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Sample records for age-dependent protein carbonylation

  1. Amelioration of age-dependent increase in protein carbonyls of cerebral hemispheres of mice by melatonin and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Dkhar, Preeticia; Sharma, Ramesh

    2011-12-01

    Melatonin secreted by the pineal gland acts as a free radical scavenger besides its role as a hormonal signaling agent. It detoxifies a variety of free radicals and reactive oxygen intermediates including hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite anion and singlet oxygen. Ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), a water soluble vitamin, is a naturally occurring antioxidant and cofactor in various enzymes. Protein carbonyls are formed as a consequence of the oxidative modification of proteins by reactive oxygen species. Oxidative modification alters the function of protein and is thought to play an important role in the decline of cellular functions during aging. In the present study, the effect of melatonin and ascorbic acid on age-related carbonyl content of cerebral hemispheres in mice was investigated. Protein carbonyls of cerebral hemispheres have been found to be significantly higher in 18-month-old mice as compared to 1-month old mice. Administration of a single dose of melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight) and ascorbic acid (10 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally for three consecutive days decreases the carbonyl content in 1- and 18-month-old mice significantly. The present study thus suggests that the formation of protein carbonyls in the cerebral hemispheres of the aging mice can be prevented by the antioxidative effects of melatonin and ascorbic acid that could in turn be beneficial in having health benefits from age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Protein carbonylation in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Giustarini, Daniela; Colombo, Roberto; Rossi, Ranieri; Milzani, Aldo

    2003-04-01

    Oxidative modifications of enzymes and structural proteins play a significant role in the aetiology and/or progression of several human diseases. Protein carbonyl content is the most general and well-used biomarker of severe oxidative protein damage. Human diseases associated with protein carbonylation include Alzheimer's disease, chronic lung disease, chronic renal failure, diabetes and sepsis. Rapid recent progress in the identification of carbonylated proteins should provide new diagnostic (possibly pre-symptomatic) biomarkers for oxidative damage, and yield basic information to aid the establishment an efficacious antioxidant therapy.

  3. Protein carbonylation, cellular dysfunction, and disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Aldini, Giancarlo; Carini, Marina; Colombo, Roberto; Rossi, Ranieri; Milzani, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    Carbonylation of proteins is an irreversible oxidative damage, often leading to a loss of protein function, which is considered a widespread indicator of severe oxidative damage and disease-derived protein dysfunction. Whereas moderately carbonylated proteins are degraded by the proteasomal system, heavily carbonylated proteins tend to form high-molecular-weight aggregates that are resistant to degradation and accumulate as damaged or unfolded proteins. Such aggregates of carbonylated proteins can inhibit proteasome activity. A large number of neurodegenerative diseases are directly associated with the accumulation of proteolysis-resistant aggregates of carbonylated proteins in tissues. Identification of specific carbonylated protein(s) functionally impaired and development of selective carbonyl blockers should lead to the definitive assessment of the causative, correlative or consequential role of protein carbonylation in disease onset and/or progression, possibly providing new therapeutic aproaches. PMID:16796807

  4. Ozone Effects on Protein Carbonyl Content in the Frontal ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is a critical part of community-based human health risk assessment of chemical exposures. There is growing concern over a common air pollutant, ozone (03), and adverse health effects including dysfunction of the pulmonary, cardiac, and nervous systems. The objective of this study was to test whether OS plays a role in the adverse effects caused by 03 exposure, and if so, if effects were age-dependent. We selected protein carbonyl as an indicator of OS because carbonyl content of cells is a useful indicator of oxidative protein damage and has been linked to chemical-induced adverse effects. Male Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were exposed to 03 (0,0.25 or 1 ppm) via inhalation for 6 h/day, 2 days per week for 13 weeks. Frontal cortex (FC) and cerebellum (CB) were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at -80°C. Protein carbonyls were assayed using commercial kits. Hydrogen peroxide, a positive control, increased protein carbonyls in cortical tissue in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant effects of age on protein carbonyls in FC and a significant effect of age and 03 dose on protein carbonyls in CB were observed. In control rats, there was an age-dependent increase in protein carbonyls indicating increased OS in 12 and 24 month old rats compared to 4 month old rats. Although 03 increase

  5. Ozone Effects on Protein Carbonyl Content in the Frontal ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in susceptibility and disease in old age. Understanding age-related susceptibility is a critical part of community-based human health risk assessment of chemical exposures. There is growing concern over a common air pollutant, ozone (03), and adverse health effects including dysfunction of the pulmonary, cardiac, and nervous systems. The objective of this study was to test whether OS plays a role in the adverse effects caused by 03 exposure, and if so, if effects were age-dependent. We selected protein carbonyl as an indicator of OS because carbonyl content of cells is a useful indicator of oxidative protein damage and has been linked to chemical-induced adverse effects. Male Brown Norway rats (4, 12, and 24 months) were exposed to 03 (0,0.25 or 1 ppm) via inhalation for 6 h/day, 2 days per week for 13 weeks. Frontal cortex (FC) and cerebellum (CB) were dissected, quick frozen on dry ice, and stored at -80°C. Protein carbonyls were assayed using commercial kits. Hydrogen peroxide, a positive control, increased protein carbonyls in cortical tissue in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Significant effects of age on protein carbonyls in FC and a significant effect of age and 03 dose on protein carbonyls in CB were observed. In control rats, there was an age-dependent increase in protein carbonyls indicating increased OS in 12 and 24 month old rats compared to 4 month old rats. Although 03 increase

  6. Age-Dependent Protein Aggregation Initiates Amyloid-β Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Nicole; Bühler, Anika; Huang, Chaolie; Li, Ka Wan; van Nierop, Pim; Smit, August B.; Fändrich, Marcus; Baumann, Frank; David, Della C.

    2017-01-01

    Aging is the most important risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases associated with pathological protein aggregation such as Alzheimer’s disease. Although aging is an important player, it remains unknown which molecular changes are relevant for disease initiation. Recently, it has become apparent that widespread protein aggregation is a common feature of aging. Indeed, several studies demonstrate that 100s of proteins become highly insoluble with age, in the absence of obvious disease processes. Yet it remains unclear how these misfolded proteins aggregating with age affect neurodegenerative diseases. Importantly, several of these aggregation-prone proteins are found as minor components in disease-associated hallmark aggregates such as amyloid-β plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. This co-localization raises the possibility that age-dependent protein aggregation directly contributes to pathological aggregation. Here, we show for the first time that highly insoluble proteins from aged Caenorhabditis elegans or aged mouse brains, but not from young individuals, can initiate amyloid-β aggregation in vitro. We tested the seeding potential at four different ages across the adult lifespan of C. elegans. Significantly, protein aggregates formed during the early stages of aging did not act as seeds for amyloid-β aggregation. Instead, we found that changes in protein aggregation occurring during middle-age initiated amyloid-β aggregation. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed several late-aggregating proteins that were previously identified as minor components of amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles such as 14-3-3, Ubiquitin-like modifier-activating enzyme 1 and Lamin A/C, highlighting these as strong candidates for cross-seeding. Overall, we demonstrate that widespread protein misfolding and aggregation with age could be critical for the initiation of pathogenesis, and thus should be targeted by therapeutic strategies to alleviate neurodegenerative

  7. Protein Carbonylation and Adipocyte Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jessica M.; Hahn, Wendy S.; Stone, Matthew D.; Inda, Jacob J.; Droullard, David J.; Kuzmicic, Jovan P.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Long, Eric K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte. PMID:22822087

  8. Validation of protein carbonyl measurement: a multi-centre study.

    PubMed

    Augustyniak, Edyta; Adam, Aisha; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Willetts, Rachel; Korkmaz, Ayhan; Atalay, Mustafa; Weber, Daniela; Grune, Tilman; Borsa, Claudia; Gradinaru, Daniela; Chand Bollineni, Ravi; Fedorova, Maria; Griffiths, Helen R

    2015-01-01

    Protein carbonyls are widely analysed as a measure of protein oxidation. Several different methods exist for their determination. A previous study had described orders of magnitude variance that existed when protein carbonyls were analysed in a single laboratory by ELISA using different commercial kits. We have further explored the potential causes of variance in carbonyl analysis in a ring study. A soluble protein fraction was prepared from rat liver and exposed to 0, 5 and 15min of UV irradiation. Lyophilised preparations were distributed to six different laboratories that routinely undertook protein carbonyl analysis across Europe. ELISA and Western blotting techniques detected an increase in protein carbonyl formation between 0 and 5min of UV irradiation irrespective of method used. After irradiation for 15min, less oxidation was detected by half of the laboratories than after 5min irradiation. Three of the four ELISA carbonyl results fell within 95% confidence intervals. Likely errors in calculating absolute carbonyl values may be attributed to differences in standardisation. Out of up to 88 proteins identified as containing carbonyl groups after tryptic cleavage of irradiated and control liver proteins, only seven were common in all three liver preparations. Lysine and arginine residues modified by carbonyls are likely to be resistant to tryptic proteolysis. Use of a cocktail of proteases may increase the recovery of oxidised peptides. In conclusion, standardisation is critical for carbonyl analysis and heavily oxidised proteins may not be effectively analysed by any existing technique.

  9. PROTEOMIC IDENTIFICATION OF CARBONYLATED PROTEINS AND THEIR OXIDATION SITES

    PubMed Central

    Madian, Ashraf G.; Regnier, Fred E.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive oxidative stress leaves a protein carbonylation fingerprint in biological systems. Carbonylation is an irreversible post translational modification (PTM) that often leads to the loss of protein function and can be a component of multiple diseases. Protein carbonyl groups can be generated directly (by amino acids oxidation and the a-amidation pathway) or indirectly by forming adducts with lipid peroxidation products or glycation and advanced glycation end-products. Studies of oxidative stress are complicated by the low concentration of oxidation products and wide array of routes by which proteins are carbonylated. The development of new selection and enrichment techniques coupled with advances in mass spectrometry are allowing identification of hundreds of new carbonylated protein products from a broad range of proteins located at many sites in biological systems. The focus of this review is on the use of proteomics tools and methods to identify oxidized proteins along with specific sites of oxidative damage and the consequences of protein oxidation. PMID:20521848

  10. Loss of prion protein leads to age-dependent behavioral abnormalities and changes in cytoskeletal protein expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a multifunctional protein, whose exact physiological role remains elusive. Since previous studies indicated a neuroprotective function of PrPC, we investigated whether Prnp knockout mice(Prnp0/0)display age-dependent behavioral abnormalities. Matched sets of Prnp0/0 ...

  11. Proteome-wide profiling of carbonylated proteins and carbonylation sites in HeLa cells under mild oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Hoffmann, Ralf; Fedorova, Maria

    2014-03-01

    A number of oxidative protein modifications have been well characterized during the past decade. Presumably, reversible oxidative posttranslational modifications (PTMs) play a significant role in redox signaling pathways, whereas irreversible modifications including reactive protein carbonyl groups are harmful, as their levels are typically increased during aging and in certain diseases. Despite compelling evidence linking protein carbonylation to numerous disorders, the underlying molecular mechanisms at the proteome remain to be identified. Recent advancements in analysis of PTMs by mass spectrometry provided new insights into the mechanisms of protein carbonylation, such as protein susceptibility and exact modification sites, but only for a limited number of proteins. Here we report the first proteome-wide study of carbonylated proteins including modification sites in HeLa cells for mild oxidative stress conditions. The analysis relied on our recent strategy utilizing mass spectrometry-based enrichment of carbonylated peptides after DNPH derivatization. Thus a total of 210 carbonylated proteins containing 643 carbonylation sites were consistently identified in three replicates. Most carbonylation sites (284, 44.2%) resulted from oxidation of lysine residues (aminoadipic semialdehyde). Additionally, 121 arginine (18.8%), 121 threonine (18.8%), and 117 proline residues (18.2%) were oxidized to reactive carbonyls. The sequence motifs were significantly enriched for lysine and arginine residues near carbonylation sites (±10 residues). Gene Ontology analysis revealed that 80% of the carbonylated proteins originated from organelles, 50% enrichment of which was demonstrated for the nucleus. Moreover, functional interactions between carbonylated proteins of kinetochore/spindle machinery and centrosome organization were significantly enriched. One-third of the 210 carbonylated proteins identified here are regulated during apoptosis.

  12. Proteomic approaches to identifying carbonylated proteins in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Linares, María; Marín-Garcíía, Patricia; Méndez, Darío; Puyet, Antonio; Diez, Amalia; Bautista, José M

    2011-04-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. The carbonyl end products of protein oxidation are among the most commonly measured markers of oxidation in biological samples. Protein carbonyl functional groups may be derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) to render a stable 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone-protein (DNP-protein) and the carbonyl contents of individual proteins then determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting using specific anti-DNP antibodies. Unfortunately, derivatization of proteins with DNPH could affect their mass spectrometry (MS) identification. This problem can be overcome using nontreated samples for protein identification. Nevertheless, derivatization could also affect their mobility, which might be solved by performing the derivatization step after the initial electrophoresis. Here, we compare two-dimensional redox proteome maps of mouse cerebellum acquired by performing the DNPH derivatization step before or after electrophoresis and detect differences in protein patterns. When the same approach is used for protein detection and identification, both methods were found to be useful to identify carbonylated proteins. However, whereas pre-DNPH derivatized proteins were successfully analyzed, high background staining complicated the analysis when the DNPH reaction was performed after transblotting. Comparative data on protein identification using both methods are provided.

  13. [Assessment of the concentrations of carbonylated proteins and carbonyl reductase enzyme in mexican women with breast cancer: A pilot study].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Mondragón-Terán, Paul; Hernández-Rodríguez, Sergio; Ramírez-García, Sotero; Núñez-Ramos, Norma Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress could promote the development of cancer and implicate carbonylated proteins in the carcinogenic process. The goal of this study was to assess the concentrations of carbonylated proteins and carbonyl reductase enzyme in women with breast cancer and determine whether these markers were possible indicators of tissue damage caused by the disease. A total of 120 healthy women and 123 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer were included. The concentration of carbonylated proteins in plasma and the concentration of carbonyl reductase enzyme in leukocytes were determined using the ELISA assay. There was a 3.76-fold increase in the amount of carbonylated proteins in the plasma from the patient group compared with healthy control group (5±3.27 vs. 1.33±2.31 nmol carbonyls/mg protein; p<0.05). Additionally, a 60% increase in the carbonyl reductase enzyme was observed in the patient group compared with the healthy control group (3.27±0.124 vs. 2.04±0.11 ng/mg protein; p<0.05). A positive correlation (r=0.95; p<0.001) was found between both measurements. These results suggest the presence of tissue damage produced by cancer; therefore, these parameters could be used to indicate tissue damage in cancer patients.

  14. Cytokinin inhibits the proteasome-mediated degradation of carbonylated proteins in Arabidopsis leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Under normal conditions, plants contain numerous carbonylated proteins, which are thought to be indicative of oxidative stress damage. Conditions that promote formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) enhance protein carbonylation, and protein degradation is required to reverse the damage. However,...

  15. Network simulation reveals significant contribution of network motifs to the age-dependency of yeast protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cheng; Luo, Jiawei; Song, Dan

    2014-07-29

    Advances in proteomic technologies combined with sophisticated computing and modeling methods have generated an unprecedented amount of high-throughput data for system-scale analysis. As a result, the study of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has garnered much attention in recent years. One of the most fundamental problems in studying PPI networks is to understand how their architecture originated and evolved to their current state. By investigating how proteins of different ages are connected in the yeast PPI networks, one can deduce their expansion procedure in evolution and how the ancient primitive network expanded and evolved. Studies have shown that proteins are often connected to other proteins of a similar age, suggesting a high degree of age preference between interacting proteins. Though several theories have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, none of them considered protein-clusters as a contributing factor. Here we first investigate the age-dependency of the proteins from the perspective of network motifs. Our analysis confirms that proteins of the same age groups tend to form interacting network motifs; furthermore, those proteins within motifs tend to be within protein complexes and the interactions among them largely contribute to the observed age preference in the yeast PPI networks. In light of these results, we describe a new modeling approach, based on "network motifs", whereby topologically connected protein clusters in the network are treated as single evolutionary units. Instead of modeling single proteins, our approach models the connections and evolutionary relationships of multiple related protein clusters or "network motifs" that are collectively integrated into an existing PPI network. Through simulation studies, we found that the "network motif" modeling approach can capture yeast PPI network properties better than if individual proteins were considered to be the simplest evolutionary units. Our approach provides a fresh

  16. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  17. Protein carbonylation and muscle function in COPD and other conditions.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, the most abundant tissue in mammals, is essential for any activity in life. Muscle dysfunction is a common systemic manifestation in highly prevalent conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cancer cachexia, and sepsis. It has a significant impact on exercise tolerance, thus worsening the patients' quality of life and survival. Among several factors, oxidative stress is a major player in the etiology of skeletal muscle dysfunction associated with those conditions. Whereas low levels of oxidants are absolutely required for normal cell adaptation, high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) alter the function and structure of molecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids. Specifically, protein carbonylation, a common variety of protein oxidation, was shown to alter the function of key enzymes and structural proteins involved in muscle contractile performance. Moreover, increased levels of ROS may also activate proteolytic systems, thus leading to enhanced protein breakdown in several models. In the current review, the specific modifications induced by carbonylation in protein structure and function in muscles have been described. Furthermore, the potential role of ROS in the activation of proteolytic systems in skeletal muscles is also discussed. The review summarizes the effects of protein carbonylation on muscles in several models and conditions such as COPD, disuse muscle atrophy, cancer cachexia, sepsis, and aging. Future research should focus on the elucidation of the specific protein sites modified by ROS in these muscles using redox proteomics analyses and on the assessment of the consequent alterations in protein function and stability.

  18. Age-related variations of protein carbonyls in human saliva and plasma: is saliva protein carbonyls an alternative biomarker of aging?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Yanyi; Liu, Hongchen; Che, Yuwei; Xu, Yingying; E, Lingling

    2015-06-01

    Free radical hypothesis which is one of the most acknowledged aging theories was developed into oxidative stress hypothesis. Protein carbonylation is by far one of the most widely used markers of protein oxidation. We studied the role of age and gender in protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma among 273 Chinese healthy subjects (137 females and 136 males aged between 20 and 79) and discussed the correlation between protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma. Protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma were, respectively, 2.391 ± 0.639 and 0.838 ± 0.274 nmol/mg. Variations of saliva and plasma different age groups all reached significant differences in both male and female (all p < 0.05) while both saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were found to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.6582 and r = 0.5176, all p < 0.001). Gender was discovered to be unrelated to saliva and plasma protein carbonyl levels (all p > 0.05). Saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were positively related (r = 0.4405, p < 0.001). Surprisingly, saliva and plasma protein carbonyls/ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) ratios were proved to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.7796 and r = 0.6938, all p < 0.001) while saliva protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio and plasma protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio were also correlated (r = 0.5573, p < 0.001). We concluded that saliva protein carbonyls seem to be an alternative biomarker of aging while the mechanisms of protein carbonylation and oxidative stress and the relationship between saliva protein carbonyls and diseases need to be further investigated.

  19. Protein carbonyl groups as biomarkers of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Rossi, Ranieri; Giustarini, Daniela; Milzani, Aldo; Colombo, Roberto

    2003-03-01

    Oxidative stress, an imbalance toward the pro-oxidant side of the pro-oxidant/antioxidant homeostasis, occurs in several human diseases. Among these diseases are those in which high levels of protein carbonyl (CO) groups have been observed, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, sepsis, chronic renal failure, and respiratory distress syndrome. What relationships might be among high level of protein CO groups, oxidative stress, and diseases remain uncertain.The usage of protein CO groups as biomarkers of oxidative stress has some advantages in comparison with the measurement of other oxidation products because of the relative early formation and the relative stability of carbonylated proteins. Most of the assays for detection of protein CO groups involve derivatisation of the carbonyl group with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), which leads to formation of a stable dinitrophenyl (DNP) hydrazone product. This then can be detected by various means, such as spectrophotometric assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and one-dimensional or two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by Western blot immunoassay. At present, the measurement of protein CO groups after their derivatisation with DNPH is the most widely utilized measure of protein oxidation.

  20. PIP3-binding proteins promote age-dependent protein aggregation and limit survival in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Balasubramaniam, Meenakshisundaram; Johnson, Jay; Alla, Ramani; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2016-08-02

    Class-I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3KI) converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3). PIP3 comprises two fatty-acid chains that embed in lipid-bilayer membranes, joined by glycerol to inositol triphosphate. Proteins with domains that specifically bind that head-group (e.g. pleckstrin-homology [PH] domains) are thus tethered to the inner plasma-membrane surface where they have an enhanced likelihood of interaction with other PIP3-bound proteins, in particular other components of their signaling pathways. Null alleles of the C. elegans age-1 gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of PI3KI, lack any detectable class-I PI3K activity and so cannot form PIP3. These mutant worms survive almost 10-fold longer than the longest-lived normal control, and are highly resistant to a variety of stresses including oxidative and electrophilic challenges. Traits associated with age-1 mutation are widely believed to be mediated through AKT-1, which requires PIP3 for both tethering and activation. Active AKT complex phosphorylates and thereby inactivates the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. However, extensive evidence indicates that pleiotropic effects of age-1-null mutations, including extreme longevity, cannot be explained by insulin like-receptor/AKT/FOXO signaling alone, suggesting involvement of other PIP3-binding proteins. We used ligand-affinity capture to identify membrane-bound proteins downstream of PI3KI that preferentially bind PIP3. Computer modeling supports a subset of candidate proteins predicted to directly bind PIP3 in preference to PIP2, and functional testing by RNAi knockdown confirmed candidates that partially mediate the stress-survival, aggregation-reducing and longevity benefits of PI3KI disruption. PIP3-specific candidate sets are highly enriched for proteins previously reported to affect translation, stress responses, lifespan, proteostasis, and lipid transport.

  1. Protein oxidation: examination of potential lipid-independent mechanisms for protein carbonyl formation.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, D P; Ryan, T P; Jolly, R A; Petry, T W

    1998-01-01

    Previous data indicated that diquat-mediated protein oxidation (protein carbonyl formation) occurs through multiple pathways, one of which is lipid dependent, and the other, lipid independent. Studies reported here investigated potential mechanisms of the lipid-independent pathway in greater detail, using bovine serum albumin as the target protein. One hypothesized mechanism of protein carbonyl formation involved diquat-dependent production of H2O2, which would then react with site-specifically bound ferrous iron as proposed by Stadtman and colleagues. This hypothesis was supported by the inhibitory effect of catalase on diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation. However, exogenous H2O2 alone did not induce protein carbonyl formation. Hydroxyl radical-generating reactions may result from the H2O2-catalyzed oxidation of ferrous iron, which normally is bound to protein in the ferric state. Therefore, the possible reduction of site-specifically bound Fe3+ to Fe2+ by the diquat cation radical (which could then react with H2O2) was also investigated. The combination of H2O2 and an iron reductant, ascorbate, however, also failed to induce significant protein carbonyl formation. In a phospholipid-containing system, an ADP:Fe2+ complex induced both lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl formation; both indices were largely inhibitable by antioxidants. There was no substantial ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation in the absence of phospholipid under otherwise identical conditions. Based on the lipid requirement and antioxidant sensitivity, these data suggest that ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation occurs through reaction of BSA with aldehydic lipid peroxidation products. The precise mechanism of diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation remains unclear, but it appears not to be a function of H2O2 generation or diquat cation radical-dependent reduction of bound Fe3+.

  2. Protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Anushka

    Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Yet, the mechanism by which oxidative stress leads to tissue damage in these disorders is unclear. Recent work from our laboratory has revealed that protein carbonylation, a major oxidative modification caused by severe and/or chronic oxidative stress conditions, is elevated in MS and EAE. Furthermore, protein carbonylation has been shown to alter protein structure leading to misfolding/aggregation. These findings prompted me to hypothesize that carbonylated proteins, formed as a consequence of oxidative stress and/or decreased proteasomal activity, promote protein aggregation to mediate neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in EAE. To test this novel hypothesis, I first characterized protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and apoptosis along the spinal cord during the course of myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice [Chapter 2]. The results show that carbonylated proteins accumulate throughout the course of the disease, albeit by different mechanisms: increased oxidative stress in acute EAE and decreased proteasomal activity in chronic EAE. I discovered not only that there is a temporal correlation between protein carbonylation and apoptosis but also that carbonyl levels are significantly higher in apoptotic cells. A high number of juxta-nuclear and cytoplasmic protein aggregates containing the majority of the oxidized proteins are also present during the course of EAE, which seems to be due to reduced autophagy. In chapter 3, I show that when gluthathione levels are reduced to those in EAE spinal cord, both neuron-like PC12 (nPC12) cells and primary neuronal cultures accumulate carbonylated proteins and undergo cell death (both by necrosis and apoptosis). Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies also revealed a temporal

  3. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic detection of protein carbonyls derivatized with biotin-hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinzi; Luo, Xiaoting; Jing, Siqun; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-04-15

    Protein carbonyls are protein oxidation products that are often used to measure the magnitude of protein oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen or reactive nitrogen species. Protein carbonyls have been found to be elevated during aging and in age-related diseases such as stroke, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present article, we provide detailed protocols for detection of mitochondrial protein carbonyls labeled with biotin-hydrazide followed by 2-dimensional isoelectric focusing (IEF)/SDS-PAGE and Western blotting probed with horse-radish peroxidase-conjugated streptavidin. The presented procedures can also be modified for detection of carbonylation of non-mitochondrial proteins.

  4. Proteomic identification of carbonylated proteins in the kidney of trichloroethene-exposed MRL+/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiuzhen; Wang, Gangduo; English, Robert D.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2013-01-01

    Trichloroethene (TCE), a common environmental and occupational pollutant, is associated with multi-organ toxicity. Kidney is one of major target organs affected as a result of TCE exposure. Our previous studies have shown that exposure to TCE causes increased protein oxidation (protein carbonylation) in the kidneys of autoimmune-prone MRL +/+ mice, and suggested a potential role of protein oxidation in TCE-mediated nephrotoxicity. To assess the impact of chronic TCE exposure on protein oxidation, particularly to identify the carbonylated proteins in kidneys, female MRL+/+ mice were treated with TCE at the dose of 2 mg/ml via drinking water for 36 weeks and kidney protein extracts were analyzed for protein carbonyls and carbonylated proteins identified using proteomic approaches (2D gel, Western blot, MALDI TOF/TOF MS/MS, etc.). TCE treatment led to significantly increased protein carbonyls in the kidney protein extracts (20,000g pellet fraction). Interestingly, among 18 identified carbonylated proteins, 10 were found only in the kidneys of TCE-treated mice, whereas other 8 were present in the kidneys of both control and TCE-treated mice. The identified carbonylated proteins represent skeletal proteins, chaperones, stress proteins, enzymes, plasma protein, and proteins involved in signaling pathways. The findings provide a map for further exploring the role of carbonylated proteins in TCE-mediated nephrotoxicity. PMID:24024666

  5. Carbonylated plasma proteins as potential biomarkers of obesity induced type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Fedorova, Maria; Blüher, Matthias; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-11-07

    Protein carbonylation is a common nonenzymatic oxidative post-translational modification, which is often considered as biomarker of oxidative stress. Recent evidence links protein carbonylation also to obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), though the protein targets of carbonylation in human plasma have not been identified. In this study, we profiled carbonylated proteins in plasma samples obtained from lean individuals and obese patients with or without T2DM. The plasma samples were digested with trypsin, carbonyl groups were derivatized with O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl)hydroxylamine, enriched by avidin affinity chromatography, and analyzed by RPC-MS/MS. Signals of potentially modified peptides were targeted in a second LC-MS/MS analysis to retrieve the peptide sequence and the modified residues. A total of 158 unique carbonylated proteins were identified, of which 52 were detected in plasma samples of all three groups. Interestingly, 36 carbonylated proteins were detected only in obese patients with T2DM, whereas 18 were detected in both nondiabetic groups. The carbonylated proteins originated mostly from liver, plasma, platelet, and endothelium. Functionally, they were mainly involved in cell adhesion, signaling, angiogenesis, and cytoskeletal remodeling. Among the identified carbonylated proteins were several candidates, such as VEGFR-2, MMP-1, argin, MKK4, and compliment C5, already connected before to diabetes, obesity and metabolic diseases.

  6. Protein carbonylation during natural leaf senescence in winter wheat, as probed by fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide.

    PubMed

    Havé, M; Leitao, L; Bagard, M; Castell, J-F; Repellin, A

    2015-09-01

    Leaf senescence is characterised by a massive degradation of proteins in order to recycle nitrogen to other parts of the plant, such as younger leaves or developing grain/seed. Protein degradation during leaf senescence is a highly regulated process and it is suggested that proteins to be degraded are marked by an oxidative modification (carbonylation) that makes them more susceptible to proteolysis. However, there is as yet no evidence of an increase in protein carbonylation level during natural leaf senescence. The aim of our study was thus to monitor protein carbonylation level during the process of natural senescence in the flag leaf of field-grown winter wheat plants. For this purpose, we adapted a fluorescence-based method using fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide (FTC) as a probe for detecting protein carbonyl derivatives. As used for the first time on plant material, this method allowed the detection of both quantitative and qualitative modifications in protein carbonyl levels during the last stages of wheat flag leaf development. The method described herein represents a convenient, sensitive and reproducible alternative to the commonly used 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-based method. In addition, our analysis revealed changes in protein carbonylation level during leaf development that were associated with qualitative changes in protein abundance and carbonylation profiles. In the senescing flag leaf, protein carbonylation increased concomitantly with a stimulation of endoproteolytic activity and a decrease in protein content, which supports the suggested relationship between protein oxidation and proteolysis during natural leaf senescence.

  7. Age-dependent blood pressure elevation is due to increased vascular smooth muscle tone mediated by G-protein signalling.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Angela; Wang, Shengpeng; Takefuji, Mikito; Tang, Cong; Althoff, Till F; Schweda, Frank; Wettschureck, Nina; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The kidney and its natriuretic function are in the centre of the prevailing models to explain the pathogenesis of hypertension; however, the mechanisms underlying blood pressure elevation remain unclear in most patients. Development of hypertension is strongly correlated with age, and this blood pressure increase typically accelerates in the fourth decade of life. The cause of age-dependent blood pressure elevation is poorly understood. This study aims to understand the role of procontractile G-protein-mediated signalling pathways in vascular smooth muscle in age-dependent hypertension. Similar to humans at mid-life, we observed in 1-year-old mice elevated blood pressure levels without any evidence for increased vessel stiffness, impaired renal function, or endocrine abnormalities. Hypertensive aged mice showed signs of endothelial dysfunction and had an increased vascular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elevated endothelial ET-1 expression. Age-dependent hypertension could be normalized by ETA receptor blockade, smooth muscle-specific inactivation of the gene encoding the ETA receptor, as well as by acute disruption of downstream signalling via induction of smooth muscle-specific Gα12/Gα13, Gαq/Gα11, or LARG deficiency using tamoxifen-inducible smooth muscle-specific conditional mouse knock-out models. Induction of smooth muscle-specific ETA receptor deficiency normalized the blood pressure in aged mice despite the continuous presence of signs of endothelial dysfunction. Age-dependent blood pressure elevation is due to a highly reversible activation of procontractile signalling in vascular smooth muscle cells indicating that increased vascular tone can be a primary factor in the development of hypertension. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of derivatization reagents for different types of protein-bound carbonyl groups.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Fedorova, Maria; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2013-09-07

    Mass spectrometry (MS) of 'carbonylated proteins' often involves derivatization of reactive carbonyl groups to facilitate their enrichment, identification and quantification. Among the many reported reagents, 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), biotin hydrazide (BHZ) and O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl) hydroxylamine (ARP) are the most frequently used. Despite their common use in carbonylation research, their reactivity towards protein-bound carbonyls has not been quantitatively evaluated in detail, to the best of our knowledge. Thus we studied the reactivity and specificity of these reagents towards different classes of reactive carbonyl groups (e.g. aldehydes, ketones and lactams), each being represented by a synthetic peptide carrying an accordingly modified residue. All three tagging reagents were selective for aliphatic aldehydes and ketones. Lactams and carbonyl-containing tryptophan oxidation products, however, were labelled only at low levels or not at all. Whereas DNPH derivatization was efficient under the published standard conditions, the derivatization conditions for BHZ and ARP had to be altered. Acidic conditions provided quantitative labelling yields for ARP. Peptides derivatized with DNPH, BHZ and ARP fragmented efficiently in tandem mass spectrometry, when the experimental conditions were chosen carefully for each reagent. Importantly, the tested carbonylated peptides did not cross-react with amino groups in other proteins present during sample preparations or enzymatic digestion. Thus, it appears favourable to digest proteins first and then derivatise the reactive carbonyl groups more efficiently at the peptide level under acidic conditions. The carbonylated model peptides used in this study might be valid internal standards for carbonylation proteomics.

  9. Structural characteristics of green tea catechins for formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takeshi; Mori, Taiki; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Kaku, Maiko; Kusaka, Koji; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Aihara, Yoshiyuki; Furuta, Takumi; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Kan, Toshiyuki; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2010-07-15

    Catechins are polyphenolic antioxidants found in green tea leaves. Recent studies have reported that various polyphenolic compounds, including catechins, cause protein carbonyl formation in proteins via their pro-oxidant actions. In this study, we evaluate the formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin (HSA) by tea catechins and investigate the relationship between catechin chemical structure and its pro-oxidant property. To assess the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA, HSA was incubated with four individual catechins under physiological conditions to generate biotin-LC-hydrazide labeled protein carbonyls. Comparison of catechins using Western blotting revealed that the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA was higher for pyrogallol-type catechins than the corresponding catechol-type catechins. In addition, the formation of protein carbonyl was also found to be higher for the catechins having a galloyl group than the corresponding catechins lacking a galloyl group. The importance of the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring and the galloyl group was confirmed using methylated catechins and phenolic acids. These results indicate that the most important structural element contributing to the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA by tea catechins is the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring, followed by the galloyl group. The oxidation stability and binding affinity of tea catechins with proteins are responsible for the formation of protein carbonyl, and consequently the difference in these properties of each catechin may contribute to the magnitude of their biological activities.

  10. Age-dependent decline of nogo-a protein in the mouse cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Anita; Thakur, M K

    2014-11-01

    Nogo-A, a myelin-associated neurite growth inhibitory protein, is implicated in synaptic plasticity. It binds to its receptor namely the Nogo-66 receptor1 (NgR1) and regulates filamentous (F) actin dynamics via small GTPases of the Rho family, RhoA kinase (ROCK), LimK and cofilin. These proteins are associated with the structural plasticity, one of the components of synaptic plasticity, which is known to decline with normal aging. So, the level of Nogo-A and its receptor NgR1 are likely to vary during normal brain aging. However, it is not clearly understood how the levels of Nogo-A and its receptor NgR1 change in the cerebrum during aging. Several studies show an age- and gender-dependent decline in synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the present study was planned to analyze the relative changes in the mRNA and protein levels of Nogo-A and NgR1 in both male and female mice cerebrum during normal aging. Western blot analysis has shown decrease in Nogo-A protein level during aging in both male and female mice cerebrum. This was further confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis. RT-PCR analysis of Nogo-A mRNA showed no significant difference in the above-mentioned groups. This was also supported by in situ hybridization. NgR1 protein and its mRNA expression levels showed no significant alteration with aging in the cerebrum of both male and female mice. Taken together, we speculate that the downregulation of Nogo-A protein might have a role in the altered synaptic plasticity during aging.

  11. Age-dependent protein modifications and declining proteasome activity in the human lens.

    PubMed

    Viteri, Gabriela; Carrard, Géraldine; Birlouez-Aragón, Inès; Silva, Eduardo; Friguet, Bertrand

    2004-07-15

    The proteasome is known to be the main enzymatic complex responsible for the intracellular degradation of altered proteins, and the age-related accumulation of modified lens proteins is associated to the formation of cataracts. The aim of this study was to determine whether the human lens proteasome becomes functionally impaired with age. The soluble and insoluble protein fractions of human lenses corresponding to various age-groups were characterized in terms of their levels of glyco-oxidative damage and found to show increasing anti-carboxymethyl-lysine immunoreactivity with age. Concomitantly, decreasing proteasome contents and peptidase activities were observed in the water-soluble fraction. The fact that peptidylglutamyl-peptide hydrolase activity is most severely affected with age suggests that specific changes are undergone by the proteasome itself. In particular, increasing levels of carboxymethylation were observed with age in the proteasome. It was concluded that the lower levels of soluble active enzymatic complex present in elderly lenses and the post-translational modifications affecting the proteasome may at least partly explain the decrease in proteasome activity and the concomitant accumulation of carboxymethylated and ubiquitinated proteins which occur with age.

  12. Age-dependent preferential dense-core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells revealed by newly developed monomeric fluorescent timer protein.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Karasawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Although it is evident that only a few secretory vesicles accumulating in neuroendocrine cells are qualified to fuse with the plasma membrane and release their contents to the extracellular space, the molecular mechanisms that regulate their exocytosis are poorly understood. For example, it has been controversial whether secretory vesicles are exocytosed randomly or preferentially according to their age. Using a newly developed protein-based fluorescent timer, monomeric Kusabira Green Orange (mK-GO), which changes color with a predictable time course, here we show that small GTPase Rab27A effectors regulate age-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles in PC12 cells. When the vesicles were labeled with mK-GO-tagged neuropeptide Y or tissue-type plasminogen activator, punctate structures with green or red fluorescence were observed. Application of high [K(+)] stimulation induced exocytosis of new (green) fluorescent secretory vesicles but not of old (red) vesicles. Overexpression or depletion of rabphilin and synaptotagmin-like protein4-a (Slp4-a), which regulate exocytosis positively and negatively, respectively, disturbed the age-dependent exocytosis of the secretory vesicles in different manners. Our results suggest that coordinate functions of the two effectors of Rab27A, rabphilin and Slp4-a, are required for regulated secretory pathway.

  13. A simple microfluidic platform to study age-dependent protein abundance and localization changes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Margarita; Novarina, Daniele; Rempel, Irina L.; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.; Chang, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae divides asymmetrically, with a smaller daughter cell emerging from its larger mother cell. While the daughter lineage is immortal, mother cells age with each cell division and have a finite lifespan. The replicative ageing of the yeast mother cell has been used as a model to study the ageing of mitotically active human cells. Several microfluidic platforms, which use fluid flow to selectively remove daughter cells, have recently been developed that can monitor cell physiology as mother cells age. However, these platforms are not trivial to set up and users often require many hours of training. In this study, we have developed a simple system, which combines a commercially available microfluidic platform (the CellASIC ONIX Microfluidic Platform) and a genetic tool to prevent the proliferation of daughter cells (the Mother Enrichment Program), to monitor protein abundance and localization changes during approximately the first half of the yeast replicative lifespan. We validated our system by observing known age-dependent changes, such as decreased Sir2 abundance, and have identified a protein with a previously unknown age-dependent change in localization. PMID:28685142

  14. Age-dependent Preferential Dense-Core Vesicle Exocytosis in Neuroendocrine Cells Revealed by Newly Developed Monomeric Fluorescent Timer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Karasawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2010-01-01

    Although it is evident that only a few secretory vesicles accumulating in neuroendocrine cells are qualified to fuse with the plasma membrane and release their contents to the extracellular space, the molecular mechanisms that regulate their exocytosis are poorly understood. For example, it has been controversial whether secretory vesicles are exocytosed randomly or preferentially according to their age. Using a newly developed protein-based fluorescent timer, monomeric Kusabira Green Orange (mK-GO), which changes color with a predictable time course, here we show that small GTPase Rab27A effectors regulate age-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles in PC12 cells. When the vesicles were labeled with mK-GO–tagged neuropeptide Y or tissue-type plasminogen activator, punctate structures with green or red fluorescence were observed. Application of high [K+] stimulation induced exocytosis of new (green) fluorescent secretory vesicles but not of old (red) vesicles. Overexpression or depletion of rabphilin and synaptotagmin-like protein4-a (Slp4-a), which regulate exocytosis positively and negatively, respectively, disturbed the age-dependent exocytosis of the secretory vesicles in different manners. Our results suggest that coordinate functions of the two effectors of Rab27A, rabphilin and Slp4-a, are required for regulated secretory pathway. PMID:19889833

  15. Behaviour of protein carbonyl groups in juvenile myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Caimi, Gregorio; Canino, Baldassare; Incalcaterra, Egle; Ferrera, Eleonora; Montana, Maria; Lo Presti, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is accompanied by oxidative stress, and protein oxidation is among the consequences of oxidative stress. We examined the plasma concentration of protein carbonyl groups (PC), a marker of protein oxidation, in a group of young subjects with AMI (45 men and 5 women; mean age 40.4 ± 4.8 yrs). We found a significant increase of PC (p < 0.001) in comparison with normal controls. No difference was observed between patients with AMI characterized by elevated ST segment and those without elevation of ST segment. There was no correlation between the ejection fraction and PC in the whole group nor in the subgroups of STEMI and non-STEMI patients. Subdividing the whole group of AMI patients according to the number of risk factors and the number of stenosed coronary vessels, the difference in PC level was not statistically significant among the subgroups. This study showed an increased protein oxidation in young subjects with recent AMI. Further investigation is needed to ascertain whether this can be a target of therapeutic intervention.

  16. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  17. Protein Carbonylation and Heat Shock Proteins in Human Skeletal Muscle: Relationships to Age and Sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    Beltran Valls, Maria R.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Narici, Marco V.; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E.; Caporossi, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into “old” and “old sarcopenic”) were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r 2 = −.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r 2 = −.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. PMID:24621945

  18. Evaluating the Age-Dependent Potential for Protein Deposition in Naked Neck Meat Type Chicken.

    PubMed

    Khan, Daulat R; Wecke, Christian; Sharifi, Ahmad R; Liebert, Frank

    2015-01-19

    The introduction of the naked neck gene (Na) into modern meat type chicken is known to be helpful in increasing the tolerance for a high ambient temperature (AT) by reducing the feather coverage which allows for a higher level of heat dissipation compared to normally feathered (na/na) birds. In addition, reduced feather coverage could affect requirements for sulfur containing amino acids. As a prerequisite for further modeling of individual amino acid requirements, the daily N maintenance requirement (NMR) and the threshold value of daily N retention (NRmaxT) were determined. This was carried out using graded dietary protein supply and exponential modeling between N intake (NI) and N excretion (NEX) or N deposition (ND), respectively. Studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% of each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments during both the starter (days 10-20) and the grower period (days 25-35). Birds were randomly allotted to five diets with graded dietary protein supply but constant protein quality. The observed estimates depending on genotype, sex and age varied for NMR and NRmaxT from 224 to 395 and 2881 to 4049 mg N/BWkg(0.67)/day, respectively.

  19. Age-dependent increase in the expression of antioxidant-like protein-1 in the gerbil hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-A; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant-like protein-1 (AOP-1) reduces the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the age-related change in AOP-1 expression in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged gerbils was compared using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that the protein expression of AOP-1 was gradually and significantly increased in the hippocampus during the normal aging process. In addition, the age-dependent increase in AOP-1 immunoreactivity was also observed in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus proper; however, in the dentate gyrus, AOP-1 immunoreactivity was not altered during the normal aging process. These results indicated that the expression of AOP-1 is significantly increased in the hippocampus proper, but not in the dentate gyrus, during the normal aging process. PMID:27511601

  20. Targeting Heat Shock Proteins Mitigates Ventilator Induced Diaphragm Muscle Dysfunction in an Age-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Cacciani, Nicola; Akkad, Hazem; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are often overtly subjected to mechanical ventilation and immobilization, which leads to impaired limb and respiratory muscle function. The latter, termed ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD) has recently been related to compromised heat shock protein (Hsp) activation. The administration of a pharmacological drug BGP-15 acting as a Hsp chaperone co-inducer has been found to partially alleviate VIDD in young rats. Considering that the mean age in the ICU is increasing, we aimed to explore whether the beneficial functional effects are also present in old rats. For that, we exposed young (7–8 months) and old (28–32 months) rats to 5-day controlled mechanical ventilation and immobilization with or without systemic BGP-15 administration. We then dissected diaphragm muscles, membrane–permeabilized bundles and evaluated the contractile function at single fiber level. Results confirmed that administration of BGP-15 restored the force-generating capacity of isolated muscle cells from young rats in conjunction with an increased expression of Hsp72. On the other hand, our results highlighted that old rats did not positively respond to the BGP-15 treatment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to comprehend in more depth the effect of VIDD on diaphragm function and ascertain any further age-related differences. PMID:27729867

  1. Targeting Heat Shock Proteins Mitigates Ventilator Induced Diaphragm Muscle Dysfunction in an Age-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Hannah; Cacciani, Nicola; Akkad, Hazem; Larsson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are often overtly subjected to mechanical ventilation and immobilization, which leads to impaired limb and respiratory muscle function. The latter, termed ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction (VIDD) has recently been related to compromised heat shock protein (Hsp) activation. The administration of a pharmacological drug BGP-15 acting as a Hsp chaperone co-inducer has been found to partially alleviate VIDD in young rats. Considering that the mean age in the ICU is increasing, we aimed to explore whether the beneficial functional effects are also present in old rats. For that, we exposed young (7-8 months) and old (28-32 months) rats to 5-day controlled mechanical ventilation and immobilization with or without systemic BGP-15 administration. We then dissected diaphragm muscles, membrane-permeabilized bundles and evaluated the contractile function at single fiber level. Results confirmed that administration of BGP-15 restored the force-generating capacity of isolated muscle cells from young rats in conjunction with an increased expression of Hsp72. On the other hand, our results highlighted that old rats did not positively respond to the BGP-15 treatment. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to comprehend in more depth the effect of VIDD on diaphragm function and ascertain any further age-related differences.

  2. Inhibition of cytoskeletal protein carbonylation may protect against oxidative damage in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiusheng; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Xianjian; Liu, Xiaojia; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the principal factor in traumatic brain injury (TBI) that initiates protracted neuronal dysfunction and remodeling. Cytoskeletal proteins are known to be carbonylated under oxidative stress; however, the complex molecular and cellular mechanisms of cytoskeletal protein carbonylation remain poorly understood. In the present study, the expression levels of glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were investigated in PC12 cells treated with H2O2. Western blot analysis was used to monitor the carbonylation levels of β-actin and β-tubulin. The results indicated that oxidative stress was increased in PC12 cells that were treated with H2O2 for 24 or 48 h. In addition, increased carbonylation levels of β-actin and β-tubulin were detected in H2O2-treated cells. However, these carbonylation levels were reduced by pretreatment with aminoguanidine, a type of reactive carbonyl species chelating agent, and a similar trend was observed following overexpression of proteasome β5 via transgenic technology. In conclusion, the present study results suggested that the development of TBI may cause carbonylation of cytoskeletal proteins, which would then undermine the stability of cytoskeletal proteins. Thus, the development of TBI may be improved via the inhibition of cytoskeletal protein carbonylation. PMID:28101189

  3. Factors influencing post-exercise plasma protein carbonyl concentration.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Alex J; Turner, James E; Aldred, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Exercise of sufficient intensity and duration can cause acute oxidative stress. Plasma protein carbonyl (PC) moieties are abundant, chemically stable, and easily detectable markers of oxidative stress that are widely used for the interpretation of exercise-induced changes in redox balance. Despite many studies reporting acute increases in plasma PC concentration in response to exercise, some studies, including those from our own laboratory have shown decreases. This review will discuss the differences between studies reporting increases, decreases, and no change in plasma PC concentration following exercise in humans; highlighting participant physiology (i.e. training status) and study design (i.e. intensity, duration, and novelty of the exercise bout) as the main factors driving the direction of the PC response to exercise. The role of the 20S proteasome system is proposed as a possible mechanism mediating the clearance of plasma PC following exercise. Resting and exercise-induced differences in plasma protein composition and balance between tissues are also discussed. We suggest that exercise may stimulate the clearance of plasma PC present at baseline, whereas simultaneously increasing reactive oxygen species production that facilitates the formation of new PC groups. The balance between these two processes likely explains why some studies have reported no change or even decreases in plasma PC level post-exercise when other biomarkers of oxidative stress (e.g. markers of lipid peroxidation) were elevated. Future studies should determine factors that influence the balance between PC clearance and formation following acute exercise.

  4. Fluorescence labeling of carbonylated lipids and proteins in cells using coumarin-hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Venukumar; Ni, Zhixu; Fedorova, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Carbonylation is a generic term which refers to reactive carbonyl groups present in biomolecules due to oxidative reactions induced by reactive oxygen species. Carbonylated proteins, lipids and nucleic acids have been intensively studied and often associated with onset or progression of oxidative stress related disorders. In order to reveal underlying carbonylation pathways and biological relevance, it is crucial to study their intracellular formation and spatial distribution. Carbonylated species are usually identified and quantified in cell lysates and body fluids after derivatization using specific chemical probes. However, spatial cellular and tissue distribution have been less often investigated. Here, we report coumarin-hydrazide, a fluorescent chemical probe for time- and cost-efficient labeling of cellular carbonyls followed by fluorescence microscopy to evaluate their intracellular formation both in time and space. The specificity of coumarin-hydrazide was confirmed in time- and dose-dependent experiments using human primary fibroblasts stressed with paraquat and compared with conventional DNPH-based immunocytochemistry. Both techniques stained carbonylated species accumulated in cytoplasm with strong perinuclear clustering. Using a complimentary array of analytical methods specificity of coumarin-hydrazide probe towards both protein- and lipid-bound carbonyls has been shown. Additionally, co-distribution of carbonylated species and oxidized phospholipids was demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modification of plasma proteins by cigarette smoke as measured by protein carbonyl formation.

    PubMed Central

    Reznick, A Z; Cross, C E; Hu, M L; Suzuki, Y J; Khwaja, S; Safadi, A; Motchnik, P A; Packer, L; Halliwell, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of human plasma to gas-phase (but not to whole) cigarette smoke (CS) produces oxidative damage to lipids [Frei, Forte, Ames & Cross (1991) Biochem. J. 277, 133-138], which is prevented by ascorbic acid. The ability of CS to induce protein damage was measured by the carbonyl assay and by loss of enzyme activity and protein -SH groups. Both whole and gas-phase CS caused formation of carbonyls in human plasma, which was partially inhibited by GSH but not by ascorbic acid or metal-ion-chelating agents. Isolated albumin exposed to CS showed much faster carbonyl formation (per unit protein) than did whole plasma; damage to isolated albumin was partially prevented by chelating agents. Isolated creatine kinase (CK) lost activity upon exposure to CS much faster than did CK in plasma. Direct addition to plasma of mixtures of some or all of the aldehydes reported to be present in CS caused protein carbonyl formation and inactivation of CK, but neither occurred to the extent produced by CS exposure. PMID:1530591

  6. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22 kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600 MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i - 2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed.

  7. Characterization of modified proteins in plasma from a subtype of schizophrenia based on carbonyl stress: Protein carbonyl is a possible biomarker of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Koike, Shin; Kayama, Tasuku; Arai, Makoto; Horiuchi, Yasue; Kobori, Akiko; Miyashita, Mitsuhiro; Itokawa, Masanari; Ogasawara, Yuki

    2015-11-13

    Although it's well known that protein carbonyl (PCO) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) levels are elevated in plasma from patients with renal dysfunction, we recently identified patients who had no renal dysfunction but possessed high levels of plasma pentosidine (PEN), which is an AGEs, and low vitamin B6 levels in serum. In this study, we investigated the status of carbonyl stress to characterize the subtype of schizophrenia. When plasma samples were subjected to Western blot analysis for various AGEs, clear differences were only observed with the anti-PEN antibody in the plasma from schizophrenic patients. Moreover, we determined the formation of protein carbonyl (PCO), a typical indicator of carbonyl stress, occurred prior to the accumulation of PEN in the plasma of schizophrenic patients. PCO levels in the plasma from schizophrenic patients were significantly higher than that from healthy subjects. Western blots analysis clearly showed that albumin and IgG were markedly carbonylated in the plasma of some patients. Thus, PCOs may be a novel marker of carbonyl stress-type schizophrenia in addition to albumin containing PEN structure.

  8. Paraquat exposure and Sod2 knockdown have dissimilar impacts on the Drosophila melanogaster carbonylated protein proteome.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Suresh K; Simpson, David C; Martin, Ian; Grotewiel, Mike; Gronert, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to Paraquat and RNA interference knockdown of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) are known to result in significant lifespan reduction, locomotor dysfunction, and mitochondrial degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Both perturbations increase the flux of the progenitor ROS, superoxide, but the molecular underpinnings of the resulting phenotypes are poorly understood. Improved understanding of such processes could lead to advances in the treatment of numerous age-related disorders. Superoxide toxicity can act through protein carbonylation. Analysis of carbonylated proteins is attractive since carbonyl groups are not present in the 20 canonical amino acids and are amenable to labeling and enrichment strategies. Here, carbonylated proteins were labeled with biotin hydrazide and enriched on streptavidin beads. On-bead digestion was used to release carbonylated protein peptides, with relative abundance ratios versus controls obtained using the iTRAQ MS-based proteomics approach. Western blotting and biotin quantitation assay approaches were also investigated. By both Western blotting and proteomics, Paraquat exposure, but not Sod2 knockdown, resulted in increased carbonylated protein relative abundance. For Paraquat exposure versus control, the median carbonylated protein relative abundance ratio (1.53) determined using MS-based proteomics was in good agreement with that obtained using a commercial biotin quantitation kit (1.36).

  9. Paraquat exposure and Sod2 knockdown have dissimilar impacts on the Drosophila melanogaster carbonylated protein proteome

    PubMed Central

    Narayanasamy, Suresh K.; Simpson, David C.; Martin, Ian; Grotewiel, Mike; Gronert, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to Paraquat and RNA interference knockdown of Mn or mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2) are known to result in significant lifespan reduction, locomotor dysfunction, and mitochondrial degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Both perturbations increase the flux of the progenitor ROS, superoxide, but the molecular underpinnings of the resulting phenotypes are poorly understood. Improved understanding of such processes could lead to advances in the treatment of numerous age-related disorders. Superoxide toxicity can act through protein carbonylation. Analysis of carbonylated proteins is attractive since carbonyl groups are not present in the twenty canonical amino acids and are amenable to labeling and enrichment strategies. Here, carbonylated proteins were labeled with biotin hydrazide and enriched on streptavidin beads. On-bead digestion was used to release carbonylated protein peptides, with relative abundance ratios versus controls obtained using the iTRAQ MS-based proteomics approach. Western blotting and biotin quantitation assay approaches were also investigated. By both western blotting and proteomics, Paraquat exposure, but not Sod2 knockdown, resulted in increased carbonylated protein relative abundance. For Paraquat exposure versus control, the median carbonylated protein relative abundance ratio (1.53) determined using MS-based proteomics was in good agreement with that obtained using a commercial biotin quantitation kit (1.36). PMID:25091824

  10. Aminoguanidine inhibits protein browning without extensive Amadori carbonyl blocking.

    PubMed

    Requena, J R; Vidal, P; Cabezas-Cerrato, J

    1993-01-01

    It has been proposed that aminoguanidine reacts extensively with Amadori carbonyl groups of glycated proteins thus blocking them and inhibiting the further reactions which lead to browning and fluorescence development. We have glycated bovine serum albumin in the presence of 1, 5, 10 and 25 mM aminoguanidine and measured fluorescence development at 440 nm upon excitation at 370 nm, free (unblocked) Amadori groups as fructosamine with a colorimetric assay and furosine by HPLC, as an index of total Amadori products. Aminoguandine significantly inhibited fluorescence development at all the tested concentrations (31%, 65%, 69% and 82% inhibitions, respectively) (P < 0.001). Blocking of Amadori groups was demonstrated by decreased fructosamine and unchanged furosine yields but only at the higher concentrations and to a very limited extent (13% and 27% blocking, respectively) (P < 0.01). Incubation of Aminoguanidine with albumin produced the appearance of 320 nm absorbing yellow chromophores, quite increased in the presence of glucose. These results suggest that Aminoguanidine is able to block Amadori groups, as previously hypothesized, but question the importance of this mechanism as an explanation of its capacity to inhibit browning. Scavenging of glucose seems to have no impact on glycation as seen by unchanged furosine yields.

  11. NbCSPR underlies age-dependent immune responses to bacterial cold shock protein in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Saur, Isabel M L; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Sklenar, Jan; Holton, Nicholas J; Smakowska, Elwira; Belkhadir, Youssef; Zipfel, Cyril; Rathjen, John P

    2016-03-22

    Plants use receptor kinases (RKs) and receptor-like proteins (RLPs) as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are typical of whole classes of microbes. After ligand perception, many leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing PRRs interact with the LRR-RK BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1). BAK1 is thus expected to interact with unknown PRRs. Here, we used BAK1 as molecular bait to identify a previously unknown LRR-RLP required for the recognition of the csp22 peptide derived from bacterial cold shock protein. We established a method to identify proteins that interact with BAK1 only after csp22 treatment. BAK1 was expressed transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana and immunopurified after treatment with csp22. BAK1-associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified several proteins including known BAK1 interactors and a previously uncharacterized LRR-RLP that we termed RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN REQUIRED FOR CSP22 RESPONSIVENESS (NbCSPR). This RLP associates with BAK1 upon csp22 treatment, and NbCSPR-silenced plants are impaired in csp22-induced defense responses. NbCSPR confers resistance to bacteria in an age-dependent and flagellin-induced manner. As such, it limits bacterial growth and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of flowering N. benthamiana plants. Transgenic expression of NbCSPR into Arabidopsis thaliana conferred responsiveness to csp22 and antibacterial resistance. Our method may be used to identify LRR-type RKs and RLPs required for PAMP perception/responsiveness, even when the active purified PAMP has not been defined.

  12. NbCSPR underlies age-dependent immune responses to bacterial cold shock protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Saur, Isabel M. L.; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Sklenar, Jan; Holton, Nicholas J.; Smakowska, Elwira; Belkhadir, Youssef; Zipfel, Cyril; Rathjen, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Plants use receptor kinases (RKs) and receptor-like proteins (RLPs) as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are typical of whole classes of microbes. After ligand perception, many leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing PRRs interact with the LRR-RK BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1). BAK1 is thus expected to interact with unknown PRRs. Here, we used BAK1 as molecular bait to identify a previously unknown LRR-RLP required for the recognition of the csp22 peptide derived from bacterial cold shock protein. We established a method to identify proteins that interact with BAK1 only after csp22 treatment. BAK1 was expressed transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana and immunopurified after treatment with csp22. BAK1-associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified several proteins including known BAK1 interactors and a previously uncharacterized LRR-RLP that we termed RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN REQUIRED FOR CSP22 RESPONSIVENESS (NbCSPR). This RLP associates with BAK1 upon csp22 treatment, and NbCSPR-silenced plants are impaired in csp22-induced defense responses. NbCSPR confers resistance to bacteria in an age-dependent and flagellin-induced manner. As such, it limits bacterial growth and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of flowering N. benthamiana plants. Transgenic expression of NbCSPR into Arabidopsis thaliana conferred responsiveness to csp22 and antibacterial resistance. Our method may be used to identify LRR-type RKs and RLPs required for PAMP perception/responsiveness, even when the active purified PAMP has not been defined. PMID:26944079

  13. Accumulation of protein carbonyls within cerebellar astrocytes in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jianzheng; Bizzozero, Oscar A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has implicated protein carbonylation in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The present study was designed to determine the changes in protein carbonylation during the disease progression, and to identify the target cells and modified proteins in the cerebellum of EAE animals, prepared by active immunization of C57/BL6 mice with MOG35-55 peptide. In this model, protein carbonylation was maximal at the peak of the disease (acute phase) to decrease thereafter (chronic phase). Double immunofluorescence microscopy of affected cerebella showed that carbonyls accumulate in white matter astrocytes, and to a lesser extent in microglia/macrophages, both in the acute and chronic phase. Surprisingly, T cells, oligodendrocytes and neurons were barely stained. By 2D-oxyblot and mass spectrometry, β-actin, β-tubulin, GFAP and HSC-71 were identified as the major targets of carbonylation throughout disease. Using a pull-down/western blot method we found a significant increase in the proportion of carbonylated β-actin, β-tubulin and GFAP in the chronic phase but not in the acute phase. These results suggest that as disease progresses from the inflammatory to the neurodegenerative phase there may be an inappropriate removal of oxidized cytoskeletal proteins. Additionally, the extensive accumulation of carbonylated GFAP in the chronic phase of EAE may be responsible for the abnormal shape of astrocytes observed at this stage. PMID:20857508

  14. Protein carbonylation sites in bovine raw milk and processed milk products.

    PubMed

    Milkovska-Stamenova, Sanja; Mnatsakanyan, Ruzanna; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2017-08-15

    During thermal treatment of milk, proteins are oxidized, which may reduce the nutritional value of milk, abolish protein functions supporting human health, especially important for newborns, and yield potentially harmful products. The side chains of several amino acids can be oxidized to reactive carbonyls, which are often used to monitor oxidative stress in organisms. Here we mapped protein carbonylation sites in raw milk and different brands of pasteurized, ultra high temperature (UHT) treated milk, and infant formulas (IFs) after digesting the precipitated proteins with trypsin. Reactive carbonyls were derivatized with O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl)hydroxylamine to enrich the modified peptides by avidin-biotin affinity chromatography and analyze them by nanoRP-UPLC-ESI-MS. Overall, 53 unique carbonylated peptides (37 carbonylation sites, 15 proteins) were identified. Most carbonyls were derived from dicarbonyls (mainly glyoxal). The number of carbonylation sites increased with the harsher processing from raw milk (4) to pasteurized (16) and UHT milk (16) and to IF (24). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein carbonylation associated to high-fat, high-sucrose diet and its metabolic effects.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Lucía; Pazos, Manuel; Molinar-Toribio, Eunice; Sánchez-Martos, Vanesa; Gallardo, José M; Rosa Nogués, M; Torres, Josep L; Medina, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    The present research draws a map of the characteristic carbonylation of proteins in rats fed high-caloric diets with the aim of providing a new insight of the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases derived from the high consumption of fat and refined carbohydrates. Protein carbonylation was analyzed in plasma, liver and skeletal muscle of Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet by a proteomics approach based on carbonyl-specific fluorescence-labeling, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Oxidized proteins along with specific sites of oxidative damage were identified and discussed to illustrate the consequences of protein oxidation. The results indicated that long-term HFHS consumption increased protein oxidation in plasma and liver; meanwhile, protein carbonyls from skeletal muscle did not change. The increment of carbonylation by HFHS diet was singularly selective on specific target proteins: albumin from plasma and liver, and hepatic proteins such as mitochondrial carbamoyl-phosphate synthase (ammonia), mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, argininosuccinate synthetase, regucalcin, mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthase subunit beta, actin cytoplasmic 1 and mitochondrial glutamate dehydrogenase 1. The possible consequences that these specific protein carbonylations have on the excessive weight gain, insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease resulting from HFHS diet consumption are discussed.

  16. Carbonylation of myofibrillar proteins through the maillard pathway: effect of reducing sugars and reaction temperature.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Adriana; Estévez, Mario

    2013-03-27

    Carbonylation is recognized as one of the most remarkable chemical modifications in oxidized proteins and is generally ascribed to the direct attack of free radicals to basic amino acid residues. The purpose of this work was to investigate the formation of specific carbonyls, α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes (AAS and GGS, respectively), in myofibrillar proteins (MP) through a Maillard-type pathway in the presence of reducing sugars. The present study confirmed the concurrent formation of protein carbonyls and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) during incubation (80 °C/48 h) of MP (4 mg/mL) in the presence of reducing sugars (0.5 M). Copper irons (10 μM) were found to promote the formation of protein carbonyls, and a specific inhibitor of the Maillard reaction (0.02 M pyridoxamine) blocked the carbonylation process which emphasize the occurrence of a Maillard-type pathway. The Maillard-mediated carbonylation occurred in a range of reducing sugars (0.02-0.5 M) and reaction temperatures (4-110 °C) compatible with food systems. Upcoming studies on this topic may contribute further to shed light on the complex interactions between protein oxidation and the Maillard reaction and the impact of the protein damage on food quality and human health.

  17. A biotin enrichment strategy identifies novel carbonylated amino acids in proteins from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Havelund, Jesper F; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Davies, Michael J; Jensen, Ole N; Møller, Ian Max; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-03-06

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible protein oxidation correlated with oxidative stress, various diseases and ageing. Here we describe a peptide-centric approach for identification and characterisation of up to 14 different types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins. The modified residues are derivatised with biotin-hydrazide, enriched and characterised by tandem mass spectrometry. The strength of the method lies in an improved elution of biotinylated peptides from monomeric avidin resin using hot water (95°C) and increased sensitivity achieved by reduction of analyte losses during sample preparation and chromatography. For the first time MS/MS data analysis utilising diagnostic biotin fragment ions is used to pinpoint sites of biotin labelling and improve the confidence of carbonyl peptide assignments. We identified a total of 125 carbonylated residues in bovine serum albumin after extensive in vitro metal ion-catalysed oxidation. Furthermore, we assigned 133 carbonylated sites in 36 proteins in native human plasma protein samples. The optimised workflow enabled detection of 10 hitherto undetected types of carbonylated amino acids in proteins: aldehyde and ketone modifications of leucine, valine, alanine, isoleucine, glutamine, lysine and glutamic acid (+14Da), an oxidised form of methionine - aspartate semialdehyde (-32Da) - and decarboxylated glutamic acid and aspartic acid (-30Da).

  18. Contributions of VEGF to age-dependent transmural gradients in contractile protein expression in ovine carotid arteries

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Stacy M.; Abrassart, Jenna M.; Hubbell, Margaret C.; Adeoye, Olayemi; Semotiuk, Andrew; Williams, James M.; Mata-Greenwood, Eugenia; Khorram, Omid

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores the hypothesis that arterial smooth muscle cells are organized into layers with similar phenotypic characteristics that vary with the relative position between the lumen and the adventitia due to transmural gradients in vasotrophic factors. A corollary hypothesis is that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a factor that helps establish transmural variations in smooth muscle phenotype. Organ culture of endothelium-denuded ovine carotid arteries with 3 ng/ml VEGF-A165 for 24 h differentially and significantly influenced potassium-induced (55% increase) and stretch-induced (36% decrease) stress-strain relations in adult (n = 18) but not term fetal (n = 21) arteries, suggesting that smooth muscle reactivity to VEGF is acquired during postnatal maturation. Because inclusion of fetal bovine serum significantly inhibited all contractile effects of VEGF (adult: n = 11; fetus: n = 11), it was excluded in all cultures. When assessed in relation to the distance between the lumen and the adventitia in immunohistochemically stained coronal artery sections, expression of smooth muscle α-actin (SMαA), myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and 20-kDa regulatory myosin light chain exhibited distinct protein-dependent and age-dependent gradients across the artery wall. VEGF depressed regional SMαA abundance up to 15% in adult (n = 6) but not in fetal (n = 6) arteries, increased regional MLCK abundance up to 140% in fetal (n = 8) but not in adult (n = 10) arteries, and increased regional MLC20 abundance up to 28% in fetal arteries (n = 7) but decreased it by 17% in adult arteries (n = 9). Measurements of mRNA levels verified that VEGF receptor transcripts for both Flt-1 and kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) were expressed in both fetal and adult arteries. Overall, the present data support the unique hypothesis that smooth muscle cells are organized into lamina of similar phenotype with characteristics that depend on the relative position between

  19. Proteomic identification of carbonylated proteins in F344 rat hippocampus after 1-bromopropane exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik; Ichihara, Gaku

    2012-08-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and humans. Previous proteomic analysis of rat hippocampus implicated alteration of protein expression in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. To understand this role at the protein level, we exposed male F344 rats to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 week or 4 weeks by inhalation and quantitated changes in hippocampal protein carbonyl using a protein carbonyl assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), immunoblotting, and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Hippocampal reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl were significantly increased, demonstrating 1-BP-associated induction of oxidative stress and protein damage. MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS identified 10 individual proteins with increased carbonyl modification (p < 0.05; fold-change ≥ 1.5). The identified proteins were involved in diverse biological processes including glycolysis, ATP production, tyrosine catabolism, GTP binding, guanine degradation, and neuronal metabolism of dopamine. Hippocampal triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activity was significantly reduced and negatively correlated with TPI carbonylation (p < 0.001; r = 0.83). Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels were significantly elevated both in the hippocampus and plasma, and hippocampal AGEs correlated negatively with TPI activity (p < 0.001; r = 0.71). In conclusion, 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus seems to involve oxidative damage of cellular proteins, decreased TPI activity, and elevated AGEs. -- Highlights: ► 1-BP increases hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampal and plasma protein carbonyls. ► 1-BP increases TPI carbonylation and decreases TPI activity in the hippocampus. ► 1-BP increases hippocampal and plasma AGE levels.

  20. Iron dextran treatment does not induce serum protein carbonyls in the newborn pig.

    PubMed

    Caperna, T J; Shannon, A E; Blomberg, L A; Garrett, W M; Ramsay, T G

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation of serum proteins can lead to carbonyl formation that alters their function and is often associated with stress-related diseases. As it is recommended that all pigs reared in modern production facilities be given supplemental iron at birth to prevent anemia, and metals can catalyze the carbonylation of proteins, the primary objective of this study was to determine whether standard iron dextran treatment was associated with enhanced serum protein oxidation in newborn piglets. Piglets were treated with 100 mg of iron dextran intramuscularly either on the day of birth, or on the third day after birth. Blood samples were collected from piglets 48 or 96 h after treatment and serum was harvested. For quantification, serum protein carbonyls were converted to hydrazones with dinitrophenyl hydrazine and analyzed spectrophotometrically. To identify and determine relative distribution of carbonylated proteins, serum protein carbonyls were derivatized with biotin hydrazide, separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, stained with avidin-fluorescein and identified by mass spectrometry. The standard iron dextran treatment was associated with no increase in total oxidized proteins if given either on the first or third day of life. In addition, with a few noted exceptions, the overall distribution and identification of oxidized proteins were similar between control and iron dextran-treated pigs. These results indicate that while iron dextran treatment is associated with a marked increase in circulating iron, it does not appear to specifically induce the oxidation of serum proteins.

  1. Novel DNPH-based method for determination of protein carbonylation in muscle and meat.

    PubMed

    Soglia, Francesca; Petracci, Massimiliano; Ertbjerg, Per

    2016-04-15

    Protein oxidation is considered an ongoing deteriorative process during storage of fresh and processed meat. Carbonyl compounds have traditionally been detected spectrophotometrically after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) to form protein-bound hydrazones with absorbance at 370 nm. Here we describe a novel DNPH-based method to quantify protein carbonylation in muscle and meat. The additional steps of the novel method aimed at increasing the protein solubility and inducing protein unfolding before labeling with DNPH. Compared to the traditional method, the new procedure reflected an increased protein carbonylation level measuring overall two to fourfold more carbonyls in muscles from different species as well as in soluble, salt-soluble and insoluble protein fractions. The study suggested that protein unfolding is a more important phenomenon than solubilization for increased DNPH labeling. The novel method resulted in three to fourfold larger carbonyl content determined in chicken, pork and beef (2.8, 3.6 and 3.1 nmol/mg of protein, respectively). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Age-dependent damage of hair cuticle: contribution of S100A3 protein and its citrullination.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshie; Mamada, Akira; Kizawa, Kenji; Suzuki, Ryosuke

    2016-09-01

    There are two types of damage pattern of human hair cuticle: type L, where the cell membrane complex is split and the cuticle lifts up, and type E, where the fragile substructure of the cuticle cell (endocuticle) is broken. In our previous paper, it was reported that the dominant damage pattern shifts from type L to E with the subjects' age around the 40s. Loss of the cuticle due to daily grooming stresses increases with the subjects' age and is related to the level of type E damage. It is supposed that deterioration of endocuticle advances the loss of cuticle. S100A3 protein, located at the endocuticle, was found to be citrullinated and transformed into tetramer to improve its Ca(2+) -binding ability. It is postulated that this biochemical property affects the maturation of cuticle and contributes to its reinforcement. This study aims to elucidate the role that S100A3 plays in age-dependent cuticle damage. Hair fibers collected from Japanese females were evaluated for the content and citrullination rate of S100A3, incidence of type E damage, and resistance of cuticle. In the aged hair, the content of S100A3 was positively correlated with the level of type E damage and low resistance to stress. Hair fibers in which S100A3 is highly citrullinated, however, showed low levels of type E damage and high resistance of cuticle, even in the aged hair as well as at younger ages. S100A3 and its citrullination process are related to rigidity of endocuticle of aged hair. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Age-dependent changes in contractile function and passive elastic properties of myocardium from mice lacking muscle LIM protein (MLP).

    PubMed

    Unsöld, Bernhard; Schotola, Hanna; Jacobshagen, Claudius; Seidler, Tim; Sossalla, Samuel; Emons, Julius; Klede, Stefanie; Knöll, Ralph; Guan, Kaomei; El-Armouche, Ali; Linke, Wolfgang A; Kögler, Harald; Hasenfuss, Gerd

    2012-04-01

    Muscle LIM protein (MLP) null mice are often used as a model for human dilated cardiomyopathy. So far, little is known about the time course and pathomechanisms leading to the development of the adult phenotype. We systematically analysed the contractile phenotype, myofilament calcium (Ca(2)(+)) responsiveness, passive myocardial mechanics, histology, and mRNA expression in mice aged 4 and 12 weeks. In 4-week-old animals, there was no significant difference in the force-frequency relationship (FFR) and catecholamine response of intact isolated papillary muscles between wild-type (WT) and MLP null myocardium. In 12-week-old animals, WT myocardium exhibited a significantly positive FFR, while that of MLP null mice was significantly negative, and the inotropic response to catecholamines was significantly reduced in MLP null mice. This time course of decline in contractile function was confirmed in vivo by echocardiography. Whereas at 4 weeks of age MLP null mice and WT littermates showed similar levels of SERCA2a (sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase) expression, the expression was significantly lower in 12-week-old MLP null mice compared with littermate controls. Myofilament Ca(2)(+) responsiveness was not affected by the lack of MLP, irrespective of age. Whereas in 4-week-old animals MLP null myocardium showed a trend to an increased compliance compared with the WT, myocardium of 12-week-old MLP null mice was significantly less compliant than WT myocardium. Parallel to the decrease in compliance there was an increase in fibrosis in the MLP null animals. Our data suggest that MLP deficiency does not primarily influence myocardial contractility. A lack of MLP leads to an age-dependent impairment of excitation-contraction coupling with resulting contractile dysfunction and secondary fibrosis.

  4. Identification of Protein Carbonyls in serum of the fetal and neonatal pig.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxidation of serum proteins leads to non-reversible carbonyl formation which alters their function and has long been associated with stress-related disease processes. The primary objective of this study was to identify oxidized serum protein biomarkers of metabolic stress in baby pigs. Protein carb...

  5. Benchmarking of protein carbonylation analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans: specific considerations and general advice.

    PubMed

    Pyr Dit Ruys, S; Bonzom, J-M; Frelon, S

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress has been extensively studied due to its correlation with cellular disorders and aging. In proteins, one biomarker of oxidative stress is the presence of carbonyl groups, such as aldehyde and ketone, in specific amino acid side chains such as lysine, proline, arginine and threonine, so-called protein carbonylation (PC). PC study is now a growing field in general and medical science since PC accumulation is associated with various pathologies and disorders. At present, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) seem to be the most robust method of quantifying the presence of carbonyl groups in proteins, despite having some recognised caveats. In parallel, gel-based approaches present cross-comparison difficulties, along with other technical problems. As generic PC analyses still suffer from poor homogeneity, leading to cross-data analysis difficulties and poor results overlap, the need for harmonisation in the field of carbonyl detection is now widely accepted. This study aims to highlight some of the technical challenges in proteomic gel-based multiplexing experiments when dealing with PC in difficult samples like those from Caenorhabditis elegans, from protein extraction to carbonyl detection. We demonstrate that some critical technical parameters, such as labelling time, probe concentration, and total and carbonylated protein recovery rates, should be re-addressed in a sample-specific way. We also defined a procedure to cost-effectively adapt CyDye™-hydrazide-based protocols to specific samples, especially when the experimental interest is focused on studying differences between stimulating conditions with a maximised signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, we have improved an already-existing powerful solubilisation buffer, making it potentially useful for hard-to-solubilise protein pellets. Lastly, the depicted methodology exemplifies a simple way of normalising carbonyl-related signal to total protein in SDS-PAGE multiplexing experiments. Within

  6. Protein targets for carbonylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin; Ngyuen, Vien; Rauniyar, Navin; Ughy, Bettina; Prokai, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Protein carbonylation has been associated with various pathophysiological processes. A representative reactive carbonyl species (RCS), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), has been implicated specifically as a causative factor for the initiation and/or progression of various diseases. To date, however, little is known about the proteins and their modification sites susceptible to “carbonyl stress” by this RCS, especially in the liver. Using chemoprecipitation based on a solid phase hydrazine chemistry coupled with LC-MS/MS bottom-up approach and database searching, we identified several protein-HNE adducts in isolated rat liver mitochondria upon HNE exposure. The identification of selected major protein targets, such as the ATP synthase β-subunit, was further confirmed by immunoblotting and a gel-based approach in combination with LC–MS/MS. A network was also created based on the identified protein targets that showed that the main protein interactions were associated with cell death, tumor morphology and drug metabolism, implicating the toxic nature of HNE in the liver mitoproteome. The functional consequence of carbonylation was illustrated by its detrimental impact on the activity of ATP synthase, a representative major mitochondrial protein target for HNE modifications. PMID:21801862

  7. Dormancy alleviation by NO or HCN leading to decline of protein carbonylation levels in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos.

    PubMed

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Dębska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-08-15

    Deep dormancy of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos can be overcome by short-term pre-treatment with nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Dormancy alleviation of embryos modulated by NO or HCN and the first step of germination depend on temporary increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Direct oxidative attack on some amino acid residues or secondary reactions via reactive carbohydrates and lipids can lead to the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives. Protein carbonylation is a widely accepted covalent and irreversible modification resulting in inhibition or alteration of enzyme/protein activities. It also increases the susceptibility of proteins to proteolytic degradation. The aim of this work was to investigate protein carbonylation in germinating apple embryos, the dormancy of which was removed by pre-treatment with NO or HCN donors. It was performed using a quantitative spectrophotometric method, while patterns of carbonylated protein in embryo axes were analyzed by immunochemical techniques. The highest concentration of protein carbonyl groups was observed in dormant embryos. It declined in germinating embryos pre-treated with NO or HCN, suggesting elevated degradation of modified proteins during seedling formation. A decrease in the concentration of carbonylated proteins was accompanied by modification in proteolytic activity in germinating apple embryos. A strict correlation between the level of protein carbonyl groups and cotyledon growth and greening was detected. Moreover, direct in vitro carbonylation of BSA treated with NO or HCN donors was analyzed, showing action of both signaling molecules as protein oxidation agents.

  8. Evaluation of three simple direct or indirect carbonyl detection methods for characterization of oxidative modifications of proteins.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Garzón, Verónica R; Rouimi, Patrick; Jouanin, Isabelle; Waeg, Georg; Zarkovic, Neven; Villa-Treviño, Saul; Guéraud, Françoise

    2012-05-01

    Among disruptions induced by oxidative stress, modifications of proteins, particularly irreversible carbonylation, are associated with the development of several diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Carbonylation of proteins can occur directly or indirectly through the adduction of lipid oxidation products. In this study, three classical and easy-to-perform techniques to detect direct or indirect carbonylation of proteins were compared. A model protein apomyoglobin and a complex mixture of rat liver cytosolic proteins were exposed to cumene hydroperoxide oxidation or adduction to the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal in order to test direct or indirect carbonylation, respectively. The technique using a specific anti-4-hydroxynonenal-histidine adduct antibody was effective to detect in vitro modification of model apomyoglobin and cytosolic proteins by 4-hydroxynonenal but not by direct carbonylation which was achieved by techniques using biotin-coupled hydrazide or dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization of carbonyls. Sequential use of these methods enabled the detection of both direct and indirect carbonyl modification in proteins, although constitutively biotinylated proteins were detected by biotin-hydrazide. Although rather classical and efficient, methods for carbonyl detection on proteins in oxidative stress studies may be biased by some artifactual detections and complicated by proteins multimerizations. The use of more and more specific available antibodies is recommended to complete detection of lipid peroxidation product adducts on proteins.

  9. Quantification of carbonylated proteins in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria using capillary sieving electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juan; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2008-01-01

    Carbonyl-modified proteins are markers of oxidative damage. Here, we report a new method for detecting and quantifying carbonylated proteins by capillary sieving electrophoresis (CSE) with LIF detection (CSE-LIF). Alexa 488 hydrazide is used for the specific labeling of carbonyls while 3-(2-furoyl) quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (FQ) is used for protein labeling. BSA subjected to metal-catalyzed oxidation is used to optimize the labeling reactions, confirm the separation power of CSE, and characterize the response of the LIF detector. The method is capable of detecting femtomole (fmol) amounts of carbonyls in proteins with molecular masses ranging from 26 to 30 kDa. Using this method, we determined that mitochondrial proteins isolated from skeletal muscle contains 2.1 +/- 0.1 (average +/- SD; n = 3) nmol carbonyl/mg protein. The methodology described here should be compatible with the analysis of single cells and needle biopsies taken from oxidative stress animal models.

  10. Iron Dextran treatment does not induce serum protein carbonyls in the newborn pig

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oxidation of serum proteins can lead to carbonyl formation which alters their function and is often associated with stress-related diseases. Since it is recommended that all pigs reared in modern production facilities be given supplemental iron at birth to prevent anemia, and metals can catalyze th...

  11. Protein Mediated Oxidative Stress in Patients with Diabetes and its Associated Neuropathy: Correlation with Protein Carbonylation and Disease Activity Markers

    PubMed Central

    Almogbel, Ebtehal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Free radicals have been implicated as Diabetes Mellitus (DM) contributors in type 2 DM and its associated Diabetes Mellitus Neuropathy (DMN). However, the potential for protein mediated oxidative stress to contribute disease pathogenesis remains largely unexplored. Aim To investigate the status and contribution of protein mediated oxidative stress in patients with DM or DMN and to explore whether oxidative protein modification has a role in DM progression to DM associated neuropathy. Materials and Methods Sera from 42 DM and 37 DMN patients with varying levels of disease activities biomarkers (HbA1C, patients’ age or disease duration) and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated for serum levels of protein mediated oxidative stress. Results Serum analysis showed significantly higher levels of protein carbonyl contents in both DM and DMN patients compared with healthy controls. Importantly, not only was there an increased number of subjects positive for protein carbonylation, but also the levels of protein carbonyl contents were significantly higher among DM and DMN patients, whose HbA1C were ≥8.8 as compared with patients with lower HbA1C (HbA1C<8.8). Similar pattern of protein carbonyls formation was also observed with patients’ ages or with patient’s disease durations, suggesting a possible relationship between protein oxidation and disease progression. Furthermore, sera from DMN patients had higher levels of protein carbonylation compared with non-neuropathic DM patients’ sera, suggesting an involvement of protein oxidation in the progression of diabetes to diabetes neuropathy. Conclusion These findings support an association between protein oxidation and DM or DMN progression. The stronger response observed in patients with higher HbA1C or patients’ ages or disease durations suggests, that protein mediated oxidative stress may be useful in evaluating the progression of DM and its associated DMN and in elucidating the

  12. [Oxidative carbonylation of vascular wall proteins in dynamics of experimental venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Fomina, N V; Fomina, M A; Kalinin, R E; Suchkov, I A

    2015-01-01

    The objects of the study were a total of 24 conventional sexually mature Wistar rats weighing 200-400 g. Thrombosis was modelled by means of ligation of the common iliac vein. Animals were withdrawn from the study on days 1, 3 and 5 after intervention. The materials for the study in each animal were homogenates of the vein portion below the site of ligation (thrombosed vein) and the portion of the symmetrical vessel (intact vein). Taken as controls were portions of the common iliac vein of intact animals matched by age, body weight, and keeping conditions. The level of spontaneous and induced in the Fenton reaction oxidative carbonylation of proteins was determined by means of carbonyl derivatives according to the R.L. Levine technique modified by E.E. Dubinina with optical registration of the formed dinitrophenylhydrazines at 356, 370, 430 and 530 nm. The reserve-and-adaptation potential was assessed by means of counting the ratio of the amount of carbonyl derivatives of proteins in spontaneous and induced oxidation. The obtained findings showed that experimental thrombosis is accompanied and followed by an increase in the content of carbonyl derivatives of proteins in the wall of thrombosed veins and, to a lesser degree, in that of intact veins. The maximal elevation of the parameters was registered during the first 24 hours of the development of pathology, demonstrating not only early but late markers of oxidative modification of proteins. Thrombosed veins on day 3 were found to have a decrease in the content of carbonylated proteins to the level of the control values, which was associated with a maximal value of the reserve-adaptation potential. However, day five was marked by a secondary increase in carbonylation accompanied by certain exhaustion of the reserve-adaptive potential. In intact veins, a decrease of the spontaneous oxidative modification level on day 3 was accompanied by a splash of induced carbonylation followed by stabilization of the parameters

  13. Role of Protein Carbonylation in Skeletal Muscle Mass Loss Associated with Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Muscle dysfunction, characterized by a reductive remodeling of muscle fibers, is a common systemic manifestation in highly prevalent conditions such as chronic heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cancer cachexia, and critically ill patients. Skeletal muscle dysfunction and impaired muscle mass may predict morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic diseases, regardless of the underlying condition. High levels of oxidants may alter function and structure of key cellular molecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids, leading to cellular injury and death. Protein oxidation including protein carbonylation was demonstrated to modify enzyme activity and DNA binding of transcription factors, while also rendering proteins more prone to proteolytic degradation. Given the relevance of protein oxidation in the pathophysiology of many chronic conditions and their comorbidities, the current review focuses on the analysis of different studies in which the biological and clinical significance of the modifications induced by reactive carbonyls on proteins have been explored so far in skeletal muscles of patients and animal models of chronic conditions such as COPD, disuse muscle atrophy, cancer cachexia, sepsis, and physiological aging. Future research will elucidate the specific impact and sites of reactive carbonyls on muscle protein content and function in human conditions. PMID:28248228

  14. Role of Protein Carbonylation in Skeletal Muscle Mass Loss Associated with Chronic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther

    2016-05-06

    Muscle dysfunction, characterized by a reductive remodeling of muscle fibers, is a common systemic manifestation in highly prevalent conditions such as chronic heart failure (CHF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cancer cachexia, and critically ill patients. Skeletal muscle dysfunction and impaired muscle mass may predict morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic diseases, regardless of the underlying condition. High levels of oxidants may alter function and structure of key cellular molecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids, leading to cellular injury and death. Protein oxidation including protein carbonylation was demonstrated to modify enzyme activity and DNA binding of transcription factors, while also rendering proteins more prone to proteolytic degradation. Given the relevance of protein oxidation in the pathophysiology of many chronic conditions and their comorbidities, the current review focuses on the analysis of different studies in which the biological and clinical significance of the modifications induced by reactive carbonyls on proteins have been explored so far in skeletal muscles of patients and animal models of chronic conditions such as COPD, disuse muscle atrophy, cancer cachexia, sepsis, and physiological aging. Future research will elucidate the specific impact and sites of reactive carbonyls on muscle protein content and function in human conditions.

  15. Impact of lipid content and composition on lipid oxidation and protein carbonylation in experimental fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Verónica; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Jesús; Ventanas, Sonia

    2014-03-15

    This study aims to investigate the effect of lipid content (∼4%, ∼10% and ∼15%) and composition (different lipid sources; animal fat and sunflower oil) on the oxidative stability of proteins and lipids in experimental fermented sausages. Increasing the lipid content of sausages enhanced the susceptibility of lipids to oxidation whereas the effect on the formation of specific carbonyls from protein oxidation was not so evident. Sausages manufactured with different lipid sources affected the susceptibility of lipids and proteins to oxidation as a likely result of the modifications in the fatty acid profile, as well as to the presence of antioxidant compounds. While the fatty acid profile had a major effect on the occurrence and extent of lipid oxidation, the presence of compounds with potential antioxidant activity may be more influential on the extent of protein carbonylation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Targets of protein carbonylation in spontaneously hypertensive obese Koletsky rats and healthy Wistar counterparts: a potential role on metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Lucía; Pazos, Manuel; Giralt, Montserrat; Nogués, M Rosa; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Torres, Josep L; Gallardo, J M; Medina, Isabel

    2014-06-25

    The study innovatively pinpoints target proteins of carbonylation, a key PTM induced by oxidative stress, in the SHROB (genetically obese spontaneously hypertensive) rat model of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Protein carbonylation was assessed by a fluorescence-labeling proteomics approach, and complemented with biometric and biochemical markers of MetS. SHROB and healthy Wistar rats were fed two diets, soybean and linseed oil supplementations, in order to distinguish intrinsic carbonylation of SHROB animals from diet-modulated carbonylation unrelated to MetS. First exploratory data showed similar carbonylation patterns and metabolic conditions in SHROB rats fed soybean and linseed, but different from Wistar animals. A total of 18 carbonylated spots in liver, and 12 in skeletal tissue, related to pathways of lipid (29.6%), carbohydrate (25.9%) and amino acid (18.5%) metabolisms, were identified. In particular, SHROB animals present higher carbonylation in four liver proteins belonging to lipid metabolism, redox regulation and chaperone activity (ALDH2, PDI, PDIA3, PECR), and in the skeletal muscle ALDOA that is involved in muscle dysfunction. Conversely, SHROB rats display lower carbonylation in liver albumin, AKR1C9, ADH1 and catalase. This investigation provides a novel perspective of carbonylation in the context of metabolic disorders, and may be a starting point to characterize new redox pathways exacerbating MetS. Oxidative stress is a concomitant factor in the pathogenesis of MetS that induces oxidative PTM as carbonylation. Through the use of a redox proteomics approach, we have thoroughly mapped the occurrence of protein targets of carbonylation in the genetically-induced MetS model SHROB rat. The present research brings a new insight of MetS pathogenesis and it may provide valuable information to understand the biological impact of oxidative stress in patients with MetS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Carbonylated proteins are eliminated during reproduction in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Goudeau, Jérôme; Aguilaniu, Hugo

    2010-12-01

    Oxidatively damaged proteins accumulate with age in many species (Stadtman (1992) Science257, 1220-1224). This means that damage must be reset at the time of reproduction. To visualize this resetting in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, a novel immunofluorescence technique that allows the detection of carbonylated proteins in situ was developed. The application of this technique revealed that carbonylated proteins are eliminated during C. elegans reproduction. This purging occurs abruptly within the germline at the time of oocyte maturation. Surprisingly, the germline was markedly more oxidized than the surrounding somatic tissues. Because distinct mechanisms have been proposed to explain damage elimination in yeast and mice (Aguilaniu et al. (2003) Science299, 1751-1753; Hernebring et al. (2006) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA103, 7700-7705), possible common mechanisms between worms and one of these systems were tested. The results show that, unlike in yeast (Aguilaniu et al. (2003) Science299, 1751-1753; Erjavec et al. (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA105, 18764-18769), the elimination of carbonylated proteins in worms does not require the presence of the longevity-ensuring gene, SIR-2.1. However, similar to findings in mice (Hernebring et al. (2006) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA103, 7700-7705), proteasome activity in the germline is required for the resetting of carbonylated proteins during reproduction in C. elegans. Thus, oxidatively damaged proteins are eliminated during reproduction in worms through the proteasome. This finding suggests that the resetting of damaged proteins during reproduction is conserved, therefore validating the use of C. elegans as a model to study the molecular basis of damage elimination.

  18. Principal Component Analysis Reveals Age-Related and Muscle-Type-Related Differences in Protein Carbonyl Profiles of Muscle Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Juan; Navratil, Marian; Thompson, LaDora V.; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonyl-modified proteins are considered markers of oxidative damage caused by oxidative stress, aging, and disease. Here we use a previously developed capillary electrophoretic method for detecting femtomole (10−15 mole) carbonyl levels in mitochondrial proteins that are size separated and profiled. For protein labeling, carbonyls were tagged with Alexa 488 hydrazine and amine groups in proteins with 3-(2-furoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde. Total mitochondrial protein carbonyl levels were statistically higher in fast- than in slow-twitch muscle of young Fischer 344 rats, and statistically higher in old than in young slow-twitch muscle. Even when some statistical comparisons of the total protein carbonyl levels would not reveal differences, principal component analysis (PCA) classified the carbonyl profiles into four distinct sample groups of different age and muscle types. In addition, PCA was used to predict that most age-related or muscle-type-related changes in carbonyl levels occur in proteins with a molecular weight between 9.8 and 11.7 kD. PMID:19126840

  19. Protein carbonyl levels in serum and gingival crevicular fluid in patients with chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Baltacioğlu, Esra; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Alver, Ahmet; Değer, Orhan; Karabulut, Erdem

    2008-08-01

    Evidence reveals the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in many pathologies including periodontitis. Protein carbonylation is the most widely used biomarker for oxidative damage to proteins, and reflects cellular damage induced by ROS. In this study protein carbonyl (PC) levels in serum and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) was evaluated. Thirty-three patients with CP and 24 healthy controls were included in the study. Following the clinical measurements and samplings, total protein levels in serum and GCF were determined by Bradford method, and serum and GCF PC levels were measured by modified Levine method. PC levels in serum and GCF were significantly higher in the CP group compared to the control group (p<0.05). In all subjects, serum and GCF PC levels showed statistically significant positive correlations with all clinical parameters (p<0.05). The results suggest that both systemic and local/periodontal protein carbonylation increase in CP compared to health and that elevated levels of PCs may be a sign of oxidative damage in periodontitis and correlate well with the periodontal status.

  20. Mitochondrial ascorbate-glutathione cycle and proteomic analysis of carbonylated proteins during tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    López-Vidal, O; Camejo, D; Rivera-Cabrera, F; Konigsberg, M; Villa-Hernández, J M; Mendoza-Espinoza, J A; Pérez-Flores, L J; Sevilla, F; Jiménez, A; Díaz de León-Sánchez, F

    2016-03-01

    In non-photosynthetic tissues, mitochondria are the main source of energy and of reactive oxygen species. Accumulation of high levels of these species in the cell causes damage to macromolecules including several proteins and induces changes in different metabolic processes. Fruit ripening has been characterized as an oxidative phenomenon; therefore, control of reactive oxygen species levels by mitochondrial antioxidants plays a crucial role on this process. In this work, ascorbate-glutathione cycle components, hydrogen peroxide levels and the proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins were analyzed in mitochondria isolated from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit at two ripening stages. A significant increase on most ascorbate-glutathione cycle components and on carbonylated proteins was observed in mitochondria from breaker to light red stage. Enzymes and proteins involved in diverse cellular and mitochondrial metabolic pathways were identified among the carbonylated proteins. These results suggest that protein carbonylation is a post-translational modification involved in tomato fruit ripening regulation.

  1. Redox Proteomic Analysis of Carbonylated Brain Proteins in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Early Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Rukhsana; Perluigi, Marzia; Newman, Shelley F.; Pierce, William M.; Cini, Chiara; Coccia, Raffaella

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies indicated increased levels of protein oxidation in brain from subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD), raising the question of whether oxidative damage is a late effect of neurodegeneration or precedes and contributes to the pathogenesis of AD. Hence, in the present study we used a parallel proteomic approach to identify oxidatively modified proteins in inferior parietal lobule (IPL) from subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage-AD (EAD). By comparing to age-matched controls, we reasoned that such analysis could help in understanding potential mechanisms involved in upstream processes in AD pathogenesis. We have identified four proteins that showed elevated levels of protein carbonyls: carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), mitogen-activated protein kinase I (MAPKI), and syntaxin binding protein I (SBP1) in MCI IPL. In EAD IPL we identified three proteins: phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PM1), glial fibrillary acidic protein, and fructose bisphospate aldolase C (FBA-C). Our results imply that some of the common targets of protein carbonylation correlated with AD neuropathology and suggest a possible involvement of protein modifications in the AD progression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 327–336. PMID:19686046

  2. Redox proteomic analysis of carbonylated brain proteins in mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Rukhsana; Perluigi, Marzia; Newman, Shelley F; Pierce, William M; Cini, Chiara; Coccia, Raffaella; Butterfield, D Allan

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies indicated increased levels of protein oxidation in brain from subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD), raising the question of whether oxidative damage is a late effect of neurodegeneration or precedes and contributes to the pathogenesis of AD. Hence, in the present study we used a parallel proteomic approach to identify oxidatively modified proteins in inferior parietal lobule (IPL) from subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage-AD (EAD). By comparing to age-matched controls, we reasoned that such analysis could help in understanding potential mechanisms involved in upstream processes in AD pathogenesis. We have identified four proteins that showed elevated levels of protein carbonyls: carbonic anhydrase II (CA II), heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), mitogen-activated protein kinase I (MAPKI), and syntaxin binding protein I (SBP1) in MCI IPL. In EAD IPL we identified three proteins: phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PM1), glial fibrillary acidic protein, and fructose bisphospate aldolase C (FBA-C). Our results imply that some of the common targets of protein carbonylation correlated with AD neuropathology and suggest a possible involvement of protein modifications in the AD progression.

  3. Proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins in rat liver: exercise attenuated oxidative stress may be involved in fatty liver improvement.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofei; Duan, Zhigui; Hu, Hui; Li, Guolin; Yan, Siyu; Wu, Jinfeng; Wang, Jun; Yin, Dazhong; Xie, Qingji

    2013-05-01

    To screen target proteins of oxidative stress which mediate the effects of exercise on preventing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the methods for selecting carbonylated proteins were modified, and carbonylated proteins were profiled. The results showed that treadmill training reduced oxidative stress and the levels of intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG). The changes in IHTG showed a significant positive correlation with oxidative stress as indicated by malondialdehyde level. Further results from proteomics illustrated that 17 functional proteins were susceptible to oxidative modification, and exercise protected three proteins from carbonylation. The latter three proteins may serve as both direct target proteins of oxidative stress and mediators contributing to the beneficial effects of exercise. In particular, a long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADL) which was a key enzyme in lipid metabolism was not carbonylated and with higher activities in exercise group. These findings indicate that this modified technique is practical and powerful in selecting carbonylated proteins. Long-term treadmill training is effective in ameliorating oxidative stress and preventing the accumulation of IHTG. Among the 17 target proteins of oxidative modification, three proteins contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise. Preventing ACADL from carbonylation may be involved in the physiological mechanism of exercise-induced NAFLD improvement.

  4. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    PubMed

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential carbonylation of cytoskeletal proteins in blood group O erythrocytes: potential role in protection against severe malaria.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Darío; Hernáez, María L; Kamali, Ali N; Diez, Amalia; Puyet, Antonio; Bautista, José M

    2012-12-01

    The molecular basis for the prevalence of blood group O in regions where malaria is endemic remains unclear. In some genetic backgrounds oxidative modifications have been linked to a reduced susceptibility to severe malaria disease. Through redox proteomics, we detected differences in carbonylated membrane proteins among the different blood groups, both in Plasmodium-infected and uninfected erythrocytes (RBC). Carbonylation profiles of RBC membrane proteins revealed that group O blood shows a reduced protein oxidation pattern compared to groups A, B and AB. Upon infection with Plasmodium falciparum Dd2, erythrocytes of all blood groups showed increased oxidation of membrane proteins. By examining 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) modified proteins by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry) we observed that, upon malaria infection, the protein components of lipid rafts and cytoskeleton were the main targets of 4-HNE carbonylation in all blood groups. Ankyrins and protein bands 4.2 and 4.1 were differentially carbonylated in group O as compared to A and B groups. During trophozoite maturation in group O erythrocytes, a steady increase was observed in the number of 4-HNE-modified proteins, suggesting a parasite-driven 4-HNE-carbonylation process. Our findings indicate a possible correlation between the protection against severe malaria in blood group O individuals and a specific pattern of 4-HNE-carbonylation of cytoskeleton proteins.

  6. Cell age dependent concentration of Escherichia coli divisome proteins analyzed with ImageJ and ObjectJ

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, Norbert O. E.; Verheul, Jolanda; Postma, Marten; van den Berg van Saparoea, Bart; Galli, Elisa; Natale, Paolo; Gerdes, Kenn; Luirink, Joen; Vollmer, Waldemar; Vicente, Miguel; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2015-01-01

    The rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli multiplies by elongation followed by binary fission. Longitudinal growth of the cell envelope and synthesis of the new poles are organized by two protein complexes called elongasome and divisome, respectively. We have analyzed the spatio-temporal localization patterns of many of these morphogenetic proteins by immunolabeling the wild type strain MC4100 grown to steady state in minimal glucose medium at 28°C. This allowed the direct comparison of morphogenetic protein localization patterns as a function of cell age as imaged by phase contrast and fluorescence wide field microscopy. Under steady state conditions the age distribution of the cells is constant and is directly correlated to cell length. To quantify cell size and protein localization parameters in 1000s of labeled cells, we developed ‘Coli-Inspector,’ which is a project running under ImageJ with the plugin ‘ObjectJ.’ ObjectJ organizes image-analysis tasks using an integrated approach with the flexibility to produce different output formats from existing markers such as intensity data and geometrical parameters. ObjectJ supports the combination of automatic and interactive methods giving the user complete control over the method of image analysis and data collection, with visual inspection tools for quick elimination of artifacts. Coli-inspector was used to sort the cells according to division cycle cell age and to analyze the spatio-temporal localization pattern of each protein. A unique dataset has been created on the concentration and position of the proteins during the cell cycle. We show for the first time that a subset of morphogenetic proteins have a constant cellular concentration during the cell division cycle whereas another set exhibits a cell division cycle dependent concentration variation. Using the number of proteins present at midcell, the stoichiometry of the divisome is discussed. PMID:26124755

  7. Protein carbonylation in a murine model for early alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Galligan, James J; Smathers, Rebecca L; Fritz, Kristofer S; Epperson, L E; Hunter, Lawrence E; Petersen, Dennis R

    2012-05-21

    Hepatic oxidative stress and subsequent lipid peroxidation are well-recognized consequences of sustained ethanol consumption. The covalent adduction of nucleophilic amino acid side-chains by lipid electrophiles is significantly increased in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD); a global assessment of in vivo protein targets and the consequences of these modifications, however, has not been conducted. In this article, we describe the identification of novel protein targets for covalent adduction in a 6-week murine model for ALD. Ethanol-fed mice displayed a 2-fold increase in hepatic TBARS, while immunohistochemical analysis for the reactive aldehydes 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), 4-oxononenal (4-ONE), acrolein (ACR), and malondialdehyde (MDA) revealed a marked increase in the staining of modified proteins in the ethanol-treated mice. Increased protein carbonyl content was confirmed utilizing subcellular fractionation of liver homogenates followed by biotin-tagging through hydrazide chemistry, where approximately a 2-fold increase in modified proteins was observed in microsomal and cytosolic fractions. To determine targets of protein carbonylation, a secondary hydrazide method coupled to a highly sensitive 2-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC-MS/MS or MuDPIT) technique was utilized. Our results have identified 414 protein targets for modification by reactive aldehydes in ALD. The presence of novel in vivo sites of protein modification by 4-HNE (2), 4-ONE (4) and ACR (2) was also confirmed in our data set. While the precise impact of protein carbonylation in ALD remains unknown, a bioinformatic analysis of the data set has revealed key pathways associated with disease progression, including fatty acid metabolism, drug metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and the TCA cycle. These data suggest a major role for aldehyde adduction in the pathogenesis of ALD.

  8. Is extinction age dependent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doran, N.A.; Arnold, A.J.; Parker, W.C.; Huffer, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    Age-dependent extinction is an observation with important biological implications. Van Valen's Red Queen hypothesis triggered three decades of research testing its primary implication: that age is independent of extinction. In contrast to this, later studies with species-level data have indicated the possible presence of age dependence. Since the formulation of the Red Queen hypothesis, more powerful tests of survivorship models have been developed. This is the first report of the application of the Cox Proportional Hazards model to paleontological data. Planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies allow the taxonomic and precise stratigraphic resolution necessary for the Cox model. As a whole, planktonic foraminiferal morphospecies clearly show age-dependent extinction. In particular, the effect is attributable to the presence of shorter-ranged species (range < 4 myr) following extinction events. These shorter-ranged species also possess tests with unique morphological architecture. The morphological differences are probably epiphenomena of underlying developmental and heterochronic processes of shorter-ranged species that survived various extinction events. Extinction survivors carry developmental and morphological characteristics into postextinction recovery times, and this sets them apart from species populations established independently of extinction events. Copyright ?? 2006, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  9. Increased nitration and carbonylation of proteins in MRL +/+ mice exposed to trichloroethene: Potential role of protein oxidation in autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Gangduo; Wang Jianling; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2009-06-01

    Even though reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated as mediators of autoimmune diseases (ADs), little is known about contribution of protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) in the pathogenesis of such diseases. The focus of this study was, therefore, to establish a link between protein oxidation and induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmunity. To achieve this, female MRL +/+ mice were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 6 or 12 weeks (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4{sup th} day). TCE treatment resulted in significantly increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT) and induction of iNOS in the serum at both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, but the response was greater at 12 weeks. Likewise, TCE treatment led to greater NT formation, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the livers and kidneys. Moreover, TCE treatment also caused significant increases ({approx}3 fold) in serum protein carbonyls (a marker of protein oxidation) at both 6 and 12 weeks. Significantly increased protein carbonyls were also observed in the livers and kidneys (2.1 and 1.3 fold, respectively) at 6 weeks, and to a greater extent at 12 weeks (3.5 and 2.1 fold, respectively) following TCE treatment. The increases in TCE-induced protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) were associated with significant increases in Th1 specific cytokine (IL-2, IFN-{gamma}) release into splenocyte cultures. These results suggest an association between protein oxidation and induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response. The results present a potential mechanism by which oxidatively modified proteins could contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response and necessitates further investigations for clearly establishing the role of protein oxidation in the pathogenesis of ADs.

  10. Increased Nitration and Carbonylation of Proteins in MRL +/+ Mice Exposed to Trichloroethene: Potential Role of Protein Oxidation in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Ma, Huaxian; Firoze Khan, M.

    2009-01-01

    Even though reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated as mediators of autoimmune diseases (ADs), little is known about contribution of protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) in the pathogenesis of such diseases. The focus of this study was, therefore, to establish a link between protein oxidation and induction and/or exacerbation of autoimmunity. To achieve this, female MRL +/+ mice were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 6 or 12 weeks (10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day). TCE treatment resulted in significantly increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT) and induction of iNOS in the serum at both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, but the response was greater at 12 weeks. Likewise, TCE treatment led to greater NT formation, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the livers and kidneys. Moreover, TCE treatment also caused significant increases (~3 fold) in serum protein carbonyls (a marker of protein oxidation) at both 6 and 12 weeks. Significantly increased protein carbonyls were also observed in the livers and kidneys (2.1 and 1.3 fold, respectively) at 6 weeks, and to a greater extent at 12 weeks (3.5 and 2.1 fold, respectively) following TCE treatment. The increases in TCE-induced protein oxidation (carbonylation and nitration) were associated with significant increases in Th1 specific cytokine (IL-2, IFN-γ) release into splenocyte cultures. These results suggest an association between protein oxidation and induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response. The results present a potential mechanism by which oxidatively modified proteins could contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response and necessitates further investigations for clearly establishing the role of protein oxidation in the pathogenesis of ADs. PMID:19332086

  11. (-)-Epicatechin in vitro ameliorates erythrocyte protein carbonyl content in hypertensive patients: comparison with L-ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Navneet; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Kant, Ruchi; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the patho-physiology of hypertension. (-)-Epicatechin has many important biological properties. The present study was undertaken to evaluate effect of (-)-epicatechin on protein carbonyl content in gender-based hypertensive patients and normal subjects. The study was carried out on 83 normal (male: 42; female: 41) and 62 hypertensive subjects (male: 32; female: 30). In vitro effect on (-)-epicatechin and L-ascorbic acid was estimated on protein carbonyl content. Result showed a significant (p < 0.001) increase in protein carbonyl content in hypertensive patients but no gender-based difference was observed. (-)-epicatechin shows significant (p < 0.001) dose-dependent effect as compared to L-ascorbic acid, which is manifested as decrease in protein carbonyl content. We hypothesizes that a higher intake of (-)-epicatechin may provide protection against hypertension in males and females.

  12. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J; Grune, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples.

  13. Vascular heat shock protein expression in response to stress. Endocrine and autonomic regulation of this age-dependent response.

    PubMed Central

    Udelsman, R; Blake, M J; Stagg, C A; Li, D G; Putney, D J; Holbrook, N J

    1993-01-01

    Adaptation to stress requires coordinated interactions between the vascular and endocrine systems. Previously we demonstrated that restraint stress induces the expression of the major heat shock protein, HSP70, in the adrenal cortex of the rat. Here we demonstrate that restraint also induces expression of HSP70 in the vasculature. We further demonstrate that the adrenal and vascular responses are differentially regulated: the adrenal response is adrenocorticotropin dependent, whereas the vascular response is under adrenergic control. In addition, the adrenal response is restricted to members of the HSP70 gene family, whereas in vascular tissue the low molecular weight HSP, HSP27, is also induced by restraint. Further characterization of the vascular response revealed that HSP70 induction occurred in both the thoracic and abdominal aortas as well as in the vena cava. However, no HSP70 induction was apparent in the heart or in a wide variety of other tissues examined. In situ hybridization showed that the vascular expression was localized to the aortic smooth muscle cells with minimal expression in the endothelium. Induction of HSP70 mRNA in both the adrenal cortex and aorta was followed by an elevation in HSP70 protein. Maximum HSP70 protein levels were seen within 3-12 h after restraint, but declined thereafter. Stress induced HSP70 expression was dramatically reduced with age, which may explain, in part, the diminished tolerance to stress seen in elderly individuals. Images PMID:8094399

  14. Ultrafast carbonyl motion of the photoactive yellow protein chromophore probed by femtosecond circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Lucille; Hache, François; Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Plaza, Pascal; Chosrowjan, Haik; Taniguchi, Seiji; Imamoto, Yasushi

    2013-10-02

    Motions of the trans-p-coumaric acid carbonyl group following the photoexcitation of the R52Q mutant of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) are investigated, for the first time, by ultrafast time-resolved circular dichroism (TRCD) spectroscopy. TRCD is monitored in the near-ultraviolet, over a time scale of 10 ps. Immediately after excitation, TRCD is found to exhibit a large negative peak, which decays within a few picoseconds. A quantitative analysis of the signals shows that, upon excitation, the carbonyl group undergoes a fast (≪0.8 ps) and unidirectional flipping motion in the excited state with an angle of ca. 17-53°. For the subset of proteins that do not enter the signaling photocycle, TRCD provides strong evidence that the carbonyl group moves back to its initial position, leading to the formation of a nonreactive ground-state intermediate of trans conformation. The initial ground state is then restored within ca. 3 ps. Comparative study of R52Q and wild-type PYP provides direct evidence that the absence of Arg52 has no effect on the conformational changes of the chromophore during those steps.

  15. On the satisfaction of backbone‐carbonyl lone pairs of electrons in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protein structures are stabilized by a variety of noncovalent interactions (NCIs), including the hydrophobic effect, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic forces and van der Waals’ interactions. Our knowledge of the contributions of NCIs, and the interplay between them remains incomplete. This has implications for computational modeling of NCIs, and our ability to understand and predict protein structure, stability, and function. One consideration is the satisfaction of the full potential for NCIs made by backbone atoms. Most commonly, backbone‐carbonyl oxygen atoms located within α‐helices and β‐sheets are depicted as making a single hydrogen bond. However, there are two lone pairs of electrons to be satisfied for each of these atoms. To explore this, we used operational geometric definitions to generate an inventory of NCIs for backbone‐carbonyl oxygen atoms from a set of high‐resolution protein structures and associated molecular‐dynamics simulations in water. We included more‐recently appreciated, but weaker NCIs in our analysis, such as n→π* interactions, Cα‐H bonds and methyl‐H bonds. The data demonstrate balanced, dynamic systems for all proteins, with most backbone‐carbonyl oxygen atoms being satisfied by two NCIs most of the time. Combinations of NCIs made may correlate with secondary structure type, though in subtly different ways from traditional models of α‐ and β‐structure. In addition, we find examples of under‐ and over‐satisfied carbonyl‐oxygen atoms, and we identify both sequence‐dependent and sequence‐independent secondary‐structural motifs in which these reside. Our analysis provides a more‐detailed understanding of these contributors to protein structure and stability, which will be of use in protein modeling, engineering and design. PMID:26833776

  16. Oxidative Stress–induced Antibodies to Carbonyl-modified Protein Correlate with Severity of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Caramori, Gaetano; Casolari, Paolo; Papi, Alberto A.; Edwards, Matt; Shamji, Betty; Triantaphyllopoulos, Kostas; Hussain, Farhana; Pinart, Mariona; Khan, Younis; Heinemann, Lucy; Stevens, Laurie; Yeadon, Mike; Barnes, Peter J.; Chung, Kian F.; Adcock, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: There is increasing evidence for the presence of autoantibodies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Chronic oxidative stress is an essential component in COPD pathogenesis and can lead to increased levels of highly reactive carbonyls in the lung, which could result in the formation of highly immunogenic carbonyl adducts on “self” proteins. Objectives: To determine the presence of autoantibodies to carbonyl-modified protein in patients with COPD and in a murine model of chronic ozone exposure. To assess the extent of activated immune responses toward carbonyl-modified proteins. Methods: Blood and peripheral lung were taken from patients with COPD, age-matched smokers, and nonsmokers with normal lung function, as well as patients with severe persistent asthma. Mice were exposed to ambient air or ozone for 6 weeks. Antibody titers were measured by ELISA, activated compliment deposition by immunohistochemistry, and cellular activation by ELISA and fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Measurements and Main Results: Antibody titer against carbonyl-modified self-protein was significantly increased in patients with Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III COPD compared with control subjects. Antibody levels inversely correlated with disease severity and showed a prevalence toward an IgG1 isotype. Deposition of activated complement in the vessels of COPD lung as well as autoantibodies against endothelial cells were also observed. Ozone-exposed mice similarly exhibited increased antibody titers to carbonyl-modified protein, as well as activated antigen-presenting cells in lung tissue and splenocytes sensitized to activation by carbonyl-modified protein. Conclusions: Carbonyl-modified proteins, arising as a result of oxidative stress, promote antibody production, providing a link by which oxidative stress could drive an autoimmune response in COPD. PMID:21965015

  17. Oxidative stress-induced antibodies to carbonyl-modified protein correlate with severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Paul A; Caramori, Gaetano; Casolari, Paolo; Papi, Alberto A; Edwards, Matt; Shamji, Betty; Triantaphyllopoulos, Kostas; Hussain, Farhana; Pinart, Mariona; Khan, Younis; Heinemann, Lucy; Stevens, Laurie; Yeadon, Mike; Barnes, Peter J; Chung, Kian F; Adcock, Ian M

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of autoantibodies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Chronic oxidative stress is an essential component in COPD pathogenesis and can lead to increased levels of highly reactive carbonyls in the lung, which could result in the formation of highly immunogenic carbonyl adducts on "self" proteins. To determine the presence of autoantibodies to carbonyl-modified protein in patients with COPD and in a murine model of chronic ozone exposure. To assess the extent of activated immune responses toward carbonyl-modified proteins. Blood and peripheral lung were taken from patients with COPD, age-matched smokers, and nonsmokers with normal lung function, as well as patients with severe persistent asthma. Mice were exposed to ambient air or ozone for 6 weeks. Antibody titers were measured by ELISA, activated compliment deposition by immunohistochemistry, and cellular activation by ELISA and fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Antibody titer against carbonyl-modified self-protein was significantly increased in patients with Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage III COPD compared with control subjects. Antibody levels inversely correlated with disease severity and showed a prevalence toward an IgG1 isotype. Deposition of activated complement in the vessels of COPD lung as well as autoantibodies against endothelial cells were also observed. Ozone-exposed mice similarly exhibited increased antibody titers to carbonyl-modified protein, as well as activated antigen-presenting cells in lung tissue and splenocytes sensitized to activation by carbonyl-modified protein. Carbonyl-modified proteins, arising as a result of oxidative stress, promote antibody production, providing a link by which oxidative stress could drive an autoimmune response in COPD.

  18. Age-dependent changes in neuronal distribution of CacyBP/SIP: comparison to tubulin and the tau protein.

    PubMed

    Filipek, Anna; Schneider, Gabriela; Mietelska, Anna; Figiel, Izabela; Niewiadomska, Grazyna

    2008-09-01

    CacyBP/SIP was originally identified as an S100A6 (calcyclin) target and later on as a Siah-1 interacting protein. Recently, we have shown that CacyBP/SIP interacts with tubulin, which suggests its involvement in the reorganization of microtubules. In this work we examined the localization of CacyBP/SIP in cultured neurons and in brain neurons of young and aged rats, and compared this localization with that of tubulin and the tau protein. We have found that in neurons of young rats CacyBP/SIP, tubulin and tau are present in the cytoplasm and in the neuronal processes, whereas in aged animals CacyBP/SIP and tau are mainly seen in the cytoplasm of the neuronal somata. In aged rats, these changes are also accompanied by a different localization pattern of tubulin. Thus, our results show that localization of CacyBP/SIP in brain neurons is similar to that observed for tau and tubulin, which points to the involvement of CacyBP/SIP in cytoskeletal physiology.

  19. Gel-free proteomic methodologies to study reversible cysteine oxidation and irreversible protein carbonyl formation.

    PubMed

    Boronat, S; García-Santamarina, S; Hidalgo, E

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative modifications in proteins have been traditionally considered as hallmarks of damage by oxidative stress and aging. However, oxidants can generate a huge variety of reversible and irreversible modifications in amino acid side chains as well as in the protein backbones, and these post-translational modifications can contribute to the activation of signal transduction pathways, and also mediate the toxicity of oxidants. Among the reversible modifications, the most relevant ones are those arising from cysteine oxidation. Thus, formation of sulfenic acid or disulfide bonds is known to occur in many enzymes as part of their catalytic cycles, and it also participates in the activation of signaling cascades. Furthermore, these reversible modifications have been usually attributed with a protective role, since they may prevent the formation of irreversible damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species. Among irreversible modifications, protein carbonyl formation has been linked to damage and death, since it cannot be repaired and can lead to protein loss-of-function and to the formation of protein aggregates. This review is aimed at researchers interested on the biological consequences of oxidative stress, both at the level of signaling and toxicity. Here we are providing a concise overview on current mass-spectrometry-based methodologies to detect reversible cysteine oxidation and irreversible protein carbonyl formation in proteomes. We do not pretend to impose any of the different methodologies, but rather to provide an objective catwalk on published gel-free approaches to detect those two types of modifications, from a biologist's point of view.

  20. The effect of occupational lead exposure on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and plasma viscosity.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Słowińska-Łożyńska, Ludmiła; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Wielkoszyński, Tomasz; Birkner, Ewa

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of occupational lead (Pb) exposure on lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and plasma viscosity in workers. The examined group included 283 healthy male employees of manufacturing facilities using zinc and Pb. The mean blood concentrations of Pb and zinc protoporphyrin as well as the mean urine δ-aminolevulinic acid levels were used as markers of exposure for the examined group. Taking into account the obtained mean values of blood lead level, the examined group was divided into three subgroups. When comparing the control group with the subgroups, Pb exposure markers were significantly elevated in all the three subgroups. Concentrations of conjugated dienes (CD), lipid hydroperoxides, malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyl groups were also significantly increased. Conversely, the levels of total protein and protein sulfhydryls were significantly decreased in the subgroups compared with the controls. The plasma viscosity was significantly elevated in the subgroups. A dose-response between Pb levels and plasma viscosity was not observed. Pb supposedly elevates MDA and CD in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, occupational Pb exposure induces oxidative stress that results in lipid and protein damage. Moreover, Pb-induced oxidative stress is likely the primary factor that elevates plasma viscosity, despite decreased protein levels.

  1. Detection of Protein Carbonyls by Means of Biotin Hydrazide-Streptavidin Affinity Methods.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative posttranslational protein modifications occur as a normal process of cell biology and to a greater extent during pathogenic conditions. The detection and quantitation of protein oxidation has posed a continuing challenge to bioanalytical chemists because of the following reasons: The products of oxidative protein damage are chemically diverse; protein oxidation generally occurs at low background levels; and the complexity of biological samples introduces high background noise when standard techniques such as immunolabeling are applied to "dirty" tissue extracts containing endogenous immunoglobulins or small molecular weight, chemically reactive compounds has been developed which circumvents these difficulties by incorporating a biotin label at sites of protein carbonylation. Biotin hydrazide-labeled proteins are detectable using standard streptavidin-coupled detection techniques such as peroxidase-catalyzed chemiluminescence of immunoblots. Advantages of the biotin hydrazide-labeling technique are its sensitivity and its lack of reliance upon antibodies that inevitably suffer from nonspecific background noise and contaminating endogenous immunoglobulins.

  2. Time and dose effects of cigarette smoke and acrolein on protein carbonyl formation in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Avezov, K; Reznick, A Z; Aizenbud, D

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is an important environmental source of human exposure to a highly toxic and chemically active α,β-unsaturated aldehyde: acrolein. It is capable of causing protein carbonylation and dysfunction, especially in oral tissues of smokers, constantly exposed to CS toxic constituents. The foremost damage is considered to be cumulative, but even a short exposure can be potentially harmful. The objectives of the current study were to examine the short time and dose effects of direct CS and acrolein exposure on intracellular protein carbonylation in epithelial cells. HaCaT-keratinocytes were exposed to different doses of acrolein and whole phase CS using a unique smoking simulator apparatus that mimics the exposure in smokers. The rate of intracellular protein carbonyl modification was examined 10-60 min after the exposure by Western blot. In addition, the effect of pre-incubation with a thiol scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was also assessed. We found that intracellular protein carbonyls increased as fast as 10 min after CS exposure and their concentration doubled after 20 min, with a slight elevation afterwards. Also, carbonyl levels increased gradually as CS and acrolein doses were elevated. Addition of 1 mM NAC neutralized part of the damage. We conclude that CS and acrolein intracellular protein carbonylation is dose- and time- dependent. Even a short time exposure to CS and its aldehydic constituents can be potentially harmful.

  3. Cross-talk between lipid and protein carbonylation in a dynamic cardiomyocyte model of mild nitroxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Eva; Vemula, Venukumar; Raulien, Nora; Wagner, Ulf; Reeg, Sandra; Grune, Tilman; Fedorova, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) play an important role in the regulation of cardiac function. Increase in ROS/RNS concentration results in lipid and protein oxidation and is often associated with onset and/or progression of many cardiovascular disorders. However, interplay between lipid and protein modifications has not been simultaneously studied in detail so far. Biomolecule carbonylation is one of the most common biomarkers of oxidative stress. Using a dynamic model of nitroxidative stress we demonstrated rapid changes in biomolecule carbonylation in rat cardiomyocytes. Levels of carbonylated species increased as early as 15min upon treatment with the peroxynitrite donor, 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), and decreased to values close to control after 16h. Total (lipids+proteins) vs. protein-specific carbonylation showed different dynamics, with a significant increase in protein-bound carbonyls at later time points. Treatment with SIN-1 in combination with inhibitors of proteasomal and autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathways allowed confirmation of a significant role of the proteasome in the degradation of carbonylated proteins, whereas lipid carbonylation increased in the presence of autophagy/lysosomal inhibitors. Electrophilic aldehydes and ketones formed by lipid peroxidation were identified and relatively quantified using LC-MS/MS. Molecular identity of reactive species was used for data-driven analysis of their protein targets. Combination of different enrichment strategies with LC-MS/MS analysis allowed identification of more than 167 unique proteins with 332 sites modified by electrophilic lipid peroxidation products. Gene ontology analysis of modified proteins demonstrated enrichment of several functional categories including proteins involved in cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, ion channels and their regulation. Using calcium mobilization assays, the effect of nitroxidative stress on the activity of several ion channels was further

  4. Effects of Heat Stress Treatment on Age-dependent Unfolded Protein Response in Different Types of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yuki; Matsunaga, Yutaka; Kitaoka, Yu; Hatta, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and subsequently activated responses (mitochondrial/ER unfolded protein responses; UPRmt/UPRER), are involved in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia. To extend both basic and translational knowledge, we examined (i) whether age-induced mitochondrial and ER stress depend on skeletal muscle type in mice and (ii) whether heat stress treatment, a suggested strategy for sarcopenia, improves age-induced mitochondrial and ER stress. Aged (21-month-old) mice showed more severe mitochondrial stress and UPRmt than young (12-week-old) mice, based on increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial proteases, and mitochondrial E3 ubiquitin ligase. The aged mice also showed ER stress and UPRER, based on decreased ER enzymes and increased ER stress-related cell death. These changes were much more evident in soleus muscle than in gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. After daily heat stress treatment (40 °C chamber for 30 minutes per day) for 4 weeks, mice showed remarkable improvements in age-related changes in soleus muscle. Heat stress had only minor effects in gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. Based on these findings, age-associated mitochondrial stress, ER stress, and UPRmt/ER vary qualitatively with skeletal muscle type. Our results suggest a molecular basis for the beneficial effects of heat stress on muscle atrophy with age in soleus muscle. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-07-12

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ or anti-..cap alpha../sub 0/ antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed.

  6. Correlation of Plasma Protein Carbonyls and C-Reactive Protein with GOLD Stage Progression in COPD Patients.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ramos, Yessica D; García-Guillen, María L; Olivares-Corichi, Ivonne M; Hicks, J J

    2009-04-14

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To investigate the correlation between the progression of COPD and plasma biomarkers of chronic inflammation and oxidative injury, blood samples were obtained from healthy volunteers (HV, n = 14) and stabilized COPD patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to their GOLD stage (II, n = 34; III, n = 18; IV, n = 20). C-reactive protein (CRP), protein carbonyls (PC), malondialdehyde (MDA), susceptible lipoperoxidation of plasma substrates (SLPS), and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) were measured. The plasma concentration of SLPS was measured as the amount of MDA generated by a metal ion-catalyzed reaction in vitro. PC, SLPS, and CPR were increased significantly (p < 0.001) in COPD patients when compared to HV. MDA concentrations and MPO activities were not significantly different from those of the HV group. In conclusion, increased oxidation of lipids and proteins resulting in a progressive increase in the amount of total plasma carbonyls and oxidative stress the presence of oxidative stress during COPD progression, concomitant with an increased oxidation of lipids and proteins resulting in a progressive and significant increase in the amount of total carbonyls formed from lipid-derived aldehydes and direct amino acid side chain oxidation in plasma, may serve as a biomarker and independent monitor of COPD progression and oxidative stress injury.

  7. Correlation of Plasma Protein Carbonyls and C-Reactive Protein with GOLD Stage Progression in COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Ramos, Yessica D; García-Guillen, María L; Olivares-Corichi, Ivonne M; Hicks, J. J

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To investigate the correlation between the progression of COPD and plasma biomarkers of chronic inflammation and oxidative injury, blood samples were obtained from healthy volunteers (HV, n = 14) and stabilized COPD patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to their GOLD stage (II, n = 34; III, n = 18; IV, n = 20). C-reactive protein (CRP), protein carbonyls (PC), malondialdehyde (MDA), susceptible lipoperoxidation of plasma substrates (SLPS), and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) were measured. The plasma concentration of SLPS was measured as the amount of MDA generated by a metal ion-catalyzed reaction in vitro. PC, SLPS, and CPR were increased significantly (p < 0.001) in COPD patients when compared to HV. MDA concentrations and MPO activities were not significantly different from those of the HV group. In conclusion, increased oxidation of lipids and proteins resulting in a progressive increase in the amount of total plasma carbonyls and oxidative stress the presence of oxidative stress during COPD progression, concomitant with an increased oxidation of lipids and proteins resulting in a progressive and significant increase in the amount of total carbonyls formed from lipid-derived aldehydes and direct amino acid side chain oxidation in plasma, may serve as a biomarker and independent monitor of COPD progression and oxidative stress injury. PMID:19461898

  8. Increased protein carbonylation in leaves of Arabidopsis and soybean in response to elevated [CO2].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Quan-Sheng; Huber, Joan L; Booker, Fitzgerald L; Jain, Vanita; Leakey, Andrew D B; Fiscus, Edwin L; Yau, Peter M; Ort, Donald R; Huber, Steven C

    2008-08-01

    While exposure of C3 plants to elevated [CO2] would be expected to reduce production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leaves because of reduced photorespiratory metabolism, results obtained in the present study suggest that exposure of plants to elevated [CO2] can result in increased oxidative stress. First, in Arabidopsis and soybean, leaf protein carbonylation, a marker of oxidative stress, was often increased when plants were exposed to elevated [CO2]. In soybean, increased carbonyl content was often associated with loss of leaf chlorophyll and reduced enhancement of leaf photosynthetic rate (Pn) by elevated [CO2]. Second, two-dimensional (2-DE) difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analysis of proteins extracted from leaves of soybean plants grown at elevated [CO2] or [O3] revealed that both treatments altered the abundance of a similar subset of proteins, consistent with the idea that both conditions may involve an oxidative stress. The 2-DE analysis of leaf proteins was facilitated by a novel and simple procedure to remove ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from soluble soybean leaf extracts. Collectively, these findings add a new dimension to our understanding of global change biology and raise the possibility that oxidative signals can be an unexpected component of plant response to elevated [CO2].

  9. Engineered Trx2p industrial yeast strain protects glycolysis and fermentation proteins from oxidative carbonylation during biomass propagation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the yeast biomass production process, protein carbonylation has severe adverse effects since it diminishes biomass yield and profitability of industrial production plants. However, this significant detriment of yeast performance can be alleviated by increasing thioredoxins levels. Thioredoxins are important antioxidant defenses implicated in many functions in cells, and their primordial functions include scavenging of reactive oxygen species that produce dramatic and irreversible alterations such as protein carbonylation. Results In this work we have found several proteins specifically protected by yeast Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2p). Bidimensional electrophoresis and carbonylated protein identification from TRX-deficient and TRX-overexpressing cells revealed that glycolysis and fermentation-related proteins are specific targets of Trx2p protection. Indeed, the TRX2 overexpressing strain presented increased activity of the central carbon metabolism enzymes. Interestingly, Trx2p specifically preserved alcohol dehydrogenase I (Adh1p) from carbonylation, decreased oligomer aggregates and increased its enzymatic activity. Conclusions The identified proteins suggest that the fermentative capacity detriment observed under industrial conditions in T73 wine commercial strain results from the oxidative carbonylation of specific glycolytic and fermentation enzymes. Indeed, increased thioredoxin levels enhance the performance of key fermentation enzymes such as Adh1p, which consequently increases fermentative capacity. PMID:22230188

  10. Protein carbonylation during electron beam irradiation may be responsible for changes in IgE binding to turbot parvalbumin.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenxing; Lu, Zongchao; Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Lin, Hong; Zhang, Limin

    2014-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between protein carbonylation and changes of the IgE reactivity of turbot parvalbumin (PV) following electron beam (EB) irradiation. The concentration of protein carbonyls, specific IgE binding, and IgE binding inhibition between irradiated and oxidized PV were assessed. Irradiation resulted in a 3-fold enhancement in the protein carbonyl content. In purified PV irradiated with a 10-kGy dose, specific IgE binding was reduced by 91.2±6.2%. When raw PV was treated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), the protein carbonyl content increased 17.6-fold, with the specific IgE binding being reduced by 87.9±6.5% at an ROS concentration of 10 nmol/mL. The IgE binding inhibition between irradiated and oxidized PV was investigated using an inhibition ELISA. Results showed that oxidized PV can inhibit the binding between irradiated PV and specific IgE with an IC50 of 8.2-58 ng according to different doses of irradiation. These findings suggest that EB irradiation reduces specific IgE binding, probably by the induction of protein carbonylation.

  11. Assessment of Protein Carbonylation and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (PTP) Oxidation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMCs) Using Immunoblotting Approaches.

    PubMed

    Tsiropoulou, Sofia; Touyz, Rhian M

    2017-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins, such as phosphorylation and oxidation, plays a major role in cellular signaling by influencing protein structure and function. In vascular cells, in addition to influencing phosphorylation, angiotensin II (Ang II) induces oxidation of proteins, important in redox signaling in the cardiovascular and renal systems. The present chapter describes immunoblotting approaches to assess irreversible protein carbonylation and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPs) oxidation status in the proteome of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC).Protein carbonylation is generally measured using the OxyBlot™ approach, whereby derivatization of protein carbonyl groups (C = O) on oxidized amino acids by dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) results in the formation of a stable dinitrophenyl (DNP) hydrazone product. The samples are analyzed by SDS-PAGE and a primary antibody raised against the DNP moiety is used to determine levels of irreversible protein carbonylation in the sample by immunoblotting.Oxidation of PTPs can be evaluated using a monoclonal antibody against the "hyperoxidized" (SO3H) catalytic site of these enzymes. The described methodology offers the ability to discriminate between irreversible (SO3H) and reversible (SOH) PTP oxidation states. Initially, the free unmodified PTP-thiols (S(-)) are alkylated and the sample is split into two. One part is used to assess the PTP-SO3H form. In the other part reversibly modified PTP-thiols are first reduced and then hyperoxidized by pervanadate (PV). Both untreated and PV-treated samples are analyzed by SDS-PAGE and "hyperoxidized" PTPs are detected by immunoblotting. The proportion of reversibly oxidized PTP-SOH fraction is determined by the difference between the signals in untreated and the PV-treated samples.The above immunoassays provide general approaches to detect and quantify global levels of irreversible protein oxidation and of irreversibly/reversibly oxidized PTPs in any (patho

  12. Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and Carbonylated Proteins as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Selected Atherosclerosis-Mediated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gryszczyńska, Bogna; Formanowicz, Dorota; Budzyń, Magdalena; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Formanowicz, Piotr; Majewski, Wacław; Strzyżewski, Krzysztof Wojciech; Kasprzak, Magdalena P; Iskra, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The main question of this study was to evaluate the intensity of oxidative protein modification shown as advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and carbonylated proteins, expressed as protein carbonyl content (C=O) in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD), and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study was carried out in a group of 35 AAA patients and 13 AIOD patients. However, CKD patients were divided into two groups: predialysis (PRE) included 50 patients or hemodialysis (HD) consisted of 34 patients. AOPP and C=O were measured using colorimetric assay kit, while C-reactive protein concentration was measured by high-sensitivity assay (hsCRP). The concentration of AOPP in both AAA and AIOD groups was higher than in PRE and HD groups according to descending order: AAA~AIOD > HD > PRE. The content of C=O was higher in the PRE group in comparison to AIOD and AAA according to the descending order: PRE~HD > AAA~AIOD. AAA, AIOD, and CKD-related atherosclerosis (PRE and HD) contribute to the changes in the formation of AOPP and C=O. They may promote modification of proteins in a different way, probably due to the various factors that influence oxidative stress here.

  13. Serum levels of carbonylated and nitrosylated proteins in mobbing victims with workplace adjustment disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, A E; Gangemi, S; Cristani, M; Fenga, C; Saitta, S; Abenavoli, E; Imbesi, S; Speciale, A; Minciullo, P L; Spatari, G; Abbate, S; Saija, A; Cimino, F

    2009-12-01

    Today the most important problem in the work place is psychological abuse, which may affect the health because of high levels of stress and anxiety. There is evidence that most psychiatric disorders are associated with increased oxidative stress but nothing is reported about the presence of oxidative stress in mobbing victims. This study has been carried out in a group of 19 patients affected by workplace mobbing-due adjustment disorders, in comparison with 38 healthy subjects, to evaluate whether oxidative stress may be induced by mobbing. Serum levels of protein carbonyl groups and of nitrosylated proteins, biological markers of oxidative stress conditions, were higher than those measured in healthy subjects. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the redox homeostasis dysregulation occurring in victims of workplace mobbing.

  14. Human DCXR - another 'moonlighting protein' involved in sugar metabolism, carbonyl detoxification, cell adhesion and male fertility?

    PubMed

    Ebert, Bettina; Kisiela, Michael; Maser, Edmund

    2015-02-01

    Dicarbonyl/L-xylulose reductase (DCXR; SDR20C1), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily catalyzes the reduction of α-dicarbonyl compounds and monosaccharides. Its role in the metabolism of L-xylulose has been known since 1970, when essential pentosuria was found to be associated with DCXR deficiency. Despite its early discovery, our knowledge about the role of human DCXR in normal physiology and pathophysiology is still incomplete. Sporadic studies have demonstrated aberrant expression in several cancers, but their physiological significance is unknown. In reproductive medicine, where DCXR is commonly referred to as 'sperm surface protein P34H', it serves as marker for epididymal sperm maturation and is essential for gamete interaction and successful fertilization. DCXR exhibits a multifunctional nature, both acting as a carbonyl reductase and also performing non-catalytic functions, possibly resulting from interactions with other proteins. Recent observations associate DCXR with a role in cell adhesion, pointing to a novel function involving tumour progression and possibly metastasis. This review summarizes the current knowledge about human DCXR and its orthologs from mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans (DHS-21) with an emphasis on its multifunctional characteristics. Due to its close structural relationship with DCXR, carbonyl reductase 2 (Cbr2), a tetrameric enzyme found in several non-primate species is also discussed. Similar to human DCXR, Cbr2 from golden hamster (P26h) and cow (P25b) is essential for sperm-zona pellucida interaction and fertilization. Because of the apparent similarity of these two proteins and the inconsistent use of alternative names previously, we provide an overview of the systematic classification of DCXR and Cbr2 and a phylogenetic analysis to illustrate their ancestry.

  15. predCar-site: Carbonylation sites prediction in proteins using support vector machine with resolving data imbalanced issue.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Al Mehedi; Li, Jinyan; Ahmad, Shamim; Molla, Md Khademul Islam

    2017-03-09

    The carbonylation is found as an irreversible post-translational modification and considered a biomarker of oxidative stress. It plays major role not only in orchestrating various biological processes but also associated with some diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease. However, since the experimental technologies are costly and time-consuming to detect the carbonylation sites in proteins, an accurate computational method for predicting carbonylation sites is an urgent issue which can be useful for drug development. In this study, a novel computational tool termed predCar-Site has been developed to predict protein carbonylation sites by (1) incorporating the sequence-coupled information into the general pseudo amino acid composition, (2) balancing the effect of skewed training dataset by Different Error Costs method, and (3) constructing a predictor using support vector machine as classifier. This predCar-Site predictor achieves an average AUC (area under curve) score of 0.9959, 0.9999, 1, and 0.9997 in predicting the carbonylation sites of K, P, R, and T, respectively. All of the experimental results along with AUC are found from the average of 5 complete runs of the 10-fold cross-validation and those results indicate significantly better performance than existing predictors. A user-friendly web server of predCar-Site is available at http://research.ru.ac.bd/predCar-Site/.

  16. Carbonylated proteins exposed to UVA and to blue light generate reactive oxygen species through a type I photosensitizing reaction.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Taeko; Sumida, Hijiri; Sagawa, Yuki; Okano, Yuri; Masaki, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    Carbonylated proteins (CPs) are generated by the reaction of basic amino acid residues in proteins with aldehyde compounds produced during lipid peroxidation. CPs in the stratum corneum (SC) impact skin conditions such as skin moisture functions including water content and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). In addition, CPs can be frequently seen in the SC from sun-exposed sites compared with sun-protected sites. The aim of this study was to reveal whether CPs could be a generation source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the SC following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and to identify the type of ROS and its generation mechanism. ROS generation was detected using a methyl cypridina luciferin analog (MCLA) chemiluminescence system and an ESR spin-trapping method. CPs in porcine SC, in a keratin film and in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were prepared by reaction with acrolein. Levels of protein carbonylation were quantified by detecting aldehyde residues. CP levels in the SC were increased in a UVA energy-dependent manner. That result suggested that a source of ROS generation existed in the SC initiated and produced the carbonylation of SC proteins. Carbonylated BSA and carbonylated porcine SC sheets exhibited fluorescence spectra at an excitation wavelength of 430nm and an emission wavelength of 520nm. Irradiation of the SC with UVA increased protein carbonylation and the amount of autofluorescence in the SC. ROS generation in the SC caused by UVA and by short-wavelength visible light (blue light, 400-470nm) was detected by the MCLA chemiluminescence system. Artificially carbonylated porcine SCs and keratin films had increases of chemiluminescence intensity after exposure to both light sources as well. The addition of superoxide dismutase to the MCLA system completely abolished the incremental chemiluminescence intensity after both UVA and blue light exposure of the SC. In addition, acrolein-treated BSA gave ESR signals like hydroxyl radicals (OH) converted

  17. [The mechanism of phenoptosis: I. Age-dependent decrease of the overall rate of protein synthesis is caused by the programmed attenuation of bio-energetics].

    PubMed

    Trubitsyn, A G

    2009-01-01

    The age-dependent degradation of all vital processes of an organism can be result of influences of destructive factors (the stochastic mechanism of aging), or effect of realizations of the genetic program (phenoptosis). The stochastic free-radical theory of aging dominating now contradicts the set of empirical data, and the semicentenial attempts to create the means to slow down aging did not give any practical results. It makes obvious that the stochastic mechanism of aging is incorrect. At the same time, the alternative mechanism of the programmed aging is not developed yet but preconditions for it development have already been created. It is shown that the genes controlling process of aging exist (contrary to the customary opinion) and the increase in the level of damaged macromolecules (basic postulate of the free-radical theory) can be explained by programmed attenuation of bio-energetics. As the bio-energetics is a driving force of all vital processes, decrease of its level is capable to cause degradation of all functions of an organism. However to transform this postulate into a basis of the theory of phenoptosis it is necessary to show, that attenuation of bio-energetics predetermines such fundamental processes accompanying aging as decrease of the overall rate of protein biosynthesis, restriction of cellular proliferations (Hayflick limit), loss of telomeres etc. This article is the first step in this direction: the natural mechanism of interaction of overall rate of protein synthesis with a level of cellular bio-energetics is shown. This is built-in into the translation machine and based on dependence of recirculation rate of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (elF2) from ATP/ADP value that is created by mitochondrial bio-energetic machine.

  18. Proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins in rat liver: discovering possible mechanisms for tetracycline-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenglu; Yan, Siyu; Hu, Hui; Duan, Zhigui; Yin, Lanxuan; Liao, Shenke; Sun, Yubai; Yin, Dazhong; Li, Guolin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate biochemical mechanisms for the tetracycline-induced steatosis in rats, targeted proteins of oxidative modification were profiled. The results showed that tetracycline induced lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and cell viability decline in HepG2 cells only under the circumstances of palmitic acid overload. Tetracycline administration in rats led to significant decrement in blood lipids, while resulted in more than four times increment in intrahepatic triacylglycerol and typical microvesicular steatosis in the livers. The triacylglycerol levels were positively correlated with oxidative stress. Proteomic profiles of carbonylated proteins revealed 26 targeted proteins susceptible to oxidative modification and most of them located in mitochondria. Among them, the long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was one of the key enzymes regulating fatty acid β-oxidation. Oxidative modification of the enzyme in the tetracycline group depressed its enzymatic activity. In conclusion, the increased influx of lipid into the livers is the first hit of tetracycline-induced microvesicular steatosis. Oxidative stress is an essential part of the second hit, which may arise from the lipid overload and attack a series of functional proteins, aggravating the development of steatosis. The 26 targeted proteins revealed here provide a potential direct link between oxidative stress and tetracycline-induced steatosis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Protein hydroperoxides and carbonyl groups generated by porphyrin-induced photo-oxidation of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Silvester, J A; Timmins, G S; Davies, M J

    1998-02-15

    Porphyrin-sensitized photo-oxidation of bovine serum albumin results in oxidation at specific sites to produce protein radical species: at the Cys-34 residue (to give a thiyl radical) and at one or both tryptophan residues (Trp-134 and Trp-214) to give tertiary carbon-centered radicals and cause disruption of the indole ring system. This study shows that these photo-oxidation processes also consume oxygen and give rise to hydrogen peroxide, protein hydroperoxides, and carbonyl functions. The yield of hydrogen peroxide, protein hydroperoxides, and carbonyl functions is shown to be dependent on illumination time, the nature of the sensitizer, and the concentration of oxygen; the yield of hydroperoxides can also be markedly diminished by the presence of a spin trap which reacts with the initial protein radicals. The mechanism of formation of the protein hydroperoxides is suggested to be primarily through type I processes (i.e., independent of singlet oxygen), while type II (singlet oxygen) mechanisms may play a significant role in protein carbonyl formation. Reaction of the protein hydroperoxide species with metal ion complexes is shown to produce further protein-derived radicals which are predominantly present on amino acid side chains. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  20. Elevated protein carbonylation and oxidative stress do not affect protein structure and function in the long-living naked-mole rat: a proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    De Waal, Eric M; Liang, Hanyu; Pierce, Anson; Hamilton, Ryan T; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Chaudhuri, Asish R

    2013-05-17

    The 'oxidative stress theory of aging' predicts that aging is primarily regulated by progressive accumulation of oxidized macromolecules that cause deleterious effects to cellular homeostasis and induces a decline in physiological function. However, our reports on the detection of higher level of oxidized protein carbonyls in the soluble cellular fractions of long-living rodent naked-mole rats (NMRs, lifespan ~30yrs) compared to short-lived mice (lifespan ~3.5yrs) apparently contradicts a key tenet of the oxidative theory. As oxidation often inactivates enzyme function and induces higher-order soluble oligomers, we performed a comprehensive study to measure global protein carbonyl level in different tissues of age-matched NMRs and mice to determine if the traditional concept of oxidation mediated impairment of function and induction of higher-order structures of proteins are upheld in the NMRs. We made three intriguing observations with NMRs proteins: (1) protein carbonyl is significantly elevated across different tissues despite of its exceptional longevity, (2) enzyme function is restored despite of experiencing higher level of protein carbonylation, and (3) enzymes show lesser sensitivity to form higher-order non-reducible oligomers compared to short-living mouse proteins in response to oxidative stress. These observations were made based on the global analysis of protein carbonyl and identification of two heavily carbonylated proteins in the kidney, triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) and cytosolic peroxiredoxin (Prdx1). These un-expected intriguing observations thus strongly suggest that oxidative modification may not be the only criteria for impairment of protein and enzyme function; cellular environment is likely be the critical determining factor in this process and may be the underlying mechanism for exceptional longevity of NMR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein carbonyl levels correlate with performance in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Lima, Frederico Luis; Lannes, Luiz; Viana-Gomes, Diego; Pierucci, Anna Paola T R; Salerno, Verônica P

    2015-07-01

    Excess and incorrectly selected exercise can degrade athletic performance from an imbalance in redox homeostasis and oxidative stress, but well-planned training and nutrition can improve antioxidant capacity. The aim of the study was to investigate how nutrient intake could influence oxidative stress and cell lesion biomarkers after 5 days of training followed by a game. Blood was collected from 10 athletes at the start of training (basal), after training (pre-game), and postgame. Their acceleration capacity also was measured pre- and postgame. Blood analysis showed an increase in lactate concentration postgame (13%) and total antioxidant capacity increased both pre-game (13.1%) and postgame (12.7%), all in comparison with basal levels. An oxidative stress marker, protein carbonyl (PC), increased 3-fold over the course of the game, which correlated with a decreased acceleration (r = 0.749). For biomarkers of tissue damage, creatine kinase and aspartate transaminase (AST) increased postgame by 150% and 75%, respectively. The AST variation had a high negative correlation with energy and carbohydrate consumption and a moderate correlation with lipid and vitamin C intake. Protein intake had a positive but moderate correlation with reduced glutathione. The observed correlations suggest that nutritional monitoring can improve exercise physiological homeostasis and that PC serves as a good biomarker for oxidative stress and performance loss.

  2. Analysis of protein oxidation in serum of fetal and newborn piglets and the influence of iron dextran on induction of protein carbonyls.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods were employed to evaluate serum biomarkers associated with protein oxidative stress and damage, to determine potential sources of metabolic stress in baby pigs. Protein carbonyls in serum were converted to dinitrophenyl (DNP) derivatives with DNP-hydrazine, precipitated with TCA, extracted i...

  3. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: assignment of the carbonyl carbon /sup 13/C NMR resonances in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, G.D.; Weiner, J.H.; Sykes, B.D.

    1987-06-16

    The major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 is a 50-residue amphiphilic polypeptide which is inserted, as an integral membrane-spanning protein, in the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host during infection. /sup 13/C was incorporated biosynthetically into a total of 23 of the peptide carbonyls using labeled amino acids (alanine, glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, and proline). The structure and dynamics of carbonyl-labeled M13 coat protein were monitored by /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Assignment of many resonances was achieved by using protease digestion, pH titration, or labeling of the peptide bond with both /sup 13/C and /sup 15/N. The carbonyl region of the natural-abundance /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of M13 coat protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution shows approximately eight backbone carbonyl resonances with line widths much narrower than the rest. Three of these more mobile residues correspond to assigned peaks (glycine-3, lysine-48, and alanine-49) in the individual amino acid spectra, and another almost certainly arises from glutamic acid-2. A ninth residue, alanine-1, also gives rise to a very narrow carbonyl resonance if the pH is well above or below the pK/sub a/ of the terminal amino group. These data suggest that only about four residues at either end of the protein experience large-amplitude spatial fluctuations; the rest of the molecule is essentially rigid on the time scale of the overall rotational tumbling of the protein-detergent complex. The relative exposure of different regions of detergent-bound protein was monitored by limited digestion with proteinase K. Comparable spectra and digestion patterns were obtained when the protein was solubilized in sodium deoxycholate, suggesting that the coat protein binds both amphiphiles in a similar fashion.

  4. Novel effects of FCCP [carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone] on amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Connop, B P; Thies, R L; Beyreuther, K; Ida, N; Reiner, P B

    1999-04-01

    Amyloidogenic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Because it has been suggested that catabolic processing of the APP holoprotein occurs in acidic intracellular compartments, we studied the effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and the H+-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 on APP catabolism in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing either wild-type or "Swedish" mutant APP. Unlike bafilomycin A1, which inhibits beta-amyloid production in cells expressing mutant but not wild-type APP, FCCP inhibited beta-amyloid production in both cell types. Moreover, the effects of FCCP were independent of alterations in total cellular APP levels or APP maturation, and the concentrations used did not alter either cellular ATP levels or cell viability. Bafilomycin A1, which had no effect on beta-amyloid production in wild-type cells, inhibited endocytosis of fluorescent transferrin, whereas concentrations of FCCP that inhibited beta-amyloid production in these cells had no effect on endosomal function. Thus, in wild-type-expressing cells it appears that the beta-amyloid peptide is not produced in the classically defined endosome. Although bafilomycin A1 decreased beta-amyloid release from cells expressing mutant APP but not wild-type APP, it altered lysosomal function in both cell types, suggesting that in normal cells beta-amyloid is not produced in the lysosome. Although inhibition of beta-amyloid production by bafilomycin A1 in mutant cells may occur via changes in endosomal/lysosomal pH, our data suggest that FCCP inhibits wild-type beta-amyloid production by acting on a bafilomycin A1-insensitive acidic compartment that is distinct from either the endosome or the lysosome.

  5. Cell Proliferation and Expression of Cell Cycle Regulatory Proteins that Control the G1/S Transition Are Age Dependent and Lobe Specific in the Brown Norway Rat Model of Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jinchun; Brown, Terry R.

    2008-01-01

    Age-dependent epithelial cell hyperplasia in the dorsal and lateral lobes of Brown Norway rats is analogous to benign prostatic hyperplasia in aging men. A major question is whether differential lobe-specific and age-dependent proliferation of cells, rather than cell survival, contributes to the hyperplasia. Although serum testosterone (T) levels decline in aged rats, active cell proliferation was detected as Ki67-positive cells in the dorsal and lateral lobes. We determined whether androgens differentially affect cell proliferation and cell-cycle regulatory proteins in the prostate lobes of young and aged rats. Castrated rats were treated with different doses of T to restore serum levels to those of intact young or aged rats. Rates of cell proliferation, measured by 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling, peaked after 3-d T treatment in all lobes. 5-bromodeoxyuridine-labeling indices were higher in the dorsal and lateral lobes of aged than of young rats with equivalent serum T levels. No age-dependent difference was seen in the ventral lobe. Cell proliferation was marked by increased levels of cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, decreased p27 and increased phosphorylation of Rb. Levels of cyclins D1 and E were higher in the dorsal and lateral lobes of intact and T-treated aged than young rats. Confocal immunofluorescent microscopy documented changes in cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1 subcellular localization. Cyclin D1 nuclear localization correlated with the time frame for cell proliferation. In conclusion, rates of cell proliferation and levels of cell-cycle regulatory proteins that control the G1/S transition exhibit lobe-specific and age-dependent differences in response to androgens. PMID:17962342

  6. Cell proliferation and expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins that control the G1/S transition are age dependent and lobe specific in the Brown Norway rat model of prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinchun; Brown, Terry R

    2008-01-01

    Age-dependent epithelial cell hyperplasia in the dorsal and lateral lobes of Brown Norway rats is analogous to benign prostatic hyperplasia in aging men. A major question is whether differential lobe-specific and age-dependent proliferation of cells, rather than cell survival, contributes to the hyperplasia. Although serum testosterone (T) levels decline in aged rats, active cell proliferation was detected as Ki67-positive cells in the dorsal and lateral lobes. We determined whether androgens differentially affect cell proliferation and cell-cycle regulatory proteins in the prostate lobes of young and aged rats. Castrated rats were treated with different doses of T to restore serum levels to those of intact young or aged rats. Rates of cell proliferation, measured by 5-bromodeoxyuridine labeling, peaked after 3-d T treatment in all lobes. 5-bromodeoxyuridine-labeling indices were higher in the dorsal and lateral lobes of aged than of young rats with equivalent serum T levels. No age-dependent difference was seen in the ventral lobe. Cell proliferation was marked by increased levels of cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6, decreased p27 and increased phosphorylation of Rb. Levels of cyclins D1 and E were higher in the dorsal and lateral lobes of intact and T-treated aged than young rats. Confocal immunofluorescent microscopy documented changes in cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and cyclin D1 subcellular localization. Cyclin D1 nuclear localization correlated with the time frame for cell proliferation. In conclusion, rates of cell proliferation and levels of cell-cycle regulatory proteins that control the G1/S transition exhibit lobe-specific and age-dependent differences in response to androgens.

  7. Nitric Oxide Enhances Desiccation Tolerance of Recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria Seeds via Protein S-Nitrosylation and Carbonylation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xuegui; Yang, Liming; Tian, Meihua; Chen, Jinhui; Shi, Jisen; Yang, Yongping; Hu, Xiangyang

    2011-01-01

    The viability of recalcitrant seeds is lost following stress from either drying or freezing. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting from uncontrolled metabolic activity are likely responsible for seed sensitivity to drying. Nitric oxide (NO) and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle can be used for the detoxification of ROS, but their roles in the seed response to desiccation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that desiccation induces rapid accumulation of H2O2, which blocks recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria seed germination; however, pretreatment with NO increases the activity of antioxidant ascorbate-glutathione pathway enzymes and metabolites, diminishes H2O2 production and assuages the inhibitory effects of desiccation on seed germination. Desiccation increases the protein carbonylation levels and reduces protein S-nitrosylation of these antioxidant enzymes; these effects can be reversed with NO treatment. Antioxidant protein S-nitrosylation levels can be further increased by the application of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibitors, which further enhances NO-induced seed germination rates after desiccation and reduces desiccation-induced H2O2 accumulation. These findings suggest that NO reinforces recalcitrant seed desiccation tolerance by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities to stabilize H2O2 accumulation at an appropriate concentration. During this process, protein carbonylation and S-nitrosylation patterns are used as a specific molecular switch to control antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:21674063

  8. Nitric oxide enhances desiccation tolerance of recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria seeds via protein S-nitrosylation and carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xuegui; Yang, Liming; Tian, Meihua; Chen, Jinhui; Shi, Jisen; Yang, Yongping; Hu, Xiangyang

    2011-01-01

    The viability of recalcitrant seeds is lost following stress from either drying or freezing. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting from uncontrolled metabolic activity are likely responsible for seed sensitivity to drying. Nitric oxide (NO) and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle can be used for the detoxification of ROS, but their roles in the seed response to desiccation remain poorly understood. Here, we report that desiccation induces rapid accumulation of H(2)O(2), which blocks recalcitrant Antiaris toxicaria seed germination; however, pretreatment with NO increases the activity of antioxidant ascorbate-glutathione pathway enzymes and metabolites, diminishes H(2)O(2) production and assuages the inhibitory effects of desiccation on seed germination. Desiccation increases the protein carbonylation levels and reduces protein S-nitrosylation of these antioxidant enzymes; these effects can be reversed with NO treatment. Antioxidant protein S-nitrosylation levels can be further increased by the application of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase inhibitors, which further enhances NO-induced seed germination rates after desiccation and reduces desiccation-induced H(2)O(2) accumulation. These findings suggest that NO reinforces recalcitrant seed desiccation tolerance by regulating antioxidant enzyme activities to stabilize H(2)O(2) accumulation at an appropriate concentration. During this process, protein carbonylation and S-nitrosylation patterns are used as a specific molecular switch to control antioxidant enzyme activities.

  9. Protein carbonylation and heat shock response in Ruditapes decussatus following p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) exposure: a proteomic approach reveals that DDE causes oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Vera; Hoarau, Pascal C; Romeo, Michèle; O'Halloran, John; van Pelt, Frank; O'Brien, Nora; Sheehan, David

    2006-04-20

    Protein carbonylation and levels of heat shock proteins (hsp; 60, 70 and 90 kDa) were measured in gill, mantle and digestive gland of Ruditapes decussatus following exposure to p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE). Heat shock response was measured by immunoblotting using antibodies specific to heat shock proteins (hsps). Densitometry analysis of individual bands revealed no difference between control and treated samples except appearance of hsp90 in DDE-treated mantle. Carbonylated protein content was determined following 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatization and two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with western blotting. Immunoblotting with dinitrophenol-specific antibody revealed extensive differences in both extent and number of carbonylated proteins in mantle and digestive gland in response to DDE while gill was unaffected. These results demonstrate for the first time that DDE causes tissue-specific formation of reactive oxygen species in clams.

  10. Hippocampal extracellular matrix levels and stochasticity in synaptic protein expression increase with age and are associated with age-dependent cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Végh, Marlene J; Rausell, Antonio; Loos, Maarten; Heldring, Céline M; Jurkowski, Wiktor; van Nierop, Pim; Paliukhovich, Iryna; Li, Ka Wan; del Sol, Antonio; Smit, August B; Spijker, Sabine; van Kesteren, Ronald E

    2014-11-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is a serious health concern in our aging society. Decreased cognitive function observed during healthy brain aging is most likely caused by changes in brain connectivity and synaptic dysfunction in particular brain regions. Here we show that aged C57BL/6J wild-type mice have hippocampus-dependent spatial memory impairments. To identify the molecular mechanisms that are relevant to these memory deficits, we investigated the temporal profile of mouse hippocampal synaptic proteome changes at 20, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 weeks of age. Extracellular matrix proteins were the only group of proteins that showed robust and progressive up-regulation over time. This was confirmed by immunoblotting and histochemical analysis, which indicated that the increased levels of hippocampal extracellular matrix might limit synaptic plasticity as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. In addition, we observed that stochasticity in synaptic protein expression increased with age, in particular for proteins that were previously linked with various neurodegenerative diseases, whereas low variance in expression was observed for proteins that play a basal role in neuronal function and synaptic neurotransmission. Together, our findings show that both specific changes and increased variance in synaptic protein expression are associated with aging and may underlie reduced synaptic plasticity and impaired cognitive performance in old age. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Age-dependent changes in the protein expression levels of Redd1 and mTOR in the gerbil hippocampus during normal aging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Soo; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Park, Joon Ha; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Redd1, also known as RTP801/Dig2/DDIT4, is a stress-induced protein and a negative regulator of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Redd1 is also closely associated with oxidative stress and DNA damage. In the present study, age‑related changes in the protein expression levels of mTOR and Redd1 were investigated using immunohistochemistry and western blot in the gerbil hippocampus at postnatal month (PM) 3, 6, 12 and 24. No significant differences were identified in the levels of mTOR among the experimental groups, whereas, the levels of phosphorylated mTOR decreased with age. The protein expression levels of Redd1 were observed to gradually increase with age; in the PM 24 group, the level was significantly increased (~189.2%), compared with the PM 3 group. In addition, Redd1 immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the hippocampal principal neurons of the PM 24 group, including the pyramidal cells in the hippocampus proper and granule cells in the dentate gyrus, compared with the other experimental groups. These results demonstrated that the protein expression of Redd1 in the hippocampus was markedly increased during normal aging, indicating that the age-related increase in the expression of Redd1 may be closely associated with age-related hippocampal change.

  12. iCar-PseCp: identify carbonylation sites in proteins by Monte Carlo sampling and incorporating sequence coupled effects into general PseAAC.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianhua; Liu, Zi; Xiao, Xuan; Liu, Bingxiang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-06-07

    Carbonylation is a posttranslational modification (PTM or PTLM), where a carbonyl group is added to lysine (K), proline (P), arginine (R), and threonine (T) residue of a protein molecule. Carbonylation plays an important role in orchestrating various biological processes but it is also associated with many diseases such as diabetes, chronic lung disease, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, chronic renal failure, and sepsis. Therefore, from the angles of both basic research and drug development, we are facing a challenging problem: for an uncharacterized protein sequence containing many residues of K, P, R, or T, which ones can be carbonylated, and which ones cannot? To address this problem, we have developed a predictor called iCar-PseCp by incorporating the sequence-coupled information into the general pseudo amino acid composition, and balancing out skewed training dataset by Monte Carlo sampling to expand positive subset. Rigorous target cross-validations on a same set of carbonylation-known proteins indicated that the new predictor remarkably outperformed its existing counterparts. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a user-friendly web-server for iCar-PseCp has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCar-PseCp, by which users can easily obtain their desired results without the need to go through the complicated mathematical equations involved. It has not escaped our notice that the formulation and approach presented here can also be used to analyze many other problems in computational proteomics.

  13. Age-dependent increase of brain copper levels and expressions of copper regulatory proteins in the subventricular zone and choroid plexus

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Sherleen; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Our recent data suggest a high accumulation of copper (Cu) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) along the wall of brain ventricles. Anatomically, SVZ is in direct contact with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is secreted by a neighboring tissue choroid plexus (CP). Changes in Cu regulatory gene expressions in the SVZ and CP as the function of aging may determine Cu levels in the CSF and SVZ. This study was designed to investigate the associations between age, Cu levels, and Cu regulatory genes in SVZ and plexus. The SVZ and CP were dissected from brains of 3-week, 10-week, or 9-month old male rats. Analyses by atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed that the SVZ of adult and old animals contained the highest Cu level compared with other tested brain regions. Significantly positive correlations between age and Cu levels in SVZ and plexus were observed; the SVZ Cu level of old animals was 7.5- and 5.8-fold higher than those of young and adult rats (p < 0.01), respectively. Quantitation by qPCR of the transcriptional expressions of Cu regulatory proteins showed that the SVZ expressed the highest level of Cu storage protein metallothioneins (MTs), while the CP expressed the high level of Cu transporter protein Ctr1. Noticeably, Cu levels in the SVZ were positively associated with type B slow proliferating cell marker Gfap (p < 0.05), but inversely associated with type A proliferating neuroblast marker Dcx (p < 0.05) and type C transit amplifying progenitor marker Nestin (p < 0.01). Dmt1 had significant positive correlations with age and Cu levels in the plexus (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that Cu levels in all tested brain regions are increased as the function of age. The SVZ shows a different expression pattern of Cu-regulatory genes from the CP. The age-related increase of MTs and decrease of Ctr1 may contribute to the high Cu level in this neurogenesis active brain region. PMID:26106293

  14. Apple phenolics as inhibitors of the carbonylation pathway during in vitro metal-catalyzed oxidation of myofibrillar proteins.

    PubMed

    Rysman, Tine; Utrera, Mariana; Morcuende, David; Van Royen, Geert; Van Weyenberg, Stephanie; De Smet, Stefaan; Estévez, Mario

    2016-11-15

    The effect of apple phenolics on the oxidative damage caused to myofibrillar proteins by an in vitro metal-catalyzed oxidation system was investigated. Three pure phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, (-)-epicatechin and phloridzin) and an apple peel extract were added to myofibrillar proteins in three concentrations (50, 100 and 200μM), and a blank treatment was included as a control. All suspensions were subjected to Fe(3+)/H2O2 oxidation at 37°C during 10days, and protein oxidation was evaluated as carbonylation (α-amino adipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes) and Schiff base cross-links. Significant inhibition by apple phenolics was found as compared to the control treatment, with (-)-epicatechin being the most efficient antioxidant and phloridzin showing the weakest antioxidant effect. The higher concentrations of apple extract showed effective antioxidant activity against protein oxidation in myofibrillar proteins, emphasizing the potential of apple by-products as natural inhibitors of protein oxidation in meat products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Carbonyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbonyl sulfide ; CASRN 463 - 58 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  16. Nickel carbonyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel carbonyl ; CASRN 13463 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  17. Levels and Age Dependency of Neurofilament Light and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein in Healthy Individuals and Their Relation to the Brain Parenchymal Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Vågberg, Mattias; Norgren, Niklas; Dring, Ann; Lindqvist, Thomas; Birgander, Richard; Zetterberg, Henrik; Svenningsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurofilament light (NFL) and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) are integral parts of the axonal and astrocytal cytoskeletons respectively and are released into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cases of cellular damage. In order to interpret the levels of these biomarkers in disease states, knowledge on normal levels in the healthy is required. Another biomarker for neurodegeneration is brain atrophy, commonly measured as brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Potential correlations between levels of NFL, GFAP and BPF in healthy individuals have not been investigated. Objectives To present levels of NFL and GFAP in healthy individuals stratified for age, and investigate the correlation between them as well as their correlation with BPF. Methods The CSF was analysed in 53 healthy volunteers aged 21 to 70 (1 sample missing for GFAP analysis) and 48 of the volunteers underwent determination of BPF using MRI. Results Mean (±SD) NFL was 355 ng/L (±214), mean GFAP was 421 ng/L (±129) and mean BPF was 0.867 (±0.035). All three biomarkers correlated with age. NFL also correlated with both GFAP and BPF. When controlled for age, only the correlation between NFL and GFAP retained statistical significance. Conclusions This study presents data on age-stratified levels of NFL and GFAP in the CSF of healthy individuals. There is a correlation between levels of NFL and GFAP and both increase with age. A correlation between NFL and BPF was also found, but did not retain statistical significance if controlled for age. PMID:26317831

  18. Use of fluorescein hydrazide and fluorescein thiosemicarbazide reagents for the fluorometric determination of protein carbonyl groups and for the detection of oxidized protein on polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B; Rhee, S G; Stadtman, E R

    1987-03-01

    Highly fluorescent thiosemicarbazide and hydrazide prepared by reaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate with hydrazine or adipic acid dihydrazide have been used to monitor the presence of carbonyl groups in oxidatively modified proteins. After oxidation, proteins react with these reagents under anaerobic conditions in the dark to yield fluorescent protein conjugates (presumably thiosemicarbazones or hydrazones) which can be visualized as fluorescent bands following electrophoresis (0-4 degrees C) on lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. These reagents do not react with unoxidized proteins. The conjugates formed dissociate readily at room temperature but are fairly stable at pH 6-9, 0 degrees C. Current data suggest that these reagents will be useful in the detection and quantitation of oxidatively modified proteins in biological systems.

  19. Dormancy removal of apple seeds by cold stratification is associated with fluctuation in H2O2, NO production and protein carbonylation level.

    PubMed

    Dębska, Karolina; Krasuska, Urszula; Budnicka, Katarzyna; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2013-03-15

    Reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species play a signaling role in seed dormancy alleviation and germination. Their action may be described by the oxidative/nitrosative "window/door". ROS accumulation in embryos could lead to oxidative modification of protein through carbonylation. Mature apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) seeds are dormant and do not germinate. Their dormancy may be overcome by 70-90 days long cold stratification. The aim of this work was to analyze the relationship between germinability of embryos isolated from cold (5°C) or warm (25°C) stratified apple seeds and ROS or nitric oxide (NO) production and accumulation of protein carbonyl groups. A biphasic pattern of variation in H2O2 concentration in the embryos during cold stratification was detected. H2O2 content increased markedly after 7 days of seeds imbibition at 5°C. After an additional two months of cold stratification, the H2O2 concentration in embryos reached the maximum. NO production by the embryos was low during entire period of stratification, but increased significantly in germination sensu stricto (i.e. phase II of the germination process). The highest content of protein carbonyl groups was detected after 6 weeks of cold stratification treatment. Fluctuation of H2O2 and protein carbonylation seems to play a pivotal role in seed dormancy alleviation by cold stratification, while NO appears to be necessary for seed germination.

  20. Hop proanthocyanidins induce apoptosis, protein carbonylation, and cytoskeleton disorganization in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells via reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L; Stevens, Jan F; Maier, Claudia S

    2009-04-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PCs) have been shown to suppress the growth of diverse human cancer cells and are considered as promising additions to the arsenal of chemopreventive phytochemicals. An oligomeric mixture of PCs from hops (Humulus lupulus) significantly decreased cell viability of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Hop PCs, at 50 or 100 microg/ml, exhibited apoptosis-inducing properties as shown by the increase in caspase-3 activity. Increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was accompanied by an augmented accumulation of protein carbonyls. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis in combination with 2-alkenal-specific immunochemical detection identified beta-actin and protein disulfide isomerase as major putative targets of acrolein adduction. Incubation of HT-29 cells with hop PCs resulted in morphological changes that indicated disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. PC-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation in the cell culture media was also quantified; but, the measured H2O2 levels would not explain the observed changes in the oxidative modifications of actin. These findings suggest new modes of action for proanthocyandins as anticarcinogenic agents in human colon cancer cells, namely, promotion of protein oxidative modifications and cytoskeleton derangement.

  1. Hop proanthocyanidins induce apoptosis, protein carbonylation, and cytoskeleton disorganization in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2009-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PCs) have been shown to suppress the growth of diverse human cancer cells and are considered as promising additions to the arsenal of chemopreventive phytochemicals. An oligomeric mixture of PCs from hops (Humulus lupulus) significantly decreased cell viability of human colon cancer HT-29 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Hop PCs, at 50 or 100 μg/ml, exhibited apoptosis-inducing properties as shown by the increase in caspase-3 activity. Increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was accompanied by an augmented accumulation of protein carbonyls. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis in combination with 2-alkenal-specific immunochemical detection identified β-actin and protein disulfide isomerase as major putative targets of acrolein adduction. Incubation of HT-29 cells with hop PCs resulted in morphological changes that indicated disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. PC-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) formation in the cell culture media was also quantified; but, the measured H2O2 levels would not explain the observed changes in the oxidative modifications of actin. These findings suggest new modes of action for proanthocyandins as antitumorgenic agents in human colon cancer cells, namely, promotion of protein oxidative modifications and cytoskeleton derangement. PMID:19271284

  2. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 protein detoxifies dietary and lipid-derived alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls at physiological levels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Linlin; Liu, Ziwen; Yan, Ruilan; Johnson, Stephen; Zhao, Yupei; Fang, Xiubin; Cao, Deliang

    2009-09-18

    Alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls are highly reactive mutagens and carcinogens to which humans are exposed on a daily basis. This study demonstrates that aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) is a critical protein in detoxifying dietary and lipid-derived unsaturated carbonyls. Purified AKR1B10 recombinant protein efficiently catalyzed the reduction to less toxic alcohol forms of crotonaldehyde at 0.90 {mu}M, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) at 0.10 {mu}M, trans-2-hexanal at 0.10 {mu}M, and trans-2,4-hexadienal at 0.05 {mu}M, the concentrations at or lower than physiological exposures. Ectopically expressed AKR1B10 in 293T cells eliminated immediately HNE at 1 (subtoxic) or 5 {mu}M (toxic) by converting to 1,4-dihydroxynonene, protecting the cells from HNE toxicity. AKR1B10 protein also showed strong enzymatic activity toward glutathione-conjugated carbonyls. Taken together, our study results suggest that AKR1B10 specifically expressed in the intestine is physiologically important in protecting the host cell against dietary and lipid-derived cytotoxic carbonyls.

  3. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 protein detoxifies dietary and lipid-derived alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls at physiological levels.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Linlin; Liu, Ziwen; Yan, Ruilan; Johnson, Stephen; Zhao, Yupei; Fang, Xiubin; Cao, Deliang

    2009-09-18

    Alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls are highly reactive mutagens and carcinogens to which humans are exposed on a daily basis. This study demonstrates that aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) is a critical protein in detoxifying dietary and lipid-derived unsaturated carbonyls. Purified AKR1B10 recombinant protein efficiently catalyzed the reduction to less toxic alcohol forms of crotonaldehyde at 0.90 microM, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) at 0.10 microM, trans-2-hexanal at 0.10 microM, and trans-2,4-hexadienal at 0.05 microM, the concentrations at or lower than physiological exposures. Ectopically expressed AKR1B10 in 293T cells eliminated immediately HNE at 1 (subtoxic) or 5 microM (toxic) by converting to 1,4-dihydroxynonene, protecting the cells from HNE toxicity. AKR1B10 protein also showed strong enzymatic activity toward glutathione-conjugated carbonyls. Taken together, our study results suggest that AKR1B10 specifically expressed in the intestine is physiologically important in protecting the host cell against dietary and lipid-derived cytotoxic carbonyls.

  4. Olive leaf extract concentrated in hydroxytyrosol attenuates protein carbonylation and the formation of advanced glycation end products in a hepatic cell line (HepG2).

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marta; Morales, Francisco J; Ramos, Sonia

    2017-03-22

    Glycation takes place both at the cellular level and at the extracellular matrix level and generates, consequently, advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) associated with chronic diseases and the aging process. Two olive leaf extracts concentrated in (i) oleuropein (OLE-A; 93.9 mg oleuropein g(-1)) and (ii) hydroxytyrosol (OLE-B; 54.5 mg hydroxytyrosol g(-1)) were evaluated according to their antiglycative and antioxidant capacity in vitro. OLE-B exerted the highest anti-AGE effect in different glycation models (IC50: 0.25-0.29 mg mL(-1)). OLE-B showed the highest antioxidant capacity and methylglyoxal-trapping capacity (IC50 0.16 mg mL(-1)). OLE-B showed a significant inhibitory effect against protein carbonylation (21%) and generation of argpyrimidine (26%) in a hepatocyte cellular carbonyl stress model evoked by methylglyoxal (MGO). OLE-B was further fractionated by solid phase-extraction, and the protective effect against protein carbonylation was only exerted by the fraction containing hydroxytyrosol. However, hydroxytyrosol standard, at the same concentration in the extract, inhibited the protein carbonylation below 10% but not significantly. The results indicate that the antiglycative activity of OLE in cells could be due to a synergic effect of hydroxytyrosol and other minor compounds with similar polarity. The research of the antiglycative activity in vivo could confirm these promising results and to propose OLE as a natural anti-AGE agent.

  5. Investigation into the Effects of Boron on Liver Tissue Protein Carbonyl, MDA, and Glutathione Levels in Endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Balabanlı, Barbaros; Balaban, Tuba

    2015-10-01

    Endotoxin has been known to cause the formation and damage of free radical. The importance of boron for human life is increasing each passing day, and its consuming fields are continuing to expand due to the advances in science and technology. Therefore, in our study, we intended to investigate into the effects of boron on liver tissue oxidative events. Eighteen male Wistar albino rats were randomly separated into three equal groups in the experiments; control group, boron + endotoxin group, and endotoxin group. Dissolved in distilled water, boric acid (100 mg/kg) was administered to boron + endotoxin group via gavage procedure for 28 days. Only distilled water was administered to control and endotoxin groups via gavage procedure for 28 days. Then 4 mg/kg endotoxin (LPS; Escherichia coli 0111:B4) was intraperitoneally (ip) administered to boron + endotoxin and endotoxin groups on the 28th day. Sterile saline was injected into control group on the 28th day (ip). Malondialdehyde (MDA), which is the end product of lipid peroxidation in liver tissues, protein carbonyl compounds (PC), which are protein oxidization markers, and glutathione (GSH) levels were measured spectrophotometrically. The results were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. When boron + endotoxin group is compared with endotoxin group, PC levels of endotoxin group showed a significant increase. When GSH levels are compared, GSH level in boron + endotoxin group decreased according to endotoxin group. Variations among all groups in MDA levels were found to be statistically insignificant. We are of the opinion that endotoxin affects the proteins by forming free radicals, and boron may also cause the structural and/or functional changes in proteins in order to protect proteins from oxidization.

  6. Direct structure refinement of high molecular weight proteins against residual dipolar couplings and carbonyl chemical shift changes upon alignment: an application to maltose binding protein.

    PubMed

    Choy, W Y; Tollinger, M; Mueller, G A; Kay, L E

    2001-09-01

    The global fold of maltose binding protein in complex with beta-cyclodextrin has been determined using a CNS-based torsion angle molecular dynamics protocol involving direct refinement against dipolar couplings and carbonyl chemical shift changes that occur upon alignment. The shift changes have been included as structural restraints using a new module, CANI, that has been incorporated into CNS. Force constants and timesteps have been determined that are particularly effective in structure refinement applications involving high molecular weight proteins with small to moderate numbers of NOE restraints. Solution structures of the N- and C-domains of MBP calculated with this new protocol are within approximately 2 A of the X-ray conformation.

  7. Herbal adaptogens combined with protein fractions from bovine colostrum and hen egg yolk reduce liver TNF-α expression and protein carbonylation in Western diet feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Mobley, C Brooks; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Lockwood, Christopher M; Heese, Alexander J; Zhu, Conan; Krieger, Anna E; Cruthirds, Clayton L; Hofheins, John C; Company, Joseph M; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Kim, Dae Y; Booth, Frank W; Roberts, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    We examined if a purported anti-inflammatory supplement (AF) abrogated Western-diet (WD)-induced liver pathology in rats. AF contained: 1) protein concentrates from bovine colostrum and avian egg yolk; 2) herbal adaptogens and antioxidants; and 3) acetyl-L-carnitine. Nine month-old male Brown Norway rats were allowed ad libitum access to WD for 41-43 days and randomly assigned to WD + AF feeding twice daily for the last 31-33 days (n = 8), or WD and water-placebo feeding twice daily for the last 31-33 days (n = 8). Rats fed a low-fat/low-sucrose diet (CTL, n = 6) for 41-43 days and administered a water-placebo twice daily for the last 31-33 days were also studied. Twenty-four hours following the last gavage-feed, liver samples were analyzed for: a) select mRNAs (via RT-PCR) as well as genome-wide mRNA expression patterns (via RNA-seq); b) lipid deposition; and, c) protein carbonyl and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Serum was also examined for TAC, 8-isoprostane and clinical chemistry markers. WD + AF rats experienced a reduction in liver Tnf-α mRNA (-2.8-fold, p < 0.01). Serum and liver TAC was lower in WD + AF versus WD and CTL rats (p < 0.05), likely due to exogenous antioxidant ingredients provided through AF as evidenced by a tendency for mitochondrial SOD2 mRNA to increase in WD + AF versus CTL rats (p = 0.07). Liver fat deposition nor liver protein carbonyl content differed between WD + AF versus WD rats, although liver protein carbonyls tended to be lower in WD + AF versus CTL rats (p = 0.08). RNA-seq revealed that 19 liver mRNAs differed between WD + AF versus WD when both groups were compared with CTL rats (+/- 1.5-fold, p < 0.01). Bioinformatics suggest that AF prevented WD-induced alterations in select genes related to the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates in favor of select genes related to lipid transport and metabolism. Finally, serum clinical safety markers and liver pathology

  8. Herbal adaptogens combined with protein fractions from bovine colostrum and hen egg yolk reduce liver TNF-α expression and protein carbonylation in Western diet feeding in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined if a purported anti-inflammatory supplement (AF) abrogated Western-diet (WD)-induced liver pathology in rats. AF contained: 1) protein concentrates from bovine colostrum and avian egg yolk; 2) herbal adaptogens and antioxidants; and 3) acetyl-L-carnitine. Methods Nine month-old male Brown Norway rats were allowed ad libitum access to WD for 41–43 days and randomly assigned to WD + AF feeding twice daily for the last 31–33 days (n = 8), or WD and water-placebo feeding twice daily for the last 31–33 days (n = 8). Rats fed a low-fat/low-sucrose diet (CTL, n = 6) for 41–43 days and administered a water-placebo twice daily for the last 31–33 days were also studied. Twenty-four hours following the last gavage-feed, liver samples were analyzed for: a) select mRNAs (via RT-PCR) as well as genome-wide mRNA expression patterns (via RNA-seq); b) lipid deposition; and, c) protein carbonyl and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Serum was also examined for TAC, 8-isoprostane and clinical chemistry markers. Results WD + AF rats experienced a reduction in liver Tnf-α mRNA (-2.8-fold, p < 0.01). Serum and liver TAC was lower in WD + AF versus WD and CTL rats (p < 0.05), likely due to exogenous antioxidant ingredients provided through AF as evidenced by a tendency for mitochondrial SOD2 mRNA to increase in WD + AF versus CTL rats (p = 0.07). Liver fat deposition nor liver protein carbonyl content differed between WD + AF versus WD rats, although liver protein carbonyls tended to be lower in WD + AF versus CTL rats (p = 0.08). RNA-seq revealed that 19 liver mRNAs differed between WD + AF versus WD when both groups were compared with CTL rats (+/- 1.5-fold, p < 0.01). Bioinformatics suggest that AF prevented WD-induced alterations in select genes related to the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates in favor of select genes related to lipid transport and metabolism. Finally, serum clinical

  9. Protein Carbonyl as a Biomarker of Oxidative Stress in Severe Leptospirosis, and Its Usefulness in Differentiating Leptospirosis from Dengue Infections

    PubMed Central

    Niloofa, Roshan; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Karunanayake, Lilani; de Silva, H. Janaka; Wickremesinghe, A. R.; Premawansa, Sunil; Rajapakse, Senaka; Handunnetti, Shiroma M.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of disease severity in leptospirosis is not clearly understood whether it is due to direct damage by pathogen or by adverse immune responses. Knowledge on biomarkers of oxidative stress which could be used in identifying patients with severe illness has shown to be of great value in disease management. Thus, the main aim of this study was to assess the damage to serum proteins and lipids, and their significance as biomarkers of oxidative stress in severe leptospirosis. In regions endemic for both leptospirosis and dengue, leptospirosis cases are often misdiagnosed as dengue during dengue epidemics. Therefore, the second aim was to assess the potential of the oxidative stress markers in differentiating severe leptospirosis from critical phase dengue. We measured serum antioxidants (uric acid and bilirubin), total antioxidant capacity (AOC), protein carbonyl (PC) and lipid hydroperoxide (LP) in patients with severe leptospirosis (n = 60), mild leptospirosis (n = 50), dengue during the critical phase (n = 30) and in healthy subjects (n = 30). All patient groups had similar total antioxidant capacity levels. However, the presence of significantly high uric acid and total bilirubin levels may reflect the degree of renal and hepatic involvement seen in severe leptospirosis patients (p<0.02). Serum PC and LP levels were significantly higher in leptospirosis patients compared to critical phase dengue infections (p<0.005). Moreover, high serum PC levels appear to differentiate SL from DC [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.96; p<0.001]. Serum PC may be a reliable biomarker of oxidative damage to serum proteins to identify severe leptospirosis patients (AUC = 0.99) and also to differentiate severe leptospirosis from mild cases (AUC = 0.78; p<0.005) indicating its contribution to pathogenesis. Use of serum PC as an indicator of leptospirosis severity and as an oxidative stress biomarker in differentiating leptospirosis from dengue would provide the opportunity to

  10. Protein Carbonyl as a Biomarker of Oxidative Stress in Severe Leptospirosis, and Its Usefulness in Differentiating Leptospirosis from Dengue Infections.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Narmada; Wickremesinghe, Shalini; Niloofa, Roshan; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Karunanayake, Lilani; de Silva, H Janaka; Wickremesinghe, A R; Premawansa, Sunil; Rajapakse, Senaka; Handunnetti, Shiroma M

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of disease severity in leptospirosis is not clearly understood whether it is due to direct damage by pathogen or by adverse immune responses. Knowledge on biomarkers of oxidative stress which could be used in identifying patients with severe illness has shown to be of great value in disease management. Thus, the main aim of this study was to assess the damage to serum proteins and lipids, and their significance as biomarkers of oxidative stress in severe leptospirosis. In regions endemic for both leptospirosis and dengue, leptospirosis cases are often misdiagnosed as dengue during dengue epidemics. Therefore, the second aim was to assess the potential of the oxidative stress markers in differentiating severe leptospirosis from critical phase dengue. We measured serum antioxidants (uric acid and bilirubin), total antioxidant capacity (AOC), protein carbonyl (PC) and lipid hydroperoxide (LP) in patients with severe leptospirosis (n = 60), mild leptospirosis (n = 50), dengue during the critical phase (n = 30) and in healthy subjects (n = 30). All patient groups had similar total antioxidant capacity levels. However, the presence of significantly high uric acid and total bilirubin levels may reflect the degree of renal and hepatic involvement seen in severe leptospirosis patients (p<0.02). Serum PC and LP levels were significantly higher in leptospirosis patients compared to critical phase dengue infections (p<0.005). Moreover, high serum PC levels appear to differentiate SL from DC [area under the curve (AUC) = 0.96; p<0.001]. Serum PC may be a reliable biomarker of oxidative damage to serum proteins to identify severe leptospirosis patients (AUC = 0.99) and also to differentiate severe leptospirosis from mild cases (AUC = 0.78; p<0.005) indicating its contribution to pathogenesis. Use of serum PC as an indicator of leptospirosis severity and as an oxidative stress biomarker in differentiating leptospirosis from dengue would provide the opportunity to

  11. [Association between carbonyl proteins and tumor necrosis factor alpha with muscle strength in young and older women: exploratory study].

    PubMed

    Martínez Huenchullán, Sergio Francisco; Mancilla Solorza, Eladio Bernabé

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that there is a close relationship between oxidative stress and low-grade chronic inflammation. Both processes have been related separately to muscle function in older adults (OA). Nevertheless, it still has not been determined if this relationship is present particularly in OA. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the plasma levels of TNF-α and carbonyl proteins (CP) and muscle strength in a group of young and older women. An exploratory study was conducted on 13 older and 8 young women, in whom the plasma levels of CP and TNF-α were measured. Muscle strength was measured by handgrip test, quadriceps voluntary maximal isometric strength, arm curl, and the 30 second sit to stand test. There were no differences in the plasma levels of CP and TNF-α between the groups, but there was relationship between the biomarkers only in the OA group. A non-linear relationship was observed between CP and quadriceps voluntary maximal isometric strength only in the OA group (R(2)=36.2; P=.038). For TNF-α there were no significant association with any of the applied tests. There is an association between CP and quadriceps voluntary maximal isometric strength only in the OA group, which could indicate a deleterious action of oxidative stress on muscle function, particularly in aging. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of organic contaminants in reactive oxygen species, protein carbonylation and DNA damage on digestive gland and haemolymph of land snails.

    PubMed

    Itziou, A; Kaloyianni, M; Dimitriadis, V K

    2011-10-01

    The present study focused on early responses of land snails Eobania vermiculata to organic environmental contaminants, by investigating the use of a newly-established method for the measurement of protein carbonylation as a new biomarker of terrestrial pollution, as well as by measuring the ROS production and the DNA damage. Land snails were exposed to different concentrations of chlorpyrifos, parathion-methyl or PAHs in vivo or in vitro in the laboratory. The susceptibility of exposed snails was increased in relation to oxidative stress induced by contaminants tested. A statistically significant increase in ROS production, protein carbonylation and DNA damage was revealed in the snails treated with pollutants, compared to the untreated ones. The results indicated the effectiveness of measuring ROS production and DNA damage and reinforce the application of the present ELISA method in organic terrestrial pollution biomonitoring studies.

  13. Conformationally Constrained Analogues of Diacylglycerol (DAG). 25. Exploration of the sn-1 and sn-2 carbonyl functionality reveals the essential role of the sn-1 carbonyl at the lipid interface in the binding of DAG-lactones to protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Hye; Peach, Megan L.; Pu, Yongmei; Lewin, Nancy E.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Marquez, Victor E.

    2008-01-01

    A group of DAG-lactones with altered functionality (C=O → CH2 or C=O → C=S) at the sn-1 and sn-2 carbonyl pharmacophores was synthesized and used as probes to dissect the individual role of each carbonyl in binding to protein kinase C (PKC). The results suggest that the hydrated sn-1 carbonyl is engaged in very strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the charged lipid headgroups and organized water molecules at the lipid interface. Conversely, the sn-2 carbonyl has a more modest contribution to the binding process as a result of its involvement with the receptor (C1 domain) via conventional hydrogen bonding to the protein. The parent DAG-lactones, E-6 and Z-7, were designed to bind exclusively in the sn-2 binding mode to insure the correct orientation and disposition of pharmacophores at the binding site. PMID:16134942

  14. Lack of FTSH4 Protease Affects Protein Carbonylation, Mitochondrial Morphology, and Phospholipid Content in Mitochondria of Arabidopsis: New Insights into a Complex Interplay.

    PubMed

    Smakowska, Elwira; Skibior-Blaszczyk, Renata; Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Kwasniak-Owczarek, Malgorzata; Parys, Katarzyna; Funk, Christiane; Janska, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    FTSH4 is one of the inner membrane-embedded ATP-dependent metalloproteases in mitochondria of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In mutants impaired to express FTSH4, carbonylated proteins accumulated and leaf morphology was altered when grown under a short-day photoperiod, at 22°C, and a long-day photoperiod, at 30°C. To provide better insight into the function of FTSH4, we compared the mitochondrial proteomes and oxyproteomes of two ftsh4 mutants and wild-type plants grown under conditions inducing the phenotypic alterations. Numerous proteins from various submitochondrial compartments were observed to be carbonylated in the ftsh4 mutants, indicating a widespread oxidative stress. One of the reasons for the accumulation of carbonylated proteins in ftsh4 was the limited ATP-dependent proteolytic capacity of ftsh4 mitochondria, arising from insufficient ATP amount, probably as a result of an impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), especially complex V. In ftsh4, we further observed giant, spherical mitochondria coexisting among normal ones. Both effects, the increased number of abnormal mitochondria and the decreased stability/activity of the OXPHOS complexes, were probably caused by the lower amount of the mitochondrial membrane phospholipid cardiolipin. We postulate that the reduced cardiolipin content in ftsh4 mitochondria leads to perturbations within the OXPHOS complexes, generating more reactive oxygen species and less ATP, and to the deregulation of mitochondrial dynamics, causing in consequence the accumulation of oxidative damage.

  15. Effect of sodium chloride and nitroprusside on protein carbonyl groups content and antioxidant enzyme activity in leaves of corn seedlings Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Vasylyk, Yu V; Semchuk, N M; Lushchak, Ok V; Lushchak, V I

    2012-01-01

    The effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and sodium chloride (NaCl) on protein carbonyl group content and activity of antioxidant enzymes was investigated in leaves of maize seedlings. Incubation with NaCl and SNP+NaCl increased the content of carbonyl proteins after 24 h. Treatment with SNP+NaCl during 48 h showed lower and after 72 h higher carbonyl protein content than that in the control. Catalase activity was higher in the leaves of SNP+NaCl-treated than in the leaves of SNP-treated seedlings after 24 h. Ascorbate peroxidase activity increased after incubation with 0.2 mM SNP for 24 h. Significant increment of guaiacol peroxidase activity was obtained in all treated groups in comparison with the control after 72 h. Glutathione-S-transferase activity increased after 48 h seedling treatment with NaCl or SNP and 72 h seedling incubation with NaCl. Under experimental conditions used, glutathione reductase activity was virtually not affected. It is proposed that SNP can be used to prevent salt-induced oxidative stress in maize.

  16. Elevated protein carbonylation, and misfolding in sciatic nerve from db/db and Sod1(-/-) mice: plausible link between oxidative stress and demyelination.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Ryan T; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Walsh, Michael E; Shi, Yun; Wei, Rochelle; Zhang, Yiqiang; Rodriguez, Karl A; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Chaudhuri, Asish R; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy is associated with decrements in motor/sensory neuron myelination, nerve conduction and muscle function; however, the mechanisms of reduced myelination in diabetes are poorly understood. Chronic elevation of oxidative stress may be one of the potential determinants for demyelination as lipids and proteins are important structural constituents of myelin and highly susceptible to oxidation. The goal of the current study was to determine whether there is a link between protein oxidation/misfolding and demyelination. We chose two distinct models to test our hypothesis: 1) the leptin receptor deficient mouse (dbdb) model of diabetic polyneuropathy and 2) superoxide dismutase 1 knockout (Sod1(-/-) ) mouse model of in vivo oxidative stress. Both experimental models displayed a significant decrement in nerve conduction, increase in tail distal motor latency as well as reduced myelin thickness and fiber/axon diameter. Further biochemical studies demonstrated that oxidative stress is likely to be a potential key player in the demyelination process as both models exhibited significant elevation in protein carbonylation and alterations in protein conformation. Since peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a key component of myelin sheath and has been found mutated and aggregated in several peripheral neuropathies, we predicted that an increase in carbonylation and aggregation of PMP22 may be associated with demyelination in dbdb mice. Indeed, PMP22 was found to be carbonylated and aggregated in sciatic nerves of dbdb mice. Sequence-driven hydropathy plot analysis and in vitro oxidation-induced aggregation of purified PMP22 protein supported the premise for oxidation-dependent aggregation of PMP22 in dbdb mice. Collectively, these data strongly suggest for the first time that oxidation-mediated protein misfolding and aggregation of key myelin proteins may be linked to demyelination and reduced nerve conduction in peripheral neuropathies.

  17. Differential Age-Dependent Import Regulation by Signal Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yi-Shan; Chan, Po-Ting; Li, Hsou-min

    2012-01-01

    Gene-specific, age-dependent regulations are common at the transcriptional and translational levels, while protein transport into organelles is generally thought to be constitutive. Here we report a new level of differential age-dependent regulation and show that chloroplast proteins are divided into three age-selective groups: group I proteins have a higher import efficiency into younger chloroplasts, import of group II proteins is nearly independent of chloroplast age, and group III proteins are preferentially imported into older chloroplasts. The age-selective signal is located within the transit peptide of each protein. A group III protein with its transit peptide replaced by a group I transit peptide failed to complement its own mutation. Two consecutive positive charges define the necessary motif in group III signals for older chloroplast preference. We further show that different members of a gene family often belong to different age-selective groups because of sequence differences in their transit peptides. These results indicate that organelle-targeting signal peptides are part of cells' differential age-dependent regulation networks. The sequence diversity of some organelle-targeting peptides is not a result of the lack of selection pressure but has evolved to mediate regulation. PMID:23118617

  18. Carbonyl J Acid Derivatives Block Protein Priming of Hepadnaviral P Protein and DNA-Dependent DNA Synthesis Activity of Hepadnaviral Nucleocapsids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Wen, Yu-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments for chronic hepatitis B are effective in only a fraction of patients. All approved directly antiviral agents are nucleos(t)ide analogs (NAs) that target the DNA polymerase activity of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) P protein; resistance and cross-resistance may limit their long-term applicability. P protein is an unusual reverse transcriptase that initiates reverse transcription by protein priming, by which a Tyr residue in the unique terminal protein domain acts as an acceptor of the first DNA nucleotide. Priming requires P protein binding to the ε stem-loop on the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) template. This interaction also mediates pgRNA encapsidation and thus provides a particularly attractive target for intervention. Exploiting in vitro priming systems available for duck HBV (DHBV) but not HBV, we demonstrate that naphthylureas of the carbonyl J acid family, in particular KM-1, potently suppress protein priming by targeting P protein and interfering with the formation of P-DHBV ε initiation complexes. Quantitative evaluation revealed a significant increase in complex stability during maturation, yet even primed complexes remained sensitive to KM-1 concentrations below 10 μM. Furthermore, KM-1 inhibited the DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of both DHBV and HBV nucleocapsids, including from a lamivudine-resistant variant, directly demonstrating the sensitivity of human HBV to the compound. Activity against viral replication in cells was low, likely due to low intracellular availability. KM-1 is thus not yet a drug candidate, but its distinct mechanism of action suggests that it is a highly useful lead for developing improved, therapeutically applicable derivatives. PMID:22787212

  19. Oxidative stress is involved in age-dependent spermatogenic damage of Immp2l mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    George, Sunil K.; Jiao, Yan; Bishop, Colin E.; Lu, Baisong

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in spermatogenic damage, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently generated a mouse in which the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene is mutated. This Immp2l mutation impairs the processing of signal peptide sequences from mitochondrial cytochrome c1 and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The mitochondria from mutant mice generate elevated levels of superoxide ion, which causes age-dependent spermatogenic damage. Here we confirm age-dependent spermatogenic damage in a new cohort of mutants, which started at the age of 10.5 months. Compared with age-matched controls, protein carbonyl content was normal in testes of 2- to 5-month-old mutants, but significantly elevated in testes of 13-month-old mutants, indicating elevated oxidative stress in the testes at the time of impaired spermatogenesis. Testicular expression of superoxide dismutases was not different between control and mutant mice, while that of catalase was increased in young and old mutants. The expression of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase 4 (phospholipid hydroperoxidase) in testes was significantly reduced in 13-month-old mutants, concomitant with impaired spermatogenesis. Apoptosis of all testicular populations was increased in mutant mice with spermatogenic damage. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation rate in germ cells of mutant mice with impaired spermatogenesis was unchanged, excluding a major role of mtDNA mutation in ROS-mediated spermatogenic damage. Our data show that increased mitochondrial ROS are one of the driving forces for spermatogenic impairment. PMID:22569411

  20. Oxidative stress is involved in age-dependent spermatogenic damage of Immp2l mutant mice.

    PubMed

    George, Sunil K; Jiao, Yan; Bishop, Colin E; Lu, Baisong

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in spermatogenic damage, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently generated a mouse in which the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene is mutated. This Immp2l mutation impairs the processing of signal peptide sequences from mitochondrial cytochrome c₁ and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The mitochondria from mutant mice generate elevated levels of superoxide ion, which causes age-dependent spermatogenic damage. Here we confirm age-dependent spermatogenic damage in a new cohort of mutants, which started at the age of 10.5 months. Compared with age-matched controls, protein carbonyl content was normal in testes of 2- to 5-month-old mutants, but significantly elevated in testes of 13-month-old mutants, indicating elevated oxidative stress in the testes at the time of impaired spermatogenesis. Testicular expression of superoxide dismutases was not different between control and mutant mice, whereas that of catalase was increased in young and old mutants. The expression of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase 4 (phospholipid hydroperoxidase) in testes was significantly reduced in 13-month-old mutants, concomitant with impaired spermatogenesis. Apoptosis of all testicular populations was increased in mutant mice with spermatogenic damage. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation rate in germ cells of mutant mice with impaired spermatogenesis was unchanged, excluding a major role of mtDNA mutation in ROS-mediated spermatogenic damage. Our data show that increased mitochondrial ROS are one of the driving forces for spermatogenic impairment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing the Effects of Amoxicillin on Antioxidant Enzyme Activities, Lipid Peroxidation and Protein Carbonyl Content in the Clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Matozzo, Valerio; Battistara, Margherita; Marisa, Ilaria; Bertin, Valeria; Orsetti, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the capability of amoxicillin (AMX)-one of the most widely used antibiotics worldwide-to induce oxidative stress in both gills and digestive gland from two bivalve species, the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, as well as the lipid peroxidation levels (LPO) and protein carbonyl content (PCC), were measured in bivalves exposed to 100, 200 and 400 µg AMX/L for 1, 3 and 7 days. The results obtained demonstrated that AMX affected slightly biomarker responses of molluscs.

  2. Mitochondrial superoxide anion overproduction in Tet-mev-1 transgenic mice accelerates age-dependent corneal cell dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Onouchi, Hiromi; Ishii, Takamasa; Miyazawa, Masaki; Uchino, Yuichi; Yasuda, Kayo; Hartman, Phil S; Kawai, Kenji; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoaki

    2012-08-31

    The Tet-mev-1 mouse expressing a mitochondrial complex-II mutated SDHC(V69E) gene controlled by a tetracycline (Tet)-On/Off system can overproduce O(2)(·-) and is a versatile whole-animal model for studying mitochondrial oxidative stress. Here we report a series of age-dependent variations in corneal epithelium, endothelium, and parenchymal cells of the Tet-mev-1 mice relative to wild-type C57BL/6j mice. Measurements of (1) mitochondrial electron transport enzyme activities; (2) O(2)(·-) production; (3) carbonylated protein, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels as markers of oxidative stress; (4) pathologic analyses under optical and electron microscopy; (5) hematoxylin-eosin or toluidine-blue staining; and (6) immunohistochemistry with an anti-β-catenin antibody were performed in the eye, especially the cornea. Complex II-III activity was decreased by electron leakage between complex II and CoQ. This resulted in increased age-dependent intracellular oxidative stress in the eye of Tet-mev-1 mice. Corneal epithelialization was delayed in Tet-mev-1 mice after 20% ethanol treatment, as the number of cells and mitotic cells decreased in the corneal epithelium of Tet-mev-1 mice compared with that of wild type. The age-dependent decrease in cell number accelerated in the corneal endothelium cells. Moreover, it was suggested that the corneal thickness was decreased by thinning of parenchymal cells with age in Tet-mev-1 mice. These results suggest that mitochondrial oxidative stress with electron transport chain dysfunction can influence pathogenesis and progression of age-related corneal diseases, as well as generalized corneal aging acceleration.

  3. Short-term supplementation with acetyl-L-carnitine and lipoic acid alters plasma protein carbonyl levels but does not improve cognition in aged beagles

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Lori-Ann; Opii, Wycliffe O.; Head, Elizabeth; Araujo, Joseph A.; De Rivera, Christina; Milgram, Norton W.; Cotman, Carl W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous work has shown that a diet enriched with antioxidants and mitochondrial co-factors improves cognition in aged dogs, which was accompanied by a reduction oxidative damage in the brain. The objective of the present study was to assess the effects of supplementation with mitochondrial co-factors on cognition and plasma protein carbonyl levels in aged dogs. Specifically, we aimed to test whether the individual or combined action of lipoic acid (LA) and acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR) could account for the beneficial effects of the enriched diet that contained both plus antioxidants. Dogs were given LA or ALCAR, alone and then in combination and cognition was assessed using a spatial learning task and two discrimination and reversal paradigms. Dogs receiving the ALCAR supplement showed an increase in protein carbonyl levels that was associated with increased error scores on the spatial task, and which was reduced upon additional supplementation with LA. We did not observe significant positive effects on cognition. The present findings suggest that short-term supplementation with LA and ALCAR is insufficient to improve cognition in aged dogs, and that the beneficial effects of the full spectrum diet arose from either the cellular antioxidants alone or their interaction with LA and ALCAR. PMID:19735717

  4. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of the age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The age-dependency of opioid analgesia and tolerance has been noticed in both clinical observation and laboratory studies. Evidence shows that many molecular and cellular events that play essential roles in opioid analgesia and tolerance are actually age-dependent. For example, the expression and functions of endogenous opioid peptides, multiple types of opioid receptors, G protein subunits that couple to opioid receptors, and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins) change with development and age. Other signaling systems that are critical to opioid tolerance development, such as N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, also undergo age-related changes. It is plausible that the age-dependent expression and functions of molecules within and related to the opioid signaling pathways, as well as age-dependent cellular activity such as agonist-induced opioid receptor internalization and desensitization, eventually lead to significant age-dependent changes in opioid analgesia and tolerance development. PMID:22612909

  5. Glutathione redox state, tocochromanols, fatty acids, antioxidant enzymes and protein carbonylation in sunflower seed embryos associated with after-ripening and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Morscher, F.; Kranner, I.; Arc, E.; Bailly, C.; Roach, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Loss of seed viability has been associated with deteriorative processes that are partly caused by oxidative damage. The breaking of dormancy, a seed trait that prevents germination in unfavourable seasons, has also been associated with oxidative processes. It is neither clear how much overlap exists between these mechanisms nor is the specific roles played by oxygen and reactive oxygen species. Methods Antioxidant profiles were studied in fresh (dormant) or after-ripened (non-dormant) sunflower (Helianthus annuus) embryos subjected to controlled deterioration at 40 °C and 75 % relative humidity under ambient (21 %) or high O2 (75 %). Changes in seed vigour and viability, dormancy, protein carbonylation and fatty acid composition were also studied. Key Results After-ripening of embryonic axes was accompanied by a shift in the thiol-based cellular redox environment towards more oxidizing conditions. Controlled deterioration under high O2 led to a faster loss of seed dormancy and significant decreases in glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase activities, but viability was lost at the same rate as under ambient O2. Irrespective of O2 concentration, the overall thiol-based cellular redox state increased significantly over 21 d of controlled deterioration to strongly oxidizing conditions and then plateaued, while viability continued to decrease. Viability loss was accompanied by a rapid decrease in glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase, which provides NADPH for reductive processes such as required by glutathione reductase. Protein carbonylation, a marker of protein oxidation, increased strongly in deteriorating seeds. The lipid-soluble tocochromanols, dominated by α-tocopherol, and fatty acid profiles remained stable. Conclusions After-ripening, dormancy-breaking during ageing and viability loss appeared to be associated with oxidative changes of the cytosolic environment and proteins in the embryonic axis rather than the lipid

  6. Proteomic identification of specifically carbonylated brain proteins in APP(NLh)/APP(NLh) × PS-1(P264L)/PS-1(P264L) human double mutant knock-in mice model of Alzheimer disease as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Rukhsana; Robinson, Renã A S; Di Domenico, Fabio; Abdul, Hafiz Mohmmad; St Clair, Daret K; Markesbery, William R; Cai, Jian; Pierce, William M; Butterfield, D Allan

    2011-10-19

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and is characterized pathologically by the presence of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), senile plaques (SPs), and loss of synapses. The main component of SP is amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ), a 39 to 43 amino acid peptide, generated by the proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the action of beta- and gamma-secretases. The presenilins (PS) are components of the γ-secretase, which contains the protease active center. Mutations in PS enhance the production of the Aβ42 peptide. To date, more than 160 mutations in PS1 have been identified. Many PS mutations increase the production of the β-secretase-mediated C-terminal (CT) 99 amino acid-long fragment (CT99), which is subsequently cleaved by γ-secretase to yield Aβ peptides. Aβ has been proposed to induce oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previous studies from our laboratory and others showed an age-dependent increase in oxidative stress markers, loss of lipid asymmetry, and Aβ production and amyloid deposition in the brain of APP/PS1 mice. In the present study, we used APP (NLh)/APP(NLh) × PS-1(P246L)/PS-1(P246L) human double mutant knock-in APP/PS-1 mice to identify specific targets of brain protein carbonylation in an age-dependent manner. We found a number of proteins that are oxidatively modified in APP/PS1 mice compared to age-matched controls. The relevance of the identified proteins to the progression and pathogenesis of AD is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Age-dependent variations of antibody avidity.

    PubMed Central

    Doria, G; D'Agostaro, G; Poretti, A

    1978-01-01

    Age-dependent variations of antibody avidity were studied in the C3HeB/FeJ mouse. Spleen cells from donors of different ages (10--720 days) were transferred and stimulated with TNP-HRBC in lethally irradiated syngenic recipients. The anti-TNP antibody response of the donor cells was estimated from the number of direct PFC per recipient spleen by the Jerne technique with TNP-SRBC. Avidity of the antibodies secreted by PFC was evaluated from the amount of added TNP-BSA that inhibited 50% of the anti-TNP PFC. Under these experimental conditions allowing the exclusion of any influence of the donor milieu during the immune response, age-dependent variations of the antibody response and avidity could be attributed to changes in the donor spleen cell population. Avidity was found to increase with the response and to vary parabolically with age. After appropriate correction of the number of PFC to make it independent from age, avidity values were fitted by a multiple curvilinear regression in which the independent variables playing a significant role were the corrected number of PFC in its linear term and the age in its linear and quadratic terms. From comparison of the standard coefficients of this regression, the observed variations of avidity could be attributed in part (82%) to the response and in part (18%) to the age. For any value of response, avidity increased 15-fold from day 10 to reach a maximum at day 110 and then declined 5-fold at the age of 720 days. Heterogeneity of avidity also changed parabolically with age as high avidity classes were present in adulthood and absent at 10 and 720 days. PMID:361545

  8. A dietary supplement improves facial photoaging and skin sebum, hydration and tonicity modulating serum fibronectin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Laurino, Carmen; Palmieri, Beniamino; Iannitti, Tommaso

    2015-03-01

    Excessive exposure to the sun can cause severe photoaging as early as the second decade of life resulting in a loss of physiological elastic fiber functions. We designed a first study to assess differences in facial skin pH, sebum, elasticity, hydration and tonicity and serum levels of fibronectin, elastin, neutrophil elastase 2, hyaluronic acid and carbonylated proteins between patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls. In a second study we tested the hypothesis that a dietary supplement would improve facial photoaging, also promoting changes in the above mentioned skin and serum parameters. In the first study we enrolled 30 women [age: 47.5 ± 1.6 years (mean ± standard error of the mean)] affected by moderate facial photoaging (4 cm ≤ Visual Analogue Scale (VAS)<7 cm) and 30 healthy women [age: 45.9 ± 1.6 years (mean ± standard error of the mean)]. In the second study we enrolled a cohort of 30 women [age: 43.6 ± 1.2 years (mean ± standard error of the mean)], affected by moderate (n = 22) and severe (VAS ≥ 7 cm; n = 8) facial photoaging, who were randomized to receive a pharmaceutical formulation (VISCODERM Pearls; IBSA FARMACEUTICI ITALIA Srl, Lodi, Italy) containing Pycnogenol, collagen, coenzyme Q10, low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15). Dietary supplement and placebo were administered 2 times a day for 4 weeks. Facial photoaging was assessed by VAS in the first cohort of patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls and, at baseline and 2 weeks after the end of treatment, in the second cohort of patients who underwent treatment with VISCODERM Pearls and placebo. Skin Tester was used to analyze differences in facial skin parameters between patients affected by facial photoaging and healthy controls. Skin Tester was also used to assess the effect of VISCODERM Pearls on facial skin parameters and compared with placebo 2 weeks after the end of

  9. Augmented cardiac formation of oxidatively-induced carbonylated proteins accompanies the increased functional severity of post-myocardial infarction heart failure in the setting of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Kathleen E; Hill, Salisha; Rose, Kristie L; Sampson, Uchechukwu K A; Hill, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a dominant cause for the higher mortality of diabetics after myocardial infarction (MI). In the present investigation, we have discovered that higher levels of oxidative stress (OS)-induced carbonylated proteins accompany worsening post-MI HF in the presence of type 1 diabetes. These findings provide a mechanistic link between amplified OS and exacerbation of post-infarction HF in diabetes. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients surviving myocardial infarction (MI) manifest an increased incidence of subsequent heart failure (HF). We have previously shown that after MI, type 1 DM is associated with accentuated myocardial oxidative stress (OS) and concomitant worsening of left ventricular (LV) function. However, the precise mechanisms whereby type 1 DM-enhanced OS adversely affects HF after MI remain obscure. As carbonylation of proteins is an irreversible post-translational modification induced only by OS that often leads to the loss of function, we analyzed protein-bound carbonyls in the surviving LV myocardium of MI and DM+MI rats in relation to residual LV function. Type 1 DM was induced in rats via administration of streptozotocin. Two weeks after induction of type 1 DM, MI was produced in DM and non-DM rats by coronary artery ligation. Residual LV function and remodeling was assessed at 4 weeks post-MI by echocardiography. Myocardial carbonylated proteins were detected through OxyBlot analysis, and identified by mass spectrometry. Compared with MI rats, DM+MI rats exhibited significantly poorer residual LV systolic function and elevated wet to dry weight ratios of the lungs. Protein carbonyl content in cardiac tissue and isolated heart mitochondria of DM+MI rats was 20% and 48% higher, respectively, versus MI rats. Anti-oxidative enzymes and fatty acid utilization proteins were among the carbonylated protein candidates identified. These findings implicate myocardial protein carbonylation as part of the molecular pathophysiology of

  10. Parthanatos Mediates AIMP2 Activated Age Dependent Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunjong; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yun-Il; Ko, Han Seok; Swing, Debbie; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Donghoon; Tessarollo, Lino; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2013-01-01

    The defining pathogenic feature of Parkinson’s disease is the age dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons. Mutations and inactivation of parkin, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, cause Parkinson’s disease through accumulation of pathogenic substrates. Here we show that transgenic overexpression of the parkin substrate, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex interacting multifunctional protein-2 (AIMP2) leads to a selective, age-dependent progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons via activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1). AIMP2 accumulation in vitro and in vivo results in PARP1 overactivation and dopaminergic cell toxicity via direct association of these proteins in the nucleus providing a new path to PARP1 activation other than DNA damage. Inhibition of PARP1 through gene deletion or drug inhibition reverses behavioral deficits and protects in vivo against dopamine neuron death in AIMP2 transgenic mice. These data indicate that brain permeable PARP inhibitors could be effective in delaying or preventing disease progression in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23974709

  11. Age-dependent decay in the landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Winitzki, Sergei

    2008-03-15

    The picture of the 'multiverse' arising in diverse cosmological scenarios involves transitions between metastable vacuum states. It was pointed out by Krauss and Dent that the transition rates decrease at very late times, leading to a dependence of the transition probability between vacua on the age of each vacuum region. I investigate the implications of this non-Markovian, age-dependent decay on the global structure of the spacetime in landscape scenarios. I show that the fractal dimension of the eternally inflating domain is precisely equal to 3, instead of being slightly below 3, which is the case in scenarios with purely Markovian, age-independent decay. I develop a complete description of a non-Markovian landscape in terms of a nonlocal master equation. Using this description I demonstrate by an explicit calculation that, under some technical assumptions about the landscape, the probabilistic predictions of our position in the landscape are essentially unchanged, regardless of the measure used to extract these predictions. I briefly discuss the physical plausibility of realizing non-Markovian vacuum decay in cosmology in view of the possible decoherence of the metastable quantum state.

  12. SEECAL: Program to calculate age-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the computer program SEECAL, which calculates specific effective energies (SEE) to specified target regions for ages newborn, 1 y, 5 y, 10 y, 15 y, a 70-kg adult male, and a 58-kg adult female. The dosimetric methodology is that of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and is generally consistent with the schema of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose committee of the US Society of Nuclear Medicine. Computation of SEEs is necessary in the computation of equivalent dose rate in a target region, for occupational or public exposure to radionuclides taken into the body. Program SEECAL replaces the program SEE that was previously used by the Dosimetry Research Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The program SEE was used in the dosimetric calculations for occupational exposures for ICRP Publication 30 and is limited to adults. SEECAL was used to generate age-dependent SEEs for ICRP Publication 56, Part 1. SEECAL is also incorporated into DCAL, a radiation dose and risk calculational system being developed for the Environmental Protection Agency. Electronic copies of the program and data files and this report are available from the Radiation Shielding Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  13. Carbonyl-carbonyl interactions stabilize the partially allowed Ramachandran conformations of asparagine and aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Deane, C M; Allen, F H; Taylor, R; Blundell, T L

    1999-12-01

    Asparagine and aspartate are known to adopt conformations in the left-handed alpha-helical region and other partially allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot more readily than any other non-glycyl amino acids. The reason for this preference has not been established. An examination of the local environments of asparagine and aspartic acid in protein structures with a resolution better than 1.5 A revealed that their side-chain carbonyls are frequently within 4 A of their own backbone carbonyl or the backbone carbonyl of the previous residue. Calculations using protein structures with a resolution better than 1.8 A reveal that this close contact occurs in more than 80% of cases. This carbonyl-carbonyl interaction offers an energetic sabilization for the partially allowed conformations of asparagine and aspartic acid with respect to all other non-glycyl amino acids. The non-covalent attractive interactions between the dipoles of two carbonyls has recently been calculated to have an energy comparable to that of a hydrogen bond. The preponderance of asparagine in the left-handed alpha-helical region, and in general of aspartic acid and asparagine in the partially allowed regions of the Ramachandran plot, may be a consequence of this carbonyl-carbonyl stacking interaction.

  14. Human serum metabolic profiles are age dependent

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhonghao; Zhai, Guangju; Singmann, Paula; He, Ying; Xu, Tao; Prehn, Cornelia; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Lattka, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Soranzo, Nicole; Heinrich, Joachim; Standl, Marie; Thiering, Elisabeth; Mittelstraß, Kirstin; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Suhre, Karsten; Li, Yixue; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; Wang-Sattler, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the complexity of aging is of utmost importance. This can now be addressed by the novel and powerful approach of metabolomics. However, to date, only a few metabolic studies based on large samples are available. Here, we provide novel and specific information on age-related metabolite concentration changes in human homeostasis. We report results from two population-based studies: the KORA F4 study from Germany as a discovery cohort, with 1038 female and 1124 male participants (32–81 years), and the TwinsUK study as replication, with 724 female participants. Targeted metabolomics of fasting serum samples quantified 131 metabolites by FIA-MS/MS. Among these, 71/34 metabolites were significantly associated with age in women/men (BMI adjusted). We further identified a set of 13 independent metabolites in women (with P values ranging from 4.6 × 10−04 to 7.8 × 10−42, αcorr = 0.004). Eleven of these 13 metabolites were replicated in the TwinsUK study, including seven metabolite concentrations that increased with age (C0, C10:1, C12:1, C18:1, SM C16:1, SM C18:1, and PC aa C28:1), while histidine decreased. These results indicate that metabolic profiles are age dependent and might reflect different aging processes, such as incomplete mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The use of metabolomics will increase our understanding of aging networks and may lead to discoveries that help enhance healthy aging. PMID:22834969

  15. Calorie Restriction Suppresses Age-Dependent Hippocampal Transcriptional Signatures

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Marissa J.; Dolgalev, Igor; Alldred, Melissa J.; Heguy, Adriana; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances longevity and mitigates aging phenotypes in numerous species. Physiological responses to CR are cell-type specific and variable throughout the lifespan. However, the mosaic of molecular changes responsible for CR benefits remains unclear, particularly in brain regions susceptible to deterioration during aging. We examined the influence of long-term CR on the CA1 hippocampal region, a key learning and memory brain area that is vulnerable to age-related pathologies, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Through mRNA sequencing and NanoString nCounter analysis, we demonstrate that one year of CR feeding suppresses age-dependent signatures of 882 genes functionally associated with synaptic transmission-related pathways, including calcium signaling, long-term potentiation (LTP), and Creb signaling in wild-type mice. By comparing the influence of CR on hippocampal CA1 region transcriptional profiles at younger-adult (5 months, 2.5 months of feeding) and older-adult (15 months, 12.5 months of feeding) timepoints, we identify conserved upregulation of proteome quality control and calcium buffering genes, including heat shock 70 kDa protein 1b (Hspa1b) and heat shock 70 kDa protein 5 (Hspa5), protein disulfide isomerase family A member 4 (Pdia4) and protein disulfide isomerase family A member 6 (Pdia6), and calreticulin (Calr). Expression levels of putative neuroprotective factors, klotho (Kl) and transthyretin (Ttr), are also elevated by CR in adulthood, although the global CR-specific expression profiles at younger and older timepoints are highly divergent. At a previously unachieved resolution, our results demonstrate conserved activation of neuroprotective gene signatures and broad CR-suppression of age-dependent hippocampal CA1 region expression changes, indicating that CR functionally maintains a more youthful transcriptional state within the hippocampal CA1 sector. PMID:26221964

  16. To tag or not to tag: A comparative evaluation of immunoaffinity-labeling and tandem mass spectrometry for the identification and localization of posttranslational protein carbonylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, an end-product of lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Prokai, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Posttranslational carbonylation of proteins by the covalent attachment of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a biomarker of oxidative stress. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has become an essential tool for characterization of this modification. Chemical tagging methods have been used to facilitate the immunoaffinity-based enrichment or even quantification of HNE-modified peptides and proteins. With MS/MS spectra of the untagged modified peptides considered as references, a comparative evaluation is presented focusing on the impact of affinity-tagging with four carbonyl-specific reagents (2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine, biotin hydrazide, biotinamidohexanoic acid hydrazide and N’-aminooxymethylcarbonylhydrazino D-biotin) on collision-induced dissociation of the tagged HNE-carbonylated peptides. Our study has shown that chemical labeling may not be carried out successfully for all the peptides and with all the reagents. The attachment of a tag usually cannot circumvent the occurrence of strong neutral losses observed with untagged species and, in addition, fragmentation of the introduced tag may also be introduced. Chemical tagging of certain peptides may, nevertheless, afford more sequence ions upon MS/MS than the untagged carbonylated peptide, especially when Michael addition of the lipid peroxidation product occurs on cysteine residues. Therefore, tagging may increase the confidence of identifications of HNE-modified peptides by database searches. PMID:21835276

  17. Piroxicam and meloxicam ameliorate hepatic oxidative stress and protein carbonylation in Kupffer and sinusoidal endothelial cells promoted by ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Javé, Eduardo E; Ortega-Salgado, José A; Castell, Andrés; Carrasco-Daza, Daniel; Jay, David; Gleason, Roberto; Muñoz, Eduardo; Montalvo-Arenas, César; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Piña, Enrique

    2011-05-01

    The present study was aimed to assess the effect of protein carbonylation (PC) in hepatic cells and effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on indicators of tissue damage induced by liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI). Warm ischemia was performed by partial vascular occlusion during 90 min in Wistar rats. In serum, we determined the catalytic activity of Alanine Aminotransferase, Aspartate Aminotransferase, Lacticate Dehydrogenase, and Ornithine Carbamoyltransferase. In liver samples, we studied cellular alterations by means of histologic studies, lipid peroxidation, PC by immunohistochemistry, apoptosis and reactive oxygen species in bile by electron paramagnetic resonance. Based on PC data, sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC) and Kupffer cells (KC) were the first to exhibit LIRI-associated oxidative damage and prior to parenchymal cells. Administration of piroxicam or meloxicam during the pre-ischemic period produced a highly significant decrease in all studied injury indicators. No significant differences were revealed between the protective action of the two drugs. The data shown here suggest the potential use of NSAIDs such as piroxicam or meloxicam in minimizing ischemic event-caused damage in liver. We also propose that PC may be employed as an adequate tool to assess tissue damage after oxidative stress. © 2011 The Authors. Transplant International © 2011 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  18. High levels of plasma malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and fibrinogen have prognostic potential to predict poor outcomes in patients with diabetic foot wounds: a preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Roma; Nayak, Debashish

    2008-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the leading cause of lower extremity amputation and is generally known to have poor prognosis. Oxidative stress is considered important in the pathogenesis of chronic wounds. Fibrinogen is a recognized marker in peripheral vascular disease; increasing levels predict an increased mortality and risk of amputation. The aim of this study was to evaluate if plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and fibrinogen levels can be used as prognostic markers in patients with DFU. The study design was prospective, nonrandomized, and controlled. A total of 41 DFU grade 1 and 20 DFU grade 2 patients were studied in this case-control study. Diabetic controls without foot ulcers and healthy controls were also studied. Plasma MDA, PC, and fibrinogen levels were significantly higher in patients with DFU compared with those without ulcers (P < .05) and nondiabetic controls (P < .001). These parameters increased in association with DFU grade (P < .01). Increased levels of plasma fibrinogen, MDA, and PC correlated with worsened outcomes. An augmented oxidative stress and plasma fibrinogen level >300.4 mg% (95% confidence interval, 100% sensitivity, 99.2% specificity) was correlated with a high risk of amputation in DFU.

  19. Protein Carbonylation of an Amino Acid Residue of the Na/K-ATPase α1 Subunit Determines Na/K-ATPase Signaling and Sodium Transport in Renal Proximal Tubular Cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yanling; Shapiro, Anna P; Mopidevi, Brahma R; Chaudhry, Muhammad A; Maxwell, Kyle; Haller, Steven T; Drummond, Christopher A; Kennedy, David J; Tian, Jiang; Malhotra, Deepak; Xie, Zi-Jian; Shapiro, Joseph I; Liu, Jiang

    2016-09-09

    We have demonstrated that cardiotonic steroids, such as ouabain, signaling through the Na/K-ATPase, regulate sodium reabsorption in the renal proximal tubule. By direct carbonylation modification of the Pro222 residue in the actuator (A) domain of pig Na/K-ATPase α1 subunit, reactive oxygen species are required for ouabain-stimulated Na/K-ATPase/c-Src signaling and subsequent regulation of active transepithelial (22)Na(+) transport. In the present study we sought to determine the functional role of Pro222 carbonylation in Na/K-ATPase signaling and sodium handling. Stable pig α1 knockdown LLC-PK1-originated PY-17 cells were rescued by expressing wild-type rat α1 and rat α1 with a single mutation of Pro224 (corresponding to pig Pro222) to Ala. This mutation does not affect ouabain-induced inhibition of Na/K-ATPase activity, but abolishes the effects of ouabain on Na/K-ATPase/c-Src signaling, protein carbonylation, Na/K-ATPase endocytosis, and active transepithelial (22)Na(+) transport. Direct carbonylation modification of Pro224 in the rat α1 subunit determines ouabain-mediated Na/K-ATPase signal transduction and subsequent regulation of renal proximal tubule sodium transport. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Single bouts of exercise affect albumin redox state and carbonyl groups on plasma protein of trained men in a workload-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Manfred; Greilberger, Joachim F; Schwaberger, Guenther; Hofmann, Peter; Oettl, Karl

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of single bouts of exercise at three different intensities on the redox state of human serum albumin (HSA) and on carbonyl groups on protein (CP) concentrations in plasma. Trained men [n = 44, maximal oxygen consumption (Vo(2max)): 55 +/- 5 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), nonsmokers, 34 +/- 5 years of age] from a homogenous population, volunteers from a police special forces unit, were randomly assigned to perform on a cycle ergometer either at 70% (n = 14), 75% (n = 14), or 80% (n = 16) of Vo(2max) for 40 min. Blood was collected before exercise, immediately after the exercise test (IE), and 30 min after each test (30M) and 30 h after each test (30H). The reduced fraction of HSA, human mercaptalbumin (HMA), decreased at all three exercise intensities IE and 30M, returning to preexercise values by 30H (P < 0.05). HMA was primarily oxidized to its reversible fraction human nonmercaptalbumin 1 (HNA1). CP concentrations increased at 75% of Vo(2max) IE and 30M with a tendency (P < 0.1) and at 80% Vo(2max) IE and 30M significantly, returning to preexercise concentrations by 30H (P < 0.01). These results indicate that the HSA redox system in plasma is activated after a single bout of cycle ergometer exercise at 70% Vo(2max) and 40 min duration. The extent of the HSA modification increased with exercise intensity. Oxidative protein damage, as indicated by CP, was only significantly increased at 80% Vo(2max) intensity in this homogenous cohort of trained men.

  1. 2-aminoadipic acid is a marker of protein carbonyl oxidation in the aging human skin: effects of diabetes, renal failure and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sell, David R; Strauch, Christopher M; Shen, Wei; Monnier, Vincent M

    2007-06-01

    We hypothesized that the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues in longlived proteins oxidatively deaminates with age forming the carbonyl compound, allysine (alpha-aminoadipic acid-delta-semialdehyde), which can further oxidize into 2-aminoadipic acid. In the present study, we measured both products in insoluble human skin collagen from n=117 individuals of age range 10-90 years, of which n=61 and n=56 were non-diabetic and diabetic respectively, and a total of n=61 individuals had either acute or chronic renal failure. Allysine was reduced by borohydride into 6-hydroxynorleucine and both products were measured in acid hydrolysates by selective ion monitoring gas chromatography (GC)-MS. The results showed that 2-aminoadipic acid (P<0.0001), but not 6-hydroxynorleucine (P=0.14), significantly increased with age reaching levels of 1 and 0.3 mmol/mol lysine at late age respectively. Diabetes in the absence of renal failure significantly (P<0.0001) increased 2-aminoadipic acid up to <3 mmol/mol, but not 6-hydroxynorleucine (levels<0.4 mmol/mol, P=0.18). Renal failure even in the absence of diabetes markedly increased levels reaching up to <0.5 and 8 mmol/mol for 6-hydroxynorleucine and 2-aminoadipic acid respectively. Septicaemia significantly (P<0.0001) elevated 2-aminoadipic acid in non-diabetic, but not diabetic individuals, and mildly correlated with other glycoxidation markers, carboxymethyl-lysine and the methylglyoxal-derived products, carboxyethyl-lysine, argpyrimidine and MODIC (methylglyoxal-derived imidazolium cross-link). These results provide support for the presence of metal-catalysed oxidation (the Suyama pathway) in diabetes and the possible activation of myeloperoxidase during sepsis. We conclude that 2-aminoadipic acid is a more reliable marker for protein oxidation than its precursor, allysine. Its mechanism of formation in each of these conditions needs to be elucidated.

  2. Bovine Serum Albumin-Catalyzed Deprotonation of [1-13C]-Glycolaldehyde: Protein Reactivity Toward Deprotonation of α–Hydroxy α–Carbonyl Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Go, Maybelle K.; Malabanan, M. Merced; Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) in D2O at 25 °C and pD 7.0 was found to catalyze the deuterium exchange reactions of [1-13C]-glycolaldehyde ([1-13C]-GA) to form [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA and [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. The formation of [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA and [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA in a total yield of 51 ± 3% was observed at early reaction times, and at latter times [1-13C, 2-2H]-GA was observed to undergo BSA-catalyzed conversion to [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. The overall second-order rate constant for these deuterium exchange reactions is (kE)P = 0.25 M−1 s−1. By comparison, values of (kE)P = 0.04 M−1 s−1 (Go, M. K., Amyes, T. L., and Richard, J. P. (2009), Biochemistry 48, 5769–5778) and 0.06 M−1 s−1 (Go, M. K., Koudelka, A., Amyes, T. L., and Richard, J. P. (2010), Biochemistry 49, 5377–5389) have been determined, respectively, for the wildtype- and K12G mutant TIM-catalyzed deuterium exchange reactions of [1-13C]-GA to form [1-13C, 2,2-di-2H]-GA. These data show that TIM and BSA exhibit a modest catalytic activity towards deprotonation of α-hydroxy α-carbonyl carbon. It is suggested that this activity is intrinsic to many globular proteins, and that it must be enhanced to demonstrate successful de novo design of protein catalysts of reactions through enamine intermediates. PMID:20687575

  3. COATING URANIUM FROM CARBONYLS

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Storrs, S.S.

    1959-07-14

    Methods are described for making adherent corrosion resistant coatings on uranium metal. According to the invention, the uranium metal is heated in the presence of an organometallic compound such as the carbonyls of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, niobium, and tungsten at a temperature sufficient to decompose the metal carbonyl and dry plate the resultant free metal on the surface of the uranium metal body. The metal coated body is then further heated at a higher temperature to thermally diffuse the coating metal within the uranium bcdy.

  4. Characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Stella, Cinzia; Wang, Weiru; Schöneich, Christian; Gennaro, Lynn

    2014-05-20

    In the biotechnology industry, oxidative carbonylation as a post-translational modification of protein pharmaceuticals has not been studied in detail. Using Quality by Design (QbD) principles, understanding the impact of oxidative carbonylation on product quality of protein pharmaceuticals, particularly from a site-specific perspective, is critical. However, comprehensive identification of carbonylation sites has so far remained a very difficult analytical challenge for the industry. In this paper, we report for the first time the identification of specific carbonylation sites on recombinant monoclonal antibodies with a new analytical approach via derivatization with Girard's Reagent T (GRT) and subsequent peptide mapping with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Enhanced ionization efficiency and high quality MS(2) data resulted from GRT derivatization were observed as key benefits of this approach, which enabled direct identification of carbonylation sites without any fractionation or affinity enrichment steps. A simple data filtering process was also incorporated to significantly reduce false positive assignments. Sensitivity and efficiency of this approach were demonstrated by identification of carbonylation sites on both unstressed and oxidized antibody bulk drug substances. The applicability of this approach was further demonstrated by identification of 14 common carbonylation sites on three highly similar IgG1s. Our approach represents a significant improvement to the existing analytical methodologies and facilitates extended characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies and potentially other protein pharmaceuticals in the biotechnology industry.

  5. Age-Dependent Neurochemical Remodeling of Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Camila Leite; Roppa, Paola Haack Amaral; Truccolo, Pedro; Fontella, Fernanda Urruth; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2017-10-04

    The hypothalamus is a crucial integrative center in the central nervous system, responsible for the regulation of homeostatic activities, including systemic energy balance. Increasing evidence has highlighted a critical role of astrocytes in orchestrating hypothalamic functions; they participate in the modulation of synaptic transmission, metabolic and trophic support to neurons, immune defense, and nutrient sensing. In this context, disturbance of systemic energy homeostasis, which is a common feature of obesity and the aging process, involves inflammatory responses. This may be related to dysfunction of hypothalamic astrocytes. In this regard, the aim of this study was to evaluate the neurochemical properties of hypothalamic astrocyte cultures from newborn, adult, and aged Wistar rats. Age-dependent changes in the regulation of glutamatergic homeostasis, glutathione biosynthesis, amino acid profile, glucose metabolism, trophic support, and inflammatory response were observed. Additionally, signaling pathways including nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2/heme oxygenase-1 p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor kappa B, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase/Akt, and leptin receptor expression may represent putative mechanisms associated with the cellular alterations. In summary, our findings indicate that as age increases, hypothalamic astrocytes remodel and exhibit changes in their neurochemical properties. This process may play a role in the onset and/or progression of metabolic disorders.

  6. THE METAL CARBONYLS.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, A A

    1941-10-03

    When the metal carbonyls were first discovered, their properties were startling because they seemed to violate nearly all the previously recognized generalizations of chemistry. Even to-day the existence of the carbonyls is not particularly emphasized in elementary courses of chemistry because it is rather hard to reconcile them with the first presentations of the generalizations of chemistry. Nevertheless, as the student progresses deeper into the knowledge of chemistry it becomes desirable to include the knowledge of the carbonyls both because they become more comprehensible when viewed in the light of Werner's system of coordination and because they themselves contribute to the comprehension of the Werner theory. As long ago as 1931, Reiff in his discussion of cobalt nitrosyl carbonyl recognized the correlation between the effective atomic number and the volatility of carbonyls. A more recent study of charged Werner coordination complexes, that is, of complex ions, has shown a similar role of the effective atomic number. We are standing on fairly firm ground when we point out the correlation between E.A.N. and the volatility of the carbonyl complexes and the existence of complex ions. Be it noted that we have made no postulates as to the arrangement of the electrons in quantum levels. In the inert gases the outer principal quantum group is supposed always to contain eight electrons. In the carbonyls and other Werner complexes there is no compelling reason to suppose that the electrons in the coordinating layer, be this layer of eight, ten, twelve or sixteen electrons, are not all at the same energy level. Although we have confined our discussion almost exclusively to the property of volatility, the carbonyls are very interesting from the standpoint of several other properties, for example, magnetic susceptibility and dielectric constant. Enthusiasts in the interpretation of such properties try to draw conclusions as to the condition of the electrons, sometimes

  7. Vasotrophic Regulation of Age-Dependent Hypoxic Cerebrovascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Silpanisong, Jinjutha; Pearce, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia can induce functional and structural vascular remodeling by changing the expression of trophic factors to promote homeostasis. While most experimental approaches have been focused on functional remodeling, structural remodeling can reflect changes in the abundance and organization of vascular proteins that determine functional remodeling. Better understanding of age-dependent hypoxic macrovascular remodeling processes of the cerebral vasculature and its clinical implications require knowledge of the vasotrophic factors that influence arterial structure and function. Hypoxia can affect the expression of transcription factors, classical receptor tyrosine kinase factors, non-classical G-protein coupled factors, catecholamines, and purines. Hypoxia’s remodeling effects can be mediated by Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) upregulation in most vascular beds, but alterations in the expression of growth factors can also be independent of HIF. PPARγ is another transcription factor involved in hypoxic remodeling. Expression of classical receptor tyrosine kinase ligands, including vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and angiopoietins, can be altered by hypoxia which can act simultaneously to affect remodeling. Tyrosine kinase-independent factors, such as transforming growth factor, nitric oxide, endothelin, angiotensin II, catecholamines, and purines also participate in the remodeling process. This adaptation to hypoxic stress can fundamentally change with age, resulting in different responses between fetuses and adults. Overall, these mechanisms integrate to assure that blood flow and metabolic demand are closely matched in all vascular beds and emphasize the view that the vascular wall is a highly dynamic and heterogeneous tissue with multiple cell types undergoing regular phenotypic transformation. PMID:24063376

  8. Site-specific protein adducts of 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal in human THP-1 monocytic cells: Protein carbonylation is diminished by ascorbic acid

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan; Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Singhal, Mudita; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2010-01-01

    The protein targets and sites of modification by 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE) in human monocytic THP-1 cells after exogenous exposure to HNE were examined using a multi-pronged proteomic approach involving electrophoretic, immunoblotting and mass spectrometric methods. Immunoblot analysis using monoclonal anti-HNE antibodies showed several proteins as targets of HNE adduction. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with ascorbic acid resulted in reduced levels of HNE-protein adducts. Biotinylation of Michael-type HNE adducts using an aldehyde-reactive hydroxylamine-functionalized probe (aldehyde-reactive probe, ARP) and subsequent enrichment facilitated the identification and site-specific assignment of the modifications by LC-MS/MS analysis. Sixteen proteins were unequivocally identified as targets of HNE adduction and eighteen sites of HNE modification at Cys and His residues were assigned. HNE exposure of THP-1 cells resulted in the modification of proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization and regulation, proteins associated with stress responses and enzymes of the glycolytic and other metabolic pathways. This study yielded the first evidence of site-specific adduction of HNE to Cys-295 in tubulin α-1B chain, Cys-351 and Cys-499 in α-actinin-4, Cys-328 in vimentin, Cys-369 in D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and His-246 in aldolase A. PMID:20043646

  9. Site-Specific Protein Adducts of 4-Hydroxy-2(E)-Nonenal in Human THP-1 Monocytic Cells: Protein Carbonylation Is Diminished by Ascorbic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Juan; Chung, Woon-Gye; Miranda, Cristobal L.; Singhal, Mudita; Stevens, Jan F.; Maier, Claudia S.

    2010-01-18

    The protein targets and sites of modification by 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal (HNE) in human monocytic THP-1 cells after exogenous exposure to HNE were examined using a multipronged proteomic approach involving electrophoretic, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometric methods. Immunoblot analysis using monoclonal anti-HNE antibodies showed several proteins as targets of HNE adduction. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with ascorbic acid resulted in reduced levels of HNE-protein adducts. Biotinylation of Michael-type HNE adducts using an aldehyde-reactive hydroxylamine-functionalized probe (aldehyde-reactive probe, ARP) and subsequent enrichment facilitated the identification and site-specific assignment of the modifications by LC-MS/MS analysis. Sixteen proteins were unequivocally identified as targets of HNE adduction, and eighteen sites of HNE modification at Cys and His residues were assigned. HNE exposure of THP-1 cells resulted in the modification of proteins involved in cytoskeleton organization and regulation, proteins associated with stress responses, and enzymes of the glycolytic and other metabolic pathways. Finally, this study yielded the first evidence of site-specific adduction of HNE to Cys-295 in tubulin α-1B chain, Cys-351 and Cys-499 in α-actinin-4, Cys-328 in vimentin, Cys-369 in d-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, and His-246 in aldolase A.

  10. Neuroprotective role for carbonyl reductase?

    PubMed

    Maser, Edmund

    2006-02-24

    Oxidative stress is increasingly implicated in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and Creutzfeld-Jakob diseases or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Reactive oxygen species seem to play a significant role in neuronal cell death in that they generate reactive aldehydes from membrane lipid peroxidation. Several neuronal diseases are associated with increased accumulation of abnormal protein adducts of reactive aldehydes, which mediate oxidative stress-linked pathological events, including cellular growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. Combining findings on neurodegeneration and oxidative stress in Drosophila with studies on the metabolic characteristics of the human enzyme carbonyl reductase (CR), it is clear now that CR has a potential physiological role for neuroprotection in humans. Several lines of evidence suggest that CR represents a significant pathway for the detoxification of reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and that CR in humans is essential for neuronal cell survival and to confer protection against oxidative stress-induced brain degeneration.

  11. Metabolic energy sensors (AMPK and SIRT1), protein carbonylation and cardiac failure as biomarkers of thermal stress in an intertidal limpet: linking energetic allocation with environmental temperature during aerial emersion.

    PubMed

    Han, Guo-dong; Zhang, Shu; Marshall, David J; Ke, Cai-huan; Dong, Yun-wei

    2013-09-01

    The effects of heat stress on organisms are manifested at the levels of organ function, metabolic activity, protein stability and gene expression. Here, we examined effects of high temperature on the intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma to determine how the temperatures at which (1) organ failure (cardiac function), (2) irreversible protein damage (carbonylation) and (3) expression of genes encoding proteins involved in molecular chaperoning (hsp70 and hsp90) and metabolic regulation (ampk and sirt1) occur compare with field temperatures, which commonly exceed 30°C and can reach 46°C. Heart failure, indexed by the Arrhenius break temperature, occurred at 34.3°C. Protein carbonylation rose significantly at 38°C. Genes for heat shock proteins HSP70 (hsp70) and HSP90 (hsp90), for two subunits of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (ampkα and ampkβ) and for histone/protein deacetylase SIRT1 (sirt1) all showed increased expression at 30°C. Temperatures of maximal expression differed among genes, as did temperatures at which upregulation ceased. Expression patterns for ampk and sirt1 indicate that heat stress influenced cellular energy homeostasis; above ~30°C, upregulation of ATP-generating pathways is suggested by elevated expression of genes for ampk; an altered balance between reliance on carbohydrate and lipid fuels is indicated by changes in expression of sirt1. These results show that C. toreuma commonly experiences temperatures that induce expression of genes associated with the stress response (hsp70 and hsp90) and regulation of energy metabolism (ampk and sirt1). At high temperatures, there is likely to be a shift away from anabolic processes such as growth to catabolic processes, to provide energy for coping with stress-induced damage, notably to proteins.

  12. Quantifying Age-dependent Extinction from Species Phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Helen K.; Lambert, Amaury; Stadler, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Several ecological factors that could play into species extinction are expected to correlate with species age, i.e., time elapsed since the species arose by speciation. To date, however, statistical tools to incorporate species age into likelihood-based phylogenetic inference have been lacking. We present here a computational framework to quantify age-dependent extinction through maximum likelihood parameter estimation based on phylogenetic trees, assuming species lifetimes are gamma distributed. Testing on simulated trees shows that neglecting age dependence can lead to biased estimates of key macroevolutionary parameters. We then apply this method to two real data sets, namely a complete phylogeny of birds (class Aves) and a clade of self-compatible and -incompatible nightshades (Solanaceae), gaining initial insights into the extent to which age-dependent extinction may help explain macroevolutionary patterns. Our methods have been added to the R package TreePar. PMID:26405218

  13. Age-dependent accumulation of soluble amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers reverses the neuroprotective effect of soluble amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPP(alpha)) by modulating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-GSK-3beta pathway in Alzheimer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Sebastian; Torres, Manuel; Vizuete, Marisa; Sanchez-Varo, Raquel; Sanchez-Mejias, Elisabeth; Trujillo-Estrada, Laura; Carmona-Cuenca, Irene; Caballero, Cristina; Ruano, Diego; Gutierrez, Antonia; Vitorica, Javier

    2011-05-27

    Neurotrophins, activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, control neuronal survival and plasticity. Alterations in NGF, BDNF, IGF-1, or insulin signaling are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have previously characterized a bigenic PS1×APP transgenic mouse displaying early hippocampal Aβ deposition (3 to 4 months) but late (17 to 18 months) neurodegeneration of pyramidal cells, paralleled to the accumulation of soluble Aβ oligomers. We hypothesized that PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway could be involved in this apparent age-dependent neuroprotective/neurodegenerative status. In fact, our data demonstrated that, as compared with age-matched nontransgenic controls, the Ser-9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β was increased in the 6-month PS1×APP hippocampus, whereas in aged PS1×APP animals (18 months), GSK-3β phosphorylation levels displayed a marked decrease. Using N2a and primary neuronal cell cultures, we demonstrated that soluble amyloid precursor protein-α (sAPPα), the predominant APP-derived fragment in young PS1×APP mice, acting through IGF-1 and/or insulin receptors, activated the PI3K/Akt pathway, phosphorylated the GSK-3β activity, and in consequence, exerted a neuroprotective action. On the contrary, several oligomeric Aβ forms, present in the soluble fractions of aged PS1×APP mice, inhibited the induced phosphorylation of Akt/GSK-3β and decreased the neuronal survival. Furthermore, synthetic Aβ oligomers blocked the effect mediated by different neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF, insulin, and IGF-1) and sAPPα, displaying high selectivity for NGF. In conclusion, the age-dependent appearance of APP-derived soluble factors modulated the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway through the major neurotrophin receptors. sAPPα stimulated and Aβ oligomers blocked the prosurvival signaling. Our data might provide insights into the selective vulnerability of specific neuronal groups in Alzheimer disease.

  14. Optimal birth control of age-dependent competitive species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ze-Rong

    2005-05-01

    We study optimal birth policies for two age-dependent populations in a competing system, which is controlled by fertilities. New results on problems with free final time and integral phase constraints are presented, and the approximate controllability of system is discussed.

  15. Age-dependent hepatocyte transplantation for functional liver tissue reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Stock, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    The transplantation of hepatocytes could be an alternative therapeutic option to the whole organ transplantation for the treatment of end-stage liver diseases. However, this cell-based therapy needs the understanding of the molecular mechanisms to improve efficacy. This chapter includes a detailed method of a rat model for liver regeneration studies after age-dependent hepatocyte transplantation.

  16. Fish oil and treadmill exercise have age-dependent effects on episodic memory and oxidative state of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Patrícia Fortes Cavalcanti de; de Melo, Janatar Stella Vasconcelos; Costa, Laís Alves Ribeiro; Braz, Glauber Rudá F; de Sousa, Shirley M; Lagranha, Cláudia J; Hornsby, Manuella Batista-de-Oliveira

    2017-01-09

    There is a growing interest to better understand how lifestyle choices can improve memory functions. Treadmill exercise and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids found in fish oil are able to stimulate hippocampal antioxidant defenses and improve memory. The aim was to test whether fish oil and exercise can improve rat's performance on memory tasks and optimize hippocampal antioxidant state in an age-dependent manner. Therefore, young and adult rats were exercised and received fish oil during 4 weeks. The exercise was performed for 30 min/day, with the speed gradually increasing from the first to the last week. Afterwards, episodic memory was measured by the recognition of object identity and spatial location. Hippocampal oxidative state was investigated with the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyls content, antioxidant enzymatic activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT)), and antioxidant nonenzymatic activity (reduced glutathione, sulfhydryl content). The adult rats treated with fish oil and exercise (FO&EX) were able to recognize object's shape and placement; however, FO&EX young rats had impaired spatial recognition (p < 0.05). The FO&EX young rats did not have reduced MDA or carbonyl content, though either fish oil or exercise reduced MDA (p < 0.05) and carbonyl levels (p < 0.01). Exercise increased SOD (p < 0.001) and CAT activities (p < 0.05), and fish oil enhanced SOD activity (p < 0.05) in young rats. At adulthood, exercise increased MDA levels (p < 0.05), and FO&EX reduced MDA (p < 0.001). Finally, exercise and fish oil improved nonenzymatic antioxidant defense (p < 0.05) only in adult rats. Results support age-dependent effects of fish oil and exercise on memory and oxidative state of the hippocampus during either neurodevelopment or adulthood.

  17. Age-dependent heterogeneity of familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotype: a role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Glaveckaitė, Sigita; Rudys, Alfredas; Mikštienė, Violeta; Valevičienė, Nomeda; Palionis, Darius; Laucevičius, Aleksandras

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, we present familiar hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with age-dependent heterogeneity of the disease phenotype among the members of one family who carry the same mutation of the myosin-binding protein C gene. Phenotypic heterogeneity is common in patients with familial forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, both in clinical expression and outcome. Compared with other noninvasive cardiac imaging modalities, cardiovascular magnetic resonance provides an opportunity to more accurately characterize the varying phenotypic presentations of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  18. Age-dependent cognitive impairment in a Drosophila Fragile X model and its pharmacological rescue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Liebelt, David A.; Ferreiro, David; Ferrick, Neal J.; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Rudominer, Rebecca L.; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Koenigsberg, Eric; Wang, Yan; Sumida, Ai; Nguyen, Hanh T.; Bell, Aaron J.; McDonald, Thomas V.

    2010-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome afflicts 1 in 2,500 individuals and is the leading heritable cause of mental retardation worldwide. The overriding clinical manifestation of this disease is mild to severe cognitive impairment. Age-dependent cognitive decline has been identified in Fragile X patients, although it has not been fully characterized nor examined in animal models. A Drosophila model of this disease has been shown to display phenotypes bearing similarity to Fragile X symptoms. Most notably, we previously identified naive courtship and memory deficits in young adults with this model that appear to be due to enhanced metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) signaling. Herein we have examined age-related cognitive decline in the Drosophila Fragile X model and found an age-dependent loss of learning during training. We demonstrate that treatment with mGluR antagonists or lithium can prevent this age-dependent cognitive impairment. We also show that treatment with mGluR antagonists or lithium during development alone displays differential efficacy in its ability to rescue naive courtship, learning during training and memory in aged flies. Furthermore, we show that continuous treatment during aging effectively rescues all of these phenotypes. These results indicate that the Drosophila model recapitulates the age-dependent cognitive decline observed in humans. This places Fragile X in a category with several other diseases that result in age-dependent cognitive decline. This demonstrates a role for the Drosophila Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (dFMR1) in neuronal physiology with regard to cognition during the aging process. Our results indicate that misregulation of mGluR activity may be causative of this age onset decline and strengthens the possibility that mGluR antagonists and lithium may be potential pharmacologic compounds for counteracting several Fragile X symptoms. PMID:20039205

  19. Age-dependent patterns of bovine tuberculosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Brooks-Pollock, Ellen; Conlan, Andrew J K; Mitchell, Andy P; Blackwell, Ruth; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Wood, James L N

    2013-10-16

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is an important livestock disease, seriously impacting cattle industries in both industrialised and pre-industrialised countries. Like TB in other mammals, infection is life long and, if undiagnosed, may progress to disease years after exposure. The risk of disease in humans is highly age-dependent, however in cattle, age-dependent risks have yet to be quantified, largely due to insufficient data and limited diagnostics. Here, we estimate age-specific reactor rates in Great Britain by combining herd-level testing data with spatial movement data from the Cattle Tracing System (CTS). Using a catalytic model, we find strong age dependencies in infection risk and that the probability of detecting infection increases with age. Between 2004 and 2009, infection incidence in cattle fluctuated around 1%. Age-specific incidence increased monotonically until 24-36 months, with cattle aged between 12 and 36 months experiencing the highest rates of infection. Beef and dairy cattle under 24 months experienced similar infection risks, however major differences occurred in older ages. The average reproductive number in cattle was greater than 1 for the years 2004-2009. These methods reveal a consistent pattern of BTB rates with age, across different population structures and testing patterns. The results provide practical insights into BTB epidemiology and control, suggesting that targeting a mass control programme at cattle between 12 and 36 months could be beneficial.

  20. Age-dependent windows for cohort culling in BSE herds.

    PubMed

    Stockmarr, Anders

    2009-11-01

    With the discovery of a BSE case in a herd, practice in Denmark prior to 2005 has been to cull any herd in its entirety, to avoid the risk of further cases. However, a growing dissatisfaction with this practice has led to a desire to be able to cull a minor fraction of a BSE herd only, while still removing the majority of the risk. One proposed method has been cohort culling. All animals in a certain age window around the age of the infected animal are culled, assuming that the BSE case and all other potential cases were infected at roughly the same time. This paper presents a method to characterize the animals in a BSE infected herd most at risk for developing BSE from the exposure that resulted in the index case. The results suggest that a +/-one-and-a-half year cohort cull would work well in Denmark for index BSE cases with an age of 6 years or less, but for older BSE cases the method is completely inadequate, making age-dependent windows a necessity. Formulas for calculating age-dependent windows are provided, and age-dependent windows for a herd size corresponding to a herd size equal to the 85% percentile of the Danish herds are provided in graphical form. A case study with a 9-year-old index case is presented.

  1. Age-dependent patterns of bovine tuberculosis in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is an important livestock disease, seriously impacting cattle industries in both industrialised and pre-industrialised countries. Like TB in other mammals, infection is life long and, if undiagnosed, may progress to disease years after exposure. The risk of disease in humans is highly age-dependent, however in cattle, age-dependent risks have yet to be quantified, largely due to insufficient data and limited diagnostics. Here, we estimate age-specific reactor rates in Great Britain by combining herd-level testing data with spatial movement data from the Cattle Tracing System (CTS). Using a catalytic model, we find strong age dependencies in infection risk and that the probability of detecting infection increases with age. Between 2004 and 2009, infection incidence in cattle fluctuated around 1%. Age-specific incidence increased monotonically until 24–36 months, with cattle aged between 12 and 36 months experiencing the highest rates of infection. Beef and dairy cattle under 24 months experienced similar infection risks, however major differences occurred in older ages. The average reproductive number in cattle was greater than 1 for the years 2004–2009. These methods reveal a consistent pattern of BTB rates with age, across different population structures and testing patterns. The results provide practical insights into BTB epidemiology and control, suggesting that targeting a mass control programme at cattle between 12 and 36 months could be beneficial. PMID:24131703

  2. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity☆

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, N.; Cavaille, J.P.; Graziani, F.; Robin, M.; Ouari, O.; Pietri, S.; Stocker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal. PMID:24688895

  3. Targeting Reactive Carbonyl Species with Natural Sequestering Agents.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Won; Lee, Yoon-Mi; Aldini, Giancarlo; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2016-02-27

    Reactive carbonyl species generated by the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sugars are highly reactive due to their electrophilic nature, and are able to easily react with the nucleophilic sites of proteins as well as DNA causing cellular dysfunction. Levels of reactive carbonyl species and their reaction products have been reported to be elevated in various chronic diseases, including metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. In an effort to identify sequestering agents for reactive carbonyl species, various analytical techniques such as spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography, western blot, and mass spectrometry have been utilized. In particular, recent advances using a novel high resolution mass spectrometry approach allows screening of complex mixtures such as natural products for their sequestering ability of reactive carbonyl species. To overcome the limited bioavailability and bioefficacy of natural products, new techniques using nanoparticles and nanocarriers may offer a new attractive strategy for increased in vivo utilization and targeted delivery of bioactives.

  4. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  5. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  6. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  7. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  8. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  9. Age-dependent diet choice in an avian top predator.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Christian; Whittingham, Mark J; Newton, Ian

    2006-03-07

    Age-dependent breeding performance is arguably one of the best-documented phenomena in ornithology. The existence of age-related trends has major implications for life-history theory, but the proximate reasons for these patterns remain poorly understood. It has been proposed that poor breeding performance of young individuals might reflect lack of foraging skills. We investigated this possibility in a medium-sized, powerful raptor-the northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis. Male goshawks are responsible for providing their females and their offspring with food. We hypothesized that young males may generally show poor breeding performance or even delay breeding, because they lack the experience to hunt efficiently-especially, their principal avian prey, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Our study exploited a rare 'natural experiment', the expansion phase of an urban population, where intraspecific interference was negligible and many young males bred successfully. This enabled us to examine the improvement of foraging skills in a larger sample of young individuals, and in more controlled conditions than usually possible. Using data from individually identified male breeders, we show that, consistent with our hypothesis, the proportion of pigeons in the diet increased significantly with male age, for at least the first three years of life. Other studies have shown a parallel increase in productivity, and a positive effect of a pigeon-rich diet on brood size and nestling condition, stressing the potential fitness relevance of this prey species for goshawks. Our results suggest a causal link between patterns of age-dependence in foraging ecology and reproductive performance. Furthermore, our study is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that prey choice of breeders, which might reflect individual hunting skills, is age-dependent in a raptor.

  10. Age-dependent diet choice in an avian top predator

    PubMed Central

    Rutz, Christian; Whittingham, Mark J; Newton, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Age-dependent breeding performance is arguably one of the best-documented phenomena in ornithology. The existence of age-related trends has major implications for life-history theory, but the proximate reasons for these patterns remain poorly understood. It has been proposed that poor breeding performance of young individuals might reflect lack of foraging skills. We investigated this possibility in a medium-sized, powerful raptor—the northern goshawk Accipiter gentilis. Male goshawks are responsible for providing their females and their offspring with food. We hypothesized that young males may generally show poor breeding performance or even delay breeding, because they lack the experience to hunt efficiently—especially, their principal avian prey, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Our study exploited a rare ‘natural experiment’, the expansion phase of an urban population, where intraspecific interference was negligible and many young males bred successfully. This enabled us to examine the improvement of foraging skills in a larger sample of young individuals, and in more controlled conditions than usually possible. Using data from individually identified male breeders, we show that, consistent with our hypothesis, the proportion of pigeons in the diet increased significantly with male age, for at least the first three years of life. Other studies have shown a parallel increase in productivity, and a positive effect of a pigeon-rich diet on brood size and nestling condition, stressing the potential fitness relevance of this prey species for goshawks. Our results suggest a causal link between patterns of age-dependence in foraging ecology and reproductive performance. Furthermore, our study is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration that prey choice of breeders, which might reflect individual hunting skills, is age-dependent in a raptor. PMID:16537129

  11. Age-dependent magnetosensitivity of heart muscle ouabain receptors.

    PubMed

    Narinyan, Lilia Yu; Ayrapetyan, Gayane S; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik N

    2013-05-01

    In our previous work we have shown that the age-dependent decrease in the magnetosensitivity of heart muscle hydration is accompanied by a dysfunction of the Na(+) /K(+) pump. The reciprocal relation between the Na(+/) K(+) pump and Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchange in development was suggested as a possible pathway for the age-dependent decrease in the magnetosensitivity of heart muscle hydration (water content). Because high and low affinity ouabain receptors in cell membranes are involved in Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchange and Na(+) /K(+) pump functions, respectively, the effect of a 0.2 T static magnetic field (SMF) on dose-dependent, ouabain-induced hydration and [(3) H]-ouabain binding with heart muscle tissues in young, adult and older rats was studied. Three populations of receptors in membranes with high (10(-11) -10(-9)  M), middle (10(-9) -10(-7)  M) and low (10(-7) -10(-4)  M) affinity to [(3) H]-ouabain were distinguished, which had specific dose-dependent [(3) H]-ouabain binding kinetics and effects on muscle hydration. The magnetosensitivity of [(3) H]-ouabain binding kinetics with high affinity receptors was prominent in all the three age groups of animals, while with low affinity receptors it was more expressed only in the young group of animals. All three types of receptors that caused modulations of muscle hydration were age dependent and magnetosensitive. Based on the obtained data we came to the conclusion that heart muscle hydration in young animals is more magnetosensitive due to the intense expression of high affinity ouabain receptors, which declines with aging.

  12. A Method to Site-Specifically Identify and Quantitate Carbonyl End Products of Protein Oxidation Using Oxidation-Dependent Element Coded Affinity Tags (O-ECAT) and NanoLiquid Chromatography Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Young, N L; Whetstone, P A; Cheal, S M; Benner, W H; Lebrilla, C B; Meares, C F

    2005-08-25

    Protein oxidation is linked to cellular stress, aging, and disease. Protein oxidations that result in reactive species are of particular interest, since these reactive oxidation products may react with other proteins or biomolecules in an unmediated and irreversible fashion, providing a potential marker for a variety of disease mechanisms. We have developed a novel system to identify and quantitate, relative to other states, the sites of oxidation on a given protein. A specially designed Oxidation-dependent carbonyl-specific Element-Coded Affinity Mass Tag (O-ECAT), AOD, ((S)-2-(4-(2-aminooxy)-acetamido)-benzyl)-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N', N'', N'''-tetraacetic acid, is used to covalently tag the residues of a protein oxidized to aldehyde or keto end products. After proteolysis, the resulting AOD-tagged peptides are affinity purified, and analyzed by nanoLC-FTICR-MS, which provides high specificity in extracting co-eluting AOD mass pairs with a unique mass difference and affords relative quantitation based on isotopic ratios. Using this methodology, we have mapped the surface oxidation sites on a model protein, recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) in its native form (as purchased) and after FeEDTA oxidation. A variety of modified amino acid residues including lysine, arginine, proline, histidine, threonine, aspartic and glutamic acids, were found to be oxidized to aldehyde and keto end products. The sensitivity of this methodology is shown by the number of peptides identified, twenty peptides on the native protein and twenty-nine after surface oxidation using FeEDTA and ascorbate. All identified peptides map to the surface of the HSA crystal structure validating this method for identifying oxidized amino acids on protein surfaces. In relative quantitation experiments between FeEDTA oxidation and native protein oxidation, identified sites showed different relative propensities towards oxidation independent of amino acid residue. We expect to extend

  13. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    PubMed

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point.

  14. Age-dependent social learning in a lizard

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Daniel W. A.; Byrne, Richard W.; Whiting, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of social learning, whereby the actions of an animal facilitate the acquisition of new information by another, is taxonomically biased towards mammals, especially primates, and birds. However, social learning need not be limited to group-living animals because species with less interaction can still benefit from learning about potential predators, food sources, rivals and mates. We trained male skinks (Eulamprus quoyii), a mostly solitary lizard from eastern Australia, in a two-step foraging task. Lizards belonging to ‘young’ and ‘old’ age classes were presented with a novel instrumental task (displacing a lid) and an association task (reward under blue lid). We did not find evidence for age-dependent learning of the instrumental task; however, young males in the presence of a demonstrator learnt the association task faster than young males without a demonstrator, whereas old males in both treatments had similar success rates. We present the first evidence of age-dependent social learning in a lizard and suggest that the use of social information for learning may be more widespread than previously believed. PMID:25009244

  15. Age-dependent social learning in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Noble, Daniel W A; Byrne, Richard W; Whiting, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Evidence of social learning, whereby the actions of an animal facilitate the acquisition of new information by another, is taxonomically biased towards mammals, especially primates, and birds. However, social learning need not be limited to group-living animals because species with less interaction can still benefit from learning about potential predators, food sources, rivals and mates. We trained male skinks (Eulamprus quoyii), a mostly solitary lizard from eastern Australia, in a two-step foraging task. Lizards belonging to 'young' and 'old' age classes were presented with a novel instrumental task (displacing a lid) and an association task (reward under blue lid). We did not find evidence for age-dependent learning of the instrumental task; however, young males in the presence of a demonstrator learnt the association task faster than young males without a demonstrator, whereas old males in both treatments had similar success rates. We present the first evidence of age-dependent social learning in a lizard and suggest that the use of social information for learning may be more widespread than previously believed.

  16. Role of Mitochondrial Complex IV in Age-Dependent Obesity.

    PubMed

    Soro-Arnaiz, Ines; Li, Qilong Oscar Yang; Torres-Capelli, Mar; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Florinda; Veiga, Sónia; Veys, Koen; Sebastian, David; Elorza, Ainara; Tello, Daniel; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Cogliati, Sara; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose Maria; Balsa, Eduardo; Fuertes, Esther; Romanos, Eduardo; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Enriquez, Jose Antonio; Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; De Bock, Katrien; Aragonés, Julián

    2016-09-13

    Aging is associated with progressive white adipose tissue (WAT) enlargement initiated early in life, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown. Here we show that mitochondrial complex IV (CIV) activity and assembly are already repressed in white adipocytes of middle-aged mice and involve a HIF1A-dependent decline of essential CIV components such as COX5B. At the molecular level, HIF1A binds to the Cox5b proximal promoter and represses its expression. Silencing of Cox5b decreased fatty acid oxidation and promoted intracellular lipid accumulation. Moreover, local in vivo Cox5b silencing in WAT of young mice increased the size of adipocytes, whereas restoration of COX5B expression in aging mice counteracted adipocyte enlargement. An age-dependent reduction in COX5B gene expression was also found in human visceral adipose tissue. Collectively, our findings establish a pivotal role for CIV dysfunction in progressive white adipocyte enlargement during aging, which can be restored to alleviate age-dependent WAT expansion.

  17. Age-dependent changes in damage processes of hair cuticle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshie; Mamada, Akira; Breakspear, Steven; Itou, Takashi; Tanji, Noriyuki

    2015-03-01

    Human hair cuticle is always exposed to various stresses and then gradually lost in daily life. There are two typical patterns of cuticle damage: type L, where the cell membrane complex, the structure located between cuticle cells, is split and the cuticle lifts up, and type E, where the fragile substructure of the cuticle cell (endocuticle) is damaged so that its rugged residue is exposed. We previously reported that type L damage preferentially occurs in the case of Japanese females in their 20s to 40s. This study aims to elucidate the age-dependent change of cuticle and its effect on hair properties. Hair fibers collected from Japanese females (ranging from 10 to 70 years old) were evaluated in the aspects of inclination for each type of damage, resistance of cuticle against grooming stresses and content of fatty acid 18-MEA on hair surface. It was revealed that the dominant damage pattern shifts from type L to E with aging. Furthermore, the cuticle becomes gradually less resistant to daily grooming stress. The dominance of type E damage accelerates cuticle loss. Reduction of 18-MEA on weathered hair is accelerated with aging on elder hair. It has been reported that various age-dependent changes of whole hair shaft, such as diameter, density, elasticity, etc., occur in the age range of 40s and 50s. In this study, it was revealed that cuticle becomes more fragile and the hair surface properties deteriorate in the same age range. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Exhaled nitric oxide is age-dependent in asthma.

    PubMed

    Avital, Avraham; Uwyyed, Kamal; Berkman, Neville; Bar-Yishay, Ephraim; Godfrey, Simon; Springer, Chaim

    2003-11-01

    We determined whether the exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) level in asthmatics is age-dependent. Eighty-seven asthmatic patients aged 2-41 years were studied. Hyperreactivity to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) was used to confirm asthma (age-dependent, with lower values in young children.

  19. Prey behavior, age-dependent vulnerability, and predation rates.

    PubMed

    Lingle, Susan; Feldman, Alex; Boyce, Mark S; Wilson, W Finbarr

    2008-11-01

    Variation in the temporal pattern of vulnerability can provide important insights into predator-prey relationships and the evolution of antipredator behavior. We illustrate these points with a system that has coyotes (Canis latrans) as a predator and two species of congeneric deer (Odocoileus spp.) as prey. The deer employ different antipredator tactics (aggressive defense vs. flight) that result in contrasting patterns of age-dependent vulnerability in their probability of being captured when encountered by coyotes. We use long-term survival data and a simple mathematical model to show that (1) species differences in age-dependent vulnerability are reflected in seasonal predation rates and (2) seasonal variation in prey vulnerability and predator hunt activity, which can be associated with the availability of alternative prey, interact to shape seasonal and annual predation rates for each prey species. Shifting hunt activity from summer to winter, or vice versa, alleviated annual mortality on one species and focused it on the other. Our results indicate that seasonal variation in prey vulnerability and hunt activity interact to influence the impact that a predator has on any particular type of prey. Furthermore, these results indicate that seasonal variation in predation pressure is an important selection pressure shaping prey defenses.

  20. HDAC6 Suppresses Age-Dependent Ectopic Fat Accumulation by Maintaining the Proteostasis of PLIN2 in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Hao; Hu, Minling; Jiang, Lifen; Wang, Yang; Liu, Pingsheng; Liang, Xuehong; Liu, Jiyong; Li, Changqing; Lindström-Battle, Anya; Lam, Sin Man; Shui, Guanghou; Deng, Wu-Min; Jiao, Renjie

    2017-10-09

    Age-dependent ectopic fat accumulation (EFA) in animals contributes to the progression of tissue aging and diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cancer. However, the primary causes of age-dependent EFA remain largely elusive. Here, we characterize the occurrence of age-dependent EFA in Drosophila and identify HDAC6, a cytosolic histone deacetylase, as a suppressor of EFA. Loss of HDAC6 leads to significant age-dependent EFA, lipid composition imbalance, and reduced animal longevity on a high-fat diet. The EFA and longevity phenotypes are ameliorated by a reduction of the lipid-droplet-resident protein PLIN2. We show that HDAC6 is associated physically with the chaperone protein dHsc4/Hsc70 to maintain the proteostasis of PLIN2. These findings indicate that proteostasis collapse serves as an intrinsic cue to cause age-dependent EFA. Our study suggests that manipulation of proteostasis could be an alternative approach to the treatment of age-related metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A path integral approach to age dependent branching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenman, Chris D.

    2017-03-01

    Age dependent population dynamics are frequently modeled with generalizations of the classic McKendrick–von Foerster equation. These are deterministic systems, and a stochastic generalization was recently reported in Greenman and Chou (2016 Phys. Rev. E 93 012112, 2016 J. Stat. Phys. 16449). Here we develop a fully stochastic theory for age-structured populations via quantum field theoretical Doi–Peliti techniques. This results in a path integral formulation where birth and death events correspond to cubic and quadratic interaction terms. This formalism allows us to efficiently recapitulate the results in Greenman and Chou (2016 Phys. Rev. E 93 012112, 2016 J. Stat. Phys. 16449), exemplifying the utility of Doi–Peliti methods. Furthermore, we find that the path integral formulation for age-structured moments has an exact perturbative expansion that explicitly relates to the hereditary structure between correlated individuals. These methods are then generalized with a binary fission model of cell division.

  2. Molecular basis of age-dependent vernalization in Cardamine flexuosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Tian-Qi; Wang, Xi; Yu, Sha; Lian, Heng; Tang, Hongbo; Feng, Zheng-Yan; Zozomova-Lihová, Judita; Wang, Jia-Wei

    2013-05-31

    Plants flower in response to many varied cues, such as temperature, photoperiod, and age. The floral transition of Cardamine flexuosa, a herbaceous biennial-to-perennial plant, requires exposure to cold temperature, a treatment known as vernalization. C. flexuosa younger than 5 weeks old are not fully responsive to cold treatment. We demonstrate that the levels of two age-regulated microRNAs, miR156 and miR172, regulate the timing of sensitivity in response to vernalization. Age and vernalization pathways coordinately regulate flowering through modulating the expression of CfSOC1, a flower-promoting MADS-box gene. The related annual Arabidopsis thaliana, which has both vernalization and age pathways, does not possess an age-dependent vernalization response. Thus, the recruitment of age cue in response to environmental signals contributes to the evolution of life cycle in plants.

  3. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H; Kuiper, Marieke J; Lunsing, Roelinka J; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P; Sival, Deborah A

    2014-06-01

    To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean age 10y 5mo SD 3y 11mo). The investigated scales involved the commonly applied International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS), and PEG-board tests. We investigated the interrelatedness between individual ataxia scales, the influence of age and sex, inter- and intra-observer agreement, and test-retest reliability. Spearman's rank correlations revealed strong correlations between ICARS, SARA BARS, and PEG-board test (all p<0.001). ICARS, SARA, BARS and PEG-board test outcomes were age-dependent until 12.5, 10, 11, and 11.5 years of age respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) varied between moderate and almost perfect (interobserver agreement: 0.85, 0.72, and 0.69; intraobserver agreement: 0.92, 0.94, and 0.70; and test-retest reliability: 0.95, 0.50, and 0.71; for ICARS, SARA, and BARS respectively). Interobserver variability decreased after the sixth year of life. In healthy children, ataxia rating scales are reliable, but should include age-dependent interpretation in children up to 12 years of age. To enable longitudinal interpretation of quantitative ataxia rating scales in children, European paediatric normative values are necessary. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  4. Age-dependent forest carbon sink: Estimation via inverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao; Shi, Peijun; Jia, Gensuo; Dai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Xiang; Shangguan, Wei; Du, Ling; Wu, Hao; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-12-01

    Forests have been recognized to sequester a substantial amount of carbon (C) from the atmosphere. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the magnitude and time course of the C sink. Revealing the intrinsic relationship between forest age and C sink is crucial for reducing uncertainties in prediction of forest C sink potential. In this study, we developed a stepwise data assimilation approach to combine a process-based Terrestrial ECOsystem Regional model, observations from multiple sources, and stochastic sampling to inversely estimate carbon cycle parameters including carbon sink at different forest ages for evergreen needle-leaved forests in China. The new approach is effective to estimate age-dependent parameter of maximal light-use efficiency (R2 = 0.99) and, accordingly, can quantify a relationship between forest age and the vegetation and soil C sinks. The estimated ecosystem C sink increases rapidly with age, peaks at 0.451 kg C m-2 yr-1 at age 22 years (ranging from 0.421 to 0.465 kg C m-2 yr-1), and gradually decreases thereafter. The dynamic patterns of C sinks in vegetation and soil are significantly different. C sink in vegetation first increases rapidly with age and then decreases. C sink in soil, however, increases continuously with age; it acts as a C source when the age is less than 20 years, after which it acts as a sink. For the evergreen needle-leaved forest, the highest C sink efficiency (i.e., C sink per unit net primary productivity) is approximately 60%, with age between 11 and 43 years. Overall, the inverse estimation of carbon cycle parameters can make reasonable estimates of age-dependent C sequestration in forests.

  5. Peripheral Surgical Wounding and Age-Dependent Neuroinflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients. PMID:24796537

  6. Peripheral surgical wounding and age-dependent neuroinflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhipeng; Dong, Yuanlin; Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J; Marcantonio, Edward R; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients.

  7. Age-dependent seizure semiology in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fogarasi, András; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Janszky, József; Janszky, Imre; Rásonyi, György; Kelemen, Anna; Halász, Péter

    2007-09-01

    To examine the effects of age on different aspects of temporal lobe seizure semiology. We performed a video analysis of 605 archived seizures from 155 consecutive patients (age 10 months to 49 years) selected by seizure freedom after temporal lobectomy. Eighty patients had hippocampal sclerosis (HS). Beside semiological seizure classification, we assessed age dependency of several axes of seizure semiology: (1) aura, (2) number of different lateralizing signs, occurrence of ictal (3) emotional signs, (4) autonomic symptoms, (5) automatisms, and (6) secondary generalization as well as (7) the ratio of motor seizure components. From the 155 patients, 117 reported aura, 39 had ictal emotional signs, 51 had autonomic symptoms, 130 presented automatisms, while 18 patients showed secondary generalization at least once during their seizures. Altogether 369 (median: 2/patient) different lateralizing signs were recorded. Frequency of HS (p < 0.001), ictal automatisms (p < 0.001), secondary generalization (p = 0.014), number of different lateralizing signs (p < 0.001) increased while the ratio of motor seizure component (p = 0.007) decreased by age. Auras, emotional symptoms, and autonomic signs occurred independently of patients' ages. Hippocampal sclerosis adjusted linear models revealed that the frequency of automatisms and secondarily generalized seizures as well as the number of different lateralizing signs are HS-independent significant variables. Our findings support that brain maturation significantly influences the evolution of some important aspects (motor seizures, lateralizing signs) of temporal lobe seizure semiology. Conversely, other aspects (aura, emotional, and autonomic signs) are independent of the maturation process. This is the first report investigating age dependency of epileptic seizure semiology comparing all age groups.

  8. Carbonylations of alkenes with CO surrogates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lipeng; Liu, Qiang; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2014-06-16

    Alkene carbonylation reactions are important for the production of value-added bulk and fine chemicals. Nowadays, all industrial carbonylation processes make use of highly toxic and flammable carbon monoxide. In fact, these properties impede the wider use of carbonylation reactions in industry and academia. Hence, performing carbonylations without the use of CO is highly desired and will contribute to the further advancement of sustainable chemistry. Although the use of carbon monoxide surrogates in alkene carbonylation reactions has been reported intermittently in the last 30 years, only recently has this area attracted significant interest. This Minireview summarizes carbonylation reactions of alkenes using different carbon monoxide surrogates.

  9. Biological factors and age-dependence of primary motor cortex experimental plasticity.

    PubMed

    Polimanti, Renato; Simonelli, Ilaria; Zappasodi, Filippo; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Pellicciari, Maria Concetta; Benussi, Luisa; Squitti, Rosanna; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Tecchio, Franca

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate whether the age-dependence of brain plasticity correlates with the levels of proteins involved in hormone and brain functions we executed a paired associative stimulation (PAS) protocol and blood tests. We measured the PAS-induced plasticity in the primary motor cortex. Blood levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), estradiol, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3, progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone, and the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) were determined in 15 healthy men and 20 healthy women. We observed an age-related reduction of PAS-induced plasticity in females that it is not present in males. In females, PAS-induced plasticity displayed a correlation with testosterone (p = 0.006) that became a trend after the adjustment for the age effect (p = 0.078). In males, IGF-1 showed a nominally significant correlation with the PAS-induced plasticity (p = 0.043). In conclusion, we observed that hormone blood levels (testosterone in females and IGF-1 in males) may be involved in the age-dependence of brain plasticity.

  10. Reactivity of silicon carbonyl with ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanzoni, P.; Giorgi, G.; Cerofolini, G. F.

    2006-02-01

    The reaction of silicon atom with carbonyl has recently been investigated by density functional calculations. A few relatively stable silicon carbonyl compounds have been found. In this Letter, the reactivity of silicon tetracarbonyl with ethylene has been investigated by a density functional approach. The calculations predict this carbonylation procedure as an alternative to the use of highly toxic phosgene commonly required in addition reactions of carbonyl to unsaturated compounds.

  11. A comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.W.; Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    In the absence of age-specific biokinetic models, current retention models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) frequently are used as a point of departure for evaluation of exposures to the general population. These models were designed and intended for estimation of long-term integrated doses to the adult worker. Their format and empirical basis preclude incorporation of much valuable physiological information and physiologically reasonable assumptions that could be used in characterizing the age-specific behavior of radioelements in humans. In this paper we discuss a comprehensive approach to age-dependent dosimetric modeling in which consideration is given not only to changes with age in masses and relative geometries of body organs and tissues but also to best available physiological and radiobiological information relating to the age-specific biobehavior of radionuclides. This approach is useful in obtaining more accurate estimates of long-term dose commitments as a function of age at intake, but it may be particularly valuable in establishing more accurate estimates of dose rate as a function of age. Age-specific dose rates are needed for a proper analysis of the potential effects on estimates or risk of elevated dose rates per unit intake in certain stages of life, elevated response per unit dose received during some stages of life, and age-specific non-radiogenic competing risks.

  12. The age dependence of left ventricular filling efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Kovács, Sándor J

    2009-07-01

    Echocardiography has emerged as the preferred modality by which diastolic function (DF) is assessed for clinical or research purposes. Echocardiographic indexes and parameters of DF such as E/A, DT, E/E', etc., deteriorate with advancing age. Whether the efficiency of filling depends on age is unknown. To better characterize the filling process and DF in causal rather than correlative terms, we have previously modeled diastole kinematically. We introduced and validated a dimensionless measure of DF termed the kinematic filling efficiency index (KFEI). In the present study, we determined the effect of aging on DF in terms of KFEI in 72 control subjects without cardiovascular-related diseases or pathologies. We also evaluated the age dependence of other conventional parameters of DF. In concordance with other noninvasive DF measures known to decrease with age, KFEI decreases and correlates very strongly with age (R2=0.80). Multivariate analysis showed that age is the single most important contributor to KFEI (p=0.003). We conclude that KFEI provides novel insight into DF impairment mechanisms because of aging. These results support the clinical value of KFEI and advance our ability to characterize DF in mechanistic and quantitative terms based on the efficiency of filling.

  13. Disrupting the key circadian regulator CLOCK leads to age-dependent cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Alibhai, Faisal J; LaMarre, Jonathan; Reitz, Cristine J; Tsimakouridze, Elena V; Kroetsch, Jeffrey T; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Shulman, Alex; Steinberg, Samantha; Burris, Thomas P; Oudit, Gavin Y; Martino, Tami A

    2017-04-01

    The circadian mechanism underlies daily rhythms in cardiovascular physiology and rhythm disruption is a major risk factor for heart disease and worse outcomes. However, the role of circadian rhythms is generally clinically unappreciated. Clock is a core component of the circadian mechanism and here we examine the role of Clock as a vital determinant of cardiac physiology and pathophysiology in aging. Clock(Δ19/Δ19) mice develop age-dependent increases in heart weight, hypertrophy, dilation, impaired contractility, and reduced myogenic responsiveness. Young Clock(Δ19/Δ19) hearts express dysregulated mRNAs and miRNAs in the PTEN-AKT signal pathways important for cardiac hypertrophy. We found a rhythm in the Pten gene and PTEN protein in WT hearts; rhythmic oscillations are lost in Clock(Δ19/Δ19) hearts. Changes in PTEN are associated with reduced AKT activation and changes in downstream mediators GSK-3β, PRAS40, and S6K1. Cardiomyocyte cultures confirm that Clock regulates the AKT signalling pathways crucial for cardiac hypertrophy. In old Clock(Δ19/Δ19) mice cardiac AKT, GSK3β, S6K1 phosphorylation are increased, consistent with the development of age-dependent cardiac hypertrophy. Lastly, we show that pharmacological modulation of the circadian mechanism with the REV-ERB agonist SR9009 reduces AKT activation and heart weight in old WT mice. Furthermore, SR9009 attenuates cardiac hypertrophy in mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC), supporting that the circadian mechanism plays an important role in regulating cardiac growth. These findings demonstrate a crucial role for Clock in growth and renewal; disrupting Clock leads to age-dependent cardiomyopathy. Pharmacological targeting of the circadian mechanism provides a new opportunity for treating heart disease.

  14. Morphological age-dependent development of the human carotid bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Seong, Jaehoon; Lieber, Baruch B; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2005-03-01

    The unique morphology of the adult human carotid bifurcation and its sinus has been investigated extensively, but its long-term, age-dependent development has not. It is important fundamentally and clinically to understand the hemodynamics and developmental forces that play a role in remodeling of the carotid bifurcation and maturation of the sinus in association with brain maturation. This understanding can lead to better prognostication and therapy of carotid disease. We analyzed the change of sinus morphology and the angle of the carotid bifurcation in four postnatal developmental stages (Group I: 0-2 years, Group II: 3-9 years, Group III: 10-19 years, and Group IV: 20-36 years, respectively) using multiprojection digital subtraction angiograms and image post-processing techniques. The most significant findings are the substantial growth of the internal carotid artery (ICA) with age and the development of a carotid sinus at the root of the ICA during late adolescence. The bifurcation angle remains virtually unchanged from infancy to adulthood. However, the angle split between the ICA and external carotid artery (ECA) relative to the common carotid artery (CCA) undergoes significant changes. Initially, the ICA appears to emanate as a side branch. Later in life, to reduce hydraulic resistance in response to increased flow demand by the brain, the bifurcation is remodeled to a construct in which both daughter vessels are a skewed continuation of the parent artery. This study provides a new analysis method to examine the development of the human carotid bifurcation over the developmental years, despite the small and sparse database. A larger database will enable in the future a more extensive analysis such as gender or racial differences.

  15. Age-Dependent Male Mating Investment in Drosophila pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    Dhole, Sumit; Pfennig, Karin S.

    2014-01-01

    Male mating investment can strongly influence fitness gained from a mating. Yet, male mating investment often changes with age. Life history theory predicts that mating investment should increase with age, and males should become less discriminatory about their mate as they age. Understanding age-dependent changes in male behavior and their effects on fitness is important for understanding how selection acts in age-structured populations. Although the independent effects of male or female age have been studied in many species, how these interact to influence male mating investment and fitness is less well understood. We mated Drosophila pseudoobscura males of five different age classes (4-, 8-, 11-, 15-, 19-day old) to either young (4-day) or old (11-day) females, and measured copulation duration and early post-mating fecundity. Along with their independent effects, we found a strong interaction between the effects of male and female ages on male mating investment and fitness from individual matings. Male mating investment increased with male age, but this increase was more prominent in matings with young females. Male D. pseudoobscura made smaller investments when mating with old females. The level of such discrimination based on female age, however, also changed with male age. Intermediate aged males were most discriminatory, while the youngest and the oldest males did not discriminate between females of different ages. We also found that larger male mating investments resulted in higher fitness payoffs. Our results show that male and female ages interact to form a complex pattern of age-specific male mating investment and fitness. PMID:24586373

  16. AGE-DEPENDENT ASCENDING AORTA MECHANICS ASSESSED THROUGH MULTIPHASE CT

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Primiano, Charles; McKay, Raymond; Elefteriades, John

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of the age- and gender-specific in vivo mechanical characteristics of the ascending aorta (AA) will allow for identification of abnormalities aside from changes brought on by aging alone. Multiphase clinical CT scans of 45 male patients between the ages of 30 and 79 years were analyzed to assess age-dependent in vivo AA characteristics. The three-dimensional AA geometry for each patient was reconstructed from the CT scans for 9–10 phases throughout the cardiac cycle. The AA circumference was measured during each phase and was used to determine the corresponding diameter, circumferential strain, and wall tension at each phase. The pressure-strain modulus was also determined for each patient. The mean diastolic AA diameter was significantly smaller among young (42.6±5.2 years) at 29.9±2.8 mm than old patients (69.0±5.2 years) at 33.2±3.2 mm. The circumferential AA strain from end-diastole to peak-systole decreased from 0.092±0.03 in young to 0.056±0.03 in old patients. The pressure-strain modulus increased two-fold from 68.4±30.5 kPa in young to 162.0±93.5 kPa in old patients, and the systolic AA wall tension increased from 268.5±31.3 kPa in young to 304.9±49.2 kPa in old patients. The AA dilates and stiffens with aging which increases the vessel wall tension, likely predisposing aneurysm and dissection. PMID:23817767

  17. Age-dependence of molecular and functional changes in biological membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Hegner, D

    1980-01-01

    Some general aspects including results on the possible mechanisms of membrane ageing are reviewed. The liquid-crystalline fluid state of a biological membrane is an essential condition for maintenance of different membrane functions. The liquid-crystalline state of different plasma membranes changes with age of the organism. The degree of unsaturated fatty acids decreases and the content of cholesterol increases during ageing. It could be shown that superoxide radicals originate from minor side-reactions of oxidoreductase enzymes. Ageing increases the amount of superoxide radicals. A small amount of radicals escape quenching by superoxide dismutase. The formation of radicals leads to degradation of membrane lipids. The age-dependent changes in membrane lipid composition influence respiratory activity in rat heart mitochondria of old animals. Rat liver plasma membrane lipids also show a decrease in membrane fluidity which results in a change in transport parameters of cholic acid and thymidine. The change in age-dependent lipid-protein interactions was demonstrated by spin-label measurements in model membranes. The results demonstrated that peroxidative break-down of lipids is an ongoing post-transcriptional process of ageing. The possible role of protective repair mechanisms is discussed.

  18. Age-dependent responses of glial cells and leptomeninges during systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhou; Tokuda, Yukie; Zhang, Xin-Wen; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Systemic inflammation causes the age-dependent differential glial responses, but little is known about how age influences the barrier function of leptomeninges during systemic inflammation. This study was conducted to elucidate the relationship between the glial responses and the levels of tight junction proteins, occludin and ZO-1, in adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats. In young AA rats, microglia and astrocytes localized to the proximity of the leptomeninges expressed interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. The level of occludin significantly increased. In middle-aged AA rats, however, glial cells expressed IL-1beta and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-synthesizing enzymes. Furthermore, occludin and ZO-1 significantly decreased, resulting in the increased permeability of leptomeninges. In the cultured leptomeningeal cells, IL-1beta and PGE(2) caused a marked loss of occludin and ZO-1, respectively. Pretreatment with IL-10 and TGF-beta1 significantly antagonized their effects. These findings establish that age strongly influences the barrier functions of the leptomeninges through the age-dependent differential glial responses during systemic inflammation.

  19. A rapid, reproducible, on-the-fly orthogonal array optimization method for targeted protein quantification by LC/MS and its application for accurate and sensitive quantification of carbonyl reductases in human liver.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jin; Gonzalez-Covarrubias, Vanessa; Covarrubias, Vanessa M; Straubinger, Robert M; Wang, Hao; Duan, Xiaotao; Yu, Haoying; Qu, Jun; Blanco, Javier G

    2010-04-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) in selected-reactions-monitoring (SRM) mode provides a powerful tool for targeted protein quantification. However, efficient, high-throughput strategies for proper selection of signature peptides (SP) for protein quantification and accurate optimization of their SRM conditions remain elusive. Here we describe an on-the-fly, orthogonal array optimization (OAO) approach that enables rapid, comprehensive, and reproducible SRM optimization of a large number of candidate peptides in a single nanoflow-LC/MS run. With the optimized conditions, many peptide candidates can be evaluated in biological matrixes for selection of the final SP. The OAO strategy employs a systematic experimental design that strategically varies product ions, declustering energy, and collision energy in a cycle of 25 consecutive SRM trials, which accurately reveals the effects of these factors on the signal-to-noise ratio of a candidate peptide and optimizes each. As proof of concept, we developed a highly sensitive, accurate, and reproducible method for the quantification of carbonyl reductases CBR1 and CBR3 in human liver. Candidate peptides were identified by nano-LC/LTQ/Orbitrap, filtered using a stringent set of criteria, and subjected to OAO. After evaluating both sensitivity and stability of the candidates, two SP were selected for quantification of each protein. As a result of the accurate OAO of assay conditions, sensitivities of 80 and 110 amol were achieved for CBR1 and CBR3, respectively. The method was validated and used to quantify the CBRs in 33 human liver samples. The mean level of CBR1 was 93.4 +/- 49.7 (range: 26.2-241) ppm of total protein, and of CBR3 was 7.69 +/- 4.38 (range: 1.26-17.9) ppm. Key observations of this study: (i) evaluation of peptide stability in the target matrix is essential for final selection of the SP; (ii) utilization of two unique SP contributes to high reliability of target protein quantification; (iii

  20. A rapid, reproducible, on-the-fly orthogonal array optimization method for targeted protein quantification by LC/MS and its application for accurate and sensitive quantification of carbonyl reductases in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jin; Gonzalez-Covarrubias, Vanessa; Straubinger, Robert M.; Wang, Hao; Duan, Xiaotao; Yu, Haoying; Qu, Jun; Blanco, Javier G.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) in selected-reactions-monitoring (SRM) mode provides a powerful tool for targeted protein quantification. However, efficient, high-throughput strategies for proper selection of signature peptides (SP) for protein quantification and accurate optimization of their SRM conditions remain elusive. Here we describe an on-the-fly, orthogonal array optimization (OAO) approach that enables rapid, comprehensive, and reproducible SRM optimization of a large number of candidate peptides in a single nanoflow-LC/MS run. With the optimized conditions, many peptide candidates can be evaluated in biological matrices for selection of the final SP. The OAO strategy employs a systematic experimental design that strategically varies product ions, de-clustering energy and collision energy in a cycle of 25 consecutive SRM trials, which accurately reveals the effects of these factors on the single-to-noise ratio of a candidate peptide, and optimizes each. As proof of concept, we developed a highly sensitive, accurate, and reproducible method for the quantification of carbonyl reductases CBR1 and CBR3 in human liver. Candidate peptides were identified by nano-LC/LTQ/Orbitrap, filtered using a stringent set of criteria, and subjected to OAO. After evaluating both sensitivity and stability of the candidates, two SP were selected for quantification of each protein. As a result of the accurate OAO of assay conditions, sensitivities of 80 and 110 amol were achieved for CBR1 and CBR3, respectively. The method was validated and used to quantify the CBRs in 33 human liver samples. The mean level of CBR1 was 93.4±49.7 (range: 26.2–241) ppm of total protein, and for CBR3 was 7.69±4.38 (range: 1.26–17.9) ppm. Key observations of this study are that: i) evaluation of peptide stability in the target matrix is essential for final selection of the SP; ii) utilization of two unique SP contributes to high reliability of target protein quantification

  1. Aging-dependent reduction in glyoxalase 1 delays wound healing.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Thomas H; Theilen, Till-Martin; Masania, Jinit; Wunderle, Marius; Karimi, Jamshid; Vittas, Spiros; Bernauer, Rainer; Bierhaus, Angelika; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J; Kroll, Jens; Tyedmers, Jens; Nawrotzki, Ralph; Herzig, Stephan; Brownlee, Michael; Nawroth, Peter P

    2013-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG), the major dicarbonyl substrate of the enzyme glyoxalase 1 (GLO1), is a reactive metabolite formed via glycolytic flux. Decreased GLO1 activity in situ has been shown to result in an accumulation of MG and increased formation of advanced glycation endproducts, both of which can accumulate during physiological aging and at an accelerated rate in diabetes and other chronic degenerative diseases. To determine the physiological consequences which result from elevated MG levels and the role of MG and GLO1 in aging, wound healing in young (≤12 weeks) and old (≥52 weeks) wild-type mice was studied. Old mice were found to have a significantly slower rate of wound healing compared to young mice (74.9 ± 2.2 vs. 55.4 ± 1.5% wound closure at day 6; 26% decrease; p < 0.0001). This was associated with decreases in GLO1 transcription, expression and activity. The importance of GLO1 was confirmed in mice by inhibition of GLO1. Direct application of MG to the wounds of young mice, decreased wound healing by 24% compared to untreated mice, whereas application of BSA modified minimally by MG had no effect. Treatment of either young or old mice with aminoguanidine, a scavenger of free MG, significantly increased wound closure by 16% (66.8 ± 1.6 vs. 77.2 ± 3.1%; p < 0.05) and 64% (40.4 ± 7.9 vs. 66.4 ± 5.2%; p < 0.05), respectively, by day 6. As a result of the aminoguanidine treatment, the overall rate of wound healing in the old mice was restored to the level observed in the young mice. These findings were confirmed in vitro, as MG reduced migration and proliferation of fibroblasts derived from young and old, wild-type mice. The data demonstrate that the balance between MG and age-dependent GLO1 downregulation contributes to delayed wound healing in old mice. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Racial disparities after vascular trauma are age-dependent.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Zarkowsky, Devin S; Arhuidese, Isibor; Obeid, Tammam; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2016-08-01

    Different racial disparities exist between white and black all-cause trauma patients depending on their age group; however, the effects of race and age on outcomes after vascular trauma are unknown. We assessed whether the previously described age-dependent racial disparities after all-cause trauma persist in the vascular trauma population. Vascular trauma patients were identified from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (January 2005 to December 2012) using International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Edition codes. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to compare in-hospital mortality and amputation for blacks vs whites for younger (16-64 years) and older (≥65 years) age groups. Black patients (n = 937) were younger, more frequently male, without insurance, and suffered from more penetrating and nonaccidental injuries than white patients (n = 1486; P < .001). On univariable analysis, blacks had a significantly higher risk of death (odds ratio, [OR], 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.74) and a significantly lower risk of amputation (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.38-0.77), but these differences were not sustained after adjusting for baseline differences between groups. When stratified by age, there were significant racial disparities in mortality and amputation on univariable analysis. After risk adjustment, these differences persisted in the older group (mortality: OR, 5.95; 95% CI, 1.42-25.0; amputation: OR, 4.21; 95% CI, 1.28-13.6; P < .001) but not the younger group (mortality: OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.71-2.42; amputation: OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.58-1.46; P = not significant). Differences in survival and amputation after vascular trauma appear to be related to a higher prevalence of nonaccidental penetrating injuries in the younger black population. Race was the single greatest predictor of poor outcomes in the older population (P ≤ .008). Older black patients are nearly five-times more likely to experience death or amputation after vascular trauma

  3. Age-dependent morphological and compositional variations on Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumann, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Extended smooth plains cover the interior of a number of craters on Ceres. Smooth plains appear on different topographic levels associated with pits and flow-like features that overrun crater rims. The material forming these plains also ponds in depressions and smaller craters and cover the pre-existing surface creating distinct geological boundaries. Ikapati crater shows smooth plains on different topographic levels associated with pits and flow-like features that overrun crater rims. The material forming these plains, ponds in depressions and smaller craters and cover the pre-existing surface creating a distinct geological boundary. The interior of Occator also exhibits extended plains of ponded material, multiple flows originating from the center overwhelming the mass wasting deposits from the rim, dome-like features, vents cracks and fissures. Furthermore, crater densities on Occator's floor are lower than those on the ejecta blanket indicating a post-impact formation age of the flows. The flows to the northeast appear to originate from the central region and move slightly uphill. This indicates either a feeding zone that pushes the flows forward by supplying low-viscosity material or a depression of the crater center, possibly after discharging a subsurface reservoir. The plains and flows as well as some areas surrounding the craters appear spectrally blue. Both plains and flow material are characterized in camera and spectrometer visible spectra by a slightly negative slope with a gradual drop off up to 10% in reflectance from 0.5μm to 1μm. Although the spectral variations in the visible are subtle, they are clearly expressed in the color ratio composite. The crater densities of 20 locations across the surface of Ceres with different spectral behavior were analyzed in order to investigate the age dependence of spectral surface features. The results indicate that bluish material is mainly associated with the youngest impact craters on Ceres (< 0.5 Ga) while

  4. Age Dependent Absolute Plate and Plume Motion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaton, D. E.; Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    construct rapidly and represent a time period close to the inception age of the seamount, thus by proxy also the hotspot location. Here we present a new age dependent plate motion model that tests the 'fixed' and 'moving' hotspot hypotheses.

  5. Age-dependent change in urine proteome of healthy individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrokhotov, Igor; Liudmila Pastushkova, MRS.; Larina, Irina; Kononikhin, Alexey

    It was analyzed the protein composition of urine samples obtained from twenty Russian cosmonauts and thirty-eight healthy volunteers, that have been selected for the experiments simulating the physiological effects of microgravity. The special sample preparation was performed, followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of the minor proteins was performed on a nano-HPLC Agilent 1100 system (Agilent Technologies Inc., USA) in combination with a LTQ-FT Ultra mass spectrometer (Thermo Electron, Germany). List of masses derived peptides and they fragments have used for search and identification of proteins by database IPI-human (international index of protein) using the program Mascot (MS version 2.0.04 , UK) according to the following criteria: 1 - enzyme-trypsin; 2 - peptide tol. ± 5 ppm; 3 - MS / MS tol. 0.5Da. From list of proteins obtained as a result Mascot-search it was selected only those proteins that were identified based on 2 or more peptides with the rating more than 24. Analysis of the list of proteins was performed using software developed in the laboratory of VA Ivanisenko (ICG SB RAS) Age of healthy individuals was ranged from 18 to 54 years. Depending on the age, the data were divided into three groups: those relating to the group of persons under 25 years (youth and mature age 1), 25-40 years (mature age 2) and 40-54 years (mature age 3) It was detected reliable changes in the number of proteins among groups depending of the age. It was found that the minimum number of different proteins were detected in the urine of the group of young patients (under 25 years old) , and the maximum - was observed in the group of middle-aged persons (25 to 40 years). When the proteins were compared according to their molecular mass it was revealed that in the older group (40-54 years ) there is noticeably smaller percentage of high molecular weight proteins than in groups of young and middle aged persons. Thus

  6. The important role of lipid peroxidation processes in aging and age dependent diseases.

    PubMed

    Spiteller, Gerhard

    2007-09-01

    Any change in the cell membrane structure activates lipoxygenases (LOX). LOX transform polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to lipidhydroperoxide molecules (LOOHs). When cells are severely wounded, this physiological process switches to a non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) process producing LOO* radicals. These oxidize nearly all-biological molecules such as lipids, sugars, and proteins. The LOO* induced degradations proceed by transfer of the radicals from cell to cell like an infection. The chemical reactions induced by LO* and LOO* radicals seem to be responsible for aging and induction of age dependent diseases.Alternatively, LO* and LOO* radicals are generated by frying of fats and involve cholesterol-PUFA esters and thus induce atherogenesis. Plants and algae are exposed to LOO* radicals generating radiation. In order to remove LOO* radicals, plants and algae transform PUFAs to furan fatty acids, which are incorporated after consumption of vegetables into mammalian tissues where they act as excellent scavengers of LOO* and LO* radicals.

  7. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-12-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥ 200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 week) compared to both immature (4 week) and old (70 week) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Age-dependent differential expression profile of a novel intergenic long noncoding RNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kour, Sukhleen; Rath, Pramod C

    2015-11-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are ≥200 nt long, abundant class of non-protein coding RNAs that are transcribed in complex, sense- and antisense patterns from the intergenic and intronic regions of mammalian genome. Mammalian central nervous system constitutes the largest repertoire of noncoding transcripts that are known to be expressed in developmentally regulated and cell-type specific manners. Although many lncRNAs, functioning in the brain development and diseases are known, none involved in brain aging has been reported so far. Here, we report involvement of a novel, repeat sequence (simple repeats and SINES)-containing, trans-spliced, long intergenic non-protein coding RNA (lincRNA), named as LINC-RBE (rat brain expressed transcript) involved in maturation and aging of mammalian brain. The LINC-RBE is strongly expressed in the rat brain and the upstream/downstream sequences of its DNA in the chromosome 5 contain binding sites for many cell growth, survival and development-specific transcriptional factors. Through RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization, LINC-RBE was found to be expressed in an age-dependent manner with significantly higher level of expression in the brain of adult (16 weeks) compared to both immature (4 weeks) and old (70 weeks) rats. Moreover, the expression pattern of the LINC-RBE showed distinct association with the specific neuro-anatomical regions, cell types and sub-cellular compartments of the rat brain in an age-related manner. Thus, its expression increased from immature stage to adulthood and declined further in old age. This is a first-time report of involvement of an intergenic repeat sequence-containing lncRNA in different regions of the rat brain in an age-dependent manner.

  9. Age-Dependent Effects of Haptoglobin Deletion in Neurobehavioral and Anatomical Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Glushakov, Alexander V.; Arias, Rodrigo A.; Tolosano, Emanuela; Doré, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhages are common features of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their presence is associated with chronic disabilities. Recent clinical and experimental evidence suggests that haptoglobin (Hp), an endogenous hemoglobin-binding protein most abundant in blood plasma, is involved in the intrinsic molecular defensive mechanism, though its role in TBI is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Hp deletion on the anatomical and behavioral outcomes in the controlled cortical impact model using wildtype (WT) C57BL/6 mice and genetically modified mice lacking the Hp gene (Hp−∕−) in two age cohorts [2–4 mo-old (young adult) and 7–8 mo-old (older adult)]. The data obtained suggest age-dependent significant effects on behavioral and anatomical TBI outcomes and recovery from injury. Moreover, in the adult cohort, neurological deficits in Hp−∕− mice at 24 h were significantly improved compared to WT, whereas there were no significant differences in brain pathology between these genotypes. In contrast, in the older adult cohort, Hp−∕− mice had significantly larger lesion volumes compared to WT, but neurological deficits were not significantly different. Immunohistochemistry for ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed significant differences in microglial and astrocytic reactivity between Hp−∕− and WT in selected brain regions of the adult but not the older adult-aged cohort. In conclusion, the data obtained in the study provide clarification on the age-dependent aspects of the intrinsic defensive mechanisms involving Hp that might be involved in complex pathways differentially affecting acute brain trauma outcomes. PMID:27486583

  10. Protective mechanisms of Cucumis sativus in diabetes-related modelsof oxidative stress and carbonyl stress

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Himan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Noubarani, Maryam; Rahmati, Mokhtar; Jafarian, Iman; Adiban, Hasan; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Oxidative stress and carbonyl stress have essential mediatory roles in the development of diabetes and its related complications through increasing free radicals production and impairing antioxidant defense systems. Different chemical and natural compounds have been suggested for decreasing such disorders associated with diabetes. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the protective effects of Cucumis sativus (C. sativus) fruit (cucumber) in oxidative and carbonyl stress models. These diabetes-related models with overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) simulate conditions observed in chronic hyperglycemia. Methods: Cytotoxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonyl stress model) were measured and the protective effects of C. sativus were evaluated using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Results: Aqueous extract of C. sativus fruit (40 μg/mL) prevented all cytotoxicity markers in both the oxidative and carbonyl stress models including cell lysis, ROS formation, membrane lipid peroxidation, depletion of glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential decline, lysosomal labialization, and proteolysis. The extract also protected hepatocytes from protein carbonylation induced by glyoxal. Our results indicated that C. sativus is able to prevent oxidative stress and carbonyl stress in the isolated hepatocytes. Conclusion: It can be concluded that C. sativus has protective effects in diabetes complications and can be considered a safe and suitable candidate for decreasing the oxidative stress and carbonyl stress that is typically observed in diabetes mellitus. PMID:27340622

  11. Protective mechanisms of Cucumis sativus in diabetes-related modelsof oxidative stress and carbonyl stress.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Himan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Noubarani, Maryam; Rahmati, Mokhtar; Jafarian, Iman; Adiban, Hasan; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and carbonyl stress have essential mediatory roles in the development of diabetes and its related complications through increasing free radicals production and impairing antioxidant defense systems. Different chemical and natural compounds have been suggested for decreasing such disorders associated with diabetes. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the protective effects of Cucumis sativus (C. sativus) fruit (cucumber) in oxidative and carbonyl stress models. These diabetes-related models with overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) simulate conditions observed in chronic hyperglycemia. Cytotoxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonyl stress model) were measured and the protective effects of C. sativus were evaluated using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Aqueous extract of C. sativus fruit (40 μg/mL) prevented all cytotoxicity markers in both the oxidative and carbonyl stress models including cell lysis, ROS formation, membrane lipid peroxidation, depletion of glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential decline, lysosomal labialization, and proteolysis. The extract also protected hepatocytes from protein carbonylation induced by glyoxal. Our results indicated that C. sativus is able to prevent oxidative stress and carbonyl stress in the isolated hepatocytes. It can be concluded that C. sativus has protective effects in diabetes complications and can be considered a safe and suitable candidate for decreasing the oxidative stress and carbonyl stress that is typically observed in diabetes mellitus.

  12. Loss of TDP-43 causes age-dependent progressive motor neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Yohei; Katsuno, Masahisa; Niwa, Jun-ichi; Takagi, Shinnosuke; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Ikenaka, Kensuke; Kawai, Kaori; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Yamanaka, Koji; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Misawa, Hidemi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2013-05-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a devastating, progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects upper and lower motor neurons. Although several genes are identified as the cause of familial cases, the pathogeneses of sporadic forms, which account for 90% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, have not been elucidated. Transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 a nuclear protein regulating RNA processing, redistributes to the cytoplasm and forms aggregates, which are the histopathological hallmark of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, in affected motor neurons, suggesting that loss-of-function of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 is one of the causes of the neurodegeneration. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of knockout of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 in mouse postnatal motor neurons using Cre/loxp system. These mice developed progressive weight loss and motor impairment around the age of 60 weeks, and exhibited degeneration of large motor axon, grouped atrophy of the skeletal muscle, and denervation in the neuromuscular junction. The spinal motor neurons lacking transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 were not affected for 1 year, but exhibited atrophy at the age of 100 weeks; whereas, extraocular motor neurons, that are essentially resistant in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, remained preserved even at the age of 100 weeks. Additionally, ultra structural analysis revealed autolysosomes and autophagosomes in the cell bodies and axons of motor neurons of the 100-week-old knockout mice. In summary, the mice in which transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 was knocked-out specifically in postnatal motor neurons exhibited an age-dependent progressive motor dysfunction accompanied by neuropathological alterations, which are common to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. These findings suggest that transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 plays an essential role in the long term maintenance of motor neurons and

  13. Mutant TDP-43 and FUS Cause Age-Dependent Paralysis and Neurodegeneration in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Alexandra; Tauffenberger, Arnaud; Aggad, Dina; Rouleau, Guy; Drapeau, Pierre; Parker, J. Alex

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the DNA/RNA binding proteins TDP-43 and FUS are associated with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration. Intracellular accumulations of wild type TDP-43 and FUS are observed in a growing number of late-onset diseases suggesting that TDP-43 and FUS proteinopathies may contribute to multiple neurodegenerative diseases. To better understand the mechanisms of TDP-43 and FUS toxicity we have created transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains that express full-length, untagged human TDP-43 and FUS in the worm's GABAergic motor neurons. Transgenic worms expressing mutant TDP-43 and FUS display adult-onset, age-dependent loss of motility, progressive paralysis and neuronal degeneration that is distinct from wild type alleles. Additionally, mutant TDP-43 and FUS proteins are highly insoluble while wild type proteins remain soluble suggesting that protein misfolding may contribute to toxicity. Populations of mutant TDP-43 and FUS transgenics grown on solid media become paralyzed over 7 to 12 days. We have developed a liquid culture assay where the paralysis phenotype evolves over several hours. We introduce C. elegans transgenics for mutant TDP-43 and FUS motor neuron toxicity that may be used for rapid genetic and pharmacological suppressor screening. PMID:22363618

  14. Age-Dependent Human Hepatic Carboxylesterase 1 (Ces1) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human hepatic carboxylesterase 1 and 2 (CES1 and CES2) are important for ester- and amide- bond containing pharmaceutical and environmental chemical disposition. Despite concern regarding juvenile sensitivity to such compounds, CES1 and CES2 ontogeny has not been well characterized. To define human hepatic microsomal and cytosolic CES1 and CES2 expression during early postnatal life, microsomal and cytosolic fractions were prepared using liver samples from subjects without liver disease [N=165, 1d-18 yrs]. Proteins were fractionated, detected and quantitated by western blotting. Median microsomal CES1 was lower among samples from subjects < 3 weeks of age (N=36) compared to the rest of the population (N=126; 6.27 vs 17.5 pmoles/mg microsomal protein, respectively; p<0.001; Kruskal Wallis test). Cytosolic CES1 increased sequentially with expression being lowest among samples from individuals between birth and 3 weeks of age (N=36), markedly greater among those from ages 3 weeks to 6 years (N=90), and then modestly greater still among those over 6 years of age (N=36; median values = 4.7, 15.8, and 16.6 pmoles/mg cytosolic protein, respectively; p values <0.001 and 0.05, respectively, Kruskal Wallis test). Microsomal CES2 also increased sequentially across the same three age groups with median values of 1.8, 2.9, and 4.2 pmoles/mg microsomal protein, respectively (p<0.001, both), whereas for cytosolic CES2, only the youngest age group differed from the two older g

  15. [Metabolic memory enhances hormesis effect to the copper ions in age-depended manner].

    PubMed

    Bozhkov, A I; Sidorov, V I; Kurguzova, N I; Dlubovskaia, V L

    2014-01-01

    The ability of young and old rats to manifest the hormesis effect to lethal doses of copper sulphate and the ability to save the induced "adaptive" pattern of redistribution of copper ions after the transfer of animals in the standard conditions is the mechanism of metabolic memory. It was found that pretreatment of animals with low-dose (1 mg per 100 g body mass, i.e. 33% of the lethal dose) of copper sulfate induced the formation of their resistance to lethal doses (3 mg per 100 g), so the hormesis effect was manifested. Hormesis effect depended on the number of pre injections of small doses of copper sulphate in an S-shaped manner. The protective effect increased after 1 to 3 of preliminary injections of copper sulfate, and after four or more injections the hormesis effect decreased. It is shown that the cardinal role in intracellular pattern of copper ion redistribution play heat-stable copper binding proteins 12 kDa cytosolic proteins. The formed "adaptive" pattern of intracellular distribution of the copper ions may be reproduced, after at least, one month. The prolonged hormesis effect can be attributed to the forming metabolic memory. The intracellular distribution pattern of the copper ions was age-dependent. Age-related differences were found in hormesis effect induced by copper ions, which results in increased binding capacity of copper binding proteins in old animals, with a higher content of copper ions in the mitochondria and microsomes as compared to young animals.

  16. Age-dependent loss of MMP-3 in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harten, Ingrid A; Zahr, Rima S; Lemire, Joan M; Machan, Jason T; Moses, Marsha A; Doiron, Robert J; Curatolo, Adam S; Rothman, Frank G; Wight, Thomas N; Toole, Bryan P; Gordon, Leslie B

    2011-11-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare, progressive segmental premature aging disease that includes scleroderma-like skin, progressive joint contracture, and atherosclerosis. Affected individuals die prematurely of heart attacks or strokes. Extracellular matrix dysregulation is implicated as a factor in disease progression. We analyzed messenger RNA and protein levels for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2,-3, and -9 in HGPS primary human dermal fibroblasts using real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gelatin zymography. MMP-3 messenger RNA and protein levels decreased significantly with increasing donor age in HGPS fibroblasts but not in controls. MMP-2 messenger RNA also showed a donor age-dependent decrease in HGPS fibroblasts, but levels of secreted protein were unchanged. MMP-9 was similar in HGPS and control cultures. The decreased MMP-3 may represent a shift in the inherent extracellular matrix-degrading proteolytic balance in favor of matrix deposition in HGPS. This metalloproteinase has the potential to serve as a biomarker of therapeutic efficacy when assessing treatments for HGPS.

  17. Evolution of male life histories and age-dependent sexual signals under female choice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sexual selection theory models evolution of sexual signals and preferences using simple life histories. However, life-history models predict that males benefit from increasing sexual investment approaching old age, producing age-dependent sexual traits. Age-dependent traits require time and energy to grow, and will not fully mature before individuals enter mating competition. Early evolutionary stages pose several problems for these traits. Age-dependent traits suffer from strong viability selection and gain little benefit from mate choice when rare. Few males will grow large traits, and they will rarely encounter choosy females. The evolutionary origins of age-dependent traits therefore remain unclear. I used numerical simulations to analyze evolution of preferences, condition (viability) and traits in an age-structured population. Traits in the model depended on age and condition (“good genes”) in a population with no genetic drift. I asked (1) if age-dependent indicator traits and their preferences can originate depending on the strength of selection and the size of the trait; (2) which mode of development (age-dependent versus age-independent) eventually predominates when both modes occur in the population; and (3) if age-independent traits can invade a population with age-dependent traits. Age-dependent traits evolve under weaker selection and at smaller sizes than age-independent traits. This result held in isolation and when the types co-occur. Evolution of age-independent traits depends only on trait size, whereas evolution of age-dependent traits depends on both strength of selection and growth rate. Invasion of age-independence into populations with established traits followed a similar pattern with age-dependence predominating at small trait sizes. I suggest that reduced adult mortality facilitates sexual selection by favoring the evolution of age-dependent sexual signals under weak selection. PMID:24392289

  18. Proteomic evaluation of myofibrillar carbonylation in chilled fish mince and its inhibition by catechin.

    PubMed

    Pazos, Manuel; Maestre, Rodrigo; Gallardo, José M; Medina, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the susceptibility of individual myofibrillar proteins from mackerel (Scomber scombrus) mince to undergo carbonylation reactions during chilled storage, and the antioxidant capacity of (+)-catechin to prevent oxidative processes of proteins. The carbonylation of each particular protein was quantified by combining the labelling of protein carbonyls by fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide (FTSC) with 1-D or 2-D gel electrophoresis. Alpha skeletal actin, glycogen phosphorylase, unnamed protein product (UNP) similar to enolase, pyruvate kinase, isoforms of creatine kinase, aldolase A and an isoform of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) showed elevated oxidation in chilled non-supplemented mince. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not carbonylated in chilled muscle, but an extensive MHC degradation was observed in those samples. The supplementation of catechin reduced protein oxidation and lipid oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner: control>25>100≈200ppm. Therefore, the highest catechin concentrations (100 and 200ppm) exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity. Catechin (200ppm) reduced significantly carbonylation of protein spots identified as glycogen phosphorylase, pyruvate kinase muscle isozyme, isoforms of creatine kinase. Conversely, catechin was ineffective to inhibit the oxidation of actin and UNP similar to enolase. These results draw attention to the inefficiency of catechin to prevent actin oxidation, in contrast to the extremely high efficiency of catechin in inhibiting oxidation of lipids and other proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evolving tip structures can explain age-dependent microtubule catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Coombes, Courtney E; Yamamoto, Ami; Kenzie, Madeline R; Odde, David J; Gardner, Melissa K

    2013-07-22

    Microtubules are key structural and transport elements in cells. The dynamics at microtubule ends are characterized by periods of slow growth, followed by stochastic switching events termed "catastrophes," in which microtubules suddenly undergo rapid shortening. Growing microtubules are thought to be protected from catastrophe by a GTP-tubulin "cap": GTP-tubulin subunits add to the tips of growing microtubules but are subsequently hydrolyzed to GDP-tubulin subunits once they are incorporated into the microtubule lattice. Loss of the GTP-tubulin cap exposes GDP-tubulin subunits at the microtubule tip, resulting in a catastrophe event. However, the mechanistic basis for sudden loss of the GTP cap, leading to catastrophe, is not known. To investigate microtubule catastrophe events, we performed 3D mechanochemical simulations that account for interactions between neighboring protofilaments. We found that there are two separate factors that contribute to catastrophe events in the 3D simulation: the GTP-tubulin cap size, which settles into a steady-state value that depends on the free tubulin concentration during microtubule growth, and the structure of the microtubule tip. Importantly, 3D simulations predict, and both fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments confirm, that microtubule tips become more tapered as the microtubule grows. This effect destabilizes the tip and ultimately contributes to microtubule catastrophe. Thus, the likelihood of a catastrophe event may be intimately linked to the aging physical structure of the growing microtubule tip. These results have important consequences for catastrophe regulation in cells, as microtubule-associated proteins could promote catastrophe events in part by modifying microtubule tip structures.

  20. Age-dependence of malonate-induced striatal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, A; Page, K J; Everitt, B J; Dunnett, S B

    2000-10-01

    Malonate is an inhibitor of cellular metabolism, which, following intrastriatal injection, induces a striatal pathology similar to that seen in Huntington's disease. In two parallel studies, we have investigated the suggested relationship between the neuronal vulnerability to metabolic toxicity and the decline in metabolic function with increasing age. The first experiment investigated malonate-induced neuronal loss in animals aged from 6 weeks up to 27 months, and the second assessed the activities of two mitochondrial enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase (CYTOX) in animals aged 6 weeks, 3, 8 and 18 months. In the first study, male Lister-Hooded rats received intrastriatal stereotaxic injections of malonate (0.5 or 1.0 M). Animals were killed 10 days after surgery, and the brains were stained with cresyl violet and processed for NADPH-diaphorase activity and glial fibrillary-acidic-protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry. Animals aged 6 months and older exhibited over 60% striatal neuronal loss. However, the degree of neuronal loss did not show any age-related increase in rats between 6 and 27 months of age, indicating that the extent of malonate-induced toxicity does not increase with age in animals older than 6 months. Infusion of 0.5 M malonate produced smaller lesions, which also demonstrated a consistent extent of neuronal loss from 6 months onwards. Metabolic enzyme activities were decreased in the striatum with increasing age, although this effect was only significant for CYTOX activity. Thus, the pattern of malonate-induced neuronal loss in aged animals partially reflects the changes in metabolic activity during ageing.

  1. Towards an Analytical Age-Dependent Model of Contrast Sensitivity Functions for an Ageing Society

    PubMed Central

    Joulan, Karine; Brémond, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF) describes how the visibility of a grating depends on the stimulus spatial frequency. Many published CSF data have demonstrated that contrast sensitivity declines with age. However, an age-dependent analytical model of the CSF is not available to date. In this paper, we propose such an analytical CSF model based on visual mechanisms, taking into account the age factor. To this end, we have extended an existing model from Barten (1999), taking into account the dependencies of this model's optical and physiological parameters on age. Age-dependent models of the cones and ganglion cells densities, the optical and neural MTF, and optical and neural noise are proposed, based on published data. The proposed age-dependent CSF is finally tested against available experimental data, with fair results. Such an age-dependent model may be beneficial when designing real-time age-dependent image coding and display applications. PMID:26078994

  2. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  3. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina.

    PubMed

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  4. Age-Dependent Changes of Monocarboxylate Transporter 8 Availability in the Postnatal Murine Retina

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Yoshiyuki; Szafranski, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (TH) triiodothyronine (T3) and its prohormone thyroxine (T4) are crucial for retinal development and function, and increasing evidence points at TH dysregulation as a cause for retinal degenerative diseases. Thus, precise regulation of retinal TH supply is required for proper retinal function, but knowledge on these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Several transmembrane transporters have been described as key regulators of TH availability in target tissues of which the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a high affinity transporter for T4 and T3, plays an essential role in the central nervous system. Moreover, in the embryonic chicken retina, MCT8 is highly expressed, but the postnatal availability of MCT8 in the mammalian retina was not reported to date. In the present study, spatiotemporal retinal MCT8 availability was examined in mice of different age. For this purpose, we quantified expression levels of Mct8 via Real-Time Reverse-Transcriptase PCR in mouse eyecups (C57BL/6) of juvenile and adult age groups. Additionally, age-dependent MCT8 protein levels were quantified via Western blotting and localized via immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. While no difference in Mct8 expression levels could be detected between age groups, MCT8 protein levels in juvenile animals were about two times higher than in adult animals based on Western blot analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that MCT8 immunoreactivity in the eyecup was restricted to the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium. In juvenile mice, MCT8 was broadly observed along the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium, tightly surrounding photoreceptor outer segments. Distinct immunopositive staining was also detected in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. However, in adult specimens, immunoreactivity visibly declined in all layers, which was in line with Western blot analyses. Since MCT8 was abundantly present in juvenile and about twofold lower in

  5. TEAD-1 Overexpression in the Mouse Heart Promotes an Age-dependent Heart Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Tsika, Richard W.; Ma, Lixin; Kehat, Izhak; Schramm, Christine; Simmer, Gretchen; Morgan, Brandon; Fine, Deborah M.; Hanft, Laurin M.; McDonald, Kerry S.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Krenz, Maike; Yang, Steve; Ji, Juan

    2010-01-01

    TEA domain transcription factor-1 (TEAD-1) is essential for proper heart development and is implicated in cardiac specific gene expression and the hypertrophic response of primary cardiomyocytes to hormonal and mechanical stimuli, and its activity increases in the pressure-overloaded hypertrophied rat heart. To investigate whether TEAD-1 is an in vivo modulator of cardiac specific gene expression and hypertrophy, we developed transgenic mice expressing hemagglutinin-tagged TEAD-1 under the control of the muscle creatine kinase promoter. We show that a sustained increase in TEAD-1 protein leads to an age-dependent dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed decreases in cardiac output, stroke volume, ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. Isolated TEAD-1 hearts revealed decreased left ventricular power output that correlated with increased βMyHC protein. Histological analysis showed altered alignment of cardiomyocytes, septal wall thickening, and fibrosis, although electrocardiography displayed a left axis shift of mean electrical axis. Transcripts representing most members of the fetal heart gene program remained elevated from fetal to adult life. Western blot analyses revealed decreases in p-phospholamban, SERCA2a, p-CX43, p-GSK-3α/β, nuclear β-catenin, GATA4, NFATc3/c4, and increased NCX1, nuclear DYKR1A, and Purα/β protein. TEAD-1 mice did not display cardiac hypertrophy. TEAD-1 mice do not tolerate stress as they die over a 4-day period after surgical induction of pressure overload. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that increased TEAD-1 can induce characteristics of cardiac remodeling associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:20194497

  6. TEAD-1 overexpression in the mouse heart promotes an age-dependent heart dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tsika, Richard W; Ma, Lixin; Kehat, Izhak; Schramm, Christine; Simmer, Gretchen; Morgan, Brandon; Fine, Deborah M; Hanft, Laurin M; McDonald, Kerry S; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Krenz, Maike; Yang, Steve; Ji, Juan

    2010-04-30

    TEA domain transcription factor-1 (TEAD-1) is essential for proper heart development and is implicated in cardiac specific gene expression and the hypertrophic response of primary cardiomyocytes to hormonal and mechanical stimuli, and its activity increases in the pressure-overloaded hypertrophied rat heart. To investigate whether TEAD-1 is an in vivo modulator of cardiac specific gene expression and hypertrophy, we developed transgenic mice expressing hemagglutinin-tagged TEAD-1 under the control of the muscle creatine kinase promoter. We show that a sustained increase in TEAD-1 protein leads to an age-dependent dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed decreases in cardiac output, stroke volume, ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. Isolated TEAD-1 hearts revealed decreased left ventricular power output that correlated with increased betaMyHC protein. Histological analysis showed altered alignment of cardiomyocytes, septal wall thickening, and fibrosis, although electrocardiography displayed a left axis shift of mean electrical axis. Transcripts representing most members of the fetal heart gene program remained elevated from fetal to adult life. Western blot analyses revealed decreases in p-phospholamban, SERCA2a, p-CX43, p-GSK-3alpha/beta, nuclear beta-catenin, GATA4, NFATc3/c4, and increased NCX1, nuclear DYKR1A, and Pur alpha/beta protein. TEAD-1 mice did not display cardiac hypertrophy. TEAD-1 mice do not tolerate stress as they die over a 4-day period after surgical induction of pressure overload. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that increased TEAD-1 can induce characteristics of cardiac remodeling associated with cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

  7. Age-dependent increase of clusterin in the human pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takaki; Zhu, Bao-Li; Li, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Dong; Michiue, Tomomi; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Clusterin is a glycoprotein known to play various physiological roles including complement activity, amyloid binding activity in Alzheimer disease, as well as binding with heat shock proteins and abnormal prions. The present study immunohistochemically investigated the expression of clusterin in the human pituitary gland in subjects of 10-88 years of age (n=173). Causes of death were blunt injury (n=35), sharp injury (n=15), poisoning (n=11), drowning (n=14), fire fatalities (n=28), asphyxiation (n=15), hypothermia (n=7), hyperthermia (n=3), and natural diseases (n=45). Clusterin was detected in mixed cell follicles and the anterior lobar parenchymal cells. The area occupied by cells positive for clusterin were measured, and the ratio to the whole area of the anterior lobe (% clusterin-positive cell area) was estimated. There was a good correlation between the age of the subjects in years and the % clusterin-positive cell area in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland (r=0.736, P<0.01). Relationships between % clusterin-positive cell and gender, cause of death, and survival time were insignificant. These findings indicate an age-dependent accumulation of clusterin in the pituitary gland, which may be related to the aging of endocrine systems.

  8. Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Lesions in Ulcerative Colitis and Associated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiqi; Li, Sai; Cao, Yu; Tian, Xuefei; Zeng, Rong; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been known as a pathogenic factor of ulcerative colitis (UC) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC), but the effects of secondary carbonyl lesions receive less emphasis. In inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion free radical (O2∙−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (HO∙), are produced at high levels and accumulated to cause oxidative stress (OS). In oxidative status, accumulated ROS can cause protein dysfunction and DNA damage, leading to gene mutations and cell death. Accumulated ROS could also act as chemical messengers to activate signaling pathways, such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK, to affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. More importantly, electrophilic carbonyl compounds produced by lipid peroxidation may function as secondary pathogenic factors, causing further protein and membrane lesions. This may in turn exaggerate oxidative stress, forming a vicious cycle. Electrophilic carbonyls could also cause DNA mutations and breaks, driving malignant progression of UC. The secondary lesions caused by carbonyl compounds may be exceptionally important in the case of host carbonyl defensive system deficit, such as aldo-keto reductase 1B10 deficiency. This review article updates the current understanding of oxidative stress and carbonyl lesions in the development and progression of UC and CAC. PMID:26823956

  9. 40 CFR 721.10409 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha. - [ [ [methyl - 3 - [ [ [ (polyfluoroalkyl)oxy]carbonyl ] amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... - carbonyl ] amino] phenyl]amino]carbonyl] - .omega. - methoxy - (generic). 721.10409 Section 721.10409... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha. - carbonyl ] amino] phenyl]amino]carbonyl] - .omega. - methoxy... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha.- carbonyl]amino]phenyl]amino]...

  10. Histone carbonylation occurs in proliferating cells.

    PubMed

    García-Giménez, José Luis; Ledesma, Ana María Velázquez; Esmoris, Isabel; Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Sanz, Pascual; Viña, José; Pallardó, Federico V

    2012-04-15

    Chromatin is a dynamic structure formed mainly by DNA and histones, and chemical modifications on these elements regulate its compaction. Histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) have a direct impact on chromatin conformation, controlling important cellular events such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Redox-related posttranslational modifications may have important effects on chromatin structure and function, offering a new intriguing area of research termed "redox epigenetics." Little is known about histone carbonylation, a PTM that may be related to modifications in the cellular redox environment. The aim of our study was to determine the carbonylation of the various histones during cell proliferation, a moment in cell life during which important redox changes take place. Here, we describe changes in histone carbonylation during cell proliferation in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. In addition, we have studied the variations of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and phospho-H2AX at the same time, because both modifications are related to DNA damage responses. High levels of carbonylation on specific histones (H1, H1(0), and H3.1 dimers) were found when cells were in an active phase of DNA synthesis. The modification decreased when nuclear proteasome activity was activated. However, these results did not correlate completely with poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and phospho-H2AX levels. Therefore, histone carbonylation may represent a specific event during cell proliferation. We describe a new methodology named oxy-2D-TAU Western blot that allowed us to separate and analyze the carbonylation patterns of the histone variants. In addition we offer a new role for histone carbonylation and its implication in redox epigenetics. Our results suggest that histone carbonylation is involved in histone detoxification during DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Photochemical Carbonylation of Ethane Under Supercritical Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitterwolf, Thomas E.; Klein, Dinara L.; Linehan, John C. ); Yonker, Clement R. ); Addleman, Raymond S. )

    2001-01-01

    The photochemical carbonylation of hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds[Eq. (1)] by rhodium catalysts of the general formula[Rh(CO)L2 Cl] (where L? PMe3 , PPh3 ) is well known,[1] and the mechanism of these reactions has been examined by several groups.[2] This reaction has been extended to liquid propane[3] and recently the carbonylation of benzene to benzaldehyde and benzyl alcohol in supercritical CO2 (scCO2 ), has been reported in the patent literature.[4

  12. Age-dependent regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondria by the thrombospondin-1 receptor CD47.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Elfaridah P; Isenberg, Jeff S; Shiva, Sruti; Zhao, Lei; Schlesinger, Paul; Dimitry, Julie; Abu-Asab, Mones S; Tsokos, Maria; Roberts, David D; Frazier, William A

    2011-03-01

    CD47, a receptor for thrombospondin-1, limits two important regulatory axes: nitric oxide-cGMP signaling and cAMP signaling, both of which can promote mitochondrial biogenesis. Electron microscopy revealed increased mitochondrial densities in skeletal muscle from both CD47 null and thrombospondin-1 null mice. We further assessed the mitochondria status of CD47-null vs WT mice. Quantitative RT-PCR of RNA extracted from tissues of 3 month old mice revealed dramatically elevated expression of mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins and PGC-1α in both fast and slow-twitch skeletal muscle from CD47-null mice, but modest to no elevation in other tissues. These observations were confirmed by Western blotting of mitochondrial proteins. Relative amounts of electron transport enzymes and ATP/O(2) ratios of isolated mitochondria were not different between mitochondria from CD47-null and WT cells. Young CD47-null mice displayed enhanced treadmill endurance relative to WTs and CD47-null gastrocnemius had undergone fiber type switching to a slow-twitch pattern of myoglobin and myosin heavy chain expression. In 12 month old mice, both skeletal muscle mitochondrial volume density and endurance had decreased to wild type levels. Expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms and myoglobin also reverted to a fast twitch pattern in gastrocnemius. Both CD47 and TSP1 null mice are leaner than WTs, use less oxygen and produce less heat than WT mice. CD47-null cells produce substantially less reactive oxygen species than WT cells. These data indicate that loss of signaling from the TSP1-CD47 system promotes accumulation of normally functioning mitochondria in a tissue-specific and age-dependent fashion leading to enhanced physical performance, lower reactive oxygen species production and more efficient metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Loss of FHL1 induces an age-dependent skeletal muscle myopathy associated with myofibrillar and intermyofibrillar disorganization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Domenighetti, Andrea A.; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Tongbin; Sheikh, Farah; Gokhin, David S.; Guo, Ling T.; Cui, Ziyou; Peter, Angela K.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; Gorham, Joshua M.; Li, Daniel Y.; Banerjee, Indroneal; Lai, Xianyin; Witzmann, Frank A.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Shelton, G. Diane; Lieber, Richard L.; Chen, Ju

    2014-01-01

    Recent human genetic studies have provided evidences that sporadic or inherited missense mutations in four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 1 (FHL1), resulting in alterations in FHL1 protein expression, are associated with rare congenital myopathies, including reducing body myopathy and Emery–Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. However, it remains to be clarified whether mutations in FHL1 cause skeletal muscle remodeling owing to gain- or loss of FHL1 function. In this study, we used FHL1-null mice lacking global FHL1 expression to evaluate loss-of-function effects on skeletal muscle homeostasis. Histological and functional analyses of soleus, tibialis anterior and sternohyoideus muscles demonstrated that FHL1-null mice develop an age-dependent myopathy associated with myofibrillar and intermyofibrillar (mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum) disorganization, impaired muscle oxidative capacity and increased autophagic activity. A longitudinal study established decreased survival rates in FHL1-null mice, associated with age-dependent impairment of muscle contractile function and a significantly lower exercise capacity. Analysis of primary myoblasts isolated from FHL1-null muscles demonstrated early muscle fiber differentiation and maturation defects, which could be rescued by re-expression of the FHL1A isoform, highlighting that FHL1A is necessary for proper muscle fiber differentiation and maturation in vitro. Overall, our data show that loss of FHL1 function leads to myopathy in vivo and suggest that loss of function of FHL1 may be one of the mechanisms underlying muscle dystrophy in patients with FHL1 mutations. PMID:23975679

  14. Cytoprotective Effects of Pumpkin (Cucurbita Moschata) Fruit Extract against Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Stress.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Reyhaneh; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Adiban, Hasan; Kardan, Azin; Keyhanfar, Fariborz; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic endocrine disorder that is associated with significant mortality and morbidity due to microvascular and macrovascular complications. Diabetes complications accompanied with oxidative stress and carbonyl stress in different organs of human body because of the increased generation of free radicals and impaired antioxidant defense systems. In the meantime, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) have key mediatory roles in the development and progression of diabetes complications. Therapeutic strategies have recently focused on preventing such diabetes-related abnormalities using different natural and chemical compounds. Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) is one of the most important vegetables in the world with a broad-range of pharmacological activities such as antihyperglycemic effect. Methods In the present study, the cytoprotective effects of aqueous extract of C. moschata fruit on hepatocyte cytotoxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonylation model) were investigated using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Results The extract of C. moschata (50 μg/ml) excellently prevented oxidative and carbonyl stress markers, including hepatocyte lysis, ROS production, lipid peroxidation, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, lysosomal damage, and cellular proteolysis. In addition, protein carbonylation was prevented by C. moschata in glyoxal-induced carbonyl stress. Conclusion It can be concluded that C. moschata has cytoprotective effects in oxidative stress and carbonyl stress models and this valuable vegetable can be considered as a suitable herbal product for the prevention of toxic subsequent of oxidative stress and carbonyl stress seen in chronic hyperglycemia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Formation of carbonyls during attack on insulin by submolar amounts of hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Handelman, G J; Nightingale, Z D; Dolnikowski, G G; Blumberg, J B

    1998-05-01

    Bovine insulin was reacted at pH 4.0 with submolar amounts of hypochlorite. At least one molecule of insulin was modified per two molecules of hypochlorite added, as estimated by HPLC of native and modified insulin. About 5% of the hypochlorite-modified insulin reacted with dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH), a reagent which specifically labels carbonyl groups. The major DNPH-labeled product was isolated from the native insulin on reverse-phase HPLC, using trifluoroacetic acid/water/acetonitrile gradients. The UV spectrum of the major peak on the HPLC diode-array detector was representative of DNPH adducts, with lambda max = 365 nm. Several methods, including total amino acid analysis, tryptic digestion, and collision-induced dissociation-electrospray MS, indicate that the major carbonyl in the DNPH-labeled product was on the amino-terminal phenylalanine of the insulin B-chain. Amino acid analysis indicated that tyrosine was also degraded by hypochlorite, but we could not detect a carbonyl group formed at tyrosine. These findings suggest that the terminal amino groups of proteins are highly vulnerable to carbonyl formation during hypochlorite attack. The use of relatively low amounts of active oxygen species (such as hypochlorite), followed by chromatographic isolation of the protein labeled with a carbonyl-specific reagent, can be a useful approach to the study of reactive sites on proteins.

  16. Proteomic and carbonylation profile analysis of rat skeletal muscles following acute swimming exercise.

    PubMed

    Magherini, Francesca; Gamberi, Tania; Pietrovito, Laura; Fiaschi, Tania; Bini, Luca; Esposito, Fabio; Marini, Marina; Abruzzo, Provvidenza Maria; Gulisano, Massimo; Modesti, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies by us and other groups characterized protein expression variation following long-term moderate training, whereas the effects of single bursts of exercise are less known. Making use of a proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of acute swimming exercise (ASE) on protein expression and carbonylation patterns in two hind limb muscles: the Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL) and the Soleus, mostly composed of fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibres, respectively. Carbonylation is one of the most common oxidative modifications of proteins and a marker of oxidative stress. In fact, several studies suggest that physical activity and the consequent increase in oxygen consumption can lead to increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) production, hence the interest in examining the impact of RONS on skeletal muscle proteins following ASE. Results indicate that protein expression is unaffected by ASE in both muscle types. Unexpectedly, the protein carbonylation level was reduced following ASE. In particular, the analysis found 31 and 5 spots, in Soleus and EDL muscles respectively, whose carbonylation is reduced after ASE. Lipid peroxidation levels in Soleus were markedly reduced as well. Most of the decarbonylated proteins are involved either in the regulation of muscle contractions or in the regulation of energy metabolism. A number of hypotheses may be advanced to account for such results, which will be addressed in future studies.

  17. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a “standard” model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors. PMID:26030468

  18. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival.

    PubMed

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E

    2015-05-28

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a "standard" model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors.

  19. Age-Dependent Retinal Iron Accumulation and Degeneration in Hepcidin Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Song, Ying; Ponnuru, Padmavathi; Iacovelli, Jared; Hunter, Allan; Haddad, Nadine; Beard, John; Connor, James R.; Vaulont, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Iron dysregulation can cause retinal disease, yet retinal iron regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood. The peptide hormone hepcidin (Hepc) limits iron uptake from the intestine by triggering degradation of the iron transporter ferroportin (Fpn). Given that Hepc is expressed in the retina and Fpn is expressed in cells constituting the blood-retinal barrier, the authors tested whether the retina may produce Hepc to limit retinal iron import. Methods. Retinas of Hepc−/− mice were analyzed by histology, autofluorescence spectral analysis, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, Perls' iron stain, and immunofluorescence to assess iron-handling proteins. Retinal Hepc mRNA was evaluated through qPCR after intravitreal iron injection. Mechanisms of retinal Hepc upregulation were tested by Western blot analysis. A retinal capillary endothelial cell culture system was used to assess the effect of exogenous Hepc on Fpn. Results. Hepc−/− mice experienced age-dependent increases in retinal iron followed by retinal degeneration with autofluorescent RPE, photoreceptor death, and subretinal neovascularization. Hepc−/− mice had increased Fpn immunoreactivity in vascular endothelial cells. Conversely, in cultured retinal capillary endothelial cells, exogenous Hepc decreased both Fpn levels and iron transport. The retina can sense increased iron levels, upregulating Hepc after phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases. Conclusions. These findings indicate that Hepc is essential for retinal iron regulation. In the absence of Hepc, retinal degeneration occurs. Increases in Hepc mRNA levels after intravitreal iron injection combined with Hepc-mediated decreases in iron export from cultured retinal capillary endothelial cells suggest that the retina may use Hepc for its tissue-specific iron regulation. PMID:20811044

  20. Lactobacillus pentosus var. plantarum C29 ameliorates age-dependent memory impairment in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J-J; Woo, J-Y; Kim, K-A; Han, M J; Kim, D-H

    2015-04-01

    To understand the anti-inflammaging effect of lactic acid bacteria, we selected NF-κB activation-inhibitory Lactobacillus pentosus var. plantarum C29 and investigated its memory-enhancing and anti-inflammatory effects in aged Fischer 344 rats. C29 (2 × 10(9) CFU rat(-1) ), which was orally administered once a day (6 days per week) for 8 weeks, significantly restored age-reduced spontaneous alternation to 95.2% of that seen in young rats (P < 0.05). C29 treatment also shortened the escape latency on the 4th day to 53.8% of that seen in young rats (P < 0.05). Twenty hours after the last training session, C29 significantly increased the swimming time within the platform quadrant, which was shortened in the aged control rats. Oral administration of C29 restored age-reduced doublecortin (DCX) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) activation in aged rats. Treatment of aged rats with C29 suppressed the expression of p16, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, as well as the activation of Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that C29 ameliorates ageing-dependent memory impairment by inhibiting NF-κB signalling pathway, inducing DCX and BDNF expression and activating CREB. The anti-inflammatory Lactobacillus pentosus var. plantarum C29 had the memory-enhancing effect in aged Fischer 344 rats by restoring doublecortin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and suppressing p16 expression and NF-κB activation in the brain. Therefore, C29 may be useful in ameliorating age-related degenerative dementia. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Age-dependent cognitive decline in the APP23 model precedes amyloid deposition.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, Debby; D'Hooge, Rudi; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Van Ginneken, Chris; Van Meir, Frans; De Deyn, Peter P

    2003-01-01

    Heterozygous APP23 mice, expressing human amyloid-precursor protein with the Swedish double mutation and control littermates, were subjected to behavioral and neuromotor tasks at the age of 6-8 weeks, 3 and 6 months. A hidden-platform Morris-type water maze showed an age-dependent decline of spatial memory capacities in the APP23 model. From the age of 3 months onwards, the APP23 mice displayed major learning and memory deficits as demonstrated by severely impaired learning curves during acquisition and impaired probe trial performance. In addition to the cognitive deficit, APP23 mice displayed disturbed activity patterns. Overnight cage-activity recording showed hyperactivity in the transgenics for the three age groups tested. However, a short 2-h recording during dusk phase demonstrated lower activity levels in 6-month-old APP23 mice as compared to controls. Moreover, at this age, APP23 mice differed from control littermates in exploration and activity levels in the open-field paradigm. These findings are reminiscent of disturbances in circadian rhythms and activity observed in Alzheimer patients. Determination of plaque-associated human amyloid-beta 1-42 peptides in brain revealed a fivefold increase in heterozygous APP23 mice at 6 months as compared to younger transgenics. This increase coincided with the first appearance of plaques in hippocampus and neocortex. Spatial memory deficits preceded plaque formation and increase in plaque-associated amyloid-beta 1-42 peptides, but probe trial performance did correlate negatively with soluble amyloid-beta brain concentration in 3-month-old APP23 mutants. Detectable plaque formation is not the (only) causal factor contributing to memory defects in the APP23 model.

  2. Age-dependent changes of the antioxidant system in rat livers are accompanied by altered MAPK activation and a decline in motor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Burkhardt, Britta; Fischer, Luise; Beirow, Maja; Bork, Nadja; Wönne, Eva C.; Wagner, Cornelia; Husen, Bettina; Zeilinger, Katrin; Liu, Liegang; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decrease of cellular functions, because cells gradually lose their capacity to respond to injury. Increased oxidative stress is considered to be one of the major contributors to age-related changes in all organs including the liver. Our study has focused on elucidating whether important antioxidative enzymes, the mTOR pathway, and MAPKs exhibit age-dependent changes in the liver of rats during aging. We found an age-dependent increase of GSH in the cytosol and mitochondria. The aged liver showed an increased SOD enzyme activity, while the CAT enzyme activity decreased. HO-1 and NOS-2 gene expression was lower in adult rats, but up-regulated in aged rats. Western blot analysis revealed that SOD1, SOD2, GPx, GR, γ-GCL, and GSS were age-dependent up-regulated, while CAT remained constant. We also demonstrated that the phosphorylation of Akt, JNK, p38, and TSC2Ser1254 decreased while ERK1/2 and TSC2Thr1462 increased age-dependently. Furthermore, our data show that the mTOR pathway seems to be activated in livers of aged rats, and hence stimulating cell proliferation/regeneration, as confirmed by an age-dependent increase of PCNA and p-eIF4ESer209 protein expression. Our data may help to explain the fact that liver cells only proliferate in cases of necessity, like injury and damage. In summary, we have demonstrated that, age-dependent changes of the antioxidant system and stress-related signaling pathways occur in the livers of rats, which may help to better understand organ aging. PMID:27004051

  3. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jean-Francois; Peeters, Jozef; Stavrakou, Trisevgeni

    2014-05-01

    We show that photolysis is, by far, the major atmospheric sink of isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications, as carbonyl nitrates constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  4. Process and catalyst for carbonylating olefins

    DOEpatents

    Zoeller, J.R.

    1998-06-02

    Disclosed is an improved catalyst system and process for preparing aliphatic carbonyl compounds such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, alkyl esters of aliphatic carboxylic acids and anhydrides of aliphatic carboxylic acids by carbonylating olefins in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (1) a first component selected from at least one Group 6 metal, i.e., chromium, molybdenum, and/or tungsten and (2) a second component selected from at least one of certain halides and tertiary and quaternary compounds of a Group 15 element, i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus and/or arsenic, and (3) as a third component, a polar, aprotic solvent. The process employing the improved catalyst system is carried out under carbonylating conditions of pressure and temperature discussed herein. The process constitutes and improvement over known processes since it can be carried out at moderate carbonylation conditions without the necessity of using an expensive noble metal catalyst, volatile, toxic materials such as nickel tetracarbonyl, formic acid or a formate ester. Further, the addition of a polar, aprotic solvent to the catalyst system significantly increases, or accelerates, the rate at which the carbonylation takes place.

  5. Process and catalyst for carbonylating olefins

    DOEpatents

    Zoeller, Joseph Robert

    1998-06-02

    Disclosed is an improved catalyst system and process for preparing aliphatic carbonyl compounds such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, alkyl esters of aliphatic carboxylic acids and anhydrides of aliphatic carboxylic acids by carbonylating olefins in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (1) a first component selected from at least one Group 6 metal, i.e., chromium, molybdenum, and/or tungsten and (2) a second component selected from at least one of certain halides and tertiary and quaternary compounds of a Group 15 element, i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus and/or arsenic, and (3) as a third component, a polar, aprotic solvent. The process employing the improved catalyst system is carried out under carbonylating conditions of pressure and temperature discussed herein. The process constitutes and improvement over known processes since it can be carried out at moderate carbonylation conditions without the necessity of using an expensive noble metal catalyst, volatile, toxic materials such as nickel tetracarbonyl, formic acid or a formate ester. Further, the addition of a polar, aprotic solvent to the catalyst system significantly increases, or accelerates, the rate at which the carbonylation takes place.

  6. Age-dependence of lipid parameters in the general population and vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Richter, V; Rassoul, F; Hentschel, B; Kothe, K; Krobara, M; Unger, R; Purschwitz, K; Rotzsch, W; Thiery, J; Muradian, K

    2004-06-01

    Age-dependent changes of lipid metabolism may arise both as a result of mechanisms of biological ageing and factors influencing age-dependent changes. To study possible influences of nutrition and life-style of vegetarians on age-dependence of lipid parameters, subjects of general population were compared with vegetarians. In the frame of population-based lipid screening projects in the city of Leipzig/Germany (Lipid Study Leipzig, LSL) 10 550 subjects (3,816 men and 6,734 women, age 18-99 years) of general population were compared with 417 vegetarians (vegans, lacto-vegetarians, lacto-ovo-vegetarians, 148 men and 269 women, age 18-93 years). Most of the vegetarians included in the study were members of the German Society of Vegetarians. The study program included capillary blood cholesterol measurements and the determination of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, the measurement of other cardiovascular risk factors and the evaluation of dietary and life-style factors. Evaluation of cardiovascular risk profile within LSL was connected with individual consultation. The mean total cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol level and the total: HDL-cholesterol ratio showed the expected age-dependence, with maximum values within the decade 60-70 years. Vegetarians showed lower total and non-HDL-cholesterol levels in comparison with the general population. Furthermore, the age-dependent increase of these parameters is less pronounced under the conditions of vegetarian nutrition and life-style. Especially in young adulthood a significant difference is observed. Thus, the results of the present study reveal the role of nutritional and life-style factors that determine the lipid profile on a population basis and suggest that the known age-dependent rise of the level of atherogenic plasma lipoproteins is partly preventable.

  7. Finding Uncertainties that Cause the Age Dependence of Dose Limits to Be Immature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation permissible exposure limits (PEL) are intended to set acceptable levels of cancer risks, and avoid any clinical significant non-cancer effects. The 1989 recommendation of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) recommended a strong age dependence of dose limits that departed drastically from the then mature 1970 dose limits recommendations from the National Academy of Science, which were independent of age. In 2000, the NCRP recommended revised limits that showed a similar trend of risk with age to the 1989 report. In this model, the cancer risk per Sv varies by more than 2-fold for ages between 30- and 50-yr. Therefore for galactic cosmic rays exposure, astronaut age has a larger influence on risk then radiation shielding mass or material composition, vehicle propulsion method, or position in the solar cycle. For considering the control of mission costs and resources, the possibility of using astronaut age as a trade variable in mission design could be considered. However, the uncertainties in describing the age dependence on risk have not been fully explored. We discuss biological factors that influence the age dependence of radiation risks, including susceptibility, expression and latency, and radiation quality. These factors depend not only on the individual s age, but also their genetic sensitivity and interaction with other environmental factors. Epidemiological data is limited in describing the age dependence on risk. The 2005, BEIR VII report recommends an age dependence for cancer risk attributable solely to the life-table disagreeing strongly with the NCRP model. However, BEIR VII also noted the limited power of human data for concomitantly describing both age and age after exposure dependences of cancer risks. Many experimental studies have shown that high LET radiation (e.g., high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and neutrons) display reduced latency compared to low LET radiation, suggesting distinct biological

  8. Age-dependent arginine phosphokinase activity changes in male vestigial and wild-type Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Baker, G T

    1975-01-01

    The activity of arginine phosphokinase, an important muscle enzyme in insects, was investigated with age in vestigial-winged and wild-type Drosophila melanogaster. Identical patterns of age-dependent activity changes were observed in the vestigial-winged flies as in the wild-type, even though vestigial-winged flies exhibit a 50% mortality approximately two thirds that of the wild-type as well as being incapable of flight. Results indicate that the age-dependent changes in arginine phosphokinase activity are intrinsically regulated within the cells of the flight muscle.

  9. Finding Uncertainties that Cause the Age Dependence of Dose Limits to Be Immature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Space radiation permissible exposure limits (PEL) are intended to set acceptable levels of cancer risks, and avoid any clinical significant non-cancer effects. The 1989 recommendation of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) recommended a strong age dependence of dose limits that departed drastically from the then mature 1970 dose limits recommendations from the National Academy of Science, which were independent of age. In 2000, the NCRP recommended revised limits that showed a similar trend of risk with age to the 1989 report. In this model, the cancer risk per Sv varies by more than 2-fold for ages between 30- and 50-yr. Therefore for galactic cosmic rays exposure, astronaut age has a larger influence on risk then radiation shielding mass or material composition, vehicle propulsion method, or position in the solar cycle. For considering the control of mission costs and resources, the possibility of using astronaut age as a trade variable in mission design could be considered. However, the uncertainties in describing the age dependence on risk have not been fully explored. We discuss biological factors that influence the age dependence of radiation risks, including susceptibility, expression and latency, and radiation quality. These factors depend not only on the individual s age, but also their genetic sensitivity and interaction with other environmental factors. Epidemiological data is limited in describing the age dependence on risk. The 2005, BEIR VII report recommends an age dependence for cancer risk attributable solely to the life-table disagreeing strongly with the NCRP model. However, BEIR VII also noted the limited power of human data for concomitantly describing both age and age after exposure dependences of cancer risks. Many experimental studies have shown that high LET radiation (e.g., high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and neutrons) display reduced latency compared to low LET radiation, suggesting distinct biological

  10. Carbonyl compounds indoors in a changing climate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Formic acid, acetic acid and formaldehyde are important compounds in the indoor environment because of the potential for these acids to degrade calcareous materials (shells, eggs, tiles and geological specimens), paper and corrode or tarnish metals, especially copper and lead. Carbonyl sulfide tarnishes both silver and copper encouraging the formation of surface sulfides. Results Carbonyls are evolved more quickly at higher temperatures likely in the Cartoon Gallery at Knole, an important historic house near Sevenoaks in Kent, England where the study is focused. There is a potential for higher concentrations to accumulate. However, it may well be that in warmer climates they will be depleted more rapidly if ventilation increases. Conclusions Carbonyls are likely to have a greater impact in the future. PMID:22439648

  11. Age-dependent gait abnormalities in mice lacking the Rnf170 gene linked to human autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Kook Hwan; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Chanki; Kim, Jeongjin; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Myung-Shik; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-12-20

    Really interesting new gene (RING) finger protein 170 (RNF170) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase known to mediate ubiquitination-dependent degradation of type-I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (ITPR1). It has recently been demonstrated that a point mutation of RNF170 gene is linked with autosomal-dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), which is characterized by an age-dependent increase of walking abnormalities, a rare genetic disorder reported in only two families. Although this mutant allele is known to be dominant, the functional identity thereof has not been clearly established. Here, we generated mice lacking Rnf170 (Rnf170(-/-)) to evaluate the effect of its loss of function in vivo. Remarkably, Rnf170(-/-) mice began to develop gait abnormalities in old age (12 months) in the form of asynchronous stepping between diagonal limb pairs with a fixed step sequence during locomotion, while age-matched wild-type mice showed stable gait patterns using several step sequence repertoires. As reported in ADSA patients, they also showed a reduced sensitivity for proprioception and thermal nociception. Protein blot analysis revealed that the amount of Itpr1 protein was significantly elevated in the cerebellum and spinal cord but intact in the cerebral cortex in Rnf170(-/-) mice. These results suggest that the loss of Rnf170 gene function mediates ADSA-associated phenotypes and this gives insights on the cure of patients with ADSA and other age-dependent walking abnormalities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Paradise Lost: Age-Dependent Mortality of American Communes, 1609-1965

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitts, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Theorists agree that the risk of folding changes as organizations age, but there is little consensus as to the general form or generative processes of age-dependent mortality. This article investigates four such processes (maturation, senescence, legitimation and obsolescence), which have been taken as competing accounts. Using two analytical…

  13. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  14. Age-dependent modulation of the somatosensory network upon eye closure.

    PubMed

    Brodoehl, Stefan; Klingner, Carsten; Witte, Otto W

    2016-02-01

    Eye closure even in complete darkness can improve somatosensory perception by switching the brain to a uni-sensory processing mode. This causes an increased information flow between the thalamus and the somatosensory cortex while decreasing modulation by the visual cortex. Previous work suggests that these modulations are age-dependent and that the benefit in somatosensory performance due to eye closing diminishes with age. The cause of this age-dependency and to what extent somatosensory processing is involved remains unclear. Therefore, we intended to characterize the underlying age-dependent modifications in the interaction and connectivity of different sensory networks caused by eye closure. We performed functional MR-imaging with tactile stimulation of the right hand under the conditions of opened and closed eyes in healthy young and elderly participants. Conditional Granger causality analysis was performed to assess the somatosensory and visual networks, including the thalamus. Independent of age, eye closure improved the information transfer from the thalamus to and within the somatosensory cortex. However, beyond that, we found an age-dependent recruitment strategy. Whereas young participants were characterized by an optimized information flow within the relays of the somatosensory network, elderly participants revealed a stronger modulatory influence of the visual network upon the somatosensory cortex. Our results demonstrate that the modulation of the somatosensory and visual networks by eye closure diminishes with age and that the dominance of the visual system is more pronounced in the aging brain.

  15. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  16. Age-dependent changes in ecosystem carbon fluxes in managed forests in Northern Wisconsin, USA

    Treesearch

    Asko Noormets; Jiquan Chen; Thomas R. Crow

    2007-01-01

    The age-dependent variability of ecosystem carbon (C) fluxes was assessed by measuring the net ecosystem exchange of C (NEE) in five managed forest stands in northern Wisconsin, USA. The study sites ranged in age from 3-year-old clearcut to mature stands (65 years). All stands, except the clearcut, accumulated C over the study period from May to October 2002. Seasonal...

  17. Age-dependent changes in the neural substrates of empathy in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Greimel, Ellen; Piefke, Martina; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Remschmidt, Helmut; Fink, Gereon R.; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    In typical development, empathic abilities continue to refine during adolescence and early adulthood. Children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) show deficits in empathy, whereas adults with ASD may have developed compensatory strategies. We aimed at comparing developmental trajectories in the neural mechanisms underlying empathy in individuals with ASD and typically developing control (TDC) subjects. Using an explicit empathizing paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging, 27 participants with ASD and 27 TDC aged 12–31 years were investigated. Participants were asked to empathize with emotional faces and to either infer the face’s emotional state (other-task) or to judge their own emotional response (self-task). Differential age-dependent changes were evident during the self-task in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, right medial prefrontal cortex, right inferior parietal cortex, right anterior insula and occipital cortex. Age-dependent decreases in neural activation in TDC were paralleled by either increasing or unchanged age-dependent activation in ASD. These data suggest ASD-associated deviations in the developmental trajectories of self-related processing during empathizing. In TDC, age-dependent modulations of brain areas may reflect the ‘fine-tuning’ of cortical networks by reduction of task-unspecific brain activity. Increased age-related activation in individuals with ASD may indicate the development of compensatory mechanisms. PMID:23784073

  18. Paradise Lost: Age-Dependent Mortality of American Communes, 1609-1965

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitts, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Theorists agree that the risk of folding changes as organizations age, but there is little consensus as to the general form or generative processes of age-dependent mortality. This article investigates four such processes (maturation, senescence, legitimation and obsolescence), which have been taken as competing accounts. Using two analytical…

  19. Intrinsic Age-Dependent Changes and Cell-Cell Contacts Regulate Nephron Progenitor Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Salomonis, Nathan; Aronow, Bruce J; Hong, Christian I; Zhang, Tongli; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-10-12

    During fetal development, nephrons of the metanephric kidney form from a mesenchymal progenitor population that differentiates en masse before or shortly after birth. We explored intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling progenitor lifespan in a transplantation assay that allowed us to compare engraftment of old and young progenitors into the same young niche. The progenitors displayed an age-dependent decrease in proliferation and concomitant increase in niche exit rates. Single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed progressive age-dependent changes, with heterogeneity increasing in older populations. Age-dependent elevation in mTor and reduction in Fgf20 could contribute to increased exit rates. Importantly, 30% of old progenitors remained in the niche for up to 1 week post engraftment, a net gain of 50% to their lifespan, but only if surrounded by young neighbors. We provide evidence in support of a model in which intrinsic age-dependent changes affect inter-progenitor interactions that drive cessation of nephrogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  1. Obesity-induced chronic inflammation in high fat diet challenged C57BL/6J mice is associated with acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Roel A; Bijzet, Johan; Meijers, Wouter C; Yakala, Gopala K; Kleemann, Robert; Nguyen, Tri Q; de Boer, Rudolf A; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Hazenberg, Bouke P C; Tietge, Uwe J F; Heeringa, Peter

    2015-11-13

    Obesity-induced inflammation presumably accelerates the development of chronic kidney diseases. However, little is known about the sequence of these inflammatory events and their contribution to renal pathology. We investigated the effects of obesity on the evolution of age-dependent renal complications in mice in conjunction with the development of renal and systemic low-grade inflammation (LGI). C57BL/6J mice susceptible to develop age-dependent sclerotic pathologies with amyloid features in the kidney, were fed low (10% lard) or high-fat diets (45% lard) for 24, 40 and 52 weeks. HFD-feeding induced overt adiposity, altered lipid and insulin homeostasis, increased systemic LGI and adipokine release. HFD-feeding also caused renal upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes, infiltrating macrophages, collagen I protein, increased urinary albumin and NGAL levels. HFD-feeding severely aggravated age-dependent structural changes in the kidney. Remarkably, enhanced amyloid deposition rather than sclerosis was observed. The degree of amyloidosis correlated significantly with body weight. Amyloid deposits stained positive for serum amyloid A (SAA) whose plasma levels were chronically elevated in HFD mice. Our data indicate obesity-induced chronic inflammation as a risk factor for the acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis and functional impairment in mice, and suggest that obesity-enhanced chronic secretion of SAA may be the driving factor behind this process.

  2. Obesity-induced chronic inflammation in high fat diet challenged C57BL/6J mice is associated with acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Roel A.; Bijzet, Johan; Meijers, Wouter C.; Yakala, Gopala K.; Kleemann, Robert; Nguyen, Tri Q.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Hazenberg, Bouke P. C.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Heeringa, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation presumably accelerates the development of chronic kidney diseases. However, little is known about the sequence of these inflammatory events and their contribution to renal pathology. We investigated the effects of obesity on the evolution of age-dependent renal complications in mice in conjunction with the development of renal and systemic low-grade inflammation (LGI). C57BL/6J mice susceptible to develop age-dependent sclerotic pathologies with amyloid features in the kidney, were fed low (10% lard) or high-fat diets (45% lard) for 24, 40 and 52 weeks. HFD-feeding induced overt adiposity, altered lipid and insulin homeostasis, increased systemic LGI and adipokine release. HFD-feeding also caused renal upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes, infiltrating macrophages, collagen I protein, increased urinary albumin and NGAL levels. HFD-feeding severely aggravated age-dependent structural changes in the kidney. Remarkably, enhanced amyloid deposition rather than sclerosis was observed. The degree of amyloidosis correlated significantly with body weight. Amyloid deposits stained positive for serum amyloid A (SAA) whose plasma levels were chronically elevated in HFD mice. Our data indicate obesity-induced chronic inflammation as a risk factor for the acceleration of age-dependent renal amyloidosis and functional impairment in mice, and suggest that obesity-enhanced chronic secretion of SAA may be the driving factor behind this process. PMID:26563579

  3. Age-dependent Fourier model of the shape of the isolated ex vivo human crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Raksha; Ho, Arthur; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop an age-dependent mathematical model of the zero-order shape of the isolated ex vivo human crystalline lens, using one mathematical function, that can be subsequently used to facilitate the development of other models for specific purposes such as optical modeling and analytical and numerical modeling of the lens. Methods Profiles of whole isolated human lenses (n=30) aged 20 to 69, were measured from shadow-photogrammetric images. The profiles were fit to a 10th-order Fourier series consisting of cosine functions in polar-coordinate system that included terms for tilt and decentration. The profiles were corrected using these terms and processed in two ways. In the first, each lens was fit to a 10th-order Fourier series to obtain thickness and diameter, while in the second, all lenses were simultaneously fit to a Fourier series equation that explicitly include linear terms for age to develop an age-dependent mathematical model for the whole lens shape. Results Thickness and diameter obtained from Fourier series fits exhibited high correlation with manual measurements made from shadow-photogrammetric images. The root-mean-squared-error of the age-dependent fit was 205 μm. The age-dependent equations provide a reliable lens model for ages 20 to 60 years. Conclusion The contour of the whole human crystalline lens can be modeled with a Fourier series. Shape obtained from the age-dependent model described in this paper can be used to facilitate the development of other models for specific purposes such as optical modeling and analytical and numerical modeling of the lens. PMID:20338192

  4. Sex differences in the effects of juvenile and adult diet on age-dependent reproductive effort.

    PubMed

    Houslay, T M; Hunt, J; Tinsley, M C; Bussière, L F

    2015-05-01

    Sexual selection should cause sex differences in patterns of resource allocation. When current and future reproductive effort trade off, variation in resource acquisition might further cause sex differences in age-dependent investment, or in sensitivity to changes in resource availability over time. However, the nature and prevalence of sex differences in age-dependent investment remain unclear. We manipulated resource acquisition at juvenile and adult stages in decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus, and assessed effects on sex-specific allocation to age-dependent reproductive effort (calling in males, fecundity in females) and longevity. We predicted that the resource and time demands of egg production would result in relatively consistent female strategies across treatments, whereas male investment should depend sharply on diet. Contrary to expectations, female age-dependent reproductive effort diverged substantially across treatments, with resource-limited females showing much lower and later investment in reproduction; the highest fecundity was associated with intermediate lifespans. In contrast, long-lived males always signalled more than short-lived males, and male age-dependent reproductive effort did not depend on diet. We found consistently positive covariance between male reproductive effort and lifespan, whereas diet altered this covariance in females, revealing sex differences in the benefits of allocation to longevity. Our results support sex-specific selection on allocation patterns, but also suggest a simpler alternative: males may use social feedback to make allocation decisions and preferentially store resources as energetic reserves in its absence. Increased calling effort with age therefore could be caused by gradual resource accumulation, heightened mortality risk over time, and a lack of feedback from available mates.

  5. Ontogenetic changes in genetic variances of age-dependent plasticity along a latitudinal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson-Örtman, V; Rogell, B; Stoks, R; Johansson, F

    2015-01-01

    The expression of phenotypic plasticity may differ among life stages of the same organism. Age-dependent plasticity can be important for adaptation to heterogeneous environments, but this has only recently been recognized. Whether age-dependent plasticity is a common outcome of local adaptation and whether populations harbor genetic variation in this respect remains largely unknown. To answer these questions, we estimated levels of additive genetic variation in age-dependent plasticity in six species of damselflies sampled from 18 populations along a latitudinal gradient spanning 3600 km. We reared full sib larvae at three temperatures and estimated genetic variances in the height and slope of thermal reaction norms of body size at three points in time during ontogeny using random regression. Our data show that most populations harbor genetic variation in growth rate (reaction norm height) in all ontogenetic stages, but only some populations and ontogenetic stages were found to harbor genetic variation in thermal plasticity (reaction norm slope). Genetic variances in reaction norm height differed among species, while genetic variances in reaction norm slope differed among populations. The slope of the ontogenetic trend in genetic variances of both reaction norm height and slope increased with latitude. We propose that differences in genetic variances reflect temporal and spatial variation in the strength and direction of natural selection on growth trajectories and age-dependent plasticity. Selection on age-dependent plasticity may depend on the interaction between temperature seasonality and time constraints associated with variation in life history traits such as generation length. PMID:25649500

  6. NADPH-dependent Reductases Involved in the Detoxification of Reactive Carbonyls in Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Ayaka; Taninaka, Ai; Mizutani, Masaharu; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-01-01

    Reactive carbonyls, especially α,β-unsaturated carbonyls produced through lipid peroxidation, damage biomolecules such as proteins and nucleotides; elimination of these carbonyls is therefore essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis. In this study, we focused on an NADPH-dependent detoxification of reactive carbonyls in plants and explored the enzyme system involved in this detoxification process. Using acrolein (CH2 = CHCHO) as a model α,β-unsaturated carbonyl, we purified a predominant NADPH-dependent acrolein-reducing enzyme from cucumber leaves, and we identified the enzyme as an alkenal/one oxidoreductase (AOR) catalyzing reduction of an α,β-unsaturated bond. Cloning of cDNA encoding AORs revealed that cucumber contains two distinct AORs, chloroplastic AOR and cytosolic AOR. Homologs of cucumber AORs were found among various plant species, including Arabidopsis, and we confirmed that a homolog of Arabidopsis (At1g23740) also had AOR activity. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these AORs belong to a novel class of AORs. They preferentially reduced α,β-unsaturated ketones rather than α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Furthermore, we selected candidates of other classes of enzymes involved in NADPH-dependent reduction of carbonyls based on the bioinformatic information, and we found that an aldo-keto reductase (At2g37770) and aldehyde reductases (At1g54870 and At3g04000) were implicated in the reduction of an aldehyde group of saturated aldehydes and methylglyoxal as well as α,β-unsaturated aldehydes in chloroplasts. These results suggest that different classes of NADPH-dependent reductases cooperatively contribute to the detoxification of reactive carbonyls. PMID:21169366

  7. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2013-11-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections, and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as the likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photorates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methylvinylketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  8. Fast photolysis of carbonyl nitrates from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.-F.; Peeters, J.; Stavrakou, T.

    2014-03-01

    Photolysis is shown to be a major sink for isoprene-derived carbonyl nitrates, which constitute an important component of the total organic nitrate pool over vegetated areas. Empirical evidence from published laboratory studies on the absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of α-nitrooxy ketones suggests that the presence of the nitrate group (i) greatly enhances the absorption cross sections and (ii) facilitates dissociation to a point that the photolysis quantum yield is close to unity, with O-NO2 dissociation as a likely major channel. On this basis, we provide new recommendations for estimating the cross sections and photolysis rates of carbonyl nitrates. The newly estimated photo rates are validated using a chemical box model against measured temporal profiles of carbonyl nitrates in an isoprene oxidation experiment by Paulot et al. (2009). The comparisons for ethanal nitrate and for the sum of methacrolein- and methyl vinyl ketone nitrates strongly supports our assumptions of large cross-section enhancements and a near-unit quantum yield for these compounds. These findings have significant atmospheric implications: the photorates of key carbonyl nitrates from isoprene are estimated to be typically between ~ 3 and 20 times higher than their sink due to reaction with OH in relevant atmospheric conditions. Moreover, since the reaction is expected to release NO2, photolysis is especially effective in depleting the total organic nitrate pool.

  9. High Pressure Synthesis of Transition Metal Carbonyls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, A. P.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an experiment which uses readily available starting materials and inexpensive equipment for synthesis of transition metal carbonyls at 1000 atm and which is intended to give students experience in techniques used in research and industry. Safety precautions are emphasized. (Author/SA)

  10. Organocatalytic Hydrophosphonylation Reaction of Carbonyl Groups.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Raquel P

    2017-02-07

    This revision is covering the limited examples reported for a pivotal strategy in the formation of C-P bonds such as the asymmetric organocatalytic hydrophosphonylation of carbonyl groups (Pudovik reaction). The scope and limitations, and the proposed mechanisms for the scarce different possibilities of asymmetric induction are also shown. The recent evolution and future trends of this undeveloped approach are commented.

  11. Organocatalyzed Intramolecular Carbonyl-Ene Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dahlmann, Heidi A; McKinney, Amanda J; Santos, Maria P; Davis, Lindsey O

    2016-05-31

    An organocatalyzed intramolecular carbonyl-ene reaction was developed to produce carbocyclic and heterocyclic 5- and 6-membered rings from a citronellal-derived trifluoroketone and a variety of aldehydes. A phosphoramide derivative was found to promote the cyclization of the trifluoroketone, whereas a less acidic phosphoric acid proved to be a superior catalyst for the aldehyde substrates.

  12. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide ⋆

    PubMed Central

    Bteich, S.B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R.A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152 - 308 GHz and analyzed using Watson’s A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. PMID:27738349

  13. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide.

    PubMed

    Bteich, S B; Tercero, B; Cernicharo, J; Motiyenko, R A; Margulès, L; Guillemin, J-C

    2016-08-01

    More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152 - 308 GHz and analyzed using Watson's A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources.

  14. Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Zacher, Alan H.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Orth, Rick J.

    2010-03-30

    A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

  15. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methyl Acetate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polichnowski, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a study of the rhodium-catalyzed, ioding-promoted carbonylation of methyl acetate. This study provides an interesting contrast between the carbonylation of methyl acetate and the carbonylation of methanol when similar rhodium/iodine catalyst systems are used. (JN)

  16. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methyl Acetate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polichnowski, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a study of the rhodium-catalyzed, ioding-promoted carbonylation of methyl acetate. This study provides an interesting contrast between the carbonylation of methyl acetate and the carbonylation of methanol when similar rhodium/iodine catalyst systems are used. (JN)

  17. Proteomic and Carbonylation Profile Analysis at the Critical Node of Seed Ageing in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guangkun; Xin, Xia; Fu, Shenzao; An, Mengni; Wu, Shuhua; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; He, Juanjuan; Whelan, James; Lu, Xinxiong

    2017-01-01

    The critical node (CN), which is the transition from the plateau phase to the rapid decreasing phase of seed ageing, is extremely important for seed conservation. Although numerous studies have investigated the oxidative stress during seed ageing, information on the changes in protein abundance at the CN is limited. In this study, we aimed to investigate the abundance and carbonylation patterns of proteins at the CN of seed ageing in rice. The results showed that the germination rate of seeds decreased by less than 20% at the CN; however, the abundance of 112 proteins and the carbonylation levels of 68 proteins markedly changed, indicating oxidative damage. The abundance and activity of mitochondrial, glycolytic, and pentose phosphate pathway proteins were reduced; consequently, this negatively affected energy production and germination. Proteins related to defense, including antioxidant system and heat shock proteins, also reduced in abundance. Overall, energy metabolism was reduced at the CN, leading to a decrease in the antioxidant capacity, whereas seed storage proteins were up-regulated and carbonylated, indicating that the seed had a lower ability to utilize seed storage proteins for germination. Thus, the significant decrease in metabolic activities at the CN might accelerate the loss of seed viability. PMID:28094349

  18. Age-dependent change of HMGB1 and DNA double-strand break accumulation in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Enokido, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Ayaka; Ito, Hikaru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2008-11-07

    HMGB1 is an evolutionarily conserved non-histone chromatin-associated protein with key roles in maintenance of nuclear homeostasis; however, the function of HMGB1 in the brain remains largely unknown. Recently, we found that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 protein level in the nucleus associates with DNA double-strand break (DDSB)-mediated neuronal damage in Huntington's disease [M.L. Qi, K. Tagawa, Y. Enokido, N. Yoshimura, Y. Wada, K. Watase, S. Ishiura, I. Kanazawa, J. Botas, M. Saitoe, E.E. Wanker, H. Okazawa, Proteome analysis of soluble nuclear proteins reveals that HMGB1/2 suppress genotoxic stress in polyglutamine diseases, Nat. Cell Biol. 9 (2007) 402-414]. In this study, we analyze the region- and cell type-specific changes of HMGB1 and DDSB accumulation during the aging of mouse brain. HMGB1 is localized in the nuclei of neurons and astrocytes, and the protein level changes in various brain regions age-dependently. HMGB1 reduces in neurons, whereas it increases in astrocytes during aging. In contrast, DDSB remarkably accumulates in neurons, but it does not change significantly in astrocytes during aging. These results indicate that HMGB1 expression during aging is differentially regulated between neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 might be causative for DDSB in neurons of the aged brain.

  19. Age-dependent change of HMGB1 and DNA double-strand break accumulation in mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Enokido, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Ayaka; Ito, Hikaru; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2008-11-07

    HMGB1 is an evolutionarily conserved non-histone chromatin-associated protein with key roles in maintenance of nuclear homeostasis; however, the function of HMGB1 in the brain remains largely unknown. Recently, we found that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 protein level in the nucleus associates with DNA double-strand break (DDSB)-mediated neuronal damage in Huntington's disease [M.L. Qi, K. Tagawa, Y. Enokido, N. Yoshimura, Y. Wada, K. Watase, S. Ishiura, I. Kanazawa, J. Botas, M. Saitoe, E.E. Wanker, H. Okazawa, Proteome analysis of soluble nuclear proteins reveals that HMGB1/2 suppress genotoxic stress in polyglutamine diseases, Nat. Cell Biol. 9 (2007) 402-414]. In this study, we analyze the region- and cell type-specific changes of HMGB1 and DDSB accumulation during the aging of mouse brain. HMGB1 is localized in the nuclei of neurons and astrocytes, and the protein level changes in various brain regions age-dependently. HMGB1 reduces in neurons, whereas it increases in astrocytes during aging. In contrast, DDSB remarkably accumulates in neurons, but it does not change significantly in astrocytes during aging. These results indicate that HMGB1 expression during aging is differentially regulated between neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that the reduction of nuclear HMGB1 might be causative for DDSB in neurons of the aged brain.

  20. Age-dependent α-synuclein aggregation in the Microcebus murinus lemur primate

    PubMed Central

    Canron, Marie-Hélène; Perret, Martine; Vital, Anne; Bézard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Since age-dependent deposition of Aβ-amyloid has been reported in the Microcebus murinus, we posited that this animal could as well be a model of age-related synucleinopathy. We characterized the distribution of Aβ-amyloid, α-synuclein and two of its modified forms in the brain of Microcebus murinus aged from 1.5 to 10 years. Intracytoplasmic α-synuclein aggregates were observed only in aged animals in different brain regions, which were also phospho-Ser129 and nitrated α-synuclein immunoreactive. Age-dependent α-synuclein aggregation occurs spontaneously in mouse lemur primates. Microcebus murinus may provide a model to study age-associated α-synucleinopathy and for testing putative therapeutic interventions for both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:23205271

  1. MLE and Bayesian inference of age-dependent sensitivity and transition probability in periodic screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongfeng; Rosner, Gary L; Broemeling, Lyle

    2005-12-01

    This article extends previous probability models for periodic breast cancer screening examinations. The specific aim is to provide statistical inference for age dependence of sensitivity and the transition probability from the disease free to the preclinical state. The setting is a periodic screening program in which a cohort of initially asymptomatic women undergo a sequence of breast cancer screening exams. We use age as a covariate in the estimation of screening sensitivity and the transition probability simultaneously, both from a frequentist point of view and within a Bayesian framework. We apply our method to the Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York study of female breast cancer and give age-dependent sensitivity and transition probability density estimates. The inferential methodology we develop is also applicable when analyzing studies of modalities for early detection of other types of progressive chronic diseases.

  2. Age-dependent changes in mitochondrial morphology and volume are not predictors of lifespan.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Saroj G; Rolland, Stéphane G; Conradt, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of skeletal muscle degeneration during aging. One mechanism through which mitochondrial dysfunction can be caused is through changes in mitochondrial morphology. To determine the role of mitochondrial morphology changes in age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction, we studied mitochondrial morphology in body wall muscles of the nematodeC. elegans. We found that in this tissue, animals display a tubular mitochondrial network, which fragments with increasing age. This fragmentation is accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial volume. Mitochondrial fragmentation and volume loss occur faster under conditions that shorten lifespan and occur slower under conditions that increase lifespan. However, neither mitochondrial morphology nor mitochondrial volume of five- and seven-day old wild-type animals can be used to predict individual lifespan. Our results indicate that while mitochondria in body wall muscles undergo age-dependent fragmentation and a loss in volume, these changes are not the cause of aging but rather a consequence of the aging process.

  3. Age dependence of metals in hair in a selected US population

    SciTech Connect

    Paschal, D.C.; DiPietro, E.S.; Phillips, D.L.; Gunter, E.W. )

    1989-02-01

    Concentrations of 28 metals were determined in hair samples from 199 children (age {le} years) and 322 adults (age 13-73) years. Levels of calcium, barium, magnesium, zinc, and strontium all show a similar age-dependent increase up to about 12-14 years; levels of aluminum show a decrease with age. Relationships of elemental concentrations with age were examined by using correlation, linear regression, t tests, and discriminant analysis. Statistically significant differences in mean concentration values between children and adults were shown for these metals. Discriminant analysis gave about 95% accuracy in classifying a test data set into the categories of children and adults. A hypothesis suggested by the data is that there is an age-dependent excretion in hair of alkali metals during skeletal growth and development. The observed decrease in aluminum is largely unexplained at this time.

  4. [On age-dependent effects of IDPN in the rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schneider, G; Oepen, H; Klapproth, A

    1980-01-01

    We report on age-dependent IDPN-effects in the rat. IDPN induces in rats irreversible movement disorders, which rise qualitatively and quantitatively with increasing age. IDPN-application causes a weight loss in rats, which correlates with the animals' ages. An equal IDPN-dose/kg body weight, in young rats (2 weeks old) causes only a temporary stagnation of the weight increase. Rats older than 2 weeks old suffer from a weight loss which rises with increasing age. In 7 months old rats, the weight loss amounts to as much as 50% of the weight at the start of the experiment. IDPN has an age-dependent strongly, deleterious effect on the rat eye (bleeding in the inner eye, buphthalmos with or without cataract) which finally leads to the loss of the eyes. If young animals (about 35 days old) receive the same IDPN-dose, these eye damages are essentially absent.

  5. [Occlusion treatment for amblyopia. Age dependence and dose-response relationship].

    PubMed

    Fronius, M

    2016-04-01

    Based on clinical experience and studies on animal models the age of 6-7 years was regarded as the limit for treatment of amblyopia, although functional improvement was also occasionally reported in older patients. New technical developments as well as insights from clinical studies and the neurosciences have attracted considerable attention to this topic. Various aspects of the age dependence of amblyopia treatment are discussed in this article, e. g. prescription, electronic monitoring of occlusion dosage, calculation of indicators for age-dependent plasticity of the visual system, and novel, alternative treatment approaches. Besides a discussion of the recent literature, results of studies by our "Child Vision Research Unit" in Frankfurt are presented: results of a questionnaire about prescription habits concerning age limits of patching, electronic recording of occlusion in patients beyond the conventional treatment age, calculation of dose-response function and efficiency of patching and their age dependence. The results of the questionnaire illustrate the uncertainty about age limits of prescription with significant deviations from the guideline of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG). Electronic recording of occlusion allowed the quantification of declining dose-response function and treatment efficiency between 5 and 16 years of age. Reports about successful treatment with conventional and novel methods in adults are at variance with the notion of a rigid adult visual system lacking plasticity. Electronic recording of patching allowed new insights into the age-dependent susceptibility of the visual system and contributes to a more evidence-based treatment of amblyopia. Alternative approaches for adults challenge established notions about age limits of amblyopia therapy. Further studies comparing different treatment options are urgently needed.

  6. Optimal Control of Markov Processes with Age-Dependent Transition Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Mrinal K. Saha, Subhamay

    2012-10-15

    We study optimal control of Markov processes with age-dependent transition rates. The control policy is chosen continuously over time based on the state of the process and its age. We study infinite horizon discounted cost and infinite horizon average cost problems. Our approach is via the construction of an equivalent semi-Markov decision process. We characterise the value function and optimal controls for both discounted and average cost cases.

  7. Age dependence of the concentrations of harmful substances in Baltic herring (Clupea harengus)

    SciTech Connect

    Perttila, M.; Tervo, V.; Parmanne, R.

    1982-01-01

    The age dependence of Zn, Cu, Pb, Cd, Hg, CH/sub 3/-Hg, DDT, DDD, DDE, HCH, HCB and the PCBs have been studied in Baltic herring of 1 to 6 years of age. Lead, cadmium, mercury and the organochlorine concentrations increase significantly with age. In the case of the DDTs and the PCBs, the variations can be attributed almost totally to the combined effect of age and variations in the lipid percentage.

  8. C1-C14 carbonyls in Los Angeles air

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, E.; Grosjean, D.; Fraser, M.; Cass, G.R.

    1995-12-01

    Air samples collected at five Los Angeles locations have been analyzed for carbonyls as their DNPH derivatives using liquid chromatography and chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Twenty-three carbonyls have been measured: 14 aliphatic aldehydes (from formaldehyde to tetradecanal); 2 aromatics (benzaldehyde and m-tolualdehyde), 3 ketones (acetone, 2-butanone and cyclohexanone), one unsaturated carbonyl (crotonaldehyde) and 3 dicarbonyls (glyoxal, methylglyoxal and biacetyl). Another nineteen carbonyls have been tentatively identified including four high MW (C{sub 15}-C{sub 18}) aliphatic carbonyls.

  9. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users.

    PubMed

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Christopoulou, Maria; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2010-04-07

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  10. Age-dependent effect of static magnetic field on brain tissue hydration.

    PubMed

    Deghoyan, Anush; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Heqimyan, Armenuhi; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2014-01-01

    Age-dependent effect of Static Magnetic Field (SMF) on rats in a condition of active and inactive Na(+)/K(+) pump was studied for comparison of brain tissues hydration state changes and magnetic sensitivity. Influence of 15 min 0, 2 Tesla (T) SMF on brain tissue hydration of three aged groups of male albino rats was studied. Tyrode's physiological solution and 10(-4) M ouabain was used for intraperitoneal injections. For animal immobilization, the liquid nitrogen was used and the definition of tissue water content was performed by tissue drying method. Initial water content in brain tissues of young animals is significantly higher than in those of adult and aged ones. SMF exposure leads to decrease of water content in brain tissues of young animals and increase in brain tissues of adult and aged ones. In case of ouabain-poisoned animals, SMF gives reversal effects on brain tissue's hydration both in young and aged animals, while no significant effect on adults is observed. It is suggested that initial state of tissue hydration could play a crucial role in animal age-dependent magnetic sensitivity and the main reason for this could be age-dependent dysfunction of Na(+)/K(+) pump.

  11. Age-Dependent Pancreatic Gene Regulation Reveals Mechanisms Governing Human β Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Arda, H Efsun; Li, Lingyu; Tsai, Jennifer; Torre, Eduardo A; Rosli, Yenny; Peiris, Heshan; Spitale, Robert C; Dai, Chunhua; Gu, Xueying; Qu, Kun; Wang, Pei; Wang, Jing; Grompe, Markus; Scharfmann, Raphael; Snyder, Michael S; Bottino, Rita; Powers, Alvin C; Chang, Howard Y; Kim, Seung K

    2016-05-10

    Intensive efforts are focused on identifying regulators of human pancreatic islet cell growth and maturation to accelerate development of therapies for diabetes. After birth, islet cell growth and function are dynamically regulated; however, establishing these age-dependent changes in humans has been challenging. Here, we describe a multimodal strategy for isolating pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells from children and adults to identify age-dependent gene expression and chromatin changes on a genomic scale. These profiles revealed distinct proliferative and functional states of islet α cells or β cells and histone modifications underlying age-dependent gene expression changes. Expression of SIX2 and SIX3, transcription factors without prior known functions in the pancreas and linked to fasting hyperglycemia risk, increased with age specifically in human islet β cells. SIX2 and SIX3 were sufficient to enhance insulin content or secretion in immature β cells. Our work provides a unique resource to study human-specific regulators of islet cell maturation and function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Age-Dependent TLR3 Expression of the Intestinal Epithelium Contributes to Rotavirus Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pott, Johanna; Stockinger, Silvia; Torow, Natalia; Smoczek, Anna; Lindner, Cornelia; McInerney, Gerald; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Baumann, Ulrich; Pabst, Oliver; Bleich, André; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2012-01-01

    Rotavirus is a major cause of diarrhea worldwide and exhibits a pronounced small intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) tropism. Both human infants and neonatal mice are highly susceptible, whereas adult individuals remain asymptomatic and shed only low numbers of viral particles. Here we investigated age-dependent mechanisms of the intestinal epithelial innate immune response to rotavirus infection in an oral mouse infection model. Expression of the innate immune receptor for viral dsRNA, Toll-like receptor (Tlr) 3 was low in the epithelium of suckling mice but strongly increased during the postnatal period inversely correlating with rotavirus susceptibility, viral shedding and histological damage. Adult mice deficient in Tlr3 (Tlr3−/−) or the adaptor molecule Trif (TrifLps2/Lps2) exerted significantly higher viral shedding and decreased epithelial expression of proinflammatory and antiviral genes as compared to wild-type animals. In contrast, neonatal mice deficient in Tlr3 or Trif did not display impaired cell stimulation or enhanced rotavirus susceptibility. Using chimeric mice, a major contribution of the non-hematopoietic cell compartment in the Trif-mediated antiviral host response was detected in adult animals. Finally, a significant age-dependent increase of TLR3 expression was also detected in human small intestinal biopsies. Thus, upregulation of epithelial TLR3 expression during infancy might contribute to the age-dependent susceptibility to rotavirus infection. PMID:22570612

  13. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Christopoulou, Maria; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2010-04-01

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  14. Defects of Lipid Synthesis Are Linked to the Age-Dependent Demyelination Caused by Lamin B1 Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Hernandez, Marylens; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Sparvero, Louis J.; Nmezi, Bruce C.; Lu, Yue; Estécio, Marcos R. H.; Lin, Kevin; Chen, Junda; He, Rong-Rong; Gong, Pin; Rigatti, Lora H.; Dupree, Jeffrey; Bayır, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E.; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Lamin B1 is a component of the nuclear lamina and plays a critical role in maintaining nuclear architecture, regulating gene expression and modulating chromatin positioning. We have previously shown that LMNB1 gene duplications cause autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD), a fatal adult onset demyelinating disease. The mechanisms by which increased LMNB1 levels cause ADLD are unclear. To address this, we used a transgenic mouse model where Lamin B1 overexpression is targeted to oligodendrocytes. These mice showed severe vacuolar degeneration of the spinal cord white matter together with marked astrogliosis, microglial infiltration, and secondary axonal damage. Oligodendrocytes in the transgenic mice revealed alterations in histone modifications favoring a transcriptionally repressed state. Chromatin changes were accompanied by reduced expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis pathways, many of which are known to play important roles in myelin regulation and are preferentially expressed in oligodendrocytes. Decreased lipogenic gene expression resulted in a significant reduction in multiple classes of lipids involved in myelin formation. Many of these gene expression changes and lipid alterations were observed even before the onset of the phenotype, suggesting a causal role. Our findings establish, for the first time, a link between LMNB1 and lipid synthesis in oligodendrocytes, and provide a mechanistic framework to explain the age dependence and white matter involvement of the disease phenotype. These results have implications for disease pathogenesis and may also shed light on the regulation of lipid synthesis pathways in myelin maintenance and turnover. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is fatal neurological disorder caused by increased levels of the nuclear protein, Lamin B1. The disease is characterized by an age-dependent loss of myelin, the fatty sheath that covers nerve fibers. We have studied a mouse model where Lamin B

  15. Kinetic mechanism of pulmonary carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, K; Nakayama, T; Nakagawa, M; Hara, A; Sawada, H

    1988-05-15

    The kinetic mechanism of guinea-pig lung carbonyl reductase was studied at pH 7 in the forward reaction with five carbonyl substrates and NAD(P)H and in the reverse reaction with propan-2-ol and NAD(P)+. In each case the enzyme mechanism was sequential, and product-inhibition studies were consistent with a di-iso ordered bi bi mechanism, in which NAD(P)H binds to the enzyme first and NAD(P)+ leaves last and the binding of cofactor induces isomerization. The kinetic and binding studies of the cofactors and several inhibitors such as pyrazole, benzoic acid, Cibacron Blue and benzamide indicate that the cofactor and Cibacron Blue bind to the free enzyme whereas the other inhibitors bind to the binary and/or ternary complexes.

  16. Kinetic mechanism of pulmonary carbonyl reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, K; Nakayama, T; Nakagawa, M; Hara, A; Sawada, H

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of guinea-pig lung carbonyl reductase was studied at pH 7 in the forward reaction with five carbonyl substrates and NAD(P)H and in the reverse reaction with propan-2-ol and NAD(P)+. In each case the enzyme mechanism was sequential, and product-inhibition studies were consistent with a di-iso ordered bi bi mechanism, in which NAD(P)H binds to the enzyme first and NAD(P)+ leaves last and the binding of cofactor induces isomerization. The kinetic and binding studies of the cofactors and several inhibitors such as pyrazole, benzoic acid, Cibacron Blue and benzamide indicate that the cofactor and Cibacron Blue bind to the free enzyme whereas the other inhibitors bind to the binary and/or ternary complexes. PMID:3048244

  17. Oxidative carbonylation of amines to carbamates

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, F.J.

    1987-04-01

    Within the last several years, new technologies have appeared to replace phosgene for isocyanate manufacture. These include carbamate chemistries based upon dialkyl carbonate, reductive carbonylation of nitroaromatics, and oxidative carbonylation of amines. The carbamate ester can be handled safely and is reversibly cleaved to the isocyanate. The technology described here involves the preparation of both aliphatic and aromatic carbamates from an amine, alcohol, CO, oxidant, and a non-corrosive catalyst. The catalyst precursor is Pd(OAc){sub 2} and the oxidants are copper carboxylates or copper carboxylates and molecular oxygen. The latter represents a one-step carbamate synthesis with high catalyst activity, nearly quantitative conversions and alcohol selectivities greater than 90%. Operating temperatures and pressures are 80-110{degree}C and less than 500 psi, respectively. Experiments designed to probe the mechanism will be presented along with a discussion of novel (Cu(O{sub 2}CR){sub 2}){sub 2}R'NH{sub 2} complexes.

  18. Gene expression changes are age-dependent and lobe-specific in the brown Norway rat model of prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Carlise R; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Anway, Matthew D; Brown, Terry R

    2009-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related enlargement of the prostate, characterized by increased proliferation of stromal and epithelial cells. Despite its prevalence, the etiology of BPH is unknown. The Brown Norway rat is a model for age-dependent, lobe-specific hyperplasia of the prostate. Histological analyses of the dorsal and lateral lobes from aged rats reveal focal areas characterized by increased numbers of luminal epithelial cells, whereas the ventral lobe is unaffected. This study examined differential gene expression by lobe and age in the Brown Norway rat prostate. The objective was to identify genes with different levels of expression in the prostate lobes from 4-month (young) and 24-month (old) animals, and to subsequently link changes in gene expression to mechanisms of prostate aging. The number of age-dependent differentially expressed genes was greatest in the dorsal compared to the ventral and lateral lobes. Minimal redundancy was observed among the differentially expressed genes in the three lobes. Age-related changes in the expression levels of 14 candidate genes in the dorsal, lateral and ventral lobes were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Genes that exhibited age-related differences in their expression were associated with proliferation, oxidative stress, and prostate cancer progression, including topoisomerase II alpha (Topo2a), aurora kinase B (Aurkb), stathmin 1 (Stmn1), and glutathione S-transferase pi. Immunohistochemistry for Topo2a, Aurkb, and Stmn1 confirmed age-related changes in protein localization in the lateral lobe of young and aged prostates. These findings provide clues to the molecular events associated with aging in the prostate. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Gene Expression Changes are Age-Dependent and Lobe-Specific in the Brown Norway Rat Model of Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, Carlise R.; Chaudhary, Jaideep; Anway, Matthew D.; Brown, Terry R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related enlargement of the prostate, characterized by increased proliferation of stromal and epithelial cells. Despite its prevalence, the etiology of BPH is unknown. Methods The Brown Norway rat is a model for age-dependent, lobe-specific hyperplasia of the prostate. Histological analyses of the dorsal and lateral lobes from aged rats reveal focal areas characterized by increased numbers of luminal epithelial cells, whereas the ventral lobe is unaffected. This study examined differential gene expression by lobe and age in the Brown Norway rat prostate. The objective was to identify genes with different levels of expression in the prostate lobes from 4-month (young) and 24-month (old) animals, and to subsequently link changes in gene expression to mechanisms of prostate aging. Results The number of age-dependent differentially expressed genes was greatest in the dorsal compared to the ventral and lateral lobes. Minimal redundancy was observed among the differentially expressed genes in the three lobes. Age-related changes in the expression levels of fourteen candidate genes in the dorsal, lateral and ventral lobes were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Genes that exhibited age-related differences in their expression were associated with proliferation, oxidative stress, and prostate cancer progression, including topoisomerase II alpha (Topo2a), aurora kinase B (Aurkb), stathmin 1 (Stmn1), and glutathione S-transferase pi. Immunohistochemistry for Topo2a, Aurkb, and Stmn1 confirmed age-related changes in protein localization in the lateral lobe of young and aged prostates. Conclusion These findings provide clues to the molecular events associated with aging in the prostate. PMID:19204916

  20. Sex- and age-dependent DNA methylation at the 17q12-q21 locus associated with childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Naumova, Anna K; Al Tuwaijri, Abeer; Morin, Andréanne; Vaillancourt, Vanessa T; Vaillancout, Vanessa T; Madore, Anne-Marie; Berlivet, Soizik; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Moussette, Sanny; Laprise, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Chromosomal region 17q12-q21 is one of the best-replicated genome-wide association study (GWAS) hits and associated with childhood-onset asthma. However, the mechanism by which the genetic association is restricted to childhood-onset disease is unclear. During childhood, more boys than girls develop asthma. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the 17q12-q21 genetic association was sex-specific. Indeed, a TDT test showed that in the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean familial collection, the 17q12-q21 association was significant among male, but not among female asthmatic subjects. We next hypothesized that the bias in the genetic association resulted from sex-specific and/or age-dependent DNA methylation at regulatory regions and determined the methylation profiles of five 17q12-q21 gene promoters using the bisulfite sequencing methylation assay. We identified a single regulatory region within the zona pellucida binding protein 2 (ZPBP2) gene, which showed statistically significant differences between males and females with respect to DNA methylation. DNA methylation also varied with age and was higher in adult males compared to boys. We have recently identified two functionally important polymorphisms, both within the ZPBP2 gene that influence expression levels of neighboring genes. Combined with the results of the present work, these data converge pointing to the same 5 kb region within the ZPBP2 gene as a critical region for both gene expression regulation and predisposition to asthma. Our data show that sex- and age-dependent DNA methylation may act as a modifier of genetic effects and influence the results of genetic association studies.

  1. Change in the mode of gene expression of the hypopharyngeal gland cells with an age-dependent role change of the worker honeybee Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Natori, S; Kubo, T

    1997-11-01

    Major proteins synthesized in the hypopharyngeal gland of the worker honeybee change from bee-milk proteins to alpha-glucosidase in accordance with the age-dependent role change of the worker bee. Previously, we showed that the gene for alpha-glucosidase is expressed specifically in the forager-bee gland [Ohashi, K., Sawata, M., Takeuchi, H., Natori, S. & Kubo, T. (1996) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 221, 380-385]. Here, we describe the isolation and analysis of cDNAs for two bee-milk 56-kDa and 64-kDa proteins. The 56-kDa protein was a glycoprotein which shared 63.2% and 56.9% amino acid sequence identities with proteins encoded by cDNA for royal-jelly-related protein 57-1 (pRJP57-1) and pRJP57-2. The 64-kDa protein cDNA was identical to pRJP57-1. Thus, these bee-milk proteins seem to form a structurally related protein family. The gene for the 64-kDa protein/RJP57-1 was expressed specifically in the nurse-bee gland, whereas that for the 56-kDa protein was expressed in both the nurse-bee and forager-bee glands. mRNAs for the 56-kDa and 64-kDa proteins were detected by in situ hybridization in a whole acinus of the nurse-bee gland, whereas mRNAs for the 56-kDa protein and alpha-glucosidase were detected in that of the forager-bee gland. Therefore, the individual secretory cells of the acinus of the hypopharyngeal gland were shown to express these genes differently with the age-dependent role change of the worker bee.

  2. Spatiotemporal distribution of carbonyl compounds in China.

    PubMed

    Ho, K F; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Huang, R-J; Dai, W T; Cao, J J; Tian, Linwei; Deng, W J

    2015-02-01

    A sampling campaign was carried out at nine Chinese cities in 2010/2011. Fifteen monocarbonyls (C# = 1-9) were quantified. Temperature is the rate-determining factor of the summertime carbonyl levels. The carbonyl emissions in winter are mainly driven by the primary anthropogenic sources like automobile. A molar ratio of propionaldehyde to nonaldehyde is a barometer of the impact of atmospheric vegetation emission which suggesting that strong vegetation emissions exist in summer and high propionaldehyde abundance is caused by fossil fuel combustion in winter. Potential health risk assessment of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde was conducted and the highest cumulative risks were observed at Chengdu in summer and Wuhan in winter. Because of the strong photochemical reaction and large amount of anthropogenic emissions, high concentrations of carbonyl compounds were observed in Chengdu. The use of ethanol-blended gasoline in Wuhan is the key reason of acetaldehyde emission and action should be taken to avoid potential health risks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbonyl compounds generated from electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Ohta, Kazushi; Inaba, Yohei; Nakagome, Hideki; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-10-28

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols) when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon.

  4. Carbonyl Compounds Generated from Electronic Cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Bekki, Kanae; Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Ohta, Kazushi; Inaba, Yohei; Nakagome, Hideki; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols) when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon. PMID:25353061

  5. Synthesis of metal-carbonyl-dendrimer-antibody immunoconjugates: towards a new format for carbonyl metallo immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Durand, Nathalie; Salmain, Michèle; Rudolf, Bogna; Vessières, Anne; Zakrzewski, Janusz; Jaouen, Gérard

    2004-04-02

    We report the preparation of metal-carbonyl-dendrimer-antibody conjugates. These metal-carbonyl-multilabeled antibodies are designed to be used in a new solid-phase-format carbonyl metallo immunoassay (CMIA). A fourth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer was labeled with 10-25 (eta5-cyclopentadienyl)iron dicarbonyl (eta1-N-succinimidyl) entities. An antibody was chemically modified at its carbohydrate chains by a site-directed process used to preserve the antigen-antibody binding site. The antibody was then coupled with the dendrimer labeled with 10 metal carbonyl groups. An average of 1.4 labeled dendrimers were grafted per antibody molecule. These metal-carbonyl-dendrimer-antibody conjugates were used as new universal detection reagents that recognize their specific antigens. The antigens were spotted onto nitrocellulose membranes and detected by using the conjugates in combination with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A detection level in the range 5-200 pmol per membrane was achieved. This approach opens the way to a new CMIA format.

  6. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bteich, S. B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims: The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods: The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152-308 GHz and analyzed using Watson's A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results: The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00009.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan) with NRC (Canada), NSC, and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of

  7. Carbonyl emissions from gasoline and diesel motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Jakober, Chris A; Robert, Michael A; Riddle, Sarah G; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M Judith; Green, Peter G; Kleeman, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel-powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured by use of an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery: 4-fluorobenzaldehyde for < C8 carbonyls and 6-fluoro-4-chromanone for > or = C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 to 2000 microg/L of fuel for LDVs and from 1.8 to 27 000 microg/L of fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95% of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88% from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19% of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37% of POC emissions from three-way catalyst-equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9% depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas and particle phases under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the present study.

  8. Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Jakober, Chris A.; Robert, Michael A.; Riddle, Sarah G.; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M. Judith; Green, Peter G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured using an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde forcarbonyls and 6-fluoro-4-chromanone for>_C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 ? 2000 ?g/L fuel for LDVs and 1.8 - 27000 mu g/L fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95percent of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88percent from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19percent of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37percent of POC emissions from three-way catalyst equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9percent depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas- and particle-phase under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the current study.

  9. Mutant alpha-synuclein causes age-dependent neuropathology in monkey brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Wang, Guohao; Wang, Chuan-En; Guo, Xiangyu; Yin, Peng; Gao, Jinquan; Tu, Zhuchi; Wang, Zhengbo; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xintian; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-05-27

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that often occurs in those over age 60. Although rodents and small animals have been used widely to model PD and investigate its pathology, their short life span makes it difficult to assess the aging-related pathology that is likely to occur in PD patient brains. Here, we used brain tissues from rhesus monkeys at 2-3, 7-8, and >15 years of age to examine the expression of Parkin, PINK1, and α-synuclein, which are known to cause PD via loss- or gain-of-function mechanisms. We found that α-synuclein is increased in the older monkey brains, whereas Parkin and PINK1 are decreased or remain unchanged. Because of the gain of toxicity of α-synuclein, we performed stereotaxic injection of lentiviral vectors expressing mutant α-synuclein (A53T) into the substantia nigra of monkeys and found that aging also increases the accumulation of A53T in neurites and its associated neuropathology. A53T also causes more extensive reactive astrocytes and axonal degeneration in monkey brain than in mouse brain. Using monkey brain tissues, we found that A53T interacts with neurofascin, an adhesion molecule involved in axon subcellular targeting and neurite outgrowth. Aged monkey brain tissues show an increased interaction of neurofascin with A53T. Overexpression of A53T causes neuritic toxicity in cultured neuronal cells, which can be attenuated by transfected neurofascin. These findings from nonhuman primate brains reveal age-dependent pathological and molecular changes that could contribute to the age-dependent neuropathology in PD. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358345-14$15.00/0.

  10. Mutant Alpha-Synuclein Causes Age-Dependent Neuropathology in Monkey Brain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weili; Wang, Guohao; Wang, Chuan-En; Guo, Xiangyu; Yin, Peng; Gao, Jinquan; Tu, Zhuchi; Wang, Zhengbo; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xintian; Li, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that often occurs in those over age 60. Although rodents and small animals have been used widely to model PD and investigate its pathology, their short life span makes it difficult to assess the aging-related pathology that is likely to occur in PD patient brains. Here, we used brain tissues from rhesus monkeys at 2–3, 7–8, and >15 years of age to examine the expression of Parkin, PINK1, and α-synuclein, which are known to cause PD via loss- or gain-of-function mechanisms. We found that α-synuclein is increased in the older monkey brains, whereas Parkin and PINK1 are decreased or remain unchanged. Because of the gain of toxicity of α-synuclein, we performed stereotaxic injection of lentiviral vectors expressing mutant α-synuclein (A53T) into the substantia nigra of monkeys and found that aging also increases the accumulation of A53T in neurites and its associated neuropathology. A53T also causes more extensive reactive astrocytes and axonal degeneration in monkey brain than in mouse brain. Using monkey brain tissues, we found that A53T interacts with neurofascin, an adhesion molecule involved in axon subcellular targeting and neurite outgrowth. Aged monkey brain tissues show an increased interaction of neurofascin with A53T. Overexpression of A53T causes neuritic toxicity in cultured neuronal cells, which can be attenuated by transfected neurofascin. These findings from nonhuman primate brains reveal age-dependent pathological and molecular changes that could contribute to the age-dependent neuropathology in PD. PMID:26019347

  11. Age-dependent changes in eumelanin composition in hairs of various ethnic origins.

    PubMed

    Commo, S; Wakamatsu, K; Lozano, I; Panhard, S; Loussouarn, G; Bernard, B A; Ito, S

    2012-02-01

    Hair pigmentation is one of the most conspicuous phenotypes of humans. From a chemical point of view, however, data remain scarce regarding human hair pigmentation characteristics. To determine melanin content and composition in human eumelanic hair from individuals of different ethnic origins and at different ages, we collected hair from 56 subjects with eumelanic hair from each group of African-American, East Asian, and Caucasian origin. The 56 subjects consist of 14, seven each of males and females, each from four age classes of younger than 11, between 12 and 19, between 20 and 45, and older than 46. We analysed hair colour scale, total melanin value, and contents of pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (PTCA) and pyrrole-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA). We measured age-dependent increases in the relative quantity of eumelanin in pigmented human hairs in the three ethnic groups. Regarding melanin composition, we observed an increase in the PDCA/PTCA ratio with age in African-American and Caucasian hairs until approaching the quite constant level of the ratio in East Asian hairs in the elderly individuals. Our results evidence differences in the content and composition of eumelanin in human hair among African-American, Caucasian and East Asian individuals. Furthermore, we show evidence of age-dependent changes in the quantity and quality of eumelanin in pigmented human hairs. In particular, the age-dependent modification of the PDCA/PTCA ratio, a marker for 5,6-dihydroxyindole units in eumelanin, suggests a chronological evolution of hair follicle melanocyte phenotype (e.g. decrease in dopachrome tautomerase expression). © 2011 The Authors. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  12. Age-dependent flea (Siphonaptera) parasitism in rodents: a host's life history matters.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Boris R; Stanko, Michal; Morand, Serge

    2006-04-01

    We studied age-dependent patterns of flea infestation in 7 species of rodents from Slovakia (Apodemus agrarius, A. flavicollis, A. sylvaticus, A. uralensis, Clethrionomys glareolus, Microtus arvalis, and M. subterraneus). We estimated the age of the host from its body mass and expected the host age-dependent pattern of flea abundance, the level of aggregation, and prevalence to be in agreement with theoretical predictions. We expected that the mean abundance and the level of aggregation of fleas would be lowest in hosts of smallest and largest size classes and highest in hosts of medium size classes, whereas pattern of variation of prevalence with host age would be either convex or asymptotic. In general, mean abundance and species richness of fleas increased with an increase in host age, although the pressure of flea parasitism in terms of number of fleas per unit host body surface decreased with host age. We found 2 clear patterns of the change in flea aggregation and prevalence with host age. The first pattern demonstrated a peak of flea aggregation and a trough of flea prevalence in animals of middle age classes (Apodemus species and C. glareolus). The second pattern was an increase of both flea aggregation and flea prevalence with host age (both Microtus species). Consequently, we did not find unequivocal evidence for the main role of either parasite-induced host mortality or acquired resistance in host age-dependent pattern of flea parasitism. Our results suggest that this pattern can be generated by various processes and is strongly affected by natural history parameters of a host species such as dispersal pattern, spatial distribution, and structure of shelters.

  13. Age-Dependent Cortical Thinning of Peripheral Visual Field Representations in Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Griffis, Joseph C.; Burge, Wesley K.; Visscher, Kristina M.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex changes throughout the lifespan, and the cortical gray matter in many brain regions becomes thinner with advancing age. Effects of aging on cortical thickness (CT) have been observed in many brain regions, including areas involved in basic perceptual functions such as processing visual inputs. An important property of early visual cortices is their topographic organization—the cortical structure of early visual areas forms a topographic map of retinal inputs. Primary visual cortex (V1) is considered to be the most basic cortical area in the visual processing hierarchy, and is topographically organized from posterior (central visual representation) to anterior (peripheral visual representation) along the calcarine sulcus. Some studies have reported strong age-dependent cortical thinning in portions of V1 that likely correspond to peripheral visual representations, while there is less evidence of substantial cortical thinning in central V1. However, the effect of aging on CT in V1 as a function of its topography has not been directly investigated. To address this gap in the literature, we estimated the CT of different eccentricity sectors in V1 using T1-weighted MRI scans acquired from groups of healthy younger and older adults, and then assessed whether between-group differences in V1 CT depended on cortical eccentricity. These analyses revealed age-dependent cortical thinning specific to peripheral visual field representations in anterior portions of V1, but did not provide evidence for age-dependent cortical thinning in other portions of V1. Additional analyses found similar effects when analyses were restricted to the gyral crown, sulcul depth and sulcul wall, indicating that these effects are not likely due to differences in gyral/sulcul contributions to our regions of interest (ROI). Importantly, this finding indicates that age-dependent changes in cortical structure may differ among functionally distinct zones within larger canonical

  14. Optimal control of an influenza model with seasonal forcing and age-dependent transmission rates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jungeun; Kwon, Hee-Dae

    2013-01-21

    This study considers an optimal intervention strategy for influenza outbreaks. Variations in the SEIAR model are considered to include seasonal forcing and age structure, and control strategies include vaccination, antiviral treatment, and social distancing such as school closures. We formulate an optimal control problem by minimizing the incidence of influenza outbreaks while considering intervention costs. We examine the effects of delays in vaccine production, seasonal forcing, and age-dependent transmission rates on the optimal control and suggest some optimal strategies through numerical simulations.

  15. Age-Dependent Cortical Thinning of Peripheral Visual Field Representations in Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Griffis, Joseph C; Burge, Wesley K; Visscher, Kristina M

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex changes throughout the lifespan, and the cortical gray matter in many brain regions becomes thinner with advancing age. Effects of aging on cortical thickness (CT) have been observed in many brain regions, including areas involved in basic perceptual functions such as processing visual inputs. An important property of early visual cortices is their topographic organization-the cortical structure of early visual areas forms a topographic map of retinal inputs. Primary visual cortex (V1) is considered to be the most basic cortical area in the visual processing hierarchy, and is topographically organized from posterior (central visual representation) to anterior (peripheral visual representation) along the calcarine sulcus. Some studies have reported strong age-dependent cortical thinning in portions of V1 that likely correspond to peripheral visual representations, while there is less evidence of substantial cortical thinning in central V1. However, the effect of aging on CT in V1 as a function of its topography has not been directly investigated. To address this gap in the literature, we estimated the CT of different eccentricity sectors in V1 using T1-weighted MRI scans acquired from groups of healthy younger and older adults, and then assessed whether between-group differences in V1 CT depended on cortical eccentricity. These analyses revealed age-dependent cortical thinning specific to peripheral visual field representations in anterior portions of V1, but did not provide evidence for age-dependent cortical thinning in other portions of V1. Additional analyses found similar effects when analyses were restricted to the gyral crown, sulcul depth and sulcul wall, indicating that these effects are not likely due to differences in gyral/sulcul contributions to our regions of interest (ROI). Importantly, this finding indicates that age-dependent changes in cortical structure may differ among functionally distinct zones within larger canonical

  16. Scheduling Maintenance Operations Which Cause Age-Dependent Failure Rate Changes,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    ENGI.. UNCLASSIFIED B EBRAHIMIAN ET AL I JUN 83 F/G 5/1 NLmEEmmEEmmmmEE EEIhEIIhEEIII EEIIIIIIIEIIIE EIIIEIIIIIIIEE IEEIhIhEIhEIhE EIIIEEEEEIhIhE...OPERATIONS WHICH CAUSE AGE-DEPENDENT FAILURE RATE CHANGES BY BEHNAM EBRAHIMIAN AND LEONARD SHAW Prepared for Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-75-C-0858... EBRAHIMIAN AND LEONARD SHAW Prepared for Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-75-C-0858 Report No. POLY EE/CS 83-002 Polytechnic Institute of New York

  17. Age-dependence of hepatic dimethylnitrosamine-demethylase activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Davies, D L; Bryant, G M; Arcos, J C; Argus, M F

    1976-05-01

    The mixed-function oxidase which activates the carcinogen dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) was determined in the rat liver as a function of animal age. DMN-demethylase activity increased considerably at first to reach a maximum on day 29, and then substantially decreased to day 59; thereafter, enzyme activity remained essentially stable up to at least day 110. Pretreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene, which caused a pronounced decrease in this enzyme activity, did not affect the general shape of the age-dependence curve. The results suggest that rats between weaning and sexual maturity are more susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of pulse doses of DMN than are neonates or adult animals.

  18. Measurements of lower carbonyls in Rome ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possanzini, M.; Di Palo, V.; Petricca, M.; Fratarcangeli, R.; Brocco, D.

    Ambient levels and diurnal profiles of lower carbonyls were measured in Rome during selected days of summer 1994 and winter 1995. The most abundant carbonyls were formaldehyde (up to 27 ppb) followed by ethanal (< 17 ppb) and acetone (< 9 ppb). Gas-phase concentrations of other seven carbonyls were in the 0-3 ppb range. The results were discussed with respect to direct emissions and photochemical production. Using carbonyl/CO concentration ratios mobil source emissions of carbonyls were estimated for the urban area. The secondary production of C 1-C 3 aldehydes from reactions of alkenes with O 3 and OH radicals during the early morning hours of summer days was also calculated. The daytime pattern of carbonyls was found to be similar to that of toluene in wintertime and close to that of ozone in summer periods conductive to photochemical pollution episodes.

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation in aged heart improves the autophagy by reducing the carbonyl modification on SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Yu, Lu; Wang, Yishi; Wang, Hongtao; Li, Chen; Yin, Yue; Yang, Jingrun; Wang, Zhifa; Zheng, Qiangsun; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-19

    Cardiac aging is characterized by accumulation of damaged proteins and decline of autophagic efficiency. Here, by forestalling SIRT1 carbonylated inactivation in aged heart, we determined the benefits of activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) on the autophagy. In this study, the ALDH2 KO mice progressively developed age-related heart dysfunction and showed reduction in the life span, which strongly suggests that ALDH2 ablation leads to cardiac aging. What's more, aged hearts displayed a significant decrease ALDH2 activity, resulting in accumulation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and protein carbonyls, impairment in the autophagy flux, and, consequently, deteriorated cardiac function after starvation. Sustained Alda-1 (selective ALDH2 activator) treatment increased cardiac ALDH2 activity and abrogated these effects. Using SIRT1 deficient heterozygous (Sirt1+/-) mice, we found that SIRT1 was necessary for ALDH2 activation-induced autophagy. We further demonstrated that ALDH2 activation attenuated SIRT1 carbonylation and improved SIRT1 activity, thereby increasing the deacetylation of nuclear LC3 and FoxO1. Sequentially, ALDH2 enhanced SIRT1 regulates LC3-Atg7 interaction and FoxO1 increased Rab7 expression, which were both necessary and sufficient for restoring autophagy flux. These results highlight that both accumulation of proteotoxic carbonyl stress linkage with autophagy decline contribute to heart senescence. ALDH2 activation is adequate to improve the autophagy flux by reducing the carbonyl modification on SIRT1, which in turn plays an important role in maintaining cardiac health during aging.

  20. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Age-dependent change of uric acid level in the dermis using cutaneous microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Suk; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Jung Chul; Eun, Hee Chul

    2005-01-01

    We had proposed the usefulness of cutaneous microdialysis for the study of antioxidants in the skin. We designed a study analyzing the level of uric acid in the skin, one of the major antioxidants, for an age-dependent change. 16 healthy male volunteers were divided into two groups according to age. Eleven subjects were in their 3rd decade, under 30 years of age (young group) and the others were their 8th decade (old group), over 70 years of age. Dialysate samples were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. In the young group the mean level of uric acid was 31.9+/-16.1 microg/ml, while in old group it was 13.4+/-5.2 microg/ml. This result demonstrated an in vivo state of antioxidant level in the human skin and the age-dependent difference was concordant with other in vitro or ex vivo studies; therefore, cutaneous microdialysis could be used in analysis and monitoring studies including human antioxidants and anti-aging. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The association between etanercept serum concentration and psoriasis severity is highly age-dependent.

    PubMed

    Detrez, Iris; Van Steen, Kristel; Segaert, Siegfried; Gils, Ann

    2017-06-01

    The association between etanercept serum concentration and psoriasis disease severity is poorly investigated, and currently etanercept serum concentration monitoring that is aiming to optimize the psoriasis treatment lacks evidence. In this prospective study, we investigated the relation between etanercept exposure and disease severity via measuring etanercept concentrations at five consecutive time points in 56 psoriasis patients. Disease severity assessments included the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), body surface area (BSA) and Physician Global Assessment (PGA), and etanercept and anti-etanercept antibody concentrations were determined every 3 months for a period of 1 year. The present study demonstrated that the association between etanercept concentration and psoriasis severity is age-dependent: when patients were stratified into three groups, patients in the youngest age group (-50 years) showed a lower PASI at a higher etanercept concentration (β = -0.26), whereas patients in the oldest age group (+59 years) showed the opposite trend (β =0.22). Similar age effects were observed in the relation of etanercept concentration with BSA (P=0.02) and PGA (P=0.02). The influence of age and length of time in therapy on the etanercept concentration-disease severity relation was unaffected by body mass index (BMI) or any other possible confounder. Incidence of anti-etanercept antibodies was low (2%). The age-dependent relation between etanercept serum concentrations is both unexpected and intriguing and needs further investigation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Age-dependent deficits in fear learning in heterozygous BDNF knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Endres, Thomas; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2012-11-15

    Beyond its trophic function, the neurotrophin BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) is well known to crucially mediate synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Whereas recent studies suggested that acute BDNF/TrkB signaling regulates amygdala-dependent fear learning, no impairments of cued fear learning were reported in heterozygous BDNF knock-out mice (BDNF(+/-)). Since brain BDNF levels are known to decline with aging, we hypothesized that BDNF(+/-) mice might show reduced fear learning at older ages. Indeed, BDNF(+/-) animals revealed an age-dependent deficit in fear learning 3 mo after birth and beyond. Since there were no alterations between the two genotypes during the conditioning training and when testing short-term memory, this learning deficit most likely reflects a deficit in memory consolidation. Importantly, there were no differences in spontaneous motor behavior and baseline anxiety in BDNF(+/-) animals at any age tested. Following behavioral testing quantification of BDNF levels in the basolateral amygdala with a sensitive BDNF ELISA revealed a positive correlation between the levels of BDNF in the amygdala and the individual learning performance. However, the age-dependent decline in the efficiency of fear conditioning in BDNF(+/-) mice was not accompanied by reduced BDNF expression in the amygdala. Thus, while reduced BDNF levels in general correlate with less efficient fear learning, this lack of BDNF can be compensated in young but not in older animals, suggesting that the cellular mechanisms responsible for fear learning consolidation become BDNF-dependent 3 mo after birth.

  4. Repeated restraint stress increases basolateral amygdala neuronal activity in an age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress is a precipitating factor for affective disorders such as depression and anxiety. This is associated with the effects of chronic stress on the amygdala. Adolescents may be more vulnerable to the effects of chronic stress, which may be related to its impact on amygdala function. However, the stress-induced changes in amygdala neuronal activity, and the age-dependent impact of chronic stress on amygdala neuronal activity have not been studied in depth. In this study, we investigated how repeated restraint impacts basolateral amygdala (BLA) projection neuron activity in both adolescent and adult rats. Using in vivo extracellular recordings from anesthetized rats, we found that repeated restraint increased the number of spontaneously firing neurons in the BLA of adolescent rats, but did not significantly increase the firing rate. In contrast, repeated restraint increased the firing rate of BLA neurons in adult rats, but did not change the number of spontaneously firing neurons. This is the first direct evidence of how stress differently impacts amygdala physiology in adolescent and adult rats. These findings may shed light on the mechanism by which chronic stress may age-dependently precipitate psychiatric disorders. PMID:22986163

  5. Age-dependent changes in cuticular hydrocarbons of larvae in Aldrichina grahami (Aldrich) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Ye, Gong-Yin; Xu, Ying; Hu, Cui; Zhu, Guang-Hui

    2014-09-01

    Necrophagous flies, comprising the first wave of insects present in a cadaver, provide a great potential for more accurate determination of the late postmortem interval (PMI) based on their age. Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHs) are a promising age indicator in some insect species, especially for the larvae of necrophagous flies. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to characterize the age-dependent, quantitative changes in CHs of larval Aldrichina grahami (Aldrich) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) at 24°C. The majority of low-molecular-weight alkanes (≤C25) and almost all of the alkenes decreased in abundance with larval development. By contrast, the abundance of high-molecular-weight alkanes of chain length greater than C25 gradually increased with age. For several peaks, including peak 28 (pentacosene a), peak 31 (n-C25), peak 43 (n-C27) and peak 68 (n-C31), a highly significant correlation was found between peak ratio (n-C29 divided by each chromatographic peak) and chronological age of the larvae. A mathematical model, derived from multivariate linear regression analysis, was developed for determining age of the larvae based on age-dependent changes in CHs. The estimated larval age based on the CHs had a good linear correlation with the chronological age (R(2)>0.9). These results indicate that CHs has a great potential for determining the age of fly larvae, and concomitantly for the PMI in forensic investigation.

  6. Light scattering study of the normal human eye lens: Elastic properties and age dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sheldon T.; Twa, Michael D.; Gump, Jared C.; Venkiteshwar, Manoj; Bullimore, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The human ocular lens is a tissue capable of changing its shape to dynamically adjust the optical power of the eye, a function known as accommodation, which gradually declines with age. This capability is the response of the lens tissue to external forces which, in turn, is modulated by the biomechanical characteristics of lens tissues. In order to investigate the contributions of lens sclerosis to loss of accommodation, we report on in vitro confocal Brillouin light scattering studies of human ocular lenses spanning over a 30-70 year age range. Using this non-destructive measurement method, we determined that the longitudinal bulk modulus (average ± SD) of the lens nucleus (2.79±0.14 GPa) was consistently greater than the bulk modulus of the lens cortex (2.36±0.09 GPa). Moreover, our results showed that these differences were not age dependent over the 40 year age range that we evaluated using healthy lens tissues. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that an age-dependent change in the bulk modulus of lens tissues does not fully account for the natural decline of accommodation. PMID:20529725

  7. Age-dependent time courses of recovery for motor functions following acute toluene intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    Samuel-Herter, Susan R; Slaght, Shelby L; McKay, Bruce E

    2014-05-01

    Toluene is a psychoactive chemical found in many household products including adhesives and thinners. Inhalation of these vapors can cause euphoria and impairments in motor control and neurological functioning. Misuse and abuse of toluene is most common in children, which may in part be due to an age-dependent neurobehavioral sensitivity to toluene. Here we assessed the effects of acute binge-like toluene inhalations (15 or 30 min; ∼5,000 ppm) on tasks that examine locomotion, exploration, balance, gait, and neurological functioning for adolescent (1 month), young adult (2-3 months), adult (5-6 months), and older adult (10-12 months) rats. Both motor and neurological functions were impaired following acute toluene inhalation at all ages. However, only the duration to recover from deficits in motor functions differed among age groups, with adolescent and young adult rats requiring notably longer recovery times than older rats. Our results are suggestive of an age-dependent vulnerability to the intoxicating effects of toluene. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  9. Pregnane X Receptor Knockout Mice Display Aging-Dependent Wearing of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Kotaro; Casey, Stephanie C.; Urano, Tomohiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Blumberg, Bruce; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) and its murine ortholog, pregnane X receptor (PXR), are nuclear receptors that are expressed at high levels in the liver and the intestine where they function as xenobiotic sensors that induce expression of genes involved in detoxification and drug excretion. Recent evidence showed that SXR and PXR are also expressed in bone tissue where they mediate bone metabolism. Here we report that systemic deletion of PXR results in aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage of knee joints. Histomorphometrical analysis showed remarkable reduction of width and an enlarged gap between femoral and tibial articular cartilage in PXR knockout mice. We hypothesized that genes induced by SXR in chondrocytes have a protective effect on articular cartilage and identified Fam20a (family with sequence similarity 20a) as an SXR-dependent gene induced by the known SXR ligands, rifampicin and vitamin K2. Lastly, we demonstrated the biological significance of Fam20a expression in chondrocytes by evaluating osteoarthritis-related gene expression of primary articular chondrocytes. Consistent with epidemiological findings, our results indicate that SXR/PXR protects against aging-dependent wearing of articular cartilage and that ligands for SXR/PXR have potential role in preventing osteoarthritis caused by aging. PMID:25749104

  10. Age-dependent changes in plasma and brain cholinesterase activities of eastern bluebirds and European starlings.

    PubMed

    Gard, N W; Hooper, M J

    1993-01-01

    Age-dependent changes in plasma and brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity were characterized in two altricial passerine species: eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). Plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity declined rapidly immediately after hatching, while plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity increased throughout the nestling period. These patterns continued after birds fledged, since the BChE: AChE ratio was higher in adult birds than fledglings. This is the first confirmation of age-dependent changes in plasma ChE activity in altricial species. Total plasma ChE activity increased with age in both species, which is the reverse of results previously reported for several precocial species. Brain ChE activity increased with age in both species, and did not reach asymptotic levels before young fledged. This corresponded with patterns previously documented in European starlings and three other altricial species. We propose that age and degree of precocity in young birds must be considered when examining sensitivity or evaluating field exposure of birds to ChE-inhibiting compounds.

  11. Age-dependent defective TGF-beta1 signaling in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine, which is deregulated in atherosclerosis; however the role of age in this process is unknown. We aimed to assess whether TGF-β1 signaling is affected by age. Methods Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were obtained from patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Levels of TGF-β1 were measured by ELISA in sera from 169 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The p27 expression was determined by Western blot from internal mammary arteries (IMA) obtained from CABG patients (n = 13). In VSMC from these patients undergoing abdominal surgery, secretion of TGF-β1 was determined by ELISA of cell-conditioned media. Results In VSMC from aged patients we observed a lower TGF-β1 secretion, measured as TGF-β1 concentration in cell conditioned medium (p < 0.001). This effect was correlated to an age-dependent decrease of p27 expression in IMA from aged CABG patients. In a similar manner, there was an age-dependent decrease of serum TGF-β1 levels in CABG patients (p = 0.0195). Conclusions VSMC from aged patients showed a higher degree of cellular senescence and it was associated to a lower TGF-β1 secretion and signaling. PMID:24495866

  12. Age dependence of myosin heavy chain transitions induced by creatine depletion in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Gregory R.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that myosin heavy chain (MHC) plasticity resulting from creatine depletion is an age-dependent process. At weaning (age 28 days), rat pups were placed on either standard rat chow (normal diet juvenile group) or the same chow supplemented with 1% wt/wt of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid (creatine depletion juvenile (CDJ) group). Two groups of adult rats (age approximately 8 wk) were placed on the same diet regimens (normal diet adult and creatine depletion adult (CDA) groups). After 40 days (CDJ and normal diet juvenile groups) and 60 days (CDA and normal diet adult groups), animals were killed and several skeletal muscles were removed for analysis of creatine content or MHC ditribution. In the CDJ group, creatine depletion (78%) was accompanied by significant shifts toward expression of slower MHC isoforms in two slow and three fast skeletal muscles. In contrast, creatine depletion in adult animals did not result in similar shifts toward slow MHC isoform expression in either muscle type. The results of this study indicate that there is a differential effect of creatine depletion on MHC tranitions that appears to be age dependent. These results strongly suggest that investigators contemplating experimental designs involving the use of the creatine analogue beta-guanidinopropionic acid should consider the age of the animals to be used.

  13. Chemoselective Intramolecular Carbonyl Ylide Formation through Electronically Differentiated Malonate Diesters.

    PubMed

    Nakhla, Mina C; Lee, Che-Wah; Wood, John L

    2015-12-04

    A method for chemoselective carbonyl ylide formation utilizing the Rh(II) catalyzed decomposition of electronically differentiated diazo malonates is disclosed. Treatment of ethyl, trifluoro ethyl diazo malonate with a Rh(II) catalyst selectively forms a carbonyl ylide from the relatively electron rich ethyl ester. This carbonyl ylide can be trapped by various alkynes giving highly functionalized oxabicyclic compounds in a chemo-, regio-, and diastereoselective fashion.

  14. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  15. Effect of hydrogen atoms on the structures of trinuclear metal carbonyl clusters: trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-mei; Wang, Chao-yang; Li, Qian-shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-05-18

    The structures of the trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 12, 11, 10, 9) have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). Optimization of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) gives the experimentally known structure in which all carbonyl groups are terminal and each edge of a central Mn(3) equilateral triangle is bridged by a single hydrogen atom. This structure establishes the canonical distance 3.11 A for the Mn-Mn single bond satisfying the 18-electron rule. The central triangular (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) unit is retained in the lowest energy structure of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(11), which may thus be derived from the H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) structure by removal of a carbonyl group with concurrent conversion of one of the remaining carbonyl groups into a semibridging carbonyl group to fill the resulting hole. The potential energy surface of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) is relatively complicated with six singlet and five triplet structures. One of the lower energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structures has one of the hydrogen atoms bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle and the other two hydrogen atoms bridging Mn-Mn edges. This H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure achieves the favored 18-electron configuration with a very short MnMn triple bond of 2.36 A. The other low energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure retains the (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) core of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) but has a unique six-electron donor eta(2)-mu(3) carbonyl group bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle similar to the unique carbonyl group in the known compound Cp(3)Nb(3)(CO)(6)(eta(2)-mu(3)-CO). For H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(9) a structure with a central (mu(3)-H)(2)Mn(3) trigonal bipyramid lies >20 kcal/mol below any of the other structures. Triplet structures were found for the unsaturated H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 11, 10, 9) systems but at significantly higher energies than the lowest lying singlet structures.

  16. Hydration and hydrogen bonding of carbonyls in dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Victor V; Nuti, Francesca; Takaoka, Yuji; Chelli, Riccardo; Papini, Anna Maria; Righini, Roberto

    2006-07-26

    We combine two-color ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the hydration of carbonyl moieties in a dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine bilayer. Excitation with femtosecond infrared pulses of the OD stretching mode of heavy water produces a time dependent change of the absorption band of the phospholipid carbonyl groups. This intermolecular vibrational coupling affects the entire C=O band, thus suggesting that the optical inhomogeneity of the infrared response of carbonyl in phospholipid membranes cannot be attributed to the variance in hydration. Both the experimental and the theoretical results demonstrate that sn-1 carbonyl has a higher propensity to form hydrogen bonds with water in comparison to sn-2. The time-resolved experiment allows following the evolution of the system from a nonequilibrium localization of energy in the OD stretching mode to a thermally equilibrated condition and provides the characteristic time constants of the process. The approach opens a new opportunity for investigation of intermolecular structural relations in complex systems, like membranes, polymers, proteins, and glasses.

  17. Hepatocyte cytotoxicity induced by hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonylation model): prevention by bioactive nut extracts or catechins.

    PubMed

    Banach, Monica S; Dong, Qiang; O'Brien, Peter J

    2009-03-16

    Carbonyl and oxidative stress play important roles in the development of diabetic complications and have been shown to be augmented by various natural compounds and pharmacological agents. Nuts are a rich source of bioactive compounds and antioxidants and various beneficial health effects of nuts have been reported. This study was conducted to evaluate the cytoprotectiveness of various nut extracts and bioactive compounds found in nuts for decreasing cytotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation in cell toxicity models of diabetes-related carbonyl (glyoxal) and oxidative stress (hydroperoxide). Methanol, ethyl acetate or water were used to prepare crude hazelnut and walnut extracts, which were then used to screen for in vitro cytoprotection of freshly isolated rat hepatocytes against these toxins. The order of protection by nut extracts against hydroperoxide induced cell death was: walnut methanolic extract>walnut aqueous extract>lipophilic walnut extract>hazelnut aqueous extract>hazelnut methanolic extract whereas the lipophilic hazelnut extract did not protect against cell death. The order of protection against lipid peroxidation was the same except for the hazelnut methanolic extract, which prevented lipid peroxidation better than the hazelnut aqueous extract. Catechin, epicatechin and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) were investigated for possible protective effects against carbonyl stress cell death and protein carbonylation in hepatocytes. Catechin protected against glyoxal induced cell death and protein carbonylation, and even elicited protection when added to hepatocytes 30 min after the addition of glyoxal. When catechin and epicatechin were compared for protectiveness against glyoxal induced carbonyl stress in hepatocytes, epicatechin protected more effectively than catechin against cell death and protein carbonylation at 120 min. Both compounds also elicited better protection when premixed with glyoxal before addition to hepatocytes, compared

  18. The Immp2l mutation causes age-dependent degeneration of cerebellar granule neurons prevented by antioxidant treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlian; Li, Xue; Lu, Baisong

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are implicated in age-associated neurodegeneration, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently showed that mice with a mutation in the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene had elevated levels of mitochondrial superoxide, impaired fertility and age-associated phenotypes, including kyphosis and ataxia. Here we show that ataxia and cerebellar hypoplasia occur in old mutant mice (> 16 months). Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are significantly underrepresented; Purkinje cells and cells in the molecular layer are not affected. Treating mutant mice with the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 from 6 weeks to 21 months protected cerebellar granule neurons. Apoptotic granule neurons were observed in mutant mice but not in age-matched normal control mice or SkQ1-treated mice. Old mutant mice showed increased serum protein carbonyl content, cerebellar 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), and nitrotyrosine modification compared to old normal control mice. SOD2 expression was increased in Purkinje cells but decreased in granule neurons of old mutant mice. Mitochondrial marker protein VDAC1 also was decreased in CGNs of old mutant mice, suggesting decreased mitochondrial number. SkQ1 treatment decreased HNE and nitrotyrosine modification, and restored SOD2 and VDAC1 expression in CGNs of old mutant mice. Neuronal expression of nitric oxide synthase was increased in cerebella of young mutant mice but decreased in old mutant mice. Our work provides evidence for a causal role of oxidative stress in neurodegeneration of Immp2l mutant mice. The Immp2l mutant mouse model could be valuable in elucidating the role of oxidative stress in age-associated neurodegeneration. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Carbonyl sulfide: No remedy for global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, Steven J.; Kasting, James F.

    1995-04-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (June 15, 1991), and the subsequent cooling of the earth's lower atmosphere [Dutton and Christy, 1992; Minnis et al., 1993] shows that stratospheric aerosols can have a strong effect on the earth's climate. This supports the notion that the intentional enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer through increased carbonyl sulfide (OCS) emissions might be an effective means for counteracting global warming. Through the use of a one-dimensional photochemical model, we investigate what effect such a program might have on global average stratospheric ozone. In addition, we consider the impact of enhanced OCS emissions on rainwater acidity and on the overall health of both plants and animals. We find that while the warming produced by a single CO2 doubling (1 to 4°C) might be offset with ozone losses of less than 5%, any attempt to use carbonyl sulfide as a permanent solution to global warming could result in depletion of global average ozone by 30% or more. We estimate that in order to achieve cooling of 4°C rainwater pH would fall to between 3.5 and 3.8. Finally, a 4°C cooling at the surface will require that ambient near ground OCS levels rise to above 10 ppmv which is probably greater than the safe exposure limit for humans. Thus, enhanced OCS emissions do not provide an environmentally acceptable solution to the problem of global warming.

  20. Age-Dependent Expression of Collagen Receptors and Deformation of Type I Collagen Substrates by Rat Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Christopher G.; Stone, John W.; Fowlkes, Vennece; Morales, Mary O.; Murphy, Catherine J.; Baxter, Sarah C.; Goldsmith, Edie C.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how age influences the ways in which cardiac fibroblasts interact with the extracellular matrix. We investigated the deformation of collagen substrates by neonatal and adult rat cardiac fibroblasts in monolayer and three-dimensional (3D) cultures, and quantified the expression of three collagen receptors [discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1, DDR2, and β1 integrin] and the contractile protein alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in these cells. We report that adult fibroblasts contracted 3D collagen substrates significantly less than their neonate counterparts, whereas no differences were observed in monolayer cultures. Adult cells had lower expression of β1 integrin and α-SMA than neonate cultures, and we detected significant correlations between the expression of α-SMA and each of the collagen receptors in neonate cells but not in adult cells. Consistent with recent work demonstrating age-dependent interactions with myocytes, our results indicate that interactions between cardiac fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix change with age. PMID:21740617

  1. Rapamycin activates autophagy in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome: implications for normal aging and age-dependent neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Graziotto, John J; Cao, Kan; Collins, Francis S; Krainc, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    While rapamycin has been in use for years in transplant patients as an antirejection drug, more recently it has shown promise in treating diseases of aging, such as neurodegenerative disorders and atherosclerosis. We recently reported that rapamycin reverses the cellular phenotype of fibroblasts from children with the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). We found that the causative aberrant protein, progerin, was cleared through autophagic mechanisms when the cells were treated with rapamycin, suggesting a new potential treatment for HGPS. Recent evidence shows that progerin is also present in aged tissues of healthy individuals, suggesting that progerin may contribute to physiological aging. While it is intriguing to speculate that rapamycin may affect normal aging in humans, as it does in lower organisms, it will be important to identify safer analogues of rapamycin for chronic treatments in humans in order to minimize toxicity. In addition to its role in HGPS and normal aging, we discuss the potential of rapamycin for the treatment of age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. AfAP2-1, An Age-Dependent Gene of Aechmea fasciata, Responds to Exogenous Ethylene Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Li, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Jia-Bin; Fu, Yun-Liu; Ao, Meng-Fei; Xu, Li

    2016-02-27

    The Bromeliaceae family is one of the most morphologically diverse families with a pantropical distribution. To schedule an appropriate flowering time for bromeliads, ethylene is commonly used to initiate flower development in adult plants. However, the mechanism by which ethylene induces flowering in adult bromeliads remains unknown. Here, we identified an APETALA2 (AP2)-like gene, AfAP2-1, in Aechmea fasciata. AfAP2-1 contains two AP2 domains and is a nuclear-localized protein. It functions as a transcriptional activator, and the activation domain is located in the C-terminal region. The expression level of AfAP2-1 is higher in juvenile plants than in adult plants, and the AfAP2-1 transcript level was rapidly and transiently reduced in plants treated with exogenous ethylene. Overexpression of AfAP2-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in an extremely delayed flowering phenotype. These results suggested that AfAP2-1 responds to ethylene and is a putative age-dependent flowering regulator in A. fasciata.

  3. AfAP2-1, An Age-Dependent Gene of Aechmea fasciata, Responds to Exogenous Ethylene Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ming; Li, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Jia-Bin; Fu, Yun-Liu; Ao, Meng-Fei; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    The Bromeliaceae family is one of the most morphologically diverse families with a pantropical distribution. To schedule an appropriate flowering time for bromeliads, ethylene is commonly used to initiate flower development in adult plants. However, the mechanism by which ethylene induces flowering in adult bromeliads remains unknown. Here, we identified an APETALA2 (AP2)-like gene, AfAP2-1, in Aechmea fasciata. AfAP2-1 contains two AP2 domains and is a nuclear-localized protein. It functions as a transcriptional activator, and the activation domain is located in the C-terminal region. The expression level of AfAP2-1 is higher in juvenile plants than in adult plants, and the AfAP2-1 transcript level was rapidly and transiently reduced in plants treated with exogenous ethylene. Overexpression of AfAP2-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in an extremely delayed flowering phenotype. These results suggested that AfAP2-1 responds to ethylene and is a putative age-dependent flowering regulator in A. fasciata. PMID:26927090

  4. Nature of Interaction between basic fibroblast growth factor and the antiangiogenic drug 7,7-(carbonyl-bis[imino-N-methyl-4,2-pyrrolecarbonylimino[N-methyl-4,2-pyrrole]-carbonylimino])-bis-(1,3-naphtalene disulfonate). II. Removal of polar interactions affects protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Zamai, Moreno; Hariharan, Chithra; Pines, Dina; Safran, Michal; Yayon, Avner; Caiolfa, Valeria R; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Pines, Ehud; Parola, Abraham H

    2002-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-2 (basic FGF), a potent inducer of angiogenesis, and the naphthalene sulfonic distamycin A derivative, 7,7-(carbonyl-bis[imino-N-methyl-4,2-pyrrolecarbonylimino[N-methyl-4,2-pyrrole]-carbonylimino])-bis-(1,3-naphtalene disulfonate) (PNU145156E), which exhibits in vivo antiangiogenic activity, form a tight reversible (1:1) complex. PNU145156E binds to the heparin and the selenate-binding sites on bFGF. The cis bFGF-heparin (2:1) complex, essential for the activation of the angiogenic process, is thus prevented. The nature of the forces involved in bFGF:PNU145156E complex, using the wild-type and the K128Q, K138Q, K134Q, and K128Q-K138Q point mutated bFGFs was sought. Based on thermodynamic analysis of the complexation constants, protein temperature stability profiles by ultraviolet absorption, circular dichroism measurements, fluorescence Förster energy-transfer, and anisotropy studies, in harmony with the published x-ray crystallographic structure, the following molecular interactions are proposed: reduced coulombic interactions, hence loosening of the complex by the removal of charged polar groups from the bFGF-heparin binding cleft resulted in decreased binding constants and in a change in the binding mode from polar to nonpolar. Concomitantly, upon mutation, the protein was rendered more compact, less flexible, and less aqueously exposed compared with the wild type. These were further pronounced with the double mutant: weaker dominantly nonpolar protein-drug interactions were accompanied by conspicuous folding. With heparin, however, wild-type bFGF forms a tighter complex with a more compact structure. PMID:11964252

  5. Assessment of (226)Ra age-dependent dose from water intake.

    PubMed

    Porntepkasemsan, Boonsom; Srisuksawad, Kanitha

    2008-11-01

    The radioactivity in canal and ground waters collected in a 2-year long observation from the vicinity of the Rare Earth Research and Development Center (RRDC), Phathumthani Province, Thailand, was measured in order to determine the concentration of (226)Ra and to estimate the age-dependent effective dose to humans due to consumption. (226)Ra activities in both canal and ground waters were well below the WHO guidance level for drinking water quality of 1 Bq L(-1). The highest (226)Ra effective doses per year were found for infants and teens. However, the observed levels of calculated (226)Ra effective doses for all age groups in both canal and ground waters show satisfactory low values (less than 15 microSv yr(-1)). These values are acceptable in accordance with the WHO recommended reference dose level of 100 microSv yr(-1) from water intake of 2 Lday(-1).

  6. An Age-Dependent Interaction with Leptin Unmasks Ghrelin's Bone-Protective Effects

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Martijn; van der Eerden, Bram C.J.; Sun, Yuxiang; Almering, Julia M.M.; van der Lely, Aart-Jan; Delhanty, Patric J.D.; Smith, Roy G.

    2012-01-01

    The mutual interplay between energy homeostasis and bone metabolism is an important emerging concept. Ghrelin and leptin antagonize each other in regulating energy balance, but the role of this interaction in bone metabolism is unknown. Using ghrelin receptor and leptin-deficient mice, we show that ghrelin has dual effects on osteoclastogenesis, inhibiting osteoclast progenitors directly and stimulating osteoclastogenesis via a more potent systemic/central pathway. Using mice with combined ghrelin receptor and leptin deficiency, we find that this systemic osteoclastogenic activity is suppressed by leptin, thus balancing the two counterregulatory ghrelin pathways and leading to an unchanged bone structure. With aging, this osteoclastogenic ghrelin pathway is lost, unmasking the direct protective effect of ghrelin on bone structure. In conclusion, we identify a novel regulatory network linking orexigenic and anorectic metabolic factors with bone metabolism that is age dependent. PMID:22700774

  7. White LED compared with other light sources: age-dependent photobiological effects and parameters for evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rebec, Katja Malovrh; Klanjšek-Gunde, Marta; Bizjak, Grega; Kobav, Matej B

    2015-01-01

    Ergonomic science at work and living places should appraise human factors concerning the photobiological effects of lighting. Thorough knowledge on this subject has been gained in the past; however, few attempts have been made to propose suitable evaluation parameters. The blue light hazard and its influence on melatonin secretion in age-dependent observers is considered in this paper and parameters for its evaluation are proposed. New parameters were applied to analyse the effects of white light-emitting diode (LED) light sources and to compare them with the currently applied light sources. The photobiological effects of light sources with the same illuminance but different spectral power distribution were determined for healthy 4-76-year-old observers. The suitability of new parameters is discussed. Correlated colour temperature, the only parameter currently used to assess photobiological effects, is evaluated and compared to new parameters.

  8. An age-dependent model to analyse the evolutionary stability of bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Mund, A; Kuttler, C; Pérez-Velázquez, J; Hense, B A

    2016-09-21

    Bacterial communication is enabled through the collective release and sensing of signalling molecules in a process called quorum sensing. Cooperative processes can easily be destabilized by the appearance of cheaters, who contribute little or nothing at all to the production of common goods. This especially applies for planktonic cultures. In this study, we analyse the dynamics of bacterial quorum sensing and its evolutionary stability under two levels of cooperation, namely signal and enzyme production. The model accounts for mutation rates and switches between planktonic and biofilm state of growth. We present a mathematical approach to model these dynamics using age-dependent colony models. We explore the conditions under which cooperation is stable and find that spatial structuring can lead to long-term scenarios such as coexistence or bistability, depending on the non-linear combination of different parameters like death rates and production costs.

  9. A test of homogeneity for age-dependent branching processes with immigration

    PubMed Central

    Yanev, Nikolay M.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel procedure to test whether the immigration process of a discretely observed age-dependent branching process with immigration is time-homogeneous. The construction of the test is motivated by the behavior of the coefficient of variation of the population size. When immigration is time-homogeneous, we find that this coefficient converges to a constant, whereas when immigration is time-inhomogeneous we find that it is time-dependent, at least transiently. Thus, we test the assumption that the immigration process is time-homogeneous by verifying that the sample coefficient of variation does not vary significantly over time. The test is simple to implement and does not require specification or fitting any branching process to the data. Simulations and an application to real data on the progression of leukemia are presented to illustrate the approach. PMID:27134694

  10. Limit Probabilities in a Multi-Type Critical Age-Dependent Branching Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-07

    or = m . Assuming this to be an m-type critical age-dependent branching process, for k = (k sub 1,...,k sub m) an m- vector of non-negative integers, not all of which are zero, it is shown that as t approaches infinity, P(Z sub i (t) = k) approx. = c/t squared for some c > 0. Similarly, let N sub i (t) = sub i1 (N sub i1 (t)), N sub i2 (t),...,N sub im(t) ) denote the m-vector with entries N sub ij (t) = total progeny of type j born by t in the critical m-type process starting with a new cell of type i at t = 0. For k = (k sub 1,...,k sub m) an m-vector of non-negative

  11. Age dependent hypergastrinaemia in children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis--evidence of early acquisition of infection.

    PubMed Central

    McCallion, W A; Ardill, J E; Bamford, K B; Potts, S R; Boston, V E

    1995-01-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis causes achlorhydria, a powerful stimulus to gastrin secretion. If H pylori infection is acquired primarily in early childhood, then the degree of hypergastrinaemia in seropositive children should be age dependent. Anti-Helicobacter antibodies and fasting gastrin concentrations were measured in 439 children aged 4 to 13 years attending hospital for routine day case surgery not connected with any gastrointestinal disorder. Thirty per cent were seropositive for H pylori. There was an inverse relationship between the fasting gastrin concentration and age; the mean fasting gastrin in children aged 4-5 years, 155 ng/l, was significantly higher than that seen in children aged 12-13 years, 90 ng/l. The more noticeable hypergastrinaemia seen in young children with H pylori associated gastritis may reflect achlorhydria associated with acute H pylori infection and suggests that this is primarily acquired in early childhood. PMID:7672676

  12. Age-dependent accumulation of (137)Cs by pike Esox lucius in the Yenisei River.

    PubMed

    Zotina, T A; Trofimova, E A; Dementyev, D V; Bolsunovsky, A Ya

    2016-05-01

    Age-dependent accumulation of (137)Cs in the muscles and bodies of the pike Esox lucius (aged two to seven years) inhabiting a section of the Yenisei River polluted with artificial radionuclides has been studied. The content of (137)Cs in muscles varied from 0.5 to 7.0 Bq/kg of fresh weight. The maximum content of the radionuclide has been found in juveniles. The content of (137)Cs in pike muscles and body decreased considerably with age. The high content of (137)Cs in the muscles of juveniles is probably a consequence of their higher intensity of feeding as compared to older individuals, which is due to the intense growth of juveniles.

  13. Distribution of uranium in drinking water and associated age-dependent radiation dose in India.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Mohapatra, S; Chakrabarty, A; Sumesh, C G; Jha, V N; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2009-09-01

    Exposure due to natural radiation is of particular importance because it accounts for the largest contribution (nearly 85 %) to the total collective dose of the world population. An attempt has been made to present the feasibility of uranium occurrence in drinking water samples from different states of India, by laser-induced fluorimetry. The associated age-dependent radiation dose was estimated by taking the prescribed water intake values of different age groups. The concentration of uranium obtained, i.e. 0.1 +/- 0.01 to 19.6 +/- 1.8 microg l(-1), is well below the drinking water guideline value of 30 microg l(-1). The annual ingestion dose due to uranium in drinking water for various age groups is found to vary from 0.14 to 48 microSv y(-1).

  14. A test of homogeneity for age-dependent branching processes with immigration.

    PubMed

    Hyrien, Ollivier; Yanev, Nikolay M; Jordan, Craig T

    We propose a novel procedure to test whether the immigration process of a discretely observed age-dependent branching process with immigration is time-homogeneous. The construction of the test is motivated by the behavior of the coefficient of variation of the population size. When immigration is time-homogeneous, we find that this coefficient converges to a constant, whereas when immigration is time-inhomogeneous we find that it is time-dependent, at least transiently. Thus, we test the assumption that the immigration process is time-homogeneous by verifying that the sample coefficient of variation does not vary significantly over time. The test is simple to implement and does not require specification or fitting any branching process to the data. Simulations and an application to real data on the progression of leukemia are presented to illustrate the approach.

  15. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-07

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls.

  16. Cytoprotective Effects of Hydrophilic and Lipophilic Extracts of Pistacia vera against Oxidative Versus Carbonyl Stress in Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Jafar; Zareh, Mona; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the cytoprotection of various extracts and bioactive compounds found in Pistacia vera againts cytotoxicity, ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, mitochondrial and lysosomal membrane damages in cell toxicity models of diabetes related carbonyl (glyoxal) and oxidative stress (hydroperoxide). Methanol, water and ethyl acetate were used to prepare crude pistachios extracts, which were then used to screen for in-vitro cytoprotection of freshly isolated rat hepatocytes against these toxins. The order of protection by Pistacia vera extracts against both hydroperoxide induced oxidative stress (ROS formation) and glyoxal induced protein carbonylation was: pistachio methanolic extract >pistachio water extract, gallic acid, catechin> α-tochoferol and pistachio ethyl acetate extract. Finally due to higher protection achieved by methanolic extract even compared to sole pretreatment of gallic acid, catechin or α-tochoferol, we suggest that cytoprotection depends on the variety of polar and non-polar compounds found in methanolic extract, it is likely that multiple cytoprotective mechanisms are acting against oxidative and carbonyl induced cytotoxicity. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the cytoprotective activity of Pistacia vera extracts against oxidative and carbonyl stress seen in type 2 diabetes hepatocytes model. PMID:25587316

  17. Age-Dependent Speciation Can Explain the Shape of Empirical Phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Oskar; Hartmann, Klaas; Steel, Mike; Stadler, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Tens of thousands of phylogenetic trees, describing the evolutionary relationships between hundreds of thousands of taxa, are readily obtainable from various databases. From such trees, inferences can be made about the underlying macroevolutionary processes, yet remarkably these processes are still poorly understood. Simple and widely used evolutionary null models are problematic: Empirical trees show very different imbalance between the sizes of the daughter clades of ancestral taxa compared to what models predict. Obtaining a simple evolutionary model that is both biologically plausible and produces the imbalance seen in empirical trees is a challenging problem, to which none of the existing models provide a satisfying answer. Here we propose a simple, biologically plausible macroevolutionary model in which the rate of speciation decreases with species age, whereas extinction rates can vary quite generally. We show that this model provides a remarkable fit to the thousands of trees stored in the online database TreeBase. The biological motivation for the identified age-dependent speciation process may be that recently evolved taxa often colonize new regions or niches and may initially experience little competition. These new taxa are thus more likely to give rise to further new taxa than a taxon that has remained largely unchanged and is, therefore, well adapted to its niche. We show that age-dependent speciation may also be the result of different within-species populations following the same laws of lineage splitting to produce new species. As the fit of our model to the tree database shows, this simple biological motivation provides an explanation for a long standing problem in macroevolution. PMID:25575504

  18. Gestational Age-Dependent Changes in Gene Expression of Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters in Pregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shuster, Diana L.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; MacDonald, James W.; Tsai, Jesse M.; Farin, Frederico M.; Hebert, Mary F.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy-induced changes in drug pharmacokinetics can be explained by changes in expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and/or normal physiology. In this study, we determined gestational age-dependent expression profiles for all metabolic enzyme and transporter genes in the maternal liver, kidney, small intestine, and placenta of pregnant mice by microarray analysis. We specifically examined the expression of genes important for xenobiotic, bile acid, and steroid hormone metabolism and disposition, namely, cytochrome P450s (Cyp), UDP-glucuronosyltranserases (Ugt), sulfotransferases (Sult), and ATP-binding cassette (Abc), solute carrier (Slc), and solute carrier organic anion (Slco) transporters. Few Ugt and Sult genes were affected by pregnancy. Cyp17a1 expression in the maternal liver increased 3- to 10-fold during pregnancy, which was the largest observed change in the maternal tissues. Cyp1a2, most Cyp2 isoforms, Cyp3a11, and Cyp3a13 expression in the liver decreased on gestation days (gd) 15 and 19 compared with nonpregnant controls (gd 0). In contrast, Cyp2d40, Cyp3a16, Cyp3a41a, Cyp3a41b, and Cyp3a44 in the liver were induced throughout pregnancy. In the placenta, Cyp expression on gd 10 and 15 was upregulated compared with gd 19. Notable changes were also observed in Abc and Slc transporters. Abcc3 expression in the liver and Abcb1a, Abcc4, and Slco4c1 expression in the kidney were downregulated on gd 15 and 19. In the placenta, Slc22a3 (Oct3) expression on gd 10 was 90% lower than that on gd 15 and 19. This study demonstrates important gestational age-dependent expression of metabolic enzyme and transporter genes, which may have mechanistic relevance to drug disposition in human pregnancy. PMID:23175668

  19. Age-dependent changes in plasma and brain cholinesterase activities of house wrens and European starlings.

    PubMed

    Mayack, David T; Martin, Tim

    2003-07-01

    We determined age-dependent changes in plasma and brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity for two species of passerines: house wren (Troglodytes aedon) and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris, starling). In plasma from nestlings of both species, total ChE activity increased with age, acetycholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7) activity declined rapidly immediately after hatching, and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, EC 3.1.1.8) activity increased steadily. For both species, total ChE and BChE activities and the BChE:AChE ratio in plasma were significantly greater in adults than nestlings suggesting trends observed in nestlings continue post fledging. In older nestlings and adults, AChE activity in plasma was significantly greater and BChE:AChE ratio less in house wrens than starlings. For house wrens as compared with starlings, ChE activity in brain increased at a significantly greater rate with age in nestlings and was significantly greater in adults. However, ChE activity in brain was similar at fledging for both species suggesting that the increase in ChE in brain is more directly related to ontogeny than chronologic age in nestlings of passerines. For both species, ChE activity increased significantly with brain weight of nestlings but not adults. House wrens hold similar patterns of age-dependent change in ChE activity in common with starlings but also exhibit differences in AChE activity in plasma that should be considered as a factor potentially affecting their relative toxicologic response to ChE inhibitors.

  20. Gestational age-dependent changes in gene expression of metabolic enzymes and transporters in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Diana L; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Macdonald, James W; Tsai, Jesse M; Farin, Frederico M; Hebert, Mary F; Thummel, Kenneth E; Mao, Qingcheng

    2013-02-01

    Pregnancy-induced changes in drug pharmacokinetics can be explained by changes in expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and/or normal physiology. In this study, we determined gestational age-dependent expression profiles for all metabolic enzyme and transporter genes in the maternal liver, kidney, small intestine, and placenta of pregnant mice by microarray analysis. We specifically examined the expression of genes important for xenobiotic, bile acid, and steroid hormone metabolism and disposition, namely, cytochrome P450s (Cyp), UDP-glucuronosyltranserases (Ugt), sulfotransferases (Sult), and ATP-binding cassette (Abc), solute carrier (Slc), and solute carrier organic anion (Slco) transporters. Few Ugt and Sult genes were affected by pregnancy. Cyp17a1 expression in the maternal liver increased 3- to 10-fold during pregnancy, which was the largest observed change in the maternal tissues. Cyp1a2, most Cyp2 isoforms, Cyp3a11, and Cyp3a13 expression in the liver decreased on gestation days (gd) 15 and 19 compared with nonpregnant controls (gd 0). In contrast, Cyp2d40, Cyp3a16, Cyp3a41a, Cyp3a41b, and Cyp3a44 in the liver were induced throughout pregnancy. In the placenta, Cyp expression on gd 10 and 15 was upregulated compared with gd 19. Notable changes were also observed in Abc and Slc transporters. Abcc3 expression in the liver and Abcb1a, Abcc4, and Slco4c1 expression in the kidney were downregulated on gd 15 and 19. In the placenta, Slc22a3 (Oct3) expression on gd 10 was 90% lower than that on gd 15 and 19. This study demonstrates important gestational age-dependent expression of metabolic enzyme and transporter genes, which may have mechanistic relevance to drug disposition in human pregnancy.

  1. Transient Elastography-Based Liver Stiffness Age-Dependently Increases in Children

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Daisuke; Cho, Yuki; Shintaku, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Pediatric use of liver transient elastography (TE) is attractive for its non-invasiveness, but reference values have not been established. We aimed to determine reference values for TE in children. Methods In pediatric patients (1 to 18 years), TE (FibroScan®) with an M probe was used for both liver stiffness measurement (LSM) and measurement of hepatic fat deposition by using a controlled attenuation parameter (CAP). The patients were divided into three relevant age groups: preschoolers (1 to 5 years), elementary school children (6 to 11 years), and adolescents (12 to 18 years). Overweight or obese patients or those with known liver disease, elevated serum liver enzymes, or hepatic echogenic abnormality were excluded from the study. Results Among 139 children, 123 (88.5%; 62 male; median age, 11.7 years; age range, 1.3 to 17.2 years) were successfully subjected to M-probe TE without anesthesia. Median LSM increased with age: it was 3.4 kPa (2.3 to 4.6 kPa, 5th to 95th percentiles) at ages 1 to 5 years; 3.8 (2.5 to 6.1) kPa at ages 6 to 11; and 4.1 (3.3 to 7.9) kPa at ages 12 to 18 (P = 0.001). Median CAP was not age dependent: it was 183 (112 to 242) for ages 1 to 18 years. Conclusions M-probe TE is suitable in a wide age range of children from age 1 year up. In children without evidence of liver disease, LSM has an age-dependent increase, whereas CAP does not differ between ages 1 and 18. PMID:27861607

  2. A Prospective Study of Age-dependent Changes in Propofol-induced Electroencephalogram Oscillations in Children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Johanna M; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Terzakis, Kristina; Pavone, Kara J; Deng, Hao; Houle, Timothy T; Firth, Paul G; Shank, Erik S; Brown, Emery N; Purdon, Patrick L

    2017-08-01

    In adults, frontal electroencephalogram patterns observed during propofol-induced unconsciousness consist of slow oscillations (0.1 to 1 Hz) and coherent alpha oscillations (8 to 13 Hz). Given that the nervous system undergoes significant changes during development, anesthesia-induced electroencephalogram oscillations in children may differ from those observed in adults. Therefore, we investigated age-related changes in frontal electroencephalogram power spectra and coherence during propofol-induced unconsciousness. We analyzed electroencephalogram data recorded during propofol-induced unconsciousness in patients between 0 and 21 yr of age (n = 97), using multitaper spectral and coherence methods. We characterized power and coherence as a function of age using multiple linear regression analysis and within four age groups: 4 months to 1 yr old (n = 4), greater than 1 to 7 yr old (n = 16), greater than 7 to 14 yr old (n = 30), and greater than 14 to 21 yr old (n = 47). Total electroencephalogram power (0.1 to 40 Hz) peaked at approximately 8 yr old and subsequently declined with increasing age. For patients greater than 1 yr old, the propofol-induced electroencephalogram structure was qualitatively similar regardless of age, featuring slow and coherent alpha oscillations. For patients under 1 yr of age, frontal alpha oscillations were not coherent. Neurodevelopmental processes that occur throughout childhood, including thalamocortical development, may underlie age-dependent changes in electroencephalogram power and coherence during anesthesia. These age-dependent anesthesia-induced electroencephalogram oscillations suggest a more principled approach to monitoring brain states in pediatric patients.

  3. Fluoxetine Exerts Age-Dependent Effects on Behavior and Amygdala Neuroplasticity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Homberg, Judith R.; Olivier, Jocelien D. A.; Blom, Tom; Arentsen, Tim; van Brunschot, Chantal; Schipper, Pieter; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac® (fluoxetine) is the only registered antidepressant to treat depression in children and adolescents. Yet, while the safety of SSRIs has been well established in adults, serotonin exerts neurotrophic actions in the developing brain and thereby may have harmful effects in adolescents. Here we treated adolescent and adult rats chronically with fluoxetine (12 mg/kg) at postnatal day (PND) 25 to 46 and from PND 67 to 88, respectively, and tested the animals 7–14 days after the last injection when (nor)fluoxetine in blood plasma had been washed out, as determined by HPLC. Plasma (nor)fluoxetine levels were also measured 5 hrs after the last fluoxetine injection, and matched clinical levels. Adolescent rats displayed increased behavioral despair in the forced swim test, which was not seen in adult fluoxetine treated rats. In addition, beneficial effects of fluoxetine on wakefulness as measured by electroencephalography in adults was not seen in adolescent rats, and age-dependent effects on the acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition were observed. On the other hand, adolescent rats showed resilience to the anorexic effects of fluoxetine. Exploratory behavior in the open field test was not affected by fluoxetine treatment, but anxiety levels in the elevated plus maze test were increased in both adolescent and adult fluoxetine treated rats. Finally, in the amygdala, but not the dorsal raphe nucleus and medial prefrontal cortex, the number of PSA-NCAM (marker for synaptic remodeling) immunoreactive neurons was increased in adolescent rats, and decreased in adult rats, as a consequence of chronic fluoxetine treatment. No fluoxetine-induced changes in 5-HT1A receptor immunoreactivity were observed. In conclusion, we show that fluoxetine exerts both harmful and beneficial age-dependent effects on depressive behavior, body weight and wakefulness, which may relate, in part, to differential fluoxetine

  4. Seafloor age dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Karen E.; Dalton, Colleen A.; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2017-05-01

    Variations in the phase velocity of fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves across the Indian Ocean are determined using two inversion approaches. First, variations in phase velocity as a function of seafloor age are estimated using a pure-path age-dependent inversion method. Second, a two-dimensional parameterization is used to solve for phase velocity within 1.25° × 1.25° grid cells. Rayleigh wave travel time delays have been measured between periods of 38 and 200 s. The number of measurements in the study area ranges between 4139 paths at a period of 200 s and 22,272 paths at a period of 40 s. At periods < 100 s, the phase velocity variations are strongly controlled by seafloor age and shown to be consistent with temperature variations predicted by the half-space-cooling model for a mantle potential temperature of 1400°C. The inferred thermal structure beneath the Indian Ocean is most similar to the structure of the Pacific upper mantle, where phase velocities can also be explained by a half-space-cooling model. The thermal structure is not consistent with that of the Atlantic upper mantle, which is best fit by a plate-cooling model and requires a thin plate. Removing age-dependent phase velocity from the 2-D maps of the Indian Ocean highlights anomalously high velocities at the Rodriguez Triple Junction and the Australian-Antarctic Discordance and anomalously low velocities immediately to the west of the Central Indian Ridge.

  5. Lung injury after hemorrhage is age-dependent: role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ

    PubMed Central

    Zingarelli, Basilia; Hake, Paul W.; O’Connor, Michael; Burroughs, Timothy J.; Wong, Hector R.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The incidence of multiple organ failure in pediatric trauma victims is lower than in the adult population. However, the molecular mechanisms are not yet defined. We investigated whether the pathophysiologic characteristics of hemorrhage-induced lung injury may be age-dependent and may be regulated by the peroxisome proliferator activator receptor γ (PPARγ). Design Prospective, laboratory investigation that used an established rodent model of hemorrhagic shock. Setting University hospital laboratory. Subjects Young (n=67; 3–5 months old) and mature (n=66; 11–13 months old) male rats. Interventions Hemorrhagic shock was induced in young and mature rats by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial blood pressure of 50 mmHg. After 3 hrs, rats were rapidly resuscitated by infusing the shed blood and sacrificed 3 hrs thereafter. Measurements and Main Results In young rats, lung injury was characterized by accumulation of red cells and neutrophils at the end of the resuscitation period; at Western blot analysis, lung expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was increased. In contrast, the severity of lung injury was more pronounced in mature rats. Lung myeloperoxidase activity and expression of constitutive and inducible ICAM-1 was significantly higher in mature rats when compared to young rats. Mature rats also had higher plasma levels of cytokines and chemokines when compared to young rats. This heightened inflammation was associated with higher degree of activation of nuclear factor-κB and down-regulation of PPARγ and heat shock factor-1 in the lung of mature rats when compared to young rats. Treatment with the PPARγ ligand, the cyclopentenone prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, ameliorated lung injury in young, but not in mature animals. Conclusions Lung injury after severe hemorrhage is age-dependent and may be secondary to a diverse regulation of PPARγ. PMID:19384226

  6. [Carbonyl compounds emission and uptake by plant: Research progress].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Cai, Jing; Yan, Liu-Shui; Li, Ling-Na; Tao, Min

    2013-02-01

    This paper reviewed the researches on the carbonyl compounds emission and uptake by plants, and discussed the compensation point of the bidirectional exchange of carbonyl compounds between plants and atmosphere. The uptake by leaf stomata and stratum corneum is the principal way for the purification of air aldehydes by plants. After entering into plant leaves, most parts of carbonyl compounds can be metabolized into organic acid, glucide, amino acid, and carbon dioxide, etc. , by the endoenzymes in leaves. The exchange direction of the carbonyl compounds between plants and atmosphere can be preliminarily predicted by the compensation point and the concentrations of ambient carbonyl compounds. This paper summarized the analytical methods such as DNPH/HPLC/UV and PFPH/GC/MS used for the determination of carbonyl compounds emitted from plants or in plant leaves. The main research interests in the future were pointed out, e. g. , to improve and optimize the analytical methods for the determination of carbonyl compounds emitted from plants and the researches on systems (e. g. , plant-soil system), to enlarge the detection species of carbonyl compounds emitted from plants, to screen the plant species which can effectively metabolize the pollutants, and to popularize the phytoremediation techniques for atmospheric

  7. Age-dependent changes in the functions and compositions of photosynthetic complexes in the thylakoid membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nath, Krishna; Phee, Bong-Kwan; Jeong, Suyeong; Lee, Sun Yi; Tateno, Yoshio; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Lee, Choon-Hwan; Nam, Hong Gil

    2013-11-01

    Photosynthetic complexes in the thylakoid membrane of plant leaves primarily function as energy-harvesting machinery during the growth period. However, leaves undergo developmental and functional transitions along aging and, at the senescence stage, these complexes become major sources for nutrients to be remobilized to other organs such as developing seeds. Here, we investigated age-dependent changes in the functions and compositions of photosynthetic complexes during natural leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that Chl a/b ratios decreased during the natural leaf senescence along with decrease of the total chlorophyll content. The photosynthetic parameters measured by the chlorophyll fluorescence, photochemical efficiency (F v/F m) of photosystem II, non-photochemical quenching, and the electron transfer rate, showed a differential decline in the senescing part of the leaves. The CO2 assimilation rate and the activity of PSI activity measured from whole senescing leaves remained relatively intact until 28 days of leaf age but declined sharply thereafter. Examination of the behaviors of the individual components in the photosynthetic complex showed that the components on the whole are decreased, but again showed differential decline during leaf senescence. Notably, D1, a PSII reaction center protein, was almost not present but PsaA/B, a PSI reaction center protein is still remained at the senescence stage. Taken together, our results indicate that the compositions and structures of the photosynthetic complexes are differentially utilized at different stages of leaf, but the most dramatic change was observed at the senescence stage, possibly to comply with the physiological states of the senescence process.

  8. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  9. Aldehydes as alkyl carbanion equivalents for additions to carbonyl compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haining; Dai, Xi-Jie; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Nucleophilic addition reactions of organometallic reagents to carbonyl compounds for carbon-carbon bond construction have played a pivotal role in modern chemistry. However, this reaction's reliance on petroleum-derived chemical feedstocks and a stoichiometric quantity of metal have prompted the development of many carbanion equivalents and catalytic metal alternatives. Here, we show that naturally occurring carbonyls can be used as latent alkyl carbanion equivalents for additions to carbonyl compounds, via reductive polarity reversal. Such 'umpolung' reactivity is facilitated by a ruthenium catalyst and diphosphine ligand under mild conditions, delivering synthetically valuable secondary and tertiary alcohols in up to 98% yield. The unique chemoselectivity exhibited by carbonyl-derived carbanion equivalents is demonstrated by their tolerance to protic reaction media and good functional group compatibility. Enantioenriched tertiary alcohols can also be accessed with the aid of chiral ligands, albeit with moderate stereocontrol. Such carbonyl-derived carbanion equivalents are anticipated to find broad utility in chemical bond formation.

  10. Aldehydes as alkyl carbanion equivalents for additions to carbonyl compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haining; Dai, Xi-Jie; Li, Chao-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Nucleophilic addition reactions of organometallic reagents to carbonyl compounds for carbon-carbon bond construction have played a pivotal role in modern chemistry. However, this reaction's reliance on petroleum-derived chemical feedstocks and a stoichiometric quantity of metal have prompted the development of many carbanion equivalents and catalytic metal alternatives. Here, we show that naturally occurring carbonyls can be used as latent alkyl carbanion equivalents for additions to carbonyl compounds, via reductive polarity reversal. Such 'umpolung' reactivity is facilitated by a ruthenium catalyst and diphosphine ligand under mild conditions, delivering synthetically valuable secondary and tertiary alcohols in up to 98% yield. The unique chemoselectivity exhibited by carbonyl-derived carbanion equivalents is demonstrated by their tolerance to protic reaction media and good functional group compatibility. Enantioenriched tertiary alcohols can also be accessed with the aid of chiral ligands, albeit with moderate stereocontrol. Such carbonyl-derived carbanion equivalents are anticipated to find broad utility in chemical bond formation.

  11. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide exchange in bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, A.; Klinger, L.F.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1993-01-22

    Measurements of Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes were carried out on bog microcosms using chamber sampling and tunable diode laser analysis. Intact bog microcosms (vascular plants, mosses, and peat) removed ambient levels of OCS in the light and dark with rates from [minus]2.4 to [minus]8.1 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2]. Peat and peat plus mosses emitted OCS in the light with rates of 17.4 and 10.9 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2], respectively. In the dark, the mosses apparently removed OCS at a rate equivalent to the peat emissions. A 3-D numerical tracer model using this data indicated that boreal bog ecosystems remove at most 1% of ambient OCS, not sufficient to account for an observed OCS depletion in boreal air masses. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Global Budgets of Atmospheric Carbonyl Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. E.; Whelan, M.; Seibt, U. H.; Smith, S.; Berry, J. A.; Montzka, S. A.; Hilton, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the magnitudes and temporal trends of sources and sinks of tropospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) and their relationship to understanding the atmospheric lifetime as well as other important atmospheric species including carbon dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and biogenic volatile organic compounds. Our analysis incorporates data that was overlooked in previous budgets, recent advances in the understanding of budget components, and temporal data relevant to estimating recent and long-term changes in budget components. While the uncertainty estimates are large and include a missing source that may be the largest individual source, atmospheric inverse studies can constrain these budgets while also addressing critical knowledge gaps for related species, particularly CO2.

  13. Detection of carbonyl fluoride in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Park, J. H.; Russell, J. M., III; Zander, R.; Brown, L. R.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.; Raper, O. F.

    1986-01-01

    Infrared solar absorption spectra of the stratosphere recorded at a resolution of 0.01/cm by the ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) instrument from onboard Spacelab 3 (04/30 to 05/6/85) have revealed the existence of many previously unobserved absorption features in the 1925 to 1960/cm and 1249 to 1255/cm regions and one at 774/cm. On the basis of comparisons with laboratory spectra, these features have been identified as belonging to the nu1, nu4, and nu6 bands of carbonyl fluoride, respectively. Volume mixing ratios of COF2 between 17 and 40 km have been deduced from analysis of the nu1 and nu6 bands.

  14. Carbonyl Emissions From Oil and Gas Production Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, S. N.; O'Neil, T.; Tran, T.

    2015-12-01

    A number of recent studies have targeted emissions of methane and other hydrocarbons from oil and gas exploration and production activity. These measurements are greatly increasing understanding of the atmospheric impacts of oil and gas development. Very few measurements exist, however, of emissions of formaldehyde and other carbonyls from oil and gas equipment. Carbonyls are toxic and serve as important ozone precursors, especially during winter ozone episodes in places like Utah's Uintah Basin. Current air quality models are only able to reproduce observed high wintertime ozone if they incorporate emissions inventories with very high carbonyl emissions. We measured carbonyl emissions from oil and gas equipment and facilities—including glycol dehydrators, liquid storage tanks, raw gas leaks, raw gas-burning engines, and produced water surface impoundments—in Rocky Mountain oil and gas fields. Carbonyl emissions from raw gas were below detection, but emissions of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and other carbonyls were detected from liquid storage tanks, glycol dehydrators, and other oil and gas equipment. In some cases, carbonyls may be formed from the degradation of methanol and other chemicals used in oil and gas production, but the collected data provide evidence for other non-combustion formation pathways. Raw gas-burning engines also emitted carbonyls. Emissions from all measured sources were a small fraction of total volatile organic compound emissions. We incorporated our measurements into an emissions inventory, used that inventory in an air quality model (WRF-SMOKE-CAMx), and were unable to reproduce observed high wintertime ozone. This could be because (1) emission sources we have not yet measured, including compressors, gas processing plants, and others, are large; (2) non-carbonyl emissions, especially those that quickly degrade into carbonyls during photochemical processing, are underestimated in the inventory; or (3) the air quality model is unable

  15. Gas-phase chemistry of technetium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fang-Li; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Cao, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Cun-Min

    2015-05-28

    Gas-phase chemical behaviors of short-lived technetium carbonyl complexes were studied using a low temperature isothermal chromatograph (IC) coupled with a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Fission products recoiled from the (252)Cf SF source were thermalized in a mixed gas containing CO, and then technetium carbonyl complexes were formed from reactions between CO gas and various technetium isotopes. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyl complexes from a recoil chamber to the IC. Short IC columns made of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon and quartz were used to obtain chemical information about the technetium carbonyl complexes. The results for the (104)Tc-(106)Tc carbonyl complexes were found to be strongly influenced by the precursors, and showed the chemical behaviors of (104)Mo-(106)Mo carbonyl complexes, respectively. However, (107)Tc and (108)Tc could represent the chemical information of the element technetium due to their high independent yields and the very short half-lives of their precursors (107)Mo and (108)Mo. An adsorption enthalpy of about ΔHads = -43 kJ mol(-1) was determined for the Tc carbonyl complexes on both the Teflon and quartz surfaces by fitting the breakthrough curves of the (107)Tc and (108)Tc carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Chemical yields of around 25% were measured for the Tc carbonyl complexes relative to the transport yields obtained with the gas-jet transport of KCl aerosol particles with Ar carrier gas. Furthermore, the influence of a small amount of O2 gas on the yields of the Mo and Tc carbonyl complexes was studied.

  16. Evidence for inactivation of cysteine proteases by reactive carbonyls via glycation of active site thiols

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jingmin; Dunlop, Rachael A.; Rodgers, Kenneth J.; Davies, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia, triose phosphate decomposition and oxidation reactions generate reactive aldehydes in vivo. These compounds react non-enzymatically with protein side chains and N-terminal amino groups to give adducts and cross-links, and hence modified proteins. Previous studies have shown that free or protein-bound carbonyls inactivate glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with concomitant loss of thiol groups [Morgan, Dean and Davies (2002) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 403, 259–269]. It was therefore hypothesized that modification of lysosomal cysteine proteases (and the structurally related enzyme papain) by free and protein-bound carbonyls may modulate the activity of these components of the cellular proteolytic machinery responsible for the removal of modified proteins and thereby contribute to a decreased removal of modified proteins from cells. It is shown that MGX (methylglyoxal), GO (glyoxal) and glycolaldehyde, but not hydroxyacetone and glucose, inhibit catB (cathepsin B), catL (cathepsin L) and catS (cathepsin S) activity in macrophage cell lysates, in a concentration-dependent manner. Protein-bound carbonyls produced similar inhibition with both cell lysates and intact macrophage cells. Inhibition was also observed with papain, with this paralleled by loss of the active site cysteine residue and formation of the adduct species S-carboxymethylcysteine, from GO, in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of autolysis of papain by MGX, along with cross-link formation, was detected by SDS/PAGE. Treatment of papain and catS with the dialdehyde o-phthalaldehyde resulted in enzyme inactivation and an intra-molecular active site cysteine–lysine cross-link. These results demonstrate that reactive aldehydes inhibit cysteine proteases by modification of the active site cysteine residue. This process may contribute to the accumulation of modified proteins in tissues of people with diabetes and age-related pathologies, including atherosclerosis, cataract and

  17. Age-Dependent Association of TNFSF15/TNFSF8 Variants and Leprosy Type 1 Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Vinicius M.; Sales-Marques, Carolinne; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Moraes, Milton O.; Schurr, Erwin

    2017-01-01

    A current major challenge in leprosy control is the prevention of permanent disabilities. Host pathological inflammatory responses termed type 1 reaction (T1R) are a leading cause of nerve damage for leprosy patients. The environmental or inherited factors that predispose leprosy cases to undergo T1R are not known. However, studies have shown an important contribution of host genetics for susceptibility to T1R. We have previously identified variants encompassing the TNFSF15/TNFSF8 genes as T1R risk factors in a Vietnamese sample and replicated this association in a Brazilian sample. However, we failed to validate in Brazilian patients the strong association of TNFSF15/TNFSF8 markers rs6478108 and rs7863183 with T1R that we had observed in Vietnamese patients. Here, we investigated if the lack of validation of these variants was due to age-dependent effects on association using four independent population samples, two from Brazil and two from Vietnam. In the combined analysis across the four samples, we observed a strong association of the TNFSF15/TNFSF8 variants rs6478108, rs7863183, and rs3181348 with T1R (pcombined = 1.5E−05, pcombined = 1.8E−05, and pcombined = 6.5E−06, respectively). However, the association of rs6478108 with T1R was more pronounced in leprosy cases under 30 years of age compared to the global sample [odds ratio (OR) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.54–2.46, pcombined = 2.5E−08 versus OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.23–1.73, pcombined = 1.5E−05]. A multivariable analysis indicated that the association of rs6478108 with T1R was independent of either rs7863183 or rs3181348. These three variants are known regulators of the TNFSF8 gene transcription level in multiple tissues. The age dependency of association of rs6478108 and T1R suggests that the genetic control of gene expression varies across the human life span. PMID:28261213

  18. Age-dependency of analgesia elicited by intraoral sucrose in acute and persistent pain models.

    PubMed

    Anseloni, Vanessa C Z; Weng, H-R; Terayama, R; Letizia, David; Davis, Barry J; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald; Ennis, Matthew

    2002-05-01

    mechanisms and that an enhanced sucrose effect takes place in hyperalgesic, inflamed animals as compared to naive animals. Taken together, these results indicate that intraoral sucrose alleviates transient pain in response to thermal and mechanical stimuli, and also effectively reduces inflammatory hyperalgesia and allodynia. Sucrose-induced analgesia is age-dependent and limited to the pre-weaning period in rats. The age-dependency of sucrose-induced analgesia and its differential maturation for the fore- and hindpaw may be due to developmental changes in endogenous analgesic mechanisms and developmental modulation of the interaction between gustatory and pain modulatory pathways.

  19. Allele-specific, age-dependent and BMI-associated DNA methylation of human MCHR1.

    PubMed

    Stepanow, Stefanie; Reichwald, Kathrin; Huse, Klaus; Gausmann, Ulrike; Nebel, Almut; Rosenstiel, Philip; Wabitsch, Martin; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Platzer, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) plays a significant role in regulation of energy balance, food intake, physical activity and body weight in humans and rodents. Several association studies for human obesity showed contrary results concerning the SNPs rs133072 (G/A) and rs133073 (T/C), which localize to the first exon of MCHR1. The variations constitute two main haplotypes (GT, AC). Both SNPs affect CpG dinucleotides, whereby each haplotype contains a potential methylation site at one of the two SNP positions. In addition, 15 CpGs in close vicinity of these SNPs constitute a weak CpG island. Here, we studied whether DNA methylation in this sequence context may contribute to population- and age-specific effects of MCHR1 alleles in obesity. We analyzed DNA methylation of a 315 bp region of MCHR1 encompassing rs133072 and rs133073 and the CpG island in blood samples of 49 individuals by bisulfite sequencing. The AC haplotype shows a significantly higher methylation level than the GT haplotype. This allele-specific methylation is age-dependent. In young individuals (20-30 years) the difference in DNA methylation between haplotypes is significant; whereas in individuals older than 60 years it is not detectable. Interestingly, the GT allele shows a decrease in methylation status with increasing BMI, whereas the methylation of the AC allele is not associated with this phenotype. Heterozygous lymphoblastoid cell lines show the same pattern of allele-specific DNA methylation. The cell line, which exhibits the highest difference in methylation levels between both haplotypes, also shows allele-specific transcription of MCHR1, which can be abolished by treatment with the DNA methylase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. We show that DNA methylation at MCHR1 is allele-specific, age-dependent, BMI-associated and affects transcription. Conceivably, this epigenetic regulation contributes to the age- and/or population specific effects reported for MCHR1 in several

  20. Aerobic exercise training induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and age-dependent adaptations in myofiber function in young and older men.

    PubMed

    Harber, Matthew P; Konopka, Adam R; Undem, Miranda K; Hinkley, James M; Minchev, Kiril; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Trappe, Todd A; Trappe, Scott

    2012-11-01

    To examine potential age-specific adaptations in skeletal muscle size and myofiber contractile physiology in response to aerobic exercise, seven young (YM; 20 ± 1 yr) and six older men (OM; 74 ± 3 yr) performed 12 wk of cycle ergometer training. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis to determine size and contractile properties of isolated slow [myosin heavy chain (MHC) I] and fast (MHC IIa) myofibers, MHC composition, and muscle protein concentration. Aerobic capacity was higher (P < 0.05) after training in both YM (16 ± 2%) and OM (13 ± 3%). Quadriceps muscle volume, determined via MRI, was 5 ± 1 and 6 ± 1% greater (P < 0.05) after training for YM and OM, respectively, which was associated with an increase in MHC I myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA), independent of age. MHC I peak power was higher (P < 0.05) after training for both YM and OM, while MHC IIa peak power was increased (P < 0.05) with training in OM only. MHC I and MHC IIa myofiber peak and normalized (peak force/CSA) force were preserved with training in OM, while MHC I peak force/CSA and MHC IIa peak force were lower (P < 0.05) after training in YM. The age-dependent adaptations in myofiber function were not due to changes in protein content, as total muscle protein and myofibrillar protein concentration were unchanged (P > 0.05) with training. Training reduced (P < 0.05) the proportion of MHC IIx isoform, independent of age, whereas no other changes in MHC composition were observed. These data suggest relative improvements in muscle size and aerobic capacity are similar between YM and OM, while adaptations in myofiber contractile function showed a general improvement in OM. Training-related increases in MHC I and MHC IIa peak power reveal that skeletal muscle of OM is responsive to aerobic exercise training and further support the use of aerobic exercise for improving cardiovascular and skeletal muscle health in older individuals.

  1. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, Conor J.; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  2. Bistable Epigenetic States Explain Age-Dependent Decline in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hamidouche, Zahia; Rother, Karen; Przybilla, Jens; Krinner, Axel; Clay, Denis; Hopp, Lydia; Fabian, Claire; Stolzing, Alexandra; Binder, Hans; Charbord, Pierre; Galle, Joerg

    2017-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which heterogeneity, a major characteristic of stem cells, is achieved are yet unclear. We here study the expression of the membrane stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clones. We show that subpopulations with varying Sca-1 expression profiles regenerate the Sca-1 profile of the mother population within a few days. However, after extensive replication in vitro, the expression profiles shift to lower values and the regeneration time increases. Study of the promoter of Ly6a unravels that the expression level of Sca-1 is related to the promoter occupancy by the activating histone mark H3K4me3. We demonstrate that these findings can be consistently explained by a computational model that considers positive feedback between promoter H3K4me3 modification and gene transcription. This feedback implicates bistable epigenetic states which the cells occupy with an age-dependent frequency due to persistent histone (de-)modification. Our results provide evidence that MSC heterogeneity, and presumably that of other stem cells, is associated with bistable epigenetic states and suggest that MSCs are subject to permanent state fluctuations. Stem Cells 2017;35:694-704. © The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  3. Age-dependent genetic variance in a life-history trait in the mute swan

    PubMed Central

    Charmantier, Anne; Perrins, Christopher; McCleery, Robin H; Sheldon, Ben C

    2005-01-01

    Genetic variance in characters under natural selection in natural populations determines the way those populations respond to that selection. Whether populations show temporal and/or spatial constancy in patterns of genetic variance and covariance is regularly considered, as this will determine whether selection responses are constant over space and time. Much less often considered is whether characters show differing amounts of genetic variance over the life-history of individuals. Such age-specific variation, if present, has important potential consequences for the force of natural selection and for understanding the causes of variation in quantitative characters. Using data from a long-term study of the mute swan Cygnus olor, we report the partitioning of phenotypic variance in timing of breeding (subject to strong natural selection) into component parts over 12 different age classes. We show that the additive genetic variance and heritability of this trait are strongly age-dependent, with higher additive genetic variance present in young and, particularly, old birds, but little evidence of any genetic variance for birds of intermediate ages. These results demonstrate that age can have a very important influence on the components of variation of characters in natural populations, and consequently that separate age classes cannot be assumed to be equivalent, either with respect to their evolutionary potential or response. PMID:16555791

  4. Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Aline; Sommer, Felix; Zhang, Kaiyi; Repnik, Urska; Basic, Marijana; Bleich, André; Kühnel, Mark; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Litvak, Yael; Fulde, Marcus; Rosenshine, Ilan; Hornef, Mathias W.

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) represents a major causative agent of infant diarrhea associated with significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Although studied extensively in vitro, the investigation of the host-pathogen interaction in vivo has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Using RT-PCR and global transcriptome analysis, high throughput 16S rDNA sequencing as well as immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we characterize the EPEC-host interaction following oral challenge of newborn mice. Spontaneous colonization of the small intestine and colon of neonate mice that lasted until weaning was observed. Intimate attachment to the epithelial plasma membrane and microcolony formation were visualized only in the presence of a functional bundle forming pili (BFP) and type III secretion system (T3SS). Similarly, a T3SS-dependent EPEC-induced innate immune response, mediated via MyD88, TLR5 and TLR9 led to the induction of a distinct set of genes in infected intestinal epithelial cells. Infection-induced alterations of the microbiota composition remained restricted to the postnatal period. Although EPEC colonized the adult intestine in the absence of a competing microbiota, no microcolonies were observed at the small intestinal epithelium. Here, we introduce the first suitable mouse infection model and describe an age-dependent, virulence factor-dependent attachment of EPEC to enterocytes in vivo. PMID:27159323

  5. Age-dependent modulation of vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusumbe, Anjali P.; Ramasamy, Saravana K.; Itkin, Tomer; Andaloussi Mäe, Maarja; Langen, Urs H.; Betsholtz, Christer; Lapidot, Tsvee; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessels define local microenvironments in the skeletal system, play crucial roles in osteogenesis and provide niches for haematopoietic stem cells1–6. The properties of niche-forming vessels and their changes in the ageing organism remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that Notch signalling in endothelial cells leads to the expansion of haematopoietic stem cell niches in bone, which involves increases in CD31-positive capillaries and PDGFRβ-positive perivascular cells, arteriole formation, and elevation of cellular stem cell factor levels. While endothelial hypoxia-inducible factor signalling promotes some of these aspects, it fails to enhance vascular niche function because of lacking arterialization and expansion of PDGFRβ-positive cells. In ageing mice, niche-forming vessels in the skeletal system are strongly reduced but can be restored by activation of endothelial Notch signalling. These findings argue that vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells are part of complex, age-dependent microenvironments involving multiple cell populations and vessel subtypes. PMID:27074508

  6. Large-Scale Age-Dependent Skewed Sex Ratio in a Sexually Dimorphic Avian Scavenger

    PubMed Central

    Lambertucci, Sergio A.; Carrete, Martina; Donázar, José Antonio; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Age-dependent skewed sex ratios have been observed in bird populations, with adult males generally outnumbering females. This trend is mainly driven by higher female mortality, sometimes associated with anthropogenic factors. Despite the large amount of work on bird sex ratios, research examining the spatial stability of adult sex ratios is extremely scarce. The Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) is the only bird of prey with strong sexual dimorphism favouring males (males are 30% heavier than females). By examining data from most of its South-American range, we show that while the juvenile sex ratio is balanced, or even female-skewed, the sex ratio becomes increasing male-skewed with age, with adult males outnumbering females by >20%, and, in some cases by four times more. This result is consistent across regions and independent of the nature of field data. Reasons for this are unknown but it can be hypothesized that the progressive disappearance of females may be associated with mortality caused by anthropogenic factors. This idea is supported by the asymmetric habitat use by the two sexes, with females scavenging in more humanized areas. Whatever the cause, male-skewed adult sex ratios imply that populations of this endangered scavenger face higher risks of extinction than previously believed. PMID:23029488

  7. Age-dependent neonatal intracerebral hemorrhage in plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Philippe; Omouendze, Priscilla L; Roy, Vincent; Dourmap, Nathalie; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Carmeliet, Peter; Leroux-Nicollet, Isabelle; Marret, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    Intracerebral-intraventricular hemorrhages (ICH/IVH) in very preterm neonates are responsible for high mortality and subsequent disabilities. In humans, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) initiates fibrinolysis and activates endoluminal-endothelial receptors; dysfunction of the t-PA inhibitor (PAI-1) results in recurrent hemorrhages. We used PAI-1 knockout (PAI-1) mice to examine the role of t-PA in age-dependent intracranial hemorrhages as a possible model of preterm ICH/IVH. Intracortical injection of 2 μL of phosphate-buffered saline produced a small traumatic injury and a high rate of hemorrhage in PAI-1 pups at postnatal day 3 (P3) or P5, whereas it had no effect in wild-type neonates. This resulted in white matter and cortical lesions, ventricle enlargement, hyperlocomotion, and altered cortical levels of serotonin and dopamine in the adult PAI mice. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blockers, plasmin- and matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors reduced hemorrhage and tissue lesions. In contrast to P3 to P5, no significant hemorrhages were induced in P10 PAI-1 pups and there were no behavioral or neurochemical alterations in adulthood. These data suggest that microvascular immaturity up to P5 in mice is a determinant factor required for t-PA-dependent vascular rupture. Neonatal PAI-1 mice could be a useful ICH/IVH model for studying the ontogenic window of vascular immaturity and vascular protection against later neurodisabilities.

  8. Assessment of age-dependent uranium intake due to drinking water in Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Balbudhe, A Y; Srivastava, S K; Vishwaprasad, K; Srivastava, G K; Tripathi, R M; Puranik, V D

    2012-03-01

    A study has been done to assess the uranium intake through drinking water. The area of study is twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad, India. Uranium concentration in water samples was analysed by laser-induced fluorimetry. The associated age-dependent uranium intake was estimated by taking the prescribed water intake values. The concentration of uranium varies from below detectable level (minimum detectable level = 0.20 ± 0.02 μg l(-1)) to 2.50 ± 0.18 μg l(-1), with the geometric mean (GM) of 0.67 μg l(-1) in tap water, whereas in ground water, the range is 0.60 ± 0.05 to 82 ± 7.1 µg l(-1) with GM of 10.07 µg l(-1). The daily intake of uranium by drinking water pathway through tap water for various age groups is found to vary from 0.14 to 9.50 µg d(-1) with mean of 1.55 µg d(-1).

  9. Age-dependent genetic variance in a life-history trait in the mute swan.

    PubMed

    Charmantier, Anne; Perrins, Christopher; McCleery, Robin H; Sheldon, Ben C

    2006-01-22

    Genetic variance in characters under natural selection in natural populations determines the way those populations respond to that selection. Whether populations show temporal and/or spatial constancy in patterns of genetic variance and covariance is regularly considered, as this will determine whether selection responses are constant over space and time. Much less often considered is whether characters show differing amounts of genetic variance over the life-history of individuals. Such age-specific variation, if present, has important potential consequences for the force of natural selection and for understanding the causes of variation in quantitative characters. Using data from a long-term study of the mute swan Cygnus olor, we report the partitioning of phenotypic variance in timing of breeding (subject to strong natural selection) into component parts over 12 different age classes. We show that the additive genetic variance and heritability of this trait are strongly age-dependent, with higher additive genetic variance present in young and, particularly, old birds, but little evidence of any genetic variance for birds of intermediate ages. These results demonstrate that age can have a very important influence on the components of variation of characters in natural populations, and consequently that separate age classes cannot be assumed to be equivalent, either with respect to their evolutionary potential or response.

  10. Accelerated Age-Dependent Hippocampal Volume Loss in Parkinson Disease With Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Christine B; Donix, Markus; Linse, Katharina; Werner, Annett; Fauser, Mareike; Klingelhoefer, Lisa; Löhle, Matthias; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Reichmann, Heinz; Storch, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease are at high risk of developing dementia. During the course of the disease, a substantial number of patients will experience a cognitive decline, indicating the dynamics of the underlying neuropathology. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become increasingly useful for identifying structural characteristics in radiological brain anatomy existing prior to clinical symptoms. Whether these changes reflect pathology, whether they are aging related, or both often remains unclear. We hypothesized that aging-associated brain structural changes would be more pronounced in the hippocampal region among patients with Parkinson disease having mild cognitive deficits relative to cognitively unimpaired patients. Using MRI, we investigated 30 cognitively healthy patients with Parkinson disease and 33 patients with nondemented Parkinson disease having mild cognitive impairment. All participants underwent structural MRI scanning and extensive clinical and neuropsychological assessments. Irrespective of the study participants' cognitive status, older age was associated with reduced cortical thickness in various neocortical regions. Having mild cognitive impairment was not associated with an increased rate of cortical thinning or volume loss in these regions, except in the hippocampus bilaterally. Patients with Parkinson disease having mild cognitive impairment show an accelerated age-dependent hippocampal volume loss when compared with cognitively healthy patients with Parkinson disease. This may indicate pathological processes in a key region for memory functioning in patients with Parkinson disease at risk of developing dementia. Structural MRI of the hippocampal region could potentially contribute to identifying patients who should receive early treatment aimed at delaying the clinical onset of dementia.

  11. Adrenoleukodystrophy in Norway: high rate of de novo mutations and age-dependent penetrance.

    PubMed

    Horn, Morten A; Retterstøl, Lars; Abdelnoor, Michael; Skjeldal, Ola H; Tallaksen, Chantal M E

    2013-03-01

    To investigate X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in an unselected population, we performed a population based, cross-sectional prevalence study, supplemented by a retrospective study of deceased subjects. Sixty-three subjects (34 males, 29 females) belonging to 22 kindreds were included. Thirty-nine subjects (13 males, 26 females) were alive, and 24 (21 males, 3 females) were deceased on the prevalence day. The point prevalence of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy in Norway on July 1, 2011, was 0.8 per 100,000 inhabitants. The incidence at birth in the period 1956-1995 was 1.6 per 100,000 inhabitants. An age-dependent penetrance was observed among males and females, with more severe phenotypes appearing with rising age. Only 5% of deceased males had not developed cerebral leukodystrophy. No female older than 50 years was neurologically intact. Sixteen mutations in the ABCD1 gene were identified. De novo mutations were found in 19% of probands. The frequency of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy was lower in Norway than reported in the literature. A more severe natural course than previously reported was observed, indicating a need for better follow-up of both male and female patients. Given the high rate of de novo mutations, identification programs such as newborn screening may be required to offer timely treatment to all patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro age dependent response of macrophages to micro and nano titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Marcos E; Sittner, Maximiliano; Cabrini, Rómulo L; Guglielmotti, María B; Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Deborah R

    2015-02-01

    As a result of corrosion, microparticles (MP) and/or nanoparticles (NP) can be released from the metallic implants surface into the bioenvironment. The biological response to these particles depends not only on the physico-chemical properties of the particles but also on host factors, such as age. Macrophages have attracted wide concern in biomedicine. The aim of this investigation was to study the age related biological response of macrophages to TiO2 -MP and NP in vitro. Alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from young and senescent rats were cultured and exposed to TiO2 -MP and NP. Cell metabolism, superoxide anion (O2 (-) ) and nitric oxide (NO) generation, and cytokine release (IL-6, TNFα, IL-10) were measured. Cell metabolism was not affected by particle exposure. O2 (-) and NO generation increased in a dose dependent manner. A marked increase on IL-6 release was found in the young-AM subpopulation exposed to TiO2 -MP. Conversely, both particle sizes induced a dose dependent release of TNFα in senescent-AM. Only the highest concentration of TiO2 -particles caused a significant increase in IL-10 release in AM-cultures. These observations lend strong support to the suggestion that cellular response of macrophages to TiO2 -particles is age dependent. The biological effect of the particles would seem to be more deleterious in the senescent age-group.

  13. Age-dependent effects of carotid endarterectomy or stenting on cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Katrin; Hildebrandt, Helmut; Gröschel, Sonja; Stojanovic, Tomislav; Schmidt, Holger; Gröschel, Klaus; Pilgram-Pastor, Sara M; Knauth, Michael; Kastrup, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Although evidence is accumulating that age modifies the risk of carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) versus endarterectomy (CEA) for patients with significant carotid stenosis, the impact of age on cognition after either CEA or CAS remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the effects of age on cognitive performance after either CEA or CAS using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery with parallel test forms and a control group to exclude a learning effect. The neuropsychological outcomes after revascularization were determined in 19 CAS and 27 CEA patients with severe carotid stenosis. The patients were subdivided according to their median age (<68 years and ≥68 years); 27 healthy subjects served as a control group. In all patients clinical examinations, MRI scans and a neuropsychological test battery that assessed four major cognitive domains were performed immediately before, within 72 h, and 3 months after CEA or CAS. While patients <68 years of age showed no significant cognitive alteration after either CEA or CAS, a significant cognitive decline was observed in patients ≥68 years in both treatment groups (p = 0.001). Notably, this cognitive deterioration persisted in patients after CEA, whereas it was only transient in patients treated with CAS. These results demonstrate an age-dependent effect of CEA and CAS on cognitive functions. In contrast to the recently observed increased clinical complication rates in older subjects after CAS compared with CEA, CEA appears to be associated with a greater, persistent decline in cognitive performance than CAS in this subgroup of patients.

  14. Resting-state Functional Connectivity is an Age-dependent Predictor of Motor Learning Abilities.

    PubMed

    Mary, Alison; Wens, Vincent; Op de Beeck, Marc; Leproult, Rachel; De Tiège, Xavier; Peigneux, Philippe

    2017-10-01

    This magnetoencephalography study investigates how ageing modulates the relationship between pre-learning resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) and subsequent learning. Neuromagnetic resting-state activity was recorded 5 min before motor sequence learning in 14 young (19-30 years) and 14 old (66-70 years) participants. We used a seed-based beta-band power envelope correlation approach to estimate rsFC maps, with the seed located in the right primary sensorimotor cortex. In each age group, the relation between individual rsFC and learning performance was investigated using Pearson's correlation analyses. Our results show that rsFC is predictive of subsequent motor sequence learning but involves different cross-network interactions in the two age groups. In young adults, decreased coupling between the sensorimotor network and the cortico-striato-cerebellar network is associated with better motor learning, whereas a similar relation is found in old adults between the sensorimotor, the dorsal-attentional and the DMNs. Additionally, age-related correlational differences were found in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, known to subtend attentional and controlled processes. These findings suggest that motor skill learning depends-in an age-dependent manner-on subtle interactions between resting-state networks subtending motor activity on the one hand, and controlled and attentional processes on the other hand. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Age-dependent decline in dental pulp regeneration after pulpectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Misako

    2014-04-01

    The age-associated decline in the regenerative abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be due to age-related changes in reduction in number, intrinsic properties of MSCs and extrinsic factors of the extracellular environment (the stem cell niche). The effect of age on the efficacy of MSC transplantation on regeneration, however, has not been clearly demonstrated due to variable methods of isolation of MSCs and variations in stem cell populations. In this study, dental pulp stem cell (DPSC) subsets were isolated from young and aged dog teeth based on their migratory response to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (MDPSCs). In order to study the age-associated changes, their biological properties and stability were compared and the regenerative potential was examined in a pulpectomized tooth model in aged dogs. MDPSCs from aged dogs were efficiently enriched in stem cells, expressing trophic factors with high proliferation, migration and anti-apoptotic effects as in MDPSCs from young dogs. However, pulp regeneration was retarded 120 days after autologous transplantation of aged MDPSCs. We further demonstrated that isolated periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) from aged dogs, representative of migrating stem cells from outside of the tooth compartment to regenerate pulp tissue, had lower proliferation, migration and anti-apoptotic abilities. These results therefore provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the age-dependent decline in pulp regeneration, which are attributed to a decrease in the regenerative potential of resident stem cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Age-Dependent Change in the Set Point of Synaptic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Rebekah E.; Rawson, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity functions within the nervous system to maintain normal neural functions, such as neurotransmission, within predefined optimal ranges. The defined output of these neuronal processes is referred to as the set point, which is the value that the homeostatic system defends against fluctuations. Currently, it is unknown how stable homeostatic set points are within the nervous system. In the present study we used the CM9 neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in the adult Drosophila to investigate the stability of the set point of synaptic homeostasis across the lifespan of the fly. At the fly NMJ, it is believed that the depolarization of the muscle by neurotransmitter during an action potential, represented by the EPSP, is a homeostatic set point that is precisely maintained via changes in synaptic vesicle release. We find that the amplitude of the EPSP abruptly increases during middle age and that this enhanced EPSP is maintained into late life, consistent with an age-dependent change to the homeostatic set point of the synapse during middle age. In support of this, comparison of the homeostatic response at the young versus the old synapse shows that the magnitude of the homeostatic response at the older synapse is significantly larger than the response at the young NMJ, appropriate for a synapse at which the set point has been increased. Our data demonstrate that the amplitude of the EPSP at the Drosophila NMJ increases during aging and that the homeostatic signaling system adjusts its response to accommodate the new set point. PMID:24501352

  17. Age-dependent striatal excitotoxic lesions produced by the endogenous mitochondrial inhibitor malonate.

    PubMed

    Beal, M F; Brouillet, E; Jenkins, B; Henshaw, R; Rosen, B; Hyman, B T

    1993-09-01

    Intrastriatal injection of malonate, a reversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), produced age-dependent striatal lesions, which were significantly greater in 4- and 12-month-old animals than in 1-month-old animals. Both histologic and neurochemical studies showed that the lesions were significantly attenuated by administration of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. Water-suppressed chemical shift magnetic resonance imaging showed that malonate produces increased striatal lactate concentrations and striatal lesions on T2-weighted scans that were attenuated by MK-801. Neurochemical characterization of the lesions showed significant decreases in markers of medium-sized spiny neurons (GABA and substance P), whereas a marker of medium-sized aspiny neurons (somatostatin) was not different from control values, consistent with an NMDA receptor-mediated mechanism. The effects of intrastriatal injections of malonate on ATP concentrations were compared with those of the irreversible SDH inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). The ATP depletions following an equimolar injection of malonate were less marked and more transient than those of 3-NP. These results show that the competitive SDH inhibitor malonate produces more transient and milder bioenergetic defects than 3-NP, which are associated with selective activation of NMDA receptors. The results strengthen the possibility that a subtle impairment of energy metabolism may play a role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease.

  18. Microscale Mechanism of Age Dependent Wetting Properties of Prickly Pear Cacti (Opuntia).

    PubMed

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Jordan, Jacob S; Linder, Rubin; Woods, Erik T; Sun, Xiaoda; Kemme, Nicholas; Manning, Kenneth C; Cherry, Brian R; Yarger, Jeffery L; Majure, Lucas C

    2016-09-13

    Cacti thrive in xeric environments through specialized water storage and collection tactics such as a shallow, widespread root system that maximizes rainwater absorption and spines adapted for fog droplet collection. However, in many cacti, the epidermis, not the spines, dominates the exterior surface area. Yet, little attention has been dedicated to studying interactions of the cactus epidermis with water drops. Surprisingly, the epidermis of plants in the genus Opuntia, also known as prickly pear cacti, has water-repelling characteristics. In this work, we report that surface properties of cladodes of 25 taxa of Opuntia grown in an arid Sonoran climate switch from water-repelling to superwetting under water impact over the span of a single season. We show that the old cladode surfaces are not superhydrophilic, but have nearly vanishing receding contact angle. We study water drop interactions with, as well as nano/microscale topology and chemistry of, the new and old cladodes of two Opuntia species and use this information to uncover the microscopic mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We demonstrate that composition of extracted wax and its contact angle do not change significantly with time. Instead, we show that the reported age dependent wetting behavior primarily stems from pinning of the receding contact line along multilayer surface microcracks in the epicuticular wax that expose the underlying highly hydrophilic layers.

  19. Age-dependent relevance of endogenous 5-lipoxygenase derivatives in anxiety-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Leo, Luciana M; Almeida-Corrêa, Suellen; Canetti, Claudio A; Amaral, Olavo B; Bozza, Fernando A; Pamplona, Fabricio A

    2014-01-01

    When 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is inhibited, roughly half of the CNS effect of the prototypic endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is lost. Therefore, we decided to investigate whether inhibiting this enzyme would influence physiological functions classically described as being under control of the endocannabinoid system. Although 5-LO inhibition by MK-886 reduced lipoxin A4 levels in the brain, no effect was found in the elevated plus maze (EPM), even at the highest possible doses, via i.p. (10 mg/kg,) or i.c.v. (500 pmol/2 µl) routes. Accordingly, no alterations in anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test were observed in 5-LO KO mice. Interestingly, aged mice, which show reduced circulating lipoxin A4 levels, were sensitive to MK-886, displaying an anxiogenic-like state in response to treatment. Moreover, exogenous lipoxin A4 induced an anxiolytic-like profile in the EPM test. Our findings are in line with other reports showing no difference between FLAP KO or 5-LO KO and their control strains in adult mice, but increased anxiety-like behavior in aged mice. We also show for the first time that lipoxin A4 affects mouse behavior. In conclusion, we propose an age-dependent relevancy of endogenous 5-LO derivatives in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior, in addition to a potential for exogenous lipoxin A4 in producing an anxiolytic-like state.

  20. Age-Dependent Relevance of Endogenous 5-Lipoxygenase Derivatives in Anxiety-Like Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Luciana M.; Almeida-Corrêa, Suellen; Canetti, Claudio A.; Amaral, Olavo B.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Pamplona, Fabricio A.

    2014-01-01

    When 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) is inhibited, roughly half of the CNS effect of the prototypic endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) is lost. Therefore, we decided to investigate whether inhibiting this enzyme would influence physiological functions classically described as being under control of the endocannabinoid system. Although 5-LO inhibition by MK-886 reduced lipoxin A4 levels in the brain, no effect was found in the elevated plus maze (EPM), even at the highest possible doses, via i.p. (10 mg/kg,) or i.c.v. (500 pmol/2 µl) routes. Accordingly, no alterations in anxiety-like behavior in the EPM test were observed in 5-LO KO mice. Interestingly, aged mice, which show reduced circulating lipoxin A4 levels, were sensitive to MK-886, displaying an anxiogenic-like state in response to treatment. Moreover, exogenous lipoxin A4 induced an anxiolytic-like profile in the EPM test. Our findings are in line with other reports showing no difference between FLAP KO or 5-LO KO and their control strains in adult mice, but increased anxiety-like behavior in aged mice. We also show for the first time that lipoxin A4 affects mouse behavior. In conclusion, we propose an age-dependent relevancy of endogenous 5-LO derivatives in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior, in addition to a potential for exogenous lipoxin A4 in producing an anxiolytic-like state. PMID:24416334

  1. Metallothionein modulation in relation to cadmium bioaccumulation and age-dependent sensitivity of Chironomus riparius larvae.

    PubMed

    Toušová, Zuzana; Kuta, Jan; Hynek, David; Adam, Vojtěch; Kizek, René; Bláha, Luděk; Hilscherová, Klára

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to contribute to understanding of the mechanisms behind sensitivity differences between early and late instar larvae of Chironomus riparius and to address the influence of the differences in standard testing approaches on the toxicity evaluation. A 10-day contact sediment toxicity test was carried out to assess sensitivity to cadmium exposure in relation to different age and laboratory culture line origin of test organisms. Chironomid larvae of early (OECD 218 method) and late instar (US-EPA600/R-99/064 method) differed substantially in sensitivity of traditional endpoints (OECD: LOEC 50 and 10 μg Cd/g dry weight (dw); US-EPA: LOEC > 1000 and 100 μg Cd/g dw for survival and growth, respectively). Bioaccumulated cadmium and metallothioneins (MTs) concentrations were analyzed to investigate the role of MTs in reduced sensitivity to cadmium in late instar larvae. Metallothioneins were induced after treatment to greater Cd concentrations, but their levels in relation to cadmium body burdens did not fully explain low sensitivity of late instars to cadmium, which indicates some other effective way of detoxification in late instars. This study brings new information related to the role of MTs in age-dependent toxicant sensitivity and discusses the implications of divergence in data generated by chironomid sediment toxicity tests by standardized methods using different instars.

  2. Large-scale age-dependent skewed sex ratio in a sexually dimorphic avian scavenger.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Sergio A; Carrete, Martina; Donázar, José Antonio; Hiraldo, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Age-dependent skewed sex ratios have been observed in bird populations, with adult males generally outnumbering females. This trend is mainly driven by higher female mortality, sometimes associated with anthropogenic factors. Despite the large amount of work on bird sex ratios, research examining the spatial stability of adult sex ratios is extremely scarce. The Andean condor (Vultur gryphus) is the only bird of prey with strong sexual dimorphism favouring males (males are 30% heavier than females). By examining data from most of its South-American range, we show that while the juvenile sex ratio is balanced, or even female-skewed, the sex ratio becomes increasing male-skewed with age, with adult males outnumbering females by >20%, and, in some cases by four times more. This result is consistent across regions and independent of the nature of field data. Reasons for this are unknown but it can be hypothesized that the progressive disappearance of females may be associated with mortality caused by anthropogenic factors. This idea is supported by the asymmetric habitat use by the two sexes, with females scavenging in more humanized areas. Whatever the cause, male-skewed adult sex ratios imply that populations of this endangered scavenger face higher risks of extinction than previously believed.

  3. Growth impairment shows an age-dependent pattern in boys with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zivicnjak, Miroslav; Franke, Doris; Filler, Guido; Haffner, Dieter; Froede, Kerstin; Nissel, Richard; Haase, Sanny; Offner, Gisela; Ehrich, Jochen H H; Querfeld, Uwe

    2007-03-01

    The impact of chronological age on longitudinal body growth from early childhood through adolescence using detailed anthropometric methods has not yet been studied in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We have evaluated growth failure by measuring four components of linear growth: body height (HT), sitting height (SHT), arm length (AL) and leg length (LL). Data were prospectively collected for up to 7 years on 190 boys (3-21 years old) with congenital or hereditary CKD (all had developed at least stage 2 CKD by the age of 10 years). Patients showed the most severe growth failure in early childhood, followed by an acceleration in growth in pre-puberty, a slowing-down of growth at puberty, as expected, and thereafter a late speeding-up of growth until early adulthood. This pattern was observed irrespective of the degree of CKD and different treatment modalities, such as conservative treatment, recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy or transplantation. LL showed the most dynamic growth changes of all the parameters evaluated and emerged as the best indicator of statural growth in children with CKD. A specific age-dependent pattern of physical growth was identified in pediatric male CKD patients. This growth pattern should be considered in the evaluation of individual growth and the assessment of treatment efficacy such as rhGH therapy.

  4. Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Aline; Sommer, Felix; Zhang, Kaiyi; Repnik, Urska; Basic, Marijana; Bleich, André; Kühnel, Mark; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Litvak, Yael; Fulde, Marcus; Rosenshine, Ilan; Hornef, Mathias W

    2016-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) represents a major causative agent of infant diarrhea associated with significant morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Although studied extensively in vitro, the investigation of the host-pathogen interaction in vivo has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Using RT-PCR and global transcriptome analysis, high throughput 16S rDNA sequencing as well as immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we characterize the EPEC-host interaction following oral challenge of newborn mice. Spontaneous colonization of the small intestine and colon of neonate mice that lasted until weaning was observed. Intimate attachment to the epithelial plasma membrane and microcolony formation were visualized only in the presence of a functional bundle forming pili (BFP) and type III secretion system (T3SS). Similarly, a T3SS-dependent EPEC-induced innate immune response, mediated via MyD88, TLR5 and TLR9 led to the induction of a distinct set of genes in infected intestinal epithelial cells. Infection-induced alterations of the microbiota composition remained restricted to the postnatal period. Although EPEC colonized the adult intestine in the absence of a competing microbiota, no microcolonies were observed at the small intestinal epithelium. Here, we introduce the first suitable mouse infection model and describe an age-dependent, virulence factor-dependent attachment of EPEC to enterocytes in vivo.

  5. Age-dependent trajectories differ between within-pair and extra-pair paternity success.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y-H; Simons, M J P; Schroeder, J; Girndt, A; Winney, I S; Burke, T; Nakagawa, S

    2017-02-24

    Reproductive success is associated with age in many taxa, increasing in early life followed by reproductive senescence. In socially monogamous but genetically polygamous species, this generates the interesting possibility of differential trajectories of within-pair and extra-pair siring success with age in males. We investigate these relationships simultaneously using within-individual analyses with 13 years of data from an insular house sparrow (Passer domesticus) population. As expected, we found that both within- and extra-pair paternity success increased with age, followed by a senescence-like decline. However, the age trajectories of within- and extra-pair paternity successes differed significantly, with the extra-pair paternity success increasing faster, although not significantly, in early life, and showing a delayed decline by 1.5 years on average later in life compared to within-pair paternity success. These different trajectories indicate that the two alternative mating tactics should have age-dependent pay-offs. Males may partition their reproductive effort between within- and extra-pair matings depending on their current age to reap the maximal combined benefit from both strategies. The interplay between these mating strategies and age-specific mortality may explain the variation in rates of extra-pair paternity observed within and between species.

  6. Steroidogenic Factor 1 in the Ventromedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Regulates Age-Dependent Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kinyua, Ann W.; Yang, Dong Joo; Chang, Inik; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) is important for the regulation of whole body energy homeostasis and lesions in the VMH are reported to result in massive weight gain. The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a known VMH marker as it is exclusively expressed in the VMH region of the brain. SF-1 plays a critical role not only in the development of VMH but also in its physiological functions. In this study, we generated prenatal VMH-specific SF-1 KO mice and investigated age-dependent energy homeostasis regulation by SF-1. Deletion of SF-1 in the VMH resulted in dysregulated insulin and leptin homeostasis and late onset obesity due to increased food intake under normal chow and high fat diet conditions. In addition, SF-1 ablation was accompanied by a marked reduction in energy expenditure and physical activity and this effect was significantly pronounced in the aged mice. Taken together, our data indicates that SF-1 is a key component in the VMH-mediated regulation of energy homeostasis and implies that SF-1 plays a protective role against metabolic stressors including aging and high fat diet. PMID:27598259

  7. Age-dependent imbalance of the antioxidative system in human satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Fulle, Stefania; Di Donna, Silvia; Puglielli, Cristina; Pietrangelo, Tiziana; Beccafico, Sara; Bellomo, Rosa; Protasi, Feliciano; Fanò, Giorgio

    2005-03-01

    The mature myofibres of human skeletal muscle are surrounded by a type of adult stem cell, known as the satellite cell, which lies outside the sarcolemma but within the basal lamina. These cells remain quiescent until external stimuli trigger their re-entry into the cell cycle. In humans, ageing is characterised by a progressive loss of muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) associated with a decline in functional ability. One of the possible causes of this decline in muscle performance is a decrease in the antioxidative capacity of skeletal muscle, resulting in an abnormal accumulation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) critical for cell life. The present study shows that: (i) the antioxidant activity of Catalase and Gluthatione transferase in satellite cells derived from the elderly is drastically reduced compared to that in cells isolated from young individuals; (ii) cell membrane fluidity is considerably different between the two age groups; and (iii) basal [Ca(2+)](i) levels in satellite cells increase significantly in an age-dependent manner. In view of the data obtained, we hypothesise that the destabilising oxidative damage that occurs during ageing in skeletal muscle also affects quiescent satellite cells, which spend their life in close anatomic and functional contact with adult fibres. This status is derived from a decrease in the antioxidative capacity, and may negatively