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Sample records for age-matched control patients

  1. Preserved Learning during the Symbol–Digit Substitution Test in Patients with Schizophrenia, Age-Matched Controls, and Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Claudia; De Picker, Livia J.; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.; Morrens, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Speed of processing, one of the main cognitive deficits in schizophrenia is most frequently measured with a digit–symbol-coding test. Performance on this test is additionally affected by writing speed and the rate at which symbol–digit relationships are learned, two factors that may be impaired in schizophrenia. This study aims to investigate the effects of sensorimotor speed, short-term learning, and long-term learning on task performance in schizophrenia. In addition, the study aims to explore differences in learning effects between patients with schizophrenia and elderly individuals. Methods: Patients with schizophrenia (N = 30) were compared with age-matched healthy controls (N = 30) and healthy elderly volunteers (N = 30) during the Symbol–Digit Substitution Test (SDST). The task was administered on a digitizing tablet, allowing precise measurements of the time taken to write each digit (writing time) and the time to decode symbols into their corresponding digits (matching time). The SDST was administered on three separate days (day 1, day 2, day 7). Symbol–digit repetitions during the task represented short-term learning and repeating the task on different days represented long-term learning. Results: The repetition of the same symbol–digit combinations within one test and the repetition of the test over days resulted in significant decreases in matching time. Interestingly, these short-term and long-term learning effects were about equal among the three groups. Individual participants showed a large variation in the rate of short-term learning. In general, patients with schizophrenia had the longest matching time whereas the elderly had the longest writing time. Writing time remained the same over repeated testing. Conclusion: The rate of learning and sensorimotor speed was found to have a substantial influence on the SDST score. However, a large individual variation in learning rate should be taken into account in the

  2. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control

    PubMed Central

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference “creatinine independent” GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys. PMID:27651734

  3. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control

    PubMed Central

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference “creatinine independent” GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys.

  4. Evaluation of Basal Renal Function in Treatment-naïve Patients with Malignancy and Comparison with Age Matched Healthy Control.

    PubMed

    Barai, Sukanta; Gambhir, Sanjay; Jain, Suruchi; Rastogi, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the prevalence of renal insufficiency in patients with malignancy at baseline before initiation of therapy. The published studies based on patient with prior exposure to cytotoxic therapy have reported a high prevalence of renal impairment. However, these studies have utilized creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) prediction equations to assess the level of renal function. These equations are known to have some serious limitations in reliably predicting GFR. The aim of the study was to accurately document the state of renal function in treatment-naïve cancer patients and compare them against age-matched healthy controls using a reference "creatinine independent" GFR measurement technique. Age-matched comparison of GFR of 1,373 treatment-naïve cancer patients and 1,089 healthy controls were done retrospectively. There was no difference in GFR between cancer and healthy group when analyzed under various age groups, though the overall mean GFR in healthy controls was significantly higher compared to cancer group (80.14 ± 17.63 mL vs 74.43 ± 20.84, P 0≤ 0.01), whereas the mean age in control arm was significantly lower compared to cancer group (44.24 ± 17.63 years vs. 50.70 ± 20.84 years, P ≤ 0.01). Treatment-naïve cancer patients have identical renal function to their healthy age-matched peers. Malignancy per se does not directly lead to the decline in filtration capacity of the kidneys. PMID:27651734

  5. Sicca symptoms in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma: a comparison with age-matched controls and correlation with disease variables.

    PubMed

    Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Sivasomboon, Chate; Wichainun, Ramjai; Sukitawut, Waraporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2006-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of ocular and oral sicca symptoms in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and scleroderma (Scl). The ocular symptoms and sign (the Schirmer's 1 test) and the oral sicca symptoms and sign (the Saxon's test) in each of 50 RA, SLE and Scl patients were compared with their age-matched controls. The correlation between the presence of sicca symptoms and signs with their clinical activity was also determined. Ocular sicca symptoms were found more common in patients with RA (38% vs 18%, p < 0.05), SLE (36% vs 14%, p < 0.05) and Scl (54% vs 16%, p < 0.01), and oral sicca symptoms were found more common in SLE (22% vs 0%, p < 0.01), and Scl (16% vs 4%, p < 0.05) than their controls. However, only RA patients had a significantly higher proportion of positive Schimer-1 test compared with their controls (p < 0.01). There was no strong correlation between sicca symptoms or signs and other clinical or laboratory variables (age, disease duration, disease activity, disease severity, and antibody to Ro and La antigens) in these three groups. In conclusion, sicca symptoms were seen significantly more common in Thai patients with connective tissue diseases, but the symptoms did not show a good correlation with the clinical and laboratory variables.

  6. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain.

  7. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain. PMID:18984021

  8. Age-Matched, Case-Controlled Comparison of Clinical Indicators for Development of Entropion and Ectropion

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Kevin S.; Czyz, Craig N.; Cahill, Kenneth V.; Foster, Jill A.; Burns, John A.; Everman, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the clinical findings associated with involutional entropion and ectropion and compare them to each other and to age-matched controls. Methods. Prospective, age-matched cohort study involving 30 lids with involutional entropion, 30 lids with involutional ectropion, and 52 age-matched control lids. Results. The statistically significant differences associated with both the entropion and ectropion groups compared to the control group were presence of a retractor dehiscence, presence of a “white line,” occurrence of orbital fat prolapse in the cul-de-sac, decreased lower lid excursion, increased lid laxity by the snapback test, and an increased lower lid distraction. Entropion also differed from the control group with an increased lid crease height and decreased lateral canthal excursion. Statistically significant differences associated with entropion compared to ectropion were presence of a retractor dehiscence, decreased lateral canthal excursion, and less laxity in the snapback test. Conclusion. Entropic and ectropic lids demonstrate clinically and statistically significant anatomical and functional differences from normal, age-matched lids. Many clinical findings associated with entropion are also present in ectropion. Entropion is more likely to develop with a pronounced retractor deficiency. Ectropion is more likely to develop with diminished elasticity as measured by the snapback test. PMID:24734167

  9. Electrophysiological Neuroimaging using sLORETA Comparing 22 Age Matched Male and Female Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eugene, Andy R.; Masiak, Jolanta; Kapica, Jacek; Masiak, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this electrophysiological neuroimaging study was to provide a deeper mechanistic understanding of both olanzapine and risperidone pharmacodynamics relative to gender. In doing so, we age-matched 22 men and women and evaluated their resting-state EEG recordings and later used standard low resolution brain Electrotomography to visualize the differences in brain activity amongst the two patient groups. Methods In this investigation, electroencephalogram (EEG) data were analyzed from male and female schizophrenia patients treated with either olanzapine or risperidone, both atypical antipsychotics, during their in-patient stay at the Department of Psychiatry. Twenty-two males and females were age-matched and EEG recordings were analyzed from 19 Ag/AgCl electrodes. Thirty-seconds of resting EEG were spectrally transformed in standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). 3D statistical non-paramentric maps for the sLORETA Global Field Power within each band were finally computed. Results The results indicated that, relative to males patients, females schizophrenia patients had increased neuronal synchronization in delta frequency, slow-wave, EEG band located in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, within the middle frontal gyrus (t= -2.881, p < 0.03580). These findings suggest that females experience greater dopamine (D2) receptor and serotonin (5-HT2) receptor neuronal blockade relative to age-matched males. Further, our finding provided insight to the pharmacodynamics of second-generation antipsychotics olanzapine and risperidone. Conclusion When compared to male patients, female patients, suffering from schizophrenia, have D2 and 5-HT2 receptors that are blocked more readily than age-matched male schizophrenia patients. Clinically, this may translate into a quicker time to treatment-response in females as compared to male patients. PMID:26617679

  10. Comparison of Conditioning Impairments in Children with Down Syndrome, Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Mental Age-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, P.; Staytom, L.; Stott, S.; Truzoli, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the relative ease of learning across four tasks suggested by an adaptation of Thomas's hierarchy of learning in children with Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorders and mental age-matched controls. Methods: Learning trials were carried out to investigate observational learning, instrumental learning, reversal…

  11. Comparison of serum sodium and potassium levels in patients with senile cataract and age-matched individuals without cataract

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Gaurav; Pai, Vijaya

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was to analyze mean serum sodium and potassium levels in cataract patients and age-matched individuals without cataract. Methods and Materials: It was a prospective case-control study. Individuals more than 50 years of age who attended our ophthalmic center in the year 2007-2010 were grouped into those having cataract and those without cataract. Mean serum sodium and potassium levels in the cataract groups were calculated and compared with the control group. Statistical software SPSS14 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean serum sodium levels in cataract group was 135.1 meqv/l and 133 meqv/l in the control group. Mean potassium was 3.96 meqv/l in the case study group and 3.97 meqv/l in controls. Mean sodium levels among cases were significantly higher than control group. No difference was seen in the PSC group and control. The difference in mean potassium among the two groups was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Diets with high sodium contents are a risk factor for senile cataract formation and dietary modifications can possibly reduce the rate of progression cataract. PMID:23552357

  12. Pitch Characteristics Before Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Pitchers Compared With Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Prodromo, John; Patel, Nimit; Kumar, Neil; Denehy, Kevin; Tabb, Loni Philip; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is commonly performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers, but little is known about the preoperative pitch type and velocity characteristics of pitchers who go on to undergo UCLR. Hypothesis: Pitchers who required UCLR have thrown a greater percentage of fastballs and have greater pitch velocities compared with age-matched controls in the season before injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: MLB pitchers active during the 2002 to 2015 seasons were included. The UCLR group consisted of MLB pitchers who received UCLR between 2003 and 2015, utilizing the season before surgery (2002-2014) for analysis. The control group comprised age-matched controls of the same season. Players who pitched less than 20 innings in the season before surgery were excluded. Pitch types were recorded as percentage of total pitches thrown. Pitch velocities were recorded for each pitch type. Pitch type and pitch velocities during preoperative seasons for UCLR pitchers were compared with age-matched controls using univariate and multivariate models. Results: A total of 114 cases that went on to UCLR and 3780 controls were included in the study. Pitchers who went on to UCLR appear to have greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities; there were no significant differences in pitch selection between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In the season before surgery, MLB pitchers who underwent UCLR demonstrated greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities, with no significant difference in pitch type. PMID:27350954

  13. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  14. Functional Aspects of Gait in Essential Tremor: A Comparison with Age-Matched Parkinson’s Disease Cases, Dystonia Cases, and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Rao, Ashwini K.

    2015-01-01

    Background An understanding of the functional aspects of gait and balance has wide ramifications. Individuals with balance disorders often restrict physical activity, travel, and social commitments to avoid falling, and loss of balance confidence, itself, is a source of disability. We studied the functional aspects of gait in patients with essential tremor (ET), placing their findings within the context of two other neurological disorders (Parkinson’s disease [PD] and dystonia) and comparing them with age-matched controls. Methods We administered the six-item Activities of Balance Confidence (ABC-6) Scale and collected data on number of falls and near-falls, and use of walking aids in 422 participants (126 ET, 77 PD, 46 dystonia, 173 controls). Results Balance confidence was lowest in PD, intermediate in ET, and relatively preserved in dystonia compared with controls. This ordering reoccurred for each of the six ABC-6 items. The number of near-falls and falls followed a similar ordering. Use of canes, walkers, and wheelchairs was elevated in ET and even greater in PD. Several measures of balance confidence (ABC-6 items 1, 4, 5, and 6) were lower in torticollis cases than in those with blepharospasm, although the two groups did not differ with respect to falls or use of walking aids. Discussion Lower balance confidence, increased falls, and greater need for walking aids are variably features of a range of movement disorder patients compared to age-matched controls. While most marked among PD patients, these issues affected ET patients as well and, to a small degree, some patients with dystonia. PMID:26056611

  15. Prematurely Delivered Rats Show Improved Motor Coordination During Sensory-evoked Motor Responses Compared to Age-matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Megan E.; Brumley, Michele R.

    2014-01-01

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat. PMID:24680729

  16. Oral contraceptive use among female elite athletes and age-matched controls and its relation to low back pain.

    PubMed

    Brynhildsen, J; Lennartsson, H; Klemetz, M; Dahlquist, P; Hedin, B; Hammar, M

    1997-10-01

    Exogenous and endogenous female sex steroids may influence the risk of low back pain. The fact that back pain is a very common symptom during pregnancy supports this theory. Back pain is also more common among female than male athletes. Oral contraceptives have been suggested to increase the risk of low back pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the prevalence of low back pain is higher among oral contraceptive users than non-users and if it differs between women taking part in different sports. A questionnaire was sent to female elite athletes in volleyball (n = 205), basketball (n = 150), and soccer (n = 361) as well as to age-matched controls (n = 113). The questionnaire comprised questions about age, constitution, occupation, parity, and use of contraceptive method as well as previous and current back pain and possible consequences of the back problems. The response rate was 85%. Between 42% and 52% of the women in the different groups used oral contraceptives. The groups were similar in most background variables, except that the volleyball and basketball players were taller. The prevalence of current low back pain was between 21% and 34% in the different athlete groups, with an average of 30%, whereas only 18% of the controls suffered from low back pain (p 0.01). The prevalence of low back pain within each group--athletes as well as controls--was similar in women who used and did not use oral contraceptives. This study does not support the theory that low back pain is affected by the use of oral contraceptives. Instead, constitutional factors and mechanical stress during intense physical activity are probably more important.

  17. No Consistent Difference in Gray Matter Volume between Individuals with Fibromyalgia and Age-Matched Healthy Subjects when Controlling for Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael C.; Harris, Richard E.; Sundgren, Pia C.; Welsh, Robert C.; Fernandes, Carlo R.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is thought to involve abnormalities in central pain processing. Recent studies involving small samples have suggested alterations in gray matter volume (GMV) in brains of FM patients. Our objective was to verify these findings in a somewhat larger sample using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), while controlling for presence of affective disorders (AD). T1-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) brain scans were obtained on 29 FM patients with AD, 29 FM patients without AD, and 29 age-matched healthy controls (HC) using a 3T scanner. Segmentation, spatial normalization, and volumetric modulation were performed using an automated protocol within SPM5. Smoothed gray matter segments were entered into a voxel-wise one-way ANOVA, and a search for significant clusters was performed using thresholding methods published in previous studies (whole-brain threshold of p<.05 correcting for multiple comparisons; region-of-interest (ROI) threshold of p≤.001 uncorrected, or p<.05 small-volume corrected). The whole-brain analysis did not reveal any significant clusters. ROI-based analysis revealed a significant difference in left anterior insula GMV among the three groups (xyz={−28, 21, 9}; p=.026, corrected). However, on post-hoc testing, FM patients without AD did not differ significantly from HC with respect to mean GMV extracted from this cluster. A significant negative correlation was found between mean cluster GMV and scores of trait anxiety (State-Trait Personality Inventory, Trait Anxiety scale; rho=−.470, p<.001). No other significant clusters were found on ROI-based analysis. Our results emphasize the importance of correcting for AD when carrying out VBM studies in chronic pain. PMID:19375224

  18. Semiquantitative proteomic analysis of human hippocampal tissues from Alzheimer’s disease and age-matched control brains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia affecting people over 65 years of age. The hallmarks of AD are the extracellular deposits known as amyloid β plaques and the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, both of which are the principal players involved in synaptic loss and neuronal cell death. Tau protein and Aβ fragment 1–42 have been investigated so far in cerebrospinal fluid as a potential AD biomarkers. However, an urgent need to identify novel biomarkers which will capture disease in the early stages and with better specificity remains. High-throughput proteomic and pathway analysis of hippocampal tissue provides a valuable source of disease-related proteins and biomarker candidates, since it represents one of the earliest affected brain regions in AD. Results In this study 2954 proteins were identified (with at least 2 peptides for 1203 proteins) from both control and AD brain tissues. Overall, 204 proteins were exclusively detected in AD and 600 proteins in control samples. Comparing AD and control exclusive proteins with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) literature-based proteome, 40 out of 204 AD related proteins and 106 out of 600 control related proteins were also present in CSF. As most of these proteins were extracellular/secretory origin, we consider them as a potential source of candidate biomarkers that need to be further studied and verified in CSF samples. Conclusions Our semiquantitative proteomic analysis provides one of the largest human hippocampal proteome databases. The lists of AD and control related proteins represent a panel of proteins potentially involved in AD pathogenesis and could also serve as prospective AD diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:23635041

  19. Immunity in young adult survivors of childhood leukemia is similar to the elderly rather than age-matched controls: Role of cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Azanan, Mohamad Shafiq; Abdullah, Noor Kamila; Chua, Ling Ling; Lum, Su Han; Abdul Ghafar, Sayyidatul Syahirah; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul; Lewin, Sharon R; Woo, Yin Ling; Ariffin, Hany; Rajasuriar, Reena

    2016-07-01

    Many treatment complications that occur late in childhood cancer survivors resemble age-related comorbidities observed in the elderly. An immune phenotype characterized by increased immune activation, systemic inflammation, and accumulation of late-differentiated memory CD57(+) CD28(-) T cells has been associated with comorbidities in the elderly. Here, we explored if this phenotype was present in young adult leukemia survivors following an average of 19 years from chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy completion, and compared this with that in age-matched controls. We found that markers of systemic inflammation-IL-6 and human C-reactive protein and immune activation-CD38 and HLA-DR on T cells, soluble CD (sCD)163 from monocytes and macrophages-were increased in survivors compared to controls. T-cell responses specific to cytomegalovirus (CMV) were also increased in survivors compared to controls while CMV IgG levels in survivors were comparable to levels measured in the elderly (>50years) and correlated with IL-6, human C-reactive protein, sCD163, and CD57(+) CD28(-) memory T cells. Immune activation and inflammation markers correlated poorly with prior chemotherapy and radiotherapy exposure. These data suggest that CMV infection/reactivation is strongly correlated with the immunological phenotype seen in young childhood leukemia survivors and these changes may be associated with the early onset of age-related comorbidities in this group. PMID:27129782

  20. Comparison of younger and older breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls on specific and overall QoL domains

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Victoria L.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Daggy, Joanne; Smith, Lisa; Cohee, Andrea; Ziner, Kim W.; Haase, Joan E.; Miller, Kathy; Pradhan, Kamnesh; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Cella, David; Ansari, Bilal; Sledge, George W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Younger survivors (YS) of breast cancer often report more survivorship symptoms such as fatigue, depression, sexual difficulty, and cognitive problems than older survivors (OS). We sought to determine the effect of breast cancer and age at diagnosis on Quality of Life (QoL) by comparing 3 groups: 1) YS diagnosed at age 45 or before, 2) OS diagnosed between 55 and 70, and, 3) for the YS, age-matched controls (AC) of women not diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods Using a large Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) data base, we recruited 505 YS who were ages 45 or younger when diagnosed and 622 OS diagnosed at 55 to 70. YS, OS, and AC were compared on physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and overall QoL variables. Results Compared to both AC and to OS, YS reported more depressive symptoms (p=.005) and fatigue (p<.001), poorer self-reported attention function (p<.001), and poorer sexual function (p<.001) than either comparison group. However, YS also reported a greater sense of personal growth (p<.001) and perceived less social constraint (p<.001) from their partner than AC. Conclusions YS reported worse functioning than AC relative to depression, fatigue, attention, sexual function, and spirituality. Perhaps even more important, YS fared worse than both AC and OS on body image, anxiety, sleep, marital satisfaction, and fear of recurrence, indicating that YS are at greater risk for long term QoL problems than survivors diagnosed at a later age. PMID:24891116

  1. Assessment of the cardiac autonomic neuropathy among the known diabetics and age-matched controls using noninvasive cardiovascular reflex tests in a South-Indian population: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Sukla, Pradeep; Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBihariLal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Rao, Nambaru Lakshmana

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition characterized by hyperglycemia. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy in a rural area of South India, among the known diabetics after comparing them with the age-matched healthy controls, utilizing noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. Materials and Methods: A case–control study was conducted for 4 months (October 2014 to January 2015) at an Urban Health and Training Center (UHTC) of a Medical College located in Kancheepuram district, Tamil Nadu. The study was conducted among 126 diagnosed Type 2 diabetes patients and in 152 age- and sex-matched healthy controls to ensure comparability between the cases and controls and, thus, reduce variability due to demographic variables. All the study subjects (cases and controls) were selected from the patients attending UHTC during the study duration, provided they satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Study participants were subjected to undergo noninvasive cardiac autonomic neuropathy reflex tests. The associations were tested using paired t-test for the continuous (mean ± standard deviation) variables. Results: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2% (67/126). On further classification, positive (abnormal) results were obtained in 56 (sympathetic – 44.4%) and 51 (parasympathetic – 40.5%) diabetic cases. Overall, heart rate variation during deep breathing was found to be the most sensitive test to detect parasympathetic autonomic neuropathy while the diastolic blood pressure response to sustained handgrip exercise was the most sensitive method to detect sympathetic neuropathy dysfunction. Conclusion: The overall prevalence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy among diabetic patients was found to be as 53.2%. Even though cardiac autonomic neuropathy can be detected by various invasive tests, noninvasive tests remain a key tool to detect

  2. RELN-expressing Neuron Density in Layer I of the Superior Temporal Lobe is Similar in Human Brains with Autism and in Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Jasmin; Ejaz, Ehsan; Ariza, Jeanelle; Noctor, Stephen C.; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Reelin protein (RELN) level is reduced in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of subjects with autism. RELN is synthesized and secreted by a subpopulation of neurons in the developing cerebral cortex termed Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. These cells are abundant in the marginal zone during cortical development, many die after development is complete, but a small population persists into adulthood. In adult brains, RELN is secreted by the surviving CR cells, by a subset of GABAergic interneurons in layer I, and by pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in deeper cortical layers. It is widely believed that decreased RELN in layer I of the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism may result from a decrease in the density of RELN expressing neurons in layer I; however, this hypothesis has not been tested. We examined RELN expression in layer I of the adult human cortex and found that 70% of cells express RELN in both control and autistic subjects. We quantified the density of neurons in layer I of the superior temporal cortex of subjects with autism and age-matched control subjects. Our data show that there is no change in the density of neurons in layer I of the cortex of subjects with autism, and therefore suggest that reduced RELN expression in the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism is not a consequence of decreased numbers of RELN-expressing neurons in layer I. Instead reduced RELN may result from abnormal RELN processing, or a decrease in the number of other RELN-expressing neuronal cell types. PMID:25067827

  3. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p < 0.05 for the overall physiologic state effect (lactation vs. control), and a within tissue pairwise comparison of p < 0.01. The proportion of false positives, an estimate of the ratio of false positives in the list of differentially expressed genes, was calculated for each tissue. The number of differentially expressed genes was 420 in the liver, 337 in the duodenum, 402 in the jejunum, and 523 in the ileum. The list of differentially expressed genes was in turn analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to detect biological pathways that were overrepresented. In all tissues, sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-regulated genes involved in cholesterol synthesis showed increased mRNA expression, with the fewest changes detected in the jejunum. We detected increased Scap mRNA in the liver only, suggesting an explanation for the difference in response to lactation between the liver and small intestine. Expression of Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In

  4. Training understanding of reversible sentences: a study comparing language-impaired children with age-matched and grammar-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) have problems with language comprehension, and little is known about how to remediate these. We focused here on errors in interpreting sentences such as "the ball is above the cup", where the spatial configuration depends on word order. We asked whether comprehension of such short reversible sentences could be improved by computerized training, and whether learning by children with SLI resembled that of younger, typically-developing children. Methods. We trained 28 children with SLI aged 6-11 years, 28 typically-developing children aged from 4 to 7 years who were matched to the SLI group for raw scores on a test of receptive grammar, and 20 typically-developing children who were matched to the SLI group on chronological age. A further 20 children with SLI were given pre- and post-test assessments, but did not undergo training. Those in the trained groups were given training on four days using a computer game adopting an errorless learning procedure, during which they had to select pictures to correspond to spoken sentences such as "the cup is above the drum" or "the bird is below the hat". Half the trained children heard sentences using above/below and the other half heard sentences using before/after (with a spatial interpretation). A total of 96 sentences was presented over four sessions. Half the sentences were unique, whereas the remainder consisted of 12 repetitions of each of four sentences that became increasingly familiar as training proceeded. Results. Age-matched control children performed near ceiling (≥ 90% correct) in the first session and were excluded from the analysis. Around half the trained SLI children also performed this well. Training effects were examined in 15 SLI and 16 grammar-matched children who scored less than 90% correct on the initial training session. Overall, children's scores improved with training. Memory span was a significant predictor of improvement, even

  5. Intensively-Managed Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes Consume High-Fat, Low-Fiber Diets Similar to Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sanjeev N.; Volkening, Lisa K.; Quinn, Nicolle; Laffel, Lori M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant emphasis on nutrition, older children with diabetes demonstrate poor dietary quality. We tested the hypothesis that dietary quality in young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) would be better than age-matched children in the US population. Dietary data from children with T1D (n=67), ages 2–12 years, attending a pediatric diabetes clinic were compared to a nationally representative, age-matched sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, n=1691). Multiple 24-hour dietary recalls were used. Recommended intakes were based on national guidelines, and dietary quality was assessed using the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005). More children with T1D were overweight or obese compared to children participating in NHANES (42% vs. 30%, p=0.04). Greater proportions of children with T1D met daily recommendations for vegetables (22% vs. 13%, p=0.03), whole grains (12% vs. 5%, p=0.005), and dairy (55% vs. 36%, p=0.001) compared to NHANES children while similar proportions met daily fruit recommendations (40% vs. 33%, p=0.2). Less than one-third of all children limited total fat to recommended levels; children with T1D consumed more saturated fat than NHANES children (14% vs. 12% total energy intake, p=0.0009). Fiber intakes were very low in both groups. Compared to NHANES children, children with T1D had higher HEI-2005 scores (59.6 vs. 49.7, p=0.0006) primarily due to lower intakes of added sugars. The nutritional intake of young children with T1D remains suboptimal in the contemporary era of diabetes management. Despite focused nutrition management, young children with T1D consume high-fat, low-fiber diets comparable to youth in the general population. PMID:24916556

  6. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals.

  7. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals. PMID:25790831

  8. Neural mechanisms of verb argument structure processing in agrammatic aphasic and healthy age-matched listeners

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, C.K.; Bonakdarpour, B.; Fix, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lexical verbs involves automatic access to argument structure entries entailed within the verb's representation. Recent neuroimaging studies with young normal listeners suggest that this involves bilateral posterior perisylvian tissue, with graded activation in these regions based on argument structure complexity. The aim of the present study was to examine the neural mechanisms of verb processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in older normal volunteers and patients with stroke-induced agrammatic aphasia, a syndrome in which verb, as compared to noun, production often is selectively impaired, but verb comprehension in both on-line and off-line tasks is spared. Fourteen healthy listeners and five age-matched aphasic patients performed a lexical decision task, which examined verb processing by argument structure complexity, i.e., one-argument (i.e., intransitive (v1)); two-argument (i.e., transitive (v2)), and three-argument (v3) verbs. Results for the age-matched listeners largely replicated those for younger participants studied by Thompson et al. (2007): v3-v1 comparisons showed activation of the angular gyrus in both hemispheres and this same heteromodal region was activated in the left hemisphere in the (v2+v3)-v1 contrast. Similar results were derived for the agrammatic aphasic patients, however, activation was unilateral (in the right hemisphere for 3 participants) rather than bilateral likely because these patients' lesions extended to the left temporoparietal region. All performed the task with high accuracy and, despite differences in lesion site and extent, they recruited spared tissue in the same regions as healthy normals. Consistent with psycholinguistic models of sentence processing, these findings indicate that the posterior language network is engaged for processing verb argument structure and is crucial for semantic integration of argument structure information. PMID:19702460

  9. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  10. Computed tomography-guided in vivo cardiac orientation and correlation with ECG in individuals without structural heart disease and in age-matched obese and older individuals.

    PubMed

    Sathananthan, Gnalini; Aggarwal, Gunjan; Zahid, Simmi; Byth, Karen; Chik, William; Friedman, Daniel; Thiagalingam, Aravinda

    2015-05-01

    The cardiac axis in a structurally normal heart is influenced by a number of factors. We investigated the anatomical and electrical cardiac axes in middle-aged individuals without structural heart disease and compared this with age-matched obese and older individuals without structural heart disease. A retrospective study of controls included those between 30 and 60 years old with a normal body mass index (BMI), who were then compared with obese individuals between 30 and 60 years old and with individuals more than 60 years old with a normal BMI. The anatomical cardiac axis was determined along the long axis by cardiac computed tomography (CT) and correlated with the electrical cardiac axis on a surface electrocardiogram (ECG) in the frontal plane. A total of 124 patients were included. In the controls (n = 59), the mean CT axis was 38.1° ± 7.8° whilst the mean ECG axis was 51.8° ± 26.6°, Pearson r value 0.12 (P = 0.365). In the obese (n = 36), the mean CT axis was 25.1° ± 6.2° whilst the mean ECG axis was 20.1° ± 23.9°, Pearson r value 0.05 (P = 0.808). In the older group (n = 29), the mean CT axis was 34.4° ± 9.1° whilst the mean ECG axis was 34.4° ± 30.3°, Pearson r value 0.26 (P = 0.209). Obese individuals have a more leftward rotation of both axes than age-matched normals (P <0.0001), which could be secondary to elevation of the diaphragm. Older individuals have a more leftward rotation only of their electrical cardiac axis (P = 0.01), which could be a normal variant or reflect underlying conduction disturbances in this age group.

  11. Abnormal sensory integration affects balance control in hemiparetic patients within the first year after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Clarissa B.; Medeiros, Ítalo R. T.; Greters, Mario G.; Frota, Norberto A. F.; Tavares Lucato, Leandro; Scaff, Milberto; Conforto, Adriana B.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Impairments in balance can be a consequence of changes in the motor, sensory, and integrative aspects of motor control. Abnormal sensory reweighting, i.e., the ability to select the most appropriate sensory information to achieve postural stability, may contribute to balance impairment. The Sensory Organization Test is a component of Computerized Dynamic Posturography that evaluates the impact of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory inputs, as well as sensory reweighting, under conditions of sensory conflict. The aim of this study is to compare balance control in hemiparetic patients during the first year post-stroke and in age-matched neurologically normal subjects using the Berg Balance Scale and Computerized Dynamic Posturography. METHODS: We compared the Berg Balance Scale and Sensory Organization Test scores in 21 patients with hemiparesis after first-ever ischemic stroke and in 21 age-matched, neurologically normal subjects. An equilibrium score was defined for each Sensory Organization Test condition. RESULTS: Berg Balance Scale scores were significantly lower in the patients than in the neurologically normal subjects. Equilibrium scores were significantly lower in the patients than in the neurologically normal subjects for those Sensory Organization Test conditions that did not provide appropriate somatosensory information and under conditions of sensory conflict. A history of falls was more frequent in patients with lower equilibrium scores. CONCLUSION: During the first year after a stroke, defective sensory reweighting significantly impacts balance control in hemiparetic patients. These results are important for the planning of effective rehabilitation interventions. PMID:22189728

  12. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lasher, Richard A; Pahnke, Aric Q; Johnson, Jeffrey M; Sachse, Frank B

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06) but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06) and adult (0.91 ± 0.04) myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal that the

  13. Menopause and menarche in patients with primary blepharospasm: an exploratory case-control study.

    PubMed

    Martino, Davide; Livrea, Paolo; Giorelli, Maurizio; Masi, Gianluca; Aniello, Maria Stella; Defazio, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    We studied the relationships between blepharospasm (BSP) and menopause/menarche in female patients with primary BSP (n = 83) and age-matched healthy (n = 83) and disease controls (n = 83). BSP patients and matched controls had comparable age at menopause, and there was no correlation between age at menopause and age at BSP onset. Thus, menopause probably exerts no significant influence on the age-dependent development of BSP. BSP cases tended to have a later menarche than either group of controls. The association was independent of age, disease duration and education level. Because the higher the age at menarche, the higher the age at BSP onset, later menarche was unlikely to be a risk factor for BSP. Rather, the two conditions may share pathophysiologic mechanisms, for example minor abnormality of neurotransmitter systems controlling both the motor system and the maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis responsible for the onset of puberty.

  14. Oxytocin administration enhances controlled social cognition in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, J.D.; Chuang, B.; Lam, O.; Lai, W.; O’Donovan, A.; Rankin, K.P.; Mathalon, D.H.; Vinogradov, S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Individuals with schizophrenia have functionally significant deficits in automatic and controlled social cognition, but no currently available pharmacologic treatments reduce these deficits. The neuropeptide oxytocin has multiple prosocial effects when administered intranasally in humans and there is growing interest in its therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. Methods We administered 40 IU of oxytocin and saline placebo intranasally to 29 male subjects with schizophrenia and 31 age-matched, healthy controls in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Social cognition was assessed with The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). We examined the effects of oxytocin administration on automatic social cognition (the ability to rapidly interpret and understand emotional cues from the voice, face, and body); controlled social cognition (the ability to comprehend indirectly expressed emotions, thoughts, and intentions through complex deliberations over longer time periods); and a control task (the ability to comprehend truthful dialog and perform general task procedures) in individuals with and without schizophrenia using mixed factorial analysis of variance models. Results Patients with schizophrenia showed significant impairments in automatic and controlled social cognition compared to healthy controls, and administration of oxytocin significantly improved their controlled, but not automatic, social cognition, F(1, 58) = 8.75; p = 0.004. Conversely, oxytocin administration had limited effects on social cognition in healthy participants. Patients and controls performed equally well and there were no effects of oxytocin administration on the control task. Discussion Intact social cognitive abilities are associated with better functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia. Our data highlight the potentially complex effects of oxytocin on some but not all aspects of

  15. Visual evoked potentials in dementia: a meta-analysis and empirical study of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pollock, V E; Schneider, L S; Chui, H C; Henderson, V; Zemansky, M; Sloane, R B

    1989-04-15

    A meta-analytic review of flash and pattern reversal visual evoked potential research indicates that elderly demented patients have longer P100 latencies than age-matched control subjects. In the present empirical research, patients with research diagnoses of probable Alzheimer's disease were compared with sex- and age-matched control subjects using P100 latencies of visual evoked potentials (VEP) elicited by flash and pattern reversal. As compared to control subjects, Alzheimer's disease patients showed significantly longer P100 latencies of the VEP elicited by pattern reversal; the flash P100 only marginally distinguished them. These findings are discussed within the context of VEP recording practices, patient selection, sex and age matching of control subjects, and the visual system.

  16. Brain activation during neurocognitive testing using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in patients following concussion compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kontos, A P; Huppert, T J; Beluk, N H; Elbin, R J; Henry, L C; French, J; Dakan, S M; Collins, M W

    2014-12-01

    There is no accepted clinical imaging modality for concussion, and current imaging modalities including fMRI, DTI, and PET are expensive and inaccessible to most clinics/patients. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive, portable, and low-cost imaging modality that can measure brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare brain activity as measured by fNIRS in concussed and age-matched controls during the performance of cognitive tasks from a computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants included nine currently symptomatic patients aged 18-45 years with a recent (15-45 days) sport-related concussion and five age-matched healthy controls. The participants completed a computerized neurocognitive test battery while wearing the fNIRS unit. Our results demonstrated reduced brain activation in the concussed subject group during word memory, (spatial) design memory, digit-symbol substitution (symbol match), and working memory (X's and O's) tasks. Behavioral performance (percent-correct and reaction time respectively) was lower for concussed participants on the word memory, design memory, and symbol match tasks than controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that fNIRS could be a useful, portable assessment tool to assess reduced brain activation and augment current approaches to assessment and management of patients following concussion.

  17. Brain activation during neurocognitive testing using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in patients following concussion compared to healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, T. J.; Beluk, N. H.; Elbin, R. J.; Henry, L. C.; French, J.; Dakan, S. M.; Collins, M. W.

    2016-01-01

    There is no accepted clinical imaging modality for concussion, and current imaging modalities including fMRI, DTI, and PET are expensive and inaccessible to most clinics/ patients. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive, portable, and low-cost imaging modality that can measure brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare brain activity as measured by fNIRS in concussed and age-matched controls during the performance of cognitive tasks from a computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants included nine currently symptomatic patients aged 18–45 years with a recent (15–45 days) sport-related concussion and five age-matched healthy controls. The participants completed a computerized neurocognitive test battery while wearing the fNIRS unit. Our results demonstrated reduced brain activation in the concussed subject group during word memory, (spatial) design memory, digit-symbol substitution (symbol match), and working memory (X’s and O’s) tasks. Behavioral performance (percent-correct and reaction time respectively) was lower for concussed participants on the word memory, design memory, and symbol match tasks than controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that fNIRS could be a useful, portable assessment tool to assess reduced brain activation and augment current approaches to assessment and management of patients following concussion. PMID:24477579

  18. Handwriting performance in the absence of visual control in writer's cramp patients: Initial observations

    PubMed Central

    Chakarov, Vihren; Hummel, Sibylla; Losch, Florian; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2006-01-01

    Background The present study was aimed at investigating the writing parameters of writer's cramp patients and control subjects during handwriting of a test sentence in the absence of visual control. Methods Eight right-handed patients with writer's cramp and eight healthy volunteers as age-matched control subjects participated in the study. The experimental task consisted in writing a test sentence repeatedly for fifty times on a pressure-sensitive digital board. The subject did not have visual control on his handwriting. The writing performance was stored on a PC and analyzed off-line. Results During handwriting all patients developed a typical dystonic limb posture and reported an increase in muscular tension along the experimental session. The patients were significantly slower than the controls, with lower mean vertical pressure of the pen tip on the paper and they could not reach the endmost letter of the sentence in the given time window. No other handwriting parameter differences were found between the two groups. Conclusion Our findings indicate that during writing in the absence of visual feedback writer's cramp patients are slower and could not reach the endmost letter of the test sentence, but their level of automatization is not impaired and writer's cramp handwriting parameters are similar to those of the controls except for even lower vertical pressure of the pen tip on the paper, which is probably due to a changed strategy in such experimental conditions. PMID:16594993

  19. Evaluation of visual stress symptoms in age-matched dyslexic, Meares-Irlen syndrome and normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mana A.; Alanazi, Saud A.; Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the prevalence of dyslexia and Meares-Irlen syndrome (MIS) among female students and determine their level of visual stress in comparison with normal subjects. METHODS A random sample of 450 female medical students of King Saud University Riyadh (age range, 18-30y) responded to a wide range of questions designed to accomplish the aims of this study. The detailed questionnaire consisted of 54 questions with 12 questions enquiring on ocular history and demography of participants while 42 questions were on visual symptoms. Items were categorized into critical and non-critical questions (CQ and NCQ) and were rated on four point Likert scale. Based on the responses obtained, the subjects were grouped into normal (control), dyslexic with or without MIS (Group 1) and subjects with MIS only (Group 2). Responses were analysed as averages and mean scores were calculated and compared between groups using one way analysis of variance to evaluate total visual stress score (TVSS=NCQ+CQ), critical and non-critical visual stress scores. The relationship between categorical variables such as age, handedness and condition were assessed with Chi-square test. RESULTS The completion rate was 97.6% and majority of the respondents (92%) were normal readers, 2% dyslexic and 6% had MIS. They were age-matched. More than half of the participants had visited an eye care practitioner in the last 2y. About 13% were recommended eye exercises and one participant experienced pattern glare. Hand preference was not associated with any condition but Group 1 subjects (3/9, 33%) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed of lazy eye than Group 2 (2/27, 7%) and control (27/414, 7%) subjects. The mean±SD of TVSS responses were 63±14 and it was 44±9 for CQ and 19±5 for NCQ. Responses from all three variables were normally distributed but the CQ responses were on the average more positive (82%) in Group 2 and less positive (46%) in Group 1 than control. With NCQ, the responses were

  20. A Controlled Study on the Correlation between Tear Film Volume and Tear Film Stability in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Iman M; Khalil, Noha M; El-Gendy, Heba A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the tear film quantity and correlate it with the quality and stability of the tear film in diabetics and compare them to age matched controls. Introduction. Diabetes affects tear film parameters in multiple ways. Poor metabolic control and neuropathy are postulated factors. To further understand how diabetes affects tear film parameters this study was conducted. Subjects and Methods. Tear meniscus height was measured by anterior segment OCT, along with tear thinning time, a subtype of noninvasive tear break-up time, and blinking rate per minute which were all recorded for 22 diabetic patients. Correlations between these tear film parameters were studied and then compared to 16 age matched controls. Results. A statistically significant difference was found in blinking rate between the diabetic and the control group (P = 0.002), with higher blinking rate among diabetics. All tear film parameters were negatively correlated with duration of diabetes. A positive correlation was found between tear film volume and stability. Conclusion. Diabetes affects the tear film in various ways. Diabetics should be examined for dry eye signs even in absence of symptoms which may be masked by associated neuropathy. Duration of diabetes has an impact on tear film status.

  1. Waking genioglossal electromyogram in sleep apnea patients versus normal controls (a neuromuscular compensatory mechanism).

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; White, D P

    1992-05-01

    Pharyngeal collapse in obstructive sleep apnea patients is likely a product of a sleep-related decrement in pharyngeal dilator muscle activity superimposed upon abnormal airway anatomy. We postulate that during wakefulness, increased pharyngeal dilator muscle activity in apnea patients compensates for diminished airway size thus maintaining patency. We studied the waking genioglossus (GG) electromyogram (EMG) activity in 11 OSA patients and 14 age-matched controls to determine if GG activity is higher in the awake state in apnea patients than controls. To make this determination, we developed a reproducible methodology whereby true maximal GG EMG could be defined and thus basal activity quantitated as a percentage of this maximal value. Therefore, direct comparisons of basal activity between individuals was possible. We observed apnea patients to have significantly greater basal genioglossal activity compared to controls (40.6 +/- 5.6% vs. 12.7 +/- 1.7% of maximum). This difference persisted when size-matched subsets were compared. This augmented GG activity in apnea patients could be reduced with positive airway pressure. We speculate that this neuromuscular compensation present during wakefulness in apnea patients may be lost during sleep leading to airway collapse.

  2. Waking genioglossal electromyogram in sleep apnea patients versus normal controls (a neuromuscular compensatory mechanism).

    PubMed Central

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; White, D P

    1992-01-01

    Pharyngeal collapse in obstructive sleep apnea patients is likely a product of a sleep-related decrement in pharyngeal dilator muscle activity superimposed upon abnormal airway anatomy. We postulate that during wakefulness, increased pharyngeal dilator muscle activity in apnea patients compensates for diminished airway size thus maintaining patency. We studied the waking genioglossus (GG) electromyogram (EMG) activity in 11 OSA patients and 14 age-matched controls to determine if GG activity is higher in the awake state in apnea patients than controls. To make this determination, we developed a reproducible methodology whereby true maximal GG EMG could be defined and thus basal activity quantitated as a percentage of this maximal value. Therefore, direct comparisons of basal activity between individuals was possible. We observed apnea patients to have significantly greater basal genioglossal activity compared to controls (40.6 +/- 5.6% vs. 12.7 +/- 1.7% of maximum). This difference persisted when size-matched subsets were compared. This augmented GG activity in apnea patients could be reduced with positive airway pressure. We speculate that this neuromuscular compensation present during wakefulness in apnea patients may be lost during sleep leading to airway collapse. PMID:1569196

  3. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  4. Improving Interference Control in ADHD Patients with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Breitling, Carolin; Zaehle, Tino; Dannhauer, Moritz; Bonath, Björn; Tegelbeckers, Jana; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Krauel, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been suggested as a promising alternative to psychopharmacological treatment approaches due to its local and network effects on brain activation. In the current study, we investigated the impact of tDCS over the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on interference control in 21 male adolescents with ADHD and 21 age matched healthy controls aged 13–17 years, who underwent three separate sessions of tDCS (anodal, cathodal, and sham) while completing a Flanker task. Even though anodal stimulation appeared to diminish commission errors in the ADHD group, the overall analysis revealed no significant effect of tDCS. Since participants showed a considerable learning effect from the first to the second session, performance in the first session was separately analyzed. ADHD patients receiving sham stimulation in the first session showed impaired interference control compared to healthy control participants whereas ADHD patients who were exposed to anodal stimulation, showed comparable performance levels (commission errors, reaction time variability) to the control group. These results suggest that anodal tDCS of the right inferior frontal gyrus could improve interference control in patients with ADHD. PMID:27147964

  5. Clinical characteristics and awareness of skin cancer in Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Javed, Saba; Javed, Syed A; Mays, Rana M; Tyring, Stephen K

    2013-09-01

    Skin cancer in darker skin is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We sought to assess the clinical characteristics of cutaneous malignancy amongst Hispanic skin cancer patients and compare them to age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians. In this retrospective study, 150 Hispanic skin cancer patients were identified from electronic medical records and age-matched to 150 non-Hispanic Caucasian controls with skin cancer. The incidence of actinic keratoses (AKs) in Hispanic skin cancer patients (34.0%) was statistically lower than age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasian skin cancer controls (61.3%, P <0.001; odds ratio, 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.92 - 4.93). Moreover, non-Hispanic Caucasian SCC (squamous cell cancer) controls were much more likely to report AKs (36.1%, P = 0.003) than Hispanic SCC patients (25.0%, P = 0.19). This study illustrates a lower incidence of AKs in Hispanic skin cancer patients as compared to their age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians. The Hispanic skin malignancies present at a more advanced state and there is usually a lack of awareness in such cases. Therefore, patient knowledge and education is crucial for early detection and prevention of skin cancer in the Hispanic population.

  6. Distorted color discrimination in 'de novo' parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Büttner, T; Kuhn, W; Müller, T; Patzold, T; Heidbrink, K; Przuntek, H

    1995-02-01

    We performed the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue test in 16 "de novo" patients with Parkinson's disease and 16 age-matched controls to determine their color discrimination ability. The mean total error score in patients was significantly elevated as compared with controls (64.6 in patients versus 16.0 in controls). We conclude that the impairment of color discrimination may be an early sign in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Decreased Postural Balance in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Low Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjeldstad, Cecilie; Pardo, Gabriel; Bemben, Debra; Bemben, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate balance in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have low disability and minimal clinical impairments as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and compare them with healthy age-matched controls. Patients were aged between 18 and 64 years; 67 individuals with MS (mu = 44.0 plus or minus 1.2 years) and 45 healthy…

  8. Thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies and early miscarriages in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Toulis, Konstantinos A; Goulis, Dimitrios G; Tsolakidou, Konstantina; Hilidis, Ilias; Fragkos, Marios; Polyzos, Stergios A; Gerofotis, Antonios; Kita, Marina; Bili, Helen; Vavilis, Dimitrios; Daniilidis, Michail; Tarlatzis, Basil C; Papadimas, Ioannis

    2013-08-01

    We have previously hypothesized that early miscarriage in women with Hashimoto thyroiditis might be the result of a cross-reactivity process, in which blocking autoantibodies against thyrotropin receptor (TSHr-Ab) antagonize hCG action on its receptor on the corpus luteum. To test this hypothesis from the clinical perspective, we investigated the presence of TSHr-Ab in Hashimoto thyroiditis patients with apparently unexplained, first-trimester recurrent miscarriages compared to that in Hashimoto thyroiditis patients with documented normal fertility. A total of 86 subjects (43 cases and 43 age-matched controls) were finally included in a case-control study. No difference in the prevalence of TSHr-Ab positivity was detected between cases and controls (Fisher's exact test, p value = 1.00). In patients with recurrent miscarriages, TSHr-Ab concentrations did not predict the number of miscarriages (univariate linear regression, p value = 0.08). These results were robust in sensitivity analyses, including only cases with full investigation or those with three or more miscarriages. We conclude that no role could be advocated for TSHr-Ab in the aetiology of recurrent miscarriages in women with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

  9. The serum levels of calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis during attack, remission and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Spacek, Jiri; Jilek, Petr; Buchta, Vladimir; Forstl, Miroslav; Hronek, Miloslav; Holeckova, Magdalena

    2005-11-01

    The real cause of recurrent vulvovaginal candidosis (RVVC) is concealed and the etiopathogenesis of this disease remains to be determined. In a cohort study, concentrations of metals in 44 patients with RVVC and 30 healthy age-matched women were measured and compared. The concentrations of serum calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) were measured photometrically, the zinc (Zn) levels were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. For statistical analysis were used the Student's t-tests (paired analysis for attack vs. remission; non-paired analysis for patient vs. control). Although all measured metals were within normal ranges the patients with RVVC had in contrast to the healthy controls significantly lower levels of serum Ca, Mg and Zn and insignificantly higher levels of Fe. These relative changes may contribute to the development of attacks in patients with RVVC. PMID:16262875

  10. "I Know What I Like": Stability of Aesthetic Preference in Alzheimer's Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Andrea R.; Ly, Jenny; Elkin-Frankston, Seth; O'Connor, Margaret G.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies explored the stability of art preference in patients with Alzheimer's disease and age-matched control participants. Preferences for three different styles of paintings, displayed on art postcards, were examined over two sessions. Preference for specific paintings differed among individuals but AD and non-AD groups maintained about the…

  11. Plasma antibodies to Abeta40 and Abeta42 in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wuhua; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Etsuro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Murakami, Tetsuro; Harigaya, Yasuo; Ikeda, Masaki; Amari, Masakuni; Kuwano, Ryozo; Abe, Koji; Shoji, Mikio

    2008-07-11

    Antibodies to amyloid beta protein (Abeta) are present naturally or after Abeta vaccine therapy in human plasma. To clarify their clinical role, we examined plasma samples from 113 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 205 normal controls using the tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity (TAPIR) assay. A high positive rate of TAPIR was revealed in AD (45.1%) and age-matched controls (41.2%), however, no significance was observed. No significant difference was observed in the MMS score or disease duration between TAPIR-positive and negative samples. TAPIR-positive plasma reacted with the Abeta40 monomer and dimer, and the Abeta42 monomer weakly, but not with the Abeta42 dimer. TAPIR was even detected in samples from young normal subjects and young Tg2576 transgenic mice. Although the Abeta40 level and Abeta40/42 ratio increased, and Abeta42 was significantly decreased in plasma from AD groups when compared to controls, no significant correlations were revealed between plasma Abeta levels and TAPIR grading. Thus an immune response to Abeta40 and immune tolerance to Abeta42 occurred naturally in humans without a close relationship to the Abeta burden in the brain. Clarification of the mechanism of the immune response to Abeta42 is necessary for realization of an immunotherapy for AD. PMID:18534566

  12. Plasma antibodies to Abeta40 and Abeta42 in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wuhua; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Etsuro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Murakami, Tetsuro; Harigaya, Yasuo; Ikeda, Masaki; Amari, Masakuni; Kuwano, Ryozo; Abe, Koji; Shoji, Mikio

    2008-07-11

    Antibodies to amyloid beta protein (Abeta) are present naturally or after Abeta vaccine therapy in human plasma. To clarify their clinical role, we examined plasma samples from 113 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 205 normal controls using the tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity (TAPIR) assay. A high positive rate of TAPIR was revealed in AD (45.1%) and age-matched controls (41.2%), however, no significance was observed. No significant difference was observed in the MMS score or disease duration between TAPIR-positive and negative samples. TAPIR-positive plasma reacted with the Abeta40 monomer and dimer, and the Abeta42 monomer weakly, but not with the Abeta42 dimer. TAPIR was even detected in samples from young normal subjects and young Tg2576 transgenic mice. Although the Abeta40 level and Abeta40/42 ratio increased, and Abeta42 was significantly decreased in plasma from AD groups when compared to controls, no significant correlations were revealed between plasma Abeta levels and TAPIR grading. Thus an immune response to Abeta40 and immune tolerance to Abeta42 occurred naturally in humans without a close relationship to the Abeta burden in the brain. Clarification of the mechanism of the immune response to Abeta42 is necessary for realization of an immunotherapy for AD.

  13. Patients with Parkinson's disease learn to control complex systems via procedural as well as non-procedural learning.

    PubMed

    Osman, Magda; Wilkinson, Leonora; Beigi, Mazda; Castaneda, Cristina Sanchez; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2008-01-01

    The striatum is considered to mediate some forms of procedural learning. Complex dynamic control (CDC) tasks involve an individual having to make a series of sequential decisions to achieve a specific outcome (e.g. learning to operate and control a car), and they involve procedural learning. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with Parkinson's disease who have striatal dysfunction, are impaired on CDC tasks only when learning involves procedural learning. 26 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 26 age-matched controls performed two CDC tasks, one in which training was observation-based (non-procedural), and a second in which training was action-based (procedural). Both groups were able to control the system to a specific criterion equally well, regardless of the training condition. However, when reporting their knowledge of the underlying structure of the system, both groups showed poorer accuracy when learning took place through observation-based compared with action-based training. Moreover, the controls' accuracy in reporting the underlying structure of the systems was superior to that of PD patients. The findings suggest that the striatal dysfunction in Parkinson's disease is not associated with impairment of procedural learning, regardless of whether the task involved procedural learning or not. It is possible that the learning and performance on CDC tasks are mediated by perceptual priming mechanisms in the neocortex. PMID:18440038

  14. Quality of sleep in patients with chronic low back pain: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Marty, M; Rozenberg, S; Duplan, B; Thomas, P; Duquesnoy, B; Allaert, F

    2008-06-01

    Animal experiments and studies in humans clearly show that the relation between pain (acute and chronic) and sleep quality is two-way: sleep disorders can increase pain, which in turn may cause sleep disorders. Sleep disorders and chronic low back pain are frequent health problems and it is unsurprising that the two can co-exist. This study was conducted to evaluate if sleep disorders and chronic pain associated are more frequently than one would expect. The objective of the study was to compare sleep quality in a population of patients with chronic low back pain and a control population. Sleep quality was assessed in 101 patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and in 97 sex- and age-matched healthy control subjects using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI; score from 0 (no disorder) to 21]. The French version of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire (DPQ) was used to assess the impact of low back pain on patients' quality of life. This impact was taken as nil in the healthy controls. The patients with CLBP and the controls were comparable in age, sex, and height, but mean bodyweight was higher in the CLBP group (70.3 +/- 14.5 vs. 61.8 +/- 11.4 kg; P < 0.05). The patients with CLBP were also more frequently on sick leave than the controls (32.3%; n = 31 vs. 0.0% n = 0; P < 0.001). Coffee, tea, and cola intakes were comparable in the two groups. Patients with CLBP had statistically higher scores in all items of the PSQI than the healthy controls. The mean PSQI was 4.7 +/- 3.2 for the healthy controls and 10.9 +/- 7.9 for the patients with CLBP (P < 0.0001). Sleep disorders were greater when the impact of CLBP on daily life (the four aspects of the DPQ) was greater [P < 0.0001]). The sleep of the patients with CLBP was significantly altered compared with that of the healthy controls, in proportion to the impact of low back pain on daily life. Our findings do not indicate whether sleep disorders are a cause or a consequence of CLBP. PMID:18389288

  15. Comparison of acute non-visual bright light responses in patients with optic nerve disease, glaucoma and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Münch, M; Léon, L; Collomb, S; Kawasaki, A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of optic nerve disease, hence retinal ganglion cell loss, on non-visual functions related to melanopsin signalling. Test subjects were patients with bilateral visual loss and optic atrophy from either hereditary optic neuropathy (n = 11) or glaucoma (n = 11). We measured melatonin suppression, subjective sleepiness and cognitive functions in response to bright light exposure in the evening. We also quantified the post-illumination pupil response to a blue light stimulus. All results were compared to age-matched controls (n = 22). Both groups of patients showed similar melatonin suppression when compared to their controls. Greater melatonin suppression was intra-individually correlated to larger post-illumination pupil response in patients and controls. Only the glaucoma patients demonstrated a relative attenuation of their pupil response. In addition, they were sleepier with slower reaction times during nocturnal light exposure. In conclusion, glaucomatous, but not hereditary, optic neuropathy is associated with reduced acute light effects. At mild to moderate stages of disease, this is detected only in the pupil function and not in responses conveyed via the retinohypothalamic tract such as melatonin suppression. PMID:26478261

  16. Comparison of acute non-visual bright light responses in patients with optic nerve disease, glaucoma and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Münch, M.; Léon, L.; Collomb, S.; Kawasaki, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of optic nerve disease, hence retinal ganglion cell loss, on non-visual functions related to melanopsin signalling. Test subjects were patients with bilateral visual loss and optic atrophy from either hereditary optic neuropathy (n = 11) or glaucoma (n = 11). We measured melatonin suppression, subjective sleepiness and cognitive functions in response to bright light exposure in the evening. We also quantified the post-illumination pupil response to a blue light stimulus. All results were compared to age-matched controls (n = 22). Both groups of patients showed similar melatonin suppression when compared to their controls. Greater melatonin suppression was intra-individually correlated to larger post-illumination pupil response in patients and controls. Only the glaucoma patients demonstrated a relative attenuation of their pupil response. In addition, they were sleepier with slower reaction times during nocturnal light exposure. In conclusion, glaucomatous, but not hereditary, optic neuropathy is associated with reduced acute light effects. At mild to moderate stages of disease, this is detected only in the pupil function and not in responses conveyed via the retinohypothalamic tract such as melatonin suppression. PMID:26478261

  17. Effects of Unilateral Cochlear Implantation on Balance Control and Sensory Organization in Adult Patients with Profound Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Montaut-Verient, Bettina; Grosjean, Rémy; Gauchard, Gérome C.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies were interested in the consequence of vestibular dysfunction related to cochlear implantation on balance control. This pilot study aimed to assess the effects of unilateral cochlear implantation on the modalities of balance control and sensorimotor strategies. Posturographic and vestibular evaluations were performed in 10 patients (55 ± 20 years) with profound hearing loss who were candidates to undergo unilateral multichannel cochlear implantation. The evaluation was carried out shortly before and one year after surgery. Posturographic tests were also performed in 10 age-matched healthy participants (63 ± 16 years). Vestibular compensation was observed within one year. In addition, postural performances of the patients increased within one year after cochlear implantation, especially in the more complex situations, in which sensory information is either unavailable or conflicting. Before surgery, postural performances were higher in the control group compared to the patients' group. One year after cochlear implantation, postural control was close to normalize. The improvement of postural performance could be explained by a mechanism of vestibular compensation. In addition, the recovery of auditory information which is the consequence of cochlear implantation could lead to an extended exploration of the environment possibly favoring the development of new balance strategies. PMID:26583121

  18. Detection of Membrane Fluidity in Submitochondrial Particles of Platelets and Erythrocyte Membranes from Mexican Patients with Alzheimer Disease by Intramolecular Excimer Formation of 1,3 Dipyrenylpropane

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, G.G.; Pacheco-Moisés, F.; El Hafidi, M.; Jiménez-Delgado, A.; Macías-Islas, M. A.; Corral, S. A. Rosales; de la Rosa, A. Célis; Sánchez-González, V. J.; Arias-Merino, E. D.; Velázquez-Brizuela, I. E.

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction and defects in membrane structure could be implied in AD pathogenesis. The aim of the present work was the study of membrane fluidity in submitochondrial platelet particles and erythrocyte membranes from Mexican patients. Blood samples were obtained from 30 patients with Alzheimer disease and 30 aged-matched control subjects. Membrane fluidity determinations were done using a very low concentration of the fluorescent dipyrenylpropane probe incorporated in both types of membranes. This probe is able to give excimer and monomer fluorescence, therefore it can be used to monitor fluidity changes in biological membranes. The data obtained showed that in submitochondrial particles from AD patients, the excimer to monomer fluorescent intensity ratio was lower (0.231 ± 0.008) than aged-matched control subjects (0.363 ± 0.014). Therefore, membrane fluidity was lower in AD samples. On the other hand, we found similar membrane fluidity in erythrocytes from AD patients and aged-matched controls: the fluorescent intensity ratios were 0.312 ± 0.03 and 0.305 ± 0.033, respectively. In addition, lipid peroxidation in submitochondrial particles and erythrocyte membranes was higher in AD samples than in aged-matched controls. These data suggest that submitochondrial platelet particles are more sensitive to oxidative stress than erythrocyte membranes. PMID:18334736

  19. The effects of visual rhythms and optic flow on stride patterns of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    van Wegen, E; Lim, I; de Goede, C; Nieuwboer, A; Willems, A; Jones, D; Rochester, L; Hetherington, V; Berendse, H; Zijlmans, J; Wolters, E; Kwakkel, G

    2006-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining the effects of rhythmic visual cueing under changing visual conditions on stride frequency in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD; n = 21) and healthy age matched controls (n = 7) while walking at different speeds on a treadmill. Stride frequency and stride length in patients with PD as well as controls were not rigidly coupled to walking speed and could be manipulated with walking speed as well as by using spatial and temporal rhythmic visual cues.

  20. Frontoparietal involvement in passively guided shape and length discrimination: a comparison between subcortical stroke patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Van de Winckel, Ann; Wenderoth, Nicole; De Weerdt, Willy; Sunaert, Stefan; Peeters, Ron; Van Hecke, Wim; Thijs, Vincent; Swinnen, Stephan P; Perfetti, Carlo; Feys, Hilde

    2012-07-01

    Fifty to 85 % of patients with sensorimotor hemiparesis following stroke encounter impaired tactile processing and proprioception. Sensory feedback is, however, paramount for motor recovery. Sensory feedback through passively guided somatosensory discrimination exercises has been used in therapy, but so far, no studies have investigated which brain areas are involved in this process. Therefore, we performed a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine brain areas related to discriminating passively guided shape and length discrimination in stroke patients and evaluate whether they differed from healthy age-matched controls. Eight subcortical stroke patients discriminated different shapes or length based on passive finger movements provided by an fMRI compatible robot. The data were contrasted to a control condition whereby patients discriminated music fragments. Passively guided somatosensory discrimination versus music discrimination elicited activation in similar frontoparietal areas in stroke patients compared to the healthy control group. Still, patients had increased activation in the right angular gyrus, left superior lingual gyrus, and right cerebellar lobule VI compared to healthy volunteers. Conversely, healthy volunteers activated the right precentral gyrus to a greater extent than patients. In both groups, shape discrimination resulted in anterior intraparietal sulcus and premotor activation, while length discrimination elicited a more medially located parietal activation with mainly right-sided premotor activity. The current study is a first step in clarifying brain activations during passively guided shape and length discrimination in subcortical stroke patients. Research into the effects of the use of sensory discrimination exercises on brain reorganization and brain plasticity is encouraged.

  1. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  2. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-02

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  3. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  4. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  5. Spontaneous Swallowing during All-Night Sleep in Patients with Parkinson Disease in Comparison with Healthy Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Uludag, Irem Fatma; Tiftikcioglu, Bedile Irem; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Spontaneous saliva swallows (SS) appear especially during sleep. The rate of SS was rarely investigated in all-night sleep in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Dysphagia is a frequent symptom in PD, but the rate of SS was never studied with an all-night sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). Methods: A total of 21 patients with PD and 18 age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Frequencies of SS and coughing were studied in all-night sleep recordings of patients with PD and controls. During all-night sleep, video-EEG 12-channel recording was used including the electromyography (EMG) of the swallowing muscles, nasal airflow, and recording of vertical laryngeal movement using a pair of EEG electrodes over the thyroid cartilage. Results: The total number of SS was increased while the mean duration of sleep was decreased in PD when compared to controls. Sialorrhea and clinical dysphagia, assessed by proper questionnaires, had no effect in any patient group. The new finding was the so-called salvo type of consecutive SS in one set of swallowing. The amount of coughing was significantly increased just after the salvo SS. Conclusions: In PD, the rate of SS was not sufficient to demonstrate the swallowing disorder, such as oropharyngeal dysphagia, but the salvo type of SS was quite frequent. This is a novel finding and may contribute to the understanding of swallowing problems in patients with dysphagic or nondysphagic PD. Citation: Uludag IF, Tiftikcioglu BI, Ertekin C. Spontaneous swallowing during all-night sleep in patients with Parkinson disease in comparison with healthy control subjects. SLEEP 2016;39(4):847–854. PMID:26943467

  6. Multivariate morphological brain signatures predict chronic abdominal pain patients from healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Labus, Jennifer S.; Van Horn, John D.; Gupta, Arpana; Alaverdyan, Mher; Torgerson, Carinna; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Irimia, Andrei; Hong, Jui-Yang; Naliboff, Bruce; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common chronic visceral pain disorder. The pathophysiology of IBS is incompletely understood, however evidence strongly suggests dysregulation of the brain-gut axis. The aim of this study was to apply multivariate pattern analysis to identify an IBS-related morphometric brain signature which could serve as a central biological marker and provide new mechanistic insights into the pathophysiology of IBS. Parcellation of 165 cortical and subcortical regions was performed using Freesurfer and the Destrieux and Harvard-Oxford atlases. Volume, mean curvature, surface area and cortical thickness were calculated for each region. Sparse partial least squares-discriminant analysis was applied to develop a diagnostic model using a training set of 160 females (80 healthy controls, 80 IBS). Predictive accuracy was assessed in an age matched holdout test set of 52 females (26 health controls, 26 IBS). A two-component classification algorithm comprised of the morphometry of 1) primary somato-sensory and motor regions, and 2) multimodal network regions, explained 36% of the variance. Overall predictive accuracy of the classification algorithm was 70%. Small effect size associations were observed between the somatosensory and motor signature and non-gastrointestinal somatic symptoms. The findings demonstrate the predictive accuracy of a classification algorithm based solely on regional brain morphometry is not sufficient but they do provide support for the utility of multivariate pattern analysis for identifying meaningful neurobiological markers in IBS. Perspective This article presents the development, optimization, and testing of a classification algorithm for discriminating female IBS patients from healthy controls using only brain morphometry data. The results provide support for utility of multivariate pattern analysis for identifying meaningful neurobiological markers in IBS. PMID:25906347

  7. Visual localisation in patients with occipital infarction.

    PubMed

    Ross Russell, R W; Bharucha, N

    1984-02-01

    Visually directed pointing has been examined in a group of patients with occipital lobe infarction and in an age-matched control group. The visual field ipsilateral to the infarct showed normal localisation; there was no evidence that right sided infarction produced a bilateral disturbance. In quadrantanopia the spared quadrant on the affected side showed abnormal localisation in a few patients but this was not consistently associated with right or left sided defects. The majority of patients were able to detect a flashing light within the blind portion of the field although the same stimulus could not be seen during conventional perimetry. Some patients could localise the stimulus normally.

  8. Infection control in severely burned patients

    PubMed Central

    Coban, Yusuf Kenan

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, much progress has been made in the control of burn wound infection and nasocomial infections (NI) in severely burned patients. The continiually changing epidemiology is partially related to greater understanding of and improved techniques for burn patient management as well as effective hospital infection control measures. With the advent of antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, infection of the wound site is now not as common as, for example, urinary and blood stream infections. Universal application of early excision of burned tissues has made a substantial improvement in the control of wound-related infections in burns. Additionally, the development of new technologies in wound care have helped to decrease morbidity and mortality in severe burn victims. Many examples can be given of the successful control of wound infection, such as the application of an appropriate antibiotic solution to invasive wound infection sites with simultaneous vacuum-assisted closure, optimal preservation of viable tissues with waterjet debridement systems, edema and exudate controlling dressings impregnated with Ag (Silvercel, Aquacell-Ag). The burned patient is at high risk for NI. Invasive interventions including intravenous and urinary chateterization, and entubation pose a further risk of NIs. The use of newly designed antimicrobial impregnated chateters or silicone devices may help the control of infection in these immunocomprimised patients. Strict infection control practices (physical isolation in a private room, use of gloves and gowns during patient contact) and appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy guided by laboratory surveillance culture as well as routine microbial burn wound culture are essential to help reduce the incidance of infections due to antibiotic resistant microorganisms. PMID:24701406

  9. Parkinson's disease patients show impaired corrective grasp control and eye-hand coupling when reaching to grasp virtual objects.

    PubMed

    Lukos, J R; Snider, J; Hernandez, M E; Tunik, E; Hillyard, S; Poizner, H

    2013-12-19

    The effect of Parkinson's disease (PD) on hand-eye coordination and corrective response control during reach-to-grasp tasks remains unclear. Moderately impaired PD patients (n=9) and age-matched controls (n=12) reached to and grasped a virtual rectangular object, with haptic feedback provided to the thumb and index fingertip by two 3-degree of freedom manipulanda. The object rotated unexpectedly on a minority of trials, requiring subjects to adjust their grasp aperture. On half the trials, visual feedback of finger positions disappeared during the initial phase of the reach, when feedforward mechanisms are known to guide movement. PD patients were tested without (OFF) and with (ON) medication to investigate the effects of dopamine depletion and repletion on eye-hand coordination online corrective response control. We quantified eye-hand coordination by monitoring hand kinematics and eye position during the reach. We hypothesized that if the basal ganglia are important for eye-hand coordination and online corrections to object perturbations, then PD patients tested OFF medication would show reduced eye-hand spans and impoverished arm-hand coordination responses to the perturbation, which would be further exasperated when visual feedback of the hand was removed. Strikingly, PD patients tracked their hands with their gaze, and their movements became destabilized when having to make online corrective responses to object perturbations exhibiting pauses and changes in movement direction. These impairments largely remained even when tested in the ON state, despite significant improvement on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. Our findings suggest that basal ganglia-cortical loops are essential for mediating eye-hand coordination and adaptive online responses for reach-to-grasp movements, and that restoration of tonic levels of dopamine may not be adequate to remediate this coordinative nature of basal ganglia-modulated function.

  10. Alternative splicing of the beta A4 amyloid gene of Alzheimer's disease in cortex of control and Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    König, G; Salbaum, J M; Wiestler, O; Lang, W; Schmitt, H P; Masters, C L; Beyreuther, K

    1991-02-01

    An S1 nuclease protection assay was designed to study the splicing pattern of the alternatively spliced beta A4 amyloid gene (APP gene) of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We determined the splicing pattern of the APP gene in fetal, adult, aged adult and AD human cortex. The results suggest that alternative splicing of the APP gene in AD is not significantly different from age-matched controls, but distinct from the developing fetal brain.

  11. Control of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Belgrade, M J

    1989-03-01

    Almost three quarters of patients with cancer have severe pain, from invasion of the cancer itself, from effects of therapy, or from causes unrelated to the cancer (but often exacerbated by it). With the proper pain-management strategy, however, pain can be controlled in most patients. The analgesic ladder for pain control, promoted by the World Health Organization, begins with a nonnarcotic agent, progresses to a weak narcotic plus a nonnarcotic, and finally reaches a strong narcotic. Adjuvant agents, which increase the analgesic potency of the drug being used, may be added at any level. The most common reasons for inadequate pain control in cancer patients are incorrect narcotic dosing and incorrect switching from one narcotic to another and from one route of administration to another. Factors that influence pain management (eg, fear, anxiety, sleep disturbance) should be treated as well with appropriate medications, behavioral therapy, counseling, hypnosis, and other supportive techniques. These points are illustrated in the case report (see box, page 328).

  12. Static and dynamic posture control in postlingual cochlear implanted patients: effects of dual-tasking, visual and auditory inputs suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Léonard, Jacques; Dumitrescu, Michel; Meller, Renaud; Magnan, Jacques; Lacour, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Posture control is based on central integration of multisensory inputs, and on internal representation of body orientation in space. This multisensory feedback regulates posture control and continuously updates the internal model of body's position which in turn forwards motor commands adapted to the environmental context and constraints. The peripheral localization of the vestibular system, close to the cochlea, makes vestibular damage possible following cochlear implant (CI) surgery. Impaired vestibular function in CI patients, if any, may have a strong impact on posture stability. The simple postural task of quiet standing is generally paired with cognitive activity in most day life conditions, leading therefore to competition for attentional resources in dual-tasking, and increased risk of fall particularly in patients with impaired vestibular function. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of postlingual cochlear implantation on posture control in adult deaf patients. Possible impairment of vestibular function was assessed by comparing the postural performance of patients to that of age-matched healthy subjects during a simple postural task performed in static (stable platform) and dynamic (platform in translation) conditions, and during dual-tasking with a visual or auditory memory task. Postural tests were done in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions, with the CI activated (ON) or not (OFF). Results showed that the postural performance of the CI patients strongly differed from the controls, mainly in the EC condition. The CI patients showed significantly reduced limits of stability and increased postural instability in static conditions. In dynamic conditions, they spent considerably more energy to maintain equilibrium, and their head was stabilized neither in space nor on trunk: they behaved dynamically without vision like an inverted pendulum while the controls showed a whole body rigidification strategy. Hearing (prosthesis on) as well

  13. Static and dynamic posture control in postlingual cochlear implanted patients: effects of dual-tasking, visual and auditory inputs suppression.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Léonard, Jacques; Dumitrescu, Michel; Meller, Renaud; Magnan, Jacques; Lacour, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Posture control is based on central integration of multisensory inputs, and on internal representation of body orientation in space. This multisensory feedback regulates posture control and continuously updates the internal model of body's position which in turn forwards motor commands adapted to the environmental context and constraints. The peripheral localization of the vestibular system, close to the cochlea, makes vestibular damage possible following cochlear implant (CI) surgery. Impaired vestibular function in CI patients, if any, may have a strong impact on posture stability. The simple postural task of quiet standing is generally paired with cognitive activity in most day life conditions, leading therefore to competition for attentional resources in dual-tasking, and increased risk of fall particularly in patients with impaired vestibular function. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of postlingual cochlear implantation on posture control in adult deaf patients. Possible impairment of vestibular function was assessed by comparing the postural performance of patients to that of age-matched healthy subjects during a simple postural task performed in static (stable platform) and dynamic (platform in translation) conditions, and during dual-tasking with a visual or auditory memory task. Postural tests were done in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions, with the CI activated (ON) or not (OFF). Results showed that the postural performance of the CI patients strongly differed from the controls, mainly in the EC condition. The CI patients showed significantly reduced limits of stability and increased postural instability in static conditions. In dynamic conditions, they spent considerably more energy to maintain equilibrium, and their head was stabilized neither in space nor on trunk: they behaved dynamically without vision like an inverted pendulum while the controls showed a whole body rigidification strategy. Hearing (prosthesis on) as well

  14. Right Ventricular Sex Differences in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Characterised by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Pair-Matched Case Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Andrew J.; Capener, Dave; Hammerton, Charlotte; Thomas, Steven M.; Elliot, Charlie; Condliffe, Robin; Wild, Jim M.; Kiely, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Sex differences exist in both the prevalence and survival of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Men are less frequently affected by the condition but have worse outcome as compared to females. We sought to characterise the sex related differences in right ventricular remodelling in age matched male and female patients with IPAH using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A case controlled pair-matched study was conducted with patients matched by age and sex. Steady state free precession (SSFP) MRI of the heart was performed at 1.5T. Cardiac volume, function and mass measurements were corrected for age, sex and BSA according to reference data. Results 40 age and sex matched patients with IPAH were identified. The mean age was 57 (SD 17) in both male and female cohorts. Men had proportionally lower right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction, RV stroke volume and LV stroke volume than females, p=0.028, p=0.007 and p=0.013, respectively. However, there was no significant difference in RV mass or haemodynamic indices of mPAP and PVR between males and females. Conclusion Male patients with IPAH have proportionally worse RV function despite similar afterload. We hypothesise that adaptive remodelling of the RV in response to increased afterload in IPAH is more effective in females. PMID:25996939

  15. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  16. Patients with Parkinson's disease learn to control complex systems-an indication for intact implicit cognitive skill learning.

    PubMed

    Witt, Karsten; Daniels, Christine; Daniel, Victoria; Schmitt-Eliassen, Julia; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther

    2006-01-01

    Implicit memory and learning mechanisms are composed of multiple processes and systems. Previous studies demonstrated a basal ganglia involvement in purely cognitive tasks that form stimulus response habits by reinforcement learning such as implicit classification learning. We will test the basal ganglia influence on two cognitive implicit tasks previously described by Berry and Broadbent, the sugar production task and the personal interaction task. Furthermore, we will investigate the relationship between certain aspects of an executive dysfunction and implicit learning. To this end, we have tested 22 Parkinsonian patients and 22 age-matched controls on two implicit cognitive tasks, in which participants learned to control a complex system. They interacted with the system by choosing an input value and obtaining an output that was related in a complex manner to the input. The objective was to reach and maintain a specific target value across trials (dynamic system learning). The two tasks followed the same underlying complex rule but had different surface appearances. Subsequently, participants performed an executive test battery including the Stroop test, verbal fluency and the Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST). The results demonstrate intact implicit learning in patients, despite an executive dysfunction in the Parkinsonian group. They lead to the conclusion that the basal ganglia system affected in Parkinson's disease does not contribute to the implicit acquisition of a new cognitive skill. Furthermore, the Parkinsonian patients were able to reach a specific goal in an implicit learning context despite impaired goal directed behaviour in the WCST, a classic test of executive functions. These results demonstrate a functional independence of implicit cognitive skill learning and certain aspects of executive functions.

  17. Patients with Parkinson's disease learn to control complex systems-an indication for intact implicit cognitive skill learning.

    PubMed

    Witt, Karsten; Daniels, Christine; Daniel, Victoria; Schmitt-Eliassen, Julia; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Günther

    2006-01-01

    Implicit memory and learning mechanisms are composed of multiple processes and systems. Previous studies demonstrated a basal ganglia involvement in purely cognitive tasks that form stimulus response habits by reinforcement learning such as implicit classification learning. We will test the basal ganglia influence on two cognitive implicit tasks previously described by Berry and Broadbent, the sugar production task and the personal interaction task. Furthermore, we will investigate the relationship between certain aspects of an executive dysfunction and implicit learning. To this end, we have tested 22 Parkinsonian patients and 22 age-matched controls on two implicit cognitive tasks, in which participants learned to control a complex system. They interacted with the system by choosing an input value and obtaining an output that was related in a complex manner to the input. The objective was to reach and maintain a specific target value across trials (dynamic system learning). The two tasks followed the same underlying complex rule but had different surface appearances. Subsequently, participants performed an executive test battery including the Stroop test, verbal fluency and the Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST). The results demonstrate intact implicit learning in patients, despite an executive dysfunction in the Parkinsonian group. They lead to the conclusion that the basal ganglia system affected in Parkinson's disease does not contribute to the implicit acquisition of a new cognitive skill. Furthermore, the Parkinsonian patients were able to reach a specific goal in an implicit learning context despite impaired goal directed behaviour in the WCST, a classic test of executive functions. These results demonstrate a functional independence of implicit cognitive skill learning and certain aspects of executive functions. PMID:16806313

  18. Pharmaceutical price controls and patient welfare.

    PubMed

    Calfee, J E

    2001-06-01

    Price controls could have a substantial negative effect on pharmaceutical research and development. Extensive research is required before the development costs of a new drug or its benefits are known; most new drug development projects fail, sometimes after substantial financial and time costs. These conditions pose intractable practical problems for the operation of price controls, which cannot rest on objective, predictable standards such as the benefits or costs of individual drugs. In the absence of objective standards, pressure from health care providers and others would create powerful incentives for price regulators to decrease drug prices toward marginal costs of production and distribution, well below levels sufficient to reward innovative research. This downwardly biased price-setting mechanism would apply with particular force to the few successful projects that yield innovative drugs, whose prices would not be set by regulatory authorities until after research expenditures have been incurred and the new drugs are ready to enter the market. Manufacturers will expect price controls to reduce the potential payoffs from breakthrough drugs. This expectation would substantially reduce the incentives to pursue innovative research, as is evident in advanced economies in which price controls are now in force. Once established, price controls for pharmaceuticals, like those for medical services in the Medicare system, would also tend toward complexity and entrenchment of vested interests and could easily become permanent regardless of the harm they cause to patients. PMID:11388819

  19. Factors That Affect Patient Attitudes toward Infection Control Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated patient attitudes toward different disease control measures taken in dental school clinics (n=272 patients) and private practices (n=107 patients). Variables examined included sex, age, educational background, and knowledge of infectious diseases. Patients tended to accept the control measures being used in each context. (MSE)

  20. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study

    PubMed Central

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:27672476

  1. Comparing the PPAT Drawings of Boys with AD/HD and Age-Matched Controls Using the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munley, Maripat

    2002-01-01

    Explores whether children with AD/HD respond differently to a specific art directive. Using the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale to evaluate the drawings, results indicate three elements that would most accurately predict the artists into the AD/HD group: color prominence, details of objects and environments, and line quality. (Contains 29…

  2. Processing Words Varying in Personal Familiarity (Based on Reading and Spelling) by Poor Readers and Age-Matched and Reading-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Evelyne; Willows, Dale M.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate whether performance differences between good and poor readers relate to reading-specific cognitive factors that result from engaging in reading activities and other experiential factors, the authors gave students in Grades 4 and 6 a perceptual identification test of words not only drawn from their personal lexicon but also varying in…

  3. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study

    PubMed Central

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD.

  4. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study.

    PubMed

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie; Krantic, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:27672476

  5. Localized 1H-NMR spectroscopy in patients with fibromyalgia: a controlled study of changes in cerebral glutamate/glutamine, inositol, choline, and N-acetylaspartate

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate whether single-voxel (SV) proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) detected differences between fibromyalgia (FM) patients and healthy controls. We also searched for correlations between neuroimaging abnormalities and neuropsychological variables. Methods Ten patients with FM and 10 gender- and age-matched control subjects were studied. A neuropsychological examination, DWI, DTI, and proton MRS were performed on the brain areas known to be associated with pain processing. Results Compared with healthy controls, FM patients had significantly higher levels of glutamate + glutamine (Glx) (mean ± SD, 10.71 ± 0.50 arbitrary institutional units versus 9.89 ± 1.04; P = 0.049) and higher glutamate + glutamine/creatine (Glx/Cr) ratios (1.90 ± 0.12 versus 1.72 ± 0.23; P = 0.034) in the posterior gyrus. Myoinositol (Ins) levels of the right and left hippocampi were significantly lower in FM patients (4.49 ± 0.74 versus 5.17 ± 0.62; P = 0.008 and 4.91 ± 0.85 versus 6.09 ± 0.78; P = 0.004, respectively). In FM patients, decreased myoinositol/creatine (Ins/Cr) ratios were found in the left sensorimotor area (P = 0.05) and the left hippocampus (P = 0.002) and lower levels of choline (P = 0.019) and N-acetyl aspartate + N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAA + NAG) (P = 0.034) in the left hippocampus. Significant correlations between depression, pain, and global function and the posterior gyrus Glx levels and Glx/Cr ratios were observed. Conclusions Glx within the posterior gyrus could be a pathologic factor in FM. Hippocampal dysfunction may be partially responsible for the depressive symptoms of FM. Additional studies with larger samples are required to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:20609227

  6. Intermittent patient suction system, self-contained control

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Jay L.

    1992-01-01

    An intermittent patient suction system, a self-contained control device therefor and methods of making the same are provided, the self-contained control device having a housing that contains two restrictor units therein for respectively controlling the "on" time and "off" time that the control device applies a vacuum and does not apply a vacuum through the output of the control device to the patient.

  7. Motor function benefits of visual restoration measured in age-related cataract and simulated patients: Case-control and clinical experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Nagura, Takeo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Negishi, Kazuno; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2015-09-30

    The aim of the present study was to measure gait velocity in cataract and simulated patients. The study was performed on 239 cataract patients, 115 age-matched subjects, and 11 simulated patients. We measured gait velocity and analyzed gait using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Mean gait velocity before and 2 and 7 months after cataract surgery was 0.91 ± 0.19, 1.04 ± 0.21, and 1.06 ± 0.21 m/s, respectively, for males and 0.84 ± 0.22, 0.91 ± 0.24, and 0.92 ± 0.25 m/s, respectively, for females. The increase after surgery was significant in both groups at 7 months (P < 0.05). Gait velocity was significantly slower in cataract patients compared with controls before surgery, but no longer different after surgery. In simulated patients, mean velocity was 87.0 ± 11.4% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.4 ± 12.3% of normal when counting fingers. Initial velocity was 89.1 ± 14.6% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.7 ± 11.6% of normal when counting fingers. There was a significant difference between normal and impaired visual function (P < 0.05). The results demonstrate the close relationship between visual function and gait in cataract patients and simulated patients.

  8. Motor function benefits of visual restoration measured in age-related cataract and simulated patients: Case-control and clinical experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Nagura, Takeo; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Negishi, Kazuno; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to measure gait velocity in cataract and simulated patients. The study was performed on 239 cataract patients, 115 age-matched subjects, and 11 simulated patients. We measured gait velocity and analyzed gait using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Mean gait velocity before and 2 and 7 months after cataract surgery was 0.91 ± 0.19, 1.04 ± 0.21, and 1.06 ± 0.21 m/s, respectively, for males and 0.84 ± 0.22, 0.91 ± 0.24, and 0.92 ± 0.25 m/s, respectively, for females. The increase after surgery was significant in both groups at 7 months (P < 0.05). Gait velocity was significantly slower in cataract patients compared with controls before surgery, but no longer different after surgery. In simulated patients, mean velocity was 87.0 ± 11.4% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.4 ± 12.3% of normal when counting fingers. Initial velocity was 89.1 ± 14.6% of normal vision with a 3° visual field and 92.7 ± 11.6% of normal when counting fingers. There was a significant difference between normal and impaired visual function (P < 0.05). The results demonstrate the close relationship between visual function and gait in cataract patients and simulated patients. PMID:26420727

  9. MCP-1and IL-1β expression in the myocardia of two young patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and fatal diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jianli; Gilliland, M G F; Jin, Zhuqing; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Hoffman, William H

    2014-02-01

    Convincing evidence exists for the early onset of diabetic cardiomyopathy and coronary artery disease (CAD) as distinct forms of cardiac disease in young patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and the pre-stages of T2DM, forms of dysregulated insulin signaling. Progression of both chronic cardiac conditions is mediated by oxidative stress and low grade inflammation. This study reports the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) chemokine and the interleukin (IL)-1β inflammatory cytokine in two young patients with suboptimal metabolic control and fatal diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), two age-matched overweight/obesity cases and two age-matched controls. In addition, markers of oxidative stress, apoptosis, collagen deposition and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were studied. Significant expression of MCP-1 and IL-1β was seen in the myocardia of the T1DM/DKA cases, with lesser amounts expressed in the overweight/obesity myocardia. All of the other markers except cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were expressed to a significantly greater extent in the T1DM/DKA and overweight/obesity cases in comparison to the age-matched controls. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was significantly greater in the overweight/obesity cases than in the T1DM/DKA or the control cases.

  10. Personality disorders and regulative styles of patients with temporo-mandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baggi, L; Rubino, I A; Zanna, V; Martignoni, M

    1995-02-01

    A sample of 42 women patients with Temporo-mandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome was given the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II and the Serial Color-Word Test. Compared with sex- and age-matched nonclinical controls, temporo-mandibular patients had significantly (1) higher scores on the Obsessive-Compulsive scale, (2) lower scores of ITa (a pattern concerned with initial times of response), and (3) higher scores of R (linear increase in reading times during the trials). The latter intergroup difference concerned mainly the first subtest, i.e., temporo-mandibular patients were characterized by higher scores of R from the very beginning of the process of adaptation.

  11. The contribution of proprioceptive information to postural control in elderly and patients with Parkinson's disease with a history of falls.

    PubMed

    Bekkers, Esther M J; Dockx, Kim; Heremans, Elke; Vercruysse, Sarah; Verschueren, Sabine M P; Mirelman, Anat; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Proprioceptive deficits negatively affect postural control but their precise contribution to postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD) is unclear. We investigated if proprioceptive manipulations differentially affect balance, measured by force plates, during quiet standing in 13 PD patients and 13 age-matched controls with a history of falls. Perceived limits of stability (LoS) were derived from the differences between maximal center of pressure (CoP) displacement in anterior-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) direction during a maximal leaning task. Task conditions comprised standing with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC): (1) on a stable surface; (2) an unstable surface; and (3) with Achilles tendon vibration. CoP displacements were calculated as a percentage of their respective LoS. Perceived LoS did not differ between groups. PD patients showed greater ML CoP displacement than elderly fallers (EF) across all conditions (p = 0.043) and tended to have higher postural sway in relation to the LoS (p = 0.050). Both groups performed worse on an unstable surface and during tendon vibration compared to standing on a stable surface with EO and even more so with EC. Both PD and EF had more AP sway in all conditions with EC compared to EO (p < 0.001) and showed increased CoP displacements when relying on proprioception only compared to standing with normal sensory input. This implies a similar role of the proprioceptive system in postural control in fallers with and without PD. PD fallers showed higher ML sway after sensory manipulations, as a result of which these values approached their perceived LoS more closely than in EF. We conclude that despite a similar fall history, PD patients showed more ML instability than EF, irrespective of sensory manipulation, but had a similar reliance on ankle proprioception. Hence, we recommend that rehabilitation and fall prevention for PD should focus on motor rather than on sensory aspects.

  12. Controlling patient participation during robot-assisted gait training

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The overall goal of this paper was to investigate approaches to controlling active participation in stroke patients during robot-assisted gait therapy. Although active physical participation during gait rehabilitation after stroke was shown to improve therapy outcome, some patients can behave passively during rehabilitation, not maximally benefiting from the gait training. Up to now, there has not been an effective method for forcing patient activity to the desired level that would most benefit stroke patients with a broad variety of cognitive and biomechanical impairments. Methods Patient activity was quantified in two ways: by heart rate (HR), a physiological parameter that reflected physical effort during body weight supported treadmill training, and by a weighted sum of the interaction torques (WIT) between robot and patient, recorded from hip and knee joints of both legs. We recorded data in three experiments, each with five stroke patients, and controlled HR and WIT to a desired temporal profile. Depending on the patient's cognitive capabilities, two different approaches were taken: either by allowing voluntary patient effort via visual instructions or by forcing the patient to vary physical effort by adapting the treadmill speed. Results We successfully controlled patient activity quantified by WIT and by HR to a desired level. The setup was thereby individually adaptable to the specific cognitive and biomechanical needs of each patient. Conclusion Based on the three successful approaches to controlling patient participation, we propose a metric which enables clinicians to select the best strategy for each patient, according to the patient's physical and cognitive capabilities. Our framework will enable therapists to challenge the patient to more activity by automatically controlling the patient effort to a desired level. We expect that the increase in activity will lead to improved rehabilitation outcome. PMID:21429200

  13. Heading perception in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Peli, Eli; Warren, William H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether retinis pigmentosa (RP) patients with residual visual field of < 100 degrees could perceive heading from optic flow. METHODS: Four RP patients and four age-matched normally sighted control subjects viewed displays simulating an observer walking over a ground. In experiment 1, subjects viewed either the entire display with free fixation (full-field condition) or through an aperture with a fixation point at the center (aperture condition). In experiment 2, patients viewed displays of different durations. RESULTS: RP patients' performance was comparable to that of the age-matched control subjects: heading judgment was better in the full-field condition than in the aperture condition. Increasing display duration from 0.5 s to 1 s improved patients' heading performance, but giving them more time (3 s) to gather more visual information did not consistently further improve their performance. CONCLUSIONS: RP patients use active scanning eye movements to compensate for their visual field loss in heading perception; they might be able to gather sufficient optic flow information for heading perception in about 1 s.

  14. Patient ECG recording control for an automatic implantable defibrillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, Glen H. (Inventor); Lee, Jr., David G. (Inventor); Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An implantable automatic defibrillator includes sensors which are placed on or near the patient's heart to detect electrical signals indicative of the physiology of the heart. The signals are digitally converted and stored into a FIFO region of a RAM by operation of a direct memory access (DMA) controller. The DMA controller operates transparently with respect to the microprocessor which is part of the defibrillator. The implantable defibrillator includes a telemetry communications circuit for sending data outbound from the defibrillator to an external device (either a patient controller or a physician's console or other) and a receiver for sensing at least an externally generated patient ECG recording command signal. The patient recording command signal is generated by the hand held patient controller. Upon detection of the patient ECG recording command, DMA copies the contents of the FIFO into a specific region of the RAM.

  15. Point of care and patient privacy: who is in control?

    PubMed

    Morgan, J D

    1994-05-01

    Public and patient access to medical records has been severely limited through policies limiting physical and timely access and intellectual understanding of content. New expectations of patient/public access and control have arisen accompanying the new paradigms of health care delivery and health information (computer-based patient records). Examples from these new paradigms are personalized and presented in information system contexts from bedside to community settings. Patient and family involvement in care delivery, education, assessment, and control of privacy are explored. A personalized confidentiality/security/privacy module of the computer-based patient record is suggested.

  16. Abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Baró, L.; Hermoso, J. C.; Núñez, M. C.; Jiménez-Rios, J. A.; Gil, A.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated total plasma fatty acid concentrations and percentages, and the fatty acid profiles for the different plasma lipid fractions and red blood cell lipids, in 17 patients with untreated colorectal cancer and 12 age-matched controls with no malignant diseases, from the same geographical area. Cancer patients had significantly lower total plasma concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives than healthy controls; when the values were expressed as relative percentages, cancer patients had significantly higher proportions of oleic acid and lower levels of linoleic acid than controls. With regard to lipid fractions, cancer patients had higher proportions of oleic acid in plasma phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesterol esters, and lower percentages of linoleic acid and its derivatives. On the other hand, alpha-linolenic acid was significantly lower in triglycerides from cancer patients and tended to be lower in phospholipids. Its derivatives also tended to be lower in phospholipids and triglycerides from cancer patients. Our findings suggest that colorectal cancer patients present abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles characterized by lower amounts of most saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives, especially members of the n-6 series, than their healthy age-matched counterparts. These changes are probably due to metabolic changes caused by the illness per se but not to malnutrition. PMID:9667678

  17. Somatosensory symptoms in unmedicated de novo patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schindlbeck, Katharina A; Mehl, Arne; Geffe, Sarah; Benik, Steffen; Tütüncü, Serdar; Klostermann, Fabian; Marzinzik, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative condition presenting with motor and non-motor symptoms including somatosensory disturbances. As neuropathic syndromes in advanced PD patients are supposed to be due to antiparkinsonian medication, we studied the presence of somatosensory symptoms and peripheral nerve function in drug naïve patients with PD as well as age-matched healthy controls. Somatosensory symptoms and signs were investigated in 39 de novo PD patients and 32 age-matched healthy controls using the modified Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Scale. To elucidate potential underlying mechanisms, peripheral nerve function was analyzed with sensory and motor neurography. About two thirds of de novo diagnosed levodopa naïve PD patients (66.7 %) reported somatosensory symptoms in comparison to one third of the control group (31.2 %) (p = 0.003). The presence of PD (p = 0.017) was a predictive factor for the occurrence of somatosensory symptoms among all participants. In contrast to the significantly higher frequency of somatosensory symptoms in patients with PD compared to controls, neurographically based peripheral nerve function did not differ between the groups. Our results indicate that somatosensory symptoms are a PD feature, which can be found when diagnosed first and independently of dopaminergic treatment. As the electrophysiologically determined peripheral nerve function was not different from that obtained in the control group, somatosensory symptoms are inherent in early PD and may be, at least partially, of central origin. PMID:26392189

  18. Proteomic Identification of Proteins Suggestive of Immune-Mediated Response or Neuronal Degeneration in Serum of Achalasia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Im, Seon Kyo; Yeo, Mari

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The primary pathophysiologic abnormality in achalasia is known to be a loss of inhibitory myenteric ganglion cells, which may result from an immune-mediated response or neuronal degeneration. The aim of this study was to identify proteins suggestive of an immune-mediated response or neuronal degeneration in the serum of achalasia patients using a proteomic analysis. Methods Blood samples were collected from five symptomatic achalasia patients and five sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Serum proteomic analysis was conducted, and the protein spots were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight and a proteomics analyzer. The serum level of C3 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in nine patients with achalasia and 18 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Results Of the 658 matched protein spots, 28 spots were up-regulated over 2-fold in the serum from achalasia patients compared with that from controls. The up-regulated proteins included complement C4B5, complement C3, cyclin-dependent kinase 5, transthyretin, and alpha 2 macroglobulin. The serum levels of C3 in achalasia patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Conclusions The serum proteomic analysis of achalasia patients suggests an immune-mediated response or neuronal degeneration. Further validation studies in larger samples and the esophageal tissue of achalasia patients are required. PMID:23898380

  19. Symptom control in the pregnant cancer patient.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, M K; LeGrand, S B; Walsh, D

    2000-12-01

    While much attention has been devoted to cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy in the pregnant cancer patient, the drugs used for management of symptoms and complications related to cancer during pregnancy have been overlooked. There is substantial overlap between the symptoms of cancer and cancer management and the symptoms related to pregnancy. The mainstay of symptom management is drug therapy and the potential for a drug to be embryotoxic or teratogenic depends on when it is given. In general, drugs not proven safe in pregnancy should be withheld, especially during the first trimester. The few drugs that have been proven to be teratogenic are alcohol, thalidomide, the folic acid antagonists (which includes methotrexate), diethylstilbestrol, and the vitamin A isomers, but there is a good deal of uncertainty about many other therapeutic agents. Placental transport of drugs from mother to fetus must be taken into consideration from the fifth week of gestation to parturition. Although the first trimester is the time of most organ development in the fetus, the brain continues to develop throughout pregnancy and may be damaged later in pregnancy, resulting in diminished intelligence or behavioral problems. This review will focus on the treatment of the most common symptoms of cancer in a pregnant patient and the potential for fetal damage. PMID:11130478

  20. Accelerometry reveals differences in gait variability between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Huisinga, Jessie M; Mancini, Martina; St George, Rebecca J; Horak, Fay B

    2013-08-01

    Variability of movement reflects important information for the maintenance of the health of the system. For pathological populations, changes in variability during gait signal the presence of abnormal motor control strategies. For persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), extensive gait problems have been reported including changes in gait variability. While previous studies have focused on footfall variability, the present study used accelerometers on the trunk to measure variability during walking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the variability of the acceleration pattern of the upper and lower trunk in PwMS compared to healthy controls. We extracted linear and nonlinear measures of gait variability from 30 s of steady state walking for 15 PwMS and 15 age-matched healthy controls. PwMS had altered variability compared to controls with greater Lyapunov exponent in the ML (p < 0.001) and AP (p < 0.001) directions, and greater frequency dispersion in the ML direction (p = 0.034). PwMS also demonstrated greater mean velocity in the ML direction (p = 0.045) and lower root mean square of acceleration in the AP direction (p = 0.040). These findings indicate that PwMS have altered structure of variability of the trunk during gait compared to healthy controls and agree with previous findings related to changes in gait variability in PwMS.

  1. Tight control of type 1 diabetes: recommendations for patients.

    PubMed

    Havas, Stephen; Donner, Thomas

    2006-09-15

    Tight control of blood glucose levels and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g., hypertension, hypercholesterolemia) can substantially reduce the incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications from type 1 diabetes. Physicians play an important role in helping patients make essential lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of these complications. Key recommendations that family physicians can give patients to optimize their outcomes include: take control of daily decisions regarding your health, focus on preventing and controlling risk factors for cardiovascular disease, tightly control your blood glucose level, be cognizant of potentially inaccurate blood glucose test results, use physiologic insulin replacement regimens, and learn how to manage and prevent hypoglycemia. PMID:17002031

  2. The use of retained patient specimens for haematology quality control.

    PubMed

    Hackney, J R; Cembrowski, G S

    1990-01-01

    Patient blood specimens constitute ideal quality control material in many respects. Although stability is a problem, patient specimens are sufficiently stable to allow their use in the control of short-term systematic error. The principal challenges involve the design of a system which combines excellent performance characteristics (probability of error detection and probability of false rejection) with a minimum of extra work. In the past, guidelines have been presented for an optimized quality control program using retained patient specimens in haematology. These guidelines call for the use of three retained specimens initially analysed only once, with subsequent analyses judged 'out of control' if they deviate from the initial result by a prescribed multiple of the long-term standard deviation. In practice, this system may result in a relatively high probability of false rejection of data (Pfr) due to inadequately established control ranges. Also, the maintenance of three retained patient specimens may be an excessive burden on small laboratories. We present data on the optimization of a quality control program using one retained specimen that is appropriate for use by smaller laboratories. The control rules and the number of initial analyses are adjusted to yield the highest possible probability of error detection (Ped while maintaining a low Pfr and a low additional workload. In addition, we present data concerning the control of satellite instruments by sharing patient specimens between the satellite instrument and a 'reference' instrument.

  3. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients. PMID:26682545

  4. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA–targeted RT–quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients. PMID:26682545

  5. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  6. Oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant defenses in peripheral cells from familial Alzheimer's patients.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Cristina; Fiorillo, Claudia; Sorbi, Sandro; Latorraca, Stefania; Nacmias, Benedetta; Bagnoli, Silvia; Nassi, Paolo; Liguri, Gianfranco

    2002-11-15

    We have measured the levels of typical end products of the processes of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in skin fibroblasts and lymphoblasts taken from patients with familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), and age-matched healthy controls. Compared to controls, the fibroblasts and lymphoblasts carrying amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS-1) gene mutations showed a clear increase in lipoperoxidation products, malondialdehyde (MDA), and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). In contrast, the antioxidant defenses of cells from FAD patients were lower than those from normal subjects. Lipoperoxidation and antioxidant capacity in lymphoblasts from patients affected by sporadic AD were virtually indistinguishable from the basal values of normal controls. An oxidative attack on protein gave rise to greater protein carbonyl content in FAD patients than in age-matched controls. Furthermore, ADP ribosylation levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) nuclear substrates were significantly raised, whereas the PARP content did not differ significantly between fibroblasts carrying gene mutations and control cells. These results indicate that peripheral cells carrying APP and PS-1 gene mutations show altered levels of oxidative markers even though they are not directly involved in the neurodegenerative process of AD. These results support the hypothesis that oxidative damage to lipid, protein, and DNA is an important early event in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:12419469

  7. [Verbal ability of Alzheimer's disease patients and very elderly control patients using the Aachen aphasia test].

    PubMed

    Ecklin, R; Schönenberger, P M

    1992-01-01

    We assessed language function, using the Aachen aphasia test (AAT), in 14 subjects with Alzheimer's disease and 6 control patients. Aphasia did not occur in control patients, but in 11 of 14 Alzheimer's disease patients. Impairment of object naming was the most prevalent abnormality. Performance in AAT subtests repetition, written language, object naming, comprehension and token test correlated strongly with Mini-Mental State scores.

  8. Pressure control to accommodate patient breathing efforts during volume ventilation.

    PubMed

    Stawitcke, F A; Ream, A K; Piziali, R L

    1987-04-01

    Intermittent positive-pressure ventilation is used to support patients whose unassisted breathing is inadequate. Mechanical ventilators deliver pressurized gas to the patient's lungs by using a pattern of volume and timing that is preset by the clinician. A weakness of existing control methods is their emphasis on maintaining adequate gas exchange while poorly accommodating the patient's efforts to reassume control of the delivery pattern. A method is proposed to control airway pressure within a breath by making it respond to measurements of volume. This method using pressure as a function of volume, or P(V) method, permits the patient to have transient control over flow rate and delivered volume. In addition, an adaptive controller is included that modifies the applied pressure during subsequent breaths; it assures an average flow rate and delivered volume at the levels prescribed by the clinician, when sustained changes occur in airway resistance, lung-thorax compliance, or breathing efforts. Analyses and computer simulations suggest that the P(V) method will be better than conventional volume ventilation in accommodating, within a breath, transient breathing efforts without long-term degradation of the prescribed delivery pattern. The P(V) method can restore the delivery pattern, using the adaptive controller, within a few breaths after changes occur in the patient's lung mechanics. We conclude that the P(V) method is feasible, that it may represent an improved method of patient ventilation, particularly during fighting or weaning from the ventilator, and that it warrants further investigation.

  9. Skin Biophysical Characteristics in Patients with Keratoconus: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Robati, Reza M.; Einollahi, Bahram; Einollahi, Hoda; Younespour, Shima; Fadaifard, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Keratoconus is a relatively common corneal disease causing significant visual disability. Individuals with connective tissue disorders that affect the skin such as Marfan's syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or patients with atopic dermatitis show an increased prevalence of keratoconus. It seems that there are some concurrent alterations of skin and cornea in patients with keratoconus. Objective. We plan to compare skin biophysical characteristics in patients with keratoconus and healthy controls. Methods. Forty patients with keratoconus (18 females and 22 males) with mean (SD) age of 33.32 (9.55) years (range 19–56) and 40 healthy controls were recruited to this study. Skin biophysical characteristics including cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT), stratum corneum hydration, and melanin values were measured in patients and controls. Results. The median CRRT, stratum corneum hydration, and melanin measurements were significantly lower in patients with keratoconus in comparison with healthy controls. Conclusion. There are some alterations of skin biophysical properties in patients with keratoconus. Therefore, the assessment of these skin parameters could provide us some clues to the possible common biophysical variations of cornea and skin tissue in diseases such as keratoconus. PMID:27403376

  10. Skin Biophysical Characteristics in Patients with Keratoconus: A Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Robati, Reza M; Einollahi, Bahram; Einollahi, Hoda; Younespour, Shima; Fadaifard, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Keratoconus is a relatively common corneal disease causing significant visual disability. Individuals with connective tissue disorders that affect the skin such as Marfan's syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or patients with atopic dermatitis show an increased prevalence of keratoconus. It seems that there are some concurrent alterations of skin and cornea in patients with keratoconus. Objective. We plan to compare skin biophysical characteristics in patients with keratoconus and healthy controls. Methods. Forty patients with keratoconus (18 females and 22 males) with mean (SD) age of 33.32 (9.55) years (range 19-56) and 40 healthy controls were recruited to this study. Skin biophysical characteristics including cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT), stratum corneum hydration, and melanin values were measured in patients and controls. Results. The median CRRT, stratum corneum hydration, and melanin measurements were significantly lower in patients with keratoconus in comparison with healthy controls. Conclusion. There are some alterations of skin biophysical properties in patients with keratoconus. Therefore, the assessment of these skin parameters could provide us some clues to the possible common biophysical variations of cornea and skin tissue in diseases such as keratoconus. PMID:27403376

  11. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  12. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2015-12-01

    The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months) and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients) and the low functioning group (20 patients) using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients.

  13. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months) and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients) and the low functioning group (20 patients) using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients. PMID:26889198

  14. Enhancing cancer pain control regimens through patient education.

    PubMed

    Rimer, B; Levy, M H; Keintz, M K; Fox, L; Engstrom, P F; MacElwee, N

    1987-12-01

    The problem of cancer-related pain afflicts millions of people annually. The study described here was aimed at improving cancer patients' pain control through a planned patient education program. A randomized clinical trial with a Solomon Four-Group design was used to assess the effectiveness of a patient education intervention consisting of nurse counseling and printed materials. The sample included 230 cancer patients. One month later, patients in the experimental group were more likely to have taken their pain medicine on the correct schedule and to have taken the correct dosage. The experimental group also was significantly less likely to report stopping the medicine when they felt better. In addition, they were significantly less worried about tolerance and addiction to pain medicines. Forty-four percent of the experimental group compared to 24% of the control group reported no or mild pain at the posttest. PMID:10315745

  15. Plasma protein thiolation index (PTI) as a biomarker of thiol-specific oxidative stress in haemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Reggiani, Francesco; Podestà, Manuel A; Garavaglia, Maria Lisa; Portinaro, Nicola M; Milzani, Aldo; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2015-12-01

    The role of oxidative stress in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), which occurs at significantly higher levels than in the general population, is often underestimated in clinical practice. Emerging evidence highlights the strong correlation of oxidative stress with chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease, which are highly prevalent in most patients on maintenance haemodialysis (HD) and are a major risk factor for mortality in this population. In this study, total plasma thiols and plasma S-thiolated proteins were measured in patients with ESRD, before and after a regular HD session, and compared to age-matched healthy subjects. We found a significant decrease in the level of total plasma thiols and, conversely, a significant increase in the level of S-thiolated proteins in these patients. In most patients, post-HD plasma level of total thiols did not differ from the one in healthy subjects, whereas plasma level of S-thiolated proteins was lower in HD patients than in age-matched healthy controls. This suggests that a single HD session restores plasma thiol redox status and re-establishes the antioxidant capacity of plasma thiols. Additionally, we determined protein thiolation index (PTI), i.e., the molar ratio between the sum of all low molecular mass thiols bound to S-thiolated plasma proteins and protein free cysteinyl residues. Patients with ESRD had a significantly higher PTI compared to age-matched healthy subjects and HD was associated with a decrease in PTI to normal, or lower than normal, levels. Although this study is limited in size, our results suggest that PTI is a useful indicator of thiol-specific oxidative stress in patients with ESRD on maintenance HD. This study also emphasizes that PTI determination is a cheap and simple tool suitable for large-scale clinical studies that could be used for routine screening of thiol-specific oxidative stress.

  16. Control of the behavior of schizophrenic patients by food.

    PubMed

    AYLLON, T; HAUGHTON, E

    1962-07-01

    Operant-conditioning principles using food as a reinforcer were applied to control the behavior of 45 chronic schizophrenic patients. The investigation was conducted in a psychiatric ward in which there was 24-hr environmental control. In order to use food as a reinforcer for controlling psychotic behavior, it was necessary first to deal with the eating deficits in the patients. Approximately 50% of the ward population was selected because of a history of refusal to eat. Their refusal to eat had remained relatively unaffected by one or more of these treatments: spoonfeeding, tubefeeding, intravaneous feeding, and electroshock. These treatments were discontinued, and the patients were left alone at mealtimes. The results show that social reinforcement in such forms as coaxing, persuading, and feeding the patient tend to shape patients into eating problems so they are conditioned to eat only with assistance. When refusal to eat was no longer followed by social reinforcement, the patients soon started eating unassisted. When access to the dining room was made dependent upon a chain of responses including a motor and social component, all patients learned these responses.

  17. Intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid temperature analysis using MR diffusion-weighted imaging thermometry in Parkinson's disease patients, multiple system atrophy patients, and healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sumida, Kaoru; Sato, Noriko; Ota, Miho; Sakai, Koji; Nippashi, Yasumasa; Sone, Daichi; Yokoyama, Kota; Ito, Kimiteru; Maikusa, Norihide; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Yamada, Kei; Murata, Miho; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined the temperature of the intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (Tv) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and those with multiple system atrophy (MSA) in comparison with healthy subjects, and we examined normal changes in this temperature with aging. Methods Tv was estimated by magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) thermometry in 36 PD patients (19 males, 17 females), 34 MSA patients (17 males, 17 females), 64 age-matched controls (27 men, 37 women), and 114 all-age adult controls (47 men, 67 women; 28–89 years old). The volume of lateral ventricles was also estimated using FreeSurfer in all subjects. Tv and ventricular volume data were compared among the PD and MSA patients and age-matched controls. We also evaluated the relationship between Tv and age in the 114 all-age controls, controlling for ventricular volume. Men and women were analyzed separately. Results The male PD and MSA patients had significantly higher Tv values compared to the male controls, with no significant difference in ventricular volume among them. There was no significant difference in Tv between the female patients and controls. In the all-age male controls, there was a significant negative correlation between Tv and age controlling for ventricular volume, and this was not observed in the women. Conclusion DWI thermometry is a useful and easy method for demonstrating an altered intracranial environment in male patients and healthy controls, but not in females. DWI thermometry can thus be used to help to explore the pathophysiology of Parkinsonian syndromes and to differentiate individuals affected by neurodegenerative disease with autonomic dysfunction from those without it. PMID:26085965

  18. Tuberculosis Control Program and patient satisfaction, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Lima, Sheyla Maria Lemos; Brito, Cláudia; Ferreira, Vanja Maria Bessa; Escosteguy, Claudia Caminha; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Teixeira Leite

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate factors associated with users’ satisfaction in the Tuberculosis Control Program. METHODS A cross-sectional study of 295 patients aged ≥ 18 years, with two or more outpatient visits in the Tuberculosis Control Program, in five cities in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, in 2010. Considering an estimated population of 4,345 patients, the sampling plan included 15 health care units participating in the program, divided into two strata: units in Rio de Janeiro City, selected with probability proportional to the monthly average number of outpatient visits, and units in the other four cities. In the units, four temporal clusters of five patients each were selected with equal probability, totaling 300 patients. A questionnaire investigating the users’ clinical and sociodemographic variables and aspects of care and service in the program relevant to user satisfaction was applied to the patients. Descriptive statistics about users and their satisfaction with the program were obtained, and the effects of factors associated with satisfaction were estimated. RESULTS Patients were predominantly males (57.7%), with a mean age of 40.9 and with low level of schooling. The mean treatment time was 4.1 months, mostly self-administered (70.4%). Additionally, 25.8% had previously been treated for tuberculosis. There was a high level of satisfaction, especially regarding medication provision, and respect to patients by the health professionals. Patients who were younger (≤ 30), those on self-administered treatment, and with graduate level, showed less satisfaction. Suggestions to improve the services include having more doctors (70.0%), and offering exams in the same place of attendance (55.1%). CONCLUSIONS Patient satisfaction with the Tuberculosis Control Program was generally high, although lower among younger patients, those with university education and those on self-administered treatment. The study indicates the need

  19. Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Genotypes in Pediatric Migraine Patients.

    PubMed

    Saygi, Semra; Erol, İlknur; Alehan, Füsun; Yalçın, Yaprak Yılmaz; Kubat, Gözde; Ataç, Fatma Belgin

    2015-10-01

    This study compared superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) alleles in 97 consecutive children and adolescents with migraine to 96 healthy children and adolescents. Isolated genomic DNA was used as a template for SOD1 (35 A/C), SOD2 16 C/T, and CAT2 [(-262 C/T) and (-21 A/T)] allele genotyping. The SOD2 16 C/T genotype and C allele frequency differed significantly between controls and migraine (P = .047; P = .038). CAT -21 AA genotype and A allele frequency were significantly higher in both migraine with aura patients (P = .013; P = .004) and migraine without aura patients (P = .003; P = .001) compared to controls. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of differences in SOD and CAT genotypes between pediatric migraine patients and age-matched controls. Further studies on the functional implications of these genetic variants on neural antioxidant capacity and the use of antioxidant modulators for migraine treatment are warranted.

  20. [Healthcare-Associated Infection Control with Awareness of Patient Safety].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    In order to provide safe and secure medical care for patients, health care-associated infections (HAI) must not occur. HAI should be considered as incidents, and countermeasures should be viewed as a patient safety management itself. Healthcare-associated infection control (HAIC) is practiced by the infection control team (ICT), which is based on multidisciplinary cooperation. Team members have to recognize that it is the most important to make use of the expertise of each discipline. In addition, all members must try to respond quickly, to help the clinic staff. Visualized rapid information provision and sharing, environmental improvement, outbreak factor analysis, hand hygiene compliance rate improvement, proper antibiotic use (Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: ASP), and regional cooperation & leadership comprise the role of the ICT in the flagship hospital. Regarding this role, we present our hospital's efforts and the outcomes. In conclusion, for medical practice quality improvement, healthcare-associated infection control should be conducted thoroughly along with an awareness of patient safety.

  1. Patient-controlled modalities for acute postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Miaskowski, Christine

    2005-08-01

    Although numerous clinical practice guidelines for pain management have been published throughout the last 12 years, inadequate pain relief remains a significant health care issue. Several patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) modalities are currently available for the treatment of acute postoperative pain, including intravenous (IV) PCA, epidural (PCEA), and oral PCA. Although PCEA and IV PCA are both commonly used modalities, IV PCA is considered the standard of care for postoperative pain management. Limitations of this modality do exist, however. Consequently, noninvasive PCA systems are under development to circumvent many of these limitations, including the fentanyl hydrochloride patient-controlled transdermal system (PCTS); (IONSYS Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ) and a number of patient-controlled intranasal analgesia (PCINA) delivery systems. The objective of this article is to review the PCA modalities currently in use and to discuss those in development for the treatment of acute postoperative pain.

  2. Patient-controlled oral analgesia versus nurse-controlled parenteral analgesia after caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, A; Dehon, A; Nagot, N; Macioce, V; Nogue, E; Morau, E

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of early patient-controlled oral analgesia compared with parenteral analgesia in a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial of women undergoing elective caesarean section under regional anaesthesia. Seventy-seven women received multimodal paracetamol, ketoprofen and morphine analgesia. The woman having patient-controlled oral analgesia were administered four pillboxes on the postnatal ward containing tablets and instructions for self-medication, the first at 7 h after the spinal injection and then three more at 12-hourly intervals. Pain at rest and on movement was evaluated using an 11-point verbal rating scale at 2 h and then at 6-hourly intervals for 48 h. The pre-defined non-inferiority limit for the difference in mean pain scores (patient-controlled oral analgesia minus parenteral) was one. The one-sided 95% CI of the difference in mean pain scores was significantly lower than one at all time-points at rest and on movement, demonstrating non-inferiority of patient-controlled oral analgesia. More women used morphine in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group (22 (58%)) than in the parenteral group (9 (23%); p = 0.002). The median (IQR [range]) number of morphine doses in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group was 2 (1-3 [1-7]) compared with 1 (1-1 [1-2]); p = 0.006) in the parenteral group. Minor drug errors or omissions were identified in five (13%) women receiving patient-controlled oral analgesia. Pruritus was more frequent in the patient-controlled oral analgesia group (14 (37%) vs 6 (15%) respectively; p = 0.03), but no differences were noted for other adverse events and maternal satisfaction. After elective caesarean section, early patient-controlled oral analgesia is non-inferior to standard parenteral analgesia for pain management, and can be one of the steps of an enhanced recovery process. PMID:26931110

  3. Late presentation of acromegaly in medically controlled prolactinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Manuylova, Ekaterina; Calvi, Laura M; Hastings, Catherine; Vates, G Edward; Johnson, Mahlon D; Cave, William T

    2016-01-01

    Summary Co-secretion of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) from a single pituitary adenoma is common. In fact, up to 25% of patients with acromegaly may have PRL co-secretion. The prevalence of acromegaly among patients with a newly diagnosed prolactinoma is unknown. Given the possibility of mixed GH and PRL co-secretion, the current recommendation is to obtain an insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in patients with prolactinoma at the initial diagnosis. Long-term follow-up of IGF-1 is not routinely done. Here, we report two cases of well-controlled prolactinoma on dopamine agonists with the development of acromegaly 10–20 years after the initial diagnoses. In both patients, a mixed PRL/GH-cosecreting adenoma was confirmed on the pathology examination after transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). Therefore, periodic routine measurements of IGF-1 should be considered regardless of the duration and biochemical control of prolactinoma. Learning points: Acromegaly can develop in patients with well-controlled prolactinoma on dopamine agonists. The interval between prolactinoma and acromegaly diagnoses can be several decades. Periodic screening of patients with prolactinoma for growth hormone excess should be considered and can 
lead to an early diagnosis of acromegaly before the development of complications.

  4. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results.

  5. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results. PMID:27062173

  6. A Novel Analog Reasoning Paradigm: New Insights in Intellectually Disabled Patients

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Aurore; Brun, Amandine; Cheylus, Anne; Reboul, Anne; Nazir, Tatjana; Bussy, Gérald; Delange, Karine; Paulignan, Yves; Mercier, Sandra; David, Albert; Marignier, Stéphanie; Merle, Lydie; de Fréminville, Bénédicte; Prieur, Fabienne; Till, Michel; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Toutain, Annick; Bieth, Eric; Touraine, Renaud; Sanlaville, Damien; Chelly, Jamel; Kong, Jian; Ott, Daniel; Kassai, Behrouz; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Gollub, Randy L.; des Portes, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Background Intellectual Disability (ID) is characterized by deficits in intellectual functions such as reasoning, problem-solving, planning, abstract thinking, judgment, and learning. As new avenues are emerging for treatment of genetically determined ID (such as Down’s syndrome or Fragile X syndrome), it is necessary to identify objective reliable and sensitive outcome measures for use in clinical trials. Objective We developed a novel visual analogical reasoning paradigm, inspired by the Progressive Raven’s Matrices, but appropriate for Intellectually Disabled patients. This new paradigm assesses reasoning and inhibition abilities in ID patients. Methods We performed behavioural analyses for this task (with a reaction time and error rate analysis, Study 1) in 96 healthy controls (adults and typically developed children older than 4) and 41 genetically determined ID patients (Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome and ARX mutated patients). In order to establish and quantify the cognitive strategies used to solve the task, we also performed an eye-tracking analysis (Study 2). Results Down syndrome, ARX and Fragile X patients were significantly slower and made significantly more errors than chronological age-matched healthy controls. The effect of inhibition on error rate was greater than the matrix complexity effect in ID patients, opposite to findings in adult healthy controls. Interestingly, ID patients were more impaired by inhibition than mental age-matched healthy controls, but not by the matrix complexity. Eye-tracking analysis made it possible to identify the strategy used by the participants to solve the task. Adult healthy controls used a matrix-based strategy, whereas ID patients used a response-based strategy. Furthermore, etiologic-specific reasoning differences were evidenced between ID patients groups. Conclusion We suggest that this paradigm, appropriate for ID patients and developmental populations as well as adult healthy controls, provides an

  7. Glycemic control and diabetes management in hospitalized patients in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of tight blood glucose control among outpatients with diabetes mellitus is well established, however, the management of diabetes in the hospital setting is generally considered secondary in importance. This study sought to assess glycemic control and diabetes management in adult patients admitted to hospitals in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional and nationwide survey was conducted from July 2010 to January 2012. Eligible cases were 18 years of age or older, had a diagnosis of diabetes and a hospitalization length of stay ≥72 hours. Socio-demographic information, hospitalization details, and data on diabetes diagnosis, management and treatment were collected for all patients by chart review. Information on all blood glucose (BG) readings for a maximum of 20 consecutive days of hospitalization was recorded for each patient. Results Overall, 2,399 patients were surveyed in 24 hospitals located in 13 cities from all five Brazilian regions. The prevalence of patients presenting hyperglycemic (BG >180 mg/dL) or hypoglycemic (BG <70 mg/dL) events was 89.4% and 30.9% in patients in general wards, and 88.2% and 27.7% in those in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), respectively. In addition, a BG measure >180 mg/dL was recorded in two-thirds of the patient-days. A high proportion of patients were treated with sliding-scale insulin regimen alone in the general wards (52.0%) and in the ICUs (69.2%), and only 35.7% and 3.9% received appropriate insulin therapy in general wards (basal + bolus insulin) and in ICUs (continuous IV insulin), respectively. Conclusions Inpatient glycemic control and diabetes management needs improvement. Opportunities to improve care in Brazilian hospitals include expanded use of intravenous insulin and subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin protocols, avoiding use of sliding-scale insulin alone, increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and institution wide quality improvement efforts targeting both physician and nursing

  8. Randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Creed, F; Black, D; Anthony, P; Osborn, M; Thomas, P; Tomenson, B

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the proportion of acutely ill psychiatric patients who can be treated in a day hospital and compare the outcome of day patient and inpatient treatment. DESIGN--Prospective randomised controlled trial of day patient versus inpatient treatment after exclusion of patients precluded by severity of illness or other factors from being treated as day patients. All three groups assessed at three and 12 months. SETTING--Teaching hospital serving small socially deprived inner city area. Day hospital designed to take acute admissions because of few beds. PATIENTS--175 Patients were considered, of whom 73 could not be allocated. Of the remaining 102 patients, 51 were allocated to each treatment setting but only 89 became established in treatment--namely, 41 day patients and 48 inpatients. 73 Of these 89 patients were reassessed at three months and 70 at one year. INTERVENTIONS--Standard day patient and inpatient treatment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Discharge from hospital and return to previous level of social functioning; reduction of psychiatric symptoms, abnormal behaviour, and burden on relatives. RESULTS--33 Of 48 inpatients were discharged at three months compared with 17 of 41 day patients. But at one year 9 of 48 inpatients and three of 41 day patients were in hospital. 18 Of 35 day patients and 16 of 39 inpatients were at their previous level of social functioning at one year. The only significant difference at three months was a greater improvement in social role performance in the inpatients. At one year there was no significant difference between day patients and inpatients in present state examination summary scores and social role performance, burden, or behaviour. CONCLUSIONS--Roughly 40% of all acutely ill patients presenting for admission to a psychiatric unit may be treated satisfactorily in a well staffed day hospital. The outcome of treatment is similar to that of inpatient care but might possibly reduce readmissions. The hospital costs

  9. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  10. Overdose of opioid from patient-controlled analgesia pumps.

    PubMed

    Notcutt, W G; Knowles, P; Kaldas, R

    1992-07-01

    Two incidence have occurred in our hospital when a patient-controlled analgesia pump has accidentally delivered the whole contents of the syringe of diamorphine (60 mg) over a period of approximately 1 h. Electrical corruption of the pumps' program has been identified as the probable cause. All pumps of this type have been modified to prevent such occurrences.

  11. Patient-controlled sedation and analgesia during SWL.

    PubMed

    Uyar, M; Uyar, M; Uğur, G; Bílge, S; Ozyar, B; Ozyurt, C

    1996-10-01

    Sixty unpremedicated outpatients undergoing elective extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) using a Dornier MPL 9000 lithotripter were randomly assigned to receive either propofol-alfentanil (PA group; N = 30) or midazolam-alfentanil (MA group; N = 30) by a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device for sedation and analgesia. Although pain intensity scores were lower after 20 minutes and sedation was more pronounced in the MA group, both drug regimens produced satisfactory sedation and analgesia and allowed the maximum number of shockwaves to be given. Alfentanil consumption was less in the MA group (P < 0.05). Both groups were hemodynamically stable. The patients in the MA group had slower ventilation rates, lower oxygen saturation, and higher end-tidal carbon dioxide levels. Use of MA was associated with more episodes of oxygen desaturation to < 90% (30% vs. 11%; P < 0.05). One patient in the PA group and three patients in the MA group developed bradypnea (< 10 breaths/min). Patient satisfaction was very high with the two sedative-analgesic techniques. Propofol and midazolam, when given in combination with alfentanil using a PCA pump, may provide safe, effective analgesia and sedation during lithotripsy. Patient-controlled sedation and analgesia may provide optimal conditions for SWL of urinary tract stones and is a useful alternative to other forms of anesthesia and analgesia.

  12. Managing the patient with hard-to-control hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oparil, S; Calhoun, D A

    1998-03-01

    Less than 25 percent of patients with hypertension in the United States have their blood pressure under control, mainly because of inadequate or inappropriate therapy and noncompliance. Approximately one half of these treatment failures are related to factors such as cost and adverse effects of medication, complex drug regimens, failure of clinicians to fully realize the benefits of antihypertensive therapy and lack of patient education. Other major causes of unresponsiveness to antihypertensive therapy include "white coat" hypertension, pseudohypertension, obesity, volume overload, excess alcohol intake and sleep apnea, as well as inappropriate antihypertensive drugs and drug combinations, and unfavorable interactions with prescription and other drugs. In many patients, these factors must be dealt with before blood pressure can be controlled. PMID:9518949

  13. Factors Associated with Non-typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia versus Typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia in Patients Presenting for Care in an Urban Diarrheal Disease Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Shahunja, K. M.; Leung, Daniel T.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Ahmed, Dilruba; Qadri, Firdausi

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi bacteremia are the causes of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a paucity of data regarding NTS bacteremia in South Asia, a region with a high incidence of typhoidal bacteremia. We sought to determine clinical predictors and outcomes associated with NTS bacteremia compared with typhoidal bacteremia. Methodology We performed a retrospective age-matched case-control study of patients admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, between February 2009 and March 2013. We compared demographic, clinical, microbiological, and outcome variables of NTS bacteremic patients with age-matched S. Typhi bacteremic patients, and a separate comparison of patients with NTS bacteremia and patients with NTS gastroenteritis. Principal Findings Of 20 patients with NTS bacteremia, 5 died (25% case fatality), compared to none of 60 age-matched cases of S. Typhi bacteremia. In univariate analysis, we found that compared with S. Typhi bacteremia, cases of NTS bacteremia had more severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children under five years of age, less often presented with a duration of fever ≥ 5 days, and were more likely to have co-morbidities on admission such as pneumonia and clinical signs of sepsis (p<0.05 in all cases). In multivariable logistic regression, SAM, clinical sepsis, and pneumonia were independent risk factors for NTS bacteremia compared with S. Typhi bacteremia (p<0.05 in all cases). Notably, we found marked differences in antibiotic susceptibilities, including NTS strains resistant to antibiotics commonly used for empiric therapy of patients suspected to have typhoid fever. Conclusions/Significance Diarrheal patients with NTS bacteremia more often presented with co-morbidities and had a higher case fatality rate compared to those with typhoidal bacteremia. Clinicians in regions where both typhoid and NTS

  14. Prevalence of Anti-Citrullinated Protein Antibodies (ACPA) in Patients with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL): A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, Gunter; Shihadeh, Klara; Poeschel, Viola; Murawski, Niels; Conigliarou, Jutta; Ong, Mei Fang; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA) have been recognised as the most specific serum marker for rheumatoid arthritis. However, serum autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear antibodies have also been detected in the sera of different lymphatic malignancies without accompanying rheumatologic disease. Therefore, we conducted a study to evaluate the prevalence of ACPA in diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (DLBCL). Methods Sera of 395 DLBCL patients and 258 age-matched healthy controls were investigated to evaluate the prevalence of ACPA and RF. ACPA-positive data were stratified into subgroups of RF positivity and established prognostic parameters for DLBCL, including overall survival. In addition, the ACPA serum concentrations levels were compared to an ACPA-positive RA cohort (n = 175). The statistics were performed with χ2 test and Mann- Whitney-U test; Kaplan-Meyer curves (log rank test) were used to analyse the overall survival. P-value <0.05 was statistically significant. Results ACPA, but not RF, occurred significantly more frequently in the sera of DLBCL patients than in healthy controls (3.5% versus 0.8%, p = 0.030). However, the ACPA serum concentration levels were significantly lower than in RA patients (median 10.4 versus 124.1 U/ml, p = 0.0001). After subgroup stratification, ACPA positivity in DLBCL was significantly associated with male gender (4.4% versus 0%, p = 0.022; odds ratio 1.046, CI 1.014–1.079) and with RF-IgM seropositivity (1.77% versus 0%, p = 0.043), but not with prognostic parameters for DLBCL. Conclusions DLBCL is associated with a significantly higher prevalence of ACPA, with an increased prevalence in male patients, and simultaneous RF-IgM positivity. However, ACPA is not prognostic for DLBCL. The prevalence of RF-IgM, -IgA, or -IgG did not differ from healthy controls. PMID:24516607

  15. Lack of contextual-word predictability during reading in patients with mild Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Gerardo; Manes, Facundo; Rotstein, Nora P; Colombo, Oscar; Mandolesi, Pablo; Politi, Luis E; Agamennoni, Osvaldo

    2014-09-01

    In the present work we analyzed the effect of contextual word predictability on the eye movement behavior of patients with mild Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to age-matched controls, by using the eyetracking technique and lineal mixed models. Twenty AD patients and 40 age-matched controls participated in the study. We first evaluated gaze duration during reading low and highly predictable sentences. AD patients showed an increase in gaze duration, compared to controls, both in sentences of low or high predictability. In controls, highly predictable sentences led to shorter gaze durations; by contrary, AD patients showed similar gaze durations in both types of sentences. Similarly, gaze duration in controls was affected by the cloze predictability of word N and N+1, whereas it was the same in AD patients. In contrast, the effects of word frequency and word length were similar in controls and AD patients. Our results imply that contextual-word predictability, whose processing is proposed to require memory retrieval, facilitated reading behavior in healthy subjects, but this facilitation was lost in early AD patients. This loss might reveal impairments in brain areas such as those corresponding to working memory, memory retrieval, and semantic memory functions that are already present at early stages of AD. In contrast, word frequency and length processing might require less complex mechanisms, which were still retained by AD patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study measuring how patients with early AD process well-defined words embedded in sentences of high and low predictability. Evaluation of the resulting changes in eye movement behavior might provide a useful tool for a more precise early diagnosis of AD.

  16. Epilepsy in patients with gliomas: incidence and control of seizures.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Toshihiko; Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor-related epilepsy (BTRE) is a unique condition that is distinct from primary epilepsy. The aim of this retrospective study was to clarify the epidemiology and results of treatment of BTRE in a single institution. From a database of 121 consecutive patients with supratentorial gliomas treated at Chiba Cancer Center from 2006-2012, the incidence and control of seizures before and after surgery were retrospectively evaluated. Epilepsy occurred in 33.9% of patients before surgery. All patients received prophylactic anti-epileptic drugs (AED) during surgery; however, seizures occurred in 9.1% of patients within the first postoperative week. During follow-up, seizures occurred in 48.3% of patients. The overall incidence of seizures was 73.7% in patients with World Health Organization Grade II gliomas, 66.7% in those with Grade III and 56.8% in those with Grade IV gliomas. Levetiracetam was very well tolerated. However, carbamazepine and phenytoin were poorly tolerated because of adverse effects. AED were discontinued in 56 patients. Fifteen of these patients (26.8%) had further seizures, half occurring within 3 months and 80% within 6 months of AED withdrawal. No clinical factors that indicated it was safe to discontinue AED were identified. The unpredictable epileptogenesis associated with gliomas and their excision requires prolonged administration of AED. To maintain quality of life and to safely and effectively control the tumor, it is necessary to select AED that do not adversely affect cognitive function or interact with other drugs, including anti-cancer agents.

  17. From armchair to wheelchair: how patients with a locked-in syndrome integrate bodily changes in experienced identity.

    PubMed

    Nizzi, Marie-Christine; Demertzi, Athena; Gosseries, Olivia; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Jouen, François; Laureys, Steven

    2012-03-01

    Different sort of people are interested in personal identity. Philosophers frequently ask what it takes to remain oneself. Caregivers imagine their patients' experience. But both philosophers and caregivers think from the armchair: they can only make assumptions about what it would be like to wake up with massive bodily changes. Patients with a locked-in syndrome (LIS) suffer a full body paralysis without cognitive impairment. They can tell us what it is like. Forty-four chronic LIS patients and 20 age-matched healthy medical professionals answered a 15-items questionnaire targeting: (A) global evaluation of identity, (B) body representation and (C) experienced meaning in life. In patients, self-reported identity was correlated with B and C. Patients differed with controls in C. These results suggest that the paralyzed body remains a strong component of patients' experienced identity, that patients can adjust to objectives changes perceived as meaningful and that caregivers fail in predicting patients' experience. PMID:22100276

  18. Elevated levels of oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes from patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mórocz, Mónika; Kálmán, János; Juhász, Anna; Sinkó, Ildikó; McGlynn, Angela P; Downes, C Stephen; Janka, Zoltán; Raskó, István

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence of the involvement of oxidative damage in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although the role of oxidative stress in the aetiology of the disease is still not clear, the detection of an increased damage status in the cells of patients could have important therapeutic implications. The level of oxidative damage and repair capacity in peripheral lymphocytes of AD patients and of age-matched controls was determined by the Comet assay applied to freshly isolated blood samples with oxidative lesion-specific DNA repair endonucleases. This is less prone to errors arising from oxidative artifacts than chemical analytical methods; and is therefore a relatively reliable, as well as rapid method for assay of oxidative DNA damage in cells. Statistically significant elevations (P < 0.05) of oxidized purines were observed in nuclear DNA of peripheral lymphocytes from AD patients, compared to age matched control subjects, both at basal level and after oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2.) AD patients also showed a diminished repair of H(2)O(2) -induced oxidized purines.

  19. Glycemic control in non-diabetic critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Farnoosh; Smiley, Dawn; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a common and costly health care problem in hospitalized patients. In hospital hyperglycemia is defined as any glucose value >7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl). Hyperglycemia is present in 40% of critically ill patients and in up to 80% of patients after cardiac surgery, with ~ 80% of ICU patients with hyperglycemia having no history of diabetes prior to admission. The risk of hospital complications relates to the severity of hyperglycemia, with a higher risk observed in patients without a history of diabetes compared to those with known diabetes. Improvement in glycemic control reduces hospital complications and mortality; however, the ideal glycemic target has not been determined. A target glucose level between 7.8 and 10.0 mmol/l (140 and 180 mg/dl) is recommended for the majority of ICU patients. This review aims to present updated recommendations for the inpatient management of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients with and without a history of diabetes. PMID:21925080

  20. Patient-controlled intracranial pressure for managing idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Werndle, Melissa C; Newling-Ward, Elizabeth; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a difficult condition to manage. We present a novel treatment that substantially improved the headaches and reduced admissions and shunt revision surgery in a patient. We inserted a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, performed subtemporal craniectomies, and instructed our patient to apply different sized headbands to allow her to anticipate and control her own intracranial pressure: a tight headband for low-pressure headaches; no band for high-pressure headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging and intracranial pressure monitoring revealed this was not a placebo effect.

  1. Pattern recognition control outperforms conventional myoelectric control in upper limb patients with targeted muscle reinnervation.

    PubMed

    Hargrove, Levi J; Lock, Blair A; Simon, Ann M

    2013-01-01

    Pattern recognition myoelectric control shows great promise as an alternative to conventional amplitude based control to control multiple degree of freedom prosthetic limbs. Many studies have reported pattern recognition classification error performances of less than 10% during offline tests; however, it remains unclear how this translates to real-time control performance. In this contribution, we compare the real-time control performances between pattern recognition and direct myoelectric control (a popular form of conventional amplitude control) for participants who had received targeted muscle reinnervation. The real-time performance was evaluated during three tasks; 1) a box and blocks task, 2) a clothespin relocation task, and 3) a block stacking task. Our results found that pattern recognition significantly outperformed direct control for all three performance tasks. Furthermore, it was found that pattern recognition was configured much quicker. The classification error of the pattern recognition systems used by the patients was found to be 16% ±(1.6%) suggesting that systems with this error rate may still provide excellent control. Finally, patients qualitatively preferred using pattern recognition control and reported the resulting control to be smoother and more consistent.

  2. Significantly higher frequency of Helicobacter suis in patients with idiopathic parkinsonism than in control patients

    PubMed Central

    Blaecher, C; Smet, A; Flahou, B; Pasmans, F; Ducatelle, R; Taylor, D; Weller, C; Bjarnason, I; Charlett, A; Lawson, A J; Dobbs, R J; Dobbs, S M; Haesebrouck, F

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increased proportional mortality from Parkinson's disease amongst livestock farmers. The hypokinesia of Parkinson's disease has been linked to Helicobacter pylori. H. suis is the most common zoonotic helicobacter in man. Aim To compare the frequency of H. suis, relative to H. pylori, in gastric biopsies of patients with idiopathic parkinsonism (IP) and controls from gastroenterology services. Methods DNA extracts, archived at a Helicobacter Reference Laboratory, from IP patient and gastroenterology service biopsies were examined anonymously for H. suis, using species-specific RT-PCR. Results Relative risk of having H. suis in 60 IP patients compared with 256 controls was 10 times greater than that of having H. pylori. In patients with IP and controls, respectively, frequencies of H. suis were 27 (exact binomial 95% C.I. 15, 38) and 2 (0, 3)%, and of H. pylori, 28 (17, 40) and 16 (12, 21)%. Excess of H. suis in IP held when only the antral or corporal biopsy was considered. Of 16 IP patients with H. suis, 11 were from 19 with proven H. pylori eradication, 3 from 17 pre-H. pylori eradication, 2 from 24 H. pylori culture/PCR-negative. Frequency was different between groups (P = 0.001), greatest where H. pylori had been eradicated. Even without known exposure to anti-H. pylori therapy, H. suis was more frequent in IP patients (5/41) than in controls (1/155) (P = 0.002). Partial multilocus sequence typing confirmed that strains from IP patients (6) and control (1) differed from RT-PCR standard strain. Conclusions Greater frequency of H. suis in idiopathic parkinsonism appears exaggerated following H. pylori eradication. Multilocus sequence testing comparison with porcine strains may clarify whether transmission is from pigs/porcine products or of human-adapted, H. suis-like, bacteria. PMID:24117797

  3. The Contribution of Proprioceptive Information to Postural Control in Elderly and Patients with Parkinson’s Disease with a History of Falls

    PubMed Central

    Bekkers, Esther M. J.; Dockx, Kim; Heremans, Elke; Vercruysse, Sarah; Verschueren, Sabine M. P.; Mirelman, Anat; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Proprioceptive deficits negatively affect postural control but their precise contribution to postural instability in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is unclear. We investigated if proprioceptive manipulations differentially affect balance, measured by force plates, during quiet standing in 13 PD patients and 13 age-matched controls with a history of falls. Perceived limits of stability (LoS) were derived from the differences between maximal center of pressure (CoP) displacement in anterior–posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) direction during a maximal leaning task. Task conditions comprised standing with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC): (1) on a stable surface; (2) an unstable surface; and (3) with Achilles tendon vibration. CoP displacements were calculated as a percentage of their respective LoS. Perceived LoS did not differ between groups. PD patients showed greater ML CoP displacement than elderly fallers (EF) across all conditions (p = 0.043) and tended to have higher postural sway in relation to the LoS (p = 0.050). Both groups performed worse on an unstable surface and during tendon vibration compared to standing on a stable surface with EO and even more so with EC. Both PD and EF had more AP sway in all conditions with EC compared to EO (p < 0.001) and showed increased CoP displacements when relying on proprioception only compared to standing with normal sensory input. This implies a similar role of the proprioceptive system in postural control in fallers with and without PD. PD fallers showed higher ML sway after sensory manipulations, as a result of which these values approached their perceived LoS more closely than in EF. We conclude that despite a similar fall history, PD patients showed more ML instability than EF, irrespective of sensory manipulation, but had a similar reliance on ankle proprioception. Hence, we recommend that rehabilitation and fall prevention for PD should focus on motor rather than on sensory aspects. PMID:25505395

  4. Marital communication in eating disorder patients: a controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Vandereycken, W; Vertommen, H

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the communication between 21 eating disorder (ED) patients and their husbands, an observational study was carried out using two matched control groups of 21 maritally distressed (MD) and 21 nondistressed (ND) couples. During some discussion tasks the interaction was videotaped and the (verbal and nonverbal) communication skills were rated afterwards according to the Kategoriensystem für Partnerschaftliche Interaktion (KPI) coding system. Unexpectedly, compared with the control groups ED couples do not show a greater disequilibrium (between patient and husband) in the emission rate of positive and negative messages. Also striking is the generally higher degree of self-disclosure in ED couples than in ND couples, but this may reflect their experience of distress. Overall and most importantly, ED couples appear to lack some of the ND couples' skills of constructive communication, but manage to avoid the destructive communication style of MD couples.

  5. Knowledge management for chronic patient control and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira, Nieves; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Dorado, Julián; Pazos, Alejandro; Pereira, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) can be seen as the process of capturing, developing, sharing, and effectively using organizational knowledge. In this context, the work presented here proposes a KM System to be used in the scope of chronic patient control and monitoring for distributed research projects. It was designed in order to enable communication between patient and doctors, as well as to be usedbythe researchers involved in the project for its management. The proposed model integrates all the information concerning every patient and project management tasks in the Institutional Memory of a KMSystem and uses an ontology to maintain the information and its categorization independently. Furthermore, taking the philosophy of intelligent agents, the system will interact with the user to show him the information according to his preferences and access rights. Finally, three different scenarios of application are described.

  6. Apolipoprotein E polymorphism in hemodialysed patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Bloudickova, Silvie; Kubinova, Ruzena; Pikhart, Hynek; Viklicky, Ondrej; Bobak, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The possible association between the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and apolipoprotein E (APOE) polymorphism was found in some, but not all studies. We have analysed the APOE genotypes in 995 haemodialysed patients (cases) and a sample of 6242 healthy individuals (controls) in the Czech Republic. There was a statistically significant difference in the frequencies of APOE alleles between the cases and controls, with more carriers of the APOE2 allele in ESRD patients (15.9%) than in controls (12.2%) (p=0.005). The odds ratio of ESRD for the APOE2 allele, compared with APOE3E3 homozygotes, was 1.37 (95% confidence interval 1.13-1.67). The strength of the association increased with the time spent on haemodialysis: the odds ratios of all-cause ESRD in patients dialysed for 8 or more years, 1-8 years and less than one year (non-survivors) were 1.27 (0.94-1.71), 1.41 (1.09-1.81) and 1.94 (0.88-4.18), respectively. This study suggests that the APOE2 allele is a possible genetic risk factor for all-cause ESRD in Caucasians. PMID:19565203

  7. [Healthcare-Associated Infection Control with Awareness of Patient Safety].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    In order to provide safe and secure medical care for patients, health care-associated infections (HAI) must not occur. HAI should be considered as incidents, and countermeasures should be viewed as a patient safety management itself. Healthcare-associated infection control (HAIC) is practiced by the infection control team (ICT), which is based on multidisciplinary cooperation. Team members have to recognize that it is the most important to make use of the expertise of each discipline. In addition, all members must try to respond quickly, to help the clinic staff. Visualized rapid information provision and sharing, environmental improvement, outbreak factor analysis, hand hygiene compliance rate improvement, proper antibiotic use (Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: ASP), and regional cooperation & leadership comprise the role of the ICT in the flagship hospital. Regarding this role, we present our hospital's efforts and the outcomes. In conclusion, for medical practice quality improvement, healthcare-associated infection control should be conducted thoroughly along with an awareness of patient safety. PMID:27363228

  8. Improved cognition after control of risk factors for multi-infarct dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Judd, B.W.; Tawaklna, T.; Rogers, R.L.; Mortel, K.F.

    1986-10-24

    A cohort of 52 patients (30 men and 22 women) with multi-infarct dementia (MID) has been followed up prospectively for a mean interval of 22.2 months. Clinical course has been documented by serial history taking and interviews and neurological, medical, and psychological examinations, and correlated with measurements of cerebral blood flow. The clinical course and cognitive performance have been compared with those of age-matched normal volunteers and patients with Alzheimer's disease. Patients with MID were subdivided into hypertensive and normotensive groups, and also into those displaying stabilized or improved cognition and those whose condition deteriorated. Among hypertensive patients with MID, improved cognition and clinical course correlated with control of systolic blood pressure within upper limits of normalf (135 to 150 mm Hg), but if systolic blood pressure was reduced below this level, patients with MID deteriorated. Among normotensive patients with MID, improved cognition was associated with cessation of smoking cigarettes.

  9. Exploring Eye Movements in Patients with Glaucoma When Viewing a Driving Scene

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, David P.; Smith, Nicholas D.; Rauscher, Franziska G.; Chisholm, Catharine M.; Barbur, John L.; Edgar, David F.; Garway-Heath, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease and a leading cause of visual disability. Automated assessment of the visual field determines the different stages in the disease process: it would be desirable to link these measurements taken in the clinic with patient's actual function, or establish if patients compensate for their restricted field of view when performing everyday tasks. Hence, this study investigated eye movements in glaucomatous patients when viewing driving scenes in a hazard perception test (HPT). Methodology/Principal Findings The HPT is a component of the UK driving licence test consisting of a series of short film clips of various traffic scenes viewed from the driver's perspective each containing hazardous situations that require the camera car to change direction or slow down. Data from nine glaucomatous patients with binocular visual field defects and ten age-matched control subjects were considered (all experienced drivers). Each subject viewed 26 different films with eye movements simultaneously monitored by an eye tracker. Computer software was purpose written to pre-process the data, co-register it to the film clips and to quantify eye movements and point-of-regard (using a dynamic bivariate contour ellipse analysis). On average, and across all HPT films, patients exhibited different eye movement characteristics to controls making, for example, significantly more saccades (P<0.001; 95% confidence interval for mean increase: 9.2 to 22.4%). Whilst the average region of ‘point-of-regard’ of the patients did not differ significantly from the controls, there were revealing cases where patients failed to see a hazard in relation to their binocular visual field defect. Conclusions/Significance Characteristics of eye movement patterns in patients with bilateral glaucoma can differ significantly from age-matched controls when viewing a traffic scene. Further studies of eye movements made by glaucomatous patients could provide useful

  10. Patients undergoing reconstructive surgery versus unburned children as "controls" in studies of pediatric patients with burns.

    PubMed

    Neely, A N; Rieman, M T; Warden, G D

    1995-01-01

    A valid control group is an essential part of any patient study. We asked whether burned children returning for reconstructive surgery could be used as "controls" in a study of seven proteolytic elements in the circulation. Functional levels of elastase, plasminogen, prekallikrein, antithrombin, alpha 2-antiplasmin, alpha 2-macroglobulin, and total proteolytic activity in 30 healthy unburned children were compared with levels in 29 patients admitted for reconstructive surgery an average of 7.9 years after burn. The two groups were not statistically different in distributions of sex and race but differed in mean age. Levels of six of the seven parameters were equal in the two groups. However, even when correction for the age difference was done between the groups, alpha 2-macroglobulin in the patients undergoing reconstructive surgery still was significantly less (p < 0.021) than in the unburned group. Therefore caution may be needed when readily available patients undergoing reconstructive surgery are used as "controls" in studies of patients with acute burns.

  11. Evaluating Estradiol Levels in Male Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Shashi; Arora, Kanchan; Verma, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Background: Globally more than 1 million people suffer from colorectal cancer (CRC) per annum, resulting in about 0.5 million deaths. The role of estrogen in CRC is being researched with great interest; expression of estrogen receptors (alfa and beta) is being explored. Aims and Objective: Our objective was to compare the serum estradiol levels in diagnosed male patients of CRC, with age-matched controls; and to study the estradiol levels across the different stages of CRC. Setting and design: A cross-sectional study was conducted from January, 2012 to March, 2013 at a tertiary care hospital in north India. Materials and Methods: Fifty one male preoperative CRC patients were enrolled along with 50 age-matched male controls. Ethical approval and informed written consent from each participant were duly obtained. CRC patients were staged as per TNM (T- Tumour, N- Node, M- Metastasis; I, II, III and IV) criteria. Serum estradiol level was measured by Chemiimmunofluroscence method (normal = 11.6 - 41.2 pg/ml). Statistical analysis used: We used student’s t test and ANOVA (analysis of variance) to analyse the data (SPSS version 17.0, SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois) Result: The mean serum estradiol level among CRC patients (43.4, sd=27.1) was significantly more than that among controls (mean=24.7, sd=17.5), (p<0.0001). Across the four TNM stages of CRC patients, mean estradiol level was highest in Stage II (55.9, sd=15.5); followed by Stages III (44.1, sd=24.9), IV (36.3, sd=30.0) and I (26.4, sd=38.8). However, significant difference was obtained only between Stages I and II. Conclusion: Our study revealed increased levels of serum estradiol in Indian male CRC patients. Further research is warranted to corroborate this finding, and to understand the role of estradiol across different TNM stages of CRC. PMID:25737973

  12. Assesment of Heart Rate Variability As A Measure of Cardiac Autonomic Status in Psychiatric Patients Exposed to Chemical Irritants

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Supriya; Rastogi, Rajesh; Gupta, Manushree

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose However, little is known about the cardiac autonomic activity due to chemicals in psychiatric patients. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effect of chemical irritants on the ANS of the person and measure that in the form of Heart Rate Variability (HRV), a noninvasive method to estimate the cardiac autonomic activity. The autonomic nervous system can significantly compromised by use of chemical irritants. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted in which 33 patients (mean age: 29.94 years) of depression/anxiety were compared with 37 age matched controls (mean age: 28.10). The patients who were diagnosed as either depressed or anxious by the psychiatry were included in the study group by random sampling. Out of these 8 patients gave positive history of odour use. Thirty seven age matched healthy persons were taken as controls. Grading of patients was done according to DSMV-IV criteria and short- term HRV was recorded. Five minute HRV recording was done and time domain and frequency domain indices of HRV were assessed using RMS Polyearite D. The result in case and control groups was compared. Results We have reported a poor HRV compared to control group in patients of depression/anxiety as reflected by NN50 values (p< 0.05). Although not significant the trend shows a better HRV control in almost all the time domain and frequency domain parameters in controls compared to cases. Regarding the history of use of chemical irritants the trend showed a poor HRV control in these cases compared to the patients who did not give any such history. Conclusion Our results suggest that impaired cardiac autonomic nerve function characterized by sympathetic over activity may occur in depression/phobic patients. The study also proves a poor HRV in psychiatric subjects with history of use of odoriferous substances. PMID:26266195

  13. Event related potentials recorded in patients with locked-in syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, M.; Thomas, A.; Paci, C.; Scesi, M.; Tombari, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the possibility of recording "cognitive" event related potentials (ERPs) in locked-in patients and therefore to determine whether ERPs can have a role in differential diagnosis of coma.
METHODS—ERPs to classic auditory or visual "odd ball paradigms" were recorded three to four days, seven to eight days, and 30 to 60days after admission to the intensive care unit, in four patients affected by basilar artery thrombembolism resulting in locked-in syndrome. Two patients (one 32 year old man, one 31 year old woman) could move the eyes laterally and vertically spontaneously and on command. One patient (a 39 year old man) had a "one and half syndrome", one patient (a 40 year old woman) could only elevate the left eyelid and eye. Results were compared with data from 30 age matched controls. In the last recording session a letter recognition paradigm was applied, in which ERPs were produced by the identification of letters forming a word. Results were compared with five age matched controls. Brainstem lesions extending to the pontomesencephalic junction were found on MRI and CT.
RESULTS—ERPs to the oddball paradigms were recorded in three patients in the first recording session, in all patients in the second recording session. Latency, amplitude, and topographic distribution of ERP components were inside normal limits. With the letter recognition paradigm the patients could emit a P3 component to correspond with target letters, with the same margin of error as controls.
CONCLUSION—It is possible to record ERPs in patients with locked-in syndrome shortly after the acute ischaemic lesion, and therefore to assess objectively cognitive activities. Furthermore the letter recognition paradigm could be implemented to facilitate linguistic communication with patients with locked-in syndrome.

 PMID:9416812

  14. Alterations in cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Liang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the protein, cholesterol, and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and identify potential blood biomarkers of the disease. A total of 31 Chinese patients with AD and 31 aged-matched control subjects were selected. Lipid rafts were isolated from platelets using Optiprep gradient centrifugation. The protein content of lipid rafts was evaluated using Micro BCA assay, the cholesterol content using molecular probes, ganglioside GM1 content using colorimetry and dot-blotting analysis. The results showed that the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from platelets was significantly higher in patients with AD than aged-matched control subjects, whereas the protein content of lipid rafts did not show any differences between the 2 groups. These results indicate that the increases in the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from the platelets of patients with AD might serve as a biochemical adjunct to the clinical diagnosis of AD.

  15. Assessment of Smell Function in Syndromic Craniosynostosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Casey; Attlmayr, Bernhard; Dalton, Lucy; Upile, Navdeep; Xie, Carol; De, Su

    2016-09-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as premature fusion of the cranial suture lines and is part of a syndrome in 15% to 40% of the patients. There is limited literature available regarding these children's ability to smell. Most of them will undergo numerous surgical procedures, some of which may alter their sense of smell, potentially leading to significant social as well as safety implications. Ethical approval was obtained for this pilot study. Children with syndromic craniosynostosis were recruited and underwent anterior rhinoscopy, prior to performing a smell test utilizing the Sensonic pediatric Smell wheel. The results were compared to an age-matched control group. Eight children with syndromic craniosynostosis participated in the study. Of a possible total score of 11, their mean average score was 6.6 and the median was 6. In comparison, the mean average score for the control group was 7.5 and the median was 7. Although the study group was small, this pilot study demonstrates that children with syndromic craniosynostosis have a similar ability to identify smells to an age-matched cohort. Further research can now be undertaken to see whether or not midface advancement procedures affect these children's sense of smell. PMID:27483093

  16. Assessment of Smell Function in Syndromic Craniosynostosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Casey; Attlmayr, Bernhard; Dalton, Lucy; Upile, Navdeep; Xie, Carol; De, Su

    2016-09-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as premature fusion of the cranial suture lines and is part of a syndrome in 15% to 40% of the patients. There is limited literature available regarding these children's ability to smell. Most of them will undergo numerous surgical procedures, some of which may alter their sense of smell, potentially leading to significant social as well as safety implications. Ethical approval was obtained for this pilot study. Children with syndromic craniosynostosis were recruited and underwent anterior rhinoscopy, prior to performing a smell test utilizing the Sensonic pediatric Smell wheel. The results were compared to an age-matched control group. Eight children with syndromic craniosynostosis participated in the study. Of a possible total score of 11, their mean average score was 6.6 and the median was 6. In comparison, the mean average score for the control group was 7.5 and the median was 7. Although the study group was small, this pilot study demonstrates that children with syndromic craniosynostosis have a similar ability to identify smells to an age-matched cohort. Further research can now be undertaken to see whether or not midface advancement procedures affect these children's sense of smell.

  17. Control-relevant models for glucose control using a priori patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, Klaske; Dassau, Eyal; Zisser, Howard C; Seborg, Dale E; Doyle, Francis J

    2012-07-01

    One of the difficulties in the development of a reliable artificial pancreas for people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the lack of accurate models of an individual's response to insulin. Most control algorithms proposed to control the glucose level in subjects with T1DM are model-based. Avoiding postprandial hypoglycemia ( 60 mg/dl) while minimizing prandial hyperglycemia ( > 180 mg/dl) has shown to be difficult in a closed-loop setting due to the patient-model mismatch. In this paper, control-relevant models are developed for T1DM, as opposed to models that minimize a prediction error. The parameters of these models are chosen conservatively to minimize the likelihood of hypoglycemia events. To limit the conservatism due to large intersubject variability, the models are personalized using a priori patient characteristics. The models are implemented in a zone model predictive control algorithm. The robustness of these controllers is evaluated in silico, where hypoglycemia is completely avoided even after large meal disturbances. The proposed control approach is simple and the controller can be set up by a physician without the need for control expertise.

  18. Can intravenous patient-controlled analgesia be omitted in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Yeon; Park, Jun Seok; Park, Soo Yeun; Kim, Hye Jin; Yeo, Jinseok; Kim, Jong-Chan; Park, Sungsik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) is a popular method of postoperative analgesia, but many patients suffer from PCA-related complications. We hypothesized that PCA was not essential in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery by minimal invasive approach. Methods Between February 2013 and August 2013, 297 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer were included in this retrospective comparative study. The PCA group received conventional opioid-based PCA postoperatively, and the non-PCA group received intravenous anti-inflammatory drugs (Tramadol) as necessary. Patients reported their postoperative pain using a subjective visual analogue scale (VAS). The PCA-related adverse effects and frequency of rescue analgesia were evaluated, and the recovery rates were measured. Results Patients in the PCA group experienced less postoperative pain on days 4 and 5 after surgery than those in the non-PCA group (mean [SD] VAS: day 4, 6.2 [0.3] vs. 7.0 [0.3], P = 0.010; and day 5, 5.1 [0.2] vs. 5.5 [0.2], P = 0.030, respectively). Fewer patients in the non-PCA group required additional parenteral analgesia (41 of 93 patients vs. 53 of 75 patients, respectively), and none in the non-PCA group required rescue PCA postoperatively. The incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was significantly higher in the non-PCA group than in the PCA group (P < 0.001). The mean (range) length of hospital stay was shorter in the non-PCA group (7.9 [6-10] days vs. 8.7 [7-16] days, respectively, P = 0.03). Conclusion Our Results suggest that IV-PCA may not be necessary in selected patients those who underwent minimal invasive surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:25692119

  19. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Borges, J P; Lopes, G O; Verri, V; Coelho, M P; Nascimento, P M C; Kopiler, D A; Tibirica, E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men. PMID:27599202

  20. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Borges, J.P.; Lopes, G.O.; Verri, V.; Coelho, M.P.; Nascimento, P.M.C.; Kopiler, D.A.; Tibirica, E.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men. PMID:27599202

  1. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Borges, J P; Lopes, G O; Verri, V; Coelho, M P; Nascimento, P M C; Kopiler, D A; Tibirica, E

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men.

  2. PAN-811 inhibits oxidative stress-induced cell death of human Alzheimer's disease-derived and age-matched olfactory neuroepithelial cells via suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valery M; Dancik, Chantée M; Pan, Weiying; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Lebowitz, Michael S; Ghanbari, Hossein A

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role in neurotoxicity associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased oxidative stress has been shown to be a prominent and early feature of vulnerable neurons in AD. Olfactory neuroepithelial cells are affected at an early stage. Exposure to oxidative stress induces the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn causes cell damage in the form of protein, lipid, and DNA oxidations. Elevated ROS levels are also associated with increased deposition of amyloid-beta and formation of senile plaques, a hallmark of the AD brain. If enhanced ROS exceeds the basal level of cellular protective mechanisms, oxidative damage and cell death will result. Therefore, substances that can reduce oxidative stress are sought as potential drug candidates for treatment or preventative therapy of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PAN-811, also known as 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone or Triapine, is a small lipophilic compound that is currently being investigated in several Phase II clinical trials for cancer therapy due to its inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase activity. Here we show PAN-811 to be effective in preventing or reducing ROS accumulation and the resulting oxidative damages in both AD-derived and age-matched olfactory neuroepithelial cells.

  3. Market-based control mechanisms for patient safety.

    PubMed

    Coiera, E; Braithwaite, J

    2009-04-01

    A new model is proposed for enhancing patient safety using market-based control (MBC), inspired by successful approaches to environmental governance. Emissions trading, enshrined in the Kyoto protocol, set a carbon price and created a carbon market--is it possible to set a patient safety price and let the marketplace find ways of reducing clinically adverse events? To "cap and trade," a regulator would need to establish system-wide and organisation-specific targets, based on the cost of adverse events, create a safety market for trading safety credits and then police the market. Organisations are given a clear policy signal to reduce adverse event rates, are told by how much, but are free to find mechanisms best suited to their local needs. The market would inevitably generate novel ways of creating safety credits, and accountability becomes hard to evade when adverse events are explicitly measured and accounted for in an organisation's bottom line.

  4. Patients Know Best: Qualitative Study on How Families Use Patient-Controlled Personal Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Hanna; Hill, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management technologies, such as patient-controlled electronic health records (PCEHRs), have the potential to help people manage and cope with disease. Objective This study set out to investigate patient families’ lived experiences of working with a PCEHR. Methods We conducted a semistructured qualitative field study with patient families and clinicians at a children’s hospital in the UK that uses a PCEHR (Patients Know Best). All families were managing the health of a child with a serious chronic condition, who was typically under the care of multiple clinicians. As data gathering and analysis progressed, it became clear that while much of the literature assumes that patients are willing and waiting to take more responsibility for and control over their health management (eg, with PCEHRs), only a minority of participants in our study responded in this way. Their experiences with the PCEHR were diverse and strongly shaped by their coping styles. Theory on coping identifies a continuum of coping styles, from approach to avoidance oriented, and proposes that patients’ information needs depend on their style. Results We identified 3 groups of patient families and an outlier, distinguished by their coping style and their PCEHR use. We refer to the outlier as controlling (approach oriented, highly motivated to use PCEHR), and the 3 groups as collaborating (approach oriented, motivated to use PCEHR), cooperating (avoidance oriented, less motivated to use PCEHR), and avoiding (very avoidance oriented, not motivated to use PCEHR). Conclusions The PCEHR met the needs of controller and collaborators better than the needs of cooperators and avoiders. We draw on the Self-Determination Theory to propose ways in which a PCEHR design might better meet the needs of avoidance-oriented users. Further, we highlight the need for families to also relinquish control at times, and propose ways in which PCEHR design might support a better distribution of control

  5. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Saveland, Christine; Hawker, Leisha; Miedema, Baukje; MacDougall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine family physicians’ career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse by controlled substance prescription seekers. Design A 4-page cross-sectional survey. Setting A family medicine continuing medical education event in Halifax, NS. Participants The survey was distributed to 316 family physicians attending the continuing medical education event. Main outcome measures Career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse related to the act of prescribing controlled substances. Results Fifty-six percent (n = 178) of the 316 surveys were returned completed. Half the study participants were men (49%). Most study participants were in private practice and lived in Nova Scotia, and approximately half (51%) practised in urban settings. On average, the study participants had 20 years of practice experience. The career prevalence of abusive encounters related to controlled substance prescribing was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Overall, 95% of study participants reported having experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse; 48% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse; and 17% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse during their careers. Further, 30% reported having been abused in the past month; among those, the average number of abusive encounters was 3. Most (82%) of the abusers were male with a history of addiction (85%) and mental illness (39%). Opioids were the most frequently sought controlled substance. Conclusion Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances is substantial. Family physicians who prescribe controlled substances are at risk of being subjected to minor, major, or even severe abuse. Opioids were the most often sought controlled substance. A national discussion to deal with this issue is needed. PMID:24522691

  6. Bevantolol disposition in patients with hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nattel, S; Lawand, S; Matthews, C; McCans, J

    1987-12-01

    Bevantolol is a new, cardioselective beta-receptor antagonist that undergoes extensive hepatic biotransformation. To evaluate changes in the disposition of bevantolol produced by liver disease, a single 200-mg oral dose of bevantolol was administered in ten patients who had hepatic cirrhosis and to ten age-matched controls. Cirrhotic patients had a greater plasma bevantolol half-life (6.9 +/- 4.0 hr, mean +/- SD) then did patients with normal liver function (2.8 +/- 1.1 hr, P less than .01), and they also had a longer duration of significant bevantolol-induced heart rate slowing (for 12 hours after oral dose in cirrhotics versus three hours for controls). On the other hand, the peak concentration after the oral dose and the magnitude of bradycardiac effect were similar for both groups. Plasma bevantolol half-life was more variable in cirrhotic patients than in controls. Some of this variability among cirrhotics was attributable to age, which was a significant determinant of bevantolol half-life in the cirrhotic (but not in the control) patient sample. These results indicate that hepatic cirrhosis alters the disposition of bevantolol and suggest that modifications in bevantolol dose should be considered when using this drug to treat patients with liver disease.

  7. Effects of neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in severe primary hip or knee osteoarthritis: a controlled before-and-after study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The benefits of exercise in mild and moderate knee or hip osteoarthritis (OA) are apparent, but the evidence in severe OA is less clear. We recently reported that neuromuscular training was well tolerated and feasible in patients with severe primary hip or knee OA. The aims of this controlled before-and-after study were to compare baseline status to an age-matched population-based reference group and to examine the effects of neuromuscular training on patient-reported outcomes and physical function in patients with severe primary OA of the hip or knee. Methods 87 patients (60–77 years) with severe primary OA of the hip (n = 38, 55% women) or knee (n = 49, 59% women) awaiting total joint replacement (TJR) had supervised, neuromuscular training (NEMEX-TJR) in groups with individualized level and progression of training. A reference group (n = 43, 53% women) was included for comparison with patients’ data. Assessments included self-reported outcomes (HOOS/KOOS) and measures of physical function (chair stands, number of knee bends/30 sec, knee extensor strength, 20-meter walk test) at baseline and at follow-up before TJR. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used for comparing patients and references and elucidating influence of demographic factors on change. The paired t-test was used for comparisons within groups. Results At baseline, patients reported worse scores than the references in all HOOS/KOOS subscales (hip 27–47%, knee 14–52%, of reference scores, respectively) and had functional limitations (hip 72–85%, knee 42–85%, of references scores, respectively). NEMEX-TJR (mean 12 weeks (SD 5.6) of training) improved self-reported outcomes (hip 9–29%, knee 7–20%) and physical function (hip 3–18%, knee 5–19%) (p < 0.005). Between 42% and 62% of hip OA patients, and 39% and 61% of knee OA patients, displayed a clinically meaningful improvement (≥15%) in HOOS/KOOS subscales by training. The improvement in HOOS

  8. Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism in Tuberculosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naserpour Farivar, Taghi; Sharifi Moud, Batool; Sargazi, Mansur; Moeenrezakhanlou, Alireza

    In this study, we aimed to determine the significance of association between Tuberculosis and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. The apolipoprotein E genotypes were assayed in 250 tuberculosis patients by polymerase chain reaction followed by enzymatic digestion with Hha I. The results were compared with the results of the same experiments on 250 sex and age matched control peoples. Present results showed that in studied populations, prevalence of E4 genotype was lower in controls than in patients (8 v. 13.2%; OR = 1.75, p<0.05) and prevalence of E3 genotype was high in controls than in patients (86 v.51%; OR = 0.17, p<0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between patients and controls with respect to ɛ2 allele frequencies, while ɛ2 allele frequency was found to be much less prevalent in controls (6%) than in patients (35.8%; OR = 8.72, p<0.05). Also, our study revealed that there is an association between apolipoprotein E genotypes and amplitude to tuberculosis in studied populations. However, large population-based studies are needed to understand the exact role played by the locus in causing the condition.

  9. New approaches to pain control in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmedzai, S

    1997-07-01

    Pain affects most patients with malignant disease, and the prevalence of severe pain increases in the advanced stages of the condition. One in 5 patients with cancer has uncontrolled pain, even after 10 years of the use of the World Health Organization programme for cancer pain control and its 'three-step ladder' for the rational use of analgesics including morphine. Morphine has long been the 'gold standard' for the treatment of severe cancer pain. However, its side-effects, particularly sedation, cognitive impairment and myoclonus at high doses, have provoked the use of 'opioid rotation' to alternatives such as methadone and hydromorphone. The new 72-h transdermal patch for fentanyl also offers advantages of reduced side-effects and increased convenience over oral morphine. Intravenous strontium-89 and bisphosphonate therapy are effective for both short- and long-term control of metastatic bone pain. The spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is important in modulating the plasticity of the central nervous system and in aggravating chronic pain through the phenomenon of 'wind-up'. The NMDA antagonist ketamine, an anaesthetic, can be used at low doses for the management of refractory and neuropathic pains. Among adjuvant drugs, ketorolac has emerged as a potent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Palliative care is gaining acceptance as a new discipline in healthcare. Its strategic role is being reviewed as an adjunct to cancer therapy at all stages and its use is no longer confined to the terminal phase of disease after curative treatment has failed. Pain control and other aspects of symptom control are, therefore, viewed as an integral part of cancer management.

  10. Interaction between selenium and mercury in biological samples of Pakistani myocardial infarction patients at different stages as related to controls.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Talpur, Farah Naz; Kazi, Atif; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Arain, Salma Aslam; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Panhwar, Abdul Haleem; Naeemullah

    2014-05-01

    It has been speculated that trace elements may a play role in the pathogenesis of heart diseases. In the present study, we aimed to assess the levels of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) in biological samples (whole blood, urine, and scalp hair) of myocardial infarction (MI) patients of both genders (age range 45-60 years) at the first, second, and third heart attack (n = 130), hospitalized in a cardiac ward of a civil hospital of Hyderabad City (Pakistan). For comparison, healthy age-matched referent subjects (n = 61) of both genders were also selected. Se and Hg in biological samples were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to microwave acid digestion, respectively. The validity of the methodology was checked by biological certified reference materials. During this study, 78 % of the 32 registered patients of third MI attack (aged >50 years) died. The concentration of Se was decreased in scalp hair and blood samples of MI patients, while Hg was higher in all biological samples as compared to referent subjects. Se concentration was inversely associated with the risk of MI attacks in both genders. These results add to an increasing body of evidence that Se is a protective element for cardiovascular health. PMID:24643467

  11. Detection of oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kadioglu, Ela; Sardas, Semra; Aslan, Selcuk; Isik, Erdal; Esat Karakaya, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA may play an important role in both normal ageing and in neurodegenerative diseases. The deleterious consequences of excessive oxidations and the pathophysiological role of reactive oxygen species have been intensively studied in Alzheimer's disease. Although the role of oxidative stress in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease is still not clear, the detection of an increased damage status in the cells of patients could have important therapeutic implications. The levels of oxidative damage in peripheral lymphocytes of 24 Alzheimer's disease patients and of 21 age-matched controls were determined by comet assay applied to freshly isolated blood samples with oxidative lesion-specific DNA repair endonucleases (endonuclease III for oxidized pyrimidines, formamidopyrimidine glycosylase for oxidized purines). It was demonstrated that Alzheimer's disease is associated with elevated levels of oxidized pyrimidines and purines (p<0.0001) as compared with age-matched control subjects. It was also demonstrated that the comet assay is useful as a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage when used with oxidative lesion-specific enzymes.

  12. Citalopram controls phobic symptoms in patients with panic disorder: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Leinonen, E; Lepola, U; Koponen, H; Turtonen, J; Wade, A; Lehto, H

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of long-term treatment with citalopram or clomipramine on subjective phobic symptoms in patients with panic disorder. DESIGN: Double-blind, parallel-group, five-arm study. PATIENTS: Patients aged 18 to 65 years with panic disorder (DMS-III-R diagnosis) and with no major depressive symptoms. INTERVENTIONS: Four hundred and seventy-five patients were randomized to 8 weeks of treatment with either citalopram (10 to 15 mg per day; 20 to 30 mg per day; or 40 to 60 mg per day), clomipramine (60 to 90 mg per day) or placebo. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients continued treatment after the 8-week acute phase. OUTCOME MEASURES: Phobic symptoms were assessed using the Phobia Scale and the Symptom Checklist's (SCL-90) phobia-related factors. RESULTS: At all dosages, citalopram was more efficacious than placebo, with 20 to 30 mg generally being the most effective dosage. Citalopram (20 to 30 mg) generally decreased phobic symptoms significantly more than placebo after Month 3. Interpersonal sensitivity decreased when measured on the respective SCL-90 sub-scale. Alleviation of phobic symptoms generally continued to increase towards the end of the treatment. The effect of clomipramine was not as consistent. CONCLUSIONS: All active treatment groups, especially the group receiving 20 to 30 mg per day of citalopram, effectively controlled phobic symptoms in patients with panic disorder. Long-term treatment with citalopram further decreased phobic symptoms. PMID:10721681

  13. Elastin cross-linking in the skin from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cross-links unique to elastin, desmosine and isodesmosine were measured and compared in skin tissue (left upper arm) from 10 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and from seven age-matched controls. The contents of desmosine and isodesmosine were significantly decreased (p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively) in patients with ALS compared with those of controls, and were negatively and significantly associated with duration of illness in ALS patients (r = -0.77, p < 0.01 and r = -0.65, p < 0.05, respectively). The decline in skin desmosine and isodesmosine is more rapid in ALS than in normal ageing. Thus cross-linking of skin elastin is affected in ALS.

  14. Immune dysfunction in Rett syndrome patients revealed by high levels of serum anti-N(Glc) IgM antibody fraction.

    PubMed

    Papini, Anna Maria; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Guerranti, Roberto; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Rovero, Paolo; De Felice, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology. PMID:25389532

  15. Immune Dysfunction in Rett Syndrome Patients Revealed by High Levels of Serum Anti-N(Glc) IgM Antibody Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Papini, Anna Maria; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology. PMID:25389532

  16. The dysfunction of face processing in patients with internet addiction disorders: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Lun

    2016-10-19

    To investigate face processing in patients with internet addiction disorders (IAD), an event-related brain potential experiment was conducted in IAD patients and healthy age-matched controls in which participants were instructed to classify each stimulus (face vs. nonface object) as quickly and accurately as possible. Although we did not find a significant difference in the performance between two groups, both the N110 and the P2 components in response to faces were larger in the IAD group than in the control group, whereas the N170 to faces decreased in the IAD group than in the control group. In addition, the source analysis of event-related potential components showed different generators between two groups. These data indicated that there was a dysfunction of face processing in IAD patients and the underlying mechanism of processing faces could be different from healthy individuals. PMID:27563738

  17. The dysfunction of face processing in patients with internet addiction disorders: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhao, Lun

    2016-10-19

    To investigate face processing in patients with internet addiction disorders (IAD), an event-related brain potential experiment was conducted in IAD patients and healthy age-matched controls in which participants were instructed to classify each stimulus (face vs. nonface object) as quickly and accurately as possible. Although we did not find a significant difference in the performance between two groups, both the N110 and the P2 components in response to faces were larger in the IAD group than in the control group, whereas the N170 to faces decreased in the IAD group than in the control group. In addition, the source analysis of event-related potential components showed different generators between two groups. These data indicated that there was a dysfunction of face processing in IAD patients and the underlying mechanism of processing faces could be different from healthy individuals.

  18. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods. PMID:27247165

  19. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods. PMID:27247165

  20. [Deceased Schizophrenic Patients--Focus on QT Prolongation].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kimiko; Kase, Koji; Hara, Koichiro; Asai, Yoshiyuki; Asai, Kuniya; Sakurai, Shotaro; Yumoto, Tetsuro; Takayama, Kohzo; Shuno, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated factors affecting the lifespan of schizophrenic patients, who are known to have a shorter life expectancy than healthy people, focusing on the relationship with QT prolongation associated with antipsychotics. In a total of 406 patients who died at Asai Hospital the mean age at death was compared between schizophrenic patients and nonpsychiatric patients. In deceased schizophrenic patients, drug-related factors, hematology results, and electrocardiographic findings for 3 years before death were compared with those for the same period in age-matched surviving schizophrenic patients. In addition, QT values in schizophrenic patients and healthy controls were evaluated by age group. The mean age at death was significantly younger in schizophrenic patients (63.4 +/- 2.63 years) than in nonpsychiatric patients (84.0 +/- 0.57 years) (p<0.001). Bivariate analysis between deceased and surviving schizophrenic patients showed significant differences in QT values at 2 years, 1 year, and 0.5 years before death and in AST and ALT values at 0.5.years before death. The incidence of QT prolongation in deceased schizophrenic patients (52.0%) was about twice as high as that in surviving schizophrenic patients (24.5%). Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that the proportion of deceased patients was higher when QT intervals were longer and ALT values were relatively higher, even if within the normal range. In both schizophrenic patients and medical checkup examinees, QT values were positively correlated with the age (R2 = 0.9061 and 0.9276, respectively), and QT intervals in schizophrenic patients were significantly longer in the 30- to 70-year age groups. In both schizophrenic patients and medical checkup examinees, QT values were positively correlated with the age, and QT intervals in schizophrenic patients were significantly longer than those in medical checkup examinees in the same age groups. Deceased schizophrenic patients showed

  1. Tuberculosis awareness in Gezira, Sudan: knowledge, attitude and practice case-control survey.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, M M A; Sahal, N; Sodemann, M; Elsony, A; Aro, A R

    2014-03-13

    This case-control study aimed to assess tuberculosis (TB) awareness and its associated sociodemographic characteristics in Gezira, Sudan. New smear-positive TB patients registered in Gezira in 2010 (n = 425) and age-matched controls who attended the same health facilities for other reasons (n = 850) formed the study sample. Awareness was measured using a modified standard World Health Organization TB knowledge, attitude and practice instrument. There was no significant difference between TB cases and the controls in overall levels of TB awareness. About two-thirds of TB cases and controls had good TB awareness. Respondents' sex was associated with awareness among the controls. Age, level of education, type of residence and type of occupation were significantly associated with TB awareness, whereas marital status had no effect. The good level of TB awareness found among TB cases and controls is a baseline for further TB awareness-raising among the Gezira population.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopic analysis of peripheral blood plasma of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Pedro; Molina, Marina; López-Tobar, Eduardo; Toledano, Adolfo

    2015-10-01

    Using Raman and infrared spectroscopy, we monitored spectral changes occurring in the blood plasma of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in relation to healthy controls. The protein secondary structure as reflected by amide I band involves β-sheet enrichment, which may be attributable to Aβ peptide formation and to increasing proportion of the globulins that are β-sheet rich. Likewise, the behavior of the infrared 1200-1000-cm(-1) region and the Raman 980-910- and 450-400-cm(-1) regions can be explained in terms of the said plasma composition change. Further, the 744-cm(-1) Raman band from healthy control plasma shows frequency upshifting in the course of AD, which may be generated by the platelets collected in blood plasma. Linear discrimination analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis have been used to distinguish between patients with AD and age-matched healthy controls with a diagnostic accuracy of about 94%.

  3. Magnetic resonance-determined sodium removal from tissue stores in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmann, Anke; Dörfelt, Kathrin; Eicher, Florian; Linz, Peter; Kopp, Christoph; Mössinger, Irina; Horn, Stephan; Büschges-Seraphin, Beatrix; Wabel, Peter; Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Kotanko, Peter; Levin, Nathan W.; Johannes, Bernd; Uder, Michael; Luft, Friedrich C.; Müller, Dominik N.; Titze, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported sodium is stored in skin and muscle. The amounts stored in hemodialysis (HD) patients are unknown. We determined whether 23Na magnetic resonance imaging (sodium-MRI) allows assessment of tissue sodium and its removal in 24 HD patients, and 27 age-matched healthy controls. We also studied 20 HD patients before and shortly after HD with a batch dialysis system with direct measurement of sodium in dialysate and ultrafiltrate. Age was associated with higher tissue sodium content in controls. This increase was paralleled by an age-dependent decrease of circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C). Older (over 60 years) HD patients showed increased sodium and water in skin and muscle, and lower VEGF-C levels than age-matched controls. After HD, patients with low VEGF-C levels had significantly higher skin sodium content than patients with high VEGF-C levels (low VEGF-C: 2.3 ng/ml and skin sodium: 24.3 mmol/L; high VEGF-C: 4.1ng/ml and skin sodium: 18.2mmol/L). Thus, sodium-MRI quantitatively detects sodium stored in skin and muscle in humans and allows studying sodium storage reduction in ESRD patients. Age and VEGF-C-related local tissue-specific clearance mechanisms may determine the efficacy of tissue sodium removal with HD. Prospective trials on the relationship between tissue sodium content and hard endpoints could provide new insights into sodium homeostasis, and clarify whether increased sodium storage is a cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:25100048

  4. Structural Imaging Changes and Behavioral Correlates in Patients with Crohn’s Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Veena A.; Beniwal-Patel, Poonam; Mbah, Ifeanyi; Young, Brittany M.; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Saha, Sumona

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a subtype of inflammatory bowel disease caused by immune-mediated inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. The extent of morphologic brain alterations and their associated cognitive and affective impairments remain poorly characterized. Aims: We used magnetic resonance imaging to identify structural brain differences between patients with Crohn’s disease in remission compared to age-matched healthy controls and evaluated for structural-behavioral correlates. Methods: Nineteen patients and 20 healthy, age-matched controls were recruited in the study. Group differences in brain morphometric measures and correlations between brain measures and performance on a cognitive task, the verbal fluency (VF) task, were examined. Correlations between brain measures and cognitive measures as well as self-reported measures of depression, personality, and affective scales were examined. Results: Patients showed significant cortical thickening in the left superior frontal region compared to controls. Significant group differences were observed in sub-cortical volume measures in both hemispheres. Investigation of brain-behavior correlations revealed significant group differences in the correlation between cortical surface area and VF performance, although behavioral performance was equivalent between the two groups. The left middle temporal surface area was a significant predictor of VF performance with controls showing a significant positive correlation between these measures, and patients showing the opposite effect. Conclusion: Our results indicate key differences in structural brain measures in patients with CD compared to controls. Additionally, correlation between brain measures and behavioral responses suggest there may be a neural basis to the alterations in patients’ cognitive and affective responses. PMID:27695405

  5. Structural Imaging Changes and Behavioral Correlates in Patients with Crohn’s Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Veena A.; Beniwal-Patel, Poonam; Mbah, Ifeanyi; Young, Brittany M.; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Saha, Sumona

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a subtype of inflammatory bowel disease caused by immune-mediated inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. The extent of morphologic brain alterations and their associated cognitive and affective impairments remain poorly characterized. Aims: We used magnetic resonance imaging to identify structural brain differences between patients with Crohn’s disease in remission compared to age-matched healthy controls and evaluated for structural-behavioral correlates. Methods: Nineteen patients and 20 healthy, age-matched controls were recruited in the study. Group differences in brain morphometric measures and correlations between brain measures and performance on a cognitive task, the verbal fluency (VF) task, were examined. Correlations between brain measures and cognitive measures as well as self-reported measures of depression, personality, and affective scales were examined. Results: Patients showed significant cortical thickening in the left superior frontal region compared to controls. Significant group differences were observed in sub-cortical volume measures in both hemispheres. Investigation of brain-behavior correlations revealed significant group differences in the correlation between cortical surface area and VF performance, although behavioral performance was equivalent between the two groups. The left middle temporal surface area was a significant predictor of VF performance with controls showing a significant positive correlation between these measures, and patients showing the opposite effect. Conclusion: Our results indicate key differences in structural brain measures in patients with CD compared to controls. Additionally, correlation between brain measures and behavioral responses suggest there may be a neural basis to the alterations in patients’ cognitive and affective responses.

  6. Lipid Profile among Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ali A Muttalib

    2014-12-01

    Associations between hearing and blood lipids have been the focus of scientific inquiry for more than 50 years. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the association between hyperlipidaemia among patients presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss compared to normal controls. A case control study concerned with 22 patients presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss who underwent lipid profile evaluation. The lipid profile of these patients was compared with corresponding results of 55 age matched persons (volunteers) with normal hearing. These patients were collected from the Out Patient Department of ENT at Al-Jamhory Teaching Hospital, Mosul/Iraq and private clinic of the author for the period from February 2011 to July 2013. The average age of patients was 44.7 years with a range of 26-65 years. The peak age incidence was in the 5(th) decade of life. The study included 11 male patients (50 %) and 11 females (50 %). Meanwhile, the average age of the control group was 41.7 years with 25 (45.5 %) males and 30 (54.5 %) females. Statistical analysis showed that there was significant difference between the means of lipid profile and blood sugar of the patients and the control group apart from HDL where there was no significant difference. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia seems to be significantly associated with the occurrence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss according to this study.

  7. Finger agnosia and cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Trotter, Jeffrey S; Hertza, Jeremy; Bell, Christopher D; Dean, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of finger agnosia in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to determine if level of finger agnosia was related to cognitive impairment. Finger agnosia is a sensitive measure of cerebral impairment and is associated with neurofunctional areas implicated in AD. Using a standardized and norm-referenced approach, results indicated that patients with AD evidenced significantly decreased performance on tests of bilateral finger agnosia compared with healthy age-matched controls. Finger agnosia was predictive of cognitive dysfunction on four of seven domains, including: Crystallized Language, Fluid Processing, Associative Learning, and Processing Speed. Results suggest that measures of finger agnosia, a short and simple test, may be useful in the early detection of AD.

  8. Chronotypes in Patients with Epilepsy: Does the Type of Epilepsy Make a Difference?

    PubMed

    Kendis, Hallie; Baron, Kelly; Schuele, Stephan U; Patel, Bhavita; Attarian, Hrayr

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms govern all biological functions. Circadian misalignment has a major impact on health. Late chronotype is a risk factor for circadian misalignment which in turn can affect the control of seizures in epilepsy patients. We compared a group of 87 confirmed epilepsy patients regardless of subtypes with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We compared generalized epilepsy patients with localization related epilepsy patients and with healthy controls. We found that primary generalized epilepsy patients were 5 times more likely to have a late chronotype than healthy controls. We did not find any significant differences between localization related epilepsy patients and healthy controls or between the overall epilepsy cohort and healthy controls. Generalized epilepsy patients are more likely to be evening types as compared to those with focal epilepsy or subjects without epilepsy. Epilepsy patients do not experience the same age related increase in morningness as do age-matched healthy controls. This is important in regard to timing of AED, identifying and preventing sleep deprivation, and integrating chronotype evaluations and chronotherapy in comprehensive epilepsy care. Further studies, using objective phase markers or the impact of chronotherapy on seizure control, are necessary. PMID:26078488

  9. Nonvisual eye position control in a patient with ocular lateropulsion.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, K; Sawa, M; Matsuda, S; Uno, A; Takeda, M

    1988-01-01

    For elucidating the nonvisual eye position control system, we studied the accuracy of saccades toward the remembered position (memory-guided saccades) in a patient with ocular lateropulsion having tonic bias of the eye position. Although the saccadic dysmetria caused by ocular lateropulsion was recorded during memory-guided saccades in the same manner as visually guided saccades, the eyes reached precisely the intended position by corrective saccades. The mean latency of corrective saccades was significantly longer than that of corrective saccades observed for visually guided saccades. This long latency of corrective saccades supports the assumption that feedback information of the eye position is a signal generated by orbital afferents rather than a copy of the motor command.

  10. [Biochemical control of thiamine status in neurotic patients].

    PubMed

    Gontzea, I; Gorcea, V; Popesco, F

    1976-01-01

    It is well established that the glucose represents the main energy source of the brain and that its metabolism supposes the presence of the vitamin B1. On the other hand, it is known that in industrialized countries, the consume (absolute or relative) of products without vitamin B1 (sugar, strong drinks) or containing it insufficiently (preparations derived from flours of low extraction, canned foods) registered a noticeable growth. On account of these premises, we made the hypothesis that the thiamino-glucidic unbalance to which the modern consumer is exposed, could be a factor contributing to the appearance of neurosis, which present now an increased incidence. In order to verify this hypothesis, we studied the vitamin B1 nutritional status in 65 patients recently taken to hospital with "nerosis sick", as well as with 49 healty subjects, who served as controls. We determined the spontaneous thiaminury (concentration, morning hourly debit and per gramme of creatinine), the provoked thiaminury (by means of an loading test, unpublished yet), as well as the erythrocyte transketolase activity and the pyruvic acid in the blood and in the urines (concentration and debit per gramme of creatinine) Compared with the control group, the patients of neurosis the average thiamin excretion was twice reduced, the transketolase activity diminished by 22 per cent, while the pyruvic acid level in blood and its renal elimination were increased by 31-38 per cent (p less than 0,001). After the vitamin B1 treatment, the values changed significatively (p less than 0,05), approaching those found in the healty subjects.

  11. Market-based control mechanisms for patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, E; Braithwaite, J

    2009-01-01

    A new model is proposed for enhancing patient safety using market-based control (MBC), inspired by successful approaches to environmental governance. Emissions trading, enshrined in the Kyoto protocol, set a carbon price and created a carbon market—is it possible to set a patient safety price and let the marketplace find ways of reducing clinically adverse events? To “cap and trade,” a regulator would need to establish system-wide and organisation-specific targets, based on the cost of adverse events, create a safety market for trading safety credits and then police the market. Organisations are given a clear policy signal to reduce adverse event rates, are told by how much, but are free to find mechanisms best suited to their local needs. The market would inevitably generate novel ways of creating safety credits, and accountability becomes hard to evade when adverse events are explicitly measured and accounted for in an organisation’s bottom line. PMID:19342522

  12. A case control study of environmental and occupational exposures associated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in patients admitted to a rural tertiary care hospital in a high density swine region

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Distinct strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been identified on livestock and livestock workers. Industrial food animal production may be an important environmental reservoir for human carriage of these pathogenic bacteria. The objective of this study was to investigate environmental and occupational exposures associated with nasal carriage of MRSA in patients hospitalized at Vidant Medical Center, a tertiary hospital serving a region with intensive livestock production in eastern North Carolina. Methods MRSA nasal carriage was identified via nasal swabs collected within 24 hours of hospital admission. MRSA carriers (cases) were gender and age matched to non-carriers (controls). Participants were interviewed about recent environmental and occupational exposures. Home addresses were geocoded and publicly available data were used to estimate the density of swine in residential census block groups of residence. Conditional logistic regression models were used to derive odds ratio (OR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Presence of the scn gene in MRSA isolates was assessed. In addition, multi locus sequence typing (MLST) of the MRSA isolates was performed, and the Diversilab® system was used to match the isolates to USA pulsed field gel electrophoresis types. Results From July - December 2011, 117 cases and 119 controls were enrolled. A higher proportion of controls than cases were current workforce members (41.2% vs. 31.6%) Cases had a higher odds of living in census block groups with medium densities of swine (OR: 4.76, 95% CI: 1.36-16.69) and of reporting the ability to smell odor from a farm with animals when they were home (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 0.80-2.86). Of 49 culture positive MRSA isolates, all were scn positive. Twenty-two isolates belonged to clonal complex 5. Conclusions Absence of livestock workers in this study precluded evaluation of occupational exposures. Higher odds of MRSA in medium swine density

  13. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia to manage the postoperative pain in patients undergoing craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyo-Seok; An, Sang-Bum; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Lim, Young-Jin; Hwang, Jung-Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2011-01-01

    Background This randomized controlled study evaluated the efficacy of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) with fentanyl and ketorolac for neurosurgical patients, and compared the effectiveness of IV-PCA with intermittent analgesics injection. Methods The patients undergoing craniotomy were randomly assigned to two groups. Patients of group P (n = 53) received fentanyl (0.2 µg/kg/hr) and ketorolac (0.3 mg/kg/hr) via IV-PCA, and those of group N (n = 53) received intermittent fentanyl or ketorolac injection as needed. Pain was evaluated using a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS) at postoperative 1, 4, and 24 hr. The amount of infused analgesic drugs, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic arterial pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and the incidence of nausea and miosis were measured at the same time points. Results Although VAS of pain (VASp) was comparable at postoperative 1 hr (P = 0.168) between the two groups, the group P had significantly lower VASp at postoperative 4 hr (P = 0.007) and 24 hr (P = 0.017). In group P, less analgesic drugs were administered at postoperative 1 hr, and more analgesic drugs were administered at postoperative 24 hr. There were no differences between two groups with respect to nausea, GCS, systolic arterial pressure, and heart rate. IV-PCA did not further incur respiratory depression or miosis. Conclusions IV-PCA with fentanyl and ketorolac after craniotomy is more effective analgesic technique, without adverse events, than the intermittent administration of analgesics. PMID:21359078

  14. Exponentially adjusted moving mean procedure for quality control. An optimized patient sample control procedure.

    PubMed

    Smith, F A; Kroft, S H

    1996-01-01

    The idea of using patient samples as the basis for control procedures elicits a continuing fascination among laboratorians, particularly in the current environment of cost restriction. Average of normals (AON) procedures, although little used, have been carefully investigated at the theoretical level. The performance characteristics of Bull's algorithm have not been thoroughly delineated, however, despite its widespread use. The authors have generalized Bull's algorithm to use variably sized batches of patient samples and a range of exponential factors. For any given batch size, there is an optimal exponential factor to maximize the overall power of error detection. The optimized exponentially adjusted moving mean (EAMM) procedure, a variant of AON and Bull's algorithm, outperforms both parent procedures. As with any AON procedure, EAMM is most useful when the ratio of population variability to analytical variability (standard deviation ratio, SDR) is low.

  15. Differences in Trauma Experience Between Patients With Bipolar I Disorder, Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Song, Wonyoung; Park, Jae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare differences in traumatic experiences between patients with bipolar I disorder, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and controls. The traumatic experiences (as measured by the Trauma Experience Questionnaire) of 40 participants with bipolar I disorder were compared with those of 38 participants with MDD and 92 controls. Participants with bipolar I disorder exhibited a significantly higher frequency of traumatic experiences and higher impact ratings when traumas did occur than did patients with MDD and controls. In addition, the present impact of past trauma for patients in the bipolar I disorder and MDD groups was significantly higher than for controls. The bipolar I disorder group reported more severe traumatic experiences than did both the MDD and control groups, and the MDD group in turn reported more severe traumatic experiences than did the control group.

  16. Swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease: a surface electromyography study.

    PubMed

    Ws Coriolano, Maria das Graças; R Belo, Luciana; Carneiro, Danielle; G Asano, Amdore; Al Oliveira, Paulo José; da Silva, Douglas Monteiro; G Lins, Otávio

    2012-12-01

    Our goal was to study deglutition of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and normal controls (NC) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The study included 15 patients with idiopathic PD and 15 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was collected over the suprahyoid muscle group. Conditions were the following: swallow at once 10 and 20 ml of water and 5 and 10 ml of yogurt of firm consistency, and freely drink 100 ml of water. During swallowing, durations of sEMG were significantly longer in PD patients than in normal controls but no significant differences of amplitudes were found. Eighty percent of the PD patients and 20 % of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 20 ml of water, while 70 % of the PD patients and none of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 5 ml of yogurt. PD patients took significantly more time and needed significantly more swallows to drink 100 ml of water than normal controls. We conclude that sEMG might be a simple and useful tool to study and monitor deglutition in PD patients.

  17. Body Image Disturbance in Acromegaly Patients Compared to Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma Patients and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Conaglen, Helen M.; de Jong, Dennis; Crawford, Veronica; Elston, Marianne S.; Conaglen, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Excess growth hormone secretion in adults results in acromegaly, a condition in which multiple physical changes occur including bony and soft tissue overgrowth. Over time these changes can markedly alter a person's appearance. The aim of this study was to compare body image disturbance in patients with acromegaly to those with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) and controls and assess the impact of obesity in these groups. Methods. A cross-sectional survey including quality of life, body image disturbance, anxiety and depression measures, growth hormone, and BMI measurement was carried out. Results. The groups did not differ with respect to body image disturbance. However separate analysis of obese participants demonstrated relationships between mood scales, body image disturbance, and pain issues, particularly for acromegaly patients. Conclusions. While the primary hypothesis that acromegaly might be associated with body image disturbance was not borne out, we have shown that obesity together with acromegaly and NFA can be associated with body image issues, suggesting that BMI rather than primary diagnosis might better indicate whether patients might experience body image disturbance problems. PMID:26078758

  18. Serum and plasma concentration of oxidant and antioxidants in patients of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and its correlation with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Khanzode, Shruti S; Khanzode, Suchet D; Dakhale, Ganesh N

    2003-05-30

    Serum superoxide dismutase, plasma ascorbic acid and lipid peroxidation in H. pylori gastritis and gastric cancer patients were compared with values for age matched healthy subjects. Serum superoxide dismutase and serum malondialdehyde were analyzed spectrophotometrically whereas plasma ascorbic acid was determined by colorimetric method. Significant increase in serum superoxide dismutase and serum malondialdehyde and significant decrease in plasma ascorbic acid were observed in H. pylori gastritis and gastric cancer patients compared to control subjects. The concentration of serum superoxide dismutase and serum malondialdehyde was significantly higher and plasma ascorbic acid was significantly lower in gastric cancer as compared to H. pylori gastritis patients. Our results demonstrate that a correlation existed between the concentration of serum superoxide dismutase, plasma ascorbic acid and lipid peroxidation in H. pylori gastritis and gastric cancer patients.

  19. Contribution of non-reference alleles in mtDNA of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Casoli, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Spazzafumo, Liana; Balietti, Marta; Giorgetti, Belinda; Giuli, Cinzia; Postacchini, Demetrio; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2014-04-01

    Many observations suggest that mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) could be responsible for the neurodegenerative changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we examined the signal intensity of the four alleles of each mtDNA nucleotide position (np) in whole blood of AD patients and age-matched controls using MitoChip v2.0 array. Our analysis identified 270 significantly different nps which, with one exception, showed an increased contribution of non-reference alleles in AD patients. Principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis showed that five of these nps could discriminate AD from control subjects with 80% of cases correctly classified. Our data support the hypothesis of mtDNA alterations as an important factor in the etiology of AD. PMID:25590040

  20. Circulating lymphocyte and T memory subsets in glucocorticosteroid versus IVIG treated patients with CIDP.

    PubMed

    Klehmet, Juliane; Staudt, Max; Ulm, Lena; Unterwalder, Nadine; Meisel, Andreas; Meisel, Christian

    2015-06-15

    The present study compared lymphocyte and T memory subsets in currently untreated patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) to glucocorticosteroid (GS) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treated patients. Peripheral blood from 48 CIDP patients (21 untreated who were either treatment naïve or without treatment during the last 3 months, 17 IVIG and 10 GS treatment) and from 12 age-matched controls was evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. Our data demonstrate that long-term GS treatment is associated with reduced frequencies of total CD4+ T cells, CD4+ memory subsets and NK cells while long-term IVIG treatment is associated with alterations of the CD8+ memory compartment. Reduction of CD4+ naïve T cell counts may explain the observation that GS treatment induces prolonged clinical remission compared to IVIG treatment.

  1. Open Source Patient-Controlled Analgesic Pump Requirements Documentation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brian R; Hatcliff, John; Chalin, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the medical domain is driving a need for continuous innovation and improvement in techniques for developing and assuring medical devices. Unfortunately, research in academia and communication between academics, industrial engineers, and regulatory authorities is hampered by the lack of realistic non-proprietary development artifacts for medical devices. In this paper, we give an overview of a detailed requirements document for a Patient-Controlled Analgesic (PCA) pump developed under the US NSF's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Scholar-in-Residence (SIR) program. This 60+ page document follows the methodology outlined in the US Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Requirements Engineering Management Handbook (REMH) and includes a domain overview, use cases, statements of safety & security requirements, and formal top-level system architectural description. Based on previous experience with release of a requirements document for a cardiac pacemaker that spawned a number of research and pedagogical activities, we believe that the described PCA requirements document can be an important research enabler within the formal methods and software engineering communities.

  2. Parkinson's disease disrupts both automatic and controlled processing of action verbs.

    PubMed

    Fernandino, Leonardo; Conant, Lisa L; Binder, Jeffrey R; Blindauer, Karen; Hiner, Bradley; Spangler, Katie; Desai, Rutvik H

    2013-10-01

    The problem of how word meaning is processed in the brain has been a topic of intense investigation in cognitive neuroscience. While considerable correlational evidence exists for the involvement of sensory-motor systems in conceptual processing, it is still unclear whether they play a causal role. We investigated this issue by comparing the performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with that of age-matched controls when processing action and abstract verbs. To examine the effects of task demands, we used tasks in which semantic demands were either implicit (lexical decision and priming) or explicit (semantic similarity judgment). In both tasks, PD patients' performance was selectively impaired for action verbs (relative to controls), indicating that the motor system plays a more central role in the processing of action verbs than in the processing of abstract verbs. These results argue for a causal role of sensory-motor systems in semantic processing.

  3. Parkinson's disease disrupts both automatic and controlled processing of action verbs.

    PubMed

    Fernandino, Leonardo; Conant, Lisa L; Binder, Jeffrey R; Blindauer, Karen; Hiner, Bradley; Spangler, Katie; Desai, Rutvik H

    2013-10-01

    The problem of how word meaning is processed in the brain has been a topic of intense investigation in cognitive neuroscience. While considerable correlational evidence exists for the involvement of sensory-motor systems in conceptual processing, it is still unclear whether they play a causal role. We investigated this issue by comparing the performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) with that of age-matched controls when processing action and abstract verbs. To examine the effects of task demands, we used tasks in which semantic demands were either implicit (lexical decision and priming) or explicit (semantic similarity judgment). In both tasks, PD patients' performance was selectively impaired for action verbs (relative to controls), indicating that the motor system plays a more central role in the processing of action verbs than in the processing of abstract verbs. These results argue for a causal role of sensory-motor systems in semantic processing. PMID:22910144

  4. A controlled study of satisfaction among psychobiology research patients.

    PubMed

    Kalman, T P; Talon, N S; Frances, A; Kocsis, J H

    1982-03-01

    Because of the controversy regarding research involving human subjects, the authors designed an 18-item questionnaire to measure research patients' satisfaction with hospital treatment. They compared the questionnaire scores of 25 hospitalized depressed patients treated on a psychobiology study unit with those of 18 comparable patients treated on standard inpatient psychiatric units. Satisfaction was equally high in both groups. Satisfaction and improvement in depression scores were significantly correlated in study unit patients but not among patients on standard units. The authors believe that these data provide valuable information for institutional review boards, potential research subjects and referral sources, researchers, and the public at large.

  5. Family functioning in families of first-episode psychosis patients as compared to chronic mentally ill patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Koutra, Katerina; Triliva, Sofia; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Stefanakis, Zacharias; Basta, Maria; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2014-11-30

    The present study aimed to investigate possible differences in family environment among patients experiencing their First Episode of Psychosis (FEP), chronic patients and controls. Family cohesion and flexibility (FACES-IV) and psychological distress (GHQ-28) were evaluated in families of 50 FEP and 50 chronic patients, as well as 50 controls, whereas expressed emotion (FQ) and family burden (FBS) were assessed in families of FEP and chronic patients. Multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusted for confounders, indicated impaired cohesion and flexibility for families of FEP patients compared to controls, and lower scores for families of chronic patients compared to those of FEP patients. Caregivers of chronic patients scored significantly higher in criticism, and reported higher burden and psychological distress than those of FEP patients. Our findings suggest that unbalanced levels of cohesion and flexibility, high criticism and burden appeared to be the outcome of psychosis and not risk factors triggering the onset of the illness. Furthermore, emotional over-involvement both in terms of positive (i.e. concern) and negative behaviors (i.e. overprotection) is prevalent in Greek families. Psychoeducational interventions from the early stages of the illness should be considered to promote caregivers' awareness regarding the patients' illness, which in turn, may ameliorate dysfunctional family interactions.

  6. Eating disorders and oral health: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ann-Katrin; Norring, Claes; Unell, Lennart; Johansson, Anders

    2012-02-01

    The aim was to compare the oral health status of patients with eating disorders (EDs), with sex- and age-matched controls, with a view to identify self-reported and clinical parameters that might alert the dental healthcare professional to the possibility of EDs. All patients who entered outpatient treatment in an ED clinic during a 12-month period were invited to participate. Of 65 ED patients who started psychiatric/medical treatment, 54 agreed to participate. Eating disorder patients and controls answered a questionnaire and underwent dental clinical examinations. Multivariate analysis identified significantly higher ORs for ED patients to present dental problems (OR = 4.1), burning tongue (OR = 14.2), dry/cracked lips (OR = 9.6), dental erosion (OR = 8.5), and less gingival bleeding (OR = 1.1) compared with healthy controls. Sensitivity and specificity for the correct classification of ED patients and controls using the five variables was 83% and 79%, respectively. The ED patients with vomiting/binge eating behaviors reported worse perceived oral health (OR = 6.0) and had more dental erosion (OR = 5.5) than those without such behavior. In ED patients with longer duration of the disease, dental erosion was significantly more common. In conclusion, oral health problems frequently affect ED patients, and this needs to be considered in patient assessment and treatment decisions.

  7. Physical performance of nontransplanted childhood ALL survivors is comparable to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Taskinen, Mervi H; Kurimo, Marita; Kanerva, Jukka; Hovi, Liisa

    2013-05-01

    Physical fitness is an essential feature of overall health. Our objective was to compare the physical performance between nontransplanted acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients (study patients), healthy controls, and ALL patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Forty-five ALL patients (median age, 13.3 y) treated without cranial irradiation were compared with 34 ALL patients (12.0 y) treated with SCT and total body irradiation and 522 age-matched and sex-matched controls. Their physical performance was assessed by 6 muscle tests measuring speed and dynamic endurance, flexibility, acceleration, maximal speed, and speed differentiation. The patients were tested at a minimum of 3 years after treatment. The muscle test results of the study patients did not differ from that of the healthy controls. The study patients had normal body mass indexes (BMI). Only 42% of them exercised at least once a week. Those who exercised >3 times a week and those with a BMI below median had better results. SCT patients had inferior results in 4 out of 6 tests. The physical performance of nontransplanted ALL patients did not differ from that of healthy controls. A higher physical exercise activity and a BMI below median positively correlated with better muscle performance, supporting the importance of encouraging ALL survivors to exercise and avoid obesity.

  8. Gluthatione level is altered in lymphoblasts from patients with familial Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, C; Latorraca, S; Sorbi, S; Iantomasi, T; Favilli, F; Vincenzini, M T; Liguri, G

    1999-11-12

    Intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulphide (GSSG), glutamic acid and gamma-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) were measured in lymphoblast lines from patients with familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) and from age-matched controls. Lymphoblasts carrying presenilins (PS) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) genes mutations showed significantly decreased GSH content with respect to controls. Levels of GSSG and glutamic acid, as well as the activity of gamma-GCS were not significantly different in lymphoblasts carrying genes mutations as compared with control cells. These results indicate that even peripheral cells not involved in the neurodegenerative process of AD show altered GSH content when carrying PS and APP genes mutations. The provided data appear to be in accordance with the known alteration of GSH levels in central nervous system and strengthen the hypothesis of oxidative stress as an important, possibly crucial mechanism in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:10568522

  9. Moderate Glucose Control Is Associated With Increased Mortality Compared With Tight Glucose Control in Critically Ill Patients Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hirshberg, Eliotte L.; Phillips, Gregory D.; Holmen, John; Stoddard, Gregory; Orme, James

    2013-01-01

    Background: Optimal glucose management in the ICU remains unclear. In 2009, many clinicians at Intermountain Healthcare selected a moderate glucose control (90-140 mg/dL) instead of tight glucose control (80-110 mg/dL). We hypothesized that moderate glucose control would affect patients with and without preexisting diabetes differently. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of all patients treated with eProtocol-insulin from November 2006 to March 2011, stratifying for diabetes. We performed multivariate logistic regression for 30-day mortality with covariates of age, modified APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) II score, Charlson Comorbidity score, and target glucose. Results: We studied 3,529 patients in 12 different ICUs in eight different hospitals. Patients with diabetes had higher mean glucose (132 mg/dL vs 124 mg/dL) and greater glycemic variability (SD = 41 mg/dL vs 29 mg/dL) than did patients without diabetes (P < .01 for both comparisons). Tight glucose control was associated with increased frequency of moderate and severe hypoglycemia (30.3% and 3.6%) compared with moderate glucose control (14.3% and 2.0%, P < .01 for both). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the moderate glucose target was independently associated with increased risk of mortality in patients without diabetes (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.84; P = .05) but decreased risk of mortality in patients with diabetes (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.45-0.93; P = .01). Conclusions: Moderate glucose control (90-140 mg/dL) may confer greater mortality in critically ill patients without diabetes compared with tight glucose control (80-110 mg/dL). A single glucose target does not appear optimal for all critically ill patients. These data have important implications for the design of future interventional trials as well as for the glycemic management of critically ill patients. PMID:23238456

  10. Association between arterial stiffness, disease activity and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Avram, Claudiu; Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel; Popoviciu, Horațiu; Drăgoi, Mihai; Avram, Adina; Amaricăi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk is an important factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The aim of this study is to assess arterial stiffness in relation to the disease activity and functional limitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Twenty-four patients (mean age 45.8 ± 11.7 years) suffering of ankylosing spondylitis (disease duration 11.1 ± 5.1 years) and 24 gender and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical, biological, and functional status of ankylosing spondylitis patients was recorded. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA) was performed using applanation tonometry. We found significant differences between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls in regard to PWV (p = 0.047), aortic augmentation pressure-AP (p = 0.028), augmentation index-AIx (p = 0.038) and aortic augmentation index adjusted for heart rate-AIx75 (p = 0.011). PWV and AIx75 were significantly associated with the disease functioning score-BASFI (p = 0.012, r = 0.504; p = 0.041, r = 0.421). Aortic AP and augmentation indexes (AIx and AIx75) were all associated to ASDAS score (p = 0.028, r = 0.448; p = 0.005, r = 0.549; p = 0.025, r = 0.455). Our study showed that ankylosing spondylitis patients have a higher arterial stiffness than the age-matched controls, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk. We found that arterial stiffness is positively associated with disease activity and functional impairment. Chronic spondiloarthropaties should be screened for arterial stiffness, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to benefit from primary prevention measures.

  11. Different gastoroesophageal reflux symptoms of middle-aged to elderly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Dobashi, Kunio; Kusano, Motoyasu; Mori, Masatomo

    2012-03-01

    Symptomatic differences and the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been clarified in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study is to assess the differences of GERD symptoms among asthma, COPD, and disease control patients, and determine the impact of GERD symptoms on exacerbation of asthma or COPD by using a new questionnaire for GERD. A total of 120 subjects underwent assessment with the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire, including 40 age-matched patients in each of the asthma, COPD, and disease control groups. Asthma and control patients had more regurgitation-related symptoms than COPD patients (p<0.05), while COPD patients had more dysmotility-related symptoms than asthma patients (p<0.01) or disease control patients (p<0.01). The most distinctive symptom of asthma patients with GERD was an unusual sensation in the throat, while bloated stomach was the chief symptom of COPD patients with GERD, and these symptoms were associated with disease exacerbations. The presence of GERD diagnosed by the total score of FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD. GERD symptoms differed between asthma and COPD patients, and the presence of GERD diagnosed by the FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD. PMID:22448100

  12. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Swedish patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Annelie; Löfberg, Robert; Sternby, Berit; Eriksson, Anders; Almer, Sven; Befrits, Ragnar; Fossum, Bjöörn; Karlén, Per; Broström, Olle; Tysk, Curt

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an increasing interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with chronic diseases, including those with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients may turn to CAM when conventional therapies are inadequate or associated with side effects for symptomatic relief or to regain control over their disease. The objectives were to explore CAM use and perceived effects in IBD patients in comparison with a control group. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter, controlled study was carried out. IBD patients were invited from 12 IBD clinics in Sweden. Controls were selected randomly from a residence registry. A study-specific questionnaire was used for data collection. Results Overall, 48.3% of patients with IBD had used some kind of CAM during the past year compared with 53.5% in controls (P=0.025, adjusted for age, sex, geographic residence, and diet). The most frequently used CAM among IBD patients was massage (21.3%), versus controls (31.4%) (adjusted P=0.0003). The second most used CAM was natural products, 18.7% in IBD patients versus 22.3% of the controls (unadjusted P=0.018). In all, 83.1% of the patients experienced positive effects from CAM and 14.4% experienced negative effects. Conclusion Overall, 48.3% of Swedish IBD patients used some kind of CAM and controls used CAM significantly more. Natural products were used by one-fifth of the patients and even more by controls. This is notable from a patient safety perspective considering the possible risks of interactions with conventional medication. In all, 40% of the patients reported adverse events from conventional medicine. Patients experienced predominantly positive effects from CAM, and so did controls. PMID:27472271

  13. Factors Related to Perceived Diabetes Control Are Not Related to Actual Glucose Control for Minority Patients With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew, Lisa M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Lancaster, Kristie J.; Leventhal, Howard

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine variables associated with perceived diabetes control compared with an objective measure of glucose control (A1C). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Beliefs about diabetes were assessed among 334 individuals with diabetes living in a primarily low-income, minority, urban neighborhood. Regression analyses tested associations between disease beliefs and both participants' perceptions of control and actual control (A1C). RESULTS Poorer perceived diabetes control was associated with perceiving a greater impact of diabetes, greater depressive symptoms, not following a diabetic diet, A1C, and a trend toward less exercise. Variables associated with better actual control (A1C) included higher BMI, older age, and not using insulin. CONCLUSIONS Patients' perceptions of their diabetes control are informed by subjective diabetes cues (e.g., perceived impact of diabetes and adherence to a diabetic diet), which are not related to A1C. Clinicians should take into account what cues patients are using to assess their diabetes control. PMID:20067972

  14. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed.

  15. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed. PMID:25972093

  16. Synchronized human skeletal myotubes of lean, obese and type 2 diabetic patients maintain circadian oscillation of clock genes

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jan; Timmers, Silvie; Moonen-Kornips, Esther; Duez, Helene; Staels, Bart; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Cell and animal studies have demonstrated that circadian rhythm is governed by autonomous rhythmicity of clock genes. Although disturbances in circadian rhythm have been implicated in metabolic disease development, it remains unknown whether muscle circadian rhythm is altered in human models of type 2 diabetes. Here we used human primary myotubes (HPM) to investigate if rhythmicity of clock- and metabolic gene expression is altered in donors with obesity or type 2 diabetes compared to metabolically healthy donors. HPM were obtained from skeletal muscle biopsies of four groups: type 2 diabetic patients and their BMI- and age-matched obese controls and from lean, healthy and young endurance trained athletes and their age-matched sedentary controls. HPM were differentiated for 7 days before synchronization by serum shock followed by gene expression profiling over the next 72 hours. HPM display robust circadian rhythms in clock genes, but REVERBA displayed dampened rhythmicity in type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, rhythmicity in NAMPT and SIRT1 expression was only observed in HPM from trained athletes. Rhythmicity in expression of key-regulators of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism was modest. We demonstrate that in human skeletal muscle REVERBA/B, NAMPT and SIRT1 circadian rhythms are affected in donors of sedentary life style and poor health status. PMID:27756900

  17. Heart rate dynamics in patients with stable angina pectoris and utility of fractal and complexity measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Ristimae, T.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic analysis techniques may uncover abnormalities in heart rate (HR) behavior that are not easily detectable with conventional statistical measures. However, the applicability of these new methods for detecting possible abnormalities in HR behavior in various cardiovascular disorders is not well established. Conventional measures of HR variability were compared with short-term (< or = 11 beats, alpha1) and long-term (> 11 beats, alpha2) fractal correlation properties and with approximate entropy of RR interval data in 38 patients with stable angina pectoris without previous myocardial infarction or cardiac medication at the time of the study and 38 age-matched healthy controls. The short- and long-term fractal scaling exponents (alpha1, alpha2) were significantly higher in the coronary patients than in the healthy controls (1.34 +/- 0.15 vs 1.11 +/- 0.12 [p <0.001] and 1.10 +/- 0.08 vs 1.04 +/- 0.06 [p <0.01], respectively), and they also had lower approximate entropy (p <0.05), standard deviation of all RR intervals (p <0.01), and high-frequency spectral component of HR variability (p <0.05). The short-term fractal scaling exponent performed better than other heart rate variability parameters in differentiating patients with coronary artery disease from healthy subjects, but it was not related to the clinical or angiographic severity of coronary artery disease or any single nonspectral or spectral measure of HR variability in this retrospective study. Patients with stable angina pectoris have altered fractal properties and reduced complexity in their RR interval dynamics relative to age-matched healthy subjects. Dynamic analysis may complement traditional analyses in detecting altered HR behavior in patients with stable angina pectoris.

  18. Antioxidant status in patients with uncomplicated insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, S R; Thomason, H; Sandler, D; Leguen, C; Baxter, M A; Thorpe, G H; Jones, A F; Barnett, A H

    1997-06-01

    Oxidative damage by free radicals has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes. We compared the radical-scavenging antioxidant activity of serum from 28 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 24 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus uncomplicated by vascular disease with age-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes had significantly reduced total antioxidant activity (320.2 +/- 11.3 vs. 427.5 +/- 19.2 mumol L-1; P < 0.001). This was attributable to lower urate (209.4 +/- 10.4 vs. 297.1 +/- 16.7 mumol L-1; P < 0.001) and vitamin C levels (63.6 +/- 6.0 vs. 87.5 +/- 4.9 mumol L-1; P < 0.01). Patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes had lower total antioxidant activity than age-matched control subjects (433.8 +/- 25.4 vs. 473.9 +/- 30.2 mumol L-1; NS), reflecting lower urate (299.5 +/- 19.4 vs. 324.8 +/- 21.4 mumol L-1; NS) and vitamin C levels (38.6 +/- 5.7 vs. 58.5 +/- 5.3 mumol L-1; P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that urate, vitamin C and vitamin E were the major contributors to serum total antioxidant activity. These results show that diabetic patients have significant defects of antioxidant protection, which may increase vulnerability to oxidative damage and the development of diabetic complications.

  19. Abnormal structure and increased stiffness of the femoral arterial wall in young patients with sustained essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eiskjaer, H; Christensen, T; Pedersen, E B

    1989-10-01

    Thickness, elastic modulus, and stiffness of the common femoral arterial wall were estimated in 11 patients with essential hypertension and in 11 age-matched normotensive control subjects by use of an in vivo, non-invasive, ultrasound time-motion display technique (M-mode). Hypertensive patients had significantly higher levels than normotensive subjects with regard to arterial wall thickness (0.23 cm vs. 0.18 cm, medians; P less than 0.01), elastic modulus (10.6 x 10(7) Pa vs. 6.18 x 10(7) Pa, medians; P less than 0.05) and arterial wall stiffness (3.80 x 10(7) Pa vs. 2.07 +/- 10(7) Pa, medians; P less than 0.01). It is concluded that structural changes in the wall of the large arteries contribute to the increase in arterial wall stiffness in young patients with sustained essential hypertension.

  20. Adaptation of the questionnaire of Hahn, Cella, Bode, and Hanrahan in Spanish patients affected by asbestos poisoning.

    PubMed

    Clemente, Miguel; Reig-Botella, Adela

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether or not the questionnaire developed by Hahn, Cella, Bode, and Hanharan (2010) for use with cancer patients accurately measures the social well-being of individuals suffering from chronic illnesses associated with asbestos poisoning. One hundred ten male patients with asbestos poisoning were age-matched in blocks to a comparison group of 70 "healthy" controls, all of whom were current or retired employees of the largest naval company in Spain. The results indicate very high reliability of the Hahn et al. (2010) test to assess social well-being in these chronically ill patients, and a high concurrent validity of the measured outcomes with regard to results of the SCL-90 Derogatis questionnaire, especially on the social well-being dimensions of negative emotional support, negative social companionship, and satisfaction. Limitations of the study and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:24230929

  1. Aberrant Effective Connectivity in Schizophrenia Patients during Appetitive Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Diaconescu, Andreea Oliviana; Jensen, Jimmy; Wang, Hongye; Willeit, Matthäus; Menon, Mahesh; Kapur, Shitij; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that schizophrenia involves dysfunction in brain connectivity at a neural level, and a dysfunction in reward processing at a behavioral level. The purpose of the present study was to link these two levels of analyses by examining effective connectivity patterns between brain regions mediating reward learning in patients with schizophrenia and healthy, age-matched controls. To this aim, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and galvanic skin recordings (GSR) while patients and controls performed an appetitive conditioning experiment with visual cues as the conditioned (CS) stimuli, and monetary reward as the appetitive unconditioned stimulus (US). Based on explicit stimulus contingency ratings, conditioning occurred in both groups; however, based on implicit, physiological GSR measures, patients failed to show differences between CS+ and CS− conditions. Healthy controls exhibited increased blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity across striatal, hippocampal, and prefrontal regions and increased effective connectivity from the ventral striatum to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC BA 11) in the CS+ compared to the CS− condition. Compared to controls, patients showed increased BOLD activity across a similar network of brain regions, and increased effective connectivity from the striatum to hippocampus and prefrontal regions in the CS− compared to the CS+ condition. The findings of increased BOLD activity and effective connectivity in response to the CS− in patients with schizophrenia offer insight into the aberrant assignment of motivational salience to non-reinforced stimuli during conditioning that is thought to accompany schizophrenia. PMID:21267430

  2. Increased risk of osteoporosis in patients with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Chai, Chee-Yin; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tsai, Feng-Ji; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we aimed to investigate the risk of osteoporosis in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) by analyzing data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). From the Taiwan NHIRD, we analyzed data on 4460 patients aged ≥40 years diagnosed with ED between 1996 and 2010. In total, 17,480 age-matched patients without ED in a 1:4 ratio were randomly selected as the non-ED group. The relationship between ED and the risk of osteoporosis was estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. During the follow-up period, 264 patients with ED (5.92%) and 651 patients without ED (3.65%) developed osteoporosis. The overall incidence of osteoporosis was 3.04-fold higher in the ED group than in the non-ED group (9.74 vs 2.47 per 1000 person-years) after controlling for covariates. Compared with patients without ED, patients with psychogenic and organic ED were 3.19- and 3.03-fold more likely to develop osteoporosis. Our results indicate that patients with a history of ED, particularly younger men, had a high risk of osteoporosis. Patients with ED should be examined for bone mineral density, and men with osteoporosis should be evaluated for ED. PMID:27368024

  3. Internal quality control of prothrombin time in primary care: comparing the use of patient split samples with lyophilised control materials.

    PubMed

    Stavelin, Anne; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Sølvik, Una; Sandberg, Sverre

    2009-09-01

    Many primary care laboratories use point-of-care (POC) instruments to monitor patients on anticoagulant treatment. The internal analytical quality control of these instruments is often assessed by analysing lyophilised control materials and/or by sending patient samples to a local hospital laboratory for comparison (split sample). The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of these two models of prothrombin time quality control. The models were evaluated by power functions created by computer simulations based on empirical data from 18 primary care laboratories using the POC instruments Thrombotrack, Coagu-Chek S, or Hemochron Jr. Signature. The control rules 1(2S), 1(3S), exponential weighted moving average, and the deviation limits of +/- 10% and +/- 20% were evaluated by their probability of error detection and false rejections. The total within-lab coefficient of variation was 3.8% and 6.9% for Thrombotrack, 8.9% and 10.5% for CoaguChek S, and 9.4% and 14.8% for Hemochron Jr. Signature for the control sample measurements and the split sample measurements, respectively. The probability of error detection was higher using a lyophilised control material than a patient split sample for all three instruments, whereas the probability of false rejection was similar. A higher probability of error detection occurred when lyophilised control material was used compared with the patient split samples; therefore, lyophilised control material should be used for internal analytical quality control of prothrombin time in primary health care.

  4. Electrocardiographic findings in Emergency Department patients with pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Richman, Peter B; Loutfi, Hassan; Lester, Steven J; Cambell, Patricia; Matthews, Jessica; Friese, Jeremy; Wood, Joseph; Kasper, David; Chen, Frederick; Mandell, Mark

    2004-08-01

    To assess the pre-study, null hypothesis that there is no difference in the electrocardiogram (EKG) findings for Emergency Department (ED) patients who rule in vs. rule out for suspected pulmonary embolism, a retrospective review of a cohort of patients with pulmonary embolism and their controls was conducted in an academic, suburban ED. Patients who were evaluated in the ED during a one-year study period for symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism were eligible for inclusion. All patients with pulmonary embolism and sex- and age-matched controls comprised the final study groups. Two board-certified cardiologists reviewed each patient's EKG. There were 350 eligible patients identified; 49 patients with pulmonary embolism and 49 controls were entered into the study. The most common rhythm observed in both groups was normal sinus rhythm (67.3% cases vs. 68.6 % controls; p = 1.0). Abnormalities believed to be associated with pulmonary embolism occurred with similar frequency in both case and control groups (sinus tachycardia [18.8 % vs. 11.8%, respectively; p = 0.40]), incomplete right bundle branch block (4.2% vs. 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.24), complete right bundle branch block (4.2% vs. 6.0, respectively; p = 1.0), S1Q3T3 pattern (2.1 vs. 0.0, respectively; p = 0.49), S1Q3 pattern (0.0 vs. 0.0), and extreme right axis (0.0 vs. 0.0). New EKG changes were identified more frequently for patients with pulmonary embolism (33.3% vs. 12.5% controls; p = 0.03), but specific findings were rarely different between cases and controls. In our cohort of ED patients, we did not identify EKG features that are likely to help distinguish patients with pulmonary embolism from those who rule out for the disease.

  5. Antibodies against papillomavirus antigens in cervical secretions from condyloma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dillner, L; Fredriksson, A; Persson, E; Forslund, O; Hansson, B G; Dillner, J

    1993-01-01

    Samples of cervical secretions and serum from 30 women with genital condylomas and 30 age-matched controls were tested for the presence of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibodies against a panel of papillomavirus-derived antigens. The same cervical samples were also analyzed for presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by Southern blotting and polymerase chain reaction. By Southern blotting HPV DNA was detected in 8 of 30 patients with condylomas and 2 of 30 controls, and by the polymerase chain reaction HPV DNA was detected in 14 of 30 patients with condylomas and 5 of 30 controls. A total of 18 of 29 patients with condylomas and 8 of 28 controls had IgA antibodies in cervical secretions to an E2 synthetic peptide, and 17 of 29 patients with condylomas and 5 of 28 controls had local IgA antibodies to an E7 peptide (P < 0.025 and P < 0.005, respectively). The results suggest that measurement of local antibody production against selected HPV antigens may be useful in the study of HPV immunology and, possibly, for the diagnosis of HPV infection. PMID:8381807

  6. Collagen cross-linking of skin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Collagen cross-links of skin tissue (left upper arm) from 11 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 9 age-matched control subjects were quantified. It was found that patients with ALS had a significant reduction in the content of an age-related, stable cross-link, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine, that was negatively correlated with the duration of illness. The contents of sodium borohydride-reducible labile cross-links, dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine, were significantly increased and were positively associated with the duration of illness (r = 0.703, p less than 0.05 and r = 0.684, p less than 0.05, respectively). The results clearly indicate that during the course of ALS, the cross-linking pathway of skin collagen runs counter to its normal aging, resulting in a "rejuvenation" phenomenon of skin collagen. Thus, cross-linking of skin collagen is affected in ALS.

  7. Comparison of Pain Scores in Postoperative Patients: Intravenous Morphine Patient-Controlled Analgesia vs Iontophoretic Transdermal Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Caram, Anthony M; Patel, Nirav; Sandler, Hayden M

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative management of pain has traditionally utilized intravenous (IV) morphine for pain control. An alternative approach to the invasive patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system is the administration of transdermal analgesics, such as fentanyl. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the fentanyl hydrochloride (fentanyl HCl) iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS), which utilizes iontophoretic technology to produce a controlled electrical current that propels ionized fentanyl molecules into the systemic vasculature. Transdermal fentanyl has been shown to be equivalent or superior to IV morphine PCA in a variety of postoperative settings with patients experiencing decreased pain scores and a favorable side effect profile. PMID:27688989

  8. Comparison of Pain Scores in Postoperative Patients: Intravenous Morphine Patient-Controlled Analgesia vs Iontophoretic Transdermal Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Caram, Anthony M; Patel, Nirav; Sandler, Hayden M

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative management of pain has traditionally utilized intravenous (IV) morphine for pain control. An alternative approach to the invasive patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system is the administration of transdermal analgesics, such as fentanyl. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the fentanyl hydrochloride (fentanyl HCl) iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS), which utilizes iontophoretic technology to produce a controlled electrical current that propels ionized fentanyl molecules into the systemic vasculature. Transdermal fentanyl has been shown to be equivalent or superior to IV morphine PCA in a variety of postoperative settings with patients experiencing decreased pain scores and a favorable side effect profile.

  9. Comparison of Pain Scores in Postoperative Patients: Intravenous Morphine Patient-Controlled Analgesia vs Iontophoretic Transdermal Fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Glaun, Gabriel D; Caram, Anthony M; Patel, Nirav; Sandler, Hayden M

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative management of pain has traditionally utilized intravenous (IV) morphine for pain control. An alternative approach to the invasive patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system is the administration of transdermal analgesics, such as fentanyl. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the fentanyl hydrochloride (fentanyl HCl) iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS), which utilizes iontophoretic technology to produce a controlled electrical current that propels ionized fentanyl molecules into the systemic vasculature. Transdermal fentanyl has been shown to be equivalent or superior to IV morphine PCA in a variety of postoperative settings with patients experiencing decreased pain scores and a favorable side effect profile. PMID:27688989

  10. Serum Levels of Growth Differentiation Factor 11 Are Independently Associated with Low Hemoglobin Values in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Matsui, Takanori; Kurokawa, Yuka; Fukami, Kei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Circulating levels of growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) have been shown to decrease with age in several mammalian species, and supplementation of GDF11 by heterochronic parabiosis or systemic administration reverses age-related organ damage. However, there is some controversy about the pathophysiological role of GDF11 in aging-associated organ damage. Since aging process is accelerated in uremia, we compared serum levels of GDF11 in hemodialysis (HD) patients with those in age-matched healthy controls, and then determined the independent clinical correlates of GDF11 in HD subjects. Sixty-two maintenance HD patients (34 male and 28 female; mean age, 52.6 years; mean duration of HD, 7.7 months) were enrolled in the present study. Twenty-nine age-matched subjects were used as a control. GDF11 was measured by a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Serum GDF11 levels in HD patients were significantly higher than those in controls (9.4 ± 5.1 pg/mL vs. 7.3 ± 5.9 pg/mL). A statistical significance was demonstrated between GDF11 and hemoglobin (inversely). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that hemoglobin (p < 0.001) was a sole independent correlate of GDF11 levels in HD patients (R2 = 0.168). Our present study suggests that kinetics and regulation of circulating GDF11 may differ between normal physiological aging process and accelerated pathological aging conditions, such as uremia. Given that GDF11 has been shown to inhibit erythroid maturation in mice, elevation of GDF11 levels may be involved in erythropoietin-resistant anemia in HD patients. PMID:27298756

  11. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Patients with Psoriasis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Golpour, Masoud; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Maryam; Ebadi, Aghdas; Koohkan, Fatemeh; Shahmohammadi, Soheila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Psoriasis is a common, genetically determined inflammatory and proliferative disease of the skin. Psychological stress can exacerbate the disease. This study sought to investigate the depression and anxiety disorders among patients with psoriasis and control group. Method. In this hospital-based case-control study, One hundred patients with psoriasis (case) referred to the dermatology department and 100 patients with otolaryngology problems and dermatological healthy volunteers (control) who referred to the Otolaryngology Department of Bouali Sina Hospital in Sari, Iran, in 2007 were studied. Demographic characteristics were recorded. Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale I-II were administered to the patients in both groups. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and descriptive statistical tests. Results. From One-hundred patients in each group, 44 (45%) were men. Depression score was 67% and 12% in psoriatic patients and control, respectively. The Beck depression scores of patients with psoriasis were significantly higher than scores of the control group (P < 0.05). Based on Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale, anxiety was found in 45% of patients in case group and 18% of controls. Conclusion. The results revealed that psoriatic patients reported significantly higher degrees of depression and anxiety than controls. In addition, psoriatic women were more depressed than psoriatic men.

  12. Patients' communication with doctors: a randomized control study of a brief patient communication intervention.

    PubMed

    Talen, Mary R; Muller-Held, Christine F; Eshleman, Kate Grampp; Stephens, Lorraine

    2011-09-01

    In research on doctor-patient communication, the patient role in the communication process has received little attention. The dynamic interactions of shared decision making and partnership styles which involve active patient communication are becoming a growing area of focus in doctor-patient communication. However, patients rarely know what makes "good communication" with medical providers and even fewer have received coaching in this type of communication. In this study, 180 patients were randomly assigned to either an intervention group using a written communication tool to facilitate doctor-patient communication or to standard care. The goal of this intervention was to assist patients in becoming more effective communicators with their physicians. The physicians and patients both rated the quality of the communication after the office visit based on the patients' knowledge of their health concerns, organizational skills and questions, and attitudes of ownership and partnership. The results supported that patients in the intervention group had significantly better communication with their doctors than patients in the standard care condition. Physicians also rated patients who were in the intervention group as having better overall communication and organizational skills, and a more positive attitude during the office visit. This study supports that helping patients structure their communication using a written format can facilitate doctor-patient communication. Patients can become more adept at describing their health concerns, organizing their needs and questions, and being proactive, which can have a positive effect on the quality of the doctor-patient communication during outpatient office visits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:21787080

  13. A patient-controlled journal for an electronic medical record: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wald, Jonathan S; Middleton, Blackford; Bloom, Amy; Walmsley, Dan; Gleason, Mary; Nelson, Elizabeth; Li, Qi; Epstein, Marianna; Volk, Lynn; Bates, David W

    2004-01-01

    Partners Healthcare System, Boston, MA, has developed a patient Web portal that features a patient-controlled electronic "journal" to allow patients to interact with their physician's electronic medical record. Patients can view and respond to health reminders, critique electronic chart information maintained by their doctor's office, enter additional clinical information, and prepare information summaries before an office visit. Creating shared information resources to support a collaborative care model required analysis of the business, architectural, and workflow requirements of the patient-controlled clinical portal and the physician-controlled electronic medical record system. In this paper we describe the challenges in aligning the two systems and serving the different user groups. Coupling the Patient Gateway system, serving over 8700 patients of 90 physicians as of September, 2003, with the Longitudinal Medical Record system, serving over 4000 physicians, has required a clear definition of user goals and workflow, well-defined interfaces, and careful consideration of system assumptions to succeed.

  14. Injury of the Arcuate Fasciculus in the Nondominant Hemisphere by Subfalcine Herniation in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage : Two Case Reports and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Seong Ho; Chang, Min Cheol

    2016-05-01

    Using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), we demonstrated injury of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the nondominant hemisphere in two patients who showed subfalcine herniation after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the dominant hemisphere. Two patients (patient 1 and patient 2) with ICH and six age-matched control patients who have ICH on the left corona radiata and basal ganglia without subfalcine herniation were recruited for this study. DTT was performed at one month after onset in patient 1 and patient 2. AFs of both hemispheres in both patients were disrupted between Wernicke's and Broca's areas. The fractional anisotropy value and tract numbers of the right AFs in both patients were found to be more than two standard deviations lower than those of control patients. In contrast, the apparent diffusion coefficient value was more than two standard deviations higher than those of control patients. Using the configuration and parameters of DTT, we confirmed injury of the AF in the nondominant hemisphere in two patients with subfalcine herniation following ICH in the dominant hemisphere. Therefore, DTT would be a useful tool for detection of underlying injury of the AF in the nondominant hemisphere in patients with subfalcine herniation. PMID:27226866

  15. Injury of the Arcuate Fasciculus in the Nondominant Hemisphere by Subfalcine Herniation in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage : Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Seong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT), we demonstrated injury of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in the nondominant hemisphere in two patients who showed subfalcine herniation after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the dominant hemisphere. Two patients (patient 1 and patient 2) with ICH and six age-matched control patients who have ICH on the left corona radiata and basal ganglia without subfalcine herniation were recruited for this study. DTT was performed at one month after onset in patient 1 and patient 2. AFs of both hemispheres in both patients were disrupted between Wernicke's and Broca's areas. The fractional anisotropy value and tract numbers of the right AFs in both patients were found to be more than two standard deviations lower than those of control patients. In contrast, the apparent diffusion coefficient value was more than two standard deviations higher than those of control patients. Using the configuration and parameters of DTT, we confirmed injury of the AF in the nondominant hemisphere in two patients with subfalcine herniation following ICH in the dominant hemisphere. Therefore, DTT would be a useful tool for detection of underlying injury of the AF in the nondominant hemisphere in patients with subfalcine herniation. PMID:27226866

  16. Patient-controlled hospital admission for patients with severe mental disorders: study protocol for a nationwide prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Christoffer Torgaard; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Hastrup, Lene Halling; Andersen, Per Kragh; Giacco, Domenico; Nordentoft, Merete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient-controlled hospital admission for individuals with severe mental disorders is a novel approach in mental healthcare. Patients can admit themselves to a hospital unit for a short stay without being assessed by a psychiatrist or contacting the emergency department. Previous studies assessing the outcomes of patient-controlled hospital admission found trends towards reduction in the use of coercive measures and length of hospital stay; however, these studies have methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Larger studies are needed to estimate the effect of patient-controlled hospital admission on the use of coercion and of healthcare services. Design and methods We aim to recruit at least 315 patients who are offered a contract for patient-controlled hospital admissions in eight different hospitals in Denmark. Patients will be followed-up for at least 1 year to compare the use of coercive measures and of healthcare services, the use of medications and suicidal behaviour. Descriptive statistics will be used to investigate hospitalisations, global assessment of functioning (GAF) and patient satisfaction with treatment. To minimise selection bias, we will match individuals using patient-controlled hospital admission and controls with a 1:5 ratio via a propensity score based on the following factors: sex, age group, primary diagnosis, substance abuse as secondary diagnosis, coercion, number of psychiatric bed days, psychiatric history, urbanity and suicidal behaviour. Additionally, a historical control study will be undertaken in which patients serve as their own control group prior to index date. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by The Danish Health and Medicines Authority (j.nr.: 3-3013-934/1/) and by The Danish Data Protection Agency (j.nr.: 2012-58-0004). The study was categorised as a register study by The Danish Health Research Ethics Committee and therefore no further approval was needed (j.nr.: H-2-2014-FSP70

  17. Inadequate Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients Referred for Cardiac Stress Test.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Tarek M; Akinseye, Oluwaseun A; Kerwin, Todd C

    2015-09-01

    The current study examined the degree of blood pressure (BP) control and incidence of myocardial ischemia in hypertensive patients (n=2039) referred for cardiac stress test. Patients were categorized into well-controlled (<140/90 mm Hg), poorly controlled (140-160/90-100 mm Hg), and very poorly controlled (>160/100 mm Hg) groups according to their resting BP. The mean age[±standard error of the mean] of the patients was 68±13 years, and 885 (43.4%) were men. The prevalence of well-controlled hypertension (HTN) was 47.2%, poorly controlled HTN was 29.5%, and very poorly controlled HTN was 23.3%. Evidence of ischemia was seen in 19.8% and 19.3% of the well-controlled and poorly controlled groups, respectively. The very poorly controlled group had the lowest incidence of ischemia (14.3%) (P<.05) compared with the other two groups. Symptoms that mimic ischemic heart disease in hypertensive patients may be partly explained by poorly controlled BP. Quality of care might be improved by optimally controlling BP in patients with angina symptoms prior to ordering diagnostic testing associated with radiation exposure and cost. PMID:26011137

  18. Satisfaction with control of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Neelufar; Lobosco, Steve; Lu, Peng; Roughley, Adam; Alperovich, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patient satisfaction with disease control of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an important component of medical management. This analysis evaluated patient and physician satisfaction with disease control of SLE, factors associated with satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and the degree of physician–patient concordance of these parameters. Patients and methods Data were extracted from the US Adelphi Real World Lupus Disease Specific Programme®, a cross-sectional survey of 50 rheumatologists, 25 nephrologists, and their patients with non-nephritis SLE (NNSLE) or lupus nephritis (LN). Results Physicians reported moderate or severe disease activity in 25.0% of patients with NNSLE and in 50.5% of patients with LN, and were satisfied with disease control in 78.6% (132/168) and 73.8% (152/206) of patients, respectively. For patients, 75.8% (75/99) with NNSLE were satisfied with their current treatment, compared with 65.5% (74/113) with LN. Physician–patient agreement (70.7%) on the level of satisfaction was “slight” (kappa =0.1445) for NNSLE; patients were more frequently dissatisfied than physicians with regard to joint tenderness, fatigue, anxiety, pain on movement, malar rash, and photosensitivity. Physician–patient agreement (71.4%) on the level of satisfaction was “fair” (kappa =0.3695) for LN; patients expressed greater dissatisfaction than physicians for headache, photosensitivity, and anxiety, whereas physicians were more dissatisfied with regard to joint swelling, kidney function, and blood pressure control. In general, patients with NNSLE or LN who were dissatisfied (or whose physicians were dissatisfied) were more likely to have joint swelling, joint stiffness, malar rash, hair loss, depression, and fatigue, have moderate or severe disease, or to be currently experiencing disease flare. Conclusion These data highlight the patient and physician dissatisfaction with real-world disease control of SLE. PMID:27784995

  19. Morphometric changes in the reward system of Parkinson's disease patients with impulse control disorders.

    PubMed

    Pellicano, Clelia; Niccolini, Flavia; Wu, Kit; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Lawrence, Andrew D; Lees, Andrew J; Piccini, Paola; Politis, Marios

    2015-12-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) occur in a subset of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who are receiving dopamine replacement therapy. In this study, we aimed to investigate structural abnormalities within the mesocortical and limbic cortices and subcortical structures in PD patients with ICDs. We studied 18 PD patients with ICDs, 18 PD patients without ICDs and a group of 24 age and sex-matched healthy controls. Cortical thickness (CTh) and subcortical nuclei volume analyses were carried out using the automated surface-based analysis package FreeSurfer (version 5.3.0). We found significant differences in MRI measures between the three groups. There was volume loss in the nucleus accumbens of both PD patients with ICDs and without ICDs compared to the control group. In addition, PD patients with ICDs showed significant atrophy in caudate, hippocampus and amygdala compared to the group of healthy controls. PD patients with ICDs had significant increased cortical thickness in rostral anterior cingulate cortex and frontal pole compared to PD patients without ICDs. Cortical thickness in rostral anterior cingulate and frontal pole was increased in PD patients with ICDs compared to the control group, but the differences failed to reach corrected levels of statistical significance. PD patients with ICDs showed increased cortical thickness in medial prefrontal regions. We speculate that these findings reflect either a pre-existing neural trait vulnerability to impulsivity or the expression of a maladaptive synaptic plasticity under non-physiological dopaminergic stimulation. PMID:26410743

  20. Gastric manometric abnormalities in patients with dyspeptic symptoms after fundoplication.

    PubMed Central

    Stanghellini, V; Malagelada, J R

    1983-01-01

    We describe six patients in whom severe dyspeptic symptoms developed after fundoplication. The symptoms began immediately after operation (three patients) or shortly thereafter (three and eight months). There were no other known predisposing factors to gastroparesis. Seven, age-matched, healthy volunteers served as controls. Pressure activity from antrum (two sites), duodenum (two sites), and jejunum (one site) was recorded by a low compliance perfusion system connected to external strain gauge transducers. Activity was recorded for three hours during fasting and for two hours after the ingestion of a solid and a liquid meal. To determine whether an inadvertent vagotomy had been performed, basal acid output and the response to insulin (Hollander's test) were measured on a separate day. Manometric studies revealed postprandial hypomotility in these patients, whereas fasting antral and intestinal activities were normal. Acid output increased in all patients during insulin induced hypoglycaemia. In three patients, an antrectomy was subsequently performed, and they were relieved of their symptoms. We conclude that, after fundoplication, symptoms associated with postprandial antral hypomotility may develop in some patients. The pathophysiologic mechanism is unknown, but a positive acid response to insulin induced hypoglycaemia does not support the occurrence of incidental vagotomy. We do not know the prevalence of this motor abnormality among asymptomatic patients with prior fundoplication. A favourable symptomatic response to antrectomy in several of our patients, however, suggests that the symptoms were related to antral motor dysfunction. PMID:6350114

  1. Altered pain modulation in patients with persistent postendodontic pain

    PubMed Central

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Khan, Junad; Benoliel, Rafael; Feng, Changyong; Yarnitsky, David; Kuo, Fengshen; Hirschberg, Craig; Hartwell, Gary; Huang, Ching-Yu; Heir, Gary; Korczeniewska, Olga; Diehl, Scott R.; Eliav, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Persistent pain may follow nerve injuries associated with invasive therapeutic interventions. About 3% to 7% of the patients remain with chronic pain after endodontic treatment, and these are described as suffering from painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Unfortunately, we are unable to identify which patients undergoing such procedures are at increased risk of developing PTTN. Recent findings suggest that impaired endogenous analgesia may be associated with the development of postsurgical chronic pain. We hypothesized that patients with PTTN display pronociceptive pain modulation, in line with other chronic pain disorders. Dynamic (conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) and static (response to mechanical and cold stimulation) psychophysical tests were performed intraorally and in the forearm of 27 patients with PTTN and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. The dynamic sensory testing demonstrated less efficient conditioned pain modulation, suggesting reduced function of the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulatory system, in patients with PTTN, mainly in those suffering from the condition for more than a year. The static sensory testing of patients with PTTN demonstrated forearm hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation mainly in patients suffering from the condition for less than a year and prolonged painful sensation after intraoral cold stimulus mainly in patients suffering from the condition for more than a year. These findings suggest that PTTN is associated more with the inhibitory rather than the facilitatory arm of pain modulation and that the central nervous system has a role in PTTN pathophysiology, possibly in a time-dependent fashion. PMID:26098442

  2. Altered pain modulation in patients with persistent postendodontic pain.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Khan, Junad; Benoliel, Rafael; Feng, Changyong; Yarnitsky, David; Kuo, Fengshen; Hirschberg, Craig; Hartwell, Gary; Huang, Ching-Yu; Heir, Gary; Korczeniewska, Olga; Diehl, Scott R; Eliav, Eli

    2015-10-01

    Persistent pain may follow nerve injuries associated with invasive therapeutic interventions. About 3% to 7% of the patients remain with chronic pain after endodontic treatment, and these are described as suffering from painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Unfortunately, we are unable to identify which patients undergoing such procedures are at increased risk of developing PTTN. Recent findings suggest that impaired endogenous analgesia may be associated with the development of postsurgical chronic pain. We hypothesized that patients with PTTN display pronociceptive pain modulation, in line with other chronic pain disorders. Dynamic (conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) and static (response to mechanical and cold stimulation) psychophysical tests were performed intraorally and in the forearm of 27 patients with PTTN and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. The dynamic sensory testing demonstrated less efficient conditioned pain modulation, suggesting reduced function of the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulatory system, in patients with PTTN, mainly in those suffering from the condition for more than a year. The static sensory testing of patients with PTTN demonstrated forearm hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation mainly in patients suffering from the condition for less than a year and prolonged painful sensation after intraoral cold stimulus mainly in patients suffering from the condition for more than a year. These findings suggest that PTTN is associated more with the inhibitory rather than the facilitatory arm of pain modulation and that the central nervous system has a role in PTTN pathophysiology, possibly in a time-dependent fashion. PMID:26098442

  3. A Practical Approach to Improving Pain Control in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, Malcolm L.; Barnett, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    Despite a wealth of recent articles, many patients with cancer pain continue to suffer needlessly. The satisfactory treatment of cancer pain requires a variety of practical management strategies. Practicing physicians need a wider understanding of both the basic principles of analgesic therapy and the pharmacologic features of analgesics. Certain analgesics are best not used in cancer care. The use of pharmacologic adjuncts may lessen overall narcotic requirements and side effects. The appropriate use of alternative therapies can dramatically improve the quality of patients' overall survival. PMID:2884781

  4. Analysis of Retinal Peripapillary Segmentation in Early Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salobrar-Garcia, Elena; Hoyas, Irene; Leal, Mercedes; de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramirez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Yubero, Raquel; Gil, Pedro; Triviño, Alberto; Ramirez, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Decreased thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) may reflect retinal neuronal-ganglion cell death. A decrease in the RNFL has been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) in addition to aging by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Twenty-three mild-AD patients and 28 age-matched control subjects with mean Mini-Mental State Examination 23.3 and 28.2, respectively, with no ocular disease or systemic disorders affecting vision, were considered for study. OCT peripapillary and macular segmentation thickness were examined in the right eye of each patient. Compared to controls, eyes of patients with mild-AD patients showed no statistical difference in peripapillary RNFL thickness (P > 0.05); however, sectors 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, and 11 of the papilla showed thinning, while in sectors 1, 5, 6, 7, and 10 there was thickening. Total macular volume and RNFL thickness of the fovea in all four inner quadrants and in the outer temporal quadrants proved to be significantly decreased (P < 0.01). Despite the fact that peripapillary RNFL thickness did not statistically differ in comparison to control eyes, the increase in peripapillary thickness in our mild-AD patients could correspond to an early neurodegeneration stage and may entail the existence of an inflammatory process that could lead to progressive peripapillary fiber damage. PMID:26557684

  5. Striatal Activity is Associated with Deficits of Cognitive Control and Aberrant Salience for Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ceaser, Alan E.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2016-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis has shown that a large dopamine abnormality exists in the striatum when comparing patients with schizophrenia and controls, and this abnormality is thought to contribute to aberrant salience assignment (or a misattribution of relevance to irrelevant stimuli). This abnormality may also disrupt striatal contributions to cognitive control processing. We examined the relationship between striatal involvement in cognition and aberrant salience symptoms using a task of cognitive control that involves updating, interference control, and simple maintenance. The current study included a sample of 22 patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls and used a slow event-related fMRI design. We predicted that (1) aberrant salience symptoms would be greater for patient's, (2) patients would demonstrate increased errors during interference control trials, given that patients may be inappropriately assigning salience to distracters, and (3) striatal activity during those errors would be correlated with aberrant salience symptoms. We found a trend toward a significant difference between patients and controls on aberrant salience symptoms, and a significant difference between groups on select task conditions. During interference control trials, patients were more likely to inappropriately encode distracters. For patients, both prefrontal and striatal activity was significantly greater when patients inappropriately identified the distracter as correct compared to activity during distracter rejection. During updating, patient prefrontal and striatal activity was significantly lower for incorrect than correct updating trials. Finally, as predicted, for patients the increase of activity during incorrect distracter trials was positively correlated with aberrant salience symptoms, but only for the striatal region. These relationships may have implications for treatments that improve cognitive function and reduce symptom expression. PMID:26869912

  6. The influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on local postural muscle and central sensory feedback balance control.

    PubMed

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Mohler, Jane; Armstrong, David G; Talal, Talal K; Najafi, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control) and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing). DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2) and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2) with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, P<0.01), which suggests a compromised local-control balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, P<0.02), which suggests an adaptation mechanism to reduce the overall body sway in DPN patients. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between central-control rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, P<0.05) and the history of diabetes (rPearson = 0.58-071, P<0.05). Results suggest that in the lack of sensory feedback cueing, DPN participants were highly unstable compared to controls. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation mechanism

  7. The Influence of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy on Local Postural Muscle and Central Sensory Feedback Balance Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control) and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing). DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2) and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2) with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, P<0.01), which suggests a compromised local-control balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, P<0.02), which suggests an adaptation mechanism to reduce the overall body sway in DPN patients. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between central-control rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, P<0.05) and the history of diabetes (rPearson = 0.58-071, P<0.05). Results suggest that in the lack of sensory feedback cueing, DPN participants were highly unstable compared to controls. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation mechanism

  8. Blood pressure control. Improving medication compliance among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Krevolin, Larry; Ilagan, Justin

    2015-08-01

    Medication compliance among individuals with hypertension symbolizes a growing concern within the medical community. It is said that roughly 50% of hypertensive patients in the United States do not comply with their medication regimen. Uncontrolled hypertension in turn can lead to kidney failure and other complications. Because compliance to medication regimens is complex and difficult to ascertain, solutions to this problem must be multifactorial.

  9. Dysfunctional whole brain networks in mild cognitive impairment patients: an fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Bai, Lijun; Dai, Ruwei; Zhong, Chongguang; Xue, Ting; You, Youbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) was recognized as the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent researches have shown that cognitive and memory decline in AD patients is coupled with losses of small-world attributes. However, few studies pay attention to the characteristics of the whole brain networks in MCI patients. In the present study, we investigated the topological properties of the whole brain networks utilizing graph theoretical approaches in 16 MCI patients, compared with 18 age-matched healthy subjects as a control. Both MCI patients and normal controls showed small-world architectures, with large clustering coefficients and short characteristic path lengths. We detected significantly longer characteristic path length in MCI patients compared with normal controls at the low sparsity. The longer characteristic path lengths in MCI indicated disrupted information processing among distant brain regions. Compared with normal controls, MCI patients showed decreased nodal centrality in the brain areas of the angular gyrus, heschl gyrus, hippocampus and superior parietal gyrus, while increased nodal centrality in the calcarine, inferior occipital gyrus and superior frontal gyrus. These changes in nodal centrality suggested a widespread rewiring in MCI patients, which may be an integrated reflection of reorganization of the brain networks accompanied with the cognitive decline. Our findings may be helpful for further understanding the pathological mechanisms of MCI.

  10. Total antioxidants status and some hematological values in sickle cell disease patients in steady state.

    PubMed Central

    Fasola, Foluke; Adedapo, Kayode; Anetor, John; Kuti, Modupe

    2007-01-01

    Congenital hemoglobin mutations may alter the delicate balance of free-radical generation and antioxidant defense systems in the red cell. Oxidative stress may thus play a role in the pathophysiology of the clinical manifestations of the disease. We assessed the total antioxidant status in steady-state sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients and related it to certain hematological parameters and their recent clinical history. Forty (25 males/15 females) adult SCA patients and 30 age-matched controls were studied. All patients and control subjects had total antioxidant status (TAS), hematocrit, white blood cells, platelets and reticulocyte count done. The results showed that TAS levels were about 50% lower in the SCA patients compared with the controls. Among the SCA patients, 57.1% of those with TAS levels <1.00 mmol/L had bone pain crisis >3 times in the past year, compared with 16% in those with TAS levels >1.00 mmol/L. Total leukocyte count and platelets were also significantly higher in the SCA patients than controls. Our data support the growing evidence that oxidative stress has a role to play in the pathophysiology of SCA and intervention aimed at increasing the antioxidant capacity of these patients may be beneficial. PMID:17722666

  11. Sex differences in face recognition memory in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, patients with generalized epilepsy, and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Bengner, T; Fortmeier, C; Malina, T; Lindenau, M; Voges, B; Goebell, E; Stodieck, S

    2006-12-01

    The influence of sex on face recognition memory was studied in 49 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 20 patients with generalized epilepsy, and 32 healthy controls. After learning 20 faces, serially presented for 5 seconds each, subjects had to recognize the 20 among 40 faces (including 20 new faces) immediately and 24 hours later. Women had better face recognition than men, with no significant differences between groups. Women's advantage was due mainly to superior delayed recognition. Taken together, the results suggest that sex has a similar impact on face recognition in patients with epilepsy and healthy controls, and that testing delayed face recognition raises sensitivity for sex differences. The influence of sex on face recognition in patients with epilepsy should be acknowledged when evaluating individuals or comparing groups.

  12. Indirect measurement of sinoatrial conduction time in patients with sinoatrial disease and in controls.

    PubMed Central

    Crook, B; Kitson, D; McComish, M; Jewitt, D

    1977-01-01

    Clinical recognition of sinoatrial disease currently depends on the presence of transient sinus bradycardia, sinoatrial block, or supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. The value of clinical electrophysiological assessment in these patients is not clear. Using intracardiac electrophysiological recordings and programmed stimulation we have examined 14 patients with sinoatrial disease and 11 control patients undergoing investigation for chest pain. Intracardiac conduction times were normal in all patients. There was no significant difference of sinus node recovery times between the sinoatrial disease and control groups. Sinoatrial conduction times were measured by the indirect method and two populations were identified. However, the mean values of 128 +/- 27 ms in patients and 112 +/- 30 ms in controls were not significantly different and major overlap rendered this measurement clinically valueless. It is concluded that no current electrophysiological measurement has diagnostic value in patients with sinoatrial disease. PMID:884027

  13. Association of serum Dkk-1 levels with β-catenin in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Xu, Xiao-juan; Shen, Lin; Yang, Yan-ping; Zhu, Rui; Shuai, Bo; Zhu, Xi-Wen; Li, Cheng-gang; Ma, Chen; Lv, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Wnt signaling plays an important role in the bone development and remodeling. The Wnt antagonist Dkk-1 is a potent inhibitor of bone formation. The aims of this study were firstly to compare the serum Dkk-1 levels in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients with age-matched healthy controls, and secondly, to assess the possible relationship between Dkk-1 and β-catenin, sclerostin, or bone turnover markers [CTX, PINP, N-MID-OT and 25(OH)D] in the setting of postmenopausal osteoporosis. A total of 350 patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and 150 age-matched healthy controls were enrolled, and the serum levels of Dkk-1, β-catenin, sclerostin, OPG, and RANKL were detected by ELISA, and bone turnover markers [CTX, PINP, N-MID-OT and 25(OH)D] were measured by Roche electrochemiluminescence system in two groups. Serum Dkk-1 levels were significantly higher in postmenopausal osteoporosis group than in control group (P<0.001). Univariate analyses revealed that serum Dkk-1 levels were weakly negatively correlated to β-catenin (r=-0.161, P=0.003) and OPG (r=-0.106, P=0.047), while multiple regression analysis showed a negative correlation between serum Dkk-1 levels with β-catenin (β=-0.165, P=0.009) and BMD (β=-0.139, P=0.027), and a positive correlation between serum Dkk-1 levels and CTX (β=0.122, P=0.040) in postmenopausal osteoporosis group. No similar correlations ware observed in control group. The results provided evidence for the role of Dkk-1 in bone metabolism and demonstrated the link of Dkk-1 and Wnt/β-catenin in some ways.

  14. Breakthrough pain in patients with controlled or uncontrolled pain: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Antonio; Gentili, Marta; Baciarello, Marco; Lazzari, Marzia; Marzi, Rossella; Palombo, Elisa; Sabato, Alessandro F; Fanelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breakthrough pain (BTP) is traditionally defined as a pain exacerbation in patients with chronic controlled pain. However, this definition has recently been challenged. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of unsatisfactory control in patients with chronic cancer pain, and investigate the frequency and intensity of BTP episodes. METHODS: A total of 665 patients with chronic cancer pain attending 21 pain therapy units in Italy were evaluated for baseline pain intensity and number of BTP episodes over a 30-day period. All patients started, continued or modified treatment for BTP at enrollment, according to medical judgment. RESULTS: The number of BTP events was higher in patients with uncontrolled baseline pain, although the intensity and duration of episodes were similar. In patients with uncontrolled baseline pain, the number of events decreased with time and reached values comparable with those reported in patients with controlled pain. Both the intensity of the pain and the duration of the BTP events exhibited similar values in the two groups at all time points, following increased monitoring and the prescription of analgesic medication. CONCLUSION: Patients with uncontrolled baseline pain experienced BTP flares with higher frequency, but similar intensity and duration with respect to patients with controlled pain at baseline. Notably, a close follow-up and adequate management of the BTP episodes led to an improvement of BTP in the observed patients. PMID:24945289

  15. Altered Cortico-Striatal Connectivity in Offspring of Schizophrenia Patients Relative to Offspring of Bipolar Patients and Controls.

    PubMed

    Solé-Padullés, Cristina; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; de la Serna, Elena; Romero, Soledad; Calvo, Anna; Sánchez-Gistau, Vanessa; Padrós-Fornieles, Marta; Baeza, Inmaculada; Bargalló, Núria; Frangou, Sophia; Sugranyes, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) share clinical features, genetic risk factors and neuroimaging abnormalities. There is evidence of disrupted connectivity in resting state networks in patients with SZ and BD and their unaffected relatives. Resting state networks are known to undergo reorganization during youth coinciding with the period of increased incidence for both disorders. We therefore focused on characterizing resting state network connectivity in youth at familial risk for SZ or BD to identify alterations arising during this period. We measured resting-state functional connectivity in a sample of 106 youth, aged 7-19 years, comprising offspring of patients with SZ (N = 27), offspring of patients with BD (N = 39) and offspring of community control parents (N = 40). We used Independent Component Analysis to assess functional connectivity within the default mode, executive control, salience and basal ganglia networks and define their relationship to grey matter volume, clinical and cognitive measures. There was no difference in connectivity within any of the networks examined between offspring of patients with BD and offspring of community controls. In contrast, offspring of patients with SZ showed reduced connectivity within the left basal ganglia network compared to control offspring, and they showed a positive correlation between connectivity in this network and grey matter volume in the left caudate. Our findings suggest that dysconnectivity in the basal ganglia network is a robust correlate of familial risk for SZ and can be detected during childhood and adolescence. PMID:26885824

  16. Altered Cortico-Striatal Connectivity in Offspring of Schizophrenia Patients Relative to Offspring of Bipolar Patients and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Solé-Padullés, Cristina; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; de la Serna, Elena; Romero, Soledad; Calvo, Anna; Sánchez-Gistau, Vanessa; Padrós-Fornieles, Marta; Baeza, Inmaculada; Bargalló, Núria; Frangou, Sophia; Sugranyes, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) share clinical features, genetic risk factors and neuroimaging abnormalities. There is evidence of disrupted connectivity in resting state networks in patients with SZ and BD and their unaffected relatives. Resting state networks are known to undergo reorganization during youth coinciding with the period of increased incidence for both disorders. We therefore focused on characterizing resting state network connectivity in youth at familial risk for SZ or BD to identify alterations arising during this period. We measured resting-state functional connectivity in a sample of 106 youth, aged 7–19 years, comprising offspring of patients with SZ (N = 27), offspring of patients with BD (N = 39) and offspring of community control parents (N = 40). We used Independent Component Analysis to assess functional connectivity within the default mode, executive control, salience and basal ganglia networks and define their relationship to grey matter volume, clinical and cognitive measures. There was no difference in connectivity within any of the networks examined between offspring of patients with BD and offspring of community controls. In contrast, offspring of patients with SZ showed reduced connectivity within the left basal ganglia network compared to control offspring, and they showed a positive correlation between connectivity in this network and grey matter volume in the left caudate. Our findings suggest that dysconnectivity in the basal ganglia network is a robust correlate of familial risk for SZ and can be detected during childhood and adolescence. PMID:26885824

  17. Increased frontal electroencephalogram theta amplitude in patients with anorexia nervosa compared to healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Hestad, Knut A; Weider, Siri; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø; Sand, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Objective To conduct a blind study of quantitative electroencephalogram-band amplitudes in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and healthy controls. Methods Twenty-one patients with AN and 24 controls were examined with eyes-closed 16-channel electroencephalogram. Main variables were absolute alpha, theta, and delta amplitudes in frontal, temporal, and posterior regions. Results There were no significant differences between the AN patients and controls regarding absolute regional band amplitudes in μV. Borderline significance was found for anterior theta (P=0.051). Significantly increased left and right frontal electrode theta amplitude was found in AN patients (F3, P=0.014; F4, P=0.038) compared to controls. Significant differences were also observed for secondary variables: lower values for relative parietooccipital delta and frontocentral alpha activity among AN patients than among controls. Conclusion We observed slight excess frontal theta and lower relative alpha and delta amplitudes among AN patients than among controls. This pattern is possibly related to a slight frontal lobe dysfunction in AN, or it may reflect increased attention/vigilance or another state-related change in patients with AN compared to healthy controls. PMID:27703359

  18. A measure of treatment response: patient and physician satisfaction with traditional NSAIDs for osteoarthritis control

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephanie D; Everett, Sharlette V; Taylor, Thomas N; Watson, Douglas J; Taylor-Stokes, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The clinical response to traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (tNSAIDs) varies substantially. The objective of this study was to describe physicians’ and patients’ perceptions of response to tNSAIDs as measured by satisfaction with control of patients’ osteoarthritis (OA). Patients and methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in 2009 in Germany, Spain, and the UK. Linked physician and patient questionnaires collected data on OA management, degree of pain and disability, and satisfaction with OA control. Results The study included 363 treating physicians and 713 patients receiving tNSAIDs. Patient mean (standard deviation) age was 65.5 (11.0) years (range 36–94 years); 60% were women; 86% were white; and one-quarter were obese. Dissatisfaction with control of patients’ OA was expressed by physicians or their patients, or both, for 51% of patients, including 208 patients (31%) with mild OA and 478 patients (60%) with moderate or severe OA. Overall, 37% of patients reported dissatisfaction and 34% had a physician who reported dissatisfaction. Patient and physician assessments were the same in 70% of cases; Cohen’s κ coefficient was 0.34 (95% confidence interval 0.26–0.41), indicating fair agreement. Of those reporting dissatisfaction, most physicians (79%) and patients (64%) believed that the current control was the best that could be achieved. The most common reasons for which physicians reported dissatisfaction were inadequate response (56%), side effects (11.1%), and poor tolerance (7.8%). Conclusion One-half of patients or their treating physicians were dissatisfied with the control of OA provided by tNSAID therapy; moreover, most believed it was the best control that could be achieved.

  19. Diagnostic, prognostic and predictive value of MicroRNA-21 in breast cancer patients, their daughters and healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Ambreen; Shoro, Amir Ali; Memon, Zahida; Hussain, Mehvish; Rehman, Rehana

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) located on 17q23.1 expressed in breast cancer has anti-apoptotic ability and causes tumor cell growth. It is also involved in functions such as signal transduction pathways effecting normal cell growth and differentiation. The primary objective of the study was to identify presence of miR-21 in the serum levels of stage III invasive ductal carcinoma patients and compare its expression with age matched healthy individuals and daughters of index cases. The secondary objective was to evaluate the significance of serum miR-21 gene expression with histologically proven estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) proteins. A total of 132 subjects were recruited: 50 (cases) of stage III invasive ductal carcinoma patients who had not undergone any chemotherapy or surgery were randomly picked with exclusion of females with other types of breast carcinoma. Age-matched, 50 healthy individuals (control A) were selected by purposive sampling after confirmation of no palpable lump/s in their breasts together with 32 daughters of index cases (control B). Serum tests were run on Real Time quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR, threshold cycle was determined and fold change calculated.Normality of continuous variables was assessed by Shapiro-Wilk’s test, groups compared by student t-test, Mann-Whitney test and Fisher exact test, P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. We observed that miR-21 was significantly higher in cases as compared to control A and B (P = 0.001) however control B showed significant gene expression as compared to control A (P = 0.001). The cases were also divided as positive or negative for ER, PR and HER2. High expression of miR-21 in females with stage III invasive ductal carcinoma had been calculated as compared to its age matched healthy subjects. It was observed that triple negative cases showed a greater expression of gene as compared to other groups (P = 0

  20. Patient-reported outcomes, patient-reported information: from randomized controlled trials to the social web and beyond.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Mike; Spong, Andrew; Doward, Lynda; Gnanasakthy, Ari

    2011-01-01

    Internet communication is developing. Social networking sites enable patients to publish and receive communications very easily. Many stakeholders, including patients, are using these media to find new ways to make sense of diseases, to find and discuss treatments, and to give support to patients and their caregivers. We argue for a new definition of patient-reported information (PRI), which differs from the usual patient-reported outcomes (PRO). These new emergent data from the social web have important implications for decision making, at both an individual and a population level. We discuss new emergent technologies that will help aggregate this information and discuss how this will be assessed alongside the use of PROs in randomized controlled trials and how these new emergent data will be one facet of changing the relationship between the various stakeholders in achieving better co-created health.

  1. Niacin skin flushing in schizophrenic and depressed patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Bosveld-van Haandel, Linda; Knegtering, Rikus; Kluiter, Herman; van den Bosch, Robert J

    2006-08-30

    This study compares the skin reactions to the niacin flushing test of 16 schizophrenic patients with those of 17 depressed patients and 16 healthy controls. Methyl nicotinate (niacin) in a concentration of 0.1 M was applied to the forearm for 5 min. Significant differences could be observed between the group of schizophrenic patients (less flushing) in comparison to the other groups. There were no statistical differences in niacin flushing between patients with depression and healthy controls. Gender, age and the use of antipsychotic agents did not appear to be confounders. The differences in flushing within the group of schizophrenic patients were striking, however. Most patients showed little or no flushing, but some patients reacted strongly. Although the three groups could be differentiated by the niacin flushing test, to develop a reliable clinical application of this test, further research is necessary.

  2. Effects of a Patient-Provider, Collaborative, Medication-Planning Tool: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael S.; Kaiser, Darren; Morrow, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with various levels of health literacy, the effects of collaborative, patient-provider, medication-planning tools on outcomes relevant to self-management are uncertain. Objective. Among adult patients with type II diabetes mellitus, we tested the effectiveness of a medication-planning tool (Medtable™) implemented via an electronic medical record to improve patients' medication knowledge, adherence, and glycemic control compared to usual care. Design. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial in outpatient primary care clinics. 674 patients received either the Medtable tool or usual care and were followed up for up to 12 months. Results. Patients who received Medtable had greater knowledge about indications for medications in their regimens and were more satisfied with the information about their medications. Patients' knowledge of drug indication improved with Medtable regardless of their literacy status. However, Medtable did not improve patients' demonstrated medication use, regimen adherence, or glycemic control (HbA1c). Conclusion. The Medtable tool supported provider/patient collaboration related to medication use, as reflected in patient satisfaction with communication, but had limited impact on patient medication knowledge, adherence, and HbA1c outcomes. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01296633.

  3. Effects of a Patient-Provider, Collaborative, Medication-Planning Tool: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael S.; Kaiser, Darren; Morrow, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with various levels of health literacy, the effects of collaborative, patient-provider, medication-planning tools on outcomes relevant to self-management are uncertain. Objective. Among adult patients with type II diabetes mellitus, we tested the effectiveness of a medication-planning tool (Medtable™) implemented via an electronic medical record to improve patients' medication knowledge, adherence, and glycemic control compared to usual care. Design. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial in outpatient primary care clinics. 674 patients received either the Medtable tool or usual care and were followed up for up to 12 months. Results. Patients who received Medtable had greater knowledge about indications for medications in their regimens and were more satisfied with the information about their medications. Patients' knowledge of drug indication improved with Medtable regardless of their literacy status. However, Medtable did not improve patients' demonstrated medication use, regimen adherence, or glycemic control (HbA1c). Conclusion. The Medtable tool supported provider/patient collaboration related to medication use, as reflected in patient satisfaction with communication, but had limited impact on patient medication knowledge, adherence, and HbA1c outcomes. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01296633. PMID:27699179

  4. Improvement of blood pressure control in hypertensive patients with renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yuko; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Koji; Tokumoto, Masanori; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Tsuchihashi, Takuya; Hirakata, Hideki; Iida, Mitsuo

    2007-04-01

    For hypertensive patients with renal diseases (RD), strict blood pressure (BP) control has been recommended in recent hypertension guidelines, such as JNC VI, JNC 7, WHO/ISH 1999 and ESH-ESC 2003. We assessed the current status of BP control and the changes of BP control before and after the publication of these guidelines in 489 hypertensive patients with or without RD (age, 19-89 years, mean 59+/-13 years) who visited the hypertension and kidney outpatient clinic at Kyushu University Hospital. The clinical characteristics of RD and non-RD patients were assessed (RD patients: age, 20-89 years, mean 60+/-13 years, n=311; non-RD patients: age, 19-86 years, mean 58+/-13 years, n=178). In addition, we compared the BP control status in 2003 to that in 1996. In 2003, the BP in RD patients was 134+/-16/78+/-10 mmHg and that in non-RD patients was 138+/-12/83+/-9 mmHg. When strict BP control was defined as <130/80 mmHg, the frequency of strict BP control in RD patients was 28.9% in 2003. In addition, the BP levels of RD patients in 2003 were significantly lower than those in 1996 (134+/-16/78+/-10 mmHg vs. 141+/-17/85+/-10 mmHg, p<0.05 for both systolic blood pressure [SBP] and diastolic blood pressure [DBP]), and the frequency of strict BP control in RD patients was higher in 2003 than in 1996 (28.9% vs. 11.8%, p<0.01). The BP levels of non-RD patients in 2003 tended to be lower than those in 1996 (138+/-12/83+/-9 mmHg vs. 141+/-13/85+/-9 mmHg, n.s.). In 2003, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) were more frequently prescribed to RD patients than to non-RD patients. Furthermore, the use of ARBs was markedly increased in 2003 compared with 1996. In conclusion, in our outpatient clinic, BP levels in hypertensive patients with RD have improved in recent years, and were lower than those in hypertensive patients without RD, which may in part reflect the physicians' awareness of the importance of strict BP control in RD patients, as suggested by several recent hypertension

  5. Observer-based state feedback for enhanced insulin control of type 'i' diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Ali; Wang, Le Yi

    2011-01-01

    During the past few decades, biomedical modeling techniques have been applied to improve performance of a wide variety of medical systems that require monitoring and control. Diabetes is one of the most important medical problems. This paper focuses on designing a state feedback controller with observer to improve the performance of the insulin control for type 'I' diabetic patients. The dynamic model of glucose levels in diabetic patients is a nonlinear model. The system is a typical fourth-order single-input-single-output state space model. Using a linear time invariant controller based on an operating condition is a common method to simplify control design. On the other hand, adaptive control can potentially improve system performance. But it increases control complexity and may create further stability issues. This paper investigates patient models and presents a simplified control scheme using observer-based feedback controllers. By comparing different control schemes, it shows that a properly designed state feedback controller with observer can eliminate the adaptation strategy that the Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers need to improve the control performance. Control strategies are simulated and their performance is evaluated in MATLAB and Simulink.

  6. Observer-Based State Feedback for Enhanced Insulin Control of Type ‘I’ Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Ali; Wang, Le Yi

    2011-01-01

    During the past few decades, biomedical modeling techniques have been applied to improve performance of a wide variety of medical systems that require monitoring and control. Diabetes is one of the most important medical problems. This paper focuses on designing a state feedback controller with observer to improve the performance of the insulin control for type ‘I’ diabetic patients. The dynamic model of glucose levels in diabetic patients is a nonlinear model. The system is a typical fourth-order single-input-single-output state space model. Using a linear time invariant controller based on an operating condition is a common method to simplify control design. On the other hand, adaptive control can potentially improve system performance. But it increases control complexity and may create further stability issues. This paper investigates patient models and presents a simplified control scheme using observer-based feedback controllers. By comparing different control schemes, it shows that a properly designed state feedback controller with observer can eliminate the adaptation strategy that the Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers need to improve the control performance. Control strategies are simulated and their performance is evaluated in MATLAB and Simulink. PMID:22276077

  7. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  8. Study of Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Using Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Sonal; Gupta, Neeti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic retina undergoes degenerative changes in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in addition to vascular changes. Loss of RNFL with changes in inner retina and their association with metabolic control have been studied with varied results in diabetic patients. Aim To compare the RNFL thickness between diabetic patients and age matched healthy controls and to correlate the thickness to metabolic control. Materials and Methods One hundred and sixty five patients were enrolled in the study out of which 50 served as controls, 58 patients were diabetic without retinopathy and 57 patients had diabetic retinopathy. Both eyes of all patients underwent optical coherence tomography scans for RNFL and ganglion cell complex. Foveal and parafoveal thickness were also measured. All the parameters were compared to patient’s metabolic control. Results RNFL thinning was observed in superotemporal (p-value = 0.001) and upper nasal sectors (p-value = 0.031) around the optic disc in eyes with diabetic retinopathy. Ganglion cell complex also showed statistically significant thinning in diabetic patients. Creatinine levels showed a weak negative correlation to the RNFL. Conclusion This study positively concluded that neurodegeneration in an early component of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27630874

  9. [Control of epilepsy in adult patients with tuberous sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Tur, Alejandro; García-Martín, Guillermina; Chamorro-Muñoz, María Isabel; Romero-Godoy, Jorge; Romero-Acebal, Manuel

    2013-06-01

    Introduccion. La esclerosis tuberosa es una enfermedad genetica cuyas manifestaciones principales son la formacion de tumores neuroectodermicos, que asocia epilepsia secundaria muy frecuentemente. Objetivo. Describir el perfil epileptico, el control, la frecuencia de crisis y la efectividad del tratamiento en pacientes adultos con esclerosis tuberosa. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio descriptivo en el que se han incluido pacientes adultos (mayores de 14 anos) con diagnostico confirmado de esclerosis tuberosa. Se ha analizado la frecuencia y tipos de crisis. Se ha realizado un estudio y contabilizacion de los diferentes farmacos antiepilepticos en cada paciente, la frecuencia de uso de cada principio activo y un estudio comparativo entre control de crisis y tipo de terapia. Resultados. De 19 adultos estudiados, tuvieron crisis epilepticas 16 (84%). Presentaron control de crisis completo, crisis esporadicas y crisis frecuentes el 44%, 25% y 31%, respectivamente. Hubo frecuencia de crisis focales, generalizadas y ambas en el 38%, 6% y 25%, respectivamente. Estaban en tratamiento con farmacos antiepilepticos en monoterapia, biterapia y triterapia el 38%, 44% y 19%, respectivamente. El mas consumido globalmente fue el levetiracetam, seguido de la carbamacepina y el acido valproico. En monoterapia, el mas frecuente fue la carbamacepina, con mayor proporcion de control completo. Conclusiones. La epilepsia en la esclerosis tuberosa es relativamente benigna, y se consigue un aceptable control en la mayoria de casos con un numero de antiepilepticos acorde con lo aconsejado en las guias de tratamiento. Se observa estabilidad de lesiones, y no hay malignizacion en nuestra serie. El bajo numero de la muestra limita el estudio, pero se observan proporciones similares de efectividad del tratamiento respecto a otra serie publicada.

  10. Influence of glycaemic control on the outcomes of patients treated by intravenous thrombolysis for cerebral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Litke, Rachel; Moulin, Solène; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Fontaine, Pierre; Leys, Didier

    2015-11-01

    Whether the glycaemic control during the first hours of cerebral ischaemia treated by thrombolysis influences outcomes remains unsettled. We aimed at evaluating the quality of the glycaemic control and whether patients with well-controlled glycaemia after thrombolysis for acute cerebral ischaemia have better outcomes. We retrospectively analysed data prospectively collected in consecutive stroke patients who received i.v. thrombolysis at the Lille University Hospital. Patients with glycaemia >1.6 g/l (8.9 mmol/l) at any point during the first 48 h received insulin. We used 2 definitions of well controlled glycaemia: (i) "well controlled 100 %" when 100 % glycaemia were <1.6 g/l (8.9 mmol/l), and (ii) "well controlled 70 %" when at least 70 % glycaemia were <1.6 g/l (8.9 mmol/l). The outcome measures at 3 months were (1) independence [modified Rankin scale (mRS) score 0 or 1], (2) absence of handicap (mRS 0-2), (3) death, and (4) symptomatic intracerebral haemorrhage (sICH). Of 875 consecutive patients, 657 (75.2 %) were considered as well controlled with a threshold at 100 % and 736 (84.2 %) with a threshold at 70 %. The glycaemic control was not independently associated with any of the four outcome measures. In patients treated by insulin, hypoglycaemic events were rare (2.1 % of all patients) and of moderate intensity [>0.5 g/l (2.8 mmol/l)]. The quality of the glycaemic control was not associated with outcomes in patients treated by thrombolysis. A possible explanation is that the glycaemic control after thrombolysis has minor influence compared with glycaemic control before thrombolysis when the artery is not yet re-open and the penumbra area at maximum. PMID:26275565

  11. Physician and patient management of type 2 diabetes and factors related to glycemic control in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Yurgin, Nicole Rae; Boye, Kristina Secnik; Dilla, Tatiana; Suriñach, Núria Lara; Llach, Xavier Badia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess current treatment patterns, blood glucose test strip usage, and treatment compliance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care centers in Spain, and to assess factors related to glycemic control. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with T2DM and measured treatment compliance using the Morisky-Green questionnaire. 294 patients were included in the study from a population of patients attending 30 primary care centers throughout Spain. Results showed that the majority of patients were treated with oral monotherapy (36%) and oral combination therapy (35%). Less than half of the patients had good glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 6.5%). Half of the patients treated pharmacologically reported good compliance with treatment. Logistic regression analyses performed to identify factors associated with glycemic control showed that high body mass index (BMI) and poor compliance were the strongest predictors of poor HbA1c control (OR: 2.198 and 1.789, respectively, p < 0.05). In conclusion, in the course of managing diabetes, physicians and patients should attempt to improve compliance and lower BMI, which could lead to better glycemic control. PMID:19920948

  12. Salt intake, knowledge of salt intake, and blood pressure control in Chinese hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yu; Li, Ting; Lou, Peian; Chang, Guiqiu; Zhang, Pan; Chen, Peipei; Qiao, Cheng; Dong, Zongmei

    2014-12-01

    A cross-sectional study involving 2502 subjects was conducted to evaluate salt intake, knowledge of salt intake, and blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. The blood pressure control rate was 33.5% among the hypertensive patients. Of the patients, 69.9% had salt intake higher than 6 g/d. Overall 35.0% knew the recommended salt intake, and 94.9% knew that "excess salt intake can result in hypertension." Altogether, 85.8% of patients had received health education related to a low-salt diet at some time. Patients who consumed less than 6 g/d of salt had a higher control rate than those who consumed more than 6 g/d (48.7% vs. 27.0%; χ(2) = 111.0; P < .001). Patients with knowledge of the recommended salt intake had a higher control rate than those without (45.8% vs. 26.9%; χ(2) = 91.3; P < .001). Our findings suggest a high salt intake and low blood pressure control rate among Chinese hypertensive patients. Knowledge of recommended salt intake is inappropriate for patients with education of a low-salt diet. PMID:25492834

  13. Massage Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Maria; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Davis, Roger B.; Walton, Tracy; Kahn, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objectives were to determine the feasibility and effects of providing therapeutic massage at home for patients with metastatic cancer. Design This was a randomized controlled trial. Settings/location Patients were enrolled at Oncology Clinics at a large urban academic medical center; massage therapy was provided in patients' homes. Subjects Subjects were patients with metastatic cancer. Interventions There were three interventions: massage therapy, no-touch intervention, and usual care. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were pain, anxiety, and alertness; secondary outcomes were quality of life and sleep. Results In this study, it was possible to provide interventions for all patients at home by professional massage therapists. The mean number of massage therapy sessions per patient was 2.8. A significant improvement was found in the quality of life of the patients who received massage therapy after 1-week follow-up, which was not observed in either the No Touch control or the Usual Care control groups, but the difference was not sustained at 1 month. There were trends toward improvement in pain and sleep of the patients after therapeutic massage but not in patients in the control groups. There were no serious adverse events related to the interventions. Conclusions The study results showed that it is feasible to provide therapeutic massage at home for patients with advanced cancer, and to randomize patients to a no-touch intervention. Providing therapeutic massage improves the quality of life at the end of life for patients and may be associated with further beneficial effects, such as improvement in pain and sleep quality. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to substantiate these findings. PMID:23368724

  14. Real-Time Control of a Neuroprosthetic Hand by Magnetoencephalographic Signals from Paralysed Patients.

    PubMed

    Fukuma, Ryohei; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Saitoh, Youichi; Hosomi, Koichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Shimizu, Takeshi; Sugata, Hisato; Yokoi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masayuki; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic arms might potentially restore motor functions for severely paralysed patients. Invasive measurements of cortical currents using electrocorticography have been widely used for neuroprosthetic control. Moreover, magnetoencephalography (MEG) exhibits characteristic brain signals similar to those of invasively measured signals. However, it remains unclear whether non-invasively measured signals convey enough motor information to control a neuroprosthetic hand, especially for severely paralysed patients whose sensorimotor cortex might be reorganized. We tested an MEG-based neuroprosthetic system to evaluate the accuracy of using cortical currents in the sensorimotor cortex of severely paralysed patients to control a prosthetic hand. The patients attempted to grasp with or open their paralysed hand while the slow components of MEG signals (slow movement fields; SMFs) were recorded. Even without actual movements, the SMFs of all patients indicated characteristic spatiotemporal patterns similar to actual movements, and the SMFs were successfully used to control a neuroprosthetic hand in a closed-loop condition. These results demonstrate that the slow components of MEG signals carry sufficient information to classify movement types. Successful control by paralysed patients suggests the feasibility of using an MEG-based neuroprosthetic hand to predict a patient's ability to control an invasive neuroprosthesis via the same signal sources as the non-invasive method. PMID:26904967

  15. Physiological differences between burnout patients and healthy controls: blood pressure, heart rate, and cortisol responses

    PubMed Central

    De Vente, W; Olff, M; Van Amsterdam, J G C; Kamphuis, J; Emmelkamp, P

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate differences between burnout patients and healthy controls regarding basal physiological values and physiological stress responses. Measures of the sympathetic-adrenergic-medullary (SAM) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis were examined. Methods: SAM axis and HPA axis activity was compared between 22 burnout patients and 23 healthy controls. SAM axis activity was measured by means of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). HPA axis activity was investigated by means of salivary cortisol levels. Resting levels of HR, BP, and cortisol were determined as well as reactivity and recovery of these measures during a laboratory session involving mental arithmetic and speech tasks. In addition, morning levels of cortisol were determined. Results: Burnout patients showed higher resting HR than healthy controls. BP resting values did not differ between burnout patients and healthy controls, nor did cardiovascular reactivity and recovery measurements during the laboratory session. Basal cortisol levels and cortisol reactivity and recovery measures were similar for burnout patients and healthy controls. However, burnout patients showed elevated cortisol levels during the first hour after awakening in comparison to healthy controls. Conclusions: The findings provided limited proof that SAM axis and HPA axis are disturbed among burnout patients. Elevated HR and elevated early morning cortisol levels may be indicative of sustained activation. PMID:12782748

  16. Influence of sleep onset on upper-airway muscle activity in apnea patients versus normal controls.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; White, D P

    1996-06-01

    Current evidence suggests that patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may have augmented pharyngeal dilator muscle activity during wakefulness, to compensate for deficient anatomy. However, the isolated effect of sleep on the activity of these muscles (comparing OSA patients with controls) has not been studied. We therefore determined waking levels of genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) muscle activity (% of maximum electromyographic [EMG] activity) in 10 OSA patients and eight controls, and then assessed the impact of the first two breaths of sleep (theta electroencephalographic [EEG] activity) following a period of stable wakefulness. Apnea patients demonstrated greater genioglossal (27.4 +/- 4.0 versus 10.7 +/- 2.1%) and tensor palatini (31.9 +/- 6.5 versus 10.6 +/- 1.9%) EMG activity than did controls during wakefulness. This augmented muscle activity in apnea patients could be reduced to near control levels during wakefulness with the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the upper airway. At sleep onset, control subjects demonstrated small but consistent decrements in the activity of both the TP and GG muscles. On the other hand, apnea patients demonstrated large, significantly greater decrements in TP EMG at sleep onset than did the control subjects. The effect of sleep on GG EMG in apnea patients was inconsistent, with most (n = 7) demonstrating large (significantly larger than controls) decrements in genioglossal activity. However, three OSA patients demonstrated small increments in GG EMG at sleep onset despite falling TP EMG and obstructive apnea or hypopnea. We conclude that sleep onset is associated with significantly larger decrements in TP muscle EMG activity in OSA patients than in controls, which may represent a loss of neuromuscular compensation that is present during wakefulness. However, our results for the GG muscle were more variable, and did not always support this hypothesis.

  17. Patient and Physician Beliefs About Control over Health: Association of Symmetrical Beliefs with Medication Regimen Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Howren, M. Bryant; Hillis, Stephen L.; Kaboli, Peter; Carter, Barry L.; Cvengros, Jamie A.; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Rosenthal, Gary E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Past work suggests that the degree of similarity between patient and physician attitudes may be an important predictor of patient-centered outcomes. OBJECTIVE To examine the extent to which patient and provider symmetry in health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs was associated with objectively derived medication refill adherence in patients with co-morbid diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN). PARTICIPANTS Eighteen primary care physicians at the VA Iowa City Medical Center and affiliated clinics; 246 patients of consented providers with co-morbid DM and HTN. DESIGN Established patient-physician dyads were classified into three groups according to the similarity of their HLOC scores (assessed in parallel). Data analysis utilized hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for clustering of patients within physicians. MAIN MEASURES Objectively derived medication refill adherence was computed using data from the VA electronic pharmacy record; blood pressure and HgA1c values were considered as secondary outcomes. KEY RESULTS Physician-patient dyads holding highly similar beliefs regarding the degree of personal control that individual patients have over health outcomes showed significantly higher overall and cardiovascular medication regimen adherence (p = 0.03) and lower diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.02) than in dyads in which the patient held a stronger belief in their own personal control than did their treating physician. Dyads in which patients held a weaker belief in their own personal control than did their treating physician did not differ significantly from symmetrical dyads. The same pattern was observed after adjustment for age, physician sex, and physician years of practice. CONCLUSIONS These data are the first to demonstrate the importance of attitudinal symmetry on an objective measure of medication adherence and suggest that a brief assessment of patient HLOC may be useful for tailoring the provider’s approach in the

  18. Are peripheral blood cells from patients with Alzheimer disease more sensitive to apoptotic stimuli?

    PubMed

    Bergman, Michael; Salman, Hertzel; Beloosesky, Yichayaou; Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2002-01-01

    One of the reasons for the increased susceptibility to infections in patients with Alzheimer disease may be enhanced apoptotic death of their peripheral leukocytes. If this is the case, the enhanced apoptosis may be due to components in the patients' sera or to an increased sensitivity of the cells to apoptotic stimuli. To examine this possibility, the percentage of apoptotic cells in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 12 patients with Alzheimer disease was compared with that of 12 age-matched non-demented persons and 12 middle-aged healthy control subjects. In addition, the effect of sera from subjects in the three groups on the apoptosis, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha production by peripheral blood cells from healthy control subjects was examined. It was found that the percentage of apoptotic PBMC from patients with Alzheimer disease was higher than that from the remaining two groups. However, incubation of control cells with sera from patients with Alzheimer disease and non-demented elderly persons did not affect the number of apoptotic cells. Sera from patients with Alzheimer disease and non-demented elderly subjects caused an increase in IL-2 and a decrease in IL-10 production by PBMC from middle-aged control subjects but did not affect IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNFalpha secretion, indicating alterations of the immune system related to aging.

  19. Sociodemographic determinants of glycaemic control in young diabetic patients in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, I S; Nazaimoon, W M; Mohamad, W B; Letchuman, R; Singaraveloo, M; Pendek, R; Faridah, I; Rasat, R; Sheriff, I H; Khalid, B A

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that good glycaemic control can prevent the development of diabetic complications in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We wished to observe the glycaemic control in patients from different centres in Peninsular Malaysia and the factors that determine it. We recruited 926 patients with diabetes diagnosed before age 40 years from seven different centres, with proportionate representation from the three main ethnic groups. Clinical history and physical examination were done and blood taken for HbA1c and fasting glucose. The overall glycaemic control was poor with geometric mean HbA1c of 8.6% whilst 61.1% of the patients had HbA1c greater than 8%. Glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes varied between various centres and ethnic groups, with the best control obtained in Chinese patients. Significant predictors of HbA1c in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes include access to nurse educators, ethnic background and WHR. In type 2 diabetes, use of insulin was a significant predictor, while in type 1 diabetes, household income was a significant predictor. Socioeconomic status did not have a significant effect in type 2 diabetes. There were no significant differences in the glycaemic control in patients with different educational status. In conclusion, glycaemic control in big hospitals in Malaysia was poor, and was closely related to the availability of diabetes care facilities and ethnic group, rather than socioeconomic status. PMID:10660222

  20. Sociodemographic determinants of glycaemic control in young diabetic patients in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, I S; Nazaimoon, W M; Mohamad, W B; Letchuman, R; Singaraveloo, M; Pendek, R; Faridah, I; Rasat, R; Sheriff, I H; Khalid, B A

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that good glycaemic control can prevent the development of diabetic complications in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We wished to observe the glycaemic control in patients from different centres in Peninsular Malaysia and the factors that determine it. We recruited 926 patients with diabetes diagnosed before age 40 years from seven different centres, with proportionate representation from the three main ethnic groups. Clinical history and physical examination were done and blood taken for HbA1c and fasting glucose. The overall glycaemic control was poor with geometric mean HbA1c of 8.6% whilst 61.1% of the patients had HbA1c greater than 8%. Glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes varied between various centres and ethnic groups, with the best control obtained in Chinese patients. Significant predictors of HbA1c in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes include access to nurse educators, ethnic background and WHR. In type 2 diabetes, use of insulin was a significant predictor, while in type 1 diabetes, household income was a significant predictor. Socioeconomic status did not have a significant effect in type 2 diabetes. There were no significant differences in the glycaemic control in patients with different educational status. In conclusion, glycaemic control in big hospitals in Malaysia was poor, and was closely related to the availability of diabetes care facilities and ethnic group, rather than socioeconomic status.

  1. Understanding the effects of nurses, patients' hospital rooms, and patients' perception of control on the perceived quality of a hospital.

    PubMed

    Gotlieb, J B

    2000-01-01

    Service marketing researchers suggest that the physical environment, the people, and the process strongly affect consumers' judgements when they evaluate services. Previous research has rarely applied this general framework to help identify specific hospital variables that affect the perceived quality of a hospital. This article presents a proposed model and empirical evidence that is based upon this general framework. That is, this article reports the results of a study which found that the physical environment (i.e., patients' perception of their hospital rooms) and people (i.e., patients' perception of nurses) affected patients' perception of hospital quality. The process (i.e., patients' perception of control over the process) did not directly affect their perception of hospital quality. However, patients' perception of control over the process and their perception of their hospital rooms affected their perception of their nurses. Consequently, this research suggests that the general framework identified by service marketing researchers can be applied to help understand how patients develop their perception of hospital quality. PMID:11184431

  2. Understanding the effects of nurses, patients' hospital rooms, and patients' perception of control on the perceived quality of a hospital.

    PubMed

    Gotlieb, J B

    2000-01-01

    Service marketing researchers suggest that the physical environment, the people, and the process strongly affect consumers' judgements when they evaluate services. Previous research has rarely applied this general framework to help identify specific hospital variables that affect the perceived quality of a hospital. This article presents a proposed model and empirical evidence that is based upon this general framework. That is, this article reports the results of a study which found that the physical environment (i.e., patients' perception of their hospital rooms) and people (i.e., patients' perception of nurses) affected patients' perception of hospital quality. The process (i.e., patients' perception of control over the process) did not directly affect their perception of hospital quality. However, patients' perception of control over the process and their perception of their hospital rooms affected their perception of their nurses. Consequently, this research suggests that the general framework identified by service marketing researchers can be applied to help understand how patients develop their perception of hospital quality.

  3. Postural control deficits in people with fibromyalgia: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Postural instability and falls are increasingly recognized problems in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether FM patients, compared to age-matched healthy controls (HCs), have differences in dynamic posturography, including sensory, motor, and limits of stability. We further sought to determine whether postural instability is associated with strength, proprioception and lower-extremity myofascial trigger points (MTPs); FM symptoms and physical function; dyscognition; balance confidence; and medication use. Last, we evaluated self-reported of falls over the past six months. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we compared middle-aged FM patients and age-matched HCs who underwent computerized dynamic posturography testing and completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR) and balance and fall questionnaires. All subjects underwent a neurological and musculoskeletal examination. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and explore the relationships between variables. The relationships between subjective, clinical and objective variables were evaluated by correlation and regression analyses. Results Twenty-five FM patients and twenty-seven HCs (combined mean age ± standard deviation (SD): 48.6 ± 9.7 years) completed testing. FM patients scored statistically lower on composite sensory organization tests (primary outcome; P < 0.010), as well as with regard to vestibular, visual and somatosensory ratio scores on dynamic posturography. Balance confidence was significantly different between groups, with FM patients reporting less confidence than HCs (mean ± SD: 81.24 ± 19.52 vs. 98.52 ± 2.45; P < 0.001). Interestingly, 76% to 84% of FM patients had gastrocnemius and/or anterior tibialis MTPs. Postural stability was best predicted by dyscognition, FIQR score and body mass index. Regarding falls, 3 (11%) of 27 HCs had fallen only once during the past 6 months, whereas 18 (72

  4. Attributional style in delusional patients: a comparison of remitted paranoid, remitted nonparanoid, and current paranoid patients with nonpsychiatric controls.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Jennifer M; Seghers, James P; St-Hilaire, Annie; Docherty, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Many studies have found that people experiencing persecutory delusions have a marked tendency to use external-personal attributions when establishing the causes of negative events. Although nonclinical populations also tend to attribute negative events to external causes, those causes are typically believed to be universal in nature, rather than personal. The central goal of the present study was to investigate whether individuals with remitted persecutory delusions would display this external-personal bias regarding negative events, in comparison to remitted patients whose delusions were not paranoid in nature and to nonpsychiatric controls. Results indicate that currently paranoid patients were significantly more likely than all other groups, including the remitted paranoid group, to use external-personal attributions in negative events. Interestingly, all patient groups also were found to be significantly more likely than the controls to use internal-personal and internal-universal attributions when explaining negative events.

  5. Patient Empowerment Improved Perioperative Quality of Care in Cancer Patients Aged ≥ 65 Years – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maren; Eckardt, Rahel; Scholtz, Kathrin; Neuner, Bruno; von Dossow-Hanfstingl, Vera; Sehouli, Jalid; Stief, Christian G.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Spies, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This randomized controlled, clinical prospective interventional trial was aimed at exploring the effect of patient empowerment on short- and long-term outcomes after major oncologic surgery in elderly cancer patients. Methods This trial was performed from February 2011 to January 2014 at two tertiary medical centers in Germany. The study included patients aged 65 years and older undergoing elective surgery for gastro-intestinal, genitourinary, and thoracic cancer. The patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group, i.e. patient empowerment through information booklet and diary keeping, or to the control group, which received standard care. Randomization was done by block randomization in blocks of four in order of enrollment. The primary outcome were 1,postoperative length of hospital stay (LOS) and 2. long-term global health-related quality of life (HRQoL) one year postoperatively. HRQoL was assessed using the EORTC QLQ C30 questionnaire. Secondary outcomes encompassed postoperative stress and complications. Further objectives were the identification of predictors of LOS, and HRQoL at 12 months. Results Overall 652 patients were included. The mean age was 72 ± 4.9 years, and the majority of patients were male (68.6%, n = 447). The ^median of postoperative length of stay was 9 days (IQR 7–14 day). There were no significant differences between the intervention and the control groups in postoperative LOS (p = 0.99) or global HRQoL after one year (women: p = 0.54, men: p = 0.94). While overall complications and major complications occurred in 74% and 24% of the cases, respectively, frequency and severity of complications did not differ significantly between the groups. Patients in the intervention group reported significantly less postoperative pain (p = 0.03) than the control group. Independent predictors for LOS were identified as severity of surgery, length of anesthesia, major postoperative complications, nutritional state, and pre

  6. Gene expression in cell lines from propionic acidemia patients, carrier parents, and controls.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Bush, William S; Zhang, Zhe

    2015-08-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an inborn of metabolism which usually presents with metabolic acidosis and accumulation of 3-hydroxypropionate among other toxins. Examining the gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from PA patients, their carrier parents and age/sex-matched controls at normal glucose and low glucose growth conditions demonstrated differences among and between these groups. Using three-way ANOVA analysis, four DAVID clusters of response were identified of which three of the four clusters showed that LCLs from carrier parents had an intermediate response between healthy controls and PA patients. These differences included changes in expression of cell cycle regulatory genes, mitochondrial related genes, and transcriptional regulation. In addition, differences also were observed in expression of genes involved in transendothelial migration and focal adhesion at normal growth conditions when comparing the LCLs from PA patients and controls. These studies demonstrate transcriptional differences between LCLs from PA patients, their parents and biochemically normal controls.

  7. Ultrasonographic Measurement of Transverse Abdominis in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Dong; Han, Nami; Eom, Mi Ja; Kim, Jong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare transverse abdominis (TrA) contractility in stroke patients with hemiparesis and healthy adults using musculoskeletal ultrasonography. Methods Forty-seven stroke patients with hemiparesis and 25 age-matched healthy control subjects participated in this study. Stroke patients were divided into three groups on the basis of their degree of ambulation. Group A consisted of 9 patients with wheelchair ambulation, group B of 23 patients with assisted ambulation, and group C of 15 patients with independent ambulation. Inter-rater reliability regarding ultrasonographic measurement of abdominal muscle thickness in the control group was assessed by two examiners. The TrA contraction ratio (TrA contracted thickness/TrA resting thickness) was measured during abdominal drawing-in maneuver and was compared between the patients and the control group and between the ambulation groups. Results The inter-rater reliability ranged from 0.900 to 0.947. The TrA contraction ratio was higher in the non-paretic side than in the paretic side (1.40±0.62 vs. 1.14±0.35, p<0.01). The TrA contraction ratio of the patient group was lower in the non-paretic side as well as in the paretic side than that of the control group (right 1.85±0.29, left 1.92±0.42; p<0.001). No difference was found between the ambulation regarding the TrA contraction ratio. Conclusion The TrA contractility in hemiparetic stroke patients is significantly decreased in the non-paretic side as well as in the paretic side compared with that of healthy adults. Ultrasonographic measurement can be clinically used in the evaluation of deep abdominal muscles in stroke patients. PMID:25024954

  8. Patients' associations and the control of leishmaniasis in Peru.

    PubMed

    Guthmann, J P; Calmet, J; Rosales, E; Cruz, M; Chang, J; Dedet, J P

    1997-01-01

    American mucocutaneous leishmaniasis is an important health problem in Peru, particularly in the mountainous Cuzco Region, where 25% of all new cases reported in 1989 were located. Cases have increased considerably since the beginning of the 1980s, when large-scale seasonal migration to endemic zones occurred, particularly the forest area of Madre de Dios, following the discovery of new gold deposits there, and the deterioration in the economic situation in Peru. Following the lack of official response from the Peruvian government, hundreds of people suffering from leishmaniasis in the Cuzco area formed self-help associations with the objective of obtaining the drugs needed to treat their disease. The major achievement of this spontaneous movement, which was supported by several public and private institutions, was to encourage sick people, particularly patients with mucosal lesions, to emerge from isolation. As a result, the prevalence and incidence of the disease have now considerably decreased in the region. PMID:9141749

  9. Improving Care in Older Patients with Diabetes: A Focus on Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Gibbs, Nancy E; Martin, John; Ziel, Fred; Polzin, Jennifer K; Palmer-Toy, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 25% of Americans older than age 65 years. The medical care of older patients must differ from the care of their younger counterparts. Older patients are at high risk of drug toxicity. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% has historically been the goal of all patients with diabetes, regardless of age. Recent research has demonstrated that using medications to achieve such tight glycemic control is not necessary and is often not safe.This article discusses the seminal research findings that strongly suggest that HbA1c goals should be relaxed in older patients. The authors then recommend an age-specific and functionally appropriate HbA1c reference range for patients receiving medications to improve glycemic control. Other interventions are suggested that should make diabetes care safer in older patients receiving hypoglycemic medications. PMID:27352408

  10. Improving Care in Older Patients with Diabetes: A Focus on Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eric A; Gibbs, Nancy E; Martin, John; Ziel, Fred; Polzin, Jennifer K; Palmer-Toy, Darryl

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 25% of Americans older than age 65 years. The medical care of older patients must differ from the care of their younger counterparts. Older patients are at high risk of drug toxicity. A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level less than 7.0% has historically been the goal of all patients with diabetes, regardless of age. Recent research has demonstrated that using medications to achieve such tight glycemic control is not necessary and is often not safe. This article discusses the seminal research findings that strongly suggest that HbA1c goals should be relaxed in older patients. The authors then recommend an age-specific and functionally appropriate HbA1c reference range for patients receiving medications to improve glycemic control. Other interventions are suggested that should make diabetes care safer in older patients receiving hypoglycemic medications. PMID:27352408

  11. Infection control practices in dental school: A patient perspective from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Baseer, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Ghousia; Yassin, Mona Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Routine use of gloves, masks and spectacles are important in infection control. Aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infection control measures among the patients attending clinics of Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy (RCsDP) in Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods: It was a cross-sectional descriptive study of a convenient sample of dental patients attending dental clinics of RCsDP. A structured, close ended, self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 350 patients and a response rate of 86% was obtained. Questionnaireconsisted of series of queries related to knowledge and attitudes of patients towards infection control measures. Data analysis included frequency distribution tables, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Final study sample included 301 patients (147 males and 154 females). Almost 99%, 93.7% and 82.7% of the patients agreed that dentist should wear gloves, face mask and spectacles while providing treatment. However, 60.1%, 30% of the patients said that HIV and hepatitis-B infections can spread in dental clinics. Half of the patients felt that they were likely to contract AIDS and 77.7% refused to attend clinics if they knew that AIDS and Hepatitis-B patients treated there. Only 25.2% said that autoclave is the best method of sterilization. A significantly higher knowledge of infection control was observed among the previous dental visitors compared to the first time visitors to the dental clinics (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients revealed adequate knowledge towards the use of gloves, face mask and spectacles by dentist. However, their knowledge regarding the spread of Hepatitis-B, HIV infection and use of autoclave was poor. Previous visitor of dental clinics showed higher knowledge of infection control as compared to the first time visitors. Many patients expressed their negative attitudes towards dental care due to AIDS and Hepatitis-B concerns

  12. Transitional care for the highest risk patients: findings of a randomised control study

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lian Leng; Allen, John; Barbier, Sylvaine; Ng, Lee Beng; Ng, Matthew Joo Ming; Tay, Wei Yi; Tan, Shu Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions to prevent readmissions of patients at highest risk have not been rigorously evaluated. We conducted a randomised controlled trial to determine if a post-discharge transitional care programme can reduce readmissions of such patients in Singapore. Methods We randomised 840 patients with two or more unscheduled readmissions in the prior 90 days and Length of stay, Acuity of admission, Comorbidity of patient, Emergency department utilisation score ≥10 to the intervention programme (n = 419) or control (n = 421). Patients allocated to the intervention group received post-discharge surveillance by a multidisciplinary integrated care team and early review in the clinic. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least one unscheduled readmission within 30 days after discharge. Results We found no statistically significant reduction in readmissions or emergency department visits in patients on the intervention group compared to usual care. However, patients in the intervention group reported greater patient satisfaction (p < 0.001). Conclusion Any beneficial effect of interventions initiated after discharge is small for high-risk patients with multiple comorbidity and complex care needs. Future transitional care interventions should focus on providing the entire cycle of care for such patients starting from time of admission to final transition to the primary care setting. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov, no NCT02325752 PMID:27118956

  13. The capsaicin cough reflex in patients with symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals.

    PubMed

    Holst, H; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mosbech, H; Vesterhauge, S; Elberling, J

    2010-01-01

    Patients with multiple chemical sensitivity and eczema patients with airway symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals have enhanced cough reflex to capsaicin when applying the tidal breathing method. The aims of the present study were to test whether the capsaicin induced cough reflex was enhanced when applying the single breath inhalation method in similar groups of patients with symptoms related to odorous chemicals e.g. other persons wearing of perfume; and to investigate to what extent the reporting of lower airway symptoms influenced the cough reflex. Sixteen patients fulfilling Cullen's criteria for multiple chemical sensitivity and 15 eczema patients with airway symptoms elicited by odorous chemicals were compared with 29 age-matched, healthy controls. We measured C5--the capsaicin concentration causing five coughs or more--using the single breath inhalation test. No difference was found between groups in age, body mass index or pulmonary function. The median C5 were 129 micromol/L (control group), 48 micromol/L (multiple chemical sensitivity patients), 32 micromol/L (eczema patients). The reporting of lower airway symptoms from odorous chemicals was significantly (p<0.05) correlated to increased cough reflex sensitivity to capsaicin, independent of patient group or co-existence of asthma. The results suggest that the C5 is not reliable for diagnosing MCS but C5 can be used to verify presence of lower airway symptoms related to odorous chemicals.

  14. Borderline typical symptoms in adult patients with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Alexandra; Feige, Bernd; Hesslinger, Bernd; Scheel, Corinna; Ebert, Dieter; Matthies, Swantje; Limberger, Matthias F; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Bohus, Martin; Lieb, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    Adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and borderline personality disorder (BPD) share several clinical features, e.g. emotional lability and impulsivity. This study aimed to delineate differences and similarities between ADHD and BPD with respect to borderline typical symptomatology and gender specifics. Borderline symptomatology was assessed in 60 adult patients with ADHD with the borderline symptom list (BSL) and compared to both 60 gender- and age-matched BPD patients and control subjects. The BSL is a standardized instrument including 95 items on 7 subscales (self-perception, affect regulation, self-destruction, dysphoria, loneliness, intrusions and hostility). Adult ADHD patients showed significantly higher BSL total scores and all of the seven subscales compared to healthy controls (p < 0.001) but lower scores than BPD patients (p < 0.001). With respect to the seven subscales, the largest differences between ADHD and BPD patients were found with respect to self-destruction (d = 1.12) and affect dysregulation (d = 0.90), whereas the smallest difference was found with respect to loneliness (d = 0.36). In females, the BSL subscales "loneliness" and "hostility" did not differentiate between BPD and ADHD. Borderline typical symptoms are common in adult patients with ADHD but seem to be less pronounced than in patients with BPD. Females with ADHD and BPD share more clinical features than males. However, symptoms of self-destruction and affect dysregulation appear to be more severe in BPD patients.

  15. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Lim, Lay Peng; Lim, Soo Kun

    2015-01-01

    Background Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established. Purpose This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients and methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7%) or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7%) based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association. Results Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%). Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9%) was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%). Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001), insulin therapy (P=0.005), and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038) were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004), comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024) and retinopathy (P=0.033), concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047), α-blockers (P=0.033), and antigouts (P=0.003) were also correlated with A1C. Conclusion Identification of factors that are associated with glycemic control is important to help in optimization of glucose control in T2DM patients with renal complication. PMID:26300627

  16. Two phase randomised controlled clinical trial of postoperative oral dietary supplements in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Keele, A M; Bray, M J; Emery, P W; Duncan, H D; Silk, D B

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous work has shown that the administration of oral dietary supplements to patients who have undergone gastrointestinal surgery results in clinically significant short term benefits. AIMS: This study aimed firstly to re-evaluate these short term effects, and secondly to establish whether there are any long term benefits. SUBJECTS: One hundred patients admitted for elective moderate or major gastrointestinal surgery. METHODS: In the inpatient phase, patients were randomised to receive a normal ward diet postoperatively, or the same diet supplemented with an oral dietary supplement. In the outpatient phase, patients were further randomised to receive their home diet, or their home diet supplemented with the oral dietary supplement for four months. RESULTS: During the inpatient phase, patients treated with oral supplements had a significantly improved nutritional intake and lost less weight (2.2, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.9 kg) compared with control patients (4.2 (0.78) kg, p < 0.001). Supplemented patients maintained their hand grip strength whereas control patients showed a significant reduction in grip strength (p < 0.01). Subjective levels of fatigue increased significantly above preoperative levels in control patients (p < 0.01) but not in the supplemented group. Twelve patients in the control group developed complications compared with four in the supplemented group (p < 0.05). In the outpatient phase, supplemented patients had improved nutrient intakes but there were no significant differences in indices of nutritional status or wellbeing between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: The prescription of oral dietary supplements to patients who have undergone gastrointestinal surgery results in clinically significant benefits. These benefits, however, are restricted to the inpatient phase. PMID:9135531

  17. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information.

  18. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information. PMID:25480723

  19. Hydromorphone levels and pain control in patients with severe chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M; Goodman, H; Erle, H; Gray, G; Lorenzo, B; Leipzig, R M; Meyer, B R; Drayer, D E

    1988-10-01

    To better understand the use of narcotic analgesics, the hydromorphone concentration was measured in serum samples from 43 patients with chronic severe pain who were receiving this drug. At the time of blood sampling, pain intensity, mood, and cognitive performance were assessed. There was large individual variation in the dose-drug level relationship. Seven patients with bone or soft tissue pain and drug levels of greater than or equal to 4 ng/ml had good pain control, whereas 10 did not. None of 15 patients with levels less than 4 ng/ml had pain control, despite drug doses similar to those given patients with higher levels. Thus 60% of the patients without control of their pain had hydromorphone levels below the lowest level that produced pain control. No patient with pain from nerve infiltration or compression had good pain control, irrespective of the drug level or dose. Poor mood correlated with high pain intensity and low drug level. Impaired cognitive performance was not related to drug level. Knowing that there is a low concentration of narcotic in the blood of a patient with chronic severe pain who is receiving high drug doses and who shows lack of both efficacy and side effects may reassure health care professionals that further narcotic dosage escalation is appropriate.

  20. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with peripheral vertigo: a prospective controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Isa; Kahraman, Cuneyt; Balikci, Hasan Huseyin; Kucur, Cuneyt; Kahraman, Nilufer Kuzeyli; Ozkaya, Derya Pınar; Oghan, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between peripheral vertigo and inflammation by using the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as an inflammatory marker. We recruited 103 patients with peripheral vertigo (71 women, 32 men; mean age, 39.8 ± 14.7 years) who presented to the Otolaryngology Department of Dumlupinar University Hospital. Vertigo patients with systemic diseases, neurological disorders, malignancy or any inflammatory disease that could alter the NLR were excluded from the study. We also enrolled 103 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (controls; 82 women, 21 men; mean age, 36.7 ± 13.5 years) who underwent routine checkups in our hospital. The vertigo patients underwent full otolaryngologic and neurologic examinations and audiometric tests to rule out any other pathology causing the peripheral vertigo. NLR was calculated in all subjects and was compared between the patient and control groups. There were no significant differences between the study and control groups in terms of lipid profiles, liver-function tests, white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin level, mean platelet volume, and vitamin B12 and folate levels. The mean NLR was significantly higher in the patients than in the controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study, which was the first to investigate the relationship between the NLR and peripheral vertigo, found that the NLR is significantly higher among peripheral vertigo patients than among healthy controls. This result suggests that the NLR is a novel potential marker of stress in peripheral vertigo patients.

  1. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient's unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient's geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  2. Physical control of patients on an inpatient setting: forensic vs. civil populations.

    PubMed

    Heilbrun, K; Golloway, G G; Shoukry, V E; Gustafson, D

    1995-01-01

    The current study examines the use of physical control (seclusion and restraint) in a sample of patients hospitalized in a public mental hospital during 1989. A total of 243 patient records involving physical control were examined; of these, 124 had been civilly committed and the remaining 119 were forensic (Incompetent to Stand Trial or Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity). Some 870 physical control events occurred in the sample, a rate that is intermediate when compared with other facilities described in the literature. Seclusion was employed most often (46% of events), with the combination of seclusion and restraint used in 32% of events and the remaining 22% of physical control events being restraint. Seclusion tended to be used more often with civilly committed patients, with restraint more frequently employed with forensic patients. Forensic patients differed from civil subjects in their greater frequency of threats, agitation, and verbal hostility. However, civil patients were more frequently aggressive toward others and destructive of property. These findings are discussed in the context of previous evidence also describing forensic patients as being perceived as more dangerous, but behaving in a fashion no more physically aggressive than civil patients.

  3. Cardiovascular risk factor control is insufficient in young patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Jensen, Jesper Møller; Brøndberg, Anders Krogh; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf

    2016-01-01

    Background Control of cardiovascular risk factor is important in secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) but it is unknown whether treatment targets are achieved in young patients. We aimed to examine the prevalence and control of risk factors in this subset of patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional, single-center study on patients with documented CAD before age 40. All patients treated between 2002 and 2014 were invited to participate at least 6 months after the last coronary intervention. We included 143 patients and recorded the family history of cardiovascular disease, physical activity level, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, metabolic status, and current medical therapy. Risk factor control and treatment targets were evaluated according to the shared guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology. Results The most common insufficiently controlled risk factors were overweight (113 [79.0%]), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol above target (77 [57.9%]), low physical activity level (78 [54.6%]), hypertriglyceridemia (67 [46.9%]), and current smoking (53 [37.1%]). Almost one-half of the patients fulfilled the criteria of metabolic syndrome. The median (interquartile range) number of uncontrolled modifiable risk factors was 2 (2;4) and only seven (4.9%) patients fulfilled all modifiable health measure targets. Conclusion Among the youngest patients with CAD, there remains a potential to improve the cardiovascular risk profile. PMID:27307744

  4. A Controlled Evaluation of Psychoeducation Workshops for Relatives of State Hospital Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Compared pre-discharge psychoeducation workshops for relatives of psychiatric inpatients, conducted with and without patient present, to hospital-tour and no-contact control groups. Found no group differences in patient relapse or family involvement in treatment after discharge; nor did groups differ on questionnaire measures of relatives' illness…

  5. Evaluation of use of electronic patient controlled analgesia pumps to improve patient safety in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; Mcintosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine; Luppi, Carol; Bane, Anne; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps are methods of pain control with complex smart infusion devices and are widely used in hospitals. Smart PCA/PCEA pumps can be programmed with the dose and rate of medications within pre-set ranges. However, adverse effects have been reported associated with these pumps' use. In this paper, we describe a prevalence observational study where observers used an electronic data collection tool to record pump settings and medications with PCA pumps, corresponding medication orders to identify errors. The results showed that there were many labeling and tubing change tag errors, which were a violation of hospital policy. A few potential harmful medication errors were identified but no critical errors. Study results suggest the importance of a standard process of PCA pump use. Next steps include implementing a safety bundle for improving PCA practice to support safe and effective pain management.

  6. Real-Time Control of a Neuroprosthetic Hand by Magnetoencephalographic Signals from Paralysed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Ryohei; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Saitoh, Youichi; Hosomi, Koichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Shimizu, Takeshi; Sugata, Hisato; Yokoi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masayuki; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic arms might potentially restore motor functions for severely paralysed patients. Invasive measurements of cortical currents using electrocorticography have been widely used for neuroprosthetic control. Moreover, magnetoencephalography (MEG) exhibits characteristic brain signals similar to those of invasively measured signals. However, it remains unclear whether non-invasively measured signals convey enough motor information to control a neuroprosthetic hand, especially for severely paralysed patients whose sensorimotor cortex might be reorganized. We tested an MEG-based neuroprosthetic system to evaluate the accuracy of using cortical currents in the sensorimotor cortex of severely paralysed patients to control a prosthetic hand. The patients attempted to grasp with or open their paralysed hand while the slow components of MEG signals (slow movement fields; SMFs) were recorded. Even without actual movements, the SMFs of all patients indicated characteristic spatiotemporal patterns similar to actual movements, and the SMFs were successfully used to control a neuroprosthetic hand in a closed-loop condition. These results demonstrate that the slow components of MEG signals carry sufficient information to classify movement types. Successful control by paralysed patients suggests the feasibility of using an MEG-based neuroprosthetic hand to predict a patient’s ability to control an invasive neuroprosthesis via the same signal sources as the non-invasive method. PMID:26904967

  7. Fuzzy-based controller for glucose regulation in type-1 diabetic patients by subcutaneous route.

    PubMed

    Campos-Delgado, D U; Hernández-Ordoñez, M; Femat, R; Gordillo-Moscoso, A

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents an advisory/control algorithm for a type-1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM) patient under an intensive insulin treatment based on a multiple daily injections regimen (MDIR). The advisory/control algorithm incorporates expert knowledge about the treatment of this disease by using Mamdani-type fuzzy logic controllers to regulate the blood glucose level (BGL). The overall control strategy is based on a two-loop feedback strategy to overcome the variability in the glucose-insulin dynamics from patient to patient. An inner-loop provides the amount of both rapid/short and intermediate/long acting insulin (RSAI and ILAI) formulations that are programmed in a three-shots daily basis before meals. The combined preparation is then injected by the patient through a subcutaneous route. Meanwhile, an outer-loop adjusts the maximum amounts of insulin provided to the patient in a time-scale of days. The outer-loop controller aims to work as a supervisor of the inner-loop controller. Extensive closed-loop simulations are illustrated, using a detailed compartmental model of the insulin-glucose dynamics in a TIDM patient with meal intake.

  8. Environmental factors, health-related habits, and serum selenium levels in cancer patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Backović, D; Marinković, J; Jorga, J; Pavlica, M; Maksimović, Z; Nikolić, M

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies conducted in Yugoslavia indicated that the concentration of selenium in soil, food items, and serum of the population is very low. The aim of the study was to investigate the possible relationship among environmental, health-related habits, nutrition, and selenium serum levels in cancer patients and the healthy population. The case-control study included a group of cancer patients and a matched group of healthy controls: 57 cancer patients and 41 healthy controls living in Stari Grad (an urban area of Belgrade), as well as 17 cancer patients and 13 healthy controls living in Barajevo (a rural community in the vicinity of Belgrade). The healthy controls were matched to cancer patients in sex and age; they were not blood related. The selenium serum levels were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Health-related habits and relevant dietary factors ("food frequency" method) that may influence the selenium serum levels were assessed by questionnaires. The differences in average values of selenium serum levels between the cancer patients and healthy controls were not significantly different, but both were below the lowest recorded in referential studies. A significant difference between the values obtained from urban and rural subgroups was noted. The most important factors that influenced the level of selenium included the residence place in the region with selenium deficiency (Barajevo), age, associated chronic diseases, and some dietary factors potentially related to the intake of selenium. The results obtained in this investigation pointed out that use of selenium supplementation in this area should be seriously considered.

  9. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Li, W.; Jennings, L.; Kearvell, R.; Bydder, S.

    2013-06-01

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  10. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control.

    PubMed

    Ebert, M A; Li, W; Jennings, L; Kearvell, R; Bydder, S

    2013-06-21

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  11. Fructosamine and glycated hemoglobin as indices of glycemic control in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Trenti, T; Cristani, A; Cioni, G; Pentore, R; Mussini, C; Ventura, E

    1990-01-01

    Glucose intolerance often occurs in liver cirrhosis; therefore a long-term control of plasma glucose levels appears to be important. For this purpose glycated hemoglobin A (HbA1c) determination is proposed as a suitable method, while no data are available on fructosamine test. In 98 cirrhotic patients serum fructosamine and HbA1c levels were compared with those of normal controls and among cirrhotic patients grouped in non glucose-intolerant and with non insulin-dependent (NIDDM) or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The mean HbA1c values of cirrhotic patients with normal glycemic control were significantly lower than normal, and only a few IDDM and NIDDM cirrhotic patients showed high values of HbA1c, indicating that HbA1c is often underestimated in these patients. On the contrary, serum fructosamine levels were on the average higher than normal in nondiabetic patients, but they were significantly higher in IDDM and NIDDM patients than in nondiabetics, and the 72% of NIDDM and 85% of IDDM patients had fructosamine levels higher than the upper normal value. In conclusion, in diabetic patients with liver cirrhosis fructosamine seems to be a more suitable test than HbA1c for monitoring blood glucose levels.

  12. Cognitive function in patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing stereotaxic thalamotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Lund-Johansen, M; Hugdahl, K; Wester, K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether thalamotomy leads to cognitive disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS--A total of 53 patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing stereotaxic ventrolateral thalamotomy for tremor and rigidity were tested for cognitive functions before and after surgery. The cognitive functions investigated involved visuospatial perception and memory. verbal memory, attention shift, and executive functions including set maintenance and shift. A neuropsychological test battery was used that contained the Wisconsin card sorting test, Street completion test, Stroop test, a dichotic memory listening test, and a facial recognition test. RESULTS--Clinically, a good or moderately good effect on parkinsonian symptoms was obtained in 50 patients. The neuropsychological investigations showed that the patients were impaired compared with healthy age matched control subjects on most tests, showing slight improvement postoperatively on verbal memory and visuospatial perception. No major differences were found between tests before and after operation, and there were no significant differences between patients undergoing surgery in the right or in the left thalamus. CONCLUSION--The study indicates that ventrolateral thalamotomy does not reduce the cognitive capacity in this group of patients. PMID:8778265

  13. Eculizumab in the management of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: patient selection and special considerations.

    PubMed

    Al-Ani, Fatimah; Chin-Yee, Ian; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a nonmalignant clonal disorder resulting from somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene leading to a deficiency of the membrane-anchoring molecule glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The lack of expression of two glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins involved in the regulation of the complement system renders PNH erythrocytes susceptible to complement-mediated lysis. Clinical manifestations include thromboembolic disease, chronic kidney injury, pulmonary hypertension, smooth muscle dysfunction, and chronic hemolysis. Until recently, treatment was mainly supportive with most patients suffering from significant morbidity and shortened survival compared to age-matched controls. The development of eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the terminal complement protein C5, has resulted in dramatic improvements of survival and reduction in complications. In this paper, we review some special considerations pertaining to the use of eculizumab for PNH. PMID:27536121

  14. Eculizumab in the management of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: patient selection and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ani, Fatimah; Chin-Yee, Ian; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a nonmalignant clonal disorder resulting from somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene leading to a deficiency of the membrane-anchoring molecule glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The lack of expression of two glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins involved in the regulation of the complement system renders PNH erythrocytes susceptible to complement-mediated lysis. Clinical manifestations include thromboembolic disease, chronic kidney injury, pulmonary hypertension, smooth muscle dysfunction, and chronic hemolysis. Until recently, treatment was mainly supportive with most patients suffering from significant morbidity and shortened survival compared to age-matched controls. The development of eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the terminal complement protein C5, has resulted in dramatic improvements of survival and reduction in complications. In this paper, we review some special considerations pertaining to the use of eculizumab for PNH. PMID:27536121

  15. Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Wen; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the serum zinc levels in patients with common oral mucosal diseases by comparing these to healthy controls. Material and Methods A total of 368 patients, which consisted of 156 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients, 57 oral lichen planus (OLP) patients, 55 burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients, 54 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients, 46 xerostomia patients, and 115 sex-and age-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Serum zinc levels were measured in all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results The mean serum zinc level in the healthy control group was significantly higher than the levels of all other groups (p < 0.001). No individual in the healthy control group had a serum zinc level less than the minimum normal value. However, up to 24.7% (13/54) of patients with AG presented with zinc deficiency, while 21.2% (33/156) of patients with RAS, 16.4% (9/55) of patients with BMS, 15.2% (7/46) of patients with xerostomia, and 14.0% (8/57) of patients with OLP were zinc deficient. Altogether, the zinc deficiency rate was 19.02% (70/368) in the oral mucosal diseases (OMD) group (all patients with OMD). The difference between the OMD and healthy control group was significant (p <0.001). Gender differences in serum zinc levels were also present, although not statistically significant. Conclusions Zinc deficiency may be involved in the pathogenesis of common oral mucosal diseases. Zinc supplementation may be a useful treatment for oral mucosal diseases, but this requires further investigation; the optimal serum level of zinc, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucosal diseases, remains to be determined. Key words:Oral mucosal diseases, Zinc deficiency, pathogenesis. PMID:27031065

  16. Tight versus standard blood pressure control in patients with hypertension with and without cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Angeli, Fabio; de Simone, Giovanni; Staessen, Jan A; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    An excessive blood pressure (BP) reduction might be dangerous in high-risk patients with cardiovascular disease. In the Studio Italiano Sugli Effetti CARDIOvascolari del Controllo della Pressione Arteriosa SIStolica (Cardio-Sis), 1111 nondiabetic patients with systolic BP ≥150 mm Hg were randomly assigned to a systolic BP target <140 mm Hg (standard control) or <130 mm Hg (tight control). We stratified patients by absence (n=895) or presence (n=216) of established cardiovascular disease at entry. Antihypertensive treatment was open-label and tailored to each patient's needs. After 2-year follow-up, the primary end point of the study, electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy, occurred less frequently in the tight than in the standard control group in the patients without (10.8% versus 15.2%) and with (14.1% versus 23.5%) established cardiovascular disease (P for interaction=0.82). The main secondary end point, a composite of cardiovascular events and all-cause death, occurred less frequently in the tight than in the standard control group both in patients without (1.47 versus 3.68 patient-years; P=0.016) and with (7.87 versus 11.22 patient-years; P=0.049) previous cardiovascular disease. In a multivariable Cox model, allocation to tight BP control reduced the risk of cardiovascular events to a similar extent in patients with or without overt cardiovascular disease at randomization (P for interaction=0.43). In conclusion, an intensive treatment aimed to lower systolic BP<130 mm Hg reduced left ventricular hypertrophy and improved clinical outcomes to a similar extent in patients with hypertension and without established cardiovascular disease.

  17. Graph analysis of functional brain networks for cognitive control of action in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Caeyenberghs, Karen; Leemans, Alexander; Heitger, Marcus H; Leunissen, Inge; Dhollander, Thijs; Sunaert, Stefan; Dupont, Patrick; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2012-04-01

    Patients with traumatic brain injury show clear impairments in behavioural flexibility and inhibition that often persist beyond the time of injury, affecting independent living and psychosocial functioning. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that patients with traumatic brain injury typically show increased and more broadly dispersed frontal and parietal activity during performance of cognitive control tasks. We constructed binary and weighted functional networks and calculated their topological properties using a graph theoretical approach. Twenty-three adults with traumatic brain injury and 26 age-matched controls were instructed to switch between coordination modes while making spatially and temporally coupled circular motions with joysticks during event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results demonstrated that switching performance was significantly lower in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with control subjects. Furthermore, although brain networks of both groups exhibited economical small-world topology, altered functional connectivity was demonstrated in patients with traumatic brain injury. In particular, compared with controls, patients with traumatic brain injury showed increased connectivity degree and strength, and higher values of local efficiency, suggesting adaptive mechanisms in this group. Finally, the degree of increased connectivity was significantly correlated with poorer switching task performance and more severe brain injury. We conclude that analysing the functional brain network connectivity provides new insights into understanding cognitive control changes following brain injury.

  18. Cerebral Circulation Time is Prolonged and Not Correlated with EDSS in Multiple Sclerosis Patients: A Study Using Digital Subtracted Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Lucia; Donati, Donatella; Menci, Elisabetta; Cioni, Samuele; Bellini, Matteo; Grazzini, Irene; Leonini, Sara; Galluzzi, Paolo; Severi, Sauro; Burroni, Luca; Casasco, Alfredo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Piu, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Literature has suggested that changes in brain flow circulation occur in patients with multiple sclerosis. In this study, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to measure the absolute CCT value in MS patients and to correlate its value to age at disease onset and duration, and to expand disability status scale (EDSS). DSA assessment was performed on eighty MS patients and on a control group of forty-four age-matched patients. CCT in MS and control groups was calculated by analyzing the angiographic images. Lesion and brain volumes were calculated in a representative group of MS patients. Statistical correlations among CCT and disease duration, age at disease onset, lesion load, brain volumes and EDSS were considered. A significant difference between CCT in MS patients (mean = 4.9s; sd = 1.27s) and control group (mean = 2.8s; sd = 0.51s) was demonstrated. No significant statistical correlation was found between CCT and the other parameters in all MS patients. Significantly increased CCT value in MS patients suggests the presence of microvascular dysfunctions, which do not depend on clinical and MRI findings. Hemodynamic changes may not be exclusively the result of a late chronic inflammatory process. PMID:25679526

  19. [Influence of out-patient training on locus of control and health-relevant attitudes in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Pötz, Hermann; Kurz, Robert W; Pirker, Hans; Dörrscheidt, Waltraud; Uhlir, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    Therapy of essential hypertension needs a comprehensive and broad assessment that includes somatic as well as psychological aims. We examined the effects of out-patient training for hypertensive patients on somatic parameters as well as locus of control and different relevant attitudes of patients. Psychological results are described in this paper. Out of the 50 patients analysis of somatic data distinguish so-called "responders" with clear improvement that permitted reduction of drugs from another group, called "non-responders", for which no reduction of drugs was possible. Analyses of psychological data show that "responders" develop a higher awareness of their body, a more positive attitude towards health, a freer attitude towards pleasure of life, sexuality, play and creativity. Their will to work and produce becomes less important. Internal locus of control (conviction that one is able to influence illness by oneself) is higher in "responders". Furthermore social external locus of control (conviction that following the suggestions of therapists is helpful) rises. Remnants of these effects were found in a follow up 18 months later.

  20. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  1. Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients in the "Hiperdia Program": A Territory-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Clarita Silva; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Bastos, Gisele Alsina Nader; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic hypertension is highly prevalent and an important risk factor for cardiovascular events. Blood pressure control in hypertensive patients enrolled in the Hiperdia Program, a program of the Single Health System for the follow-up and monitoring of hypertensive patients, is still far below the desired level. Objective To describe the epidemiological profile and to assess blood pressure control of patients enrolled in Hiperdia, in the city of Novo Hamburgo (State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil). Methods Cross-sectional study with a stratified cluster random sample, including 383 adults enrolled in the Hiperdia Program of the 15 Basic Health Units of the city of Porto Alegre, conducted between 2010 and 2011. Controlled blood pressure was defined as ≤140 mmHg × 90 mmHg. The hypertensive patients were interviewed and their blood pressure was measured using a calibrated aneroid device. Prevalence ratios (PR) with 95% confidence interval, Wald's χ2 test, and simple and multiple Poisson regression were used in the statistical analysis. Results The mean age was 63 ± 10 years, and most of the patients were females belonging to social class C, with a low level of education, a sedentary lifestyle, and family history positive for systemic hypertension. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was observed in 31%; adherence to the antihypertensive treatment in 54.3%; and 33.7% had their blood pressure controlled. DM was strongly associated with inadequate BP control, with only 15.7% of the diabetics showing BP considered as controlled. Conclusion Even for hypertensive patients enrolled in the Hiperdia Program, BP control is not satisfactorily reached or sustained. Diabetic hypertensive patients show the most inappropriate BP control. PMID:25004419

  2. The fentanyl HCl patient-controlled transdermal system (PCTS): an alternative to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia in the postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Sinatra, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    Inadequate pain control in the postoperative period not only contributes to patient discomfort, but also causes physiological changes that may result in increased risk of myocardial ischaemia, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These events complicate postoperative recovery and may lead to longer hospital stays as well as increased healthcare costs. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) has emerged as an effective way for patients to manage their pain, allowing self-administration of small doses of analgesics to maintain a certain level of pain control. PCA is most commonly delivered via an intravenous (IV) or epidural route, and while patient satisfaction is higher with PCA than with conventional methods of analgesic administration, the invasiveness, costs and risk of errors associated with currently available modalities may limit their utility. These systems also require significant healthcare resources, as nurses must manually program the pumps to deliver the correct amount of medication. Several new PCA modalities are being developed to address these limitations. These systems deliver drug through a variety of routes, including nasal transmucosal and transdermal. Most notably, a self-contained, credit card-sized, transdermal PCA system is currently in the final stages of development. The fentanyl HCl patient-controlled transdermal system (PCTS; IONSYS, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc., Raritan, NJ) uses an imperceptible, low-intensity direct current to transfer fentanyl on demand across the skin into the systemic circulation. This compact system is patient-activated, can be applied to the patient's upper arm or chest, and is designed to manage moderate-to-severe pain requiring opioid analgesia. The system delivers a preprogrammed amount of fentanyl HCI over 10 minutes, for a total of 80 doses, or for 24 hours, whichever occurs first. The on-demand dosing and pharmacokinetics of this system differentiate it from the passive transdermal formulation of

  3. Asthma out of control? A structured review of recent patient surveys

    PubMed Central

    Holgate, Stephen T; Price, David; Valovirta, Erkka

    2006-01-01

    Background An understanding of the needs and behaviors of asthma patients is important in developing an asthma-related healthcare policy. The primary goal of the present review was to assess patient perspectives on key issues in asthma and its management, as captured in patient surveys. Methods Local, national, and multinational asthma surveys were reviewed to assess patient perspectives, and where possible healthcare provider (HCP) perspectives, on key issues, including diagnosis, treatment, control, quality of life, and other patient-centered outcomes. Twenty-four surveys, conducted or published between 1997 and 2003 in Europe and North America, were included in this review. Substantial differences among studies prevented a formal meta-analysis; instead, data were pooled to allow for general comparisons and qualitative analysis. Results The results indicate that patients' knowledge of the underlying causes of asthma and treatment options remains inadequate. Moreover, patients often tolerate poor symptom control, possess meager knowledge of correct drug usage, and display insufficient adherence to therapy. Many patients have a low expectation of receiving an appropriate therapy or of having a positive encounter with the HCP. Among HCPs, there is evidence of inadequate understanding of disease etiology and poor or unstructured communication with patients, resulting often in inaccurate assessment of disease severity. Moreover, patients often underreport their symptoms and severity, which in turn could lead to misclassification and undertreatment. Conclusion Improving patient education about the importance of achieving optimal asthma control, along with improved communication between patients and HCPs, emphasizing treatment options and optimal treatment of inflammation, may lead to better outcomes and improved asthma management in daily practice. PMID:17140420

  4. Electroencephalographic spectral power in writer's cramp patients: evidence for motor cortex malfunctioning during the cramp.

    PubMed

    Kristeva, Rumyana; Chakarov, Vihren; Losch, Florian; Hummel, Sibylla; Popa, Traian; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen

    2005-09-01

    We investigated cortical activation as reflected in task-related spectral power (TRPow) changes in 8 writer's cramp patients during writing on a digital board and during isometric contraction and compared them to those of 8 age-matched healthy subjects. Scalp EEG was recorded over the contralateral primary sensorimotor area (SM1(c)), and from the ipsilateral sensorimotor area (SM1(i)). The electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from the Extensor Digitorum Communis (Extensor), Flexor Digitorum Superficialis (Flexor), and First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) muscles. We analyzed (1) handwriting performance, (2) changes in the TRPow confined to alpha and beta band, and (3) the EMG spectral power during both tasks, writing and isometric contraction. During writing, all patients developed writer's cramp. The handwriting in writer's cramp patients was associated with significantly less reduction of the beta-range TRPow and lower frequency of the TRPow reduction compared to controls. No significant differences between patients and controls for the alpha band TRPow reduction during handwriting were observed. During writing, the patients showed higher EMG spectral power than the controls but this difference was at the border of significance. The present results indicate disorder in the motor execution system, in writer's cramp patients, associated with impaired functional beta-network state of the contra- and ipsilateral sensorimotor cortices, most probably due to inadequate modulation of the intracortical inhibition associated with writing.

  5. Enteric neurons from Parkinson’s disease patients display ex vivo aberrations in mitochondrial structure

    PubMed Central

    Baumuratov, A. S.; Antony, P. M. A.; Ostaszewski, M.; He, F.; Salamanca, L.; Antunes, L.; Weber, J.; Longhino, L.; Derkinderen, P.; Koopman, W. J. H.; Diederich, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Based on autopsy material mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed being part of the pathophysiological cascade of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, in living patients, evidence for such dysfunction is scarce. As the disease presumably starts at the enteric level, we studied ganglionic and mitochondrial morphometrics of enteric neurons. We compared 65 ganglia from 11 PD patients without intestinal symptoms and 41 ganglia from 4 age-matched control subjects. We found that colon ganglia from PD patients had smaller volume, contained significantly more mitochondria per ganglion volume, and displayed a higher total mitochondrial mass relative to controls. This suggests involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD at the enteric level. Moreover, in PD patients the mean mitochondrial volume declined in parallel with motor performance. Ganglionic shrinking was evident in the right but not in the left colon. In contrast, mitochondrial changes prevailed in the left colon suggesting that a compensatory increase in mitochondrial mass might counterbalance mitochondrial dysfunction in the left colon but not in the right colon. Reduction in ganglia volume and combined mitochondrial morphometrics had both predictive power to discriminate between PD patients and control subjects, suggesting that both parameters could be used for early discrimination between PD patients and healthy individuals. PMID:27624977

  6. Enteric neurons from Parkinson's disease patients display ex vivo aberrations in mitochondrial structure.

    PubMed

    Baumuratov, A S; Antony, P M A; Ostaszewski, M; He, F; Salamanca, L; Antunes, L; Weber, J; Longhino, L; Derkinderen, P; Koopman, W J H; Diederich, N J

    2016-01-01

    Based on autopsy material mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed being part of the pathophysiological cascade of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, in living patients, evidence for such dysfunction is scarce. As the disease presumably starts at the enteric level, we studied ganglionic and mitochondrial morphometrics of enteric neurons. We compared 65 ganglia from 11 PD patients without intestinal symptoms and 41 ganglia from 4 age-matched control subjects. We found that colon ganglia from PD patients had smaller volume, contained significantly more mitochondria per ganglion volume, and displayed a higher total mitochondrial mass relative to controls. This suggests involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD at the enteric level. Moreover, in PD patients the mean mitochondrial volume declined in parallel with motor performance. Ganglionic shrinking was evident in the right but not in the left colon. In contrast, mitochondrial changes prevailed in the left colon suggesting that a compensatory increase in mitochondrial mass might counterbalance mitochondrial dysfunction in the left colon but not in the right colon. Reduction in ganglia volume and combined mitochondrial morphometrics had both predictive power to discriminate between PD patients and control subjects, suggesting that both parameters could be used for early discrimination between PD patients and healthy individuals. PMID:27624977

  7. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  8. Calcium Stone Growth in Urine from Cystic Fibrosis Patients and Healthy Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSorley, Anita; Jones, Andrew M.; Webb, A. Kevin; Rao, P. Nagaraj; Kavanagh, John P.

    2007-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients have an increased risk of renal stone disease. There is some evidence that this may be related to a different excretory pattern of stone risk factors, but an alternative hypothesis, that the urine of cystic fibrosis patients is deficient in urinary inhibitors of crystallization and stone formation has not been tested. Here we have grown calcium stones, in vitro, in the presence of urine from healthy controls and compared this with growth in the presence of urine from cystic fibrosis patients. A stone farm was used to grow twelve calcium stones simultaneously, firstly in artificial urine for about 200 hours and then in 90% whole human urine for another 500 hours. Six of the stones received urine from healthy controls and six received urine from adult cystic fibrosis patients. There were no significant differences in stone mass at any of the key time points or in the overall growth pattern (p>0.05) between stones destined for, or treated with, urine from CF patients and the controls. Human urine greatly inhibited stone growth in vitro but there was no difference in the growth rate in urine from healthy controls and CF patients. This refutes the hypothesis that a tendency for a higher prevalence of urinary stones in CF patients is related to a deficiency in inhibitory activity.

  9. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  10. CT pulmonary densitovolumetry in patients with acromegaly: a comparison between active disease and controlled disease

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Gustavo B; Carvalho, Alysson R S; Machado, Dequitier C; Mogami, Roberto; Melo, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to compare the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function in patients with active acromegaly and controlled acromegaly and, secondarily, to correlate these findings. Methods: 11 patients with active acromegaly, 18 patients with controlled acromegaly and 17 control subjects, all non-smokers, underwent quantification of lung volume using multidetector CT (Q-MDCT) and pulmonary function tests. Results: Patients with active acromegaly had larger total lung mass (TLM) values than the controls and larger amounts of non-aerated compartments than the other two groups. Patients with active acromegaly also had larger amounts of poorly aerated compartments than the other two groups, a difference that was observed in both total lung volume (TLV) and TLM. TLV as measured by inspiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with total lung capacity, whereas TLV measured using expiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with functional residual capacity. Conclusion: Patients with active acromegaly have more lung mass and larger amounts of non-aerated and poorly aerated compartments. There is a relationship between the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function test parameters. Advances in knowledge: Although the nature of our results demands further investigation, our data suggest that both CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function tests can be used as useful tools for patients with acromegaly by assisting in the prediction of disease activity. PMID:26246281

  11. Acupressure in Controlling Nausea in Young Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    RATIONALE: Acupressure wristbands may prevent or reduce nausea and caused by chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether standard care is more effective with or without acupressure wristbands in controlling acute and delayed nausea. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying how well acupressure wristbands work with or without standard care in controlling nausea in young patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. |

  12. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p < .05). Administration of pleasant, natural sounds via headphones is a simple, safe, nonpharmacologic nursing intervention that may be used to allay pain for up to 120 minutes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support.

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess in diabetic patients: association of glycemic control with the clinical characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess (KPLA) has been reported with increasing frequency in East Asian countries in the past 3 decades, especially in Taiwan and Korea. Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for KPLA and highly associated with septic metastatic complications from KPLA. We investigated the association of glycemic control in diabetic patients with the clinical characteristics of KPLA in Taiwan. Methods Adult diabetic patients with KPLA were identified retrospectively in a medical center from January 2007 to January 2012. Clinical characteristics were compared among patients with different levels of current hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Risk factors for metastatic infection from KPLA were analyzed. Results Patients with uncontrolled glycemia (HbA1c ≥ 7%) were significantly younger than those with controlled glycemia (HbA1c < 7%). Patients with uncontrolled glycemia had the trend to have a higher rate of gas-forming liver abscess, cryptogenic liver abscess, and metastatic infection than those with controlled glycemia. Cryptogenic liver abscess and metastatic infection were more common in the poor glycemic control group (HbA1c value >; 10%) after adjustment with age. HbA1c level and abscess < 5 cm were independent risk factors for metastatic complications from KPLA. Conclusions Glycemic control in diabetic patients played an essential role in the clinical characteristics of KPLA, especially in metastatic complications from KPLA. PMID:23363608

  14. Level of asthma control and its relationship with medication use in asthma patients in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Marchioro, Josiane; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Montealegre, Federico; Fish, James; Jardim, José Roberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess asthma patients in Brazil in terms of the level of asthma control, compliance with maintenance treatment, and the use of rescue medication. METHODS: We used data from a Latin American survey of a total of 400 asthma patients in four Brazilian state capitals, all of whom completed a questionnaire regarding asthma control and treatment. RESULTS: In that sample, the prevalence of asthma was 8.8%. Among the 400 patients studied, asthma was classified, in accordance with the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria, as controlled, partially controlled, and uncontrolled in 37 (9.3%), 226 (56.5%), and 137 (34.3%), respectively. In those three groups, the proportion of patients on maintenance therapy in the past four weeks was 5.4%, 19.9%, and 41.6%, respectively. The use of rescue medication was significantly more common in the uncontrolled asthma group (86.9%; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that, in accordance with the established international criteria, asthma is uncontrolled in the vast majority of asthma patients in Brazil. Maintenance medications are still underutilized in Brazil, and patients with partially controlled or uncontrolled asthma are more likely to use rescue medications and oral corticosteroids. PMID:25410836

  15. [Patient-oriented prevention and control of hospital-acquired infections (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Daschner, F

    1979-11-15

    The incidence of hospital-acquired infections varies between 2 and 15% (on average 5 to 8%). Most common nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections, wound infections, respiratory tract infections, septicemia and infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Nosocomial infections arise essentially via two routes: endogenously from the bodies own flora or exogenously via direct or indirect contact with the patient. Bacteria are most commonly transmitted from patient to patient by hands. Air as a vehicle, by which bacteria are transmitted, plays a relatively minor role. Priorities in hospital infection control are: hand washing and hand desinfection, improvement of certain nursing techniques, isolation of infected or susceptible patients, an infection control team with a nurse epidemiologist, surveillance and control of antibiotic therapy regimens, especially of antibiotic prophylaxis. Routine floor desinfection could not be shown to significantly reduce the hospital infection rate.

  16. Association between glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with cardiovascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Ling, Doris Yew Hui; Ahmad, Wan Azman Wan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a macrovascular complication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To date, glycemic control profiles of antidiabetic drugs in cardiovascular (CV) complications have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, this study was conducted retrospectively to assess the association of antidiabetic drugs and glycemic control with CV profiles in T2DM patients. The association of concurrent medications and comorbidities with glycemic control was also investigated. Methods A total of 220 T2DM patients from the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, who had at least one CV complication and who had been taking at least one antidiabetic drug for at least 3 months, were included. The associations of antidiabetics, cardiovascular diseases, laboratory parameters, concurrent medications, comorbidities, demographics, and clinical characteristics with glycemic control were investigated. Results Sulfonylureas in combination (P=0.002) and sulfonylurea monotherapy (P<0.001) were found to be associated with good glycemic control, whereas insulin in combination (P=0.051), and combination biguanides and insulin therapy (P=0.012) were found to be associated with poor glycemic control. Stroke (P=0.044) was the only type of CVD that seemed to be significantly associated with good glycemic control. Other factors such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (P=0.026), elderly patients (P=0.018), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P=0.021), and fasting plasma glucose (P<0.001) were found to be significantly correlated with good glycemic control. Conclusion Individualized treatment in T2DM patients with CVDs can be supported through a better understanding of the association between glycemic control and CV profiles in T2DM patients. PMID:26316711

  17. Cognitive control under distressing emotional stimulation in adolescents with conduct disorder.

    PubMed

    Euler, Felix; Sterzer, Philipp; Stadler, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior has been linked to deficient processing of emotional stimulation and recent studies indicate that in aggressive juveniles executive functions are impaired when distressing emotional stimulation is being processed. This study examines the interrelation of distressing emotional stimulation and cognitive control in aggressive adolescents and healthy controls. We combined a color-word Stroop test with pictures from the International Affective Picture System with either neutral or distressing emotional content to assess Stroop interference under neutral and distressing emotional stimulation in 20 male reactive aggressive patients with conduct disorder (CD) and 20 age-matched male control participants. We found impaired Stroop performance under distressing emotional stimulation in patients compared to healthy controls. No difference was present under neutral emotional stimulation. Our results indicate that cognitive control under distressing emotional stimulation was affected in adolescents with CD but not in healthy controls. We conclude that executive functions in reactive aggressive CD patients are more susceptible to the deleterious effects of distressing emotional stimulation. The results provide a possible explanation for pathologic impulsive-aggressive behavior under emotional distress in CD patients.

  18. Predictive factors of death in patients with tuberculosis: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moosazadeh, M; Nezammahalleh, A; Movahednia, M; Movahednia, N; Khanjani, N; Afshari, M

    2015-06-09

    Tuberculosis is one of the main causes of death worldwide. This study aimed to determine predictive factors for death in patients with tuberculosis to set priorities for public heath interventions to reduce mortality in these patients. This nested case-control study was carried out in Mazandaran province of Islamic Republic of Iran among tuberculosis patients who were treated during 2002-2009. Each deceased patient was individually matched with a control patient according to sex, age, area of involvement and time of follow-up. Potential risk factors for death were evaluated using multivariate conditional logistic regression models. From 2206 patients 376 cases and 376 matched controls were selected. Only positive serology for HIV (OR = 19.1), history of kidney disease (OR = 6.81) and use of immunosuppressant drugs (OR = 3.96) significantly increased the risk of death in tuberculosis patients. These potentially modifiable risk factors could be taken into account in preventive interventions for tuberculosis patients in our country.

  19. A patient-centric goal in time to blood pressure control from drug therapy initiation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song Hee; Wang, Junling; Tak, Sunghee

    2013-02-01

    A time frame in which newly diagnosed hypertensive patients attain blood pressure (BP) goal would guide patients through uncertainty associated with initiating drug therapy for hypertension control. This study estimates time to BP goal resulting from drug therapy initiation among real-world hypertensive patients and identifies factors associated with variations in time to BP goal. The study uses a historical cohort design. Hypertensive patients who had initiated antihypertensive drug therapy between July 1, 2002, and December 31, 2003, were followed up to 12 months until the end of 2004. Electronic medical records from a medical group were linked with pharmacy claims, as well as with medical claims. Survival analyses were used to compare lengths of time needed to reach BP goals. A total of 223 patients from a real world practice setting had initiated antihypertensive drug therapy. The patients took 3.25 months (95% CI: 2.49-4.82) to reach BP goal. The patient-centric time to BP goal was 7.1 weeks longer than those reported in controlled experimental settings. This finding highlights the gap between results of controlled clinical trials and their application to clinical practice, and informs healthcare practitioners of the importance of setting a patient-centric goal in pharmacological treatment of hypertension.

  20. Intellectual differences between schizophrenic patients and normal controls across the adult lifespan.

    PubMed

    Kondel, Tejinder K; Mortimer, Ann M; Leeson, Verity C; Laws, Keith R; Hirsch, Steven R

    2003-12-01

    A debate persists about whether IQ declines during the duration of schizophrenia or whether an early deficit remains static across the lifespan. To examine this, we measured estimated current IQ (Quick Test Revised: QTR) and estimated premorbid IQ (National Adult Reading Test: NART) in schizophrenic patients (n=110) and matched healthy controls (n=71) across a wide age range (20-88). Age correlated negatively with NART and QTR IQ for schizophrenic patients, but not for controls. A subset of 23 schizophrenic patients was also retested on the NART after 4 years to determine NART stability and they showed no significant change. We propose that the lower NART IQ in older patients reflects a lower 'starting point' and that this may be related to lower educational opportunities in older patients.

  1. Variations in tobacco control in National Dental PBRN practices: The role of patient and practice factors

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Midge N.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Coley, Heather L.; Williams, Jessica H.; Kohler, Connie; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Richman, Joshua S.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Sadasivam, Rajani S.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    We engaged dental practices enrolled in The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to quantify tobacco screening (ASK) and advising (ADVISE); and to identify patient and practice characteristics associated with tobacco control. Dental practices (N=190) distributed patient surveys that measured ASK and ADVISE. 29% of patients were ASKED about tobacco use during visit, 20% were identified as tobacco users, and 41% reported being ADVISED. Accounting for clustering of patients within practices, younger age and male gender were positively associated with ASK and ADVISE. Adjusting for patient age and gender, a higher proportion of non-whites in the practice, preventive services and proportion on public assistance were positively associated with ASK. Proportion of tobacco users in the practice and offering other preventive services were more strongly associated with ASK and ADVISE than other practice characteristics. Understanding variations in performance is an important step toward designing strategies for improving tobacco control in dentistry. PMID:24164227

  2. Bone disease in calcium stone forming patients.

    PubMed

    Heilberg, I P; Martini, L A; Szejnfeld, V L; Carvalho, A B; Draibe, S A; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L; Schor, N

    1994-09-01

    The association between idiopathic hypercalciuria and osteopenia (OP) has been recently recognized. It is not established whether or not calcium intake plays a critical role in the loss of bone mass. Fifty-five calcium stone forming patients with either absorptive hypercalciuria (AH) or fasting hypercalciuria (FH), 29 males and 26 premenopausal females, were submitted to dual photon absorptiometry at lumbar spine. Calcium intake was assessed by a 72 hr dietary record. OP was detected in 20% (11/55) of patients, being more common among men, 9/26 (35%) than in women, 2/29 (7%), p < 0.05. Male FH patients presented lower mean bone mineral density (BMD) than sex, weight and age-matched control (1.058 +/- 0.18 vs 1.209 +/- 0.13 g/cm2, X +/- SD, p < 0.05). OP was more frequent in FH patients, 7/20 (35%) than in AH patients 4/35 (11%), albeit the difference was not statistically significant. There was no correlation between calcium intake and BMD measurement. Six osteopenic male FH patients were further submitted to histomorphometric evaluation with tetracycline double labeling. Bone volume was lower than the controls (13.2 +/- 3.0 vs 27.2 +/- 3.7%, p < 0.05). Osteoid surfaces were reduced, although not significantly (10.1 +/- 8.2% vs 15.9 +/- 6.7%). Eroded surfaces were markedly increased (23.9 +/- 13.4 vs 4.2 +/- 1.4%, p < 0.05). The bone formation rate was very low with a complete lack of tetracycline double labeling in 4 patients. These data suggest low bone volume, tendency to low bone formation, increased bone resorption and a severe mineralization defect, consistent with normal or low bone turnover osteoporosis. PMID:7994936

  3. T-wave morphology can distinguish healthy controls from LQTS patients.

    PubMed

    Immanuel, S A; Sadrieh, A; Baumert, M; Couderc, J P; Zareba, W; Hill, A P; Vandenberg, J I

    2016-09-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited disorder associated with prolongation of the QT/QTc interval on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and a markedly increased risk of sudden cardiac death due to cardiac arrhythmias. Up to 25% of genotype-positive LQTS patients have QT/QTc intervals in the normal range. These patients are, however, still at increased risk of life-threatening events compared to their genotype-negative siblings. Previous studies have shown that analysis of T-wave morphology may enhance discrimination between control and LQTS patients. In this study we tested the hypothesis that automated analysis of T-wave morphology from Holter ECG recordings could distinguish between control and LQTS patients with QTc values in the range 400-450 ms. Holter ECGs were obtained from the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW) database. Frequency binned averaged ECG waveforms were obtained and extracted T-waves were fitted with a combination of 3 sigmoid functions (upslope, downslope and switch) or two 9th order polynomial functions (upslope and downslope). Neural network classifiers, based on parameters obtained from the sigmoid or polynomial fits to the 1 Hz and 1.3 Hz ECG waveforms, were able to achieve up to 92% discrimination between control and LQTS patients and 88% discrimination between LQTS1 and LQTS2 patients. When we analysed a subgroup of subjects with normal QT intervals (400-450 ms, 67 controls and 61 LQTS), T-wave morphology based parameters enabled 90% discrimination between control and LQTS patients, compared to only 71% when the groups were classified based on QTc alone. In summary, our Holter ECG analysis algorithms demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis of T-wave morphology to distinguish LQTS patients, even those with normal QTc, from healthy controls.

  4. T-wave morphology can distinguish healthy controls from LQTS patients.

    PubMed

    Immanuel, S A; Sadrieh, A; Baumert, M; Couderc, J P; Zareba, W; Hill, A P; Vandenberg, J I

    2016-09-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited disorder associated with prolongation of the QT/QTc interval on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and a markedly increased risk of sudden cardiac death due to cardiac arrhythmias. Up to 25% of genotype-positive LQTS patients have QT/QTc intervals in the normal range. These patients are, however, still at increased risk of life-threatening events compared to their genotype-negative siblings. Previous studies have shown that analysis of T-wave morphology may enhance discrimination between control and LQTS patients. In this study we tested the hypothesis that automated analysis of T-wave morphology from Holter ECG recordings could distinguish between control and LQTS patients with QTc values in the range 400-450 ms. Holter ECGs were obtained from the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW) database. Frequency binned averaged ECG waveforms were obtained and extracted T-waves were fitted with a combination of 3 sigmoid functions (upslope, downslope and switch) or two 9th order polynomial functions (upslope and downslope). Neural network classifiers, based on parameters obtained from the sigmoid or polynomial fits to the 1 Hz and 1.3 Hz ECG waveforms, were able to achieve up to 92% discrimination between control and LQTS patients and 88% discrimination between LQTS1 and LQTS2 patients. When we analysed a subgroup of subjects with normal QT intervals (400-450 ms, 67 controls and 61 LQTS), T-wave morphology based parameters enabled 90% discrimination between control and LQTS patients, compared to only 71% when the groups were classified based on QTc alone. In summary, our Holter ECG analysis algorithms demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis of T-wave morphology to distinguish LQTS patients, even those with normal QTc, from healthy controls. PMID:27510854

  5. Total serum IgE concentration in patients with psoriasis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Vahideh; Ghiasi, Maryam; Goodarzi, Azadeh; Mohtasham, Sima; Ansari, Mahsa; Hedayat, Kosar; Nassiri, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves the skin, nails and joints. With regard to the role of the immune system in psoriasis, the current study compared serum IgE concentration in patients with psoriasis with control group. Current case-control study was conducted in Dermatology clinic of Razi hospital, Tehran University of medical sciences, Tehran, Iran in 2012. Fifty-eight patients with psoriasis e referred to the clinic were assigned as patient group and 58 healthy subjects with matched age and sex as a control group. Patient's history, family history and demographic characteristics such as age and sex, duration and severity of disease using PASI, were collected and entered into a form. Consent form was obtained from participants. Serum IgE concentrations of both study groups were measured by electrochemiluminescence assay in the laboratory A total number of 58 patients with psoriasis, mean age of 44.15 (19-76 years) and 58 controls with matched age and sex were studied. Mean average of serum IgE concentration in the control group was 115.13 versus 200/06 concentration in patients group (P=0.16). Serum IgE concentration in 22.4% of patients versus 17.2% in controls was greater than normal concentration (P=0.48). No significant correlation was between serum IgE concentration and disease severity using PASI (P=0.11, r=0.21), neither a significant correlation with disease duration, age and gender. According to the present study, serum IgE concentrations are not greater in patients with psoriasis. IgE concentration is also not associated with the severity of psoriasis based on the PASI score, therefore, the role of IgE in psoriasis can be considered insignificant as some previous studies indicate.

  6. Loss of sensory function in patients with idiopathic hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Suttrup, Inga; Oberdiek, Denise; Suttrup, Judith; Osada, Nani; Evers, Stefan; Marziniak, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Former studies suggest an additional involvement of the sensory nervous system, beside the involuntary contractions of antagonist muscles, in idiopathic hand dystonia. We studied contact heat-evoked potentials and quantitative sensory testing (QST) in 10 patients suffering from idiopathic hand dystonia and 10 age-matched healthy controls. Cortical potentials recorded from the vertex (Pz) after contact heat stimulation of the volar forearm and the dorsum of the hand at a temperature of 51°C showed significantly reduced A-δ-amplitudes. Numerical pain ratings on the affected side in comparison to the unaffected side and to healthy controls were significantly reduced. QST results showed an impairment of the thermal detection thresholds, the mechanical pain sensitivity and the mechanical pain threshold at the affected body side of the patients. Our results suggest a loss of distinct sensory functions of the affected hand in comparison with the contralateral hand and to matched healthy subjects in patients suffering from idiopathic hand dystonia. For the first time, an extended loss of sensory function could be shown in patients suffering from idiopathic hand dystonia.

  7. Usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in patients who showed sustained unexplainable clinical symptom of torticollis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Eunsil; Kim, Saeyoon; Cho, Yun Woo; Hong, Ji Heon; Son, Su Min

    2012-07-26

    To investigate corticospinal tract (CST) status using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients who had clinical symptom of torticollis but no definite cause of sustained symptom of torticollis. We evaluated 10 patients with sustained torticollis and 12 age-matched control subjects. All patients showed no specific fibromatosis coli findings on neck sonography. Even after intensive manual therapy, there was no improvement of clinical symptom of torticollis. DTI was performed using 1.5 T with a synergy-L Sensitivity Encoding (SENSE) head coil. Fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient were measured using the region of interest method, and diffusion tensor tractography was conducted. We estimated the asymmetric anisotropic index (AA) and asymmetric mean diffusivity index (AD) to evaluate the asymmetry between right and left CSTs. All patients showed only torticollis symptom but no definite hemiplegic pattern on their extremities at initial evaluation. DTT, which was performed to reveal the reason of sustained asymmetric postural symptom showed hemiplegic pattern. The results of DTT corresponded to the delayed hemiplegic symptoms, which were found in the patients at second evaluation. AA and AD values between patients and control group were significantly different. Torticollis is usually caused by fibromatosis coli, but may be one of the symptoms of hemiplegia. DTI may be an additional technique for the early detection of hemiplegia in patients with sustained symptoms of unexplainable postural torticollis.

  8. Global fibrinolytic capacity in pediatric patients with sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Bay, Ali; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Kose, Dogan; Dogan, Murat

    2006-10-01

    There are many complex pathophysiologic changes of the coagulation system in sepsis. The fibrinolytic system was evaluated in septic children using the global fibrinolytic capacity (GFC), a new technique reflecting the overall fibrinolytic activity. The study consisted of 24 children with sepsis, 36 children with sepsis plus disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and 20 healthy age-matched control individuals. Compared with controls, 86% of sepsis patients and 87% of sepsis plus DIC patients had decreased GFC levels. Between the sepsis plus DIC and sepsis groups there was no significant difference in terms of GFC levels. While 19 patients (52.7%) died in the sepsis plus DIC group, only three patients (12.5%) died in the sepsis group. When survivors and nonsurvivors were compared in terms of coagulation tests, there were significant differences for protein C, antithrombin, platelet, fibrinogen, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, prothrombin time, and white blood cell values. In conclusion, the level of GFC reduced in most of the pediatric sepsis patients but no difference was observed between patients with sepsis and patients with sepsis plus DIC. While inhibition of fibrinolysis is an important finding in sepsis, the mortality is mainly associated with the presence of end-organ damage and the status of coagulation parameters.

  9. Lower Extremity Kinematic Profile of Gait of Patients After Ankle Fracture: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Avi; Mor, Amit; Segal, Ganit; Bar, Dana; Monda, Maureen K; Kish, Benjamin; Nyska, Meir; Palmanovich, Ezequiel

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the differences in the lower extremity gait kinematic profile of patients recovering from ankle fracture compared with healthy controls. In addition, we inquired whether the profile would differ among fracture severity groups. A total of 48 patients participated in the present prospective, case-control study. The gait of 24 patients recovering from an ankle fracture injury and 24 healthy matched controls was examined using an inertial measurement unit sensor system. The following gait parameters were evaluated: knee range of motion (ROM) during the swing phase, maximum knee flexion angle during stance, thigh and calf ROM, and stride duration. Statistically significant differences were found between the ankle fracture group and the control group for all parameters. The patients with ankle fracture had a lower knee ROM during swing phase compared with the control group (mean ± standard deviation 43.0° ± 15.5° compared with 66.7° ± 5.1°, respectively; p < .001). The maximum knee flexion angle during stance was lower in the patients with ankle fracture than in the control group (mean ± standard deviation 10.5° ± 6.1° compared with 21.2° ± 4.5°, respectively; p < .001). Patients with ankle fracture also had lower gait cycle thigh and calf ROM angles (p < .001) and a longer stride duration (p < .001) compared with the control group. No statistically significant differences were found among the severity groups. These results suggest that the gait kinematic characteristics vary between healthy people and patients recovering from an ankle fracture injury during the short-term period after injury. PMID:27267411

  10. Serum prolactin level in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis during relapse.

    PubMed

    Moshirzadeh, Sasan; Ghareghozli, Kourosh; Harandi, Ali Amini; Pakdaman, Hossien

    2012-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that hyperprolactinemia may contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). In a case-control study, 58 patients with definite relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) during relapse and 58 sex-matched and age-matched healthy controls were assessed for serum prolactin (PRL) concentration. Mean serum PRL levels (± standard deviation) were significantly higher in patients with MS (501.3 ± 232.6 mIU/L) than in healthy control patients (233.3 ± 142.7 mIU/L; p < 0.0001). Furthermore, these differences were consistent in each sex: females with MS (704.4 ± 119.6 mIU/L) compared to female controls (305.5 ± 156.9 mIU/L p < 0.001); and in males with MS (358.0 ± 180.0 mIU/L) compared to male controls (182.3 ± 107.5 mIU/L; p < 0.001). Our findings provided more evidence to support the hypothesis that patients with RRMS, regardless of gender, are in a hyperprolactinemic state. PMID:22341909

  11. Physical and functional follow-up of tuberculosis patients in initial intensive phase of treatment in Cameroon using the 6-min walk test

    PubMed Central

    Guessogo, Wiliam R.; Mandengue, Samuel H.; Assomo Ndemba, Peguy B.; Medjo, Ubald Olinga; Minye, Edmond Ebal; Ahmaidi, Said; Temfemo, Abdou

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate functional capacities of Cameroonian tuberculosis (TB) patients in initial intensive phase of treatment using the 6-min walk test (6MWT) and to compare them to an age-matched healthy group. Twenty-eight TB patients newly diagnosed and 19 healthy age-matched peoples participated in the study. Performance parameters were determined using the 6MWT. Anthropometric and cardiorespiratory parameters were measured at baseline and after 6MWT. Two months later, TB patients were submitted to the same evaluation. We found significant differences in anthropometric parameters between the two groups. The baseline cardiorespiratory parameters and performance characteristics of TB patients were lower than control group (571.7±121.0 m vs 841.6±53.0 m, P<0.0001 for 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and 18.1±2.8 mL/kg/min vs 24.3±1.2 mL/kg/min, P<0.001 for mean VO2 peak (peak oxygen consumption). Two months after, significant improvements were noted in anthropometric, cardiorespiratory and performance parameters except for bone mass and FEV1/FEV6 (forced expiratory volumes in 1 second/6 seconds) ratio. Significant correlations were found between the 2-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.95), 4-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.97) and 6MWD. In conclusion, TB patients have impaired physical functional capacity but they improved after 2 months of treatment. 6MWT can be a useful tool in the assessment of physical parameters and cardiorespiratory functional capacity rehabilitation of TB patients during the treatment.

  12. Physical and functional follow-up of tuberculosis patients in initial intensive phase of treatment in Cameroon using the 6-min walk test

    PubMed Central

    Guessogo, Wiliam R.; Mandengue, Samuel H.; Assomo Ndemba, Peguy B.; Medjo, Ubald Olinga; Minye, Edmond Ebal; Ahmaidi, Said; Temfemo, Abdou

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate functional capacities of Cameroonian tuberculosis (TB) patients in initial intensive phase of treatment using the 6-min walk test (6MWT) and to compare them to an age-matched healthy group. Twenty-eight TB patients newly diagnosed and 19 healthy age-matched peoples participated in the study. Performance parameters were determined using the 6MWT. Anthropometric and cardiorespiratory parameters were measured at baseline and after 6MWT. Two months later, TB patients were submitted to the same evaluation. We found significant differences in anthropometric parameters between the two groups. The baseline cardiorespiratory parameters and performance characteristics of TB patients were lower than control group (571.7±121.0 m vs 841.6±53.0 m, P<0.0001 for 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and 18.1±2.8 mL/kg/min vs 24.3±1.2 mL/kg/min, P<0.001 for mean VO2 peak (peak oxygen consumption). Two months after, significant improvements were noted in anthropometric, cardiorespiratory and performance parameters except for bone mass and FEV1/FEV6 (forced expiratory volumes in 1 second/6 seconds) ratio. Significant correlations were found between the 2-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.95), 4-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.97) and 6MWD. In conclusion, TB patients have impaired physical functional capacity but they improved after 2 months of treatment. 6MWT can be a useful tool in the assessment of physical parameters and cardiorespiratory functional capacity rehabilitation of TB patients during the treatment. PMID:27656631

  13. Physical and functional follow-up of tuberculosis patients in initial intensive phase of treatment in Cameroon using the 6-min walk test.

    PubMed

    Guessogo, Wiliam R; Mandengue, Samuel H; Assomo Ndemba, Peguy B; Medjo, Ubald Olinga; Minye, Edmond Ebal; Ahmaidi, Said; Temfemo, Abdou

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate functional capacities of Cameroonian tuberculosis (TB) patients in initial intensive phase of treatment using the 6-min walk test (6MWT) and to compare them to an age-matched healthy group. Twenty-eight TB patients newly diagnosed and 19 healthy age-matched peoples participated in the study. Performance parameters were determined using the 6MWT. Anthropometric and cardiorespiratory parameters were measured at baseline and after 6MWT. Two months later, TB patients were submitted to the same evaluation. We found significant differences in anthropometric parameters between the two groups. The baseline cardiorespiratory parameters and performance characteristics of TB patients were lower than control group (571.7±121.0 m vs 841.6±53.0 m, P<0.0001 for 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and 18.1±2.8 mL/kg/min vs 24.3±1.2 mL/kg/min, P<0.001 for mean VO2 peak (peak oxygen consumption). Two months after, significant improvements were noted in anthropometric, cardiorespiratory and performance parameters except for bone mass and FEV1/FEV6 (forced expiratory volumes in 1 second/6 seconds) ratio. Significant correlations were found between the 2-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.95), 4-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.97) and 6MWD. In conclusion, TB patients have impaired physical functional capacity but they improved after 2 months of treatment. 6MWT can be a useful tool in the assessment of physical parameters and cardiorespiratory functional capacity rehabilitation of TB patients during the treatment. PMID:27656631

  14. Environmental controls in reducing house dust mites and nasal symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Moon, J S; Choi, S O

    1999-06-01

    A randomized comparison group pretest-posttest experimental design was used to quantitatively determine the effects of environmental control measures on patients with allergic rhinitis. Environmental controls included wrapping the mattress with a vinyl cover, washing the top bedding cover with 55 degrees C hot water every two weeks, removal of soft furniture, and wet cleaning of the bedroom floor every day. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The amount of house dust mites in dust samples collected from the bedroom floor, bedding and mattress, as well as the nasal symptoms of patients, were measured twice at one-month intervals. A significant decrease in house dust mites in dust samples and relief in patients' nasal symptoms were observed in the experimental group who had environmental controls.

  15. Bedside charting of pain levels in hospitalized patients with cancer: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, R L; Delafield, J P; Hays, R D; Drazin, R; Conolly, M

    1996-02-01

    Despite advances in the technology of cancer pain assessment and control, cancer pain often remains undertreated even in hospital settings. To determine whether a graphical display of cancer patients' pain levels might improve their treatment, the investigators conducted a randomized controlled trial. Patients assigned to the intervention group (N = 40) had periodic pain assessments by study staff, who graphically recorded their reported pain-intensity levels on bedside wall charts. Control group patients (N = 38) had periodic pain assessments by study staff but did not have this information displayed. The results failed to show a significant beneficial effect of the intervention on pain control, sleep, cancer-related symptoms, or analgesic dosing, but confidence intervals were broad. More research is needed to improve the quality of care for inpatients with cancer-related pain. PMID:8907138

  16. Change in response time of stroke patients and controls during rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Korner-Bitensky, N; Mayo, N E; Kaizer, F

    1990-02-01

    In this study we investigated motor response times of stroke patients at admission to a rehabilitation hospital and again after 6 wk of hospitalization. A prospective comparative study was carried out on 164 stroke patients; 48 hospitalized patients served as controls. Mean motor response times to visual stimuli presented in the left and right visual fields and to centrally presented stimuli were studied. The principle finding was that stroke patients improved significantly in their response times from initial to final evaluation. While at initial assessment they performed significantly more slowly than controls, by final assessment the response times of the two groups did not differ. Visual hemineglect influenced change in response time differentially depending on side of lesion: right hemisphere lesion patients with neglect improved, whereas left hemisphere lesion patients with neglect actually deteriorated. The presence of depression influenced right hemisphere lesion patients' response times and change in response times but it did not have any influence for left hemisphere lesion patients. The findings that response time generally improved during rehabilitation has important implications for the treatment of individuals with brain injury. It will be important to identify therapeutic practices which will be effective in the remediation of response time for all patients. Ultimately the goal of intervening in slow response time is to improve performance of functional activities which are influenced by an individual's ability to respond to visual stimuli.

  17. Visual memory errors in Parkinson's disease patient with visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Barnes, J; Boubert, L

    2011-03-01

    The occurrences of visual hallucinations seem to be more prevalent in low light and hallucinators tend to be more prone to false positive type errors in memory tasks. Here we investigated whether the richness of stimuli does indeed affect recognition differently in hallucinating and nonhallucinating participants, and if so whether this difference extends to identifying spatial context. We compared 36 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with visual hallucinations, 32 Parkinson's patients without hallucinations, and 36 age-matched controls, on a visual memory task where color and black and white pictures were presented at different locations. Participants had to recognize the pictures among distracters along with the location of the stimulus. Findings revealed clear differences in performance between the groups. Both PD groups had impaired recognition compared to the controls, but those with hallucinations were significantly more impaired on black and white than on color stimuli. In addition, the group with hallucinations was significantly impaired compared to the other two groups on spatial memory. We suggest that not only do PD patients have poorer recognition of pictorial stimuli than controls, those who present with visual hallucinations appear to be more heavily reliant on bottom up sensory input and impaired on spatial ability.

  18. Costs of a limited patient notification exercise following infection control failures in a dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Conrad, D; Dardamissis, E; Oyinloye, A; Vivancos, R; Ratcliffe, P

    2011-08-01

    In February 2008, a primary care trust in Cheshire Merseyside was notified of failures in the infection control practises of a dentist working in a large group practice. On advice from national experts, a look-back was undertaken to identify any patients infected with hepatitis followed by a notification exercise of patients who had received invasive treatment immediately afterwards. One patient with hepatitis C (HCV) was identified. Sixty patients were notified by letter and offered advice and HCV screening. The total cost of the patient notification exercise (PNE) was estimated at £85,936, equating to £1,562.47 per patient who responded to the notification (55), or £2,455.31 per patient screened (35). All results were negative. While this adds to evidence that the risk to patients in such incidents is small, failing to investigate the possibility that BBV transmission has occurred would carry public health, reputational and legal risks. Conducting a PNE in the first instance for those patients at highest risk, with the option of extending it if evidence of patient-to-patient transmission is found, ensures that the total costs of dealing appropriately with such incidents - while still substantial - are at least kept to a minimum. PMID:21869792

  19. Comparing health locus of control in patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia, Functional Dysphonia and Nonlaryngeal Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Haselden, Karen; Powell, Theresa; Drinnan, Mike; Carding, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Locus of Control (LoC) refers to an individuals' perception of whether they are in control of life events. Health Locus of Control refers to whether someone feels they have influence over their health. Health Locus of Control has not been studied in any depth in voice-disordered patients. The objective of this study was to examine Health Locus of Control in three patient groups: (1) Spasmodic Dysphonia, (2) Functional Dysphonia and (3) a nondysphonic group with Nonlaryngeal Dystonia. LoC was measured and compared in a total of 57 patients using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales (diagnostic specific) Form C. Internal, Chance, and Powerful others LoC were measured and comparisons were made using one-way analysis of variance. Contrary to expectations Internal LoC was found to be significantly higher in the Functional Dysphonia group when compared to the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in Chance or Powerful others LoC. The two organic groups, Spasmodic Dysphonia and Nonlaryngeal Dystonia, were more alike in Internal Health Locus of Control than the Functional Dysphonia group. The diagnostic nature of the groups was reflected in their LoC scores rather than their voice loss. These results contribute to the debate about the etiology of Spasmodic Dysphonia and will be of interest to those involved in the psychology of voice and those managing voice-disordered patients.

  20. [Ultrasound controlled extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of pancreatic calculi in patients with chronic recurrent pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, F; Gurakuqi, G C; Trauner, M; Krejs, G J

    1994-09-01

    A consecutive series of 10 patients with pancreatic stones due to chronic pancreatitis was treated by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy during an investigation period of 2 years. The first step of the therapeutic regime included an endoscopic sphincterotomy prior to shockwave treatment. The targeting procedure was performed strictly under sonographic control. All patients were treated with a second-generation electrohydraulic lithotriptor, fragmentation could be achieved in all 10 cases. In 7 patients stonefreeness could be reached by endoscopic stone extraction, all these patients were symptom-free over a follow-up period of 12 months. In 3 patients complete duct clearance could not be achieved, these patients presented with minor symptoms over the follow-up period.

  1. Dietary Habits in Patients with Ischemic Stroke: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Campello, Ana; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Ois, Ángel; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Schroeder, Helmut; Romeral, Gemma; Llop, Mireia; Soriano-Tárraga, Carolina; Garralda-Anaya, Montserrat; Roquer, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Diet appears to have some role in stroke development. The objective of our study was to describe the dietary habits in patients admitted with acute ischemic stroke and compare selected dietary components with healthy controls. Adherence to healthy diet behaviors was also assessed. Methods A case-control study of consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to the Neurology Department of Hospital del Mar from 2007 to 2010. Patients were matched by age and sex with control subjects. A previously validated nutritional survey was administered to patients and controls. Demographic data, vascular risk factors, caloric intake and dietary nutrients were evaluated. Intention to follow a healthy diet was also assessed in both groups. Results A total of 300 acute ischemic stroke patients and 300 controls with evaluation of dietary habits. No differences were observed in vascular risk factors, except smoking habit, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. Stroke patients reported a higher caloric intake: 2444.8(1736.8–3244.5) vs 2208.7(1753.1–2860.7) Kcal, p = 0.001. After adjusting for energy intake, patients had higher intake of proteins (p<0.001; OR 1.02), total cholesterol (p = 0.001; OR 1.04), and breaded foods (p = 0.001; OR 1.94) and lower consumption of probiotic yogurt (p = 0.002; OR 0.88). Compared to patients, control participants indicated greater intention to eat vegetables (p = 0.002; OR 1.5) and whole foods (p = 0.000; OR 2.4) and reduce their intake of salt (p = 0.002; OR 1.7), fat (p = 0.000; OR 3.7) and sweets (p = 0.004; OR 1.7) than patients. Conclusion We observed different dietary patterns between stroke patients and controls. Stroke patients have a higher caloric intake and are less concerned about maintaining healthy nutritional habits. PMID:25506934

  2. Altered Recruitment of the Attention Network Is Associated with Disability and Cognitive Impairment in Pediatric Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Strazzer, Sandra; Rocca, Maria A.; Molteni, Erika; De Meo, Ermelinda; Recla, Monica; Valsasina, Paola; Arrigoni, Filippo; Galbiati, Susanna; Bardoni, Alessandra; Filippi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We assessed abnormalities of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity during a sustained attention task (Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CCPT)) in 20 right-handed pediatric acquired brain injury (ABI) patients versus 7 right-handed age-matched healthy controls, and we estimated the correlation of such abnormalities with clinical and cognitive deficits. Patients underwent the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) evaluations. During fMRI, patients and controls activated regions of the attention network. Compared to controls, ABI patients experienced a decreased average fMRI recruitment of the left cerebellum and a decreased deactivation of the left anterior cingulate cortex. With increasing task demand, compared to controls, ABI patients had an impaired ability to increase the recruitment of several posterior regions of the attention network. They also experienced a greater activation of frontal regions, which was correlated with worse performance on FIM, WISC, and fMRI CCPT. Such abnormal brain recruitment was significantly influenced by the type of lesion (focal versus diffuse axonal injury) and time elapsed from the event. Pediatric ABI patients experienced an inability to optimize attention network recruitment, especially when task difficulty was increased, which likely contributes to their clinical and cognitive deficits. PMID:26448878

  3. Elevated Hair Cortisol Levels among Heroin Addicts on Current Methadone Maintenance Compared to Controls.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Li, Jifeng; Xu, Guanyi; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Zuhong; Deng, Huihua

    2016-01-01

    Whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can improve the basal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is suppressed by long-term heroin consumption, is a matter of debate. The stress state and depression and anxiety symptoms may affect the basal activity of the HPA axis in MMT patients. However, the effect of psychological factors on HPA activity was not simultaneously controlled in previous studies. This study investigated differences in HPA basal activity between MMT patients and controls using psychological variables as covariates. The participants included 52 MMT patients and 41 age-matched, non-heroin-dependent controls. Psychological states were self-reported with the Perceived Stress Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. The hair cortisol level was adopted as a biomarker of HPA basal activity and was determined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results revealed that MMT patients had significantly higher hair cortisol levels than the controls (p<0.05), but the difference was not significant (p>0.05) when the perceived stress, depression and anxiety scores were used as covariates. We concluded that patients with long-term MMT showed higher basal activity of the HPA axis. The high chronic stress state and increase in depression and anxiety symptoms may mask the suppression effect of methadone on the HPA activity. PMID:27010803

  4. Elevated Hair Cortisol Levels among Heroin Addicts on Current Methadone Maintenance Compared to Controls.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Li, Jifeng; Xu, Guanyi; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Zuhong; Deng, Huihua

    2016-01-01

    Whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can improve the basal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is suppressed by long-term heroin consumption, is a matter of debate. The stress state and depression and anxiety symptoms may affect the basal activity of the HPA axis in MMT patients. However, the effect of psychological factors on HPA activity was not simultaneously controlled in previous studies. This study investigated differences in HPA basal activity between MMT patients and controls using psychological variables as covariates. The participants included 52 MMT patients and 41 age-matched, non-heroin-dependent controls. Psychological states were self-reported with the Perceived Stress Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. The hair cortisol level was adopted as a biomarker of HPA basal activity and was determined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results revealed that MMT patients had significantly higher hair cortisol levels than the controls (p<0.05), but the difference was not significant (p>0.05) when the perceived stress, depression and anxiety scores were used as covariates. We concluded that patients with long-term MMT showed higher basal activity of the HPA axis. The high chronic stress state and increase in depression and anxiety symptoms may mask the suppression effect of methadone on the HPA activity.

  5. Elevated Hair Cortisol Levels among Heroin Addicts on Current Methadone Maintenance Compared to Controls

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Li, Jifeng; Xu, Guanyi; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Zuhong; Deng, Huihua

    2016-01-01

    Whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can improve the basal function of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, which is suppressed by long-term heroin consumption, is a matter of debate. The stress state and depression and anxiety symptoms may affect the basal activity of the HPA axis in MMT patients. However, the effect of psychological factors on HPA activity was not simultaneously controlled in previous studies. This study investigated differences in HPA basal activity between MMT patients and controls using psychological variables as covariates. The participants included 52 MMT patients and 41 age-matched, non-heroin-dependent controls. Psychological states were self-reported with the Perceived Stress Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. The hair cortisol level was adopted as a biomarker of HPA basal activity and was determined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results revealed that MMT patients had significantly higher hair cortisol levels than the controls (p<0.05), but the difference was not significant (p>0.05) when the perceived stress, depression and anxiety scores were used as covariates. We concluded that patients with long-term MMT showed higher basal activity of the HPA axis. The high chronic stress state and increase in depression and anxiety symptoms may mask the suppression effect of methadone on the HPA activity. PMID:27010803

  6. Intradialytic Massage for Leg Cramps Among Hemodialysis Patients: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mastnardo, Diane; Lewis, Janice M.; Hall, Kristi; Sullivan, Catherine M.; Cain, Katrice; Theurer, Jacqueline; Huml, Anne; Sehgal, Ashwini R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients on hemodialysis often experience muscle cramps that result in discomfort, shortened treatment times, and inadequate dialysis dose. Cramps have been associated with adversely affecting sleep and health-related quality of life, depression and anxiety. There is limited evidence available about massage in dialysis; however, massage in cancer patients has demonstrated decreases in pain, inflammation, and feelings of anxiety. These correlations indicate massage may be an effective treatment modality for hemodialysis-related lower extremity cramping. Purpose To determine the effectiveness of intradialytic massage on the frequency of cramping among hemodialysis patients prone to lower extremity cramping. Participants 26 maintenance hemodialysis patients with frequent lower extremity cramps. Setting three outpatient hemodialysis centers in Northeast Ohio. Research Design randomized controlled trial. Intervention The intervention group received a 20-minute massage of the lower extremities during each treatment (three times per week) for two weeks. The control group received usual care by dialysis center staff. Main Outcome Measure change in frequency of lower leg cramping. Results Patient reported cramping at home decreased by 1.3 episodes per week in the intervention group compared to 0.2 episodes per week in the control group (p=.005). Patient reported cramping during dialysis decreased by 0.8 episodes in the intervention group compared to 0.4 episodes in the control group (p=0.44). Conclusion Intradialytic massage appears to be an effective way to address muscle cramping. Larger studies with longer duration should be conducted to further examine this approach. PMID:27257445

  7. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  8. Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation: Is it controlled by patient brain?

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-07-01

    Tidal volume (VT) is the controlled variable during passive mechanical ventilation (CMV) in order to avoid ventilator-induced-lung-injury. However, recent data indicate that the driving pressure [ΔP; VT to respiratory system compliance (Crs) ratio] is the parameter that best stratifies the risk of death. In order to study which variable (VT or ΔP) is controlled by critically ill patients, 108 previously studied patients were assigned to receive PAV+ (a mode that estimates Crs and permits the patients to select their own breathing pattern) after CMV, were re-analyzed. When patients were switched from CMV to PAV+ they controlled ΔP without constraining VT to narrow limits. VT was increased when the resumption of spontaneous breathing was associated with an increase in Crs. When ΔP was high during CMV, the patients (n=12) decreased it in 58 out of 67 measurements. We conclude that critically ill patients control the driving pressure by sizing the tidal volume to individual respiratory system compliance using appropriate feedback mechanisms aimed at limiting the degree of lung stress.

  9. Kraepelin Was Right: A Latent Class Analysis of Symptom Dimensions in Patients and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Eske M.; Allardyce, Judith; Boks, Marco P.; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Hijman, Ron; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity within patients and controls may explain why the genetic variants contributing to schizophrenia risk explain only a fraction of the heritability. The aim of this study is to investigate quantitative and qualitative differences in psychosis symptoms in a sample including psychosis patients, their relatives, and community controls. We combined factor analysis and latent class analysis to analyze variation in Comprehensive Assessment of Symptoms and History lifetime-rated symptoms in 4286 subjects. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Intelligence Quotient (N = 2663) and the Camberwell Assessment of Need rating scale (N = 625) were assessed in a subsample. Variation in 5 continuous dimensions (disorganization, positive, negative, mania, and depression) was accounted for by the presence of 7 homogeneous classes (Kraepelinian schizophrenia, affective psychosis, manic-depression, deficit nonpsychosis, depression, healthy, and no symptoms). Eighty-five percent of the schizophrenia patients was assigned to the Kraepelinian schizophrenia class (characterized by high scores on the 5 dimensions, low IQ, and poor outcome) while 15% was assigned to the affective psychosis class (relatively low disorganization and negative scores, normal IQ, and good outcome). In bipolar patients (91% bipolar I), 41% was assigned to the Kraepelinian schizophrenia class, 44% to the affective psychosis class, and 10% to the manic-depression class. Latent class membership was associated with intelligence in psychosis patients and in their relatives but not in community controls. In conclusion, symptom heterogeneity is more pronounced in bipolar disorder compared with schizophrenia. Reducing phenotypic heterogeneity within psychosis patients and controls may facilitate etiological research. PMID:20864620

  10. Sleep quality in patients with xerostomia: a prospective and randomized case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jornet, Pia; Lucero Berdugo, Maira; Fernandez-Pujante, Alba; C, Castillo Felipe; Lavella C, Zamora; A, Pons-Fuster; J, Silvestre Rangil; Silvestre, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate sleep quality, anxiety/depression and quality-of-life in patients with xerostomia. Materials and methods This prospective, observational, cross-sectional study was conducted among a group of xerostomia patients (n = 30) compared with 30 matched control subjects. The following evaluation scales were used to assess the psychological profile of each patient: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), the Xerostomia Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Results The PSQI obtained 5.3 3 ± 1.78 for patients with xerostomia compared with 4.26 ± 1.01 for control subjects (p = 0.006); ESS obtained 5.7 ± 2.1 for test patients vs 4.4 0 ± 1 for control subjects (p = 0.010). Statistical regression analysis showed that xerostomia was significantly associated with depression (p = 0.027). Conclusions Patients with xerostomia exhibited significant decreases in sleep quality compared with control subjects.

  11. Prevalence of Cytomegalovirus in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study in Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Saeideh; Ghane, Masood; Poortahmasebi, Vahdat; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, Shahrokh

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating disease known as one of the most common neurological dysfunctions in young adults. Recent studies suggest that infections with herpesviruses play a critical role in the pathogenesis of MS. Objectives The present investigation aimed to detect the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in patients with MS using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Patients and Methods Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from MS patients (n = 82) and from blood donors as control group (n = 89). They were tested for the presence of CMV antibodies and DNA by ELISA and PCR, respectively. Results Anti-CMV was positive in 65 (79.3%) and 69 (77.5%) of the MS patients and healthy subjects, respectively (P= 0.853). Similarly, 23 (28%) and 2 (2.2%) patients were positive for CMV DNA among the MS and control groups, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the frequency of CMV DNA in the MS patients was significantly higher than in the healthy controls (P < 0.001). Conclusions The results of this study showed a possible association between CMV infection and MS. Further experimental and epidemiological studies using case-control approaches are needed to confirm this association. PMID:27679707

  12. The application of control limits analysis to the myometric assessment of motor performance in neuropathy patients.

    PubMed

    Lough, J C; Rafferty, D; McColl, J H; Bell, F; Willison, H J

    2000-07-01

    Measurement of muscle strength by myometry is used to monitor the natural course and treatment response of motor system diseases, both in individual patients and clinical trials. However, the practical usefulness of myometric data is reliant upon a statistical method for analysing serial strength measurements which distinguishes disease-related changes from random fluctuations in patient performance and operator/device dependent measurement errors. In this study we have applied control limits analysis to this problem. Using hand-held dynamometry, sets of baseline strength measurements were collected on two separate occasions during a period of clinical stability from up to four muscle groups in 22 patients with peripheral neuropathies. From these sets of data, 76 control limits were calculated and then used to describe the inter-measurement variation in muscle strength in individual muscles. The range of control limits was wide, varying from <10% of baseline (in 36% of muscles tested) to >50% (in 4% of muscles tested), with 88% of muscles falling within 30% of baseline. Follow-up data were also collected from all patients, including those undergoing treatment. Control limits analysis is a powerful and simple method for assessing the significance of motor performance changes in individual muscles in patients undergoing serial monitoring and can be easily applied to both single patients and clinical trials.

  13. Prevalence of Cytomegalovirus in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study in Northern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Saeideh; Ghane, Masood; Poortahmasebi, Vahdat; Jazayeri, Seyed Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Chabok, Shahrokh

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating disease known as one of the most common neurological dysfunctions in young adults. Recent studies suggest that infections with herpesviruses play a critical role in the pathogenesis of MS. Objectives The present investigation aimed to detect the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in patients with MS using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Patients and Methods Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from MS patients (n = 82) and from blood donors as control group (n = 89). They were tested for the presence of CMV antibodies and DNA by ELISA and PCR, respectively. Results Anti-CMV was positive in 65 (79.3%) and 69 (77.5%) of the MS patients and healthy subjects, respectively (P= 0.853). Similarly, 23 (28%) and 2 (2.2%) patients were positive for CMV DNA among the MS and control groups, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the frequency of CMV DNA in the MS patients was significantly higher than in the healthy controls (P < 0.001). Conclusions The results of this study showed a possible association between CMV infection and MS. Further experimental and epidemiological studies using case-control approaches are needed to confirm this association.

  14. Subjective and objective knowledge and decisional role preferences in cerebrovascular patients compared to controls

    PubMed Central

    Riechel, Christina; Alegiani, Anna Christina; Köpke, Sascha; Kasper, Jürgen; Rosenkranz, Michael; Thomalla, Götz; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk knowledge and active role preferences are important for patient involvement in treatment decision-making and adherence. Although knowledge about stroke warning signs and risk factors has received considerable attention, objective knowledge on secondary prevention and further self-esteem subjective knowledge have rarely been studied. The aim of our study was to investigate knowledge and treatment decisional role preferences in cerebrovascular patients compared to controls. Methods We performed a survey on subjective and objective stroke risk knowledge and autonomy preferences in cerebrovascular patients from our stroke outpatient clinic (n=262) and from pedestrians on the street taken as controls during a “World Stroke Day” (n=274). The questionnaire includes measures for knowledge and decisional role preferences from previously published questionnaires and newly developed measures, for example, subjective knowledge, revealed on a visual analog scale. Results The overall stroke knowledge was low to moderate, with no differences between patients and controls. Knowledge about secondary prevention was particularly low. Only 10%–15% of participants correctly estimated the stroke absolute risk reduction potential of aspirin. The medical data interpretation competence was moderate in both groups. Age and basic mathematical and statistical understanding (numeracy) were the only independent predictors of objective stroke knowledge, whereas previous stroke had no impact on stroke knowledge. However, patients were thought to be better informed than controls. Approximately 60% of both patients and controls claimed to prefer a shared decision-making approach in treatment decisions. Conclusion The level of stroke risk knowledge in patients with cerebrovascular diseases was as low as in randomly selected pedestrians, although patients felt better informed. Both groups preferred involvement in treatment decision-making. We conclude that educational concepts

  15. Family caregiver preferences for patient decisional control among Hispanics in the United States and Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Yennurajalingam, Sriram; Noguera, Antonio; Parsons, Henrique Afonseca; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Duarte, Eva Rosina; Palma, Alejandra; Bunge, Sofia; Palmer, J. Lynn; Delgado-Guay, Marvin Omar; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding family caregivers’ decisional role preferences is important for communication, quality of care, and patient and family satisfaction. The family caregiver has an important role in a patient’s decisional role preferences. There are limited studies on family caregivers’ preferences of the patient’s decisional control at the end of life among Hispanics. Aims To identify Hispanic caregivers’ preferences of the decision control of patients with advanced cancer and to compare the preferences of caregivers in Latin America (HLA) and Hispanic American (HUSA) caregivers. Design We surveyed patients and their family caregivers referred to outpatient palliative care clinics in the United States, Chile, Argentina, and Guatemala. Caregiver preferences of patient’s decisional control were evaluated using the Control Preference Scale. Caregivers’ and patients’ socio-demographic variables, patient performance status, and HUSA patient acculturation level was also collected. Participants A total of 387 caregivers were surveyed: 100 (26%) in Chile, 99 (26%) in Argentina, 97 (25%) in Guatemala, and 91 (24%) in the United States. The median age was 56 years, and 59% were female. Results Caregiver preference of patients decisions control was passive, shared, and active by 10 (11%), 45 (52%) and 32 (37%) HUSA caregivers and 54 (19%), 178 (62%) and 55 (19%) HLA caregivers (p=0.0023). Caregiver acculturation level did not affect the preferences of the HUSA sample (p=0.60). Conclusions Most Hispanic family caregivers preferred the patient to make shared decisions. HLA caregivers preferred more frequently patients to assume a passive decisional role. Acculturation did not influence the preferences of HUSA caregivers. PMID:23670718

  16. Cushing's syndrome in type 2 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Gungunes, Askin; Sahin, Mustafa; Demirci, Taner; Ucan, Bekir; Cakir, Evrim; Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Unsal, Ilknur Ozturk; Karbek, Basak; Calıskan, Mustafa; Ozbek, Mustafa; Cakal, Erman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome may be more frequent in some specific patient groups such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome in outpatients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least 3-months insulin therapy. Outpatients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite receiving at least 3-months long insulin treatment (insulin alone or insulin with oral antidiabetics) were included. Patients with classic features of Cushing's syndrome were excluded. Overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) was performed as a screening test. A total of 277 patients with type 2 diabetes whose glycemic control is poor (Hb Alc value >7 %) despite insulin therapy were included. Two of the 277 patients with type 2 diabetes were diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome (0.72 %). Hypertension was statistically more frequent in the patients with cortisol levels ≥1.8 μg/dL than the patients with cortisol levels <1.8 μg/dL after overnight 1 mg DST (p = 0.041). Statistically significant correlation was determined between cortisol levels after 1 mg DST and age, daily insulin dose (r = 0.266 and p < 0.001, r = 0.163 and p = 0.008, respectively). According to our findings, the prevalence of Cushing's syndrome among patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite insulin therapy is much higher than in the general population. The patients with type 2 diabetes with poor glycemic control despite at least three months of insulin therapy should be additionally tested for Cushing's syndrome if they have high dose insülin requirements.

  17. Predictors of Asthma Control by Stepwise Treatment in Elderly Asthmatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Young; Ye, Young-Min; Lee, Yunhwan; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Nam, Young-Hee; Lee, Soo-Keol; Kim, Joo-Hee; Jung, Ki-Suck; Kim, Sang-Ha; Park, Hae-Sim

    2015-08-01

    The geriatric population is increasing, and asthma severity increases with age. We determined the predictors of asthma control, exacerbation, and the factors that affect asthma-specific quality of life (A-QOL) in elderly asthmatic patients. This was a prospective, multicenter, real-life study for 6 months with stepwise pharmacologic treatment based on the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline. A total of 296 asthmatic patients aged ≥ 60 yr were recruited from 5 university centers in Korea. The improved-asthma control group was defined as the group of patients who maintained well-controlled or improved disease and the not-improved asthma control group was defined as the remaining patients. Fewer number of medications for comorbidities (2.8 ± 3.3 in the improved vs. 4.5 ± 4.4 in the control) and higher physical functioning (PF) scale (89.8 ± 14.2 in the improved vs. 82.0 ± 16.4 in the control) were significant predictors in the improved-asthma control group (OR = 0.863, P = 0.004 and OR = 1.028, P = 0.018, respectively). An asthma control test (ACT) score of ≤ 19 at baseline was a significant predictor of asthma exacerbation (OR = 3.938, P = 0.048). Asthma duration (F = 5.656, P = 0.018), ACT score (F = 12.237, P = 0.001) at baseline, and the presence of asthma exacerbation (F = 5.565, P = 0.019) were significant determinants of changes in A-QOL. The number of medications for comorbidities and performance status determined by the PF scale may be important parameters for assessing asthma control in elderly asthmatic patients.

  18. Peripheral chemoreceptor control of cardiovascular function at rest and during exercise in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Edgell, Heather; McMurtry, M Sean; Haykowsky, Mark J; Paterson, Ian; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Dyck, Jason R B; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor activity/sensitivity is enhanced in chronic heart failure (HF), and sensitivity is linked to greater mortality. This study aimed to determine the role of the peripheral chemoreceptor in cardiovascular control at rest and during exercise in HF patients and controls. Clinically stable HF patients (n = 11; ejection fraction: 39 ± 5%) and risk-matched controls (n = 10; ejection fraction: 65 ± 2%) performed randomized trials with or without dopamine infusion (2 μg·min(-1)·kg(-1)) at rest and during 40% maximal voluntary contraction handgrip (HG) exercise, and a resting trial of 2 min of inspired 100% oxygen. Both dopamine and hyperoxia were used to inhibit the peripheral chemoreceptor. At rest in HF patients, dopamine decreased ventilation (P = 0.02), decreased total peripheral resistance index (P = 0.003), and increased cardiac and stroke indexes (P ≤ 0.01), yet there was no effect of dopamine on these variables in controls (P ≥ 0.7). Hyperoxia lowered ventilation in HF (P = 0.01), but not in controls (P = 0.9), indicating suppression of the peripheral chemoreceptors in HF. However, no decrease of total peripheral resistance index was observed in HF. As expected, HG increased heart rate, ventilation, and brachial conductance of the nonexercising arm in controls and HF patients. During dopamine infusion, there were no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, or ventilation responses to HG in either group (P ≥ 0.26); however, brachial conductance increased with dopamine in the control group (P = 0.004), but decreased in HF (P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that the peripheral chemoreceptor contributes to cardiovascular control at rest in HF patients and during exercise in risk-matched controls.

  19. Excellent Local Control With Stereotactic Radiotherapy Boost After External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, Wendy; Loo, Billy W.; Goffinet, Don R.; Chang, Steven D.; Adler, John R.; Pinto, Harlan A.; Fee, Willard E.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine long-term outcomes in patients receiving stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) as a boost after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Eight-two patients received an SRT boost after EBRT between September 1992 and July 2006. Nine patients had T1, 30 had T2, 12 had T3, and 31 had T4 tumors. Sixteen patients had Stage II, 19 had Stage III, and 47 had Stage IV disease. Patients received 66 Gy of EBRT followed by a single-fraction SRT boost of 7-15 Gy, delivered 2-6 weeks after EBRT. Seventy patients also received cisplatin-based chemotherapy delivered concurrently with and adjuvant to radiotherapy. Results: At a median follow-up of 40.7 months (range, 6.5-144.2 months) for living patients, there was only 1 local failure in a patient with a T4 tumor. At 5 years, the freedom from local relapse rate was 98%, freedom from nodal relapse 83%, freedom from distant metastasis 68%, freedom from any relapse 67%, and overall survival 69%. Late toxicity included radiation-related retinopathy in 3, carotid aneurysm in 1, and radiographic temporal lobe necrosis in 10 patients, of whom 2 patients were symptomatic with seizures. Of 10 patients with temporal lobe necrosis, 9 had T4 tumors. Conclusion: Stereotactic radiotherapy boost after EBRT provides excellent local control for patients with NPC. Improved target delineation and dose homogeneity of radiation delivery for both EBRT and SRT is important to avoid long-term complications. Better systemic therapies for distant control are needed.

  20. Controlled trials of antibiotic treatment in patients with post-treatment chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Mark S

    2002-01-01

    Some patients have persistence of profound fatigue, myalgias, arthralgias without arthritis, dysesthesia/paresthesia, and mood and memory disturbances after standard courses of antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease. This constellation of symptoms has been variously referred to as "chronic Lyme disease," "post-Lyme disease syndrome," and "post-treatment chronic Lyme disease." Persistent symptoms have been reported in patients who are seropositive for IgG antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi as well as in patients who are seronegative. The cause or causes of persistent symptoms in these patients have not been clearly defined and are controversial. Because of the temporal association of these symptoms with infection with B. burgdorferi, some patients have been treated with prolonged courses of antibiotics. Case reports and uncontrolled trials have reported the efficacy of prolonged antibiotic therapy, often with relapse of the symptoms after discontinuation of therapy. To date, only one randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of antibiotic therapy for these patients has been published. An abstract of a second placebo-controlled trial of antibiotic therapy in a smaller cohort has also been presented. This paper will describe this patient population in detail and will review the clinical, microbiological, and selected biochemical and immunologic parameters and their responses to antibiotic treatment in the setting of a controlled trial.

  1. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  2. Domiciliary occupational therapy for patients with stroke discharged from hospital: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Louise; Langhorne, Peter; Walker, Andrew; Allen, Ann; Murray, Gordon D

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish if a brief programme of domiciliary occupational therapy could improve the recovery of patients with stroke discharged from hospital. Design Single blind randomised controlled trial. Setting Two hospital sites within a UK teaching hospital. Subjects 138 patients with stroke with a definite plan for discharge home from hospital. Intervention Six week domiciliary occupational therapy or routine follow up. Main outcome measures Nottingham extended activities of daily living score and “global outcome” (deterioration according to the Barthel activities of daily living index, or death). Results By eight weeks the mean Nottingham extended activities of daily living score in the intervention group was 4.8 points (95% confidence interval −0.5 to 10.0, P=0.08) greater than that of the control group. Overall, 16 (24%) intervention patients had a poor global outcome compared with 30 (42%) control patients (odds ratio 0.43, 0.21 to 0.89, P=0.02). These patterns persisted at six months but were not statistically significant. Patients in the intervention group were more likely to report satisfaction with a range of aspects of services. Conclusion The functional outcome and satisfaction of patients with stroke can be improved by a brief occupational therapy programme carried out in the patient's home immediately after discharge. Major benefits may not, however, be sustained. PMID:10698876

  3. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  4. Erythematous oral candidiasis in patients with controlled type II diabetes mellitus and complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Motta-Silva, Arlindo C; Aleva, Natanael A; Chavasco, Jorge K; Armond, Mônica C; França, Julieta P; Pereira, Luciano José

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a systemic condition characterized by a deficient sugar metabolism, which affects the immune system and favors the development of yeasts. The aim of the present study was to perform biochemical, morphological, exoenzyme analyses of Candida species and the molecular identification (DNA) of C. albicans in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. The exoenzyme quantification was compared to non-diabetic patients as controls. Two hundred and seventy-four patients who make use of complete dentures were evaluated, 28 of whom had diabetes and erythematous oral candidiasis. Other thirty patients presented the same clinical feature but without diabetes. Samples were isolated for biochemical identification (auxonogram), morphological identification (production of germ tubes) and PCR molecular identification (DNA). The capability of the Candida samples in producing phospholipases and proteinases was also determined. The diabetic patients had a greater diversity of Candida species (Fischer's exact test, P = 0.04). The production of proteinases by C. albicans in patients with diabetes was greater than in the control group (unpaired "t" test P < 0.003). However, there was no difference between groups for phospholipase production (unpaired "t" test P > 0.05). It was concluded that patients with controlled DM exhibited systemic conditions predisposing C. albicans proteinase increased production.

  5. Blood pressure control among hypertensive patients with and without diabetes mellitus in six public primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ai Theng; Tong, Seng Fah; Sazlina, Sharrif G; Azah, Abdul Samad; Salmiah, Md Sharif

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension is a common comorbidity among diabetic patients. This study aimed to determine blood pressure (BP) control among hypertensive patients with and without diabetes. This was a cross-sectional study in 6 public primary care clinics in Wilayah Persekutuan, Malaysia. Hypertensive patients aged ≥18 years and attending the clinics were selected via systematic random sampling. The BP control target was defined as <130/80 mm Hg for diabetic patients and <140/90 mm Hg for nondiabetic patients. A total of 1107 hypertensive patients participated in this study and 540 (48.7%) had diabetes. About one fourth (24.3%) of the hypertensive patients with diabetes achieved BP control target, compared with 60.1% patients without diabetes (P < .001). Being diabetic and on ≥2 antihypertensive treatments were associated with poor BP control. Attention needs to be given to these groups of patients when managing patients with hypertension.

  6. Insulin pump patient characteristics and glucose control in the hospitalized setting.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Subramanian; Satra, Ankita; Calogeras, Ellen; Lock, Patricia; Lansang, M Cecilia

    2014-05-01

    Patients' knowledge of their insulin pumps and glucose control during hospitalization has not been studied. The aim was to study the determinants of glycemic control in patients using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in the hospital. Three groups of patients were identified: those who did not need any inpatient education and continued on CSII (gorup A), those who received education then continued on CSII (group B), and those for whom CSII was not appropriate and were treated with multiple daily insulin injections (gorup C). We compared the measures of glycemic control between the 3 groups and analyzed which variables impacted glucose control. There were 50 patients, with 51 hospital admissions, 57% males, mean age 48 ± 13 years, 86% had type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The mean DM duration was 26 ± 14 years, mean duration of CSII use was 8.7 ± 6 years, and mean HbA1c was 7.6 ± 1.4%. The mean duration of hospital stay was 5.6 ± 4.6 days. Mean blood glucose (BG) and frequency of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemic events among the 3 groups adjusted for their duration of hospital stay were not statistically different. None of the patients developed diabetic ketoacidosis while using their pump. Stepwise multivariate analysis revealed knowledge of hypoglycemia correction was the single most important predictor of mean BG (P < .001). Patients who received inpatient education performed similarly to patients who did not need inpatient education. Patients who receive inpatient education on CSII fare similar as patients who did not require inpatient education.

  7. Memory monitoring and memory control in patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Daurat, Agnès; Huet, Nathalie; Tiberge, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome exhibit memory deficit. The present study looked at whether this deficit is related to impaired memory monitoring and/or memory control. Here 25 patients and 26 healthy controls performed a paired-associate learning task. After participants had made a judgement of learning for each pair and performed an initial recall test they were free to restudy any items they wished, for as long or little as they wished, within a 5-minute period. They then performed a second recall test. Monitoring and control processes were assessed on the basis of judgements of learning, item selection, and study-time allocation. In spite of their memory impairment, patients accurately predicted their recall. For the restudy phase patients preferentially selected the judged-easy items, while controls selected the judged-difficult items. However, all the participants allocated more restudy time to the judged-difficult items than to the judged-easy ones. There were no significant correlations between memory performance, metamemory processes, and clinical measures (i.e., subjective sleepiness, subjective sleep quality, anxiety, and depression scores). Results suggested that both memory monitoring and memory control were preserved in our sample of patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

  8. Enablers of Physician Prescription of a Long-Term Asthma Controller in Patients with Persistent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Martha L.; Desplats, Eve; Ernst, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to identify key enablers of physician prescription of a long-term controller in patients with persistent asthma. Methods. We conducted a mailed survey of randomly selected Quebec physicians. We sent a 102-item questionnaire, seeking reported management regarding one of 4 clinical vignettes of a poorly controlled adult or child and endorsement of enablers to prescribe long-term controllers. Results. With a 56% participation rate, 421 physicians participated. Most (86%) would prescribe a long-term controller (predominantly inhaled corticosteroids, ICS) to the patient in their clinical vignette. Determinants of intention were the recognition of persistent symptoms (OR 2.67), goal of achieving long-term control (OR 5.31), and high comfort level in initiating long-term ICS (OR 2.33). Decision tools, pharmacy reports, reminders, and specific training were strongly endorsed by ≥60% physicians to support optimal management. Physicians strongly endorsed asthma education, lung function testing, specialist opinion, accessible asthma clinic, and paramedical healthcare professionals to guide patients, as enablers to improve patient adherence to and physicians' comfort with long-term ICS. Interpretation. Tools and training to improve physician knowledge, skills, and perception towards long-term ICS and resources that increase patient adherence and physician comfort to facilitate long-term ICS prescription should be considered as targets for implementation. PMID:27445537

  9. Sexual Well-Being in Patients with Blepharospasm, Spasmodic Torticollis, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Perozzo, Paola; Salatino, Adriana; Cerrato, Paolo; Ricci, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Mood, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospasm (BSP) and spasmodic torticollis (ST). Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N = 30), ST (N = 30), and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N = 30), undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory, a reduced form of the Golombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2) were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e., altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits). Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS, and comparable data are not available. PMID:27761118

  10. Increased coronary intervention rate among diabetic patients with poor glycaemic control: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Süha; Öztürk, Mehmet Akif; Barındık, Nadir; İmren, Ersin; Peker, Yüksel

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between glycaemic control and coronary artery disease (CAD) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is controversial. In the current cross-sectional study, we addressed the relationship between Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values and the need for revascularization among diabetic patients undergoing coronary angiography. A total of 301 consecutive patients with known T2DM (age 61.8±10.1 years, 46.2 % women) requiring coronary angiography due to CAD symptoms were included. T2DM patients were categorized into two groups based on their HbA1c values: 93 (30.9%) diabetics with good glycaemic control (HbA1c≤7 %), and 208 (69.1%) diabetics with poor glycaemic control (HbA1c>7 %). A total of 123 patients (40.9%) required revascularization. The revascularization rate was 28.0% among T2DM patients with good glycaemic control and 46.6% among T2DM patients with poor glycaemic control, respectively (p=0.002). In a logistic regression analysis, the need for revascularization was predicted by poor glycaemic control (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.26, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.32-3.82; p=0.003) adjusted for age, gender, Body-Mass-Index and diabetes duration. Moreover, there was a linear relationship between HbA1c values and number of affected coronary arteries (r= 0.169; p=0.003). Our data suggest that there is a close association between poor glycaemic control and increased revascularization rate in T2DM, which should be considered in primary and secondary prevention models.

  11. Patient-related barriers to hypertension control in a Nigerian population

    PubMed Central

    Okwuonu, Chimezie Godswill; Ojimadu, Nnamdi Ezekiel; Okaka, Enajite Ibiene; Akemokwe, Fatai Momodu

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension control is a challenge globally. Barriers to optimal control exist at the patient, physician, and health system levels. Patient-related barriers in our environment are not clear. The aim of this study was to identify patient-related barriers to control of hypertension among adults with hypertension in a semiurban community in South-East Nigeria. Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of patients with a diagnosis of hypertension and on antihypertensive medication. Results A total of 252 participants were included in the survey, and comprised 143 males (56.7%) and 109 females (43.3%). The mean age of the participants was 56.6±12.7 years, with a diagnosis of hypertension for a mean duration of 6.1±3.3 years. Among these patients, 32.9% had controlled blood pressure, while 39.3% and 27.8%, respectively, had stage 1 and stage 2 hypertension according to the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection and Evaluation of High Blood Pressure. Only 23.4% knew the consequences of poor blood pressure control and 64% were expecting a cure from treatment even when the cause of hypertension was not known. Furthermore, 68.7% showed low adherence to medication, the reported reasons for which included forgetfulness (61.2%), financial constraints (56.6%), high pill burden (22.5%), side effects of medication (17.3%), and low measured blood pressure (12.1%). Finally, knowledge and practice of the lifestyle modifications necessary for blood pressure control was inadequate among the participants. Conclusion Poor knowledge regarding hypertension, unrealistic expectations of treatment, poor adherence with medication, unawareness of lifestyle modification, and failure to apply these were identified as patient-related barriers to blood pressure control in this study. PMID:25061335

  12. Current understanding in source control management in septic shock patients: a review

    PubMed Central

    Encina, Belen; Ramirez-Estrada, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Antibiotics, fluid resuscitation support of vital organ function and source control are the cornerstones for the treatment of these patients. Source control measures include all those actions taken in the process of care to control the foci of infection and to restore optimal function of the site of infection. Source control represents the multidisciplinary team required in order to optimize critical care for septic shock patients. In the last decade an increase interest on fluids, vasopressors, antibiotics, and organ support techniques in all aspects whether time, dose and type of any of those have been described. However information of source control measures involving minimal invasion and new techniques, time of action and outcome without it, is scarce. In this review the authors resumes new information, recommendations and future directions on this matter when facing the more common types of infections. PMID:27713888

  13. Prevalence of Intestinal Protozoa among Saudi Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hawash, Yousry A; Dorgham, Laila Sh; Amir, El-Amir M; Sharaf, Osama F

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that chronic renal failure (CRF) predisposes patients to infection with intestinal protozoa. We tested this hypothesis with a matched case-control study to determine the prevalence of these protozoa and their diarrhea associated symptoms among 50 patients with CRF (cases) from Taif, western Saudi Arabia. Fifty diarrheal patients without CRF were recruited in the study as controls. Participants were interviewed by a structured questionnaire and stool samples were collected. Samples were thoroughly examined with microscopy and three coproantigens detection kits. Enteric protozoa were detected in 21 cases and 14 controls. Blastocystis spp. were the most predominant parasite (16% in cases versus 8% in controls), followed by Giardia duodenalis (10% in cases versus 12% in controls) and Cryptosporidium spp. (10% in cases versus 6% in controls). Cyclospora cayetanensis was identified in two cases, while Entamoeba histolytica was described in one case and one control. Intestinal parasitism was positively associated with the male gender, urban residence, and travel history. Clinical symptoms of nausea/vomiting and abdominal pain were significantly varied between the parasitized cases and controls (P value ≤ 0.05). Given the results, we recommend screening all diarrheal feces for intestinal protozoa in the study's population, particularly those with CRF. PMID:26491455

  14. Indicators of glycemic control in patients with gestational diabetes mellitus and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kunihiko; Koga, Masafumi

    2015-07-25

    Recently, it has become clear that mild abnormal glucose tolerance increases the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications, and so the definition and diagnostic criteria of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have been changed. Therefore, in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus, even stricter glycemic control than before is required to reduce the incidence of perinatal maternal-infant complications. Strict glycemic control cannot be attained without an indicator of glycemic control; this review proposes a reliable indicator. The gold standard indicator of glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); however, we have demonstrated that HbA1c does not reflect glycemic control accurately during pregnancy because of iron deficiency. It has also become clear that glycated albumin, another indicator of glycemic control, is not influenced by iron deficiency and therefore might be a better indicator of glycemic control in patients with GDM and pregnant women with diabetes mellitus. However, large-population epidemiological studies are necessary in order to confirm our proposal. Here, we outline the most recent findings about the indicators of glycemic control during pregnancy including fructosamine and 1,5-anhydroglucitol.

  15. Prevalence of Intestinal Protozoa among Saudi Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Hawash, Yousry A; Dorgham, Laila Sh; Amir, El-Amir M; Sharaf, Osama F

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that chronic renal failure (CRF) predisposes patients to infection with intestinal protozoa. We tested this hypothesis with a matched case-control study to determine the prevalence of these protozoa and their diarrhea associated symptoms among 50 patients with CRF (cases) from Taif, western Saudi Arabia. Fifty diarrheal patients without CRF were recruited in the study as controls. Participants were interviewed by a structured questionnaire and stool samples were collected. Samples were thoroughly examined with microscopy and three coproantigens detection kits. Enteric protozoa were detected in 21 cases and 14 controls. Blastocystis spp. were the most predominant parasite (16% in cases versus 8% in controls), followed by Giardia duodenalis (10% in cases versus 12% in controls) and Cryptosporidium spp. (10% in cases versus 6% in controls). Cyclospora cayetanensis was identified in two cases, while Entamoeba histolytica was described in one case and one control. Intestinal parasitism was positively associated with the male gender, urban residence, and travel history. Clinical symptoms of nausea/vomiting and abdominal pain were significantly varied between the parasitized cases and controls (P value ≤ 0.05). Given the results, we recommend screening all diarrheal feces for intestinal protozoa in the study's population, particularly those with CRF.

  16. Gray Matter Volume Decreases in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia: A Voxel-based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Caroline; Schuller, Anne Marie; Paulos, Carlos; Namer, Izzie; Pull, Charles; Danion, Jean Marie; Foucher, Jack René

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aged patients (>50 years old) with residual schizophrenic symptoms differ from young patients. They represent a subpopulation with a more unfavorable Kraepelinian course and have an increased risk (up to 30%) for dementia of unknown origin. However, our current understanding of age-related brain changes in schizophrenia is derived from studies that included less than 17% of patients who were older than 50 years of age. This study investigated the anatomical distribution of gray matter (GM) brain deficits in aged patients with ongoing schizophrenia. Methods: Voxel-based morphometry was applied to 3D-T1 magnetic resonance images obtained from 27 aged patients with schizophrenia (mean age of 60 years) and 40 age-matched normal controls. Results: Older patients with schizophrenia showed a bilateral reduction of GM volume in the thalamus, the prefrontal cortex, and in a large posterior region centered on the occipito-temporo-parietal junction. Only the latter region showed accelerated GM volume loss with increasing age. None of these results could be accounted for by institutionalization, antipsychotic medication, or cognitive scores. Conclusions: This study replicated most common findings in patients with schizophrenia with regard to thalamic and frontal GM deficits. However, it uncovered an unexpected large region of GM atrophy in the posterior tertiary cortices. The latter observation may be specific to this aged and chronically symptomatic subpopulation, as atrophy in this region is rarely reported in younger patients and is accelerated with age. PMID:21205677

  17. Evaluation of Serum Leptin Levels and Growth in Patients with β-Thalassaemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naama, Lamia Mustafa; Hassan, Meaad Kadum; Abdul Karim, Muhannad Maki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Iron deposition in the body can damage the endocrine glands of patients with β-thalassaemia major (β-TM). Leptin plays a key role in the regulation of appetite, body fat mass, and endocrine function. Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum leptin and growth and pubertal development in patients with β-TM, as well as whether serum leptin can predict growth retardation and delayed puberty in these patients. Methods. Fifty β-TM patients (aged 8–20 years) and 75 age-matched healthy controls were recruited. Anthropometric data and sexual maturity ratings were assessed. Serum leptin was measured by ELISA. Results. Serum leptin levels were significantly lower in patients with β-TM than in healthy individuals (P < 0.001). Leptin levels were also significantly reduced in female patients with short stature (P < 0.002) and in patients who displayed delayed puberty (P = 0.032) compared to those with normal stature who had reached puberty. The sensitivity of leptin for predicting short stature and delayed puberty among patients was 84.6% and 92.3%, respectively. Conclusion. Low serum leptin is sensitive to predict short stature and significant in β-TM females only. This link could thus be used as a guide for further therapeutic or hormonal modulation. PMID:27088012

  18. Beyond Neglect: Preliminary Evidence of Retrospective Time Estimation Abnormalities in Non-Neglect Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients

    PubMed Central

    Low, Essie; Crewther, Sheila G.; Perre, Diana L.; Ben Ong; Laycock, Robin; Tu, Hans; Wijeratne, Tissa

    2016-01-01

    Perception of the passage of time is essential for safe planning and navigation of everyday activities. Findings from the literature have demonstrated a gross underestimation of time interval in right-hemisphere damaged neglect patients, but not in non-neglect unilaterally-damaged patients, compared to controls. This study aimed to investigate retrospective estimation of the duration of a target detection task over two occasions, in 30 stroke patients (12 left-side stroke 15 right-side stroke, and 3 right-side stroke with neglect) and 10 transient ischemic attack patients, relative to 31 age-matched controls. Performances on visual short-term and working memory tasks were also examined to investigate the associations between timing abilities with residual cognitive functioning. Initial results revealed evidence of perceptual time underestimation, not just in neglect patients, but also in non-neglect unilaterally-damaged stroke patients and transient ischemic attack patients. Three months later, underestimation of time persisted only in left-side stroke and right-side stroke with neglect patients, who also demonstrated reduced short-term and working memory abilities. Findings from this study suggest a predictive role of residual cognitive impairments in determining the prognosis of perceptual timing abnormalities. PMID:26940859

  19. [Respiratory function impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease--a consideration on the possible pathogenetic relation to autonomic dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Murahashi, M; Takahashi, H; Kai, K; Shibuya, S; Jimi, T; Wakayama, Y; Yamada, M

    2000-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics and clinical significance of respiratory function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we studied 38 patients (male, 19; female, 19: mean age, 65.5 years: mean duration of disease, 6.7 years) who had no history of respiratory disease and smoking. Fifty three non-respiratory disease subjects (male, 26; female, 27: mean age, 67.6 years) were served as age-matched control. We measured spirometry and maximal expiratory flow-volume curve in all patients, and analyzed the relations between respiratory function variables and clinical profiles. The clinical disability of PD was indicated by Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) scale. The number of PD patients was 15 in H-Y 2, 18 in H-Y 3 and 5 in H-Y 4, respectively. The values of % VC, %FEV 1, FEV 1/FVC, %PEFR, % V50 in H-Y 4 group were significantly smaller than those in H-Y 2 and 3 groups. Small airway dysfunction (SAD) was represented by abnormality of % V25, % V50/V25. The prevalence of impairment in % V25 and % V50/V25 was detected in 13 patients (34.2%) and 15 patients (39.5%), respectively, this was significantly higher than age-matched controls. However, the mean value and prevalence of impairment in % V25, % V50/V25 were not affected by H-Y scale and duration of disease or ideal body weight (%predicted value). Twenty seven patients showed normal ventilatory function based on % VC over 80% and FEV 1/FVC over 70%. The prevalence of impairment in % V25, % V50/V25 was detected in 8 patients (29.6%), 9 patients (33.3%), respectively, among 27 patients with normal ventilatory function. These results suggest that ventilatory dysfunction is concerned with clinical disability but SAD which is independent of clinical disability seen prevalently in patients with PD. It is widely accepted that patients with PD frequently have cardiac or bowel dysfunction based on the visceral autonomic dysfunction. We hypothesize that SAD may also be caused by possible autonomic dysfunction in patients with PD.

  20. [Respiratory function impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease--a consideration on the possible pathogenetic relation to autonomic dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Murahashi, M; Takahashi, H; Kai, K; Shibuya, S; Jimi, T; Wakayama, Y; Yamada, M

    2000-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics and clinical significance of respiratory function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we studied 38 patients (male, 19; female, 19: mean age, 65.5 years: mean duration of disease, 6.7 years) who had no history of respiratory disease and smoking. Fifty three non-respiratory disease subjects (male, 26; female, 27: mean age, 67.6 years) were served as age-matched control. We measured spirometry and maximal expiratory flow-volume curve in all patients, and analyzed the relations between respiratory function variables and clinical profiles. The clinical disability of PD was indicated by Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) scale. The number of PD patients was 15 in H-Y 2, 18 in H-Y 3 and 5 in H-Y 4, respectively. The values of % VC, %FEV 1, FEV 1/FVC, %PEFR, % V50 in H-Y 4 group were significantly smaller than those in H-Y 2 and 3 groups. Small airway dysfunction (SAD) was represented by abnormality of % V25, % V50/V25. The prevalence of impairment in % V25 and % V50/V25 was detected in 13 patients (34.2%) and 15 patients (39.5%), respectively, this was significantly higher than age-matched controls. However, the mean value and prevalence of impairment in % V25, % V50/V25 were not affected by H-Y scale and duration of disease or ideal body weight (%predicted value). Twenty seven patients showed normal ventilatory function based on % VC over 80% and FEV 1/FVC over 70%. The prevalence of impairment in % V25, % V50/V25 was detected in 8 patients (29.6%), 9 patients (33.3%), respectively, among 27 patients with normal ventilatory function. These results suggest that ventilatory dysfunction is concerned with clinical disability but SAD which is independent of clinical disability seen prevalently in patients with PD. It is widely accepted that patients with PD frequently have cardiac or bowel dysfunction based on the visceral autonomic dysfunction. We hypothesize that SAD may also be caused by possible autonomic dysfunction in patients with PD. PMID

  1. X-ray microanalysis of chloride in nails from cystic fibrosis and control patients.

    PubMed

    Chapman, A L; Fegley, B; Cho, C T

    1985-03-01

    Nail clippings from 60 individuals were examined. There were 34 "old" (greater than 16 years) controls, 16 "young" controls and 10 CF patients. In regard to elements found, Si and Al were considered as exogenous contamination. Other elements examined were variable in both control and CF. Examination of the Cl levels among the 3 groups showed a highly significant difference between the mean Cl integral values of the young controls (619 integral) and the CF patients (2956 integral). The results of the older control population ranged from 0-905 integral with a mean of 269 integral. We found no age or sex difference in the amount of Cl or any other element from either the CF or control population. Results show that the x-ray energy dispersive system (EDS) is very useful in studying the Cl in nails. We found that examination of nails frozen in liquid nitrogen followed by fracturing without prior washing was the preferred method. Although the results of this study clearly show statistically the value of EDS analysis of Cl in the diagnosis of CF, we must await further study of a larger group of patients to determine its usefulness in evaluating individual patients, particularly newborns. PMID:3979487

  2. Neovascularization Capacity of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells From Critical Limb Ischemia Patients Is Equivalent to Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Gremmels, Hendrik; Teraa, Martin; Quax, Paul HA; den Ouden, Krista; Fledderus, Joost O; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2014-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is often poorly treatable by conventional management and alternatives such as autologous cell therapy are increasingly investigated. Whereas previous studies showed a substantial impairment of neovascularization capacity in primary bone-marrow (BM) isolates from patients, little is known about dysfunction in patient-derived BM mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). In this study, we have compared CLI-MSCs to healthy controls using gene expression profiling and functional assays for differentiation, senescence and in vitro and in vivo pro-angiogenic ability. Whereas no differentially expressed genes were found and adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation did not significantly differ between groups, chondrogenic differentiation was impaired in CLI-MSCs, potentially as a consequence of increased senescence. Migration experiments showed no differences in growth factor sensitivity and secretion between CLI- and control MSCs. In a murine hind-limb ischemia model, recovery of perfusion was enhanced in MSC-treated mice compared to vehicle controls (71 ± 24% versus 44 ± 11%; P < 1 × 10−6). CLI-MSC- and control-MSC–treated animals showed nearly identical amounts of reperfusion (ratio CLI:Control = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.82–1.14), meeting our criteria for statistical equivalence. The neovascularization capacity of MSCs derived from CLI-patients is not compromised and equivalent to that of control MSCs, suggesting that autologous MSCs are suitable for cell therapy in CLI patients. PMID:25174586

  3. Cardiovascular disease in lupus patients: should all patients be treated with statins and aspirin?

    PubMed

    Bruce, Ian N

    2005-10-01

    Premature coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In certain age groups, the risk can be >50 times that of an age-matched population. This population also has an increased prevalence of several key classic risk factors that contribute to the CHD development. Chronic inflammation, anti-phospholipid antibodies and exposure to steroid therapy are also likely to have an impact. We have adopted a proactive approach to classic risk factor management with 'ideal targets' based on viewing SLE as a CHD equivalent condition. In this context, a significant proportion of SLE patients (approximately 30%) will require statins and the majority would be treated with aspirin prophylaxis. Better control of the underlying inflammatory disease is also likely to play an important role and the relative safety of anti-malarials allows their consideration as an adjunct in a large proportion of patients. Well-conducted clinical trials are now needed to advance beyond these initial recommendations.

  4. Evaluation of TKTL1 as a biomarker in serum of prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Thurn, Kristina; Juengel, Eva; Oppermann, Elsie; Nelson, Karen; Thomas, Christian; Bartsch, Georg; Oremek, Gerhard M.; Haferkamp, Axel; Rubenwolf, Peter; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Monocyte associated transketolase-like 1 (TKTL1) as a cancer biomarker has become popular with alternative practitioners, but plays no role in conventional medicine. This investigation evaluates the potential of serum TKTL1 as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Material and methods Patients (n = 66) undergoing curative radical prostatectomy (RPE) for biopsy-pro-ven PCa were included in the study. Controls (n = 10) were healthy, age-matched, male volunteers. 10 ml of peripheral blood was drawn from patients several days before surgery and from controls. Serum TKTL1 was measured using the ELISA method. Results The median age at tumor diagnosis was 66 years and median serum PSA was 8.0 ng/ml. Nearly 96% of PCas submitted to surgery were clinically significant. Compared to healthy controls, serum TKTL1 was significantly lower in PCa patients (p = 0.0001, effect size indicator r = Z/sqr(n) = 0.4179). No correlation was apparent between serum TKTL1 and serum PSA, Gleason sum, tumor stage or further clinical and pathologic parameters. Conclusions Reduced serum TKTL1 in PCa patients stands in opposition to TKTL1 epitope detection in monocytes (EDIM) based studies, whereby increased TKTL1 in monocytes of tumor patients has been reported. Since serum TKTL1 does not correlate with clinical parameters in the current investigation, further research is needed to clarify whether serum TKTL1 has potential as a biomarker for PCa. PMID:27729989

  5. Aberrant temporal and spatial brain activity during rest in patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Malinen, Sanna; Vartiainen, Nuutti; Hlushchuk, Yevhen; Koskinen, Miika; Ramkumar, Pavan; Forss, Nina; Kalso, Eija; Hari, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of external stimuli, human hemodynamic brain activity displays slow intrinsic variations. To find out whether such fluctuations would be altered by persistent pain, we asked 10 patients with unrelenting chronic pain of different etiologies and 10 sex- and age-matched control subjects to rest with eyes open during 3-T functional MRI. Independent component analysis was used to identify functionally coupled brain networks. Time courses of an independent component comprising the insular cortices of both hemispheres showed stronger spectral power at 0.12 to 0.25 Hz in patients than in control subjects, with the largest difference at 0.16 Hz. A similar but weaker effect was seen in the anterior cingulate cortex, whereas activity of the precuneus and early visual cortex, used as a control site, did not differ between the groups. In the patient group, seed point-based correlation analysis revealed altered spatial connectivity between insulae and anterior cingulate cortex. The results imply both temporally and spatially aberrant activity of the affective pain-processing areas in patients suffering from chronic pain. The accentuated 0.12- to 0.25-Hz fluctuations in the patient group might be related to altered activity of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:20308545

  6. Functional Sympatholysis During Exercise in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes With Intact Response to Acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Thaning, Pia; Bune, Laurids T.; Zaar, Morten; Saltin, Bengt; Rosenmeier, Jaya B.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sympathetic vasoconstriction is blunted in contracting human skeletal muscles (functional sympatholysis). In young subjects, infusion of adenosine and ATP increases blood flow, and the latter compound also attenuates α-adrenergic vasoconstriction. In patients with type 2 diabetes and age-matched healthy subjects, we tested 1) the sympatholytic capacity during one-legged exercise, 2) the vasodilatory capacity of adenosine and ATP, and 3) the ability to blunt α-adrenergic vasoconstriction during ATP infusion. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 10 control subjects and 10 patients with diabetes and normal endothelial function, determined by leg blood flow (LBF) response to acetylcholine infusion, we measured LBF and venous NA, with and without tyramine-induced sympathetic vasoconstriction, during adenosine-, ATP-, and exercise-induced hyperemia. RESULTS LBF during acetylcholine did not differ significantly. LBF increased ninefold during exercise and during adenosine- and ATP-induced hyperemia. Infusion of tyramine during exercise did not reduce LBF in either the control or the patient group. During combined ATP and tyramine infusions, LBF decreased by 30% in both groups. Adenosine had no sympatholytic effect. CONCLUSIONS In patients with type 2 diabetes and normal endothelial function, functional sympatholysis was intact during moderate exercise. The vasodilatory response for adenosine and ATP did not differ between the patients with diabetes and the control subjects; however, the vasodilatory effect of adenosine and ATP and the sympatholytic effect of ATP seem to decline with age. PMID:21447654

  7. Changes in serum growth factors in stroke rehabilitation patients and their relation to hemiparesis improvement.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hideto; Beppu, Hidehiko; Mizutani, Kenmei; Okamoto, Sayaka; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    Predicting recovery from hemiparesis after stroke is important for rehabilitation. A few recent studies reported that the levels of some growth factors shortly after stroke were positively correlated with the clinical outcomes during the chronic phase. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between the serum levels of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], insulin-like growth factor-I [IGF-I], and hepatocyte growth factor [HGF]) and improvement in hemiparesis in stroke patients who received rehabilitation in a postacute rehabilitation hospital. Subjects were 32 stroke patients (cerebral infarction: 21 and intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH]: 11). We measured serum levels of VEGF, IGF-I, and HGF and 5 items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS) for hemiparesis on admission and at discharge. Age-matched healthy subjects (n=15) served as controls. Serum levels of VEGF and HGF in cerebral infarct patients on admission were higher than those in control subjects, and the serum levels of IGF-I in stroke patients were lower than those in controls. The level of HGF in ICH patients on admission was negatively correlated with gains in SIAS, and higher outliers in HGF concentration were correlated with lower gains in SIAS. Focusing on the extremely high levels of these factors may be a predictor of the low recovery from hemiparesis after stroke.

  8. Controlled Blood Pressure in Iranian Patients: A Multi-Center Report.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Ezzatollah; Behnood-Rod, Azin; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Shobeiri, Elham; Pourzargar, Pirouz; Ormoz, Ehsan; Sadigh, Nader; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2016-01-01

    We decided to determine the percentage of hypertensive patients whose blood pressure (BP) measurements were within recommended controlled range and to identify predictive factors for controlled BP. In this study carried out in 2014, 280 patients were included consecutively through sampling from both university and private medical centers/pharmacies in four Iranian cities. Demographic data as well as information about duration of HTN and prescribed medications, admission to emergency department (ED) because of HTN crisis, comorbidities, and control of HTN during the last 6 months by a healthcare provider were gathered. Adherence to anti-hypertensives was also determined using the validated Persian version of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Controlled BP was defined as systolic BP< 140 and diastolic BP< 90 mmHg in non-diabetics and < 130/80 mmHg in diabetics. Of 280 patients, 122 subjects (43.6%) had controlled BP. Among 55 diabetics, only two patients (3.6%) had controlled BP. Multiple logistic regression revealed the following variables as significant predictors of controlled BP: higher MMAS-8 score (adjusted odds ratio (OR)= 1.19, P= 0.03), fewer number of comorbid conditions (adjusted OR= 0.71, P = 0.03), having occupation as clerk/military personnel (adjusted OR= 1.03, P= 0.04), and not having history of ED admission during the last 6 months because of HTN crisis (adjusted OR= 2.11, P= 0.01). Considerable number of the studied patients had uncontrolled BP. Regarding the dramatic consequences of uncontrolled high BP in long term, it is advisable that careful attention by health care providers to the aforementioned factors could raise the likelihood of achieving controlled BP. PMID:26573037

  9. Biomarkers and Bacterial Pneumonia Risk in Patients with Treated HIV Infection: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjerk, Sonja M.; Baker, Jason V.; Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Angus, Brian; Gordin, Fred M.; Pett, Sarah L.; Stephan, Christoph; Kunisaki, Ken M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist. Methods We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases) and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls) were matched 1∶1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16), Surfactant Protein D (SP-D), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls. Results Cases (n = 72) and controls (n = 72) were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR) age was 45 (41, 51) years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690) cells/mm3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p = 0.02). IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively). Conclusions In patients with cART-treated HIV infection, higher levels of systemic inflammatory markers were associated with increased bacterial pneumonia risk, while two pulmonary-specific inflammatory biomarkers, CC16 and SP-D, were not associated with bacterial pneumonia risk. PMID:23457535

  10. The Association Between Antihypertensive Medication and Blood Pressure Control in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Lucília N; Pinto, Paula; Bárbara, Cristina; Papoila, Ana L; Monteiro, Emília C

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypertension are closely related diseases. The lowering effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressure (BP) control is modest and concomitant antihypertensive therapy is still required. However, the best antihypertensive regimen for BP control in patients with OSA remains unknown. We aimed to investigate a hypothetical association between ongoing antihypertensive medication and BP control rates in patients with OSA. We conducted a prospective observational study in a cohort of 205 patients with OSA and hypertension who underwent a sleep study and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Ongoing antihypertensive medication profile was recorded. Logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between antihypertensive regimen and BP control, before (n = 205) and, when applicable, after CPAP adaptation (n = 90). One hundred and fifty-five patients (155/205) were being treated with 31 different antihypertensive regimens. At baseline, the antihypertensive regimens and the number of antihypertensive drugs were not associated with BP control (p = 0.847; p = 0.991). After CPAP adaptation, a decrease in median night-time systolic and diastolic BP was observed (p = 0.001; p = 0.006). Nevertheless, the lack of association between antihypertensive regimens and the number of antihypertensive drugs and BP control remained (p = 0.864; p = 0.800). Our findings confirm that although CPAP improves nocturnal BP, this improvement is not sufficient to control blood pressure for 24 h. This study shows, for the first time, that in patients with OSA, there is no association between BP control and both the antihypertensive regimen and the number of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:26303482

  11. Intentional hypoglycemia to control bingeing in a patient with type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Mandana; Kreisman, Stuart; Hall, Lacresha

    2015-02-01

    Most cases of eating disorders associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus are categorized as diabulimia, a disorder of withholding insulin treatment to lose weight through sustained hyperglycemia. In this paper, we report a unique case of a patient with both type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa who has an atypical way of controlling her bingeing by keeping her blood sugars low. This pattern of intentionally sustained hypoglycemia has not been previously described in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Knowing various presentations of eating disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes can provide healthcare workers with enhanced ability in recognizing and educating at-risk patients, in the hope of preventing serious hypoglycemia or complications. Furthermore, a patient's awareness of complications associated with suboptimal control of diabetes, whether by overdosing or underdosing their insulin regimen, might lead to avoidance of disordered eating behaviours.

  12. A contextual role-based access control authorization model for electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Motta, Gustavo H M B; Furuie, Sergio S

    2003-09-01

    The design of proper models for authorization and access control for electronic patient record (EPR) is essential to a wide scale use of EPR in large health organizations. In this paper, we propose a contextual role-based access control authorization model aiming to increase the patient privacy and the confidentiality of patient data, whereas being flexible enough to consider specific cases. This model regulates user's access to EPR based on organizational roles. It supports a role-tree hierarchy with authorization inheritance; positive and negative authorizations; static and dynamic separation of duties based on weak and strong role conflicts. Contextual authorizations use environmental information available at access time, like user/patient relationship, in order to decide whether a user is allowed to access an EPR resource. This enables the specification of a more flexible and precise authorization policy, where permission is granted or denied according to the right and the need of the user to carry out a particular job function.

  13. Endometriosis is associated with central sensitization: a psychophysical controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Prem; Bajaj, Priti; Madsen, Hans; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2003-09-01

    Endometriosis is a pain syndrome representing a major cause of pelvic pain in women of reproductive age. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that persistent nociceptive input from endometriotic tissues leads to central sensitization manifested by somatic hyperalgesia and increased referred pain areas to experimental saline-induced muscle pain in patients with endometriosis, compared to healthy control subjects. Ten women with laparoscopically confirmed endometriosis and 10 healthy, age-matched women participated in the study. Hypertonic saline (0.5 mL, 5.8%) was injected intramuscularly, in random succession, into 1 site of menstrual pain referral (the multifidus muscle at the low back) and into 1 non-pain control site (first dorsal interosseous muscle [FDI] of the hand). The post-saline pain intensity and pain areas at the FDI were significantly greater in patients with endometriosis than in control subjects (P <.05) but were not different between the groups for the back. An absence of enhancement of post-saline pain responses at the back in the endometriosis group suggests that saline-induced pain at the back appears to activate segmental inhibitory systems in patients with endometriosis. Manifestation of central sensitization in women with endometriosis is demonstrated by increased muscle nociceptor input in the form of increased post-saline pain intensity, pain areas at the FDI, and hypersensitivity to pressure stimulation. These findings provide new insights into the complex pain mechanisms associated with endometriosis.

  14. Family Physician Clinical Inertia in Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Valerija Bralić; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. Material/Methods This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15–25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. Results A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Conclusions Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control. PMID:25652941

  15. Effect of Using Eye Mask on Sleep Quality in Cardiac Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Babaii, Atye; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Hajibagheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients in coronary care unit are at risk of sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation can be associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate, raising the risk of developing cardiovascular problems among patients hospitalized in coronary care unit. Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the effect of eye mask on sleep quality in cardiac patients. Patients and Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 60 patients who met the inclusion criteria were selected using a convenient sampling method and randomly allocated into the experimental and control groups. Patients in the control group received routine care. However, in the experimental group, patients received routine care and eye mask for three subsequent nights. In the both groups, the sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index. Data were analyzed by the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: After the study, the median scores of the subjective sleep quality, the sleep latency, the sleep duration, the habitual sleep efficiency, and the sleep disturbances domains, as well as the median score of overall Pittsburgh sleep quality index in the experimental group were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in terms of the use of sleep medications and the daytime dysfunction domains (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Using eye mask can significantly improve the sleep quality in cardiac patients. Therefore, nurses are recommended to use eye mask in combination with current treatments for improving patients’ sleep quality. PMID:26835463

  16. Breaking the barriers to optimal glycaemic control--what physicians need to know from patients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Snoek, Frank J

    2002-07-01

    Diabetes is a largely self-managed disease with a major psychosocial impact on the lives of patients and their families. Coping effectively with the stresses related to living with and having to manage diabetes on a daily basis is not a simple function of education, i.e., knowing "what is right for you." Clearly, knowledge is a prerequisite, but in no way a guarantee, of making the recommended changes in self-care necessary to achieve optimal glycaemic control. To understand patients' self-care behaviour, we need to take into account various psychological and social factors. Behavioural research findings underscore the role of attitudes and illness beliefs as determinants of patients' health behaviours. For example, misperceptions regarding the seriousness and controllability of diabetes can inhibit active participation of the patient in the treatment. A reluctance to start insulin therapy can be observed in patients with type 2 diabetes who have poor glycaemic control on maximum dosage of oral hypoglycaemic agents. This phenomenon of "psychological insulin resistance" clearly demonstrates how even irrational beliefs can impact health outcomes. Misconceptions about having to start insulin treatment ("now I am seriously ill") are often linked to negative emotions, e.g. anger and fear. Negativistic attitudes and low self-efficacy expectations are not uncommon among people with diabetes, precipitated and maintained by repeated experiences of failure to "master" the diabetes and achieve satisfactory diabetes control. Ultimately, cumulative negative experiences can result in a state of "learned helplessness" or "diabetes burnout." Relational conflicts and lack of social support can also seriously hamper patients' self-care behaviours. In addition, contextual factors such as financial barriers and difficulty with access to health care influence peoples' self-care behaviours. In diabetes care, a bio-psychosocial approach to the patient and his or her coping problems is

  17. Circadian Rhythms of Oxidative Stress Markers and Melatonin Metabolite in Patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a genetic disorder in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) with severe neurological disorders, in which oxidative stress and disturbed melatonin metabolism may be involved. Herein we confirmed the diurnal variation of melatonin metabolites, oxidative stress markers, and antioxidant power in urine of patients with XPA and age-matched controls, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The peak of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, a metabolite of melatonin, was seen at 6:00 in both the XPA patients and controls, though the peak value is lower, specifically in the younger age group of XPA patients. The older XPA patients demonstrated an increase in the urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, having a robust peak at 6:00 and 18:00, respectively. In addition, the urinary level of total antioxidant power was decreased in the older XPA patients. Recently, it is speculated that oxidative stress and antioxidant properties may have a diurnal variation, and the circadian rhythm is likely to influence the NER itself. We believe that the administration of melatonin has the possibility of ameliorating the augmented oxidative stress in neurodegeneration, especially in the older XPA patients, modulating the melatonin metabolism and the circadian rhythm. PMID:27213030

  18. Preserved Transcallosal Inhibition to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Nondemented Elderly Patients with Leukoaraiosis

    PubMed Central

    Bella, Rita; Giuffrida, Salvatore; Pennisi, Giovanni; Spampinato, Concetto; Giordano, Daniela; Malaguarnera, Giulia; Raggi, Alberto; Pennisi, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Structural corpus callosum (CC) changes in patients with leukoaraiosis (LA) are significantly associated with cognitive and motor impairment. The aim of this study is to investigate the transcallosal fibers functioning by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in elderly patients with LA. The resting motor threshold (rMT), the motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), and the controlateral (cSP) and ipsilateral silent periods (iSP) were determined using single-pulse TMS in 15 patients and 15 age-matched controls. The neuropsychological profile and the vascular burden at brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were concomitantly explored. Patients reported abnormal scores at tests evaluating executive control functions. No significant difference was found in TMS measures of intra- and intercortical excitability. No CC lesion was evident at MRI. Transcallosal inhibitory mechanisms to TMS seem to be spared in LA patients, a finding which is in line with neuroimaging features and suggests a functional integrity of the CC despite the ischemic interruption of corticosubcortical loops implicated in cognition and behavior. The observed neurophysiological finding differs from that reported in degenerative dementia, even in the preclinical or early stage. In our group of patients, the pure extent of LA is more related to impairment of frontal lobe abilities rather than functional callosal changes. PMID:23984349

  19. Three-dimensional nasal morphology in cleft lip and palate operated adult patients.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Sforza, Chiarella; Dellavia, Claudia; Vizzotto, Laura; Carù, Armando

    2003-10-01

    Nasal morphology was assessed three-dimensionally in 18 cleft lip and palate operated patients aged 19 to 27 years, and in 161 sex- and age-matched control subjects. Comparisons were performed by Student t and Watson-Williams' tests. No differences were found in nasal volume or surface. Nasal width, alar base width, and inferior width of the nostrils were significantly larger in male patients than in the reference men. The nasal bridge was shorter. Similar differences were found in the female patients. In addition, the right nostril was larger and the nasal height shorter. In men, the nasolabial and the nasal tip angles were smaller in the patients than in the reference subjects, whereas the facial convexity angle was larger in the patients. In conclusion, the nose of adult operated cleft lip and palate patients differed from that of normal control subjects. Surgical corrections of the cleft lip and palate failed to provide a completely normal appearance. The methods might be used to indicate where additional procedures might be performed to approximate a reference population.

  20. Aerobic exercise improves oxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Zeynep; Duger, Tulin; Atalay-Guzel, Nevin; Aral, Arzu; Basturk, Bilkay; Haznedaroglu, Seminur; Goker, Berna

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] Although oxidative stress is known to be present in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the effects of exercise on oxidative parameters are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on serum oxidant and antioxidant levels in patients with RA. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen patients with RA and 10 age-matched healthy volunteers participated in this study. All participants wore polar telemeters and walked on a treadmill for 30 minutes at a speed eliciting 60-75% of maximal heart rates. Blood samples were obtained before, immediately and 24 hours after exercise and malondialdehyde (MDA) and total sulfhydrile group (RSH) levels were measured. [Results] Both groups had similar heart rates during the test but the treadmill speed of the RA patients was significantly lower than that of the healthy volunteers. Serum MDA levels were lower than in both groups immediately after exercise, with greater decrements in the RA patients than controls. MDA levels returned to baseline 24 hours after the exercise only in the controls; they remained low in the RA patients. There was a slight increase in serum RSH levels after exercise compared to baseline in both groups. [Conclusion] Moderate intensity treadmill exercise did not have any adverse effect on the oxidant-antioxidant balance. The results suggest that such an exercise may be safely added to the rehabilitation program of RA for additional antioxidant effects. Morever, this antioxidant environment is maintained longer in RA patients.

  1. Evaluation of Periodontal Parameters in Patients with Early Stage Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Božić, Darko; Rinčić, Goran; Gaćina, Petar; Plančak, Darije

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess periodontal conditions in patients with early stage CLL and to compare it with the periodontal status of age matched healthy controls and to analyze the relationship between periodontal and hematological parameters in CLL patients. Materials and Methods 60 subjects were examined: 30 patients with CLL Rai 0 (test group) and 30 age-matching healthy individuals (control group). The exclusion criteria were: presence of other systemic disease or condition (e.g. diabetes), history of treatment for periodontitis, use of antibiotics during the last 3 months, use of medications. Socio-demographic data were obtained by means of a questionnaire. Participants with at least 8 teeth underwent a full mouth examination assessing API, PBI, PPD, REC and CAL. Medical data for CLL patients were collected from the patients’ records, while hematological data were obtained from the hemogram. Results Difference between groups was statistically significant for age, number of teeth and frequency of dental checkups (p<0.05). Patients with CLL had significantly higher average values of periodontal indices (API 0.81±0.18; PBI 2.72±0.68; PPD 3.40±0.53; REC 1.95±0.87, CAL 4.37±0.80) compared to the control group (API 0.69±0.15; PBI 1.91±0.45; PPD 2.51±0.40; REC 0.99±0.54; CAL 3.00±0.58). The correlation coefficients between age and periodontal indices showed statistically significance between age and REC (r=0.357; p<0.01), and age and CAL (r=0.295; p<0.05). Age was not statistically significant covariate for CAL (F=2.205; p>0.05), only for REC (F=4.601; p<0.05). After the removal of the statistical effect of age, the difference in REC between CLL and control group remained statistically significant (F=19.732; p<0.01; eta2=0.287). Statistically significant association between periodontal and hematological parameters in CLL patients was not found (p>0.05). Conclusion The results of this study showed that patients with CLL had worse periodontal status compared to

  2. Evaluation of Periodontal Parameters in Patients with Early Stage Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Božić, Darko; Rinčić, Goran; Gaćina, Petar; Plančak, Darije

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess periodontal conditions in patients with early stage CLL and to compare it with the periodontal status of age matched healthy controls and to analyze the relationship between periodontal and hematological parameters in CLL patients. Materials and Methods 60 subjects were examined: 30 patients with CLL Rai 0 (test group) and 30 age-matching healthy individuals (control group). The exclusion criteria were: presence of other systemic disease or condition (e.g. diabetes), history of treatment for periodontitis, use of antibiotics during the last 3 months, use of medications. Socio-demographic data were obtained by means of a questionnaire. Participants with at least 8 teeth underwent a full mouth examination assessing API, PBI, PPD, REC and CAL. Medical data for CLL patients were collected from the patients’ records, while hematological data were obtained from the hemogram. Results Difference between groups was statistically significant for age, number of teeth and frequency of dental checkups (p<0.05). Patients with CLL had significantly higher average values of periodontal indices (API 0.81±0.18; PBI 2.72±0.68; PPD 3.40±0.53; REC 1.95±0.87, CAL 4.37±0.80) compared to the control group (API 0.69±0.15; PBI 1.91±0.45; PPD 2.51±0.40; REC 0.99±0.54; CAL 3.00±0.58). The correlation coefficients between age and periodontal indices showed statistically significance between age and REC (r=0.357; p<0.01), and age and CAL (r=0.295; p<0.05). Age was not statistically significant covariate for CAL (F=2.205; p>0.05), only for REC (F=4.601; p<0.05). After the removal of the statistical effect of age, the difference in REC between CLL and control group remained statistically significant (F=19.732; p<0.01; eta2=0.287). Statistically significant association between periodontal and hematological parameters in CLL patients was not found (p>0.05). Conclusion The results of this study showed that patients with CLL had worse periodontal status compared to

  3. Effects of Rotator Cuff Pathology and Physical Therapy on In Vivo Shoulder Motion and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With a Symptomatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Baumer, Timothy G.; Chan, Derek; Mende, Veronica; Dischler, Jack; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S.; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical therapy (PT) is often prescribed for patients with rotator cuff tears. The extent to which PT influences strength, range of motion (ROM), and patient-reported outcomes has been studied extensively, but the effect of PT on in vivo joint kinematics is not well understood. Purpose: To assess the influence of symptomatic rotator cuff pathology and the effects of PT on shoulder motion, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-five patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear and 25 age-matched asymptomatic control subjects were recruited. Shoulder motion was measured using a biplane radiography imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex dynamometer, and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores. Data were acquired from the patients before and after 8 weeks of physical therapy. Data were acquired at 1 time point for the control subjects. Results: Compared with the control subjects, patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had significantly worse pain/function scores (P < .01); less ROM (P < .01); lower abduction (ABD), external rotation (ER), and internal rotation (IR) strength (P < .01); less scapulothoracic posterior tilt (P = .05); and lower glenohumeral joint elevation (P < .01). Physical therapy resulted in improved pain/function scores (P < .01), increased ROM (P < .02), increased scapulothoracic posterior tilt (P = .05), increased glenohumeral joint elevation (P = .01), and decreased acromiohumeral distance (AHD) (P = .02). Conclusion: Compared with age-matched controls, patients had worse pain/function scores, less ROM, and lower ABD, ER, and IR strength. Patients also had less scapulothoracic anteroposterior tilt, less glenohumeral joint elevation, and an altered glenohumeral joint contact path. PT resulted in improved pain/function scores, increased ROM, greater posterior

  4. Periodontal treatment to improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients: study protocol of the randomized, controlled DIAPERIO trial

    PubMed Central

    Vergnes, Jean-Noel; Arrivé, Elise; Gourdy, Pierre; Hanaire, Hélène; Rigalleau, Vincent; Gin, Henri; Sédarat, Cyril; Dorignac, Georges; Bou, Christophe; Sixou, Michel; Nabet, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a common, chronic inflammatory disease caused by gram-negative bacteria leading to destruction of tissues supporting the teeth. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown increased frequency, extent and severity of periodontitis among diabetic adults. More recently, some controlled clinical trials have also suggested that periodontal treatment could improve glycaemic control in diabetic patients. However current evidence does not provide sufficient information on which to confidently base any clinical recommendations. The main objective of this clinical trial is to assess whether periodontal treatment could lead to a decrease in glycated haemoglobin levels in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from chronic periodontitis. Methods The DIAPERIO trial is an open-label, 13-week follow-up, randomized, controlled trial. The total target sample size is planned at 150 participants, with a balanced (1:1) treatment allocation (immediate treatment vs delayed treatment). Periodontal treatment will include full mouth non-surgical scaling and root planing, systemic antibiotherapy, local antiseptics (chlorhexidine 0.12%) and oral health instructions. The primary outcome will be the difference in change of HbA1c between the two groups after the 13-weeks' follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be the difference in change of fructosamine levels and quality of life between the two groups. Discussion The DIAPERIO trial will provide insight into the question of whether periodontal treatment could lead to an improvement in glycaemic control in metabolically unbalanced diabetic patients suffering from periodontitis. The results of this trial will help to provide evidence-based recommendations for clinicians and a draft framework for designing national health policies. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN15334496 PMID:19646281

  5. Linaclotide in Chronic Idiopathic Constipation Patients with Moderate to Severe Abdominal Bloating: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Schey, Ron; Shiff, Steven J.; Lavins, Bernard J.; Fox, Susan M.; Jia, Xinwei D.; Blakesley, Rick E.; Hao, Xinming; Cronin, Jacquelyn A.; Currie, Mark G.; Kurtz, Caroline B.; Johnston, Jeffrey M.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Abdominal bloating is a common and bothersome symptom of chronic idiopathic constipation. The objective of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of linaclotide in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation and concomitant moderate-to-severe abdominal bloating. Methods This Phase 3b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial randomized patients to oral linaclotide (145 or 290 μg) or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Eligible patients met Rome II criteria for chronic constipation upon entry with an average abdominal bloating score ≥5 (self-assessment: 0 10-point numerical rating scale) during the 14-day baseline period. Patients reported abdominal symptoms (including bloating) and bowel symptoms daily; adverse events were monitored. The primary responder endpoint required patients to have ≥3 complete spontaneous bowel movements/week with an increase of ≥1 from baseline, for ≥9 of 12 weeks. The primary endpoint compared linaclotide 145 μg vs. placebo. Results The intent-to-treat population included 483 patients (mean age=47.3 years, female=91.5%, white=67.7%). The primary endpoint was met by 15.7% of linaclotide 145 μg patients vs. 7.6% of placebo patients (P<0.05). Both linaclotide doses significantly improved abdominal bloating vs. placebo (P<0.05 for all secondary endpoints, controlling for multiplicity). Approximately one-third of linaclotide patients (each group) had ≥50% mean decrease from baseline in abdominal bloating vs. 18% of placebo patients (P<0.01). Diarrhea was reported in 6% and 17% of linaclotide 145 and 290 μg patients, respectively, and 2% of placebo patients. AEs resulted in premature discontinuation of 5% and 9% of linaclotide 145 μg and 290 μg patients, respectively, and 6% of placebo patients. Conclusions Once-daily linaclotide (145 and 290 μg) significantly improved bowel and abdominal symptoms in chronic idiopathic constipation patients with moderate-to-severe baseline abdominal

  6. Serologic evaluation of celiac disease in patients with beta thalassemia major and control

    PubMed Central

    Shahramian, Iraj; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Haghighat, Mahmood; Noori, Noor Mohammad; Teimouri, Ali Reza; Sharafi, Elham; Kalili, Manijeh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study reports evaluated prevalence of CD in patients with Beta-thalassemia major. Background: Celiac Disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder triggered by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Patients and methods: In this case-control study in a period of 3 years, which was performed on 620 children in two groups of Beta-thalassemia major patients (n=200) and control (n=420), serum tissue transglutamianse (tTG) IgA levels were measured. The two groups were compared together in terms of tTG IgA levels, and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The means of serum tTG IgA levels in patients with Beta-thalassemia major and control groups were 28.81±68.44 and 6.94±6.68 U/mL, respectively. There was a significant difference in favor of the case group (p=0.000). Body mass index in the two case and control groups had a significant difference (t=3.859, p=0.001). Belonging to each group will change the probability of having less than 20 in tTG IgA (odds=0.285) and it means that belonging to the control group has a protective role. There is only a significant association in the case of all population (r=0.102, p=0.011). Body mass index in the two case and control groups had a significant difference (t=3.859, p=0.001). Conclusion: Probability of CD should be considered since the prevalence of CD is high in patients with and Beta-thalassemia major. Patients with thalassemia major are recommended for screening for CD. PMID:25926941

  7. Seventy-year-old habitual volleyball players have larger tibial cross-sectional area and may be differentiated from their age-matched peers by the osteogenic index in dynamic performance.

    PubMed

    Rantalainen, T; Linnamo, V; Komi, P V; Selänne, H; Heinonen, A

    2010-07-01

    The osteogenicity of a given exercise may be estimated by calculating an osteogenic index (OI) consisting of magnitude and rate of strain. Volleyball involves repetitive jumping and requires high power output and thus may be expected to be beneficial to bone and performance. The purpose of the present study was to examine if habitual volleyball playing is reflected in OI. Ten elderly habitual volleyball players [age 69.9 (SD 4.4) years] and ten matched controls volunteered [age 69.7 (4.2) years] as subjects. Distal tibia (d), tibial mid-shaft (50) and femoral neck (FN) bone characteristics were measured using pQCT and DXA. To estimate skeletal rigidity, cross-sectional area (ToA(50)), and compressive (BSI(d)) and bending strength indices (SSImax(50)) were calculated. Maximal performance was assessed with eccentric ankle plantar flexion, isometric leg press and countermovement jump (CMJ). A fast Fourier transform (FFT) was calculated from the acceleration of the center of mass during the CMJ. Maximal acceleration (MAG) and mean magnitude frequency (MMF) were selected to represent the constituents of OI. OI was calculated as the sum of the products of magnitudes and corresponding frequencies. Volleyball players had 7% larger ToA(50) and 37% higher power in CMJ, 15% higher MAG and 36% higher OI (P controls. No difference was observed in leg press, plantar flexion or the MMF (P >or= 0.646). In conclusion, habitual volleyball players may be differentiated from their matched peers by their dynamic jumping performance, and the differences are reflected in the magnitude but not rate of loading.

  8. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  9. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Simon; Sidani, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT). A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P < 0.01). The proportion of positive LBTs was significantly higher in CP patients (38.7 versus 2.5%: P < 0.01). A trend toward a higher proportion of positive LBTs in women compared with men was observed (66.6 versus 27.3%; P = 0.056). The subgroups with positive and negative LBTs were comparable in demographic and clinical characteristics, use of opiates, pancreatic enzymes replacement therapy (PERT), and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO. PMID:27446865

  10. Too Much or Too Little? How Much Control Should Patients Have Over EHR Data?

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Soumitra Sudip; Bailey-DeLeeuw, Sandra; Wyant, David K; Chang, Cyril F

    2016-07-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have been promoted as a mechanism to overcome the fragmented healthcare system in the United States. The challenge that is being discussed is the rights of the patient to control the access to their EHRs' data and the needs of healthcare professionals to know health data to make the best treatment decisions for their patients. The Federal Trade Commission has asked those who store consumer information to comply with the Fair Information Practice Principles. In the EHR context, these principles give the rights to the patient to control who can see their health data and what components of the data are restricted from view. Control is not limited to patients, as it also includes parents of adolescent children. We suggest that the ongoing policy discussion include consideration of the precise questions patients will be asked when a need for data sharing arises. Further, patients should understand the relative risks that they face, and the degree to which their decisions will (or will not) significantly reduce the risk of a data breach. As various approaches are considered, it is important to address the relative resource requirements and the associated costs of each option. PMID:27272134

  11. Preoperative Cognitive Intervention Reduces Cognitive Dysfunction in Elderly Patients after Gastrointestinal Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Amin J.; Tang, Guan-Xiu; Hadi, Sally M.; Yan, Liao; Chen, Ming-Hua; Duan, Kai-Ming; Tong, Jianbin; Ouyang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative conditions may play a significant role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) development in elderly patients. We aimed to investigate whether preoperative cognitive training could lower the incidence of POCD one week after surgery. Material/Methods A total of 141 ASA I–III elderly patients who underwent gastrointestinal surgery were enrolled into the study. Patients were randomized into either the Intervention group (69 analyzed) or the Control group (72 analyzed). Patients in the intervention group were instructed and trained in a cognition mnemonic skill for a total of three 1-hour sessions with the method of loci (MoL). Controls did not receive any cognitive training during hospitalization. All patients were tested using neuropsychological battery tests (NPTs) on admission and one week after surgery. Result The incidence of POCD in the intervention group (15.9%) was significantly lower than in the controls (36.1%) (P<0.05). Patients’ performance in Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised and Symbol-Digit Modalities Test were improved by the cognitive training. Increasing age, longer length of anesthesia and surgery, and lack of cognitive training were associated with a significantly higher risk of POCD (P<0.05). Conclusions Cognitive training with MoL can reduce the decline of early postoperative cognitive function in elderly patients undergoing major gastrointestinal surgery. PMID:25782136

  12. Patients want granular privacy control over health information in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Kelly; Hanania, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess patients’ desire for granular level privacy control over which personal health information should be shared, with whom, and for what purpose; and whether these preferences vary based on sensitivity of health information. Materials and methods A card task for matching health information with providers, questionnaire, and interview with 30 patients whose health information is stored in an electronic medical record system. Most patients’ records contained sensitive health information. Results No patients reported that they would prefer to share all information stored in an electronic medical record (EMR) with all potential recipients. Sharing preferences varied by type of information (EMR data element) and recipient (eg, primary care provider), and overall sharing preferences varied by participant. Patients with and without sensitive records preferred less sharing of sensitive versus less-sensitive information. Discussion Patients expressed sharing preferences consistent with a desire for granular privacy control over which health information should be shared with whom and expressed differences in sharing preferences for sensitive versus less-sensitive EMR data. The pattern of results may be used by designers to generate privacy-preserving EMR systems including interfaces for patients to express privacy and sharing preferences. Conclusions To maintain the level of privacy afforded by medical records and to achieve alignment with patients’ preferences, patients should have granular privacy control over information contained in their EMR. PMID:23184192