumei

    2015-04-01

    Emulsion electrospinning is a convenient and promising method for incorporating proteins and drugs into nanofiber scaffolds. The aim of this study was to fabricate a nanofiber scaffold for anticoagulation and rapid endothelialization. For this purpose, we encapsulated heparin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into the core of poly(L-lactic acid-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) core-shell nanofibers via emulsion electrospinning. The fiber morphology, core-shell structure and hydrophilicity of the nanofiber mats were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and water contact angle. The blood compatibility was measured by hemolysis and anticoagulation testing. A CCK-8 assay was performed to study the promotion of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) growth and was complemented by immunofluorescent staining and SEM. Our study demonstrates that heparin and VEGF can be incorporated into P(LLA-CL) nanofibers via emulsion. The released heparin performed well as an anticoagulant, and the released VEGF promoted EPC growth on the fiber scaffolds. These results imply that electrospun P(LLA-CL) nanofibers containing heparin and VEGF have great potential in the development of vascular grafts in cases where antithrombogenicity and accelerated endothelialization are desirable.

  15. Cyclic stretch induces cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in vascular endothelial cells via activation of nuclear factor kappa-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haige; Hiroi, Toyoko; Hansen, Baranda S.; Rade, Jeffrey J.

    2009-11-27

    Vascular endothelial cells respond to biomechanical forces, such as cyclic stretch and shear stress, by altering gene expression. Since endothelial-derived prostanoids, such as prostacyclin and thromboxane A{sub 2}, are key mediators of endothelial function, we investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the expression of genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells controlling prostanoid synthesis: cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) and thromboxane A{sub 2} synthase (TXAS). COX-2 and TXAS mRNAs were upregulated by cyclic stretch for 24 h. In contrast, PGIS mRNA was decreased and stretch had no effect on COX-1 mRNA expression. We further show that stretch-induced upregulation of COX-2 is mediated by activation of the NF-{kappa}{beta} signaling pathway.

  16. By Different Cellular Mechanisms, Lymphatic Vessels Sprout by Endothelial Cell Recruitment Whereas Blood Vessels Grow by Vascular Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; McKay, Terri L.; Leontiev, Dmitry; Condrich, Terence K.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The development of effective vascular therapies requires the understanding of all modes of vessel formation contributing to vasculogenesis, angiogenesis (here termed hemangiogenesis) and lymphangiogenesis. We show that lymphangiogenesis proceeds by blind-ended vessel sprouting via recruitment of isolated endothelial progenitor cells to the tips of growing vessels, whereas hemangiogenesis occurs by non-sprouting vessel expansion from the capillary network, during middevelopment in the quail chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Blood vessels expanded out of capillaries that displayed transient expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alphaSMA), accompanied by mural recruitment of migratory progenitor cells expressing SMA. Lymphatics and blood vessels were identified by confocal/fluorescence microscopy of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, alphaSMA (expressed on CAM blood vessels but not on lymphatics), homeobox transcription factor Prox-1 (specific to CAM lymphatic endothelium), and the quail hematopoetic/vascular marker, QH-1. Expression of VEGFR-1 was highly restricted to blood vessels (primarily capillaries). VEGFR-2 was expressed intensely in isolated hematopoietic cells, lymphatic vessels and moderately in blood vessels. Prox-1 was absent from endothelial progenitor cells prior to lymphatic recruitment. Although vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF(sub 165)) is a key regulator of numerous cellular processes in hemangiogenesis and vasculogenesis, the role of VEGF(sub 165) in lymphangiogenesis is less clear. Exogenous VEGF(sub 165) increased blood vessel density without changing endogenous modes of vascular/lymphatic vessel formation or marker expression patterns. However, VEGF(sub 165) did increase the frequency of blood vascular anastomoses and strongly induced the antimaturational dissociation of lymphatics from blood vessels, with frequent formation of homogeneous lymphatic networks.

  17. NG2 proteoglycan-dependent recruitment of tumor macrophages promotes pericyte-endothelial cell interactions required for brain tumor vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Yotsumoto, Fusanori; You, Weon-Kyoo; Cejudo-Martin, Pilar; Kucharova, Karolina; Sakimura, Kenji; Stallcup, William B

    2015-01-01

    Early stage growth of intracranial B16F10 tumors is reduced by 87% in myeloid-specific NG2 null (Mac-NG2ko) mice and by 77% in pericyte-specific NG2 null (PC-NG2ko) mice, demonstrating the importance of the NG2 proteoglycan in each of these stromal compartments. In both genotypes, loss of pericyte-endothelial cell interaction results in numerous structural defects in tumor blood vessels, including decreased formation of endothelial cell junctions and decreased assembly of the vascular basal lamina. All vascular deficits are larger in Mac-NG2ko mice than in PC-NG2ko mice, correlating with the greater decrease in pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko animals. Accordingly, tumor vessels in Mac-NG2ko mice have a smaller diameter, lower degree of patency, and higher degree of leakiness than tumor vessels in PC-NG2ko mice, leading to less efficient tumor blood flow and to increased intratumoral hypoxia. While reduced pericyte interaction with endothelial cells in PC-NG2ko mice is caused by loss of NG2-dependent pericyte activation of β1 integrin signaling in endothelial cells, reduced pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko mice is due to a 90% reduction in NG2-dependent macrophage recruitment to tumors. The absence of a macrophage-derived signal(s) in Mac-NG2ko mice results in the loss of pericyte ability to associate with endothelial cells, possibly due to reduced expression of N-cadherin by both pericytes and endothelial cells. PMID:26137396

  18. Structure and Binding Mechanism of Vascular Endothelial Cadherin: A Divergent Classical Cadherin

    SciTech Connect

    J Brasch; O Harrison; G Ahlsen; S Carnally; R Henderson; B Honig; L Shapiro

    2011-12-31

    Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), a divergent member of the type II classical cadherin family of cell adhesion proteins, mediates homophilic adhesion in the vascular endothelium. Previous investigations with a bacterially produced protein suggested that VE-cadherin forms cell surface trimers that bind between apposed cells to form hexamers. Here we report studies of mammalian-produced VE-cadherin ectodomains suggesting that, like other classical cadherins, VE-cadherin forms adhesive trans dimers between monomers located on opposing cell surfaces. Trimerization of the bacterially produced protein appears to be an artifact that arises from a lack of glycosylation. We also present the 2.1-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the VE-cadherin EC1-2 adhesive region, which reveals homodimerization via the strand-swap mechanism common to classical cadherins. In common with type II cadherins, strand-swap binding involves two tryptophan anchor residues, but the adhesive interface resembles type I cadherins in that VE-cadherin does not form a large nonswapped hydrophobic surface. Thus, VE-cadherin is an outlier among classical cadherins, with characteristics of both type I and type II subfamilies.

  19. Radiation Retinopathy Is Treatable With Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Bevacizumab (Avastin)

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To report on bevacizumab treatment for radiation retinopathy affecting the macula. Patients and Methods: Twenty-one patients with radiation retinopathy (edema, hemorrhages, capillary dropout, and neovascularization) and a subjective or objective loss of vision were treated. Treatment involved intravitreal injection of bevacizumab (1.25 mg in 0.05 mL) every 6-12 weeks. Treatment was discontinued at patient request or if there was no measurable response to therapy. Main outcome measures included best corrected visual acuity, ophthalmic examination, retinal photography, and angiography. Results: Bevacizumab treatment was followed by reductions in retinal hemorrhage, exudation, and edema. Visual acuities were stable or improved in 86% (n = 18). Three patients discontinued therapy. Each was legally blind before treatment (n = 1), experienced little to no subjective improvement (n = 2), or was poorly compliant (n = 2). Three patients (14%) regained 2 or more lines of visual acuity. No ocular or systemic bevacizumab-related side effects were observed. Conclusions: Intravitreal bevacizumab can be used to treat radiation retinopathy. In most cases treatment was associated with decreased vascular leakage, stabilization, or improved vision. An anti-vascular endothelial growth factor strategy may reduce tissue damage associated with radiation vasculopathy and neuropathy.

  20. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  1. Cost and Selection of Ophthalmic Anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Emily; Greenberg, Paul B; Voruganti, Indu; Krzystolik, Magdalena G

    2016-01-01

    Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) drugs - ranibizumab, aflibercept, and off-label bevacizumab - are vital to the treatment of common retinal diseases, including exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular edema (DME), and macular edema (ME) associated with retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Given the high prevalence of AMD and retinal vascular diseases, anti-VEGF agents represent a large cost burden to the United States (US) healthcare system. Although ranibizumab and aflibercept are 30-fold more expensive per injection than bevacizumab, the two more costly medications are commonly used in the US, even though all three have been shown to be effective and safe for treatment of these retinal diseases. We investigated the availability and content of professional ophthalmic guidelines on cost consideration in the selection of anti-VEGF agents. We found that current professional guidelines were limited in availability and lacked specific guidance on cost-based anti-VEGF drug selection. This represents a missed opportunity to encourage the practice of value-based medicine. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-05.asp, free with no login].

  2. [Snake venom proteins related to "vascular endothelial growth factor": new tools for therapeutic angiogenesis].

    PubMed

    Aloui, Z; Essafi-Benkhadir, K; Karoui, H; Gasmi, A

    2013-01-01

    The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor "VEGF" plays a pivotal role in the stimulation of angiogenesis. The VEGF isoforms (A-D) and PlGF act in a coordinate fashion to develop the vascular network. Numerous proteins closely related in structure and function to VEGF-A have been reported and were grouped in the VEGF family. Some predators make use of VEGF-like molecules with devastating results for their prey. VEGF-E, investigated in 1994, is encoded by the parapoxvirus (Orf virus). VEGF-F is a common term designating molecules which were isolated from snake venom (also known as svVEGF). These proteins are disulphide-linked homodimers of 110 amino acids each and have a molecular weight of approximately 25 kDa. Their primary structures show approximately 50% identity to VEGF-A. However, unlike VEGF-A, they do not contain any N-linked glycosylation sites. They interact with heparin but have a different binding domain from that of VEGF-A. Among species, these svVEGFs vary extensively in amino acid sequences and in receptor-binding specificities towards endogenous VEGF receptors. Understanding the properties that determine the specificity of these interactions could improve our knowledge of the VEGF-receptor interactions. This knowledge is essential to the development of new drugs in angiogenesis. This knowledge is essential to the development of new drugs in angiogenesis.

  3. Guided bone regeneration (GBR) utilizing injectable Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) delivery gel

    PubMed Central

    Kaigler, Darnell; Silva, Eduardo A.; Mooney, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascularization underlies the success of guided bone regeneration (GBR) procedures. This study evaluated the regenerative potential of GBR in combination with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) delivery, via an injectable hydrogel system. Methods Critical-sized defects were created in rat calvariae and GBR procedures were performed with a collagen membrane either alone (control), plus bolus delivery of VEGF, or plus application of VEGF releasing hydrogels (VEGF - Alg). Four and eight weeks following treatment, defect sites were evaluated with microcomputed tomographic and histomorphometric analyses for blood vessel and bone formation. Results At four weeks, relative to the control condition, the bolus addition of VEGF did not affect blood vessel density within the defect site; yet, the application of the VEGF+ Alg significantly (p< 0.05) increased blood vessel density. Though there was no difference in bone regeneration at four weeks, at eight weeks, there was a significant (p < 0.05) increase in bone regeneration in the VEGF + Alg treated defects. Conclusions These data demonstrated that the application of VEGF + Alg enhanced early angiogenesis while at a later timepoint, it enhanced bone regeneration. Controlled delivery approaches of angiogenic growth factors used adjunctively with GBR may be a promising strategy for enhancing outcomes of GBR. PMID:22668339

  4. Vitamin K{sub 1} (phylloquinone) induces vascular endothelial dysfunction: Role of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tirapelli, Carlos R.; De Andrade, Claudia R.; Lieberman, Marcel; Laurindo, Francisco R.; De Souza, Heraldo P.; Oliveira, Ana M. de . E-mail: amolive@usp.br

    2006-05-15

    We aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects induced by phylloquinone (Vitamin K{sub 1}; VK{sub 1}). Vascular reactivity experiments, using standard muscle bath procedures, showed that VK{sub 1} (5 and 50 {mu}M) enhances the contractile response of endothelium-intact, but not denuded, rat carotid rings to phenylephrine. Similarly, maximal contraction induced by phenylephrine was enhanced in the presence of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N {sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The combination of L-NAME and VK{sub 1} did not produce any further additional effect. Pre-incubation of intact-rings with VK{sub 1} reduced both acetylcholine- and bradykinin-induced relaxation. VK{sub 1} induced an increment in tension on carotid rings submaximally pre-contracted with phenylephrine. VK{sub 1}-induced increment in tension was completely abolished by endothelial removal or incubation of intact rings with L-NAME and L-NNA. Conversely, 7-nitroindazole, 1400 W, or indomethacin did not affect VK{sub 1}-induced contraction. Moreover, VK{sub 1} reduced L-arginine-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact rings. Lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence assays showed that VK{sub 1} induced an increase in the level of superoxide anions in endothelium-intact but not denuded rings. Measurement of nitrite and nitrate generation showed that VK{sub 1} did not alter nitrate formation but strongly inhibited the generation of nitrite. Finally, the superoxide anions scavenger tiron prevented the endothelial vasomotor dysfunction caused by VK{sub 1} on phenyleprine-induced contraction and acetylcholine or bradykinin-induced relaxation. In conclusion, our data show that VK{sub 1} disrupts the vasomotor function of rat carotid. Our results suggest that VK{sub 1}-induced oxidative stress through production of superoxide anion is interfering with the NO pathway, which in turn is responsible for the altered vascular reactivity induced by VK{sub 1}.

  5. Schedule-Dependent Antiangiogenic and Cytotoxic Effects of Chemotherapy on Vascular Endothelial and Retinoblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Ursula; Mena, Hebe A.; Negrotto, Soledad; Arana, Eloisa; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Laurent, Viviana; Suñol, Mariona; Chantada, Guillermo L.; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of retinoblastoma involves using the maximum dose of chemotherapy that induces tumor control and is tolerated by patients. The impact of dose and schedule on the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy has not been studied. Our aim was to gain insight into the cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effect of the treatment scheme of chemotherapy used in retinoblastoma by means of different in vitro models and to evaluate potential effects on multi-drug resistance proteins. Two commercial and two patient-derived retinoblastoma cell types and two human vascular endothelial cell types were exposed to increasing concentrations of melphalan or topotecan in a conventional (single exposure) or metronomic (7-day continuous exposure) treatment scheme. The concentration of chemotherapy causing a 50% decrease in cell proliferation (IC50) was determined by MTT and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Expression of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCC1 after conventional or metronomic treatments was assessed by RT-qPCR. We also evaluated the in vivo response to conventional (0.6 mg/kg once a week for 2 weeks) and metronomic (5 days a week for 2 weeks) topotecan in a retinoblastoma xenograft model. Melphalan and topotecan were cytotoxic to both retinoblastoma and endothelial cells after conventional and metronomic treatments. A significant decrease in the IC50 (median, 13-fold; range: 3–23) was observed following metronomic chemotherapy treatment in retinoblastoma and endothelial cell types compared to conventional treatment (p<0.05). Metronomic topotecan or melphalan significantly inhibited in vitro tube formation in HUVEC and EPC compared to vehicle-treated cells (p<0.05). Both treatment schemes induced apoptosis and/or necrosis in all cell models. No significant difference was observed in the expression of ABCB1, ABCC1 or ABCG2 when comparing cells treated with melphalan or topotecan between treatment schedules at the IC50 or with control cells (p>0.05). In mice, continuous

  6. Schedule-Dependent Antiangiogenic and Cytotoxic Effects of Chemotherapy on Vascular Endothelial and Retinoblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Winter, Ursula; Mena, Hebe A; Negrotto, Soledad; Arana, Eloisa; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Laurent, Viviana; Suñol, Mariona; Chantada, Guillermo L; Carcaboso, Angel M; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of retinoblastoma involves using the maximum dose of chemotherapy that induces tumor control and is tolerated by patients. The impact of dose and schedule on the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy has not been studied. Our aim was to gain insight into the cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effect of the treatment scheme of chemotherapy used in retinoblastoma by means of different in vitro models and to evaluate potential effects on multi-drug resistance proteins. Two commercial and two patient-derived retinoblastoma cell types and two human vascular endothelial cell types were exposed to increasing concentrations of melphalan or topotecan in a conventional (single exposure) or metronomic (7-day continuous exposure) treatment scheme. The concentration of chemotherapy causing a 50% decrease in cell proliferation (IC50) was determined by MTT and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Expression of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCC1 after conventional or metronomic treatments was assessed by RT-qPCR. We also evaluated the in vivo response to conventional (0.6 mg/kg once a week for 2 weeks) and metronomic (5 days a week for 2 weeks) topotecan in a retinoblastoma xenograft model. Melphalan and topotecan were cytotoxic to both retinoblastoma and endothelial cells after conventional and metronomic treatments. A significant decrease in the IC50 (median, 13-fold; range: 3-23) was observed following metronomic chemotherapy treatment in retinoblastoma and endothelial cell types compared to conventional treatment (p<0.05). Metronomic topotecan or melphalan significantly inhibited in vitro tube formation in HUVEC and EPC compared to vehicle-treated cells (p<0.05). Both treatment schemes induced apoptosis and/or necrosis in all cell models. No significant difference was observed in the expression of ABCB1, ABCC1 or ABCG2 when comparing cells treated with melphalan or topotecan between treatment schedules at the IC50 or with control cells (p>0.05). In mice, continuous

  7. Functional Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate ICAM-1 Expression and Promote Leukocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Newfell, Brenna G.; la Sala, Andrea; Baur, Wendy; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Mendelsohn, Michael E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists decrease cardiovascular mortality and ischemia by unknown mechanisms. The steroid hormone aldosterone acts by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. In humans, aldosterone causes MR-dependent endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and in animal models, aldosterone increases vascular macrophage infiltration and atherosclerosis. MR antagonists inhibit these effects without changing blood pressure, suggesting a direct role for vascular MR in EC function and atherosclerosis. Whether human vascular EC express functional MR is not known. Here we show that human coronary artery and aortic EC express MR mRNA and protein and that EC MR mediates aldosterone-dependent gene transcription. Human EC also express the enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2(11βHSD2) and inhibition of 11βHSD2 in aortic EC enhances gene transactivation by cortisol, supporting that EC 11βHSD2 is functional. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulates transcription of the proatherogenic leukocyte-EC adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM1) gene and protein expression on human coronary artery EC, an effect inhibited by the MR antagonist spironolactone and by MR knock-down with siRNA. Cell adhesion assays demonstrate that aldosterone promotes leukocyte-EC adhesion, an effect that is inhibited by spironolactone and ICAM1 blocking antibody, supporting that aldosterone induction of EC ICAM1 surface expression via MR mediates leukocyte-EC adhesion. These data show that aldosterone activates endogenous EC MR and proatherogenic gene expression in clinically important human EC. These studies describe a novel mechanism by which aldosterone may influence ischemic cardiovascular events and support a new explanation for the decrease in ischemic events in patients treated with aldosterone antagonists. PMID:18467630

  8. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Promotes Fibrosis Resolution and Repair in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Kwon, Junghee; Popov, Yury; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Ordog, Tamas; Brekken, Rolf A.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Schuppan, Detlef; Bi, Yan; Simonetto, Douglas; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)—induced angiogenesis is implicated in fibrogenesis and portal hypertension. However, the function of VEGF in fibrosis resolution has not been explored. Methods We developed a cholecystojejunostomy procedure to reconstruct biliary flow after bile duct ligation in C57BL/6 mice to generate a model of fibrosis resolution. These mice were then given injections of VEGF-neutralizing (mcr84) or control antibodies, and other mice received an adenovirus that expressed mouse VEGF or a control vector. The procedure was also performed on macro-phage fas-induced apoptosis mice, in which macrophages can be selectively depleted. Liver and blood samples were collected and analyzed in immunohistochemical, morphometric, vascular permeability, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry assays. Results VEGF-neutralizing antibodies prevented development of fibrosis but also disrupted hepatic tissue repair and fibrosis resolution. During fibrosis resolution, VEGF inhibition impaired liver sinusoidal permeability, which was associated with reduced monocyte migration, adhesion, and infiltration of fibrotic liver. Scar-associated macrophages contributed to this process by producing the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 9 and matrix metalloproteinase 13. Resolution of fibrosis was impaired in macrophage fas-induced apoptosis mice but increased after overexpression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 9. Conclusions In a mouse model of liver fibrosis resolution, VEGF promoted fibrogenesis, but was also required for hepatic tissue repair and fibrosis resolution. We observed that VEGF regulates vascular permeability, monocyte infiltration, and scar-associated macrophages function. PMID:24503129

  9. High Calcium Bioglass Enhances Differentiation and Survival of Endothelial Progenitor Cells, Inducing Early Vascularization in Critical Size Bone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Ngoc, Christina; Meier, Simon; Nau, Christoph; Schaible, Alexander; Marzi, Ingo; Henrich, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Early vascularization is a prerequisite for successful bone healing and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), seeded on appropriate biomaterials, can improve vascularization. The type of biomaterial influences EPC function with bioglass evoking a vascularizing response. In this study the influence of a composite biomaterial based on polylactic acid (PLA) and either 20 or 40% bioglass, BG20 and BG40, respectively, on the differentiation and survival of EPCs in vitro was investigated. Subsequently, the effect of the composite material on early vascularization in a rat calvarial critical size defect model with or without EPCs was evaluated. Human EPCs were cultured with β-TCP, PLA, BG20 or BG40, and seeding efficacy, cell viability, cell morphology and apoptosis were analysed in vitro. BG40 released the most calcium, and improved endothelial differentiation and vitality best. This effect was mimicked by adding an equivalent amount of calcium to the medium and was diminished in the presence of the calcium chelator, EGTA. To analyze the effect of BG40 and EPCs in vivo, a 6-mm diameter critical size calvarial defect was created in rats (n = 12). Controls (n = 6) received BG40 and the treatment group (n = 6) received BG40 seeded with 5×105 rat EPCs. Vascularization after 1 week was significantly improved when EPCs were seeded onto BG40, compared to implanting BG40 alone. This indicates that Ca2+ release improves EPC differentiation and is useful for enhanced early vascularization in critical size bone defects. PMID:24244419

  10. Use of tritiated thymidine as a marker to compare the effects of matrix proteins on adult human vascular endothelial cell attachment: implications for seeding of vascular prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Hasson, J.E.; Wiebe, D.H.; Sharefkin, J.B.; D'Amore, P.A.; Abbott, W.M.

    1986-11-01

    We have developed a technique to measure attachment of adult human vascular endothelial cells to test surfaces with tritiated thymidine used as a marker. With this technique, we measured attachment of adult human vascular endothelial cells to a series of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin-coated (10 micrograms/cm/sup 2/), laminin-coated (10 micrograms/cm/sup 2/), and collagen-coated (1% gelatin) surfaces because of the role of these proteins in promoting cell attachment and growth. For a typical experiment, in the presence of serum, initial attachment (at 1 hour) was greatest on fibronectin-coated (63%) and gelatin-coated (60%) tissue culture plastic (polystyrene) and was least on laminin-coated (28%) or untreated polystyrene (18%). The data suggest that fibronectin, either alone, or with a more complex combination of extracellular components may need to be present on prosthetic surfaces to produce maximal cell attachment and subsequent growth to confluence in vivo. The described method of measuring attachment is independent of surface properties, ensures complete recovery of cells, and will allow systematic exploration of those properties that best support human endothelial cell attachment to vascular prosthetic surfaces.

  11. Endothelial function and vascular oxidative stress in long-lived GH/IGF-deficient Ames dwarf mice

    PubMed Central

    Csiszar, Anna; Labinskyy, Nazar; Perez, Viviana; Recchia, Fabio A.; Podlutsky, Andrej; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Pacher, Pal; Austad, Steven N.; Bartke, Andrzej; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2008-01-01

    Hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice have low circulating growth hormone (GH)/IGF-I levels, and they have extended longevity and exhibit many symptoms of delayed aging. To elucidate the vascular consequences of Ames dwarfism we compared endothelial O2•− and H2O2 production, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, expression of antioxidant enzymes, and nitric oxide (NO) production in aortas of Ames dwarf and wild-type control mice. In Ames dwarf aortas endothelial O2•− and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria were enhanced compared with those in vessels of wild-type mice. In Ames dwarf aortas there was a less abundant expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). NO production and acetylcholine-induced relaxation were also decreased in aortas of Ames dwarf mice. In cultured wild-type mouse aortas and in human coronary arterial endothelial cells treatment with GH and IGF significantly reduced cellular O2•− and H2O2 production and ROS generation by mitochondria and upregulated expression of Mn-SOD, Cu,Zn-SOD, GPx-1, and eNOS. Thus GH and IGF-I promote antioxidant phenotypic changes in the endothelial cells, whereas Ames dwarfism leads to vascular oxidative stress. PMID:18757483

  12. Vascular endothelial cell participation in formation of lymphoepithelial lesions (epi-myoepithelial islands) in lymphoepithelial sialadenitis (benign lymphoepithelial lesion).

    PubMed

    Metwaly, Hamdy; Cheng, Jun; Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Ohshiro, Kazufumi; Jen, Kai Yu; Liu, Ai Ru; Saku, Takashi

    2003-07-01

    Lymphoepithelial lesions (LELs, or epi-myoepithelial islands) in lymphoepithelial sialadenitis (LESA, or benign lymphoepithelial lesion) of the salivary gland are known to be mainly composed of duct epithelial cells. However, other constituent cells are poorly characterized. Formalin-fixed paraffin sections obtained from six surgical specimens of LESA were examined using immunohistochemistry for cytoskeletal proteins, inflammatory cells, vascular endothelial cells, and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules as well as by in situ hybridization for ECM molecules. In addition to keratin-immunopositive (+) duct-like epithelial cells, there were CD31/CD34+ vascular endothelial cells-which were either scattered in a singular fashion, in formed sheets, or in tubular structures-, CD20+ B lymphocytes, CD45RO+ T lymphocytes, and CD68 macrophages in the LELs. ECM molecules, such as heparan sulfate proteoglycan and tenascin, were immunolocalized in hyaline materials in the LELs. Their mRNAs were demonstrated mainly in endothelial cells and, to a lesser extent, in lympho-monocytic cells around hyaline materials, but were not as evident in epithelial constituent cells of LELs. The results indicate that endothelial cells as well as inflammatory cells are important constituents of the LELs, and the hyaline ECM cores mainly result from the intra-LEL angiogenesis by endothelial cells with the assistance of inflammatory cells. This intra-LEL vasculature seems to support regeneration and proliferation of salivary epithelial remnant cells.

  13. PRDM6 is enriched in vascular precursors during development and inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaxu; Ferguson, James E; Wang, Hong; Kelley, Rusty; Ren, Rongqin; McDonough, Holly; Meeker, James; Charles, Peter C; Wang, Hengbin; Patterson, Cam

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate the differentiation program of multipotential stem cells remain poorly understood. In order to define the cues that delineate endothelial commitment from precursors, we screened for candidate regulatory genes in differentiating mouse embryoid bodies. We found that the PR/SET domain protein, PRDM6, is enriched in flk1(+) hematovascular precursor cells using a microarray-based approach. As determined by 5' RACE, full-length PRDM6 protein contains a PR domain and four Krüppel-like zinc fingers. In situ hybridization in mouse embryos demonstrates staining of the primitive streak, allantois, heart, outflow tract, paraaortic splanchnopleura (P-Sp)/aorto-gonadal-mesonephric (AGM) region and yolk sac, all sites known to be enriched in vascular precursor cells. PRDM6 is also detected in embryonic and adult-derived endothelial cell lines. PRDM6 is co-localized with histone H4 and methylates H4-K20 (but not H3) in vitro and in vivo, which is consistent with the known participation of PR domains in histone methyltransferase activity. Overexpression of PRDM6 in mouse embryonic endothelial cells induces apoptosis by activating caspase-3 and inducing G1 arrest. PRDM6 inhibits cell proliferation as determined by BrdU incorporation in endothelial cells, but not in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Overexpression of PRDM6 also results in reduced tube formation in cultured endothelial cells grown in Matrigel. Taken together, our data indicate that PRDM6 is expressed by vascular precursors, has differential effects in endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and may play a role in vascular precursor differentiation and survival by modulating local chromatin-remodeling activity within hematovascular subpopulations during development.

  14. Coordinated regulation of angiopoietin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor by arsenite in human brain microvascular pericytes: implications of arsenite-induced vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Sun; Seo, Jungwon; Kim, Yong-Ou; Lee, Ho-Sa; Jo, Inho

    2009-10-01

    Arsenite is an environmental toxicant that is associated with vascular disease; however, the underlying mechanism of its toxicity has yet to be elucidated. Vascular stability appears to be tightly regulated by several vasoactive proteins produced by two adjacent vascular cells, endothelial cells (EC) and pericytes. The disruption of vascular stability may be involved in arsenite toxicity. The roles of angipoietins (Ang) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in this process have been evaluated, but these studies have mostly been limited to EC. In this study, we used human brain microvascular pericytes (HBMP) to evaluate the effects of arsenite on Ang-1 and VEGF regulation. Ang-2 was reported to be not detected in HBMP. Arsenite decreased Ang-1 secretion in a time and dose-dependent manner, while it increased VEGF secretion. Although arsenite did not alter Ang-1 mRNA expression, it increased intracellular Ang-1 protein levels in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a role for arsenite in the intracellular trapping of Ang-1. Contrary to Ang-1, the expression of VEGF mRNA was dose-dependently up-regulated by arsenite. Treatment with N-actyl-l:-cysteine (NAC) alone decreased the release of Ang-1, but failed to attenuate the arsenite-induced decrease in Ang-1 secretion, while NAC completely blocked the arsenite-stimulated VEGF secretion. These results indicate that reactive oxygen species are involved in the regulation of VEGF, but not of Ang-1, secretion in response to arsenite treatment in pericytes. Furthermore, immunocytochemical analysis using confocal microscopy revealed a colocalization of Ang-1 with actin filaments that occurred independently of tubulin. In conclusion, arsenite decreases Ang-1 secretion and increases VEGF secretion, which may offer new insight into understanding the arsenite toxicity associated with vascular instability and subsequent development of vascular disease.

  15. Endothelial and vascular dysfunctions and insulin resistance in rats fed a high-fat, high-sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Bourgoin, Frédéric; Bachelard, Hélène; Badeau, Mylène; Mélançon, Sébastien; Pitre, Maryse; Larivière, Richard; Nadeau, André

    2008-09-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet on vascular and metabolic actions of insulin. Male rats were randomized to receive an HFHS or regular chow diet for 4 wk. In a first series of experiments, the rats had pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters implanted to measure blood pressure, heart rate, and regional blood flows. Insulin sensitivity and vascular responses to insulin were assessed during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp performed in conscious rats. In a second series of experiments, new groups of rats were used to examine skeletal muscle glucose transport activity and to determine in vitro vascular reactivity, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression in muscle and vascular tissues and endothelin content, nitrotyrosine formation, and NAD(P)H oxidase protein expression in vascular tissues. The HFHS-fed rats displayed insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperlipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and impaired insulin-mediated renal and skeletal muscle vasodilator responses. A reduction in endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, accompanied by a decreased eNOS protein expression in muscles and blood vessel endothelium, and increased vascular endothelin-1 protein content were also noted in HFHS-fed rats compared with control rats. Furthermore, the HFHS diet induced a reduced insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in muscles and increased levels of NAD(P)H oxidase protein and nitrotyrosine formation in vascular tissues. These findings support the importance of eNOS protein in linking metabolic and vascular disease and indicate the ability of a Westernized diet to induce endothelial dysfunction and to alter metabolic and vascular homeostasis.

  16. Effect of immobilized collagen type IV on biological properties of endothelial cells for the enhanced endothelialization of synthetic vascular graft materials.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yunhoe; Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Lim, Youn Mook; Shin, Heungsoo

    2015-10-01

    Regeneration of healthy endothelium onto vascular graft materials is imperative for prevention of intimal hyperplasia and thrombogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of collagen type IV (COL-IV) immobilized onto electrospun nanofibers on modulation of endothelial cell (EC) function, as a potential signal to rapid endothelialization of vascular grafts. COL-IV is assembled in basement membrane underneath intimal layer and regulates morphogenesis of blood vessels. For immobilization of COL-IV, poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers (PL) were prepared as a model vascular graft substrate, onto which acrylic acid (AAc) was then grafted by using gamma-ray irradiation. AAc graft was dependent on irradiation doses and AAc concentrations, which allowed us to select the condition of 5% (v/v) AAc and 10 kGy for further conjugation of COL-IV. COL-IV immobilization was proportionally controlled as a function of its concentration. Atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis qualitatively supported immobilization of COL-IV, demonstrating increase in root mean square roughness of the PL from 665.37 ± 13.20 nm to 1440.74 ± 33.24. However, the Young's modulus of nanofibers was retained as approximately 1 MPa, regardless of surface modification. The number of ECs attached on the nanofibers with immobilized COL-IV was significantly increased by 5 times (1052 ± 138 cells/mm(2)) from pristine PL (234 ± 41 cells/mm(2)). In addition, the effect of immobilized COL-IV was profound for enhancing proliferation and up-regulation of markers implicated in rapid endothelialization. Collectively, our results suggest that COL-IV immobilized onto electrospun PLLA nanofibers may serve as a promising instructive cue used in vascular graft materials.

  17. Effect of immobilized collagen type IV on biological properties of endothelial cells for the enhanced endothelialization of synthetic vascular graft materials.

    PubMed

    Heo, Yunhoe; Shin, Young Min; Lee, Yu Bin; Lim, Youn Mook; Shin, Heungsoo

    2015-10-01

    Regeneration of healthy endothelium onto vascular graft materials is imperative for prevention of intimal hyperplasia and thrombogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effect of collagen type IV (COL-IV) immobilized onto electrospun nanofibers on modulation of endothelial cell (EC) function, as a potential signal to rapid endothelialization of vascular grafts. COL-IV is assembled in basement membrane underneath intimal layer and regulates morphogenesis of blood vessels. For immobilization of COL-IV, poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers (PL) were prepared as a model vascular graft substrate, onto which acrylic acid (AAc) was then grafted by using gamma-ray irradiation. AAc graft was dependent on irradiation doses and AAc concentrations, which allowed us to select the condition of 5% (v/v) AAc and 10 kGy for further conjugation of COL-IV. COL-IV immobilization was proportionally controlled as a function of its concentration. Atomic force microscope (AFM) analysis qualitatively supported immobilization of COL-IV, demonstrating increase in root mean square roughness of the PL from 665.37 ± 13.20 nm to 1440.74 ± 33.24. However, the Young's modulus of nanofibers was retained as approximately 1 MPa, regardless of surface modification. The number of ECs attached on the nanofibers with immobilized COL-IV was significantly increased by 5 times (1052 ± 138 cells/mm(2)) from pristine PL (234 ± 41 cells/mm(2)). In addition, the effect of immobilized COL-IV was profound for enhancing proliferation and up-regulation of markers implicated in rapid endothelialization. Collectively, our results suggest that COL-IV immobilized onto electrospun PLLA nanofibers may serve as a promising instructive cue used in vascular graft materials. PMID:26196092

  18. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. I. Cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Kang, H.J.; Baumann, F.E.; Blazek, E.R.

    1996-02-01

    Normal tissue toxicity limits radiation therapy and could depend on the extent of damage to the vascular endothelium. Aminothiols such as WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] provide radioprotection for normal tissues, but little is known about how the aminothiols specifically affect the endothelium. Bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture were exposed to WR-1065 for 2 h before irradiation ({sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays, 1 Gy/min). Alone, WR-1065 demonstrated an antiproliferative effect that was related to dose (0.5-4 mM) and was evident by lowered counts of adherent cells 48 h after exposure. WR-1065 was clearly radioprotective when assessed by colony formation and incorporation of [{sup 3}H]thymidine. However, when the number of adherent cells was evaluated, radioprotection appeared to be slight and evident only in logarithmically growing cells. WR-1065 at 2 mM suppressed single-strand DNA breaks after 3 Gy by 22% and double-strand breaks after 9 Gy by 47%. Also in the irradiated cells, WR-1065 more than doubled the rate of progression of cells from G{sub 1} to S phase. WR-1065 pretreatment elevated cellular glutathione (GSH) content more than twofold. Although pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine inhibited the elevation of GSH, the radioprotective impact of WR-1065 on total DNA strand breaks and colony formation was unaffected. These results suggest that WR-1065 may enable tissue recovery from irradiation by promoting the replication of endothelial cells, possibly by mechanisms independent of GSH. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Clinical use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chase, Judy L

    2008-11-01

    Abstract Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the most potent proangiogenic factor and has been identified as an important target of cancer therapy. Blocking endothelial cell VEGF activity inhibits tumor angiogenesis; normalizes tumor vasculature, facilitating improved chemotherapy delivery; and prevents the recruitment of progenitor cells from the bone marrow. Bevacizumab, the only United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anti-VEGF agent, is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits the binding of VEGF to VEGF receptors. The addition of bevacizumab to standard first- and second-line chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer improves overall and progression-free survival times and increases the time to disease progression. Studies are evaluating bevacizumab as adjuvant therapy. The optimal bevacizumab dosage is unknown, but 5 mg/kg every 2 weeks is currently recommended for initial therapy. A surrogate efficacy marker is needed to optimize bevacizumab use, both for dose and patient selection; the clinical applicability of several surrogate efficacy markers is being evaluated. Generally, bevacizumab is well tolerated; however, several serious adverse effects that may occur (e.g., hypertensive crisis) can usually be appropriately prevented or managed. Although current recommendations suggest the administration of the first bevacizumab dose over 90 minutes to prevent infusion-related hypersensitivity reactions, recent study results show that 5 and 10 mg/kg can safely be administered over 10 and 20 minutes, respectively. Whether the addition of bevacizumab to metastatic colorectal cancer treatment regimens is a cost-effective treatment option is unknown; health economic studies are needed. When used for FDA-approved indications or for off-label indications being evaluated in select clinical trials, Medicare reimburses for bevacizumab therapy. PMID:18980549

  20. The Association between Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-related Factors with Severity of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kouchaki, Ebrahim; Otroshi Shahreza, Bentolhoda; Faraji, Saiedeh; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sehat, Mojtaba

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can trigger angiogenesis as well as inflammation through binding to its membranous receptor-1 on endothelial and inflammatory cells. We aimed to correlate the circulatory number of cells expressing such receptor as well as the serum level of VEGF and the soluble form of its receptor-1 (sVEGFR1) to the severity of multiple sclerosis (MS). This case-control study was done on 102 cases of MS lacking any other inflammatory or pathologic conditions and 75 healthy volunteer subjects. The severity of MS was examined by expanded disability status scale (EDSS). The serum levels of VEGF and sVEGFR1 were measured by ELISA, and the circulatory frequency of VEGFR1 expressing cells was counted by flowcytometry. Then, the correlation of these variables was evaluated by pearson's correlation coefficient and spearman's test. We also investigated the influence of sex, age, treatment duration, and the number of recurrences on such association through linear multivariate regression method. We found an increase in circulatory level of VEGFR1 expressing cells and the serum level of VEGF as well as sVEGFR1 in MS patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.001). The greater severity of MS, the higher VEGFR1 expressing cells (ρ=0.47; p<0.001), serum level of VEGF (ρ=0.44; p<0.001), and sVEGFR1 (ρ=0.76; p<0.001). Having adjusted the effects of VEGF on sVEGFR1, we found a significant association between the EDSS score and sVEGFR1 (β=0.007; p<0.001). Our findings revealed that circulatory membranous as well as soluble expression of VEGFR1 increases during angiogenic and inflammatory phenomena of MS. Such increase may exacerbate the symptoms and cause more disability. PMID:27424135

  1. Platelet activating factors alters calcium homeostasis in cultured vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine; PAF), a potent in vivo mediator of allergic and inflammatory reactions, induced a rapid (onset less than 30 s), concentration-dependent (threshold approximately 10(-11) M, half-maximal approximately 10(-10) M, maximal approximately 10(-8)-10(-7) M) efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from preloaded cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). In contrast, deacetylated and other PAF analogues were essentially ineffective. PAF (10(-7) M) was also shown to increase cytosolic free calcium (49 +/- 5%) in suspensions of quin 2 (calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye)-loaded BAEC. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was not blocked by aspirin treatment (100 or 500 microM, 30 min). In the absence of external calcium, PAF was still highly effective in stimulating unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting that PAF mobilized a sequestered pool of intracellular calcium. CV-3988, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BAEC with PAF (10(-8) M, 15 min), but not with other PAF analogues, resulted in a decrease in subsequent PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting an agonist-specific desensitization. PAF also stimulated a 30% net decrease in the equilibrium /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ content of BAEC within 1 min, which gradually recovered to prestimulus levels in 10-15 min. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was also observed in endothelial cells cultured from human umbilical vein and baboon cephalic vein but not from cultured human dermal fibroblasts or bovine aortic smooth muscle. These studies provide direct evidence for agonist- and cell-specific effects of PAF on vascular endothelium.

  2. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3 Directly Interacts with Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase to Regulate Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Coso, Sanja; Zeng, Yiping; Opeskin, Kenneth; Williams, Elizabeth D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dysfunctional lymphatic vessel formation has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions including cancer metastasis, lymphedema, and impaired wound healing. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family is a major regulator of lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) function and lymphangiogenesis. Indeed, dissemination of malignant cells into the regional lymph nodes, a common occurrence in many cancers, is stimulated by VEGF family members. This effect is generally considered to be mediated via VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3. However, the role of specific receptors and their downstream signaling pathways is not well understood. Methods and Results Here we delineate the VEGF-C/VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-3 signaling pathway in LECs and show that VEGF-C induces activation of PI3K/Akt and MEK/Erk. Furthermore, activation of PI3K/Akt by VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 resulted in phosphorylation of P70S6K, eNOS, PLCγ1, and Erk1/2. Importantly, a direct interaction between PI3K and VEGFR-3 in LECs was demonstrated both in vitro and in clinical cancer specimens. This interaction was strongly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases in primary small cell carcinoma of the lung in clinical specimens. Blocking PI3K activity abolished VEGF-C-stimulated LEC tube formation and migration. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that specific VEGFR-3 signaling pathways are activated in LECs by VEGF-C. The importance of PI3K in VEGF-C/VEGFR-3-mediated lymphangiogenesis provides a potential therapeutic target for the inhibition of lymphatic metastasis. PMID:22745786

  3. Adverse events with intravitreal injection of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors: nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Sudeep S; Bronskill, Susan E; Paterson, J Michael; Whitehead, Marlo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of systemic adverse events associated with intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibiting drugs. Design Population based nested case-control study. Setting Ontario, Canada. Participants 91 378 older adults with a history of physician diagnosed retinal disease identified between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2011. Cases were 1477 patients admitted to hospital for ischaemic stroke, 2229 admitted for an acute myocardial infarction, 1059 admitted or assessed in an emergency department for venous thromboembolism, and 2623 admitted for congestive heart failure. Event-free controls (at a ratio of 5:1) were matched to cases on the basis of year of birth, sex, history of the outcome in the previous 5 years, and diabetes. Main exposure measure Exposure to vascular endothelial growth factor inhibiting drugs identified within 180 days before the index date. Results After adjustment for potential confounders, participants who had ischaemic stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or venous thromboembolism were not more likely than control participants to have been exposed to either bevacizumab (adjusted odds ratios of 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.68 to 1.34) for ischaemic stroke, 1.04 (0.77 to 1.39) for acute myocardial infarction, 0.81 (0.49 to 1.34) for venous thromboembolism, and 1.21 (0.91 to 1.62) for congestive heart failure) or ranibizumab (adjusted odds ratios 0.87 (0.68 to 1.10) for ischaemic stroke, 0.90 (0.72 to 1.11) for acute myocardial infarction, 0.88 (0.67 to 1.16) for venous thromboembolism, and 0.87 (0.70 to 1.07) for congestive heart failure). Similarly, a secondary analysis of exclusive users of bevacizumab or ranibizumab showed no differences in risk between the two drugs (adjusted odds ratios for bevacizumab relative to ranibizumab of 1.03 (0.67 to 1.60) for ischaemic stroke, 1.23 (0.85 to 1.77) for acute myocardial infarction, 0.92 (0.51 to 1.69) for venous thromboembolism, and

  4. Effects of black raspberry on lipid profiles and vascular endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Han Saem; Hong, Soon Jun; Lee, Tae-Bum; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Jeong, Jong Tae; Joo, Hyung Joon; Park, Jae Hyoung; Ahn, Chul-Min; Yu, Cheol Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) has been known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. However, short-term effects of black raspberry on lipid profiles and vascular endothelial function have not been investigated in patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 77) were prospectively randomized into a group with black raspberry (n = 39, 750 mg/day) and a placebo group (n = 38) during a 12-week follow-up. Lipid profiles, brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (baFMD), and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α, C-reactive protein, adiponectin, sICAM-1, and sVCAM-1 were measured at the baseline and at the 12-week follow-up. Decreases from the baseline in the total cholesterol level (-22.8 ± 30.4 mg/dL vs. -1.9 ± 31.8 mg/dL, p < 0.05, respectively) and total cholesterol/HDL ratio (-0.31 ± 0.64 vs. 0.07 ± 0.58, p < 0.05, respectively) were significantly greater in the group with black raspberry than in the placebo group. Increases in baFMD at the 12-week follow-up were significantly greater in the group with black raspberry than in the placebo group (0.33 ± 0.44 mm vs. 0.10 ± 0.35 mm, p < 0.05, respectively). Decreases from the baseline in IL-6 (-0.4 ± 1.5 pg/mL vs. -0.1 ± 1.0 pg/mL, p < 0.05, respectively) and TNF-α (-2.9 ± 4.7 pg/mL vs. 0.1 ± 3.6 pg/mL, p < 0.05, respectively) were significantly greater in the group with black raspberry. The use of black raspberry significantly decreased serum total cholesterol level and inflammatory cytokines, thereby improving vascular endothelial function in patients with metabolic syndrome during the 12-week follow-up.

  5. Hypoxia-induced paracrine regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor expression.

    PubMed Central

    Brogi, E; Schatteman, G; Wu, T; Kim, E A; Varticovski, L; Keyt, B; Isner, J M

    1996-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular permeability factor (VPF), an endothelial cell (EC)-specific mitogen, stimulates angiogenesis in vivo, particularly in ischemic regions. VEGF/VPF expression by cells of hypoxic tissues coincides with expression of its two receptors, KDR and flt-1, by ECs in the same tissues. We investigated whether hypoxia or hypoxia-dependent conditions operate in coordinating this phenomenon. Human umbilical vein and microvascular ECs were exposed to direct hypoxia or to medium conditioned (CM) by myoblasts maintained in hypoxia for 4 d. Control ECs were maintained in normoxia or normoxia-CM. Binding of 125I-VEGF to ECs was then evaluated. Hypoxic treatment of ECs had no effect on 125I-VEGF binding. However, treatment of ECs with hypoxia-CM produced a threefold increase in 125I-VEGF binding, with peak at 24 h (P < 0.001, ANOVA). Scatchard analysis disclosed that increased binding was due to a 13-fold increase in KDR receptors/cell, with no change in KDR affinity (Kd = 260 +/- 51 pM, normoxia-CM versus Kd = 281 +/- 94 pM, hypoxia-CM) and no change in EC number (35.6 +/- 5.9 x 10(3) ECs/cm2, normoxia-CM versus 33.5 +/- 5.5 x 10(3) ECs/cm2, hypoxia-CM). Similar results were obtained using CM from hypoxic smooth muscle cells. KDR upregulation was not prevented by addition to the hypoxia-CM of neutralizing antibodies against VEGF, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor beta 1 or basic fibroblast growth factor. Similarly, addition of VEGF or lactic acid to the normoxia-CM had no effect on VEGF binding. We conclude that mechanism(s) initiated by hypoxia can induce KDR receptor upregulation in ECs. Hypoxic cells, normal or neoplastic, not only can produce VEGF/VPF, but can also modulate its effects via paracrine induction of VEGF/VPF receptors in ECs. PMID:8567969

  6. Targeting Angiogenesis in Cancer Therapy: Moving Beyond Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis, or the formation of new capillary blood vessels, occurs primarily during human development and reproduction; however, aberrant regulation of angiogenesis is also a fundamental process found in several pathologic conditions, including cancer. As a process required for invasion and metastasis, tumor angiogenesis constitutes an important point of control of cancer progression. Although not yet completely understood, the complex process of tumor angiogenesis involves highly regulated orchestration of multiple signaling pathways. The proangiogenic signaling molecule vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its cognate receptor (VEGF receptor 2 [VEGFR-2]) play a central role in angiogenesis and often are highly expressed in human cancers, and initial clinical efforts to develop antiangiogenic treatments focused largely on inhibiting VEGF/VEGFR signaling. Such approaches, however, often lead to transient responses and further disease progression because angiogenesis is regulated by multiple pathways that are able to compensate for each other when single pathways are inhibited. The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGF receptor (PDGFR) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and FGF receptor (FGFR) pathways, for example, provide potential escape mechanisms from anti-VEGF/VEGFR therapy that could facilitate resumption of tumor growth. Accordingly, more recent treatments have focused on inhibiting multiple signaling pathways simultaneously. This comprehensive review discusses the limitations of inhibiting VEGF signaling alone as an antiangiogenic strategy, the importance of other angiogenic pathways including PDGF/PDGFR and FGF/FGFR, and the novel current and emerging agents that target multiple angiogenic pathways for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. Implications for Practice: Significant advances in cancer treatment have been achieved with the development of antiangiogenic agents, the majority of which have focused on inhibition of the

  7. [Endothelial dysfunction as a marker of vascular aging syndrome on the background of hypertension, coronary heart disease, gout and obesity].

    PubMed

    Vatseba, M O

    2013-09-01

    Under observation were 40 hypertensive patients with coronary heart disease, gout and obesity I and II degree. Patients with hypertension in combination with coronary heart disease, gout and obesity, syndrome of early vascular aging is shown by increased stiffness of arteries, increased peak systolic flow velocity, pulse blood presure, the thickness of the intima-media complex, higher level endotelinemia and reduced endothelial vasodilation. Obtained evidence that losartan in complex combination with basic therapy and metamaks in complex combination with basic therapy positively affect the elastic properties of blood vessels and slow the progression of early vascular aging syndrome.

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A165b prevents diabetic neuropathic pain and sensory neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Richard P; Beazley-Long, Nicholas; Ved, Nikita; Bestall, Samuel M; Riaz, Hamza; Singhal, Priya; Ballmer Hofer, Kurt; Harper, Steve J; Bates, David O; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2015-10-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects up to half of diabetic patients. This neuronal damage leads to sensory disturbances, including allodynia and hyperalgesia. Many growth factors have been suggested as useful treatments for prevention of neurodegeneration, including the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family. VEGF-A is generated as two alternative splice variant families. The most widely studied isoform, VEGF-A165a is both pro-angiogenic and neuroprotective, but pro-nociceptive and increases vascular permeability in animal models. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats develop both hyperglycaemia and many of the resulting diabetic complications seen in patients, including peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, we show that the anti-angiogenic VEGF-A splice variant, VEGF-A165b, is also a potential therapeutic for diabetic neuropathy. Seven weeks of VEGF-A165b treatment in diabetic rats reversed enhanced pain behaviour in multiple behavioural paradigms and was neuroprotective, reducing hyperglycaemia-induced activated caspase 3 (AC3) levels in sensory neuronal subsets, epidermal sensory nerve fibre loss and aberrant sciatic nerve morphology. Furthermore, VEGF-A165b inhibited a STZ-induced increase in Evans Blue extravasation in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), saphenous nerve and plantar skin of the hind paw. Increased transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel activity is associated with the onset of diabetic neuropathy. VEGF-A165b also prevented hyperglycaemia-enhanced TRPA1 activity in an in vitro sensory neuronal cell line indicating a novel direct neuronal mechanism that could underlie the anti-nociceptive effect observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that in a model of Type I diabetes VEGF-A165b attenuates altered pain behaviour and prevents neuronal stress, possibly through an effect on TRPA1 activity. PMID:26201024

  9. Normoxic wound fluid contains high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Howdieshell, T R; Riegner, C; Gupta, V; Callaway, D; Grembowicz, K; Sathyanarayana; McNeil, P L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the temporal integration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which has been shown to be present in wound fluid, with the putatively related processes of wound fluid oxygen content, wound angiogenesis, and granulation tissue formation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During cutaneous wound repair, new tissue formation starts with reepithelialization and is followed by granulation tissue formation, including neutrophil and macrophage accumulation, fibroblast ingrowth, matrix deposition, and angiogenesis. Because angiogenesis and increased vascular permeability are characteristic features of wound healing, VEGF may play an important role in tissue repair. METHODS: A ventral hernia, surgically created in the abdominal wall of female swine, was repaired using silicone sheeting and skin closure. Over time, a fluid-filled wound compartment formed, bounded by subcutaneous tissue and omentum. Ultrasonography was performed serially to examine the anatomy and dimensions of the subcutaneous tissue and wound compartment. Serial wound fluid samples, obtained by percutaneous aspiration, were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, pH, and growth factor concentrations. RESULTS: Three independent assays demonstrate that VEGF protein is present at substantially elevated levels in a wound fluid associated with the formation of abdominal granulation tissue. However, the wound fluid is not hypoxic at any time. Serial sampling reveals that transforming growth factor beta-1 protein appears in the wound fluid before VEGF. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that VEGF is a prominent regulator of wound angiogenesis and vessel permeability. A factor other than hypoxia, perhaps the earlier appearance of another growth factor, transforming growth factor beta-1, may positively regulate VEGF appearance in the wound fluid. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 5. Figure 7. PMID:9833810

  10. A vascular injury model using focal heat-induced activation of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sylman, J.L.; Artzer, D.T.; Rana, K.; Neeves, K.B.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) both inhibit and promote platelet function depending on their activation state. Quiescent EC inhibit platelet activation by constitutive secretion of platelet inhibitors. Activated EC promote platelet adhesion by secretion of von Willebrand factor (vWF). EC also secrete an extracellular matrix that support platelet adhesion when exposed following vascular injury. Previous studies of EC-platelet interactions under flow activate entire monolayers of cells by chemical activation. In this study, EC cultured in microfluidic channels were focally activated by heat from an underlying microelectrode. Based on finite element modeling, microelectrodes induced peak temperature increases of 10–40 °C above 37 °C after applying 5–9 V for 30 s resulting in three zones: (1) A quiescent zone corresponded to peak temperatures of less than 15 °C characterized by no EC activation or platelet accumulation. (2) An activation zone corresponding to an increase of 16–22 °C yielded EC that were viable, secreted elevated levels of vWF, and were P-selectin positive. Platelets accumulated in the retracted spaces between EC in the activation zone at a wall shear rate of 150 s−1. Experiments with blocking antibodies show that platelets adhere via GPIbα-vWF and α6β1-laminin interactions. (3) A kill zone corresponded to peak temperatures of greater than 23 °C where EC were not viable and did not support platelet adhesion. These data define heating conditions for the activation of EC, causing the secretion of vWF and the exposure of a subendothelial matrix that support platelet adhesion and aggregation. This model provides for spatially defined zones of EC activation that could be a useful tool for measuring the relative roles of anti- and prothrombotic roles of EC at the site of vascular injury. PMID:26087748

  11. Reversal of ApoE4-Driven Brain Pathology by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Salomon-Zimri, Shiran; Glat, Micaela Johanna; Barhum, Yael; Luz, Ishai; Boehm-Cagan, Anat; Liraz, Ori; Ben-Zur, Tali; Offen, Daniel; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2016-06-30

    Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4), the most prevalent genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with increased neurodegeneration and vascular impairments. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), originally described as a key angiogenic factor, has recently been shown to play a crucial role in the nervous system. The objective of this research is to examine the role of VEGF in mediating the apoE4-driven pathologies. We show that hippocampal VEGF levels are lower in apoE4 targeted replacement mice compared to the corresponding apoE3 mice. This effect was accompanied by a specific decrease in both VEGF receptor-2 and HIF1-α. We next set to examine whether upregulation of VEGF can reverse apoE4-driven pathologies, namely the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau (AT8) and Aβ42, and reduced levels of the pre-synaptic marker, VGluT1, and of the ApoE receptor, ApoER2. This was first performed utilizing intra-hippocampal injection of VEGF-expressing-lentivirus (LV-VEGF). This revealed that LV-VEGF treatment reversed the apoE4-driven cognitive deficits and synaptic pathologies. The levels of Aβ42 and AT8, however, were increased in apoE3 mice, masking any potential effects of this treatment on the apoE4 mice. Follow-up experiments utilizing VEGF-expressing adeno-associated-virus (AAV-VEGF), which expresses VEGF specifically under the GFAP astrocytic promoter, prevented this effects on apoE3 mice, and reversed the apoE4-related increase in Aβ42 and AT8. Taken together, these results suggest that apoE4-driven pathologies are mediated by a VEGF-dependent pathway, resulting in cognitive impairments and brain pathology. These animal model findings suggest that the VEGF system is a promising target for the treatment of apoE4 carriers in AD.

  12. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator transiently enhances blood-brain barrier permeability during cerebral ischemia through vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated endothelial endocytosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Nobuo; Yamakawa, Kasumi; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Hokamura, Kazuya; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) modulates cerebrovascular permeability and exacerbates brain injury in ischemic stroke, but its mechanisms remain unclear. We studied the involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated endocytosis in the increase of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability potentiated by rt-PA after ischemic stroke. The rt-PA treatment at 4 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion induced a transient increase in BBB permeability after ischemic stroke in mice, which was suppressed by antagonists of either low-density lipoprotein receptor families (LDLRs) or VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). In immortalized bEnd.3 endothelial cells, rt-PA treatment upregulated VEGF expression and VEGFR-2 phosphorylation under ischemic conditions in an LDLR-dependent manner. In addition, rt-PA treatment increased endocytosis and transcellular transport in bEnd.3 monolayers under ischemic conditions, which were suppressed by the inhibition of LDLRs, VEGF, or VEGFR-2. The rt-PA treatment also increased the endocytosis of endothelial cells in the ischemic brain region after stroke in mice. These findings indicate that rt-PA increased BBB permeability via induction of VEGF, which at least partially mediates subsequent increase in endothelial endocytosis. Therefore, inhibition of VEGF induction may have beneficial effects after thrombolytic therapy with rt-PA treatment after stroke.

  13. Ectodomain Shedding of Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Hyaluronan Receptor 1 (LYVE-1) Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A).

    PubMed

    Nishida-Fukuda, Hisayo; Araki, Ryoichi; Shudou, Masachika; Okazaki, Hidenori; Tomono, Yasuko; Nakayama, Hironao; Fukuda, Shinji; Sakaue, Tomohisa; Shirakata, Yuji; Sayama, Koji; Hashimoto, Koji; Detmar, Michael; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Hirakawa, Satoshi

    2016-05-13

    Lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is known as one of the most specific lymphatic vessel markers in the skin. In this study, we found that the ectodomain of LYVE-1 undergoes proteolytic cleavage, and this process produces soluble LYVE-1. We further identified the cleavage site for ectodomain shedding and generated an uncleavable mutant of LYVE-1. In lymphatic endothelial cells, ectodomain shedding of LYVE-1 was induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, an important factor for angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis under pathological conditions. VEGF-A-induced LYVE-1 ectodomain shedding was mediated via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 17. Wild-type LYVE-1, but not uncleavable LYVE-1, promoted migration of lymphatic endothelial cells in response to VEGF-A. Immunostaining analyses in human psoriasis skin lesions and VEGF-A transgenic mouse skin suggested that the ectodomain shedding of LYVE-1 occurred in lymphatic vessels undergoing chronic inflammation. These results indicate that the ectodomain shedding of LYVE-1 might be involved in promoting pathological lymphangiogenesis.

  14. Date syrup-derived polyphenols attenuate angiogenic responses and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Taleb, Hajer; Morris, R Keith; Withycombe, Cathryn E; Maddocks, Sarah E; Kanekanian, Ara D

    2016-07-01

    Bioactive components such as polyphenols, present in many plants, are purported to have anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties. Date syrup, produced from date fruit of the date palm tree, has traditionally been used to treat a wide range of diseases with etiologies involving angiogenesis and inflammation. It was hypothesized that polyphenols in date syrup reduce angiogenic responses such as cell migration, tube formation, and matrix metalloproteinase activity in an inflammatory model by exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the prostaglandin enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in endothelial cells. Date syrup polyphenols at 60 and 600μg/mL reduced inflammation and suppressed several stages of angiogenesis, including endothelial cell migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and tube formation, without evidence of cytotoxicity. VEGF and COX-2 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha at both gene expression and protein level was significantly reduced by date syrup polyphenols in comparison to untreated cells. In conclusion, polyphenols in date syrup attenuated angiogenic responses and exhibited anti-inflammatory activity mediated by VEGF and COX-2 expression in endothelial cells. PMID:27333954

  15. Ectodomain Shedding of Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Hyaluronan Receptor 1 (LYVE-1) Is Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGF-A).

    PubMed

    Nishida-Fukuda, Hisayo; Araki, Ryoichi; Shudou, Masachika; Okazaki, Hidenori; Tomono, Yasuko; Nakayama, Hironao; Fukuda, Shinji; Sakaue, Tomohisa; Shirakata, Yuji; Sayama, Koji; Hashimoto, Koji; Detmar, Michael; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Hirakawa, Satoshi

    2016-05-13

    Lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE-1), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, is known as one of the most specific lymphatic vessel markers in the skin. In this study, we found that the ectodomain of LYVE-1 undergoes proteolytic cleavage, and this process produces soluble LYVE-1. We further identified the cleavage site for ectodomain shedding and generated an uncleavable mutant of LYVE-1. In lymphatic en