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Sample records for age-matched control patients

  1. Nimodipine disposition and haemodynamic effects in patients with cirrhosis and age-matched controls.

    PubMed Central

    Gengo, F M; Fagan, S C; Krol, G; Bernhard, H

    1987-01-01

    Six biopsy proven cirrhotics and five age-matched controls (mean 55.3 vs 52.4 years) were randomly given single 60 mg p.o. and 30 mg s.l. doses of nimodipine. Serum concentrations and blood pressure were measured regularly over the subsequent 24 h period. The clearance of nimodipine was reduced in the patients with cirrhosis. Apparent oral clearance of nimodipine in the cirrhotic group was significantly lower than that observed in the normal group (187 +/- 163 l h-1 vs 469.6 +/- 198.4 l h-1, P less than 0.01). There were no significant changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the normal subjects. There were, however, significant reductions in MAP following oral nimodipine in the cirrhotics. These reductions were significantly related to nimodipine concentrations in individual patients (P less than 0.05). PMID:3814462

  2. ABCB1 genotypes and haplotypes in patients with dementia and age-matched non-demented control patients

    PubMed Central

    Frankfort, Suzanne V; Doodeman, Valerie D; Bakker, Remco; Tulner, Linda R; van Campen, Jos PCM; Smits, Paul HM; Beijnen, Jos H

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid β is an in vitro substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux pump at the blood brain barrier (BBB). The Multi Drug Resistance (ABCB1) gene, encoding for P-gp, is highly polymorphic and this may result in a changed function of P-gp and may possibly interfere with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. This study investigates to what extent ABCB1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs; C1236T in exon 12, G2677T/A in exon 21 and C3435T in exon 26) and inferred haplotypes exist in an elderly population and if these SNPs and haplotypes differ between patients with dementia and age-matched non-demented control patients. ABCB1 genotype, allele and haplotype frequencies were neither significantly different between patients with dementia and age-matched controls, nor between subgroups of different types of dementia nor age-matched controls. This study shows ABCB1 genotype frequencies to be comparable with described younger populations. To our knowledge this is the first study on ABCB1 genotypes in dementia. ABCB1 genotypes are presently not useful as a biomarker for dementia, as they were not significantly different between demented patients and age-matched control subjects. PMID:16999857

  3. Preserved Learning during the Symbol–Digit Substitution Test in Patients with Schizophrenia, Age-Matched Controls, and Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Claudia; De Picker, Livia J.; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.; Morrens, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Speed of processing, one of the main cognitive deficits in schizophrenia is most frequently measured with a digit–symbol-coding test. Performance on this test is additionally affected by writing speed and the rate at which symbol–digit relationships are learned, two factors that may be impaired in schizophrenia. This study aims to investigate the effects of sensorimotor speed, short-term learning, and long-term learning on task performance in schizophrenia. In addition, the study aims to explore differences in learning effects between patients with schizophrenia and elderly individuals. Methods: Patients with schizophrenia (N = 30) were compared with age-matched healthy controls (N = 30) and healthy elderly volunteers (N = 30) during the Symbol–Digit Substitution Test (SDST). The task was administered on a digitizing tablet, allowing precise measurements of the time taken to write each digit (writing time) and the time to decode symbols into their corresponding digits (matching time). The SDST was administered on three separate days (day 1, day 2, day 7). Symbol–digit repetitions during the task represented short-term learning and repeating the task on different days represented long-term learning. Results: The repetition of the same symbol–digit combinations within one test and the repetition of the test over days resulted in significant decreases in matching time. Interestingly, these short-term and long-term learning effects were about equal among the three groups. Individual participants showed a large variation in the rate of short-term learning. In general, patients with schizophrenia had the longest matching time whereas the elderly had the longest writing time. Writing time remained the same over repeated testing. Conclusion: The rate of learning and sensorimotor speed was found to have a substantial influence on the SDST score. However, a large individual variation in learning rate should be taken into account in the

  4. Stable Schizophrenia Patients Learn Equally Well as Age-Matched Controls and Better than Elderly Controls in Two Sensorimotor Rotary Pursuit Tasks

    PubMed Central

    De Picker, Livia J.; Cornelis, Claudia; Hulstijn, Wouter; Dumont, Glenn; Fransen, Erik; Timmers, Maarten; Janssens, Luc; Morrens, Manuel; Sabbe, Bernard G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare sensorimotor performance and learning in stable schizophrenia patients, healthy age- and sex-matched controls and elderly controls on two variations of the rotary pursuit: circle pursuit (true motor learning) and figure pursuit (motor and sequence learning). Method: In the circle pursuit, a target circle, rotating with increasing speed along a predictable circular path on the computer screen, must be followed by a cursor controlled by a pen on a writing tablet. In the eight-trial figure pursuit, subjects learn to draw a complex figure by pursuing the target circle that moves along an invisible trajectory between and around several goals. Tasks were administered thrice (day 1, day 2, day 7) to 30 patients with stable schizophrenia (S), 30 healthy age- and sex-matched controls (C), and 30 elderly participants (>65 years; E) and recorded with a digitizing tablet and pressure-sensitive pen. The outcome measure accuracy (% of time that cursor is within the target) was used to assess performance. Results: We observed significant group differences in accuracy, both in circle and figure pursuit tasks (E < S < C, p < 0.01). Strong learning effects were found in each group. Learning curves were similar in circle pursuit but differed between groups in figure pursuit. When corrected for group differences in starting level, the learning gains over the three sessions of schizophrenia patients and age-matched controls were equal and both were larger than those of the elderly controls. Conclusion: Despite the reduced sensorimotor performance that was found in the schizophrenia patients, their sensorimotor learning seems to be preserved. The relevance of this finding for the evaluation of procedural learning in schizophrenia is discussed. The better performance and learning rate of the patients compared to the elderly controls was unexpected and deserves further study. PMID:25505425

  5. Postural finger tremor exhibited by Parkinson patients and age-matched subjects.

    PubMed

    Palmer, S S; Hutton, J T

    1995-09-01

    Physiological correlates of postural tremor of the finger seen in Parkinson's disease patients are different from those seen in age-matched control subjects. A significant correlation between the spectral peak of acceleration and the spectral peak of rectified electromyographic activity from the muscle responsible for finger extension was found in Parkinson's disease patients. This correlation was not seen in age-matched control subjects. Any neural drive imposed on the motoneuron pool from supraspinal levels would enhance the electromyographic activity. Likewise, any feedback effects via spinal stretch reflexes or supraspinal stretch responses would be mediated through the motoneuron pool and electromyographic activity. The results of this research support the theory that Parkinson tremor is a centrally driven rhythm that may be influenced by feedback effects, whereas physiological tremor is due to a complex interaction of central, feedback, and mechanical effects.

  6. Evaluation and correlation of stress scores with blood pressure, endogenous cortisol levels, and homocysteine levels in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy and comparison with age-matched controls

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Abhishek; Garg, Monika; Dixit, Nikhil; Godara, Rohini

    2016-01-01

    Context: Stress had been associated with the development of central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). The study was designed to evaluate the effect of stress on other risk factors of CSC such as serum cortisol levels, serum homocysteine levels, and blood pressure (BP) in CSC patients. Aims: To compare stress scores, serum cortisol and serum homocysteine levels, and BP of CSC patients with that of control population and to correlate stress scores of CSC patients with BP, serum cortisol levels, and serum homocysteine levels. Materials and Methods: Stress scores, serum morning and evening cortisol levels, serum homocysteine levels, systolic and diastolic BP of 54 CSC patients were measured and compared with that of 54 age- and sex-related controls using Student's t-test. Stress scores of CSC patients were correlated with systolic and diastolic BP, serum morning and evening cortisol levels and serum homocysteine levels and Pearson correlation coefficient (r) were calculated. Results: Stress scores, serum homocysteine levels, serum morning and evening cortisol levels, and systolic and diastolic BP were all elevated in CSC patients as compared with age- and sex-related controls (P < 0.05). Stress scores of CSC patients were found to correlate strongly with serum homocysteine levels, serum morning and evening cortisol levels, and systolic and diastolic BP, with r values 0.82, 0.8, 0.8, 0.8, and 0.81, respectively (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Stress scores were elevated in CSC patients and were strongly correlated with serum homocysteine and cortisol levels and BP. PMID:27958201

  7. A proteomic study of protein variation between osteopenic and age-matched control bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Christopher D; Dangott, Lawrence J; Rahm, Mark D; Hitt, Kirby D; Stewart, Donald S; Wayne Sampson, H

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this study was to identify changes in protein expression within the bone tissue environment between osteopenic and control bone tissue of human femoral neck patients with osteoarthritis. Femoral necks were compared from osteopenic patients and age-matched controls. A new method of bone protein extraction was developed to provide a swift, clear view of the bone proteome. Relative changes in protein expression between control and osteopenic samples were quantified using difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology after affinity chromatographic depletion of albumin and IgG. The proteins that were determined to be differentially expressed were identified using standard liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and database searching techniques. In order to rule out blood contamination, blood from age-matched osteoporotic, osteopenic and controls were analyzed in a similar manner. Image analysis of the DIGE gels indicated that 145 spots in the osteopenic bone samples changed at least ± 1.5-fold from the control samples (P < 0.05). Three of the proteins were identified by LC/MS/MS. Of the proteins that increased in the osteopenic femurs, two were especially significant: carbonic anhydrase I and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Apolipoprotein A-I was the most prominent protein that significantly decreased in the osteopenic femurs. The blood samples revealed no significant differences between groups for any of these proteins. In conclusion, carbonic anhydrase I, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 and apolipoprotein A-I appeared to be the most significant variations of proteins in patients with osteopenia and osteoarthritis.

  8. Comparison of Brachial Artery Vasoreactivity in Elite Power Athletes and Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Michael A.; Blalock, Paul; Credeur, Daniel P.; Parish, Tracie R.

    2013-01-01

    Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes. Purpose To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls. Methods Eight elite power athletes (age = 23±2 years) and ten controls (age = 22±1 yrs) were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD) and a cold pressor test (CPT). Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test. Results Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39±1.51 vs. Controls: 3.73±0.71 mm, p<0.05), had greater vasodilatory (BAFMD%: Athletes: 8.21±1.78 vs. Controls: 5.69±1.56%) and constrictor (CPT %: Athletes: -2.95±1.07 vs. Controls: −1.20±0.48%) responses, compared to controls. Vascular operating range (VOR = Peak dilation+Peak Constriction) was also greater in athletes (VOR: Athletes: 0.55±0.15 vs. Controls: 0.25±0.18 mm, p<0.05). Athletes had superior handgrip strength (Athletes: 55.92±17.06 vs. Controls: 36.77±17.06 kg, p<0.05) but similar heart rate responses at peak (Athletes: 123±16 vs. Controls: 130±25 bpm, p>0.05) and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88±21 vs. Controls: 98±26 bpm, p>0.05) following the step test. Conclusion Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses) than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an

  9. Developmental Level and Psychopathology: Comparing Children with Developmental Delays to Chronological and Mental Age Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Barbara; Neece, Cameron L.; Baker, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Children with developmental delays (DD) are at heightened risk for developing clinically significant behavioral and emotional difficulties as compared to children with typical development (TD). However, nearly all studies comparing psychopathology in youth with DD employ TD control groups of the same chronological age (CA). It is unclear, then, whether the heightened symptomology found in age-matched children with DD is beyond what would be expected given their developmental level. The present study assessed rates of behavior problems and mental disorder in 35 children with DD at age 9 years. These were compared with rates from 35 children with TD matched for CA at age 9 and also earlier rates for these same children at age 6, when matched for mental age (MA). Children with DD had significantly more behavior problems in 7 of the 17 scales of the CBCL when compared to TD children matched for CA, and 6 of 17 scales when compared to the MA-matched group. Rates of meeting DSM-IV criteria for a psychiatric disorder were significantly higher in the DD group than both the CA- and MA-matched TD groups for three and four, respectively, of the seven diagnoses examined. Descriptively, the mean ratings for all variables assessed were higher for the DD group than both TD comparison groups, with the exception of the Anxious/Depressed scale of the CBCL. These findings validate the heightened risk for clinically significant behavior problems and mental disorders in youth with DD above and beyond their developmental functioning. PMID:25498740

  10. Comparison of Conditioning Impairments in Children with Down Syndrome, Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Mental Age-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, P.; Staytom, L.; Stott, S.; Truzoli, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the relative ease of learning across four tasks suggested by an adaptation of Thomas's hierarchy of learning in children with Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorders and mental age-matched controls. Methods: Learning trials were carried out to investigate observational learning, instrumental learning, reversal…

  11. Pitch Characteristics Before Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction in Major League Pitchers Compared With Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Prodromo, John; Patel, Nimit; Kumar, Neil; Denehy, Kevin; Tabb, Loni Philip; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is commonly performed in Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers, but little is known about the preoperative pitch type and velocity characteristics of pitchers who go on to undergo UCLR. Hypothesis: Pitchers who required UCLR have thrown a greater percentage of fastballs and have greater pitch velocities compared with age-matched controls in the season before injury. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: MLB pitchers active during the 2002 to 2015 seasons were included. The UCLR group consisted of MLB pitchers who received UCLR between 2003 and 2015, utilizing the season before surgery (2002-2014) for analysis. The control group comprised age-matched controls of the same season. Players who pitched less than 20 innings in the season before surgery were excluded. Pitch types were recorded as percentage of total pitches thrown. Pitch velocities were recorded for each pitch type. Pitch type and pitch velocities during preoperative seasons for UCLR pitchers were compared with age-matched controls using univariate and multivariate models. Results: A total of 114 cases that went on to UCLR and 3780 controls were included in the study. Pitchers who went on to UCLR appear to have greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities; there were no significant differences in pitch selection between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In the season before surgery, MLB pitchers who underwent UCLR demonstrated greater fastball, slider, curveball, changeup, and split-fingered fastball velocities, with no significant difference in pitch type. PMID:27350954

  12. Associations Between Physical Fitness Indices and Working Memory in Breast Cancer Survivors and Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Michael J.; Zuniga, Krystle E.; Raine, Lauren B.; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Hillman, Charles H.; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study examined the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness, heart rate recovery, and physical activity on working memory in breast cancer survivors and age-matched controls. Method: Using a case-control design, 32 women who had received a breast cancer diagnosis and completed primary treatment within the past 36-months (11 radiation only; 21 chemotherapy) and 30 age-matched women with no previous cancer diagnosis completed a n-back continuous performance task commonly used as an assessment of working memory. In addition, cardiorespiratory fitness and heart rate recovery were measured during a submaximal graded exercise test and physical activity was measured using 7-days of accelerometer monitoring. Results: Breast cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy had poorer heart rate recovery (p = .010) and engaged in less physical activity than women who had received radiation only (p = .004) or non-cancer controls (p = .029). Cancer treatment (radiation; chemotherapy) predicted differences in reaction times on the 1-back working memory task (p = .029). However, more rapid heart rate recovery predicted shorter reaction times on the 1-back task in the age-matched control group (p = .002). All participants with greater cardiorespiratory fitness displayed greater accuracy independent of disease status on the 1-back task (p = .017). No significant group differences in reaction times were observed for 2-back target trials between breast cancer survivors and controls. However, greater total physical activity predicted shorter reaction times in breast cancer survivors (radiation, chemotherapy) on the 2-back task (p = .014). In addition, all participants who exhibited more rapid heart rate recovery demonstrated better greater accuracy regardless of disease status (p = .013). Conclusion: These findings support differences in physical activty participation, heart rate recovery, and 1- and 2-back working memory reaction

  13. A Comparison of Substantia Nigra T1 Hyperintensity in Parkinson's Disease Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Controls: Volumetric Analysis of Neuromelanin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju-Yeon; Yun, Won-Sung; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Moon, Yeon Sil; Kim, Heejin; Kwak, Ki-Chang; Lee, Jong-Min; Han, Seol-Heui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuromelanin loss of substantia nigra (SN) can be visualized as a T1 signal reduction on T1-weighted high-resolution imaging. We investigated whether volumetric analysis of T1 hyperintensity for SN could be used to differentiate between Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched controls. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 10 patients with PDD, 18 patients with AD, and 13 age-matched healthy elderly controls. MR imaging was performed at 3 tesla. To measure the T1 hyperintense area of SN, we obtained an axial thin section high-resolution T1-weighted fast spin echo sequence. The volumes of interest for the T1 hyperintense SN were drawn onto heavily T1-weighted FSE sequences through midbrain level, using the MIPAV software. The measurement differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by a post hoc comparison. Results A comparison of the three groups showed significant differences in terms of volume of T1 hyperintensity (p < 0.001, Bonferroni corrected). The volume of T1 hyperintensity was significantly lower in PDD than in AD and normal controls (p < 0.005, Bonferroni corrected). However, the volume of T1 hyperintensity was not different between AD and normal controls (p = 0.136, Bonferroni corrected). Conclusion The volumetric measurement of the T1 hyperintensity of SN can be an imaging marker for evaluating neuromelanin loss in neurodegenerative diseases and a differential in PDD and AD cases. PMID:27587951

  14. Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Have Comparable Hip Bone Geometry to Age-Matched Control Women.

    PubMed

    McBreairty, Laura E; Zello, Gordon A; Gordon, Julianne J; Serrao, Shani B; Pierson, Roger A; Chizen, Donna R; Chilibeck, Philip D

    2016-12-26

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age manifesting with polycystic ovaries, menstrual irregularities, hyperandrogenism, hirsutism, and insulin resistance. The oligomenorrhea and amenorrhea characteristic to PCOS are associated with low bone mineral density (BMD); conversely, the hyperandrogenism and hyperinsulinemia may elicit a protective effect on BMD. As bone geometric properties provide additional information about bone strength, the objective of this study was to compare measures of hip geometry in women with PCOS to a healthy female population. Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, BMD and measures of hip geometry were determined in women with PCOS (n = 60) and healthy controls (n = 60) aged 18-35 years. Clinical biochemical measures were also determined in women with PCOS. Measures of hip geometry, including cross-sectional area, cross-sectional moment of inertia, subperiosteal width (SPW), and section modulus, were similar between groups following correction for body mass index (BMI) (all p > 0.05) with intertrochanter SPW significantly lower in women with PCOS (p < 0.05). BMI-corrected whole body BMD as well as the lumbar spine and regions of proximal femur were also comparable between groups. In women with PCOS, BMI-corrected correlations were found between insulin and femoral shaft SPW (r = 0.322, p < 0.05), glucose and femoral neck (r = 0.301, p < 0.05), and trochanter BMD (0.348, p < 0.05), as well as between testosterone and femoral neck BMD (0.376, p < 0.05) and narrow neck cross-sectional area (0.306, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that women with PCOS may have compromised intertrochanter SPW while oligomenorrhea appears to have no detrimental effect on bone density or geometry in women with PCOS.

  15. The Long-Term Effect of Radical Prostatectomy on Erectile Function, Urinary Continence, and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: A Comparison to Age-Matched Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Ponholzer, Anton; Augustin, Herbert; Madersbacher, Stephan; Pummer, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. To analyze the impact of radical prostatectomy (RPE) on erectile function and lower urinary tract function in comparison to age-matched healthy men. Materials and Methods. Patients who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy completed questionnaires containing the IIEF-5, the Bristol female LUTS questionnaire, and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Results. Patients after RPE were included (n = 363). Age-matched healthy men (n = 363) were included. The mean IIEF-5 of patients aged 61–70 yrs after RPE was 10.4 ± 6.6 versus 18.8 ± 5.3 in the control cohort; the respective values for men aged 71–80 yrs after RPE were 7.2 ± 6.5 versus 13.6 ± 7.7 in the control cohort. Urinary incontinence after RPE was reported in 41.9% (61–70 years) and 37.7% (71–80) versus 7.5% and 15.1% in the control cohort. The mean IPSS of patients after RPE aged 61–70 yrs was 5.0 ± 4.4 versus 5.5 ± 4.9 in the control cohort; the respective values for men aged 71–80 yrs were 6.0 ± 4.9 versus 7.5 ± 5.7 in the healthy cohort. Conclusions. The negative effect of radical prostatectomy on erectile and urinary incontinence remains substantial. The physiologically declining erectile and lower urinary tract function with ageing reduces the difference between healthy men and those after surgery. Healthy men have a higher IPSS presumably due to the presence of bladder outlet obstruction. PMID:28261619

  16. Prematurely delivered rats show improved motor coordination during sensory-evoked motor responses compared to age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Megan E; Brumley, Michele R

    2014-05-10

    The amount of postnatal experience for perinatal rats was manipulated by delivering pups one day early (postconception day 21; PC21) by cesarean delivery and comparing their motor behavior to age-matched controls on PC22 (the typical day of birth). On PC22, pups were tested on multiple measures of motor coordination: leg extension response (LER), facial wiping, contact righting, and fore- and hindlimb stepping. The LER and facial wiping provided measures of synchronous hind- and forelimb coordination, respectively, and were sensory-evoked. Contact righting also was sensory-evoked and provided a measure of axial coordination. Stepping provided a measure of alternated forelimb and hindlimb coordination and was induced with the serotonin receptor agonist quipazine. Pups that were delivered prematurely and spent an additional day in the postnatal environment showed more bilateral limb coordination during expression of the LER and facial wiping, as well as a more mature righting strategy, compared to controls. These findings suggest that experience around the time of birth shapes motor coordination and the expression of species-typical behavior in the developing rat.

  17. Comparative gait analysis between children with autism and age-matched controls: analysis with temporal-spatial and foot pressure variables.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bee-Oh; O'Sullivan, David; Choi, Bum-Gwon; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite(®) system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns.

  18. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p < 0.05 for the overall physiologic state effect (lactation vs. control), and a within tissue pairwise comparison of p < 0.01. The proportion of false positives, an estimate of the ratio of false positives in the list of differentially expressed genes, was calculated for each tissue. The number of differentially expressed genes was 420 in the liver, 337 in the duodenum, 402 in the jejunum, and 523 in the ileum. The list of differentially expressed genes was in turn analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to detect biological pathways that were overrepresented. In all tissues, sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-regulated genes involved in cholesterol synthesis showed increased mRNA expression, with the fewest changes detected in the jejunum. We detected increased Scap mRNA in the liver only, suggesting an explanation for the difference in response to lactation between the liver and small intestine. Expression of Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In

  19. Training understanding of reversible sentences: a study comparing language-impaired children with age-matched and grammar-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsinjen Julie; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many children with specific language impairment (SLI) have problems with language comprehension, and little is known about how to remediate these. We focused here on errors in interpreting sentences such as "the ball is above the cup", where the spatial configuration depends on word order. We asked whether comprehension of such short reversible sentences could be improved by computerized training, and whether learning by children with SLI resembled that of younger, typically-developing children. Methods. We trained 28 children with SLI aged 6-11 years, 28 typically-developing children aged from 4 to 7 years who were matched to the SLI group for raw scores on a test of receptive grammar, and 20 typically-developing children who were matched to the SLI group on chronological age. A further 20 children with SLI were given pre- and post-test assessments, but did not undergo training. Those in the trained groups were given training on four days using a computer game adopting an errorless learning procedure, during which they had to select pictures to correspond to spoken sentences such as "the cup is above the drum" or "the bird is below the hat". Half the trained children heard sentences using above/below and the other half heard sentences using before/after (with a spatial interpretation). A total of 96 sentences was presented over four sessions. Half the sentences were unique, whereas the remainder consisted of 12 repetitions of each of four sentences that became increasingly familiar as training proceeded. Results. Age-matched control children performed near ceiling (≥ 90% correct) in the first session and were excluded from the analysis. Around half the trained SLI children also performed this well. Training effects were examined in 15 SLI and 16 grammar-matched children who scored less than 90% correct on the initial training session. Overall, children's scores improved with training. Memory span was a significant predictor of improvement, even

  20. "CADASIL coma" in an Italian homozygous CADASIL patient: comparison with clinical and MRI findings in age-matched heterozygous patients with the same G528C NOTCH3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ragno, Michele; Pianese, Luigi; Morroni, Manrico; Cacchiò, Gabriella; Manca, Antonio; Di Marzio, Fabio; Silvestri, Serena; Miceli, Cristina; Scarcella, Maria; Onofrj, Marco; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, with a striking variability in phenotypic expression. To date, only two homozygous patients have been reported, with divergent phenotypic features. We describe an Italian CADASIL patient, homozygous for G528C mutation, in whom early manifestation of the disease was migraine, but whose clinical evolution was characterized by a reversible acute encephalopathy followed by full recovery ("CADASIL coma"). Clinical evaluation, MR scan, neuropsychological and neurophysiological investigation did not reveal substantial differences between our homozygous patient and her heterozygous relatives sharing the same mutation, or between our patient and a group of heterozygous individuals with the same mutation but from different families. Skin biopsy identified peculiar features in the homozygous patient, with cytoplasmic pseudoinclusions likely containing granular osmiophilic material (GOM) in the vascular smooth muscle cells, but further studies are necessary to substantiate their possible relationships with CADASIL homozygosis. "CADASIL coma" did not seem to be specific of patient's homozygosis, since it was observed in one of her heterozygous relatives, whereas its pathogenesis seems to be related to peculiar constellations of unknown predisposing factors. The present study demonstrated that CADASIL conforms to the classical definition of dominant diseases, according to which homozygotes and heterozygotes for a defect are phenotypically indistinguishable.

  1. Soluble BACE-1 Activity and sAβPPβ Concentrations in Alzheimer's Disease and Age-Matched Healthy Control Cerebrospinal Fluid from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 Baseline Cohort.

    PubMed

    Savage, Mary J; Holder, Daniel J; Wu, Guoxin; Kaplow, June; Siuciak, Judith A; Potter, William Z

    2015-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) plays an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), freeing the amyloid-β (Aβ) N-terminus from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), the first step in Aβ formation. Increased BACE1 activity in AD brain or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported. Other studies, however, found either no change or a decrease with AD diagnosis in either BACE1 activity or sAβPPβ, the N-terminal secreted product of BACE1 (sBACE1) activity on AβPP. Here, sBACE1 enzymatic activity and secreted AβPPβ (sAβPPβ) were measured in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1) baseline CSF samples and no statistically significant changes were found in either measure comparing healthy control, mild cognitively impaired, or AD individual samples. While CSF sBACE1 activity and sAβPPβ demonstrated a moderate yet significant degree of correlation with each other, there was no correlation of either analyte to CSF Aβ peptide ending at residue 42. Surprisingly, a stronger correlation was demonstrated between CSF sBACE1 activity and tau, which was comparable to that between CSF Aβ₄₂ and tau. Unlike for these latter two analytes, receiver-operator characteristic curves demonstrate that neither CSF sBACE1 activity nor sAβPPβ concentrations can be used to differentiate between healthy elderly and AD individuals.

  2. Which oropharyngeal factors are significant risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea? An age-matched study and dentist perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ruangsri, Supanigar; Jorns, Teekayu Plangkoon; Puasiri, Subin; Luecha, Thitisan; Chaithap, Chariya; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep breathing disorder. Untreated OSA may lead to a number of cardiovascular complications. Dentists may play an important role in OSA detection by conducting careful oral examinations. This study focused on the correlation of oral anatomical features in Thai patients who presented with OSA. Methods We conducted a prospective comparative study at a sleep/hypertension clinic and a dental clinic at Khon Kaen University in Thailand. Patients with OSA were enrolled in the study, along with age-matched patients with non-OSA (controls). Baseline characteristics, clinical data, and oropharyngeal data of all patients were compared between the two groups. Oropharyngeal measurements included tongue size, torus mandibularis, Mallampati classification, palatal space, and lateral pharyngeal wall area. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with OSA. Results During the study period, there were 156 patients who met the study criteria; 78 were patients with OSA and the other 78 were healthy control subjects. In the OSA group, there were 43 males with a mean age of 53 (standard deviation 12.29) years and a mean BMI of 30.86 kg/mm2. There were 37 males in the control group with a mean age of 50 (standard deviation 12.04) years and a mean BMI of 24.03 kg/mm2. According to multivariate logistic analysis, three factors were perfectly associated with OSA, including torus mandibularis class 6, narrow lateral pharyngeal wall, and Mallampati class 4. There were two other significant factors associated with having OSA, namely, BMI and Mallampati classification. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of these two factors were 1.445 (1.017, 2.052) and 5.040 (1.655, 15.358), respectively. Conclusion Dentists may play an important role in the detection of OSA in patients with high BMI through careful oropharyngeal examination in routine dental treatment. A large torus mandibularis

  3. Cardiovascular function is better in veteran football players than age-matched untrained elderly healthy men.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J F; Andersen, T R; Andersen, L J; Randers, M B; Hornstrup, T; Hansen, P R; Bangsbo, J; Krustrup, P

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether lifelong football training may improve cardiovascular function, physical fitness, and body composition. Our subjects were 17 male veteran football players (VPG; 68.1 ± 2.1 years) and 26 healthy age-matched untrained men who served as a control group (CG; 68.2 ± 3.2 years). Examinations included measurements of cardiac function, microvascular endothelial function [reactive hyperemic index (RHI)], maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), and body composition. In VPG, left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume was 20% larger (P < 0.01) and LV ejection fraction was higher (P < 0.001). Tissue Doppler imaging revealed an augmented LV longitudinal displacement, i.e., LV shortening of 21% (P < 0.001) and longitudinal 2D strain was 12% higher (P < 0.05), in VPG. In VPG, resting heart rate was lower (6 bpm, P < 0.05), and VO2max was higher (18%, P < 0.05). In addition, RHI was 21% higher (P < 0.05) in VPG. VPG also had lower body mass index (P < 0.05), body fat percentage, total body fat mass, android fat percentage, and gynoid fat percentage (all P < 0.01). Lifelong participation in football training is associated with better LV systolic function, physical fitness, microvascular function, and a healthier body composition. Overall, VPG have better cardiovascular function compared with CG, which may reduce their cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  4. Are the prevalence and treatment of asthma similar in elite athletes and the aged-matched non-athlete population?

    PubMed

    Locke, S; Marks, G

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of asthma and use of asthma medications in elite athletes compared with an age-matched non-athlete population. Data were collected from the respiratory component of annual medical screening of 424 elite athletes from the Queensland Academy of Sport. Measures included the prevalence of current asthma and ever doctor-diagnosed asthma, and the prevalence of use of treatment for asthma including beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroid medication. The prevalence of current asthma in athletes aged 18-29 years was 14% (95% CI, 9-19%), which did not differ significantly from the prevalence in the non-athlete control population (11%; 95% CI, 9-12%, P=0.3). Of athletes with current asthma, 27% were not taking any medications for asthma, and 25% were treated with short-acting beta-agonist medications alone and were not taking inhaled corticosteroids. These data indicate that the overall cumulative and period prevalence of asthma in Queensland athletes is similar to that in the general age-matched population. Athletes use beta-agonists with a frequency similar to the general population.

  5. Finger movement improves ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, K; Kamata, N; Iwata, A; Minamida, F; Abe, K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of finger movement on ankle control for gait initiation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD patients). The subjects were 13 PD patients and 6 age-matched healthy adults. The subjects moved fingers before or after gait initiation, or initiated gait without finger movement. Ankle joint movement in the stance leg was recorded to estimate the duration of ankle dorsiflexion (DIF duration), which reflects the degree of disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients. In the PD patients with prolonged D/F duration, finger movement that preceded gait initiation shortened the D/F duration, but in the PD patients without prolonged D/F duration and in healthy subjects, the effect was not found. Accordingly, finger movement that precedes gait initiation improves ankle control for gait initiation in PD patients who suffer disturbance in ankle control for gait initiation.

  6. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder pain in Chinese adolescents compared to an age-matched Swedish population.

    PubMed

    Hongxing, L; Astrøm, A N; List, T; Nilsson, I-M; Johansson, A

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to (i) assess the prevalence and perceived need for treatment of TMD pain, and its association with socio-economic factors and gender, in adolescents in Xi᾽an, Shaanxi Province, China, and (ii) compare the prevalence and association with gender of TMD pain in Xi᾽an to an age-matched Swedish population. We surveyed Chinese adolescents aged 15 to 19 years in Xi'an, China (n = 5524), using a questionnaire with two-stage stratified sampling and the school as the sampling unit. The study included second-year students at selected high schools. It also included an age-matched Swedish population (n = 17,015) surveyed using the same diagnostic criteria for TMD pain as that used in the Chinese sample. The survey found TMD pain in 14·8% (n = 817) of the Chinese sample and 5·1% (n = 871) of the Swedish sample (P < 0·0001). Girls had significantly more TMD pain than boys in both the Chinese (P < 0·05) and Swedish (P < 0·001) samples. TMD pain increased with age in the Chinese population. Of the Chinese adolescents with TMD pain, 47% reported that they felt a need for treatment. Rural schools, low paternal education levels, poverty, living outside the home, poor general and oral health, and dissatisfaction with teeth all showed significant positive correlations with TMD pain. Prevalence of TMD pain in Chinese adolescents was significantly higher than in the Swedish sample.

  7. Oxytocin administration enhances controlled social cognition in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, J.D.; Chuang, B.; Lam, O.; Lai, W.; O’Donovan, A.; Rankin, K.P.; Mathalon, D.H.; Vinogradov, S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Individuals with schizophrenia have functionally significant deficits in automatic and controlled social cognition, but no currently available pharmacologic treatments reduce these deficits. The neuropeptide oxytocin has multiple prosocial effects when administered intranasally in humans and there is growing interest in its therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. Methods We administered 40 IU of oxytocin and saline placebo intranasally to 29 male subjects with schizophrenia and 31 age-matched, healthy controls in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Social cognition was assessed with The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). We examined the effects of oxytocin administration on automatic social cognition (the ability to rapidly interpret and understand emotional cues from the voice, face, and body); controlled social cognition (the ability to comprehend indirectly expressed emotions, thoughts, and intentions through complex deliberations over longer time periods); and a control task (the ability to comprehend truthful dialog and perform general task procedures) in individuals with and without schizophrenia using mixed factorial analysis of variance models. Results Patients with schizophrenia showed significant impairments in automatic and controlled social cognition compared to healthy controls, and administration of oxytocin significantly improved their controlled, but not automatic, social cognition, F(1, 58) = 8.75; p = 0.004. Conversely, oxytocin administration had limited effects on social cognition in healthy participants. Patients and controls performed equally well and there were no effects of oxytocin administration on the control task. Discussion Intact social cognitive abilities are associated with better functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia. Our data highlight the potentially complex effects of oxytocin on some but not all aspects of

  8. Visual evoked potentials in dementia: a meta-analysis and empirical study of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pollock, V E; Schneider, L S; Chui, H C; Henderson, V; Zemansky, M; Sloane, R B

    1989-04-15

    A meta-analytic review of flash and pattern reversal visual evoked potential research indicates that elderly demented patients have longer P100 latencies than age-matched control subjects. In the present empirical research, patients with research diagnoses of probable Alzheimer's disease were compared with sex- and age-matched control subjects using P100 latencies of visual evoked potentials (VEP) elicited by flash and pattern reversal. As compared to control subjects, Alzheimer's disease patients showed significantly longer P100 latencies of the VEP elicited by pattern reversal; the flash P100 only marginally distinguished them. These findings are discussed within the context of VEP recording practices, patient selection, sex and age matching of control subjects, and the visual system.

  9. Brain activation during neurocognitive testing using functional near-infrared spectroscopy in patients following concussion compared to healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kontos, A P; Huppert, T J; Beluk, N H; Elbin, R J; Henry, L C; French, J; Dakan, S M; Collins, M W

    2014-12-01

    There is no accepted clinical imaging modality for concussion, and current imaging modalities including fMRI, DTI, and PET are expensive and inaccessible to most clinics/patients. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive, portable, and low-cost imaging modality that can measure brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare brain activity as measured by fNIRS in concussed and age-matched controls during the performance of cognitive tasks from a computerized neurocognitive test battery. Participants included nine currently symptomatic patients aged 18-45 years with a recent (15-45 days) sport-related concussion and five age-matched healthy controls. The participants completed a computerized neurocognitive test battery while wearing the fNIRS unit. Our results demonstrated reduced brain activation in the concussed subject group during word memory, (spatial) design memory, digit-symbol substitution (symbol match), and working memory (X's and O's) tasks. Behavioral performance (percent-correct and reaction time respectively) was lower for concussed participants on the word memory, design memory, and symbol match tasks than controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that fNIRS could be a useful, portable assessment tool to assess reduced brain activation and augment current approaches to assessment and management of patients following concussion.

  10. Evaluation of visual stress symptoms in age-matched dyslexic, Meares-Irlen syndrome and normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Mana A.; Alanazi, Saud A.; Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the prevalence of dyslexia and Meares-Irlen syndrome (MIS) among female students and determine their level of visual stress in comparison with normal subjects. METHODS A random sample of 450 female medical students of King Saud University Riyadh (age range, 18-30y) responded to a wide range of questions designed to accomplish the aims of this study. The detailed questionnaire consisted of 54 questions with 12 questions enquiring on ocular history and demography of participants while 42 questions were on visual symptoms. Items were categorized into critical and non-critical questions (CQ and NCQ) and were rated on four point Likert scale. Based on the responses obtained, the subjects were grouped into normal (control), dyslexic with or without MIS (Group 1) and subjects with MIS only (Group 2). Responses were analysed as averages and mean scores were calculated and compared between groups using one way analysis of variance to evaluate total visual stress score (TVSS=NCQ+CQ), critical and non-critical visual stress scores. The relationship between categorical variables such as age, handedness and condition were assessed with Chi-square test. RESULTS The completion rate was 97.6% and majority of the respondents (92%) were normal readers, 2% dyslexic and 6% had MIS. They were age-matched. More than half of the participants had visited an eye care practitioner in the last 2y. About 13% were recommended eye exercises and one participant experienced pattern glare. Hand preference was not associated with any condition but Group 1 subjects (3/9, 33%) were significantly more likely to be diagnosed of lazy eye than Group 2 (2/27, 7%) and control (27/414, 7%) subjects. The mean±SD of TVSS responses were 63±14 and it was 44±9 for CQ and 19±5 for NCQ. Responses from all three variables were normally distributed but the CQ responses were on the average more positive (82%) in Group 2 and less positive (46%) in Group 1 than control. With NCQ, the responses were

  11. Physical fitness assessment in multiple sclerosis patients: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Guerra, E; di Cagno, A; Mancini, P; Sperandii, F; Quaranta, F; Ciminelli, E; Fagnani, F; Giombini, A; Pigozzi, F

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence to show the effectiveness of physical exercise for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Aim of this study was to evaluate aerobic capacity, strength, balance, and the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) after exercise, in ambulatory patients with mild MS and matched control healthy participants. Seventeen MS patients aged 48.09 ± 10.0 years, with mild MS disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale: EDSS 1.5 to 4.5) and 10 healthy sedentary age matched (41.9 ± 11.2 years) subjects volunteered for the study. MS patients underwent medical examination with resting electrocardiogram, arterial blood pressure, EDSS, and Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-MFIS. Both groups also underwent physical assessment with the Berg Balance Scale(,) test (Berg), Six Minutes Walking Test (6MWT), maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC) of forearm, lower limb, shoulder strength test, and the Borg 10-point scale test. The one-way ANOVA showed significant differences for MFIS (F1.19=9.420; p<0.01), Berg (F1.19=13.125; p<0.01), handgrip MIVC (F1.19=4.567; p<0.05), lower limbs MIVC (F1.19=7.429; p<0.01), and 6MWT (F1.19=28.061; p<0.01) between groups. EDSS, Berg test and Borg scores explained 80% of 6MWT variation. Mild grade EDSS patients exhibited impaired balance, muscle strength, and low self pace-6MWT scores, whereas RPE response after the exercise was similar to that of sedentary individuals. Both groups showed similar global physiological adjustments to exercise.

  12. Exercise performance and cardiovascular health variables in 70-year-old male soccer players compared to endurance-trained, strength-trained and untrained age-matched men.

    PubMed

    Randers, Morten Bredsgaard; Andersen, Jesper L; Petersen, Jesper; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Bangsbo, Jens; Saltin, Bengt; Krustrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate performance variables and indicators of cardiovascular health profile in elderly soccer players (SP, n = 11) compared to endurance-trained (ET, n = 8), strength-trained (ST, n = 7) and untrained (UT, n = 7) age-matched men. The 33 men aged 65-85 years underwent a testing protocol including measurements of cycle performance, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and body composition, and muscle fibre types and capillarisation were determined from m. vastus lateralis biopsy. In SP, time to exhaustion was longer (16.3 ± 2.0 min; P < 0.01) than in UT (+48%) and ST (+41%), but similar to ET (+1%). Fat percentage was lower (P < 0.05) in SP (-6.5% points) than UT but not ET and ST. Heart rate reserve was higher (P < 0.05) in SP (104 ± 16 bpm) than UT (+21 bpm) and ST (+24 bpm), but similar to ET (+2 bpm), whereas VO2max was not significantly different in SP (30.2 ± 4.9 ml O2 · min(-1) · kg(-1)) compared to UT (+14%) and ST (+9%), but lower (P < 0.05) than ET (-22%). The number of capillaries per fibre was higher (P < 0.05) in SP than UT (53%) and ST (42%) but similar to ET. SP had less type IIx fibres than UT (-12% points). In conclusion, the exercise performance and cardiovascular health profile are markedly better for lifelong trained SP than for age-matched UT controls. Incremental exercise capacity and muscle aerobic capacity of SP are also superior to lifelong ST athletes and comparable to endurance athletes.

  13. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunctions in elderly patients with essential tremor: comparison with healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong-Seok; Oh, Yoon-Sang; Park, Hyung-Eun; Lee, Si-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Wook; Song, In-Uk; An, Jae-Young; Park, Hun-Jun; Son, Byung-Chul; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Questionnaire-based analyses show that patients with essential tremor (ET) may have several autonomic dysfunctions, especially in the cardiovascular and genitourinary domains; yet the laboratory correlates of autonomic dysfunction in ET are unknown and have not been studied. Herein, we explored whether sympathetic and parasympathetic functions differed between control subjects and patients with ET. Seventy-five elderly patients with ET were enrolled in this study, along with 25 age-matched controls. Orthostatic vital signs, ambulatory 24-h blood pressure monitoring and 24-h Holter monitoring values were recorded and metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) uptake was assessed using the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M ratio). The frequencies of orthostatic hypotension, supine hypertension, nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping were not different between the ET patients and the controls, although ET patients had more episodes of orthostatic intolerance. The ET group also had similar heart rate variations as the control group for all the time-domains. The mean H/M ratios for the ET group were not statistically different from that of the control group. This result proves that the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system is normal in ET.

  14. Improving Interference Control in ADHD Patients with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS).

    PubMed

    Breitling, Carolin; Zaehle, Tino; Dannhauer, Moritz; Bonath, Björn; Tegelbeckers, Jana; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Krauel, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been suggested as a promising alternative to psychopharmacological treatment approaches due to its local and network effects on brain activation. In the current study, we investigated the impact of tDCS over the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on interference control in 21 male adolescents with ADHD and 21 age matched healthy controls aged 13-17 years, who underwent three separate sessions of tDCS (anodal, cathodal, and sham) while completing a Flanker task. Even though anodal stimulation appeared to diminish commission errors in the ADHD group, the overall analysis revealed no significant effect of tDCS. Since participants showed a considerable learning effect from the first to the second session, performance in the first session was separately analyzed. ADHD patients receiving sham stimulation in the first session showed impaired interference control compared to healthy control participants whereas ADHD patients who were exposed to anodal stimulation, showed comparable performance levels (commission errors, reaction time variability) to the control group. These results suggest that anodal tDCS of the right inferior frontal gyrus could improve interference control in patients with ADHD.

  15. Improving Interference Control in ADHD Patients with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Breitling, Carolin; Zaehle, Tino; Dannhauer, Moritz; Bonath, Björn; Tegelbeckers, Jana; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Krauel, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been suggested as a promising alternative to psychopharmacological treatment approaches due to its local and network effects on brain activation. In the current study, we investigated the impact of tDCS over the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on interference control in 21 male adolescents with ADHD and 21 age matched healthy controls aged 13–17 years, who underwent three separate sessions of tDCS (anodal, cathodal, and sham) while completing a Flanker task. Even though anodal stimulation appeared to diminish commission errors in the ADHD group, the overall analysis revealed no significant effect of tDCS. Since participants showed a considerable learning effect from the first to the second session, performance in the first session was separately analyzed. ADHD patients receiving sham stimulation in the first session showed impaired interference control compared to healthy control participants whereas ADHD patients who were exposed to anodal stimulation, showed comparable performance levels (commission errors, reaction time variability) to the control group. These results suggest that anodal tDCS of the right inferior frontal gyrus could improve interference control in patients with ADHD. PMID:27147964

  16. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  17. Error types and error positions in neglect dyslexia: comparative analyses in neglect patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Weinzierl, Christiane; Kerkhoff, Georg; van Eimeren, Lucia; Keller, Ingo; Stenneken, Prisca

    2012-10-01

    Unilateral spatial neglect frequently involves a lateralised reading disorder, neglect dyslexia (ND). Reading of single words in ND is characterised by left-sided omissions and substitutions of letters. However, it is unclear whether the distribution of error types and positions within a word shows a unique pattern of ND when directly compared to healthy controls. This question has been difficult to answer so far, given the usually low number of reading errors in healthy controls. Therefore, the present study compared single word reading of 18 patients with left-sided neglect, due to right-hemisphere stroke, and 11 age-matched healthy controls, and adjusted individual task difficulty (by varying stimulus presentation times in participants) in order to reach approximately equal error rates between neglect patients and controls. Results showed that, while both omission and substitution errors were frequently produced in neglect patients and controls, only omissions appeared neglect-specific when task difficulty was adapted between groups. Analyses of individual letter positions within words revealed that the spatial distribution of reading errors in the neglect dyslexic patients followed an almost linear increase from the end to the beginning of the word (right-to-left-gradient). Both, the gradient in error positions and the predominance of omission errors presented a neglect-specific pattern. Consistent with current models of visual word processing, these findings suggest that ND reflects sublexical, visuospatial attentional mechanisms in letter string encoding.

  18. Abnormal capacity for grip force control in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Abe, Masaki O; Iwaya, Tsutomu; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP), which is an extremely rare sensory neuropathy, is defined as the absence of normal responses to noxious stimuli. Although motor function is not directly impaired in CIP patients, it is likely that the sensory deficit affects the motor control system. In order to characterize motor capacity in CIP patients, we here measured grip force and acceleration of a held object in 12 patients with CIP and 12 age-matched able-bodied subjects. The results demonstrated that the grip force during the object grasp-lift-holding task was significantly greater, less reproducibility and greater fluctuation in the acceleration of the object in CIP patients than in normal subjects. Moreover, some patients showed absence of temporal coupling between the grip and load force, suggesting that anticipatory modulation of the grip force was at least partly impaired. As far as the authors know, this is the first study to characterize motor control ability in patients with CIP. The observed abnormal motor capacity can be at least partly attributed to a lack of sensory inputs mediated by Aδ and unmyelinated C-, specifically C-tactile, fibers. The present results may provide information useful for the prevention of secondary injury and education for patients during the developmental stage.

  19. Impaired Synergic Control of Posture in Parkinson’s Patients without Postural Instability

    PubMed Central

    Falaki, Ali; Huang, Xuemei; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural instability is one of most disabling motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease. Indices of multi-muscle synergies are new measurements of movement and postural stability. Objectives Multi-muscle synergies stabilizing vertical posture were studied in Parkinson’s disease patients without clinical symptoms of postural instability (Hoehn-Yahr- ≤ II) and age-matched controls. We tested the hypothesis that both synergy indices during quiet standing and synergy adjustments to self-triggered postural perturbations would be reduced in patients. Methods Eleven Parkinson’s disease patients and 11 controls performed whole-body tasks while standing. Surface electromyography was used to quantify synergy indices stabilizing center of pressure shifts in the anterior-posterior direction during a load-release task. Results Parkinson’s disease patients showed a significantly lower percentage of variance in the muscle activation space accounted for by the first four principal components, significantly reduced synergy indices during steady state, and significantly reduced anticipatory synergy adjustments (a drop in the synergy index prior to the self-triggered unloading). Conclusions The study demonstrates for the first time that impaired synergic control in Parkinson’s disease can be quantified in postural tasks, even in patients without clinical manifestations of postural instability. Synergy measurements may provide a biomarker sensitive for early problems with postural stability in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27004660

  20. Clinical characteristics and awareness of skin cancer in Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Javed, Saba; Javed, Syed A; Mays, Rana M; Tyring, Stephen K

    2013-09-14

    Skin cancer in darker skin is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We sought to assess the clinical characteristics of cutaneous malignancy amongst Hispanic skin cancer patients and compare them to age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians. In this retrospective study, 150 Hispanic skin cancer patients were identified from electronic medical records and age-matched to 150 non-Hispanic Caucasian controls with skin cancer. The incidence of actinic keratoses (AKs) in Hispanic skin cancer patients (34.0%) was statistically lower than age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasian skin cancer controls (61.3%, P <0.001; odds ratio, 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.92 - 4.93). Moreover, non-Hispanic Caucasian SCC (squamous cell cancer) controls were much more likely to report AKs (36.1%, P = 0.003) than Hispanic SCC patients (25.0%, P = 0.19). This study illustrates a lower incidence of AKs in Hispanic skin cancer patients as compared to their age-matched non-Hispanic Caucasians. The Hispanic skin malignancies present at a more advanced state and there is usually a lack of awareness in such cases. Therefore, patient knowledge and education is crucial for early detection and prevention of skin cancer in the Hispanic population.

  1. Influence of BMI on health-related quality of life: comparison between an obese adult cohort and age-matched population norms.

    PubMed

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; Caterson, Ian D; Leibman, Steven; Smith, Garett S; Sambrook, Phillip N; Fransen, Marlene; March, Lyn M

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine health-related quality of life and fatigue measures in obese subjects and to compare scores with age- and gender-matched population norms. A total of 163 obese subjects were recruited from laparoscopic-adjustable gastric banding or exercise and diet weight loss programs between March 2006 and December 2007. All subjects completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36), Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL), and Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue (MAF) questionnaires. One-sample t-tests were used to compare transformed scores with age- and gender-matched population norms and controls. Obese subjects have significantly lower SF-36 physical and emotional component scores, significantly lower AQoL utility scores and significantly higher fatigue scores compared to age-matched population norms. Within the study cohort, the SF-36 physical functioning, role physical and bodily pain scores, and AQoL utility index were even lower in subjects with clinical knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, obese individuals without OA still had significantly lower scores compared to population norms. Obesity is associated with impaired health-related quality of life and disability as measured by the SF-36, AQoL, and fatigue score (MAF) compared to matched population norms.

  2. Decreased Postural Balance in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Low Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjeldstad, Cecilie; Pardo, Gabriel; Bemben, Debra; Bemben, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate balance in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have low disability and minimal clinical impairments as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and compare them with healthy age-matched controls. Patients were aged between 18 and 64 years; 67 individuals with MS (mu = 44.0 plus or minus 1.2 years) and 45 healthy…

  3. Functional ability perceived by individuals following total knee arthroplasty compared to age-matched individuals without knee disability.

    PubMed

    Finch, E; Walsh, M; Thomas, S G; Woodhouse, L J

    1998-04-01

    A comparison of function of individuals 1 year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with healthy control subjects (controls) meaningfully describes outcome in these patients. Perception of function measured by two questionnaires, the Lower Extremity Activity Profile (LEAP) and the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and walking and stair performance was compared between 29 patients, 1 year after TKA, and 40 controls. There was significantly greater perceived difficulty with function in patients with TKA than in controls. In TKA men, LEAP and WOMAC scores correlated respectively with self-paced walk speed (r = -.71 and -.55) and stair performance time (r = 0.70 and 0.68). In TKA women, LEAP difficulty score correlated with self-paced walk speed (r = -.41) and stair performance time (r = -0.71). By 1 year, TKA subjects regained 80% of the function of controls. Perception of function after TKA can be measured by either questionnaire in men; however, the LEAP is the preferable questionnaire with women.

  4. When brain damage "improves" perception: neglect patients can localize motion-shifted probes better than controls.

    PubMed

    de Vito, Stefania; Lunven, Marine; Bourlon, Clémence; Duret, Christophe; Cavanagh, Patrick; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    When we look at bars flashed against a moving background, we see them displaced in the direction of the upcoming motion (flash-grab illusion). It is still debated whether these motion-induced position shifts are low-level, reflexive consequences of stimulus motion or high-level compensation engaged only when the stimulus is tracked with attention. To investigate whether attention is a causal factor for this striking illusory position shift, we evaluated the flash-grab illusion in six patients with damaged attentional networks in the right hemisphere and signs of left visual neglect and six age-matched controls. With stimuli in the top, right, and bottom visual fields, neglect patients experienced the same amount of illusion as controls. However, patients showed no significant shift when the test was presented in their left hemifield, despite having equally precise judgments. Thus, paradoxically, neglect patients perceived the position of the flash more veridically in their neglected hemifield. These results suggest that impaired attentional processes can reduce the interaction between a moving background and a superimposed stationary flash, and indicate that attention is a critical factor in generating the illusory motion-induced shifts of location.

  5. Impact of Limiting Visual Input on Gait: Individuals with Parkinson Disease, Age-matched Controls and Healthy Young Participants

    PubMed Central

    Pilgram, Laura M.; Earhart, Gammon M.; Pickett, Kristen A.

    2016-01-01

    Normal and limited vision gait was investigated in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD), healthy older and healthy young individuals. Participants walked a GAITRite mat with normal vision or vision of lower limbs occluded. Results indicate individuals with PD walked more slowly, with shorter and wider steps and spent more time in double support with limited vision as compared to full vision. Healthy young and old individuals took shorter steps but were otherwise unchanged between conditions. PMID:26987577

  6. Exploring Metabolic Profile Differences between Colorectal Polyp Patients and Controls Using Seemingly Unrelated Regression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Deng, Lingli; Wei, Siwei; Nagana Gowda, G A; Gu, Haiwei; Chiorean, Elena G; Abu Zaid, Mohammad; Harrison, Marietta L; Pekny, Joseph F; Loehrer, Patrick J; Zhang, Dabao; Zhang, Min; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-06-05

    Despite the fact that colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent and deadly cancers in the world, the development of improved and robust biomarkers to enable screening, surveillance, and therapy monitoring of CRC continues to be evasive. In particular, patients with colon polyps are at higher risk of developing colon cancer; however, noninvasive methods to identify these patients suffer from poor performance. In consideration of the challenges involved in identifying metabolite biomarkers in individuals with high risk for colon cancer, we have investigated NMR-based metabolite profiling in combination with numerous demographic parameters to investigate the ability of serum metabolites to differentiate polyp patients from healthy subjects. We also investigated the effect of disease risk on different groups of biologically related metabolites. A powerful statistical approach, seemingly unrelated regression (SUR), was used to model the correlated levels of metabolites in the same biological group. The metabolites were found to be significantly affected by demographic covariates such as gender, BMI, BMI(2), and smoking status. After accounting for the effects of the confounding factors, we then investigated potential of metabolites from serum to differentiate patients with polyps and age matched healthy controls. Our results showed that while only valine was slightly associated, individually, with polyp patients, a number of biologically related groups of metabolites were significantly associated with polyps. These results may explain some of the challenges and promise a novel avenue for future metabolite profiling methodologies.

  7. Sexual dysfunction in Klinefelter's syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    El Bardisi, H; Majzoub, A; Al Said, S; Alnawasra, H; Dabbous, Z; Arafa, M

    2016-09-23

    Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) is the most common chromosomal abnormality in men with infertility and hypogonadism. Although its influence on fertility has been extensively investigated, very few studies assessed the sexual function of patients with KS. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in patients with KS and investigate possible aetiological factors for reported findings. Medical records of 53 patients with KS were retrospectively reviewed and compared to 75 age-matched control subjects who were prospectively recruited. Sexual history was evaluated through utilisation of international index of erectile function-5 and Arabic index for premature ejaculation questionnaires. Sexual desire was reported subjectively by patients or controls. The incidence of erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation in patients with KS was 18.9% and 22.6% respectively. Compared to age-matched controls, patients with KS had significantly lower incidence of PE. However, there was no statistically significant difference between both groups regarding erectile function. Libido was significantly lower in patients with KS than normal controls (54.7% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.001). Klinefelter's syndrome is a condition that has a variable presentation. Despite having a higher likelihood of reduced sexual desire, patients may have normal erectile function comparable to age-matched individuals. They tend to have a lower incidence of premature ejaculation.

  8. Analysis of the immune system of multiple myeloma patients achieving long-term disease control by multidimensional flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pessoa de Magalhães, Roberto J; Vidriales, María-Belén; Paiva, Bruno; Fernandez-Gimenez, Carlos; García-Sanz, Ramón; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Gutierrez, Norma C; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Blanco, Juan F; Hernández, Jose; de las Heras, Natalia; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Roig, Monica; Costa, Elaine Sobral; Ocio, Enrique M; Perez-Andres, Martin; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio; De La Rubia, Javier; Lahuerta, Juan-Jose; San-Miguel, Jesús F; Orfao, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma remains largely incurable. However, a few patients experience more than 10 years of relapse-free survival and can be considered as operationally cured. Interestingly, long-term disease control in multiple myeloma is not restricted to patients with a complete response, since some patients revert to having a profile of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We compared the distribution of multiple compartments of lymphocytes and dendritic cells in the bone marrow and peripheral blood of multiple myeloma patients with long-term disease control (n=28), patients with newly diagnosed monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (n=23), patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma (n=23), and age-matched healthy adults (n=10). Similarly to the patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and symptomatic multiple myeloma, patients with long-term disease control showed an expansion of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and natural killer cells. However, the numbers of bone marrow T-regulatory cells were lower in patients with long-term disease control than in those with symptomatic multiple myeloma. It is noteworthy that B cells were depleted in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and in those with symptomatic multiple myeloma, but recovered in both the bone marrow and peripheral blood of patients with long-term disease control, due to an increase in normal bone marrow B-cell precursors and plasma cells, as well as pre-germinal center peripheral blood B cells. The number of bone marrow dendritic cells and tissue macrophages differed significantly between patients with long-term disease control and those with symptomatic multiple myeloma, with a trend to cell count recovering in the former group of patients towards levels similar to those found in healthy adults. In summary, our results indicate that multiple myeloma patients with long-term disease control have a constellation of unique immune changes

  9. "I Know What I Like": Stability of Aesthetic Preference in Alzheimer's Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Andrea R.; Ly, Jenny; Elkin-Frankston, Seth; O'Connor, Margaret G.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies explored the stability of art preference in patients with Alzheimer's disease and age-matched control participants. Preferences for three different styles of paintings, displayed on art postcards, were examined over two sessions. Preference for specific paintings differed among individuals but AD and non-AD groups maintained about the…

  10. Plasma antibodies to Abeta40 and Abeta42 in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wuhua; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Etsuro; Deguchi, Kentaro; Murakami, Tetsuro; Harigaya, Yasuo; Ikeda, Masaki; Amari, Masakuni; Kuwano, Ryozo; Abe, Koji; Shoji, Mikio

    2008-07-11

    Antibodies to amyloid beta protein (Abeta) are present naturally or after Abeta vaccine therapy in human plasma. To clarify their clinical role, we examined plasma samples from 113 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 205 normal controls using the tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity (TAPIR) assay. A high positive rate of TAPIR was revealed in AD (45.1%) and age-matched controls (41.2%), however, no significance was observed. No significant difference was observed in the MMS score or disease duration between TAPIR-positive and negative samples. TAPIR-positive plasma reacted with the Abeta40 monomer and dimer, and the Abeta42 monomer weakly, but not with the Abeta42 dimer. TAPIR was even detected in samples from young normal subjects and young Tg2576 transgenic mice. Although the Abeta40 level and Abeta40/42 ratio increased, and Abeta42 was significantly decreased in plasma from AD groups when compared to controls, no significant correlations were revealed between plasma Abeta levels and TAPIR grading. Thus an immune response to Abeta40 and immune tolerance to Abeta42 occurred naturally in humans without a close relationship to the Abeta burden in the brain. Clarification of the mechanism of the immune response to Abeta42 is necessary for realization of an immunotherapy for AD.

  11. Patients with Parkinson's disease learn to control complex systems via procedural as well as non-procedural learning.

    PubMed

    Osman, Magda; Wilkinson, Leonora; Beigi, Mazda; Castaneda, Cristina Sanchez; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2008-01-01

    The striatum is considered to mediate some forms of procedural learning. Complex dynamic control (CDC) tasks involve an individual having to make a series of sequential decisions to achieve a specific outcome (e.g. learning to operate and control a car), and they involve procedural learning. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with Parkinson's disease who have striatal dysfunction, are impaired on CDC tasks only when learning involves procedural learning. 26 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 26 age-matched controls performed two CDC tasks, one in which training was observation-based (non-procedural), and a second in which training was action-based (procedural). Both groups were able to control the system to a specific criterion equally well, regardless of the training condition. However, when reporting their knowledge of the underlying structure of the system, both groups showed poorer accuracy when learning took place through observation-based compared with action-based training. Moreover, the controls' accuracy in reporting the underlying structure of the systems was superior to that of PD patients. The findings suggest that the striatal dysfunction in Parkinson's disease is not associated with impairment of procedural learning, regardless of whether the task involved procedural learning or not. It is possible that the learning and performance on CDC tasks are mediated by perceptual priming mechanisms in the neocortex.

  12. Comparison of acute non-visual bright light responses in patients with optic nerve disease, glaucoma and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Münch, M.; Léon, L.; Collomb, S.; Kawasaki, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of optic nerve disease, hence retinal ganglion cell loss, on non-visual functions related to melanopsin signalling. Test subjects were patients with bilateral visual loss and optic atrophy from either hereditary optic neuropathy (n = 11) or glaucoma (n = 11). We measured melatonin suppression, subjective sleepiness and cognitive functions in response to bright light exposure in the evening. We also quantified the post-illumination pupil response to a blue light stimulus. All results were compared to age-matched controls (n = 22). Both groups of patients showed similar melatonin suppression when compared to their controls. Greater melatonin suppression was intra-individually correlated to larger post-illumination pupil response in patients and controls. Only the glaucoma patients demonstrated a relative attenuation of their pupil response. In addition, they were sleepier with slower reaction times during nocturnal light exposure. In conclusion, glaucomatous, but not hereditary, optic neuropathy is associated with reduced acute light effects. At mild to moderate stages of disease, this is detected only in the pupil function and not in responses conveyed via the retinohypothalamic tract such as melatonin suppression. PMID:26478261

  13. Detection of Membrane Fluidity in Submitochondrial Particles of Platelets and Erythrocyte Membranes from Mexican Patients with Alzheimer Disease by Intramolecular Excimer Formation of 1,3 Dipyrenylpropane

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, G.G.; Pacheco-Moisés, F.; El Hafidi, M.; Jiménez-Delgado, A.; Macías-Islas, M. A.; Corral, S. A. Rosales; de la Rosa, A. Célis; Sánchez-González, V. J.; Arias-Merino, E. D.; Velázquez-Brizuela, I. E.

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction and defects in membrane structure could be implied in AD pathogenesis. The aim of the present work was the study of membrane fluidity in submitochondrial platelet particles and erythrocyte membranes from Mexican patients. Blood samples were obtained from 30 patients with Alzheimer disease and 30 aged-matched control subjects. Membrane fluidity determinations were done using a very low concentration of the fluorescent dipyrenylpropane probe incorporated in both types of membranes. This probe is able to give excimer and monomer fluorescence, therefore it can be used to monitor fluidity changes in biological membranes. The data obtained showed that in submitochondrial particles from AD patients, the excimer to monomer fluorescent intensity ratio was lower (0.231 ± 0.008) than aged-matched control subjects (0.363 ± 0.014). Therefore, membrane fluidity was lower in AD samples. On the other hand, we found similar membrane fluidity in erythrocytes from AD patients and aged-matched controls: the fluorescent intensity ratios were 0.312 ± 0.03 and 0.305 ± 0.033, respectively. In addition, lipid peroxidation in submitochondrial particles and erythrocyte membranes was higher in AD samples than in aged-matched controls. These data suggest that submitochondrial platelet particles are more sensitive to oxidative stress than erythrocyte membranes. PMID:18334736

  14. Effects of Unilateral Cochlear Implantation on Balance Control and Sensory Organization in Adult Patients with Profound Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Montaut-Verient, Bettina; Grosjean, Rémy; Gauchard, Gérome C

    2015-01-01

    Many studies were interested in the consequence of vestibular dysfunction related to cochlear implantation on balance control. This pilot study aimed to assess the effects of unilateral cochlear implantation on the modalities of balance control and sensorimotor strategies. Posturographic and vestibular evaluations were performed in 10 patients (55 ± 20 years) with profound hearing loss who were candidates to undergo unilateral multichannel cochlear implantation. The evaluation was carried out shortly before and one year after surgery. Posturographic tests were also performed in 10 age-matched healthy participants (63 ± 16 years). Vestibular compensation was observed within one year. In addition, postural performances of the patients increased within one year after cochlear implantation, especially in the more complex situations, in which sensory information is either unavailable or conflicting. Before surgery, postural performances were higher in the control group compared to the patients' group. One year after cochlear implantation, postural control was close to normalize. The improvement of postural performance could be explained by a mechanism of vestibular compensation. In addition, the recovery of auditory information which is the consequence of cochlear implantation could lead to an extended exploration of the environment possibly favoring the development of new balance strategies.

  15. Noise control considerations for patient rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenny, Benjamin

    2005-09-01

    The patient room envelope is a path between outside noise sources and the patient receiver. Within the patient room there are several sources including televisions, clinical monitor alarms, medical pumps, etc. Noise control in patient rooms relies on a combination of the sound transmission loss of the patient room envelope and the level of background sound at the patient's head. Guidelines published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), American Institute of Architects (AIA), and the U.S. Department of Defense for background noise and sound transmission loss in patient rooms will be discussed. Appropriate levels, spectra, and temporal characteristics of background sound at the patient head location may be helpful in raising the threshold of annoying sounds. Various means of personal hearing protection for patients will be discussed. Sound-pressure levels in patient rooms reported in previous literature will also be discussed.

  16. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  17. Spontaneous Swallowing during All-Night Sleep in Patients with Parkinson Disease in Comparison with Healthy Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Uludag, Irem Fatma; Tiftikcioglu, Bedile Irem; Ertekin, Cumhur

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Spontaneous saliva swallows (SS) appear especially during sleep. The rate of SS was rarely investigated in all-night sleep in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Dysphagia is a frequent symptom in PD, but the rate of SS was never studied with an all-night sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). Methods: A total of 21 patients with PD and 18 age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Frequencies of SS and coughing were studied in all-night sleep recordings of patients with PD and controls. During all-night sleep, video-EEG 12-channel recording was used including the electromyography (EMG) of the swallowing muscles, nasal airflow, and recording of vertical laryngeal movement using a pair of EEG electrodes over the thyroid cartilage. Results: The total number of SS was increased while the mean duration of sleep was decreased in PD when compared to controls. Sialorrhea and clinical dysphagia, assessed by proper questionnaires, had no effect in any patient group. The new finding was the so-called salvo type of consecutive SS in one set of swallowing. The amount of coughing was significantly increased just after the salvo SS. Conclusions: In PD, the rate of SS was not sufficient to demonstrate the swallowing disorder, such as oropharyngeal dysphagia, but the salvo type of SS was quite frequent. This is a novel finding and may contribute to the understanding of swallowing problems in patients with dysphagic or nondysphagic PD. Citation: Uludag IF, Tiftikcioglu BI, Ertekin C. Spontaneous swallowing during all-night sleep in patients with Parkinson disease in comparison with healthy control subjects. SLEEP 2016;39(4):847–854. PMID:26943467

  18. Current status of patient-controlled analgesia in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, C; Bruera, E

    1997-03-01

    Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is a relatively new technique in which patients are able to self-administer small doses of opioid analgesics when needed. Many different devices are available for opioid infusion, including a syringe pump, disposable plastic cylinder, and battery-operated computer-driven pump. These devices allow patients to choose an intermittent (demand) bolus, continuous infusion, or both modes of administration. Parameters, such as route, drug concentration dose, frequency, and maximum daily or hourly dose, are programmed by the physician. The patient decides whether or not to take a dose. Devices can be used to deliver the drug into a running intravenous infusion, the epidural space, or subcutaneously. Controlled trials indicate that PCA is probably superior to regular opioid administration in postoperative pain. Reported advantages include greater patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, and reduced nursing time and hospitalization. Preliminary experience suggests that PCA is also useful and safe for cancer pain, but further research is greatly needed.

  19. Multivariate morphological brain signatures predict chronic abdominal pain patients from healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Labus, Jennifer S.; Van Horn, John D.; Gupta, Arpana; Alaverdyan, Mher; Torgerson, Carinna; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Irimia, Andrei; Hong, Jui-Yang; Naliboff, Bruce; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common chronic visceral pain disorder. The pathophysiology of IBS is incompletely understood, however evidence strongly suggests dysregulation of the brain-gut axis. The aim of this study was to apply multivariate pattern analysis to identify an IBS-related morphometric brain signature which could serve as a central biological marker and provide new mechanistic insights into the pathophysiology of IBS. Parcellation of 165 cortical and subcortical regions was performed using Freesurfer and the Destrieux and Harvard-Oxford atlases. Volume, mean curvature, surface area and cortical thickness were calculated for each region. Sparse partial least squares-discriminant analysis was applied to develop a diagnostic model using a training set of 160 females (80 healthy controls, 80 IBS). Predictive accuracy was assessed in an age matched holdout test set of 52 females (26 health controls, 26 IBS). A two-component classification algorithm comprised of the morphometry of 1) primary somato-sensory and motor regions, and 2) multimodal network regions, explained 36% of the variance. Overall predictive accuracy of the classification algorithm was 70%. Small effect size associations were observed between the somatosensory and motor signature and non-gastrointestinal somatic symptoms. The findings demonstrate the predictive accuracy of a classification algorithm based solely on regional brain morphometry is not sufficient but they do provide support for the utility of multivariate pattern analysis for identifying meaningful neurobiological markers in IBS. Perspective This article presents the development, optimization, and testing of a classification algorithm for discriminating female IBS patients from healthy controls using only brain morphometry data. The results provide support for utility of multivariate pattern analysis for identifying meaningful neurobiological markers in IBS. PMID:25906347

  20. Spectrum of Cerebrovascular Disease in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Chemotherapy—Results of a Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hinduja, Archana; Limaye, Kaustubh; Ravilla, Rahul; Sasapu, Appalnaidu; Papanikolaou, Xenofon; Wei, Lai; Torbey, Michel; Waheed, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) are at increased risk of arterial thrombosis. Our aim was to determine the risk factors, mechanisms and outcome of strokes in these patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective matched case–control study from our database of MM patients enrolled in Total Therapy (TT) 2, TT3a and TT3b protocols who developed a vascular event (transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke, or intracerebral hemorrhage) from October 1998 to January 2014. Cases were matched for age-matched selected controls. Baseline demographics, risk factors, MM characteristics, laboratory values, and mortality of cases were compared to those of controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified risk factors associated with stroke. Ischemic strokes (IS) were classified with modified Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria. Results Of 1,148 patients, 46 developed a vascular event (ischemic stroke, 33; transient ischemic attack, 11; hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage, 2). Multivariate logistic regression analysis determined renal insufficiency (odds Ratio, 3.528; 95% CI, 1.36–9.14; P = 0.0094) and MM Stages I and II (odds Ratio, 2.770, 95% CI, 1.31–5.81; p = 0.0073) were independent predictors of stroke. In our study, strokes attributable to hypercoagulability, atrial fibrillation and small-vessel occlusion were common mechanisms. After a stroke, 78% of patients were discharged to home or a rehabilitation facility and 4% to a long-term nursing facility; in-hospital mortality was 15%. Despite suffering a stroke no significant differences in survival were observed. Conclusion In our cohort of multiple myeloma patients, renal failure and MM Stages I and II had increased risk of stroke. PMID:27902730

  1. Thyroid function in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neeck, G; Riedel, W

    1992-07-01

    Thyroid function was tested in 13 female patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) and 10 healthy age matched controls by intravenous injection of 400 micrograms thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). Basal thyroid hormone levels of both groups were in the normal range. However, patients with primary FS responded with a significantly lower secretion of thyrotropin and thyroid hormones to TRH, within an observation period of 2 h, and reacted with a significantly higher increase of prolactin. Total and free serum calcium and calcitonin levels were significantly lower in patients with primary FS, while both groups exhibited parathyroid hormone levels in the normal range.

  2. Writing to patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Máire; Cahill, Mary R; Perry, Ivan J

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that consultants should consider writing directly to patients with a summary of their outpatient consultation. In a controlled trial involving consecutive new referrals to a haematology outpatient clinic, we randomised patients to receive either a personal letter from their consultant summarising their consultation (n = 77) or a brief note thanking them for attending the clinic (n = 73). Patients were assessed for recall of and satisfaction with the consultation by a single independent observer, using standardised methods. At the second visit to outpatients, the patients' median percentage recall of items discussed during the consultation was 67% (IQ range 50-80%) in the intervention group, versus 57% (IQ range 43-76%) in the control group (p = 0.3). Strongly positive views on the personal letter were expressed by patients and referring clinicians. The findings suggest that although personal letters do not substantially improve recall of the clinical encounter, they are feasible, highly valued by patients and acceptable to referring clinicians.

  3. The Left Hand Second to Fourth Digit Ratio (2D:4D) Does Not Discriminate World-Class Female Gymnasts from Age Matched Sedentary Girls

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Maarten W.; Claessens, Albrecht L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The second to fourth-digit-ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action and a sexually dimorphic trait, has been suggested to be related with sports performance, although results are not univocal. If this relation exists, it is most likely to be detected by comparing extreme groups on the continuum of sports performance. Methods In this study the 2D:4D ratio of world-class elite female artistic gymnasts (n = 129), competing at the 1987 Rotterdam World-Championships was compared to the 2D:4D ratio of sedentary age-matched sedentary girls (n = 129), alongside with other anthropometric characteristics including other sexually dimorphic traits such as an androgyny index (Bayer & Bayley) and Heath-Carter somatotype components (endomorphy, mesomorphy, ectomorphy) using AN(C)OVA. 2D:4D was measured on X-rays of the left hand. Results Left hand 2D:4D digit ratio in world class elite female gymnasts (0.921±0.020) did not differ significantly from 2D:4D in age-matched sedentary girls (0.924±0.018), either with or without inclusion of potentially confounding covariates such as skeletal age, height, weight, somatotype components or androgyny index. Height (161.9±6.4 cm vs 155.4±6.6 cm p<0.01), weight (53.9±7.6 kg vs 46.2 6.3 kg p<0.01), BMI (20.51±2.41 kg/m2 vs 19.05±1.56 kg/m2), skeletal age (15.2±1.1 y vs 14.5±1.2 y p>0.01), somatotype components (4.0/3.0/2.9 vs 1.7/3.7/3.2 for endomorphy (p<0.01), mesomorphy (p<0.01) and ectomorphy (p<0.05) respectively) all differed significantly between sedentary girls and elite gymnasts. As expressed by the androgyny index, gymnasts have, on average, broader shoulders relative to their hips, compared to the reference sample. Correlations between the 2D:4D ratio and chronological age, skeletal age, and the anthropometric characteristics are low and not significant. Conclusion Although other anthropometric characteristics of sexual dimorphism were significantly different between the two samples

  4. Haemorrhage control in severely injured patients.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Russell L; Brohi, Karim; Schreiber, Martin; Balogh, Zsolt J; Pitt, Veronica; Narayan, Mayur; Maier, Ronald V

    2012-09-22

    Most surgeons have adopted damage control surgery for severely injured patients, in which the initial operation is abbreviated after control of bleeding and contamination to allow ongoing resuscitation in the intensive-care unit. Developments in early resuscitation that emphasise rapid control of bleeding, restrictive volume replacement, and prevention or early management of coagulopathy are making definitive surgery during the first operation possible for many patients. Improved topical haemostatic agents and interventional radiology are becoming increasingly useful adjuncts to surgical control of bleeding. Better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy is paving the way for the replacement of blind, unguided protocols for blood component therapy with systemic treatments targeting specific deficiencies in coagulation. Similarly, treatments targeting dysregulated inflammatory responses to severe injury are under investigation. As point-of-care diagnostics become more suited to emergency environments, timely targeted intervention for haemorrhage control will result in better patient outcomes and reduced demand for blood products. Our Series paper describes how our understanding of the roles of the microcirculation, inflammation, and coagulation has shaped new and emerging treatment strategies.

  5. Confirming the cognition of rising scores: Fox and Mitchum (2013) predicts violations of measurement invariance in series completion between age-matched cohorts.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mark C; Mitchum, Ainsley L

    2014-01-01

    The trend of rising scores on intelligence tests raises important questions about the comparability of variation within and between time periods. Descriptions of the processes that mediate selection of item responses provide meaningful psychological criteria upon which to base such comparisons. In a recent paper, Fox and Mitchum presented and tested a cognitive theory of rising scores on analogical and inductive reasoning tests that is specific enough to make novel predictions about cohort differences in patterns of item responses for tests such as the Raven's Matrices. In this paper we extend the same proposal in two important ways by (1) testing it against a dataset that enables the effects of cohort to be isolated from those of age, and (2) applying it to two other inductive reasoning tests that exhibit large Flynn effects: Letter Series and Word Series. Following specification and testing of a confirmatory item response model, predicted violations of measurement invariance are observed between two age-matched cohorts that are separated by only 20 years, as members of the later cohort are found to map objects at higher levels of abstraction than members of the earlier cohort who possess the same overall level of ability. Results have implications for the Flynn effect and cognitive aging while underscoring the value of establishing psychological criteria for equating members of distinct groups who achieve the same scores.

  6. The fears, phobias and anxieties of children with autism spectrum disorders and Down syndrome: comparisons with developmentally and chronologically age matched children.

    PubMed

    Evans, David W; Canavera, Kristin; Kleinpeter, F Lee; Maccubbin, Elise; Taga, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This study compared the fears and behavior problems of 25 children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 43 children with Down syndrome (DS), 45 mental age (MA) matched children, and 37 chronologically age (CA) matched children. Children's fears, phobias, anxieties and behavioral problems were assessed using parent reports. Significant differences emerged across the diagnostic groups on a variety of fears. Children with ASD were reported to have more situation phobias and medical fears, but fewer fears of harm/injury compared to all other groups. The groups also differed in terms of the pattern of correlations between fears, phobias, anxieties and behavior problems. For children with ASD, fears, phobias and anxieties were closely related to problem behaviors, whereas fears, phobias, and anxieties were less related to behavioral symptoms for the other groups of subjects. Such findings suggest that children with ASD exhibit a distinct profile of fear and anxiety compared to other mental age and chronologically age-matched children, and these fears are related to the symptoms associated with ASD.

  7. Circulating long-non coding RNAs as biomarkers of left ventricular diastolic function and remodelling in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo-Calvo, D; Kenneweg, F; Bang, C; Toro, R; van der Meer, R W; Rijzewijk, L J; Smit, J W; Lamb, H J; Llorente-Cortes, V; Thum, T

    2016-11-22

    Contractile dysfunction is underdiagnosed in early stages of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We evaluated the potential of circulating long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as biomarkers of subclinical cardiac abnormalities in type 2 diabetes. Forty-eight men with well-controlled type 2 diabetes and 12 healthy age-matched volunteers were enrolled in the study. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. A panel of lncRNAs was quantified in serum by RT-qPCR. No differences in expression levels of lncRNAs were observed between type 2 diabetes patients and healthy volunteers. In patients with type 2 diabetes, long intergenic non-coding RNA predicting cardiac remodeling (LIPCAR) was inversely associated with diastolic function, measured as E/A peak flow (P < 0.050 for all linear models). LIPCAR was positively associated with grade I diastolic dysfunction (P < 0.050 for all logistic models). Myocardial infarction-associated transcript (MIAT) and smooth muscle and endothelial cell-enriched migration/differentiation-associated long noncoding RNA (SENCR) were directly associated with LV mass to LV end-diastolic volume ratio, a marker of cardiac remodelling (P < 0.050 for all linear models). These findings were validated in a sample of 30 patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes. LncRNAs are independent predictors of diastolic function and remodelling in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Circulating long-non coding RNAs as biomarkers of left ventricular diastolic function and remodelling in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Gonzalo-Calvo, D.; Kenneweg, F.; Bang, C.; Toro, R.; van der Meer, R. W.; Rijzewijk, L. J.; Smit, J. W.; Lamb, H. J.; Llorente-Cortes, V.; Thum, T.

    2016-01-01

    Contractile dysfunction is underdiagnosed in early stages of diabetic cardiomyopathy. We evaluated the potential of circulating long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as biomarkers of subclinical cardiac abnormalities in type 2 diabetes. Forty-eight men with well-controlled type 2 diabetes and 12 healthy age-matched volunteers were enrolled in the study. Left ventricular (LV) parameters were measured by magnetic resonance imaging. A panel of lncRNAs was quantified in serum by RT-qPCR. No differences in expression levels of lncRNAs were observed between type 2 diabetes patients and healthy volunteers. In patients with type 2 diabetes, long intergenic non-coding RNA predicting cardiac remodeling (LIPCAR) was inversely associated with diastolic function, measured as E/A peak flow (P < 0.050 for all linear models). LIPCAR was positively associated with grade I diastolic dysfunction (P < 0.050 for all logistic models). Myocardial infarction-associated transcript (MIAT) and smooth muscle and endothelial cell-enriched migration/differentiation-associated long noncoding RNA (SENCR) were directly associated with LV mass to LV end-diastolic volume ratio, a marker of cardiac remodelling (P < 0.050 for all linear models). These findings were validated in a sample of 30 patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes. LncRNAs are independent predictors of diastolic function and remodelling in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27874027

  9. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Vlychou, Marianna; Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients.

  10. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients. PMID:27956899

  11. Static and dynamic posture control in postlingual cochlear implanted patients: effects of dual-tasking, visual and auditory inputs suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Léonard, Jacques; Dumitrescu, Michel; Meller, Renaud; Magnan, Jacques; Lacour, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Posture control is based on central integration of multisensory inputs, and on internal representation of body orientation in space. This multisensory feedback regulates posture control and continuously updates the internal model of body's position which in turn forwards motor commands adapted to the environmental context and constraints. The peripheral localization of the vestibular system, close to the cochlea, makes vestibular damage possible following cochlear implant (CI) surgery. Impaired vestibular function in CI patients, if any, may have a strong impact on posture stability. The simple postural task of quiet standing is generally paired with cognitive activity in most day life conditions, leading therefore to competition for attentional resources in dual-tasking, and increased risk of fall particularly in patients with impaired vestibular function. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of postlingual cochlear implantation on posture control in adult deaf patients. Possible impairment of vestibular function was assessed by comparing the postural performance of patients to that of age-matched healthy subjects during a simple postural task performed in static (stable platform) and dynamic (platform in translation) conditions, and during dual-tasking with a visual or auditory memory task. Postural tests were done in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions, with the CI activated (ON) or not (OFF). Results showed that the postural performance of the CI patients strongly differed from the controls, mainly in the EC condition. The CI patients showed significantly reduced limits of stability and increased postural instability in static conditions. In dynamic conditions, they spent considerably more energy to maintain equilibrium, and their head was stabilized neither in space nor on trunk: they behaved dynamically without vision like an inverted pendulum while the controls showed a whole body rigidification strategy. Hearing (prosthesis on) as well

  12. A comparative proteomic study of sera in paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients and in healthy controls using MALDI-TOF-TOF and LC MS–A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus (pSLE) exhibits an aggressive clinical phenotype with severe complications and overall poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to analyse differential expression of low molecular weight (LMW) serum protein molecules of pSLE patients with active disease in comparison to sera of healthy age matched controls. Further, some of the differential expressed spots were characterised and identified by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and liquid chromatography (LC-MS). Methods 2D-PAGE was performed using pooled sera of active pSLE and age matched healthy controls. Gels were silver-stained and differentially expressed protein spots were detected by automated image master platinum 2D software. 79 ± 17 protein spots were detected for control gels and 78 ± 17 protein spots for patient gels. Of these eleven protein spots were selected randomly and characterized by MALDI-TOF MS (five protein spots) and LC MS (six protein spots) techniques. Results Out of the 11 protein spots, 5 protein spots were significantly upregulated viz., leiomodin 2 (LMOD2); epidermal cytokeratin 2; immunoglobulin kappa light chain variable region; keratin 1 and transthyretin (TTR). Three protein spots were significantly down regulated e.g., apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1); chain B human complement component C3c; campath antibody antigen complex. Two protein spots (complement component C3; retinol binding protein (RBP) were found to be expressed only in disease and one protein spot cyclohydrolase 2 was only expressed in controls. Conclusions We conclude that 2-D maps of patients with active pSLE and controls differ significantly. In this pilot study, using proteomic approach we have identified differential expressed proteins (of LMW) e.g., RBP, LMOD 2, TTR, Component C3c Chain B and APO A1. However, in future, further studies need to confirm the physiological and pathological role of these

  13. Vitamins C and E treatment combined with exercise modulates oxidative stress markers in blood of patients with fibromyalgia: a controlled clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Akkuş, Selami; Soyupek, Feray; Yalman, Kadir; Çelik, Ömer; Eriş, Sevilay; Uslusoy, Gökçen Ay

    2010-11-01

    We aimed to investigate effects of vitamins C and E (VCE) supplementation with exercise (EX) on antioxidant vitamin and lipid peroxidation (LP) levels in blood of patients with fibromyalgia (FM). A controlled study was performed on blood samples from 32 female FM patients and 30 age-matched controls. The patients were divided into three groups namely EX (n = 10), VCE (n = 11), and EX plus VCE (n = 11) after taking basal blood samples. After 12 weeks of EX and VCE supplementation, blood samples were taken once more from the patients. LP levels in plasma and erythrocytes were higher in the patients at baseline than those in controls, whereas LP levels were lower in the VCE and EX groups at the end of 12 weeks than those at baseline. Plasma concentrations of vitamins A and E and reduced glutathione were lower in the patients than those in controls and their concentrations were increased by VCE and EX. Glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes was increased by VCE supplementation, with or without EX. Concentrations of β-carotene in the groups did not change with treatment. Despite the measured effects on anti-oxidative mechanisms, FM symptoms were not improved by the treatments. In conclusion, VCE with EX may protect against FM-induced oxidative stress by up-regulation of an antioxidant redox system in the plasma and erythrocytes of patients with FM. Such protective effects of VCE in the patients seemed to be greater in combination with EX than EX alone.

  14. Structure and strength of the distal radius in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tracy Y; Griffith, James F; Qin, Ling; Hung, Vivian W Y; Fong, Tsz-Ning; Au, Sze-Ki; Tang, Xiao Lin; Kwok, Anthony W; Leung, Ping-Chung; Li, Edmund K; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone microstructure, and mechanical indices of the distal radius in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report a cross-sectional study of 66 middle-aged female RA patients and 66 age-matched healthy females. Areal BMD (aBMD) of the hip, lumbar spine, and distal radius was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) was performed at the distal radius, yielding vBMD, bone microstructure, and mechanical indices. Cortical and trabecular vBMD were 3.5% and 10.7% lower, respectively, in RA patients than controls, despite comparable aBMD. Trabecular microstructural indices were -5.7% to -23.1% inferior, respectively, in RA patients compared to controls, with significant differences in trabecular bone volume fraction, separation, inhomogeneity, and structural model index. Cortical porosity volume and percentage were 128% and 93% higher, respectively, in RA patients, with stress being distributed more unevenly. Fourteen RA patients had exaggerated periosteal bone apposition primarily affecting the ulnovolar aspect of the distal radius. These particular patients were more likely to have chronic and severe disease and coexisting wrist deformity. The majority of the differences in density and microstructure between RA patients and controls did not depend on menstrual status. Recent exposure to glucocorticoids did not significantly affect bone density and microstructure. HR-pQCT provides new insight into inflammation-associated bone fragility in RA. It detects differences in vBMD, bone microstructure, and mechanical indices that are not captured by DXA. At the distal radius, deterioration in density and microstructure in RA patients involved both cortical and trabecular compartments. Excessive bone resorption appears to affect cortical more than trabecular bone at distal radius, particularly

  15. Rate of change in cerebral oxygenation and blood pressure in response to passive changes in posture: a comparison between pure autonomic failure patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, Ilias; Elwell, Clare E; Leung, Terence S; Bleasdale-Barr, Katharine; Hunt, Katharine; Toms, Nathan; Smith, Martin; Mathias, Christopher J; Delpy, David T

    2005-01-01

    The cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to head-up postural change are compromised in pure autonomic failure (PAF) patients because of sympathetic denervation. The aim of this study was to characterize the rate of change of systemic mean blood pressure (MBP) and cerebral haemodynamics in response to passive posture changes. Nine PAF patients and 9 age-matched controls took part in this study. MBP and oxy- (O2Hb), deoxy-haemoglobin (HHb), and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) on the forehead were continuously monitored non-invasively using the Portapres and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), respectively. From visual inspection of the haemoglobin difference signal (Hb(diff) = O2Hb-HHb), seven distinct phases were marked (1: supine, 2: start passive tilt, 3: head up to 60 degrees degrees, 4: end of tilt, 5: tilt reversal, 6: return to supine, 7: rest); the same time points were used for all of the other signals. For each phase, the slope was calculated using a linear regression algorithm. Significant differences were found between PAF patients and controls in the Hb(diff) slope magnitudes for phases 3 (P < .05) and 5 (P = .01), and the duration of phase 2 (P < .05). MBP slope magnitudes showed significant differences for phases 2 (P < .01) and 5 (P < .01). These differences in the rate of change suggest differences in blood vessel resistance related to sympathetic activation.

  16. Effects of Resveratrol on Crosstalk between Canonical Β-Catenin/Wnt and FOXO Pathways in Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shanaki, Mehrnoosh; Hossein-nezhad, Arash; Meshkani, Reza; Beigy, Maani; Shirzad, Mahmoud; Pasalar, Parvin; Golmohammadi, Taghi

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of resveratrol (RES) on Canonical β-catenin/Wnt and forkhead box O (FOXO) pathways in CAD patients. We performed this study on 10 metabolic syndrome patients with three-vessel CAD and 10 sex-aged matched healthy subjects. The effects of RES on β-Catenin, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPAR-δ) expression were evaluated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of participants. RES could increase the MnSOD expression in CAD patients (38%, p < 0.0001). After RES treatment, the MnSOD expression of patients is still non-significantly lower than controls. In both blank and RES treatments, a significant positive correlation between β-catenin and MnSOD mRNA expressions was found in controls, whereas no correlation between these gene expressions was found in untreated PBMCs of CAD patients. However, RES could modestly improve this pathway in CAD. RES could increase the MnSOD activity in healthy and CAD subjects (p = 0.051 and p = 0.009, respectively). Furthermore, in both blank and RES treatments, the significant correlation was found between total β-catenin protein and the MnSOD activity in PBMCs of the controls but not in patients. The cross-talk between β-catenin/Wnt and FOXO pathways was impaired in PBMCs of CAD patients. RES treatment could lead to a modest increase in the MnSOD activity independent of β-catenin/FOXO pathway. Despite a modest improvement in the β-catenin/FOXO pathway after RES treatment, this pathway was not completely repaired in CAD patients. PMID:27980591

  17. Expression of Phenotypic Astrocyte Marker Is Increased in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease versus Age-Matched Controls: A Presymptomatic Stage Study

    PubMed Central

    Doméné, Aurélie; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Page, Guylène; Bodard, Sylvie; Klein, Christophe; Delarasse, Cécile; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Recent mouse studies of the presymptomatic stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have suggested that proinflammatory changes, such as glial activation and cytokine induction, may occur already at this early stage through unknown mechanisms. Because TNFα contributes to increased Aβ production from the Aβ precursor protein (APP), we assessed a putative correlation between APP/Aβ and TNFα during the presymptomatic stage as well as early astrocyte activation in the hippocampus of 3-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. While Western blots revealed significant APP expression, Aβ was not detectable by Western blot or ELISA attesting that 3-month-old, APPswe/PS1dE9 mice are at a presymptomatic stage of AD-like pathology. Western blots were also used to show increased GFAP expression in transgenic mice that positively correlated with both TNFα and APP, which were also mutually correlated. Subregional immunohistochemical quantification of phenotypic (GFAP) and functional (TSPO) markers of astrocyte activation indicated a selective and significant increase in GFAP-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Our data suggest that subtle morphological and phenotypic alterations, compatible with the engagement of astrocyte along the activation pathway, occur in the hippocampus already at the presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:27672476

  18. Processing Words Varying in Personal Familiarity (Based on Reading and Spelling) by Poor Readers and Age-Matched and Reading-Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Evelyne; Willows, Dale M.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate whether performance differences between good and poor readers relate to reading-specific cognitive factors that result from engaging in reading activities and other experiential factors, the authors gave students in Grades 4 and 6 a perceptual identification test of words not only drawn from their personal lexicon but also varying in…

  19. Comparing the PPAT Drawings of Boys with AD/HD and Age-Matched Controls Using the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munley, Maripat

    2002-01-01

    Explores whether children with AD/HD respond differently to a specific art directive. Using the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale to evaluate the drawings, results indicate three elements that would most accurately predict the artists into the AD/HD group: color prominence, details of objects and environments, and line quality. (Contains 29…

  20. Multivariate proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with peripheral neuropathic pain and healthy controls – a hypothesis-generating pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bäckryd, Emmanuel; Ghafouri, Bijar; Carlsson, Anders K; Olausson, Patrik; Gerdle, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and treatment. Combining two-dimensional gel proteomics with multivariate data analysis by projection, we exploratively analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid of eleven patients with severe peripheral neuropathic pain due to trauma and/or surgery refractory to conventional treatment and eleven healthy controls. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, we identified a panel of 36 proteins highly discriminating between the two groups. Due to a possible confounding effect of age, a new model with age as outcome variable was computed for patients (n=11), and four out of 36 protein spots were excluded due to a probable influence of age. Of the 32 remaining proteins, the following seven had the highest discriminatory power between the two groups: an isoform of angiotensinogen (upregulated in patients), two isoforms of alpha-1-antitrypsin (downregulated in patients), three isoforms of haptoglobin (upregulated in patients), and one isoform of pigment epithelium-derived factor (downregulated in patients). It has recently been hypothesized that the renin–angiotensin system may play a role in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, and a clinical trial of an angiotensin II receptor antagonist was recently published. It is noteworthy that when searching for neuropathic pain biomarkers with a purely explorative methodology, it was indeed a renin–angiotensin system protein that had the highest discriminatory power between patients and controls in the present study. The results from this hypothesis-generating pilot study have to be confirmed in larger, hypothesis-driven studies with age-matched controls, but the present study illustrates the fruitfulness of combining proteomics with multivariate data analysis in hypothesis-generating pain biomarker studies in humans. PMID:26170714

  1. Composition of enamel pellicle from dental erosion patients.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G; Cotroneo, E; Moazzez, R; Rojas-Serrano, M; Donaldson, N; Austin, R; Zaidel, L; Bartlett, D; Proctor, G

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is dependent upon a thin mobile film of saliva on soft and hard tissues. Salivary proteins adhere to teeth to form the acquired enamel pellicle which is believed to protect teeth from acid erosion. This study investigated whether patients suffering diet-induced dental erosion had altered enamel pellicles. Thirty patients suffering erosion were compared to healthy age-matched controls. Subjects wore a maxillary splint holding hydroxyapatite and human enamel blocks for 1 h. The acquired enamel pellicle was removed from the blocks and compared to the natural incisor pellicle. Basic Erosive Wear Examination scores confirmed that dental erosion was present in erosion patients and absent from healthy age-matched controls. Erosion patients had half the amount of proteins (BCA assay) within the acquired pellicle forming on splint blocks compared to normal controls (p < 0.05). In particular, statherin, a calcium-binding protein, was 35% less abundant (p < 0.05). Calcium concentration within the acquired pellicle was also reduced by 50% in erosion patients (p < 0.001). In contrast, the natural pellicle on the incisor had similar amounts of total protein in erosion patients and healthy controls. In summary, the formation of new acquired pellicles on surfaces was reduced in erosion patients, which may explain their greater susceptibility to acid erosion of teeth.

  2. Design and implementation of an SVM-based computer classification system for discriminating depressive patients from healthy controls using the P600 component of ERP signals.

    PubMed

    Kalatzis, I; Piliouras, N; Ventouras, E; Papageorgiou, C C; Rabavilas, A D; Cavouras, D

    2004-07-01

    A computer-based classification system has been designed capable of distinguishing patients with depression from normal controls by event-related potential (ERP) signals using the P600 component. Clinical material comprised 25 patients with depression and an equal number of gender and aged-matched healthy controls. All subjects were evaluated by a computerized version of the digit span Wechsler test. EEG activity was recorded and digitized from 15 scalp electrodes (leads). Seventeen features related to the shape of the waveform were generated and were employed in the design of an optimum support vector machine (SVM) classifier at each lead. The outcomes of those SVM classifiers were selected by a majority-vote engine (MVE), which assigned each subject to either the normal or depressive classes. MVE classification accuracy was 94% when using all leads and 92% or 82% when using only the right or left scalp leads, respectively. These findings support the hypothesis that depression is associated with dysfunction of right hemisphere mechanisms mediating the processing of information that assigns a specific response to a specific stimulus, as those mechanisms are reflected by the P600 component of ERPs. Our method may aid the further understanding of the neurophysiology underlying depression, due to its potentiality to integrate theories of depression and psychophysiology.

  3. Factors That Affect Patient Attitudes toward Infection Control Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated patient attitudes toward different disease control measures taken in dental school clinics (n=272 patients) and private practices (n=107 patients). Variables examined included sex, age, educational background, and knowledge of infectious diseases. Patients tended to accept the control measures being used in each context. (MSE)

  4. Chromosome X aneuploidy in Brazilian schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Leopoldo Silva; Khayat, André Salim; de Lima, Patrícia Danielle Lima; Lima, Eleonidas Moura; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    The identification of cytogenetic abnormalities in schizophrenic patients may provide clues to the genes involved in this disease. For this reason, a chromosomal analysis of samples from 62 schizophrenics and 70 controls was performed with trypsin-Giemsa banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization of the X chromosome. A clonal pericentric inversion on chromosome 9 was detected in one male patient, and we also discovered mosaicism associated with X chromosome aneuploidy in female patients, primarily detected in schizophrenic and normal female controls over 40 years old. When compared with age-matched female controls, the frequency of X chromosome loss was not significantly different between schizophrenics and controls, except for the 40- to 49-year-old age group. Our findings suggest that the X chromosome loss seen in schizophrenic patients is inherent to the normal cellular aging process. However, our data also suggest that X chromosome gain may be correlated with schizophrenia in this Brazilian population.

  5. Comparison of Model-Based Indices of Cerebral Autoregulation and Vasomotor Reactivity Using Transcranial Doppler versus Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Shin, Dae C.; Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    We recently introduced model-based “physiomarkers” of dynamic cerebral autoregulation and CO2 vasomotor reactivity as an aid for diagnosis of early-stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) [1], where significant impairment of dynamic vasomotor reactivity (DVR) was observed in early-stage AD patients relative to age-matched controls. Milder impairment of DVR was shown in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using the same approach in a subsequent study [2]. The advocated approach utilizes subject-specific data-based models of cerebral hemodynamics to quantify the dynamic effects of resting-state changes in arterial blood pressure and end-tidal CO2 (the putative inputs) upon cerebral blood flow velocity (the putative output) measured at the middle cerebral artery via transcranial Doppler (TCD). The obtained input-output models are then used to compute model-based indices of DCA and DVR from model-predicted responses to an input pressure pulse or an input CO2 pulse, respectively. In this paper, we compare these model-based indices of DVR and DCA in 46 amnestic MCI patients, relative to 20 age-matched controls, using TCD measurements with their counterparts using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements of blood oxygenation at the lateral prefrontal cortex in 43 patients and 22 age-matched controls. The goal of the study is to assess whether NIRS measurements can be used instead of TCD measurements to obtain model-based physiomarkers with comparable diagnostic utility. The results corroborate this view in terms of the ability of either output to yield model-based physiomarkers that can differentiate the group of aMCI patients from age-matched healthy controls. PMID:27911329

  6. Localized 1H-NMR spectroscopy in patients with fibromyalgia: a controlled study of changes in cerebral glutamate/glutamine, inositol, choline, and N-acetylaspartate

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate whether single-voxel (SV) proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) detected differences between fibromyalgia (FM) patients and healthy controls. We also searched for correlations between neuroimaging abnormalities and neuropsychological variables. Methods Ten patients with FM and 10 gender- and age-matched control subjects were studied. A neuropsychological examination, DWI, DTI, and proton MRS were performed on the brain areas known to be associated with pain processing. Results Compared with healthy controls, FM patients had significantly higher levels of glutamate + glutamine (Glx) (mean ± SD, 10.71 ± 0.50 arbitrary institutional units versus 9.89 ± 1.04; P = 0.049) and higher glutamate + glutamine/creatine (Glx/Cr) ratios (1.90 ± 0.12 versus 1.72 ± 0.23; P = 0.034) in the posterior gyrus. Myoinositol (Ins) levels of the right and left hippocampi were significantly lower in FM patients (4.49 ± 0.74 versus 5.17 ± 0.62; P = 0.008 and 4.91 ± 0.85 versus 6.09 ± 0.78; P = 0.004, respectively). In FM patients, decreased myoinositol/creatine (Ins/Cr) ratios were found in the left sensorimotor area (P = 0.05) and the left hippocampus (P = 0.002) and lower levels of choline (P = 0.019) and N-acetyl aspartate + N-acetyl aspartyl glutamate (NAA + NAG) (P = 0.034) in the left hippocampus. Significant correlations between depression, pain, and global function and the posterior gyrus Glx levels and Glx/Cr ratios were observed. Conclusions Glx within the posterior gyrus could be a pathologic factor in FM. Hippocampal dysfunction may be partially responsible for the depressive symptoms of FM. Additional studies with larger samples are required to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:20609227

  7. MCP-1and IL-1β expression in the myocardia of two young patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and fatal diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jianli; Gilliland, M G F; Jin, Zhuqing; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Hoffman, William H

    2014-02-01

    Convincing evidence exists for the early onset of diabetic cardiomyopathy and coronary artery disease (CAD) as distinct forms of cardiac disease in young patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and the pre-stages of T2DM, forms of dysregulated insulin signaling. Progression of both chronic cardiac conditions is mediated by oxidative stress and low grade inflammation. This study reports the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) chemokine and the interleukin (IL)-1β inflammatory cytokine in two young patients with suboptimal metabolic control and fatal diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), two age-matched overweight/obesity cases and two age-matched controls. In addition, markers of oxidative stress, apoptosis, collagen deposition and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were studied. Significant expression of MCP-1 and IL-1β was seen in the myocardia of the T1DM/DKA cases, with lesser amounts expressed in the overweight/obesity myocardia. All of the other markers except cardiomyocyte hypertrophy were expressed to a significantly greater extent in the T1DM/DKA and overweight/obesity cases in comparison to the age-matched controls. Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was significantly greater in the overweight/obesity cases than in the T1DM/DKA or the control cases.

  8. Neuropsychological impairments in elderly Neurofibromatosis type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Costa, Danielle de Souza; de Paula, Jonas Jardim; de Rezende, Nilton Alves; Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro Fernandes; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurélio; Miranda, Débora Marques de

    2014-04-01

    Cognitive performance is compromised in Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients, but neuropsychological data including elderly NF1 are extremely sparse. We compared the cognitive performance of a small elderly NF1 group (n = 5) with an age-matched healthy control group (n = 49). NF1 group performed worse than control group on a global cognitive impairment task, verbal working memory, and visuospatial functioning. The results suggest that cognitive impairment is an important feature of NF1 across lifespan, including elderly individuals. Future studies approaching the NF1 cognitive profile might benefit from looking at the mechanisms linked to the age-related aspects of cognitive decline.

  9. Facial affect recognition in early and late-stage schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ferreiro, María Verónica; Aguado, Luis; Rodriguez-Torresano, Javier; Palomo, Tomás; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto; Pedreira-Massa, José Luis

    2016-04-01

    Prior studies have shown deficits in social cognition and emotion perception in first-episode psychosis (FEP) and multi-episode schizophrenia (MES) patients. These studies compared patients at different stages of the illness with only a single control group which differed in age from at least one clinical group. The present study provides new evidence of a differential pattern of deficit in facial affect recognition in FEP and MES patients using a double age-matched control design. Compared to their controls, FEP patients only showed impaired recognition of fearful faces (p=.007). In contrast to this, the MES patients showed a more generalized deficit compared to their age-matched controls, with impaired recognition of angry, sad and fearful faces (ps<.01) and an increased misattribution of emotional meaning to neutral faces. PANSS scores of FEP patients on Depressed factor correlated positively with the accuracy to recognize fearful expressions (r=.473). For the MES group fear recognition correlated positively with negative PANSS factor (r=.498) and recognition of sad and neutral expressions was inversely correlated with disorganized PANSS factor (r=-.461 and r=-.541, respectively). These results provide evidence that a generalized impairment of affect recognition is observed in advanced-stage patients and is not characteristic of the early stages of schizophrenia. Moreover, the finding that anomalous attribution of emotional meaning to neutral faces is observed only in MES patients suggests that an increased attribution of salience to social stimuli is a characteristic of social cognition in advanced stages of the disorder.

  10. Intermittent patient suction system, self-contained control

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Jay L.

    1992-01-01

    An intermittent patient suction system, a self-contained control device therefor and methods of making the same are provided, the self-contained control device having a housing that contains two restrictor units therein for respectively controlling the "on" time and "off" time that the control device applies a vacuum and does not apply a vacuum through the output of the control device to the patient.

  11. Thrombokinetics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with D-penicillamine.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D; Gallus, A S; Brooks, P M; Tampi, R; Geddes, R; Hill, W

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of D-penicillamine induced thrombocytopenia in rheumatoid arthritis was investigated by measuring platelet life-span and platelet production rate in 2 groups of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with 250-750 mg/day D-penicillamine, 14 with a normal platelet count and 9 with thrombocytopenia (platelet count 50-130 X 10(9)/1). Age matched control patients not treated with D-penicillamine included 14 with rheumatoid arthritis and 9 with osteoarthritis. The platelet life-span was normal, but platelet production rate was significantly reduced in the thrombocytopenic patients, suggesting that D-penicillamine causes thrombocytopenia through bone marrow suppression. PMID:6742902

  12. Patients with Parkinson's disease can employ a predictive motor strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Day, B L; Dick, J P; Marsden, C D

    1984-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that predictive motor behaviour is abnormal in Parkinson's disease. In the first experiment elbow movements were performed to track a moving spot on an oscilloscope screen. The performance of 12 patients with Parkinson's disease and eight age-matched control subjects was measured when tracking a repeated pattern under two conditions. In the first condition subjects were not aware of the repetitive nature of the tracking task whilst in the second condition they were. For both groups tracking error and tracking lag were less when aware of the repetition. In the second experiment wrist movements were studied. Five age-matched controls were compared with five patients, studied on and off drugs. In this experiment the performance tracking a repeated pattern was compared to that tracking unpredictable patterns. Tracking lags were reduced to very low values (less than 20 ms) in response to the repeated pattern for both groups. This was true even when the patients were relatively immobile off drugs. We conclude that patients with Parkinson's disease are capable of predictive motor behaviour although such a strategy does not always confer as great an advantage in reducing tracking error in patients compared with control subjects. PMID:6512550

  13. The contribution of proprioceptive information to postural control in elderly and patients with Parkinson's disease with a history of falls.

    PubMed

    Bekkers, Esther M J; Dockx, Kim; Heremans, Elke; Vercruysse, Sarah; Verschueren, Sabine M P; Mirelman, Anat; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Proprioceptive deficits negatively affect postural control but their precise contribution to postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD) is unclear. We investigated if proprioceptive manipulations differentially affect balance, measured by force plates, during quiet standing in 13 PD patients and 13 age-matched controls with a history of falls. Perceived limits of stability (LoS) were derived from the differences between maximal center of pressure (CoP) displacement in anterior-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) direction during a maximal leaning task. Task conditions comprised standing with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC): (1) on a stable surface; (2) an unstable surface; and (3) with Achilles tendon vibration. CoP displacements were calculated as a percentage of their respective LoS. Perceived LoS did not differ between groups. PD patients showed greater ML CoP displacement than elderly fallers (EF) across all conditions (p = 0.043) and tended to have higher postural sway in relation to the LoS (p = 0.050). Both groups performed worse on an unstable surface and during tendon vibration compared to standing on a stable surface with EO and even more so with EC. Both PD and EF had more AP sway in all conditions with EC compared to EO (p < 0.001) and showed increased CoP displacements when relying on proprioception only compared to standing with normal sensory input. This implies a similar role of the proprioceptive system in postural control in fallers with and without PD. PD fallers showed higher ML sway after sensory manipulations, as a result of which these values approached their perceived LoS more closely than in EF. We conclude that despite a similar fall history, PD patients showed more ML instability than EF, irrespective of sensory manipulation, but had a similar reliance on ankle proprioception. Hence, we recommend that rehabilitation and fall prevention for PD should focus on motor rather than on sensory aspects.

  14. Heading perception in patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Peli, Eli; Warren, William H.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether retinis pigmentosa (RP) patients with residual visual field of < 100 degrees could perceive heading from optic flow. METHODS: Four RP patients and four age-matched normally sighted control subjects viewed displays simulating an observer walking over a ground. In experiment 1, subjects viewed either the entire display with free fixation (full-field condition) or through an aperture with a fixation point at the center (aperture condition). In experiment 2, patients viewed displays of different durations. RESULTS: RP patients' performance was comparable to that of the age-matched control subjects: heading judgment was better in the full-field condition than in the aperture condition. Increasing display duration from 0.5 s to 1 s improved patients' heading performance, but giving them more time (3 s) to gather more visual information did not consistently further improve their performance. CONCLUSIONS: RP patients use active scanning eye movements to compensate for their visual field loss in heading perception; they might be able to gather sufficient optic flow information for heading perception in about 1 s.

  15. A preliminary study on the relationships between diurnal melatonin secretion profile and sleep variables in patients emergently admitted to the coronary care unit.

    PubMed

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Futenma, Kunihiro; Kobayashi, Mina; Komada, Yoko; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the significance of melatonin secretion under intensive care conditions, we investigated melatonin secretion profiles and sleep parameters of 23 patients just after admission to the coronary care unit (CCU) and 19 age-matched controls. Sleep parameters were evaluated by actigraphy, and melatonin secretion was assessed by measuring the urinary 6-sulphatoxy melatonin (6-SMT). 6-SMT secretion was lower and nocturnal sleep parameters were less satisfactory in the subjects than those in the controls, and there were positive correlations between these variables, particularly in the subject patients. The lowered melatonin secretion might be involved in the mechanism of insomnia in CCU patients.

  16. Inhaler Reminders Significantly Improve Asthma Patients' Use of Controller Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... of controller medications Share | Inhaler reminders significantly improve asthma patients’ use of controller medications Published Online: July ... effective in reducing the burden and risk of asthma, but many patients do not use them regularly. ...

  17. Barrett's esophagus in the patients with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Gatalica, Zoran; Chen, Mingkui; Snyder, Carrie; Mittal, Sumeet; Lynch, Henry T

    2014-06-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germ line mutations in the APC gene. Barrett's esophagus (BE) and Barrett's adenocarcinoma are intestinal type lesions of the esophagus characterized by an early loss of heterozygosity at the APC locus. We hypothesized that patients with FAP are at risk for the early development of BE due to the inherited mutations in the APC gene (haploinsufficiency). Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract biopsies from 36 patients with FAP were reviewed to determine the incidence and characteristics of BE in these patients. Twenty-four patients were confirmed carriers of a deleterious germline APC mutation. The other 12 patients were from FAP families with known APC gene mutations and had clinical manifestations of FAP. The control group consisted of patients who did not have a personal or family history of FAP undergoing UGI endoscopic examination in our institution over a 30 month period of time. The difference in expression of Wnt pathway proteins (APC, β-catenin, E-cadherin and cyclin D1) in BE between BE(+)/FAP(+), BE(-)/FAP(+) and age-matched BE(+)/FAP(-) groups was studied using immunohistochemistry. BE was found in 6 of 36 (6/36 or 16%) patients with FAP and in 266 of 1662 patients (16%) in the control group of symptomatic patients. The average age at the first diagnosis of BE in FAP patients was 37.8 versus 57.5 years in the control group (sporadic BE). When compared to age matched BE(+)/FAP- group (7/334), patients with FAP had a significantly (p = 0.005843, odds ratio 9.2; Fisher exact test) higher incidence of BE. Both classic FAP and attenuated FAP phenotypes were associated with BE .Two types of germ line mutations in APC gene were identified in BE(+)/FAP(+) patients: Five patients had 2-base deletion in exon 4 (426delAT) and one patient had 4-base deletion in exon 15 (3202del4). No difference in Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was detected between BE(+)/FAP(+) and the age matched group of patients with

  18. Patient ECG recording control for an automatic implantable defibrillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, Glen H. (Inventor); Lee, Jr., David G. (Inventor); Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An implantable automatic defibrillator includes sensors which are placed on or near the patient's heart to detect electrical signals indicative of the physiology of the heart. The signals are digitally converted and stored into a FIFO region of a RAM by operation of a direct memory access (DMA) controller. The DMA controller operates transparently with respect to the microprocessor which is part of the defibrillator. The implantable defibrillator includes a telemetry communications circuit for sending data outbound from the defibrillator to an external device (either a patient controller or a physician's console or other) and a receiver for sensing at least an externally generated patient ECG recording command signal. The patient recording command signal is generated by the hand held patient controller. Upon detection of the patient ECG recording command, DMA copies the contents of the FIFO into a specific region of the RAM.

  19. Computer-Assisted and Patient-Controlled Sedation Platforms.

    PubMed

    Pambianco, Daniel; Niklewski, Paul

    2016-07-01

    As the number and complexity of endoscopic procedures increase, the role of sedation has been integral in patient and physician satisfaction. This article discusses the advances of computer-assisted and patient-controlled platforms. These computer-assisted and patient-controlled platforms use different anesthetics and analgesics, all with the intent of achieving improved consistency in the level of sedation, appropriate to the needs of patients, while also improving patient safety. These systems have been around for decades; however, few are approved for use in the United States, and several still require further study before broad clinical application.

  20. Abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Baró, L.; Hermoso, J. C.; Núñez, M. C.; Jiménez-Rios, J. A.; Gil, A.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated total plasma fatty acid concentrations and percentages, and the fatty acid profiles for the different plasma lipid fractions and red blood cell lipids, in 17 patients with untreated colorectal cancer and 12 age-matched controls with no malignant diseases, from the same geographical area. Cancer patients had significantly lower total plasma concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives than healthy controls; when the values were expressed as relative percentages, cancer patients had significantly higher proportions of oleic acid and lower levels of linoleic acid than controls. With regard to lipid fractions, cancer patients had higher proportions of oleic acid in plasma phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesterol esters, and lower percentages of linoleic acid and its derivatives. On the other hand, alpha-linolenic acid was significantly lower in triglycerides from cancer patients and tended to be lower in phospholipids. Its derivatives also tended to be lower in phospholipids and triglycerides from cancer patients. Our findings suggest that colorectal cancer patients present abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles characterized by lower amounts of most saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives, especially members of the n-6 series, than their healthy age-matched counterparts. These changes are probably due to metabolic changes caused by the illness per se but not to malnutrition. PMID:9667678

  1. Patient-controlled analgesia after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, Sarah

    Patient-controlled analgesia is a method of pain control that allows the patient to self-administer opioid medication as and when it is needed. Pain is a personal experience and one pain-relieving intervention may not be effective for all patients. This article reviews the literature on patient-controlled analgesia, particularly with reference to patients after coronary artery bypass grafting. Pain policies and education programmes need to be proactive in addressing staff and patient gaps in knowledge and misconceptions about pain assessment and management. Nurses need to appreciate the nature and importance of research in promoting a more critical approach to patient care and the development of quality nursing practice.

  2. Latent ocular deviations in patients with advanced AIDS.

    PubMed

    España-Gregori, E; Montés-Micó, R; Bueno-Gimeno, I; Díaz-Llopi, M; Menezo-Rozalén, J L

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine horizontal latent ocular deviations in patients with advanced AIDS (CD4+ count <0.050 x 10(9)/l) and to compare with normal values by means of the von Graefe technique. Twenty patients aged between 17 and 44 years with AIDS and aged-matched control groups were submitted to study. The AC/A ratio was also measured in both groups using the Gradient test. The AIDS patients showed a horizontal latent deviation value of 0.28+/-1.07delta exo at near (40 cm.) and 2.12+/-1.37delta eso at distance (6 m). The AC/A ratio obtained was 2.03+/-0.65. Statistically significant differences were obtained in relation to aged-matched control group at near and at distance (p<0.01). The horizontal latent ocular deviation at near and at distance in advanced AIDS patients showed lower values than the expected. The AC/A relationship also was lower. The results obtained in this study indicate that AIDS patients suffer a divergence insufficiency, which could add to other visual complaints such as blurred vision, photophobia, nyctalopia and reading difficulty.

  3. Sleep quality, morningness-eveningness preference, mood profile, and levels of serum melatonin in migraine patients: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Hasan Hüseyin; Boysan, Murat; Uca, Ali Ulvi; Aydın, Adem; Kılınç, İbrahim; Genç, Emine; Altaş, Mustafa; Güngör, Dilara Cari; Turgut, Keziban; Özer, Nejla

    2017-03-01

    The melatonin as the pineal gland's secretory product is implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. Melatonin has critical functions in human physiology, and research underscores the importance of melatonin in circadian rhythm, sleep, and mood regulation. Clinical observations have indicated that migraine attacks have a seasonal, menstrual, and circadian timing, suggesting that chronobiological mechanisms and their alterations may causally involve in the etiology of the disease. However, the topic has received relatively little attention in the migraine literature. Associations between melatonin, circadian preference, sleep, and mood states were investigated in the current study. Fifty-five patients (47 females and 8 males) were compared to 57 gender and age-matched control subjects (40 females and 17 males). A socio-demographical questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Profile of Mood States (POMS), and Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire were administered to volunteers. Blood samples were taken from all participants at about 1:00 AM in an unlit room not to hamper melatonin secretion, and blood melatonin levels were measured using quantitative ELISA test. In comparison with controls, melatonin levels were significantly lower among migraine patients. Migraineurs reported significantly greater scores on the BAI, confusion-bewilderment subscale of the POMS, and total and sleep latency subscale of the PSQI. Migraine patients who had nausea during the migraine attacks and who reported bouts relevant to certain food consumption, such as cheese or chocolate, had significantly lower levels of melatonin. Contrarily, groups did not reveal statistically substantial difference in circadian preferences.

  4. Frequency of colour vision deficiencies in melanoma patients: results of a prospective comparative screening study with the Farnsworth panel D 15 test including 300 melanoma patients and 100 healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Pföhler, Claudia; Tschöp, Sabine; König, Jochem; Rass, Knuth; Tilgen, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Patients with melanoma may experience a variety of different vision symptoms, in part associated with melanoma-associated retinopathy. For several melanoma patients with or without melanoma-associated retinopathy, colour vision deficiencies, especially involving the tritan system, have been reported. The frequency of colour vision deficiencies in a larger cohort of melanoma patients has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of colour vision deficiencies in melanoma patients subject to stage of disease, prognostic factors such as tumour thickness or Clark level, S100-beta and predisposing diseases that may have an impact on colour vision (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, glaucoma or cataract). Three hundred melanoma patients in different tumour stages and 100 healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls were examined with the saturated Farnsworth panel D 15 test. Seventy out of 300 (23.3%) melanoma patients and 12/100 (12%) controls showed pathologic results in colour testing. This discrepancy was significant (P < 0.016; odds ratio = 2.23, 95% confidence interval 1.15-4.32). Increasing age was identified as a highly significant (P = 0.0005) risk factor for blue vision deficiency. Adjusting for the age and predisposing diseases, we could show that melanoma was associated with the risk of blue vision deficiency. The frequency of blue vision deficiency in 52/260 melanoma patients without predisposing diseases (20%) compared with 4/78 controls without predisposing diseases (5.1%) differed significantly (odds ratio 4.441; confidence interval 1.54-12.62; P < 0.004). In 260 melanoma patients without predisposing diseases, blue vision deficiency, as graded on a 6-point scale, showed a weak positive correlation (Spearman) with tumour stage (r = 0.147; P < 0.01), tumour thickness (r = 0.10; P = 0.0035), Clark level (r = 0.12; P = 0.04) and a weak negative correlation with time since initial diagnosis (r = -0.11; P = 0.0455). Blue

  5. Metacognitive Performance, the Tip-of-Tongue Experience, Is Not Disrupted in Parkinsonian Patients.

    PubMed

    Oh-Lee, Justin D; Szymkowicz, Sarah M; Smith, Stefanie L; Otani, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a form of metamemory, the tip-of-tongue phenomenon (TOT), was affected in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). The PD patient (n = 22), age-matched elderly control (n = 22), and college student control (n = 46) groups were compared on a motor timing task and TOT measures. Motor timing was assessed using a cued hand-clapping task, whereas TOT was assessed using general knowledge questions. The results indicated that motor timing was significantly impaired in the PD group relative to both control groups. However, all of the TOT metacognitive measures: frequency, strength, and accuracy were statistically equivalent between the PD patients and elderly control groups, both of whom showed significantly better memory performance than college controls. These findings demonstrate that TOT metamemory is not compromised in PD patients, and that further insight into TOT mechanisms in PD may prove helpful in developing novel intervention strategies to enhance memory and general cognitive functions in these patients.

  6. Patients' health education and diabetes control in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Ezenwaka, C E; Offiah, N V

    2003-12-01

    We previously reported poor metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients attending 2 primary care clinics in Trinidad. In an attempt to explain the poor metabolic control, we assessed primary care patients' theoretical knowledge of diabetes control and risk factors. Two hundred fifty-four diabetic out-patients recruited consecutively were asked by questionnaire: (i) if they were aware that family history of diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity and cigarette smoking were diabetes risk factors; (ii) if they knew the benefits of weight loss, exercise and healthy diet in diabetes management, and (iii) what where their common sources of diabetes health information. Although the majority of the patients (81.1%) were unaware that cigarette smoking is a diabetes risk factor, a majority were aware that obesity (66.3%), physical inactivity (73.5%) and being a relative of a diabetic patient (78.7%) constitute diabetes risk factors. Again, the majority of the patients were aware that healthy diet (94.9%), exercise (94.5%) and weight loss (87.4%) are beneficial in diabetes control. While media (48.6%) was the commonest source of diabetes information, doctors and nurses were consulted by 39.9% and 11.0% of patients, respectively. Type 2 diabetic patients in these clinics were well informed about diabetes risk factors and benefits of healthy lifestyle. Given our recent reports on poor metabolic control, application of this theoretical knowledge in controlling their diabetes remains doubtful.

  7. Comparison of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients having pseudo exfoliation syndrome with healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Yasmeen, Naila; Fatima, Nauroz; Qamar-ul-Islam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in patients having pseudo exfoliation (PXF) with normal age matched controls using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods: This was a case control study conducted at Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology (AFIO) Rawalpindi from 12 June 2013 to 12 January 2014. Seventy eyes (Group A - 35 patients with PXF and Group B - 35 healthy age matched subjects) of more than 40 years of age were included in the study. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured with Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT) and peripapillary RNFL thickness was measured in four quadrants with SD-OCT (Topcon 3D OCT-1000 Mark II) in all subjects. Data was analyzed using the SPSS version 14. Results: Mean age of group A (PXF patients) was 65.63 ± 8.47 years and of group B (Healthy subjects) was 64.31 ± 6.51 years (p = 0.470). Both groups were gender matched with male preponderance (p = 0.673). Mean IOP in each group was 13.80 ± 2.59 mm Hg, and 13.49 ± 2.07 mm Hg respectively (p= 0.578). Mean average peripapillary RNFL thickness was 77.46 ± 12.17 µm in group A and 83.96 ± 10.58 µm in group B. Statistically significant differences were detected between two groups for mean average RNFL thickness (p= 0.020) and mean RNFL thickness in inferior quadrant (p=0.014). Conclusion: PXF patients with normal IOP and visual fields have thin RNFL as compared to healthy age matched controls. Therefore routine assessment and follow up of PXF patients with OCT may help in early diagnosis of PXF glaucoma. PMID:28083059

  8. Factors associated with conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia: A case control study

    SciTech Connect

    Napora, C.; Cohen, E.J.; Genvert, G.I.; Presson, A.C.; Arentsen, J.J.; Eagle, R.C.; Laibson, P.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Familial and environmental factors may play a role in the development of conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Nineteen patients with biopsy-proven CIN completed a questionnaire to evaluate possible predisposing factors. Nineteen age-matched and sex-matched controls completed questionnaires and received slit-lamp examinations. Factors associated with a relatively increased risk of developing CIN included exposure to petroleum products, heavy cigarette smoking, light hair and ocular pigmentation, and family origin in the British Isles, Austria or Switzerland. Non-office and nonprofessional workers were more likely to develop conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia (p = .05), as were those who were not college graduates (p = .07).

  9. Surface electromyography shows increased mirroring in Parkinson's disease patients without overt mirror movements.

    PubMed

    Cincotta, Massimo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Borgheresi, Alessandra; Balestrieri, Fabrizio; Vanni, Paola; Ragazzoni, Aldo; Zaccara, Gaetano; Ziemann, Ulf

    2006-09-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may present mirror movements (MM). Transcranial magnetic stimulation data indicate that these movements reflect an abnormal enhancement of the "physiological mirroring" that can be observed in healthy adults during complex and effortful tasks. It was hypothesized that, in PD, enhanced mirroring is caused by a failure of basal ganglia output to support the cortical network that is responsible for the execution of strictly unimanual movements. If so, it is likely that subtle alterations of voluntary unimanual motor control are also present in PD patients without overt MM. We tested this hypothesis by using surface electromyographic (EMG) techniques in 12 mildly to moderately affected PD patients without overt MM, and in 2 control groups (12 age-matched and 10 young healthy volunteers). Subjects performed unilateral phasic thumb abduction during a sustained tonic contraction of the opposite abductor pollicis brevis. All patients were tested on dopaminergic therapy. On a separate day, 7 of 12 patients were re-tested after withdrawal of medication. During this task, involuntary mirror-like increase in surface EMG of the tonically abducting thumb was significantly larger in PD patients than in age-matched or young healthy volunteers. Off therapy, mirroring was slightly greater than on medication, although this difference was not significant. Our findings suggest that dysfunction of unimanual motor control is a general feature of PD. It is likely that this deficient movement lateralization contributes to an impairment of nonsymmetrical bimanual movements in PD.

  10. A combined form of hypothyroidism in pubertal patients with non-mosaic Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tahani, Natascia; Ruga, Gilda; Granato, Simona; Spaziani, Matteo; Panimolle, Francesca; Anzuini, Antonella; Lenzi, Andrea; Radicioni, Antonio Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Klinefelter syndrome has been associated with thyroid abnormalities, the genesis of which is not yet fully clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate thyroid function in Klinefelter syndrome subjects during the pubertal period. Chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay was used to analyze Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone, fT3 and fT4 concentration in serum samples from 40 Klinefelter syndrome pubertal boys with classic 47,XXY karyotype and 157 healthy age-matched controls. 13 Klinefelter syndrome patients also underwent Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone testing to evaluate hypothalamic-pituitary function. fT3 levels were significantly lower in Klinefelter syndrome patients than in age-matched controls (p < 0.001). No significant differences were found for Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (p = 0.138) or fT4 (p = 0.274), but the serum levels of Klinefelter syndrome patients tended to cluster around the lower part of the reference range for the assay. Three of the thirteen Klinefelter syndrome patients undergoing the Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone test had an adequate response, one had a prolonged response at 60 min and nine responded inadequately. This study demonstrated for the first time that pubertal Klinefelter syndrome patients have significantly lower fT3 serum levels than do healthy age-matched boys, whereas Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and fT4 are normal, albeit at the lower end of the reference range. Most patients showed an inadequate/prolonged response to pituitary stimulation with Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone. These findings suggest a combined form of both central and peripheral hypothyroidism in Klinefelter syndrome boys during pubertal development.

  11. Accelerometry reveals differences in gait variability between patients with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Huisinga, Jessie M.; Mancini, Martina; St. George, Rebecca; Horak, Fay

    2014-01-01

    Variability of movement reflects important information for the maintenance of the health of the system. For pathological populations, changes in variability during gait signal the presence of abnormal motor control strategies. For persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), extensive gait problems have been reported including changes in gait variability. While previous studies have focused on footfall variability, the present study used accelerometers on the trunk to measure variability during walking. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the variability of the acceleration pattern of the upper and lower trunk in PwMS compared to healthy controls. We extracted linear and nonlinear measures of gait variability from 30s of steady state walking for 15 PwMS and 15 age-matched healthy controls. PwMS had altered variability compared to controls with greater Lyapunov exponent in the ML (p < 0.001) and AP (p < 0.001) directions, and greater frequency dispersion in the ML direction (p = 0.034). PwMS also demonstrated greater mean velocity in the ML direction (p = 0.045) and lower root mean square of acceleration in the AP direction (p = 0.040). These findings indicate that PwMS have altered structure of variability of the trunk during gait compared to healthy controls and agree with previous findings related to changes in gait variability in PwMS. PMID:23161166

  12. Safety and efficacy of resistance training in germ cell cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, J F; Jones, L W; Tolver, A; Jørgensen, L W; Andersen, J L; Adamsen, L; Højman, P; Nielsen, R H; Rørth, M; Daugaard, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bleomycin–etoposid–cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy is curative in most patients with disseminated germ cell cancer (GCC) but also associated with toxic actions and dysfunction in non-targeted tissues. We investigated changes in muscle function during BEP and the safety and efficacy of resistance training to modulate these changes. Methods: Thirty GCC patients were randomly assigned to resistance training (resistance training group (INT), n=15) or usual care (CON, n=15) during 9 weeks of BEP therapy. Resistance training consisted of thrice weekly sessions of four exercises, 3–4 sets/exercise of 10–15 repetitions at 12–15 repetition maximum load. The primary endpoint was muscle fibre size, assessed in muscle biopsies from musculus vastus lateralis. Secondary endpoints were fibre phenotype composition, body composition, strength, blood biochemistry and patient-reported endpoints. Healthy age-matched subjects (REF, n=19) performed the same RT-programme for comparison purposes. Results: Muscle fibre size decreased by −322 μm2 (95% confidence interval (CI): −899 to 255; P=0.473) in the CON-group and increased by +206 μm2 (95% CI: −384 to 796; P=0.257) in the INT-group (adjusted mean difference (AMD), +625 μm2, 95% CI: −253 to 1503, P=0.149). Mean differences in type II fibre size (AMD, +823 μm2, P=0.09) and lean mass (AMD, +1.49 kg, P=0.07) in favour of the INT-group approached significance. The REF-group improved all muscular endpoints and had significantly superior changes compared with the INT-group (P<0.05). Conclusions: BEP was associated with significant reduction in lean mass and strength and trends toward unfavourable changes in muscle fibre size and phenotype composition. Resistance training was safe and attenuated dysfunction in selected endpoints, but BEP blunted several positive adaptations observed in healthy controls. Thus, our study does not support the general application of resistance training in this setting but

  13. Inhaled insulin for controlling blood glucose in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Bernard L; Barnes, Christopher J; Campaigne, Barbara N; Muchmore, Douglas B

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a significant worldwide health problem, with the incidence of type 2 diabetes increasing at alarming rates. Insulin resistance and dysregulated blood glucose control are established risk factors for microvascular complications and cardiovascular disease. Despite the recognition of diabetes as a major health issue and the availability of a growing number of medications designed to counteract its detrimental effects, real and perceived barriers remain that prevent patients from achieving optimal blood glucose control. The development and utilization of inhaled insulin as a novel insulin delivery system may positively influence patient treatment adherence and optimal glycemic control, potentially leading to a reduction in cardiovascular complications in patients with diabetes. PMID:18200813

  14. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    PubMed

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  15. Bevacizumab for Treatment-Refractory Pain Control in Neurofibromatosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Recht, Lawrence D

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic pain is a well-known morbidity associated with neurofibromatosis (NF) for which better therapies are needed. Surgery, radiation, and pain medications have been utilized, but often fail to relieve debilitating pain. One patient at our institution was noted to have near complete resolution of pain after treatment with bevacizumab for progressive neurologic deficit associated with NF2, suggesting its potential as an effective pain control method. We aim to better characterize the use of bevacizumab for pain control in this subset of patientsPatients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 38 NF patients treated at our institution.   Results: Of the 38 total NF patients, we found that 63% reported chronic pain, with 18% reporting chronic opiate usage. Nine patients with chronic pain were considered for bevacizumab treatment and five went on to receive infusions. Of these patients, four out of five had previous surgical debulking and two out of five had previous radiation for attempted pain control. One patient had a lesion not amenable to surgery or radiation. Patients received a median of 13 cycles of bevacizumab, and four out of five patients reported a decrease in subjective pain. All patients that had pain relief had a relapse of pain symptoms when the dose was reduced or infusions were paused. Seventy-five percent were able to decrease opiate use. No major complications were noted. All five patients have elected to continue infusions for pain control.  Conclusion: Bevacizumab was, in general, well tolerated and should be considered as a treatment option in NF patients with chronic pain refractory or not amenable to surgical decompression and debulking, radiation, and pain medication.   PMID:28123914

  16. Stability of piritramide in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) solutions.

    PubMed

    Remane, D; Scriba, G; Meissner, W; Hartmann, M

    2009-06-01

    For patient controlled analgesia, syringes with solutions of 1.5 mg/ml piritramide in 0.9% aqueous sodium chloride are used. The physical and chemical stability for dilutions of the commercially available preparation of piritramide is limited up to 72 hours by the manufacturer. Since application duration for patient-controlled analgesia can exceed that limited time, stability was investigated by HPLC. Our results show that these solutions are chemically stable over a time period of 60 days.

  17. A 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D J; Krige, D; Barnes, P R; Kemp, G J; Carroll, M T; Mann, V M; Cooper, J M; Marsden, C D; Schapira, A H

    1994-08-01

    The activity of complex I of the respiratory chain is decreased in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) but the presence of this defect in skeletal muscle is controversial. Therefore, the mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in patients with PD was investigated in vivo using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results from 7 PD patients, 11 age matched controls and 9 mitochondrial myopathy patients with proven complex I deficiency were obtained from finger flexor muscle at rest, during exercise and in recovery from exercise. In resting muscle, the patients with mitochondrial myopathy showed a low PCr/ATP ratio, a low phosphorylation potential, a high P(i)/PCr ratio and a high calculated free [ADP]. During exercise, stores of high energy phosphate were depleted more rapidly than normal, while in recovery, the concentration of phosphocreatine and free ADP returned to pre-exercise values more slowly than normal. In contrast, the patients with PD were not significantly different from normal for any of these variables, and no abnormality of muscle energetics was detected. Three of the PD patients also had mitochondrial function assessed biochemically in muscle biopsies. No respiratory chain defect was identified in any of these patients by polarography or enzyme analysis when compared with age-matched controls. These results suggest that skeletal muscle is not a suitable tissue for the investigation and identification of the biochemical basis of the nigral complex I deficiency in PD.

  18. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months) and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients) and the low functioning group (20 patients) using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients. PMID:26889198

  19. Infection control: maintaining the personal hygiene of patients and staff.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lynn

    This article concentrates on the importance of personal hygiene for staff and patients in reducing the risk of healthcare-associated infections for patients. It provides an historical context to the associated risks of "basic nursing care" and how these can be counteracted. With the introduction of modern matrons and directors of infection control, emphasis is again focused on these practices.

  20. Can the Randomized Controlled Trial Literature Generalize to Nonrandomized Patients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Rothman, Allison

    2005-01-01

    To determine the extent to which published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychotherapy can be generalized to a sample of outpatients, the authors matched information obtained from charts of patients who had been screened out of RCTs to inclusion and exclusion criteria from published RCT studies. Most of the patients in the sample who had…

  1. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  2. Increased frequency of immunoglobulin (Ig)A-secreting cells following Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9 engagement in patients with Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, L; Quaranta, M G; Marchesi, A; Straface, E; Pietraforte, D; Villani, A; Malorni, W; Del Principe, D; Viora, M

    2011-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute vasculitis affecting mainly infants and children. Human B cells express Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9, whose natural ligands are unmethylated cytosine–guanine dinucleotide (CpG) motifs characteristic of bacterial DNA. The aim of this study was to clarify the pathogenesis of KD analysing the activation status of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), focusing on B lymphocyte activation and functions. Ten patients and 10 age-matched healthy donors were recruited from the Bambino Gesù Hospital of Rome, Italy and enrolled into this study. We determined phenotype profile and immunoglobulin (Ig) production of PBMC from KD patients and age-matched controls. We found that the frequency of CD19+ B lymphocytes and CD19+/CD86+ activated B lymphocytes from KD patients during the acute phase before therapy was increased significantly. Moreover, B lymphocytes of acute-phase KD patients were more prone to CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) activation compared with the age-matched controls, as assessed by a significant increase of the number of IgA-secreting cells (SC). In the same patients we found a marked increase of IgM, IgG, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production compared with the control group. In addition, in two convalescent KD patients, conventional treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) restored the normal frequency of CD19+ B cells, the number of IgA-, IgM- and IgG-SC and the production of IL-6 and TNF-α. Our findings indicate that the percentages of peripheral B lymphocytes of acute-phase KD patients are increased and are prone to bacterial activation in terms of increased numbers of IgA-SC and increased production of IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines. Thus, our data support the hypothesis of an infectious triggering in KD. PMID:21175593

  3. Increased frequency of immunoglobulin (Ig)A-secreting cells following Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9 engagement in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Giordani, L; Quaranta, M G; Marchesi, A; Straface, E; Pietraforte, D; Villani, A; Malorni, W; Del Principe, D; Viora, M

    2011-03-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute vasculitis affecting mainly infants and children. Human B cells express Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9, whose natural ligands are unmethylated cytosine-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) motifs characteristic of bacterial DNA. The aim of this study was to clarify the pathogenesis of KD analysing the activation status of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), focusing on B lymphocyte activation and functions. Ten patients and 10 age-matched healthy donors were recruited from the Bambino Gesù Hospital of Rome, Italy and enrolled into this study. We determined phenotype profile and immunoglobulin (Ig) production of PBMC from KD patients and age-matched controls. We found that the frequency of CD19(+) B lymphocytes and CD19(+) /CD86(+) activated B lymphocytes from KD patients during the acute phase before therapy was increased significantly. Moreover, B lymphocytes of acute-phase KD patients were more prone to CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) activation compared with the age-matched controls, as assessed by a significant increase of the number of IgA-secreting cells (SC). In the same patients we found a marked increase of IgM, IgG, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production compared with the control group. In addition, in two convalescent KD patients, conventional treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) restored the normal frequency of CD19(+) B cells, the number of IgA-, IgM- and IgG-SC and the production of IL-6 and TNF-α. Our findings indicate that the percentages of peripheral B lymphocytes of acute-phase KD patients are increased and are prone to bacterial activation in terms of increased numbers of IgA-SC and increased production of IL-6 and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines. Thus, our data support the hypothesis of an infectious triggering in KD.

  4. Plasma protein thiolation index (PTI) as a biomarker of thiol-specific oxidative stress in haemodialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Graziano; Reggiani, Francesco; Podestà, Manuel A; Garavaglia, Maria Lisa; Portinaro, Nicola M; Milzani, Aldo; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Dalle-Donne, Isabella

    2015-12-01

    The role of oxidative stress in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), which occurs at significantly higher levels than in the general population, is often underestimated in clinical practice. Emerging evidence highlights the strong correlation of oxidative stress with chronic inflammation and cardiovascular disease, which are highly prevalent in most patients on maintenance haemodialysis (HD) and are a major risk factor for mortality in this population. In this study, total plasma thiols and plasma S-thiolated proteins were measured in patients with ESRD, before and after a regular HD session, and compared to age-matched healthy subjects. We found a significant decrease in the level of total plasma thiols and, conversely, a significant increase in the level of S-thiolated proteins in these patients. In most patients, post-HD plasma level of total thiols did not differ from the one in healthy subjects, whereas plasma level of S-thiolated proteins was lower in HD patients than in age-matched healthy controls. This suggests that a single HD session restores plasma thiol redox status and re-establishes the antioxidant capacity of plasma thiols. Additionally, we determined protein thiolation index (PTI), i.e., the molar ratio between the sum of all low molecular mass thiols bound to S-thiolated plasma proteins and protein free cysteinyl residues. Patients with ESRD had a significantly higher PTI compared to age-matched healthy subjects and HD was associated with a decrease in PTI to normal, or lower than normal, levels. Although this study is limited in size, our results suggest that PTI is a useful indicator of thiol-specific oxidative stress in patients with ESRD on maintenance HD. This study also emphasizes that PTI determination is a cheap and simple tool suitable for large-scale clinical studies that could be used for routine screening of thiol-specific oxidative stress.

  5. Improving Hypertension Control and Patient Engagement Using Digital Tools.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Lavie, Carl J; Bober, Robert M; Milani, Alexander R; Ventura, Hector O

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is present in 30% of the adult US population and is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease. The established office-based approach yields only 50% blood pressure control rates and low levels of patient engagement. Available home technology now provides accurate, reliable data that can be transmitted directly to the electronic medical record. We evaluated blood pressure control in 156 patients with uncontrolled hypertension enrolled into a home-based digital-medicine blood pressure program and compared them with 400 patients (matched to age, sex, body mass index, and blood pressure) in a usual-care group after 90 days. Digital-medicine patients completed questionnaires online, were asked to submit at least one blood pressure reading/week, and received medication management and lifestyle recommendations via a clinical pharmacist and a health coach. Blood pressure units were commercially available that transmitted data directly to the electronic medical record. Digital-medicine patients averaged 4.2 blood pressure readings per week. At 90 days, 71% of digital-medicine vs 31% of usual-care patients had achieved target blood pressure control. Mean decrease in systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 14/5 mm Hg in digital medicine, vs 4/2 mm Hg in usual care (P < .001). Excess sodium consumption decreased from 32% to 8% in the digital-medicine group (P = .004). Mean patient activation increased from 41.9 to 44.1 (P = .008), and the percentage of patients with low patient activation decreased from 15% to 6% (P = .03) in the digital-medicine group. A digital hypertension program is feasible and associated with significant improvement in blood pressure control rates and lifestyle change. Utilization of a virtual health intervention using connected devices improves patient activation and is well accepted by patients.

  6. Olfactory deficits and sleep disturbances in Parkinson's disease: a case–control survey

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J; Lu, Y; Wang, S; Cartwright, H; Halliday, G

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To obtain information about olfactory and sleep deficits preceding the onset of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Subjects: 38 community dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease (73% response rate) and 32 age matched controls (60% response rate). Methods: Using a questionnaire survey, the frequencies, timing, and relations between olfactory and sleep disturbances, drug treatment, mood, and motor deficits in Parkinson's disease were compared with those in age matched controls. Reliability of information was validated by informant interview in 9% of the sample. Interdependency of factors was assessed using Fisher's fourfold table test, and differences between populations were analysed using χ2 and unpaired t tests. Results: Microsmia was reported by 26 patients (68%) (and only one control), on average within a year of the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. More patients than controls had excessive daytime somnolence (45% v 6%), restless legs (50% v 19%), and abnormal movements during sleep (34% v 0%), which generally occurred three to five years after diagnosis and were independent of mood disorders and drug treatment. Conclusions: Many patients with Parkinson's disease have microsmia at the onset of motor deficits, but some sleep disorders are a subsequent occurrence. PMID:12810790

  7. Inhibitory attentional control in patients with frontal lobe damage

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Mariana; Nakic, Marina; Elpern-Waxman, Jordan; Granetz, Joy; O'Grady, Joy; Phipps, Michael; Milne, Elizabeth; Logan, Gordon D.; Hasher, Lynn; Grafman, Jordan

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a group of frontal lobe lesion and a group of frontal lobe dementia patients was compared with the performance of their respective matched normal control groups on two tests of inhibitory attentional control—the stop-signal reaction time task and a negative priming task. Both patient groups responded significantly slower than their respective normal control groups, but they showed only marginally significant selective impairments on the measures of inhibition. The data suggest that the specific inhibitory processes evaluated by these two tests are, in general, spared in patients with focal frontal lobe lesions or frontal lobe degeneration. PMID:12821109

  8. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  9. The Impact of Electronic Patient Portals on Patient Care: A Systematic Review of Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ammenwerth, Elske; Schnell-Inderst, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern information technology is changing and provides new challenges to health care. The emergence of the Internet and the electronic health record (EHR) has brought new opportunities for patients to play a more active role in his/her care. Although in many countries patients have the right to access their clinical information, access to clinical records electronically is not common. Patient portals consist of provider-tethered applications that allow patients to electronically access health information that are documented and managed by a health care institution. Although patient portals are already being implemented, it is still unclear in which ways these technologies can influence patient care. Objective To systematically review the available evidence on the impact of electronic patient portals on patient care. Methods A systematic search was conducted using PubMed and other sources to identify controlled experimental or quasi-experimental studies on the impact of patient portals that were published between 1990 and 2011. A total of 1,306 references from all the publication hits were screened, and 13 papers were retrieved for full text analysis. Results We identified 5 papers presenting 4 distinct studies. There were no statistically significant changes between intervention and control group in the 2 randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of patient portals on health outcomes. Significant changes in the patient portal group, compared to a control group, could be observed for the following parameters: quicker decrease in office visit rates and slower increase in telephone contacts; increase in number of messages sent; changes of the medication regimen; and better adherence to treatment. Conclusions The number of available controlled studies with regard to patient portals is low. Even when patient portals are often discussed as a way to empower patients and improve quality of care, there is insufficient evidence to support this

  10. Cancer patients' preferences for control at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Volker, Deborah L; Wu, Hung-Lan

    2011-12-01

    The achievement of a death consistent with personal preferences is an elusive outcome for most people with cancer. Maintaining a sense of control is a core component of a dignified death; however, control might be a Western bioethical notion with questionable relevance to culturally diverse groups. Thus, the purpose of our study was to explore the meaning of control and control preferences in a group of racially and ethnically diverse patients with an advanced cancer diagnosis. Using a hermeneutic, phenomenological approach, we interviewed 20 patients with advanced cancer and uncovered two themes: (a) preferences for everyday control over treatment decisions, family issues, final days of life, and arrangements after death, vs. (b) awareness that cancer and death are controlled by a higher power. Although the sample included non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans, and Hispanics, participants shared common views that are characteristic of American cultural norms regarding the value of autonomy.

  11. Temporal movement control in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Teasdale, N; Phillips, J; Stelmach, G E

    1990-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have been reported to be unable to modify their movement velocity to adapt to changing environmental demands. For example, when movement amplitude is varied, PD patients usually exhibit a nearly constant peak velocity, whereas elderly subjects show an increase of their peak velocity with increased amplitude. The experiment examined the ability of PD patients to vary the duration of their movement (four different percentages of their maximum) under conditions where temporal, but not spatial, control was emphasised. PD patients had longer movement times than control subjects, but were able to vary the duration of their movement with comparable temporal accuracy to that of elderly subjects. For both groups, the agonist EMG activity increased with decreased movement duration. For the PD patients, the number of agonist bursts increased with increased movement duration. PMID:2266367

  12. Power and Control: Contracts and the Patient-Physician Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Sarah R.; Kim, Scotty Y.; Volk, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Contracts with patients have become increasingly common in clinical practice and the medical literature. These include behavioral contracts for managing “difficult patients” 1, opioid contracts2–5, suicide prevention contracts6,7, and healthy living contracts8. Some physician practices have even asked patients to sign contracts promising not to litigate or post defamatory comments on the Internet9. Despite widespread adoption, few have stopped to consider the potential risks and ethical concerns with using these documents. This perspective will describe how patient contracts are ultimately about power and control, and if not used carefully could damage the patient-physician relationship. PMID:22093528

  13. Alterations of bone density, microstructure, and strength of the distal radius in male patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a case-control study with HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tracy Y; Griffith, James F; Qin, Ling; Hung, Vivian W; Fong, Tsz-Ning; Au, Sze-Ki; Li, Martin; Lam, Yvonne Yi-On; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Kwok, Anthony W; Leung, Ping-Chung; Li, Edmund K; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2014-09-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we investigated volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone microstructure, and biomechanical competence of the distal radius in male patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study cohort comprised 50 male RA patients of average age of 61.1 years and 50 age-matched healthy males. Areal BMD (aBMD) of the hip, lumbar spine, and distal radius was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) of the distal radius provided measures of cortical and trabecular vBMD, microstructure, and biomechanical indices. aBMD of the hip but not the lumbar spine or ultradistal radius was significantly lower in RA patients than controls after adjustment for body weight. Total, cortical, and trabecular vBMD at the distal radius were, on average, -3.9% to -23.2% significantly lower in RA patients, and these differences were not affected by adjustment for body weight, testosterone level, or aBMD at the ultradistal radius. Trabecular microstructure indices were, on average, -8.1% (trabecular number) to 28.7% (trabecular network inhomogeneity) significantly inferior, whereas cortical pore volume and cortical porosity index were, on average, 80.3% and 63.9%, respectively, significantly higher in RA patients. RA patients also had significantly lower whole-bone stiffness, modulus, and failure load, with lower and more unevenly distributed cortical and trabecular stress. Density and microstructure indices significantly correlated with disease activity, severity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL] 12p70, tumor necrosis factor, IL-6 and IL-1β). Ten RA patients had focal periosteal bone apposition most prominent at the ulnovolar aspect of the distal radius. These patients had shorter disease duration and significantly higher cortical porosity. In conclusion, HR-pQCT reveals significant alterations of bone density, microstructure, and strength of the distal radius in

  14. Postmovement beta synchronization in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Pfurtscheller, G; Pichler-Zalaudek, K; Ortmayr, B; Diez, J; Reisecker, F

    1998-05-01

    Event-related synchronization (ERS) after self-paced, voluntary brisk movement of the right and left thumb was studied in 17 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and 17 age-matched control subjects. All patients were receiving L-DOPA and/or DOPA-agonists. The movement-offset-triggered EEG data were analyzed in the 12- to 16-Hz, 16- to 20-Hz, and 20- to 24-Hz bands for eight time intervals after termination of movement. Significant differences in postmovement beta synchronization were observed in all three frequency bands. As compared with the control group, patients with PD showed a remarkably smaller beta ERS. This was the overall main effect for groups, as well as for interactions concerning side of movement and electrode positions. If beta ERS is a measure of recovery of the primary motor area after movement, our results indicate that this ability is impaired in PD patients.

  15. Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

    2011-01-01

    Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ≤150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association.

  16. Personality traits of patients with multiple sclerosis and their relationship with clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gazioglu, Sibel; Cakmak, Vildan Altunayoglu; Ozkorumak, Evrim; Usta, Nuray Can; Ates, Can; Boz, Cavit

    2014-05-01

    Few studies have investigated personality characteristics in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and little is known about the relationship between personality and clinical characteristics in these patients. We aimed to investigate the personality traits of MS patients and their relationship with clinical characteristics. The study population consisted of 74 MS patients and age-matched, sex-matched, and education level-matched healthy controls. All participants were instructed to complete the self-administered 240-item Temperament and Character Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory. The MS patients exhibited higher harm avoidance (HA) and lower self-directedness scores than the control group, although these differences disappeared after controlling for depression. Duration of the disease was positively correlated with HA and negatively correlated with novelty-seeking scores. Expanded Disability Status Scale scores were negatively correlated with reward dependence. Our results suggest a possible relationship between personality characteristics and the stage of the disease or the degree of damage in MS patients.

  17. Decreased dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) concentrations in plasma of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Sarah; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    DHEA is secreted by the adrenal cortex and is also a neurosteroid. Its sulfate (DHEAS) is the most abundant steroid in circulation. The levels of both are seen to decline in concentration with age. Evidence is available for altered levels of DHEA and DHEAS in AD but is limited to relatively few studies assessing small cohorts. This study assessed plasma DHEA and DHEAS levels in AD sufferers (n=72) and compared them to age-matched controls (n=72). Plasma DHEA concentrations were significantly lower in AD patients compared to control (4.24+/-0.4 ng/ml for AD; 3.38+/-0.3 ng/ml for control, p=0.027, Mann-Whitney 1-tailed) and DHEA levels were significantly correlated to DHEAS levels in both control and AD conditions (Spearman's rho correlation coefficient=0.635 in controls and 0.467 in AD, ppatients suffering from AD when compared to age-matched controls.

  18. Precision control of trunk movement in low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Willigenburg, Nienke W; Kingma, Idsart; Hoozemans, Marco J M; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-02-01

    Motor control is challenged in tasks with high precision demands. In such tasks, signal-dependent neuromuscular noise causes errors and proprioceptive feedback is required for optimal performance. Pain may affect proprioception, muscle activation patterns and resulting kinematics. Therefore, we investigated precision control of trunk movement in 18 low back pain (LBP) patients and 13 healthy control subjects. The subjects performed a spiral-tracking task requiring precise trunk movements, in conditions with and without disturbance of proprioception by lumbar muscle vibration. Tracking task performance and trunk muscle electromyography were recorded. In conditions without lumbar muscle vibration, tracking errors were 27.1% larger in LBP patients compared to healthy controls. Vibration caused tracking errors to increase by 10.5% in healthy controls, but not in LBP patients. These results suggest that reduced precision in LBP patients might be explained by proprioceptive deficits. Ratios of antagonistic over agonistic muscle activation were similar between groups. Tracking errors increased trunk inclination, but no significant relation between tracking error and agonistic muscle activation was found. Tracking errors did not decrease when antagonistic muscle activation increased, so, neither healthy subjects nor LBP patients appear to counteract trunk movement errors by increasing co-contraction.

  19. Impairment of motor planning in patients with Parkinson's disease: evidence from ideomotor apraxia testing.

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, G; Wimmer, A; Auff, E; Schnaberth, G

    1986-01-01

    Compared with a group of age matched controls, patients with Parkinson's disease scored significantly lower in testing for ideomotor apraxia. Imitation of movement sequences was affected more severely than performance of single movements. The degree of impairment was not related to severity of motor disability, but correlated strongly with the results of tests that measured visuospatial and visuoperceptive abilities. It is suggested that defective encoding and central processing of visuospatial information impairs memory for movement which is necessary for correct imitation of movements. Enhanced vulnerability to interference between successively presented items may cause further deterioration of performance in the copying of movement sequences. PMID:3794732

  20. A Novel Analog Reasoning Paradigm: New Insights in Intellectually Disabled Patients

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Aurore; Brun, Amandine; Cheylus, Anne; Reboul, Anne; Nazir, Tatjana; Bussy, Gérald; Delange, Karine; Paulignan, Yves; Mercier, Sandra; David, Albert; Marignier, Stéphanie; Merle, Lydie; de Fréminville, Bénédicte; Prieur, Fabienne; Till, Michel; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Toutain, Annick; Bieth, Eric; Touraine, Renaud; Sanlaville, Damien; Chelly, Jamel; Kong, Jian; Ott, Daniel; Kassai, Behrouz; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Gollub, Randy L.; des Portes, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Background Intellectual Disability (ID) is characterized by deficits in intellectual functions such as reasoning, problem-solving, planning, abstract thinking, judgment, and learning. As new avenues are emerging for treatment of genetically determined ID (such as Down’s syndrome or Fragile X syndrome), it is necessary to identify objective reliable and sensitive outcome measures for use in clinical trials. Objective We developed a novel visual analogical reasoning paradigm, inspired by the Progressive Raven’s Matrices, but appropriate for Intellectually Disabled patients. This new paradigm assesses reasoning and inhibition abilities in ID patients. Methods We performed behavioural analyses for this task (with a reaction time and error rate analysis, Study 1) in 96 healthy controls (adults and typically developed children older than 4) and 41 genetically determined ID patients (Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome and ARX mutated patients). In order to establish and quantify the cognitive strategies used to solve the task, we also performed an eye-tracking analysis (Study 2). Results Down syndrome, ARX and Fragile X patients were significantly slower and made significantly more errors than chronological age-matched healthy controls. The effect of inhibition on error rate was greater than the matrix complexity effect in ID patients, opposite to findings in adult healthy controls. Interestingly, ID patients were more impaired by inhibition than mental age-matched healthy controls, but not by the matrix complexity. Eye-tracking analysis made it possible to identify the strategy used by the participants to solve the task. Adult healthy controls used a matrix-based strategy, whereas ID patients used a response-based strategy. Furthermore, etiologic-specific reasoning differences were evidenced between ID patients groups. Conclusion We suggest that this paradigm, appropriate for ID patients and developmental populations as well as adult healthy controls, provides an

  1. [Healthcare-Associated Infection Control with Awareness of Patient Safety].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    In order to provide safe and secure medical care for patients, health care-associated infections (HAI) must not occur. HAI should be considered as incidents, and countermeasures should be viewed as a patient safety management itself. Healthcare-associated infection control (HAIC) is practiced by the infection control team (ICT), which is based on multidisciplinary cooperation. Team members have to recognize that it is the most important to make use of the expertise of each discipline. In addition, all members must try to respond quickly, to help the clinic staff. Visualized rapid information provision and sharing, environmental improvement, outbreak factor analysis, hand hygiene compliance rate improvement, proper antibiotic use (Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: ASP), and regional cooperation & leadership comprise the role of the ICT in the flagship hospital. Regarding this role, we present our hospital's efforts and the outcomes. In conclusion, for medical practice quality improvement, healthcare-associated infection control should be conducted thoroughly along with an awareness of patient safety.

  2. Late presentation of acromegaly in medically controlled prolactinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Manuylova, Ekaterina; Calvi, Laura M; Hastings, Catherine; Vates, G Edward; Johnson, Mahlon D; Cave, William T

    2016-01-01

    Summary Co-secretion of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) from a single pituitary adenoma is common. In fact, up to 25% of patients with acromegaly may have PRL co-secretion. The prevalence of acromegaly among patients with a newly diagnosed prolactinoma is unknown. Given the possibility of mixed GH and PRL co-secretion, the current recommendation is to obtain an insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in patients with prolactinoma at the initial diagnosis. Long-term follow-up of IGF-1 is not routinely done. Here, we report two cases of well-controlled prolactinoma on dopamine agonists with the development of acromegaly 10–20 years after the initial diagnoses. In both patients, a mixed PRL/GH-cosecreting adenoma was confirmed on the pathology examination after transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). Therefore, periodic routine measurements of IGF-1 should be considered regardless of the duration and biochemical control of prolactinoma. Learning points: Acromegaly can develop in patients with well-controlled prolactinoma on dopamine agonists. The interval between prolactinoma and acromegaly diagnoses can be several decades. Periodic screening of patients with prolactinoma for growth hormone excess should be considered and can 
lead to an early diagnosis of acromegaly before the development of complications. PMID:27855229

  3. Glycemic control in diabetic patients served by community health centers.

    PubMed

    Maizlish, Neil A; Shaw, Beryl; Hendry, Khati

    2004-01-01

    The Community Health Center Network measured the prevalence of glycemic control in diabetic patients at 7 community health centers as part of its clinical quality improvement program. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in a random sample of 1817 diabetic patients having 1 or more encounters from October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001. Computerized laboratory results for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests were available for half the sample. Manual review of medical charts was carried out for the rest. The proportion of diabetic patients with 1 or more HbA1c tests in the measurement year was 91% (CI95%: 90-93%) and poor glycemic control (HbA1c > 9%) occurred in 27% (CIM%: 25-30%). The mean of the most recent test was 7.8%. The frequency of testing varied significantly by clinic from 79% to 94% and increased with the number of encounters. Poor glycemic control also varied significantly by clinic (17-48%) and was significantly better in females and older patients. Measures of glycemic control were not associated with ethnicity or insurance status in multivariate analyses. A high proportion of diabetic patients received appropriate care, and this care was not associated with ethnicity or insurance status. The data warehouse was an essential tool for the clinical quality improvement program.

  4. Inserting epidural patient controlled analgesia into a peripheral venous line.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported from the Safety Reporting System in Anaesthesia and Resuscitation database. The event occurred in a patient undergoing abdominal surgery in whom an epidural catheter was inserted for analgesia. After the intervention, the patient was transferred to the recovery unit where the patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is programmed. Due to an error, the PCA was connected to a peripheral venous line, which was detected early without harm to the patient. Communication and analysis of this incident served to introduce a new drug delivery protocol through PCA pumps, including the obligation to prescribe the PCA in the electronic system, a dual computerised check immediately before connecting PCA, labelling the medication bag as well as the proximal and distal lines, standardisation of daily visits to patients, and monthly monitoring of results.

  5. [Organization of treatment and control of type 2 diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Drivsholm, Thomas Bo; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-09-10

    The organization of treatment and control of type 2 diabetic patients in Denmark has undergone a major development within the last decade. From being based on local hospital guidelines, treatment and control have moved towards a more organized collaboration between primary and secondary care based on common national guidelines. Quality indicators from primary and secondary care are collected routinely, and gradually an increasingly precise depiction is documented in the National Indicator Project.

  6. Lack of contextual-word predictability during reading in patients with mild Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Gerardo; Manes, Facundo; Rotstein, Nora P; Colombo, Oscar; Mandolesi, Pablo; Politi, Luis E; Agamennoni, Osvaldo

    2014-09-01

    In the present work we analyzed the effect of contextual word predictability on the eye movement behavior of patients with mild Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to age-matched controls, by using the eyetracking technique and lineal mixed models. Twenty AD patients and 40 age-matched controls participated in the study. We first evaluated gaze duration during reading low and highly predictable sentences. AD patients showed an increase in gaze duration, compared to controls, both in sentences of low or high predictability. In controls, highly predictable sentences led to shorter gaze durations; by contrary, AD patients showed similar gaze durations in both types of sentences. Similarly, gaze duration in controls was affected by the cloze predictability of word N and N+1, whereas it was the same in AD patients. In contrast, the effects of word frequency and word length were similar in controls and AD patients. Our results imply that contextual-word predictability, whose processing is proposed to require memory retrieval, facilitated reading behavior in healthy subjects, but this facilitation was lost in early AD patients. This loss might reveal impairments in brain areas such as those corresponding to working memory, memory retrieval, and semantic memory functions that are already present at early stages of AD. In contrast, word frequency and length processing might require less complex mechanisms, which were still retained by AD patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study measuring how patients with early AD process well-defined words embedded in sentences of high and low predictability. Evaluation of the resulting changes in eye movement behavior might provide a useful tool for a more precise early diagnosis of AD.

  7. From armchair to wheelchair: how patients with a locked-in syndrome integrate bodily changes in experienced identity.

    PubMed

    Nizzi, Marie-Christine; Demertzi, Athena; Gosseries, Olivia; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Jouen, François; Laureys, Steven

    2012-03-01

    Different sort of people are interested in personal identity. Philosophers frequently ask what it takes to remain oneself. Caregivers imagine their patients' experience. But both philosophers and caregivers think from the armchair: they can only make assumptions about what it would be like to wake up with massive bodily changes. Patients with a locked-in syndrome (LIS) suffer a full body paralysis without cognitive impairment. They can tell us what it is like. Forty-four chronic LIS patients and 20 age-matched healthy medical professionals answered a 15-items questionnaire targeting: (A) global evaluation of identity, (B) body representation and (C) experienced meaning in life. In patients, self-reported identity was correlated with B and C. Patients differed with controls in C. These results suggest that the paralyzed body remains a strong component of patients' experienced identity, that patients can adjust to objectives changes perceived as meaningful and that caregivers fail in predicting patients' experience.

  8. The relation of anthropometric measurements and insulin resistance in patients with polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Bennur; Gokmen, Emel Sağlam; Kaya, Mahmut; Ozkan, Burak; Atay, Ahmet Engin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the frequency of insulin resistance (IR) and its relation with anthropometric measurements in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Material and Methods Nonobese 82 patients with ADPKD and 58 age matched healthy controls were enrolled into the study. None of participants were diabetic or receiving renal replacement therapies (RRT). IR was determined by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) formula. Tanita body composition analyzer was used for anthropometric measurements. Creatinine clearance of participant were assessed by the modification of diet in renal diseases (MDRD). Results Patients with ADPKD had significantly higher level of urea and creatinine, microalbuminuria, and lower level of MDRD. Body fat distribution and HOMA-IR in both the groups were similar. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure of patients were higher than those of controls. Conclusion We failed to determine a higher frequency of IR among patients with ADPKD. PMID:28191534

  9. Improving Balance in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goljar, Nika; Burger, Helena; Rudolf, Marko; Stanonik, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of balance training in a balance trainer, a newly developed mechanical device for training balance, with conventional balance training in subacute stroke patients. This was a randomized controlled study. Fifty participants met the inclusion criteria and 39 finished the study. The participants were…

  10. The evaluation of pain in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case controlled observational study.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Victoria C J; Ellis, Cathy M; Burman, Rachel; Knights, Catherine; Shaw, Christopher E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder leading to progressive paralysis. ALS is complicated by a number of non-motor symptoms including pain. Pain in ALS has been poorly studied and poorly managed. This study aimed to collate information regarding pain in ALS using standardized pain questionnaires. Forty-two patients with ALS participated in the study. Control subjects included 41 age-matched healthy volunteers and 42 age-matched patients with neurological conditions other than ALS. Data on pain were collected using the The Brief Pain Inventory and The painDetect Questionnaire. Eighty-five percent of subjects with ALS reported pain versus 50% of neurology clinic controls and 35% of healthy controls (p < 0.01). Pain in ALS included cramping, aching, tiring, sharp and tender, and was non-neuropathic. Pain impacted significantly on mood, general activity, relationships and general enjoyment of life. Fifty-four percent of people with painful ALS used regular analgesia and 29% regular opioids. Other non-motor symptoms suffered included tiredness, constipation, urinary problems, itching and drowsiness. In conclusion, these data support the fact that pain is a significant symptom in ALS which impacts on quality of life. These data can be used to educate clinicians and patients to promote better multidisciplinary management of ALS symptoms and a better quality of life.

  11. Comparative EEG mapping studies in Huntington's disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Painold, Annamaria; Anderer, Peter; Holl, Anna K; Letmaier, Martin; Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda M; Saletu, Bernd; Bonelli, Raphael M

    2010-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with prominent motor and cognitive decline. Previous studies with small sample sizes and methodological limitations have described abnormal electroencephalograms (EEG) in this cohort. The aim of the present study was to investigate objectively and quantitatively the neurophysiological basis of the disease in HD patients as compared to normal controls, utilizing EEG mapping. In 55 HD patients and 55 healthy controls, a 3-min vigilance-controlled EEG (V-EEG) was recorded during midmorning hours. Evaluation of 36 EEG variables was carried out by spectral analysis and visualized by EEG mapping techniques. To elucidate drug interference, the analysis was performed for the total group, unmedicated patients only and between treated and untreated patients. Statistical overall analysis by the omnibus significance test demonstrated significant (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05) EEG differences between HD patients and controls. Subsequent univariate analysis revealed a general decrease in total power and absolute alpha and beta power, an increase in delta/theta power, and a slowing of the centroids of delta/theta, beta and total power. The slowing of the EEG in HD reflects a disturbed brain function in the sense of a vigilance decrement, electrophysiologically characterized by inhibited cortical areas (increased delta/theta power) and a lack of normal routine and excitatory activity (decreased alpha and beta power). The results are similar to those found in other dementing disorders. Medication did not affect the overall interpretation of the quantitative EEG analysis, but certain differences might be due to drug interaction, predominantly with antipsychotics. Spearman rank correlations revealed significant correlations between EEG mapping and cognitive and motor impairment in HD patients.

  12. Cephalometric comparison of obstructive sleep apnea patients and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Ahmet Yalcin; Turkkahraman, Hakan; Yilmaz, H. Huseyin; Yariktas, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to compare the cephalometric characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with those of healthy subjects and to determine possible relationships between cephalometric measurements of OSA patients and control subjects. Methods: Standardized lateral cephalograms of 16 OSA patients and 16 healthy controls were obtained. Airway dimensions and dentofacial parameters were measured using a cephalometric analysis program (Dolphin Imaging Cephalometric and Tracing Software, Chatsworth, CA, USA). All statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS version 17.0.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Descriptive statistics were calculated for all measurements, and the Mann–Whitney U test was used to evaluate intergroup differences. Results: Midface length was significantly shorter and upper lip E-plane length was significantly longer in the OSA group than in the controls (P<.05). SNA, SNB, and mandibular plane angles (GoGn-SN), anterior and posterior facial heights, and posteroanterior face height ratio were similar in both groups. Maxillary length was slightly longer in the OSA group, whereas the mandibular length showed a slight increase in the control group (P<.05). The axial inclination of the lower incisor to its respective plane was normal, whereas the upper incisor was significantly protrusive (P<.05) in the OSA group. Distance between the hyoid and mandible was significantly greater in the OSA group than in the controls, indicating that the hyoid bone was positioned more downward in the OSA group (P<.05). Conclusions: In this study, the patients with OSA demonstrated significant differences in several craniofacial measurements. OSA patients showed reduced midface length and inferiorly placed hyoid bone and tended to have smaller airway dimensions. PMID:23408768

  13. Patient safety in elderly hip fracture patients: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical environment in which health care providers have to work everyday is highly complex; this increases the risk for the occurrence of unintended events. The aim of this randomised controlled trial is to improve patient safety for a vulnerable group of patients that have to go through a complex care chain, namely elderly hip fracture patients. Methods/design A randomised controlled trial that consists of three interventions; these will be implemented in three surgical wards in Dutch hospitals. One surgical ward in another hospital will be the control group. The first intervention is aimed at improving communication between care providers using the SBAR communication tool. The second intervention is directed at stimulating the role of the patient within the care process with a patient safety card. The third intervention consists of a leaflet for patients with information on the most common complications for the period after discharge. The primary outcome measures in this study are the incidence of complications and adverse events, mortality rate within six months after discharge and functional mobility six months after discharge. Secondary outcome measures are length of hospital stay, quality and completeness of information transfer and patient satisfaction with the instruments. Discussion The results will give insight into the nature and scale of complications and adverse events that occur in elderly hip fracture patients. Also, the implementation of three interventions aimed at improving the communication and information transfer provides valuable possibilities for improving patient safety in this increasing patient group. This study combines the use of three interventions, which is an innovative aspect of the study. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1562 PMID:21418630

  14. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia: interactions between nalbuphine and hydromorphone.

    PubMed

    Parker, R K; Holtmann, B; White, P F

    1997-04-01

    Epidural opioid analgesia can offer advantages over intravenous administration, however, opioid-related side effects are common after epidural administration. We studied the effect of adding nalbuphine (NB), an opioid agonist-antagonist, to hydromorphone (HM) for patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in 78 healthy women after elective cesarean delivery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. The control group received preservative-free HM (Dilaudid) alone, 0.075 mg/mL, while the three study groups received HM, 0.075 mg/mL, containing preservative-free NB (Nubain) 0.02, 0.04, or 0.08 mg/mL. Intraoperatively, all patients received epidural bupivacaine 0.5%. Postoperatively, a patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA) device was connected to the epidural catheter and programmed to deliver a 3-mL loading dose of the analgesic solution. Subsequently, patients could self-administer 2 mL bolus doses on demand with a 30-min lockout interval. Patients were encouraged to ambulate approximately 8 h after surgery, and PCEA therapy was discontinued when a clear liquid diet was tolerated. Visual analog scale scores were used to assess pain at 8-h intervals while using PCEA therapy. Although the overall incidences of nausea (19%-35%) and pruritus (32%-62%) were similar in all four groups, the addition of NB decreased the need for bladder catheterization. The highest NB concentration resulted in increased PCA demands during the 32-h study period. In conclusion, the combination of HM 0.075 mg/mL and NB 0.04 mg/mL resulted in lower nausea scores and a decreased incidence of urinary retention compared with HM alone, without increasing the opioid analgesic requirement.

  15. Effects of glycemic control on refraction in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Yan; Luo, Guo-Chun; Guo, Jiang; Liang, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of glycemic control on refraction in diabetic patients. METHODS Twenty newly diagnosed diabetic patients were included in this study. The random blood glucose, HbA1c levels, fasting C-peptide and postprandial 2h C-peptide were measured before treatment. The patients with random blood glucose higher than 12.0mmol/L and HbA1c level higher than 10.0% were selected. Refraction, intraocular pressure, radius of the anterior corneal curvature, depth of the anterior chamber, lens thickness, vitreous length, and axial length were measured on admission and at the end of week 1, 2, 3 and 4 during glycemic control. RESULTS A transient hyperopic change occurred in all the patients receiving glycemic control. The maximum hyperopic change was 1.60D (range 0.50±3.20D). Recovery of the previous refraction occurred between two and four weeks after insulin treatment. There was a positive correlation between the maximum hyperopic changes and the HbA1c levels on admission (r=0.84, P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between the maximum hyperopic changes and the daily rate of blood glucose reduction over the first 7 days of the treatment (r=0.53, P<0.05). During transient hyperopia, no significant changes were observed in the intraocular pressure, radius of the anterior corneal curvature, depth of the anterior chamber, lens thickness, vitreous length and axial length. CONCLUSION Transient hyperopic changes occur after glycemic control in diabetic patients with severe hyperglycemia. The degrees of transient hyperopia are highly dependent on HbA1c levels before treatment and the rate of reduction of the blood glucose level. PMID:22553542

  16. Identifying older diabetic patients at risk of poor glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Pedone, Claudio; Corica, Francesco; Carosella, Luciana; Mazzei, Bruno; Perticone, Francesco; Carbonin, PierUgo

    2002-01-01

    Background Optimal glycemic control prevents the onset of diabetes complications. Identifying diabetic patients at risk of poor glycemic control could help promoting dedicated interventions. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of poor short-term and long-term glycemic control in older diabetic in-patients. Methods A total of 1354 older diabetic in-patients consecutively enrolled in a multicenter study formed the training population (retrospective arm); 264 patients consecutively admitted to a ward of general medicine formed the testing population (prospective arm). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured on admission and one year after the discharge in the testing population. Independent correlates of a discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl in the training population were assessed by logistic regression analysis and a clinical prediction rule was developed. The ability of the prediction rule and that of admission HbA1c to predict discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl and HbA1c > 7% one year after discharge was assessed in the testing population. Results Selected admission variables (diastolic arterial pressure < 80 mmHg, glycemia = 143–218 mg/dl, glycemia > 218 mg/dl, history of insulinic or combined hypoglycemic therapy, Charlson's index > 2) were combined to obtain a score predicting a discharge fasting glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl in the training population. A modified score was obtained by adding 1 if admission HbA1c exceeded 7.8%. The modified score was the best predictor of both discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl (sensitivity = 79%, specificity = 63%) and 1 year HbA1c > 7% (sensitivity = 72%, specificity = 71%) in the testing population. Conclusion A simple clinical prediction rule might help identify older diabetic in-patients at risk of both short and long term poor glycemic control. PMID:12194701

  17. PAN-811 inhibits oxidative stress-induced cell death of human Alzheimer's disease-derived and age-matched olfactory neuroepithelial cells via suppression of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valery M; Dancik, Chantée M; Pan, Weiying; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Lebowitz, Michael S; Ghanbari, Hossein A

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a significant role in neurotoxicity associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased oxidative stress has been shown to be a prominent and early feature of vulnerable neurons in AD. Olfactory neuroepithelial cells are affected at an early stage. Exposure to oxidative stress induces the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn causes cell damage in the form of protein, lipid, and DNA oxidations. Elevated ROS levels are also associated with increased deposition of amyloid-beta and formation of senile plaques, a hallmark of the AD brain. If enhanced ROS exceeds the basal level of cellular protective mechanisms, oxidative damage and cell death will result. Therefore, substances that can reduce oxidative stress are sought as potential drug candidates for treatment or preventative therapy of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PAN-811, also known as 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone or Triapine, is a small lipophilic compound that is currently being investigated in several Phase II clinical trials for cancer therapy due to its inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase activity. Here we show PAN-811 to be effective in preventing or reducing ROS accumulation and the resulting oxidative damages in both AD-derived and age-matched olfactory neuroepithelial cells.

  18. Autobiographical memory specificity in patients with tinnitus versus patients with depression and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Gerhard; Hesser, Hugo; Cima, Rilana F F; Weise, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Several studies show that patients with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder respond with fewer specific autobiographical memories in a cued memory task (i.e. the autobiographical memory test; AMT) compared to healthy controls. One previous study found this phenomenon among tinnitus patients as well (Andersson, Ingerholt, & Jansson, 2003). The aim of this study was to replicate the previous study with an additional control group of depressed patients and memory errors as measured with the AMT as an additional outcome. We included 20 normal hearing tinnitus patients, 20 healthy controls and 20 persons diagnosed with clinical depression. The AMT was administered together with self-report measures of depression, anxiety and tinnitus distress. Both the tinnitus and depression groups differed from the healthy control group in that they reported fewer specific autobiographical memories. There were, however, differences between the tinnitus and depression groups in terms of the errors made on the AMT. The depression group had more overgeneral memories than the normal control group, whereas the tinnitus group did not differ from the control group on this memory error. The tinnitus group had more semantic associations and non-memories than the other two groups, suggesting that executive functioning may play a role for the tinnitus group when completing the AMT. Clinical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

  19. Improved cognition after control of risk factors for multi-infarct dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Judd, B.W.; Tawaklna, T.; Rogers, R.L.; Mortel, K.F.

    1986-10-24

    A cohort of 52 patients (30 men and 22 women) with multi-infarct dementia (MID) has been followed up prospectively for a mean interval of 22.2 months. Clinical course has been documented by serial history taking and interviews and neurological, medical, and psychological examinations, and correlated with measurements of cerebral blood flow. The clinical course and cognitive performance have been compared with those of age-matched normal volunteers and patients with Alzheimer's disease. Patients with MID were subdivided into hypertensive and normotensive groups, and also into those displaying stabilized or improved cognition and those whose condition deteriorated. Among hypertensive patients with MID, improved cognition and clinical course correlated with control of systolic blood pressure within upper limits of normalf (135 to 150 mm Hg), but if systolic blood pressure was reduced below this level, patients with MID deteriorated. Among normotensive patients with MID, improved cognition was associated with cessation of smoking cigarettes.

  20. Sham surgery trial controls: perspectives of patients and their relatives.

    PubMed

    Swift, Teresa L

    2012-07-01

    This study reports on qualitative research conducted in the UK with people with Parkinson's Disease and their relatives on the subject of "sham surgery." It explores attitudes toward sham surgery and reasoning about hypothetical participation in a sham-controlled trial. Results showed that attitudes toward sham surgery may not necessarily predict trial participation behavior. A small majority of interviewees deemed sham surgery ethically acceptable with certain provisos, but hypothetical participation was driven primarily by disease severity and a lack of standard treatment options, with a preference for receiving the real surgery over sham. Ethical implications for patient equipoise and the autonomy of patients' research participation decisions are discussed.

  1. Variables related to behavioral and emotional problems and gender typed behaviors in female patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Oner, Ozgur; Aycan, Zehra; Tiryaki, Tugrul; Soy, Derya; Cetinkaya, Ergun; Kibar, Esin

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the effects of type of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), treatment, endocrinological, surgical, and socio-demographic factors as well as patients' body perception on the gender-typed play and behavioral and emotional problems in female children with CAH. The sample included 28 females with CAH (mean age: 12.6 years). We compared patients with CAH to 28 age-matched patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 28 healthy controls. Patients with CAH had significantly higher externalization and total problems scores and were less interested in typically female behaviors. The behavioral and emotional problems in patients with CAH were associated with patient satisfaction with the appearance of their genitalia, the surgeons' assessment of the success of the surgical procedures, and mean testosterone level. Our results showed the severity of the behavioral and emotional problems was associated with severity of androgenization, patients' perception of their genitalia and the surgical outcome.

  2. Overview of current development in patient-controlled analgesia.

    PubMed

    Lindley, C

    1994-09-01

    Over the past two decades, numerous trials have assessed the safety and efficacy of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Advantages over conventional parenteral narcotics reported from these trials include equivalent to superior pain relief, superior patient satisfaction, decreased sedation and anxiety, faster return to normal functional status, and reduction in nursing time and hospitalization. The majority of these trials have been conducted in the postoperative patient population. In the mid to late 1980s, interest arose in applying PCA technology to the management of cancer pain. Factors that served as an impetus for the use of PCA in cancer pain included favorable reports from the postoperative setting and the often-cited statistics regarding the magnitude of the cancer pain problem. Advances in PCA technology coupled with advances in vascular access technology that allow the placement of long-term ports and catheters to facilitate intravenous, epidural, or intrathecal administration of opioid analgesics have made the applicability of PCA in ambulatory cancer patients an attractive option. The greatest breakthrough in PCA technology came with the introduction of devices making it possible to choose between intermittent (demand bolus) and continuous administration (continuous infusion) or both intermittent and continuous modes. A comparison of these types of PCA devices is described. The limitations of the literature involving PCA therapy in cancer patients make it difficult to identify optimal patient selection criteria, PCA administration schedules, drug selection and dosing, and optimal route of administration. The current status and pertinent issues related to these topics are addressed.

  3. Central Systolic Hypertension in Patients with Well-Controlled Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Potočárová, Mária; Murín, Ján; Kozlíková, Katarína; Luha, Ján; Čaprnda, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background. Central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) has prognostic significance and simplified devices for its estimation have been introduced recently. The aim of this study was to assess the achievement of the target CSBP in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects and Methods. One hundred patients with well-controlled hypertension were analysed. For CSBP estimation, we used the Arteriograph (TensioMed Ltd.), which uses one cuff for all measurements, the “single-point measurement” approach. Results. We found that 62% of patients had CSBP ≥ 130 mmHg, the suggested cut-off value for hypertension. When sex-specific classification was employed (CSBP ≥ 137 mmHg for female and CSBP ≥ 133 mmHg for male), only 13% of patients (mainly women) remained in the hypertensive range. We also found that 55% of patients had a CSBP higher than brachial pressure. Multiple analyses showed that CSBP was significantly associated with sex, height, and return time. Conclusions. A high proportion of treated hypertensive patients had CSBP levels that exceeded their brachial BP. CSBP positively correlated with lower height and shorter return time of the reflected pressure wave and was significantly higher in females compared to males. These findings suggest that, for CSBP classification, it is important to take height and sex-specific differences into account. PMID:28127560

  4. Alterations in cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Liang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the protein, cholesterol, and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and identify potential blood biomarkers of the disease. A total of 31 Chinese patients with AD and 31 aged-matched control subjects were selected. Lipid rafts were isolated from platelets using Optiprep gradient centrifugation. The protein content of lipid rafts was evaluated using Micro BCA assay, the cholesterol content using molecular probes, ganglioside GM1 content using colorimetry and dot-blotting analysis. The results showed that the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from platelets was significantly higher in patients with AD than aged-matched control subjects, whereas the protein content of lipid rafts did not show any differences between the 2 groups. These results indicate that the increases in the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from the platelets of patients with AD might serve as a biochemical adjunct to the clinical diagnosis of AD.

  5. Assesment of Heart Rate Variability As A Measure of Cardiac Autonomic Status in Psychiatric Patients Exposed to Chemical Irritants

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Supriya; Rastogi, Rajesh; Gupta, Manushree

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose However, little is known about the cardiac autonomic activity due to chemicals in psychiatric patients. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the effect of chemical irritants on the ANS of the person and measure that in the form of Heart Rate Variability (HRV), a noninvasive method to estimate the cardiac autonomic activity. The autonomic nervous system can significantly compromised by use of chemical irritants. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional hospital based study was conducted in which 33 patients (mean age: 29.94 years) of depression/anxiety were compared with 37 age matched controls (mean age: 28.10). The patients who were diagnosed as either depressed or anxious by the psychiatry were included in the study group by random sampling. Out of these 8 patients gave positive history of odour use. Thirty seven age matched healthy persons were taken as controls. Grading of patients was done according to DSMV-IV criteria and short- term HRV was recorded. Five minute HRV recording was done and time domain and frequency domain indices of HRV were assessed using RMS Polyearite D. The result in case and control groups was compared. Results We have reported a poor HRV compared to control group in patients of depression/anxiety as reflected by NN50 values (p< 0.05). Although not significant the trend shows a better HRV control in almost all the time domain and frequency domain parameters in controls compared to cases. Regarding the history of use of chemical irritants the trend showed a poor HRV control in these cases compared to the patients who did not give any such history. Conclusion Our results suggest that impaired cardiac autonomic nerve function characterized by sympathetic over activity may occur in depression/phobic patients. The study also proves a poor HRV in psychiatric subjects with history of use of odoriferous substances. PMID:26266195

  6. EMG and MMG activities of agonist and antagonist muscles in Parkinson's disease patients during absolute submaximal load holding.

    PubMed

    Marusiak, Jaroslaw; Jaskólska, Anna; Kisiel-Sajewicz, Katarzyna; Yue, Guang H; Jaskólski, Artur

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the study was (1) to assess changes in electromyographical (EMG) and mechanomyographical (MMG) signals of the biceps and triceps brachii muscles during absolute submaximal load holding in Parkinson's disease patients tested during their medication "ON-phase" and in age-matched controls, and (2) to check whether mechanomyography can be useful in evaluation of neuromuscular system activity in Parkinson's disease patients. The data analysis was performed on nine females with Parkinson's disease and six healthy, age-matched females. The EMG and MMG signals were recorded from the short head of the biceps brachii (BB) and the lateral head of the triceps brachii (TB) muscles. It was concluded that compared to the controls, the Parkinson's disease patients exhibited higher amplitude in the biceps brachii muscle and lower median frequency of the MMG signal in the both tested muscles. However, no differences in the EMG amplitude and an increase of the EMG median frequency in the triceps brachii muscle of the Parkinson's disease group were observed. The MMG was not affected by physiological postural tremor and can depict differences between parkinsonians and controls, which may suggest that it is valuable tool for neuromuscular assessment for this condition.

  7. Gait in SWEDDs patients: comparison with Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Mian, Omar S; Schneider, Susanne A; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Bhatia, Kailash P; Day, Brian L

    2011-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease on clinical grounds who subsequently turn out to have normal dopamine transporter imaging have been referred to as SWEDDs (scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficits). Despite having clinical features similar to those of Parkinson's disease, these patients seem to have different pathophysiology, prognosis, and treatment requirements. In this study we determined the similarities and differences in the gaits of SWEDDs and Parkinson's disease patients to investigate whether walking patterns can distinguish these entities. We used 3-D motion capture to analyze the gaits of 11 SWEDDs patients (who had unilateral or asymmetric upper limb tremor with a rest component), 12 tremor-dominant Parkinson's disease patients, and 13 healthy control participants. In common with Parkinson's disease patients, SWEDDs patients had a slow gait mainly because of a small stride length, as well as a reduced arm swing. However, several abnormal features of posture and gait in Parkinson's disease were normal in SWEDDs. Thus, SWEDDs patients had normal trunk and elbow posture, normal stride length variability, and normal bilateral step-phase coordination, all of which were abnormal in Parkinson's disease patients. We also searched for signs of ataxic movements during normal and tandem walking, but found no evidence that ataxic gait was a general feature in SWEDDs. These findings could aid the clinician in identification of potential tremulous SWEDDs cases. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Event related potentials recorded in patients with locked-in syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, M.; Thomas, A.; Paci, C.; Scesi, M.; Tombari, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the possibility of recording "cognitive" event related potentials (ERPs) in locked-in patients and therefore to determine whether ERPs can have a role in differential diagnosis of coma.
METHODS—ERPs to classic auditory or visual "odd ball paradigms" were recorded three to four days, seven to eight days, and 30 to 60days after admission to the intensive care unit, in four patients affected by basilar artery thrombembolism resulting in locked-in syndrome. Two patients (one 32 year old man, one 31 year old woman) could move the eyes laterally and vertically spontaneously and on command. One patient (a 39 year old man) had a "one and half syndrome", one patient (a 40 year old woman) could only elevate the left eyelid and eye. Results were compared with data from 30 age matched controls. In the last recording session a letter recognition paradigm was applied, in which ERPs were produced by the identification of letters forming a word. Results were compared with five age matched controls. Brainstem lesions extending to the pontomesencephalic junction were found on MRI and CT.
RESULTS—ERPs to the oddball paradigms were recorded in three patients in the first recording session, in all patients in the second recording session. Latency, amplitude, and topographic distribution of ERP components were inside normal limits. With the letter recognition paradigm the patients could emit a P3 component to correspond with target letters, with the same margin of error as controls.
CONCLUSION—It is possible to record ERPs in patients with locked-in syndrome shortly after the acute ischaemic lesion, and therefore to assess objectively cognitive activities. Furthermore the letter recognition paradigm could be implemented to facilitate linguistic communication with patients with locked-in syndrome.

 PMID:9416812

  9. Relationship between chest expansion and respiratory muscle strength in patients with primary fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Ozgocmen, S; Cimen, O B; Ardicoglu, O

    2002-02-01

    In this paper the assessment of the relationship between chest expansion with maximal inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory pressures (MEP) in primary fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome is discussed. Chest expansion (CE) measurements, spirometric values, and MIP and MEP values in 30 female patients with primary FM are compared with 29 healthy age-matched female controls. Patients with FM had lower CE, MEP and MIP values than controls. CE correlated significantly with MIP and MEP values. There was no significant difference between groups in spirometric values. Our results indicate that patients with FM have impaired respiratory muscle strength, and measurement of CE may be a useful clinical parameter. Despite its limitations CE may reflect respiratory muscle strength. It is worth following up these data in a wider and controlled series, with ancillary tests in addition to the MIP and MEP.

  10. Knowledge management for chronic patient control and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedreira, Nieves; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Dorado, Julián; Pazos, Alejandro; Pereira, Javier

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge Management (KM) can be seen as the process of capturing, developing, sharing, and effectively using organizational knowledge. In this context, the work presented here proposes a KM System to be used in the scope of chronic patient control and monitoring for distributed research projects. It was designed in order to enable communication between patient and doctors, as well as to be usedbythe researchers involved in the project for its management. The proposed model integrates all the information concerning every patient and project management tasks in the Institutional Memory of a KMSystem and uses an ontology to maintain the information and its categorization independently. Furthermore, taking the philosophy of intelligent agents, the system will interact with the user to show him the information according to his preferences and access rights. Finally, three different scenarios of application are described.

  11. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p < 0.001), 24 (p = 0.004), 48 (p = 0.015), 72 (p = 0.0031), and 96 hours (p < 0.001), patients in the PCEA treatment group displayed significantly increased mobilization capacity compared with those of the PIA group. Time until normal accomplishment of all mobilization maneuvers was reduced in the PCEA group compared with that in the PIA group (p = 0.04). No differences in complication rates were observed between the 2 groups (p = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS PCEA may reduce postoperative pain and lead to earlier achievement of functional capacity at a low

  12. A Comparison of the Effect of Epidural Patient-Controlled Analgesia with Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia on Pain Control after Posterior Lumbar Instrumented Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Cheong, Seong-Mee; Kim, Sumi; Kooh, Mirang

    2011-01-01

    Objective Retrospective analysis to compare the effect and complication of epidural patient-controlled analgesia (epidural PCA) with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) for the treatment of the post-operative pain after posterior lumbar instrumented fusion. Methods Sixty patients who underwent posterior lumbar instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar disease at our institution from September 2007 to January 2008 were enrolled in this study. Out of sixty patients, thirty patients received IV PCA group and thirty patients received epidural PCA group. The pain scale was measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Results There were no significant difference between IV PCA group and epidural PCA group on the PCA related complications (p=0.7168). Ten patients in IV PCA group and six patients in epidural PCA group showed PCA related complications. Also, there were no significant differences in reduction of VAS score between two groups on postoperative 2 hours (p=0.9618) and 6 hours (p=0.0744). However, postoperative 12 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours showed the significant differences as mean of reduction of VAS score (p=0.0069, 0.0165, 0.0058 respectively). Conclusion The epidural PCA is more effective method to control the post-operative pain than IV PCA after 12 hours of spinal fusion operation. However, during the first twelve hours after operation, there were no differences between IV PCA and epidural PCA. PMID:22102950

  13. Medication reconciliation at patient admission: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Antonio E.; Lombardi, Natália F.; Andrzejevski, Vânia S.; Frandoloso, Gibran; Correr, Cassyano J.; Carvalho, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To measure length of hospital stay (LHS) in patients receiving medication reconciliation. Secondary characteristics included analysis of number of preadmission medications, medications prescribed at admission, number of discrepancies, and pharmacists interventions done and accepted by the attending physician. Methods: A 6 month, randomized, controlled trial conducted at a public teaching hospital in southern Brazil. Patients admitted to general wards were randomized to receive usual care or medication reconciliation, performed within the first 72 hours of hospital admission. Results: The randomization process assigned 68 patients to UC and 65 to MR. LHS was 10±15 days in usual care and 9±16 days in medication reconciliation (p=0.620). The total number of discrepancies was 327 in the medication reconciliation group, comprising 52.6% of unintentional discrepancies. Physicians accepted approximately 75.0% of the interventions. Conclusion: These results highlight weakness at patient transition care levels in a public teaching hospital. LHS, the primary outcome, should be further investigated in larger studies. Medication reconciliation was well accepted by physicians and it is a useful tool to find and correct discrepancies, minimizing the risk of adverse drug events and improving patient safety. PMID:27011775

  14. Meaninglessness in terminally ill cancer patients: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Murata, Hisayuki; Kishi, Emi; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2009-04-01

    Although recent empirical studies reveal that fostering patients' perception of meaning in their lives is an essential task for palliative care clinicians, few studies have reported the effects of training programs for nurses specifically aimed at improving these skills. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial was to determine the effects of an educational workshop focusing on patients' feelings of meaninglessness on nurses' confidence, self-reported practice, and attitudes toward caring for such patients, in addition to burnout and meaning of life. The study was designed as a single-institution, randomized controlled trial using a waiting list control. The intervention consisted of eight 180-minute training sessions over four months, including lectures and exercises using structured assessment. A total of 41 nurses were randomly allocated to three groups, which were separately trained, and all were evaluated four times at three-month intervals (before intervention, between each intervention, and after the last intervention). Assessments included validated Confidence and Self-Reported Practice scales, the Attitudes Toward Caring for Patients Feeling Meaningless Scale (including willingness to help, positive appraisal, and helplessness items), the Maslach Burnout Scale, job satisfaction, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual (FACIT-Sp). One participant withdrew from the study before the baseline evaluation, and the remaining 40 nurses completed the study. The nurses were all female and had a mean age of 31+/-6.4, and mean clinical experience of 8.9+/-5.5 years. There were no significant differences in background among the groups. The intervention effects were statistically significant on the Confidence Scale, the Self-Reported Practice Scale, and the willingness to help, positive appraisal, and helplessness subscales, in addition to the overall levels of burnout, emotional exhaustion, personal accomplishment, job satisfaction

  15. [Analysis of the blood and serum biochemistry findings in patients demonstrating convulsion with mild gastroenteritis].

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Yuki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuko; Nonoyama, Shigeaki

    2011-07-01

    We analyzed the blood cell count and serum biochemistry findings in patients demonstrating convulsion with mild gastroenteritis (CwG). As a control group, age matched patients presenting with only gastroenteritis during the same period were compared. The results showed significant differences between the two groups regarding such factors as the sex ratio, serum uric acid, and serum chloride levels. All CwG patients showed hyperuricemia (10.0 +/- 2.2 mg/dL, mean +/- SD). The patients in both groups showed similar levels of metabolic acidosis. The patients with CwG therefore have both hyperuricemia and metabolic acidosis, which may contribute to the pathogenic mechanism of CwG.

  16. Dynamic information flow analysis in Vascular Dementia patients during the performance of a visual oddball task.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Xu, Jin; Lou, Wutao; Zhao, Songzhen

    2014-09-19

    This study investigated the information flow in patients with Vascular Dementia (VaD). Twelve VaD patients and twelve age-matched controls participated in the study. EEG signal was recorded when subjects were performing a visual oddball task. Information flow was analyzed between 9 electrodes in frontal, central, and parietal lobes using short-window Directed Transfer Function (sDTF). VaD patients presented a significant decline in the information flow from parietal to frontal and central lobes, compared with the healthy elderly. This decline mainly occurred in delta, theta, and lower alpha bands, from about 200ms to 300ms after target stimulus onset. The findings indicated an impaired parietal-to-frontal and parietal-to-central connectivity in VaD patients, which may be one reason for the cognitive deficits in VaD patients.

  17. Control-relevant models for glucose control using a priori patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, Klaske; Dassau, Eyal; Zisser, Howard C; Seborg, Dale E; Doyle, Francis J

    2012-07-01

    One of the difficulties in the development of a reliable artificial pancreas for people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the lack of accurate models of an individual's response to insulin. Most control algorithms proposed to control the glucose level in subjects with T1DM are model-based. Avoiding postprandial hypoglycemia ( 60 mg/dl) while minimizing prandial hyperglycemia ( > 180 mg/dl) has shown to be difficult in a closed-loop setting due to the patient-model mismatch. In this paper, control-relevant models are developed for T1DM, as opposed to models that minimize a prediction error. The parameters of these models are chosen conservatively to minimize the likelihood of hypoglycemia events. To limit the conservatism due to large intersubject variability, the models are personalized using a priori patient characteristics. The models are implemented in a zone model predictive control algorithm. The robustness of these controllers is evaluated in silico, where hypoglycemia is completely avoided even after large meal disturbances. The proposed control approach is simple and the controller can be set up by a physician without the need for control expertise.

  18. Optimal control of ICU patient discharge: from theory to implementation.

    PubMed

    Mallor, Fermín; Azcárate, Cristina; Barado, Julio

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the management of scarce health care resources. We consider a control problem in which the objective is to minimize the rate of patient rejection due to service saturation. The scope of decisions is limited, in terms both of the amount of resources to be used, which are supposed to be fixed, and of the patient arrival pattern, which is assumed to be uncontrollable. This means that the only potential areas of control are speed or completeness of service. By means of queuing theory and optimization techniques, we provide a theoretical solution expressed in terms of service rates. In order to make this theoretical analysis useful for the effective control of the healthcare system, however, further steps in the analysis of the solution are required: physicians need flexible and medically-meaningful operative rules for shortening patient length of service to the degree needed to give the service rates dictated by the theoretical analysis. The main contribution of this paper is to discuss how the theoretical solutions can be transformed into effective management rules to guide doctors' decisions. The study examines three types of rules based on intuitive interpretations of the theoretical solution. Rules are evaluated through implementation in a simulation model. We compare the service rates provided by the different policies with those dictated by the theoretical solution. Probabilistic analysis is also included to support rule validity. An Intensive Care Unit is used to illustrate this control problem. The study focuses on the Markovian case before moving on to consider more realistic LoS distributions (Weibull, Lognormal and Phase-type distribution).

  19. Informing cancer patient in relation to his type of personality: the controlling-orderly (obsessive) patient.

    PubMed

    Kallergis, G

    2010-01-01

    The questions "Do you tell the diagnosis or not? How much information do you reveal? Who do you inform about the diagnosis and/or what do you tell" are very frequent during scientific discussions. Must the patients know or do they also have the right not to know? Is it possible to determine who should be told what, when and how? Is it possible individualizing the informing of a cancer patient according to his character or type of personality? The aim of this paper was to describe the Controlling- Orderly (C-O) character, so any therapist can build up an information strategy to cancer patients. This study took place within the framework of Consulting- Liaison (C-L) psychiatry and included: 1) Training groups in which doctors and nurses participated. 2) The section of C-L Psychiatry of the Psychiatry Department. 3) The training activity in the framework of C-L Psychiatry. 4) The annual seminars of psychooncology for health professionals. How a doctor could use the characteristics of a C-O patient for an empathetic approach and correctly inform him. And how to approach his denial and family in order to tailor the information strategy. Understanding the personality type of C-O patient, his denial mechanisms and the dynamics within his family maximizes the therapist's empathetic approach towards the cancer patient. The therapist can respond at "what, when and how" about to break bad news. A therapist must take into account the main C-O patient characteristics (control and order), as well as the attributes or cognitions: the tendency to use reason, the mechanism of rationalization by which he exercises mental control that leads to doubt. The denial degree is small to minimal, while the degree of information is large to very large.

  20. The willingness of patients to pay for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungsun; Lee, Duck-Hyoung; Lee, Jeongwoo; Han, Young Jin; Choe, Huhn

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) has been increasing because it has advantages such as improved pain relief, greater patient satisfaction, and fewer postoperative complications. However, current research has not considered the patients' thoughts about IV-PCA's cost-effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to investigate the willingness to pay (WTP) for IV-PCA and the relationship between patients' characteristics and WTP in Korea. Methods We enrolled 400 adult patients who were scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was requested to indicate a series of predefined amounts of money (Korean won; 30,000/50,000/100,000/150,000/200,000/300,000/500,000). We also recorded patient characteristics, such as age, sex, type of surgery, IV-PCA history, education level, the person responsible for medical expenses, type of insurance, net annual income, and residential area. Three days after surgery, we asked about the degree of satisfaction and the WTP for IV-PCA. Results For IV-PCA, the median WTP was 100,000 won (25-75%; 50,000-200,000 won: US$1 = W1078.04; July 19, 2011) before surgery. All patients' characteristics were not related to preoperative WTP for IV-PCA, whereas the increase in WTP after surgery showed a tendency correlated to higher IV-PCA satisfaction. Conclusions The median WTP was 100,000 won. The satisfaction of IV-PCA increased patients' WTP after surgery, but the WTP may be independent of patient characteristics in Korea. PMID:22778891

  1. Differences in postoperative opioid consumption in patients prescribed patient-controlled analgesia versus intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Everett, Bronwyn; Salamonson, Yenna

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in opioid consumption in patients prescribed patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus intramuscular injection (IMI) in the early postoperative period after open abdominal surgery. A retrospective audit of 115 patients elicited demographic and clinical data. No significant differences were found between the demographic variables of the PCA and IMI groups. There was a significant difference in the mean opioid dose used during the first 3 postoperative days (p < .01). Mean opioid consumption was 136.89 mg for the PCA group and 50.79 mg for the IMI group. Although there was a reduction in the amount of opioid consumed over the first 3 postoperative days, the PCA group consistently consumed more opioid analgesia compared with the IMI group. Furthermore, there was a disproportionate reduction in opioid consumption between the two groups from Day 1 (r = .34; p < .01) to Day 3 (r = .14; p = .14). This study shows that the amount of analgesia consumed during the postoperative period by patients who had abdominal surgery varied markedly depending on the mode of analgesia (PCA or IMI). The difference in analgesic consumption was also found to increase throughout the 3-day postoperative period. This divergence in the amount of opioid consumption between patients who were prescribed PCA and patients who were prescribed IM analgesia heightens the need for vigilance in assessment and management of pain during the early postoperative period, particularly in patients prescribed IM analgesia on an "as-needed" basis.

  2. Benefit of Blood Pressure Control in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kintscher, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The coexistence of arterial hypertension and diabetes represents a devastating partnership for cardiovascular health. Thus, blood pressure and blood glucose control are essential therapeutic goals to reduce cardiovascular risk and other diabetes-related endpoints in these patients. The major benefit of blood pressure lowering in diabetes comes from a marked reduction of cardiovascular and renal endpoints. New target blood pressure values to achieve maximum cardiovascular and renal protection will be discussed. In addition to the reduction of macrovascular endpoints, blood pressure lowering therapy in diabetic patients has also been discussed to improve microvascular diseases during diabetes, in particular microalbuminuria or diabetic retinopathy. However, current clinical trial evidence is less robust than for macrovascular disease. Clinical studies showed controversial results, and will be discussed. Finally, new data from the ADVANCE-ON study about the long-term, sustained benefit of blood pressure lowering in hypertensive, diabetic patients has been recently published, and will be evaluated in the context of previous evidence. In summary, the present article will discuss selected new topics in the field of hypertension and diabetes focusing on the benefits achieved by blood pressure lowering in these patients.

  3. Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism in Tuberculosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naserpour Farivar, Taghi; Sharifi Moud, Batool; Sargazi, Mansur; Moeenrezakhanlou, Alireza

    In this study, we aimed to determine the significance of association between Tuberculosis and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. The apolipoprotein E genotypes were assayed in 250 tuberculosis patients by polymerase chain reaction followed by enzymatic digestion with Hha I. The results were compared with the results of the same experiments on 250 sex and age matched control peoples. Present results showed that in studied populations, prevalence of E4 genotype was lower in controls than in patients (8 v. 13.2%; OR = 1.75, p<0.05) and prevalence of E3 genotype was high in controls than in patients (86 v.51%; OR = 0.17, p<0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between patients and controls with respect to ɛ2 allele frequencies, while ɛ2 allele frequency was found to be much less prevalent in controls (6%) than in patients (35.8%; OR = 8.72, p<0.05). Also, our study revealed that there is an association between apolipoprotein E genotypes and amplitude to tuberculosis in studied populations. However, large population-based studies are needed to understand the exact role played by the locus in causing the condition.

  4. Circulating levels of vitamin K1, menaquinone-4, and menaquinone-7 in healthy elderly Japanese women and patients with vertebral fractures and patients with hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Kawana, K; Takahashi, M; Hoshino, H; Kushida, K

    2001-08-01

    Recently, vitamin K has become increasingly of interest in the bone metabolism field because of its role as a cofactor in the carboxylation of osteocalcin. Although the role of osteocalcin is not clear, noncarboxylated osteocalcin is one risk factor in hip fractures. It has been reported that the circulating levels of vitamin K1 in osteoporotic patients were significantly lower than those of age-matched control subjects. In this study, we measured circulating levels of vitamin K1, menaquinone-4 (MK-4) and menaquinone-7 (MK-7) in 23 normal healthy women aged 52-93 years (mean +/- SD: 80.1 +/- 3.5), 13 female patients with vertebral fractures aged 66-93 years (80.3 +/- 7.8) and 38 female patients with hip fractures aged 76-87 years (79.8 +/- 9.2), (all Japanese), in order to make sure whether these vitamin K levels were different in these three groups. Serum circulating levels of MK-4 was undetectable in most subjects (only one out of 74). Appreciable numbers from these three groups had undetectable levels of MK-7 (52% of the control group, 23% of the vertebral fracture group and 24% of the hip fracture group). Eight subjects from the normal control group (35%) and five patients from the vertebral group (38%) had undetectable levels of vitamin K1. We did not find a significant difference in the measurable levels of vitamin K1, MK-4 and MK-7 in patients with vertebral fractures or patients with hip fractures compared to age-matched normal controls. Undetectable levels of measured vitamin K1, MK-4 and MK-7 in most of subjects may significantly affect the results.

  5. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Saveland, Christine; Hawker, Leisha; Miedema, Baukje; MacDougall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine family physicians’ career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse by controlled substance prescription seekers. Design A 4-page cross-sectional survey. Setting A family medicine continuing medical education event in Halifax, NS. Participants The survey was distributed to 316 family physicians attending the continuing medical education event. Main outcome measures Career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse related to the act of prescribing controlled substances. Results Fifty-six percent (n = 178) of the 316 surveys were returned completed. Half the study participants were men (49%). Most study participants were in private practice and lived in Nova Scotia, and approximately half (51%) practised in urban settings. On average, the study participants had 20 years of practice experience. The career prevalence of abusive encounters related to controlled substance prescribing was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Overall, 95% of study participants reported having experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse; 48% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse; and 17% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse during their careers. Further, 30% reported having been abused in the past month; among those, the average number of abusive encounters was 3. Most (82%) of the abusers were male with a history of addiction (85%) and mental illness (39%). Opioids were the most frequently sought controlled substance. Conclusion Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances is substantial. Family physicians who prescribe controlled substances are at risk of being subjected to minor, major, or even severe abuse. Opioids were the most often sought controlled substance. A national discussion to deal with this issue is needed. PMID:24522691

  6. Immune dysfunction in Rett syndrome patients revealed by high levels of serum anti-N(Glc) IgM antibody fraction.

    PubMed

    Papini, Anna Maria; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Guerranti, Roberto; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Rovero, Paolo; De Felice, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology.

  7. Immune Dysfunction in Rett Syndrome Patients Revealed by High Levels of Serum Anti-N(Glc) IgM Antibody Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Papini, Anna Maria; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Rossi, Giada; Tiberi, Caterina; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Pandey, Shashank; Lavielle, Solange; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting exclusively (99%) female infants, is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and, more rarely, cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) and forkhead box protein G1 (FOXG1). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the function of the immune system by measuring serum immunoglobulins (IgG and IgM) in RTT patients (n = 53) and, by comparison, in age-matched children affected by non-RTT pervasive developmental disorders (non-RTT PDD) (n = 82) and healthy age-matched controls (n = 29). To determine immunoglobulins we used both a conventional agglutination assay and a novel ELISA based on antibody recognition by a surrogate antigen probe, CSF114(Glc), a synthetic N-glucosylated peptide. Both assays provided evidence for an increase in IgM titer, but not in IgG, in RTT patients relative to both healthy controls and non-RTT PDD patients. The significant difference in IgM titers between RTT patients and healthy subjects in the CSF114(Glc) assay (P = 0.001) suggests that this procedure specifically detects a fraction of IgM antibodies likely to be relevant for the RTT disease. These findings offer a new insight into the mechanism underlying the Rett disease as they unveil the possible involvement of the immune system in this pathology. PMID:25389532

  8. Elastin cross-linking in the skin from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cross-links unique to elastin, desmosine and isodesmosine were measured and compared in skin tissue (left upper arm) from 10 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and from seven age-matched controls. The contents of desmosine and isodesmosine were significantly decreased (p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively) in patients with ALS compared with those of controls, and were negatively and significantly associated with duration of illness in ALS patients (r = -0.77, p < 0.01 and r = -0.65, p < 0.05, respectively). The decline in skin desmosine and isodesmosine is more rapid in ALS than in normal ageing. Thus cross-linking of skin elastin is affected in ALS.

  9. Nitric Oxide Dysregulation in Platelets from Patients with Advanced Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Vittorio; Damato, Antonio; Amico, Enrico; Formisano, Luigi; Vecchione, Carmine; Squitieri, Ferdinando

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biologically active inorganic molecule involved in the regulation of many physiological processes, such as control of blood flow, platelet adhesion, endocrine function, neurotransmission and neuromodulation. In the present study, for the first time, we investigated the modulation of NO signaling in platelets of HD patients. We recruited 55 patients with manifest HD and 28 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Our data demonstrated that NO-mediated vasorelaxation, when evoked by supernatant from insulin-stimulated HD platelets, gradually worsens along disease course. The defective vasorelaxation seems to stem from a faulty release of NO from platelets of HD patients and, it is associated with impairment of eNOS phosphorylation (Ser1177) and activity. This study provides important insights about NO metabolism in HD and raises the hypothesis that the decrease of NO in platelets of HD individuals could be a good tool for monitoring advanced stages of the disease. PMID:24587005

  10. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity), mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost effectiveness of remifentanil as

  11. Achieving Symptom Control in Patients with Moderate Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Nargues A.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2012-01-01

    Disease severity in asthma can be classified as mild, moderate or severe based upon the frequency of symptoms or the severity of airflow obstruction. This review will focus on the treatment of youths greater than 12 years of age and adults with moderate persistent asthma. Moderate asthmatics may have daily symptoms that cause some limitation with normal daily activities and require use of a rescue inhaled short-acting beta2-agonist inhaler or experience nocturnal awakenings secondary to asthma that occur more than once per week. Furthermore, spirometry may reveal airflow obstruction with a reduction in FEV1 to between 60% and 80% of predicted. Although inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the primary controller medication used to modify symptoms in moderate asthmatics, additional controller medications, such as inhaled long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA), leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) or theophylline, are often needed to obtain optimal disease control. While the addition of an inhaled LABA to an ICS is very effective at improving disease control in moderate asthma, concerns have arisen over the safety of LABAs, in particular the risk of asthma-related death. Therefore, consideration may be given to initially adding a LTRA, rather than a LABA, to ICS when asthma symptoms are not adequately controlled by ICS alone. Furthermore, individualization of medication regimens, treatment of co-morbid conditions, and patient education are crucial to optimizing compliance with therapy, improving disease control, and reducing the risk of exacerbations. Lastly, the development of new asthma treatments, perhaps based upon personalized medicine, may revolutionize the future treatment of moderate asthma. PMID:22259262

  12. Vibrational spectroscopic analysis of peripheral blood plasma of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Pedro; Molina, Marina; López-Tobar, Eduardo; Toledano, Adolfo

    2015-10-01

    Using Raman and infrared spectroscopy, we monitored spectral changes occurring in the blood plasma of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in relation to healthy controls. The protein secondary structure as reflected by amide I band involves β-sheet enrichment, which may be attributable to Aβ peptide formation and to increasing proportion of the globulins that are β-sheet rich. Likewise, the behavior of the infrared 1200-1000-cm(-1) region and the Raman 980-910- and 450-400-cm(-1) regions can be explained in terms of the said plasma composition change. Further, the 744-cm(-1) Raman band from healthy control plasma shows frequency upshifting in the course of AD, which may be generated by the platelets collected in blood plasma. Linear discrimination analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis have been used to distinguish between patients with AD and age-matched healthy controls with a diagnostic accuracy of about 94%.

  13. Transforming care at the bedside: patient-controlled liberalized diet.

    PubMed

    Scott-Smith, Joyce L; Greenhouse, Pamela K

    2007-03-01

    A 2003 partnership between the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation created an initiative to redesign medical-surgical inpatient care - Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB). TCAB is intended to transform the elements that affect care on medical/surgical units by rapidly creating, testing, and measuring new ideas. TCAB began as a pilot with three hospitals nationwide, including the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Shadyside in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. UPMC Shadyside initiated its TCAB efforts with an interdisciplinary initiative, involving registered nurses (RNs), nursing assistants, registered dietitians (RDs), and medical doctors (MDs), to transform nutritional services for medical-surgical inpatients. The Patient Controlled Liberalized Diet Program, piloted in late 2003 and rolled-out house-wide in August, 2004, puts the patient in control. The goal is to improve nutritional status and satisfaction among inpatients by empowering them to make menu selections and providing individualized nutrition education. Positive quantitative and qualitative outcomes have resulted, leading to plans for system-wide (19-hospital) spread and further programmatic evolution.

  14. Blood pressure control in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Grossman, Ehud

    2017-01-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and essential hypertension are common conditions that are frequently present together. Both are considered risk factors for cardiovascular disease and microvascular complications and therefore treatment of both conditions is essential. Many papers were published on blood pressure (BP) targets in diabetic patients, including several works published in the last 2 years. As a result, guidelines differ in their recommendations on BP targets in diabetic patients. The method by which to control hypertension, whether pharmacological or non-pharmacological, is also a matter of debate and has been extensively studied in the literature. In recent years, new medications were introduced for the treatment of DM, some of which also affect BP and the clinician treating hypertensive and diabetic patients should be familiar with these medications and their effect on BP. In this manuscript, we discuss the evidence supporting different BP targets in diabetics and review the various guidelines on this topic. In addition, we discuss the various options available for the treatment of hypertension in diabetics and the recommendations for a specific treatment over the other. Finally we briefly discuss the new diabetic drug classes and their influence on BP.

  15. Myopathological features in skeletal muscle of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Gosker, H R; Kubat, B; Schaart, G; van der Vusse, G J; Wouters, E F M; Schols, A M W J

    2003-08-01

    Despite the fact that muscle weakness is a major problem in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), detailed information on myopathological changes at the microscopic level in these patients is scarce, if indeed available at all. Vastus lateralis biopsies of 15 COPD weight-stable patients (body mass index (BMI) 23.9+/-1.0 kg x m(-2); fat-free mass index (FFMI) 17.2+/-1.7 kg x m(-2)) and 16 healthy age-matched controls (BMI 26.3+/-0.8 kg x m(-2); FFMI 19.6+/-2.2 kg x m(-2)) were evaluated. Histochemistry was used to evaluate myopathological features. Immunohistochemistry was used for the detection of macrophages and leukocytes, and active caspase 3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end labelling (TUNEL) as markers of apoptosis. Fatty cell replacement and fibrosis were observed in both groups, the latter being slightly, but significantly, more pronounced in COPD. No differences between COPD and controls were found with respect to central nuclei, necrosis, regeneration, or fibre splitting. Signs of mitochondrial abnormalities were absent and normal numbers of inflammatory cells were found. Active caspase 3 positive myocytes were not observed and no difference was found in the number of TUNEL-positive myonuclei between controls and COPD patients (1.1% versus 1.0%, respectively). The cross-sectional area of type-IIX muscle fibres was smaller in COPD than in controls (2,566 versus 4,248 microm2). Except for the I to IIX shift in fibre types, the selective type-IIX atrophy and a slight accompanying increase in fibrosis and fat cell replacement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease relative to age-matched controls, no other morphological abnormalities were observed in the muscle biopsies of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Also, in this group of clinically and weight stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, apoptosis appeared not to be involved in muscle pathology.

  16. Structural Imaging Changes and Behavioral Correlates in Patients with Crohn’s Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Veena A.; Beniwal-Patel, Poonam; Mbah, Ifeanyi; Young, Brittany M.; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Saha, Sumona

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a subtype of inflammatory bowel disease caused by immune-mediated inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. The extent of morphologic brain alterations and their associated cognitive and affective impairments remain poorly characterized. Aims: We used magnetic resonance imaging to identify structural brain differences between patients with Crohn’s disease in remission compared to age-matched healthy controls and evaluated for structural-behavioral correlates. Methods: Nineteen patients and 20 healthy, age-matched controls were recruited in the study. Group differences in brain morphometric measures and correlations between brain measures and performance on a cognitive task, the verbal fluency (VF) task, were examined. Correlations between brain measures and cognitive measures as well as self-reported measures of depression, personality, and affective scales were examined. Results: Patients showed significant cortical thickening in the left superior frontal region compared to controls. Significant group differences were observed in sub-cortical volume measures in both hemispheres. Investigation of brain-behavior correlations revealed significant group differences in the correlation between cortical surface area and VF performance, although behavioral performance was equivalent between the two groups. The left middle temporal surface area was a significant predictor of VF performance with controls showing a significant positive correlation between these measures, and patients showing the opposite effect. Conclusion: Our results indicate key differences in structural brain measures in patients with CD compared to controls. Additionally, correlation between brain measures and behavioral responses suggest there may be a neural basis to the alterations in patients’ cognitive and affective responses. PMID:27695405

  17. Finger agnosia and cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew S; Trotter, Jeffrey S; Hertza, Jeremy; Bell, Christopher D; Dean, Raymond S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of finger agnosia in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to determine if level of finger agnosia was related to cognitive impairment. Finger agnosia is a sensitive measure of cerebral impairment and is associated with neurofunctional areas implicated in AD. Using a standardized and norm-referenced approach, results indicated that patients with AD evidenced significantly decreased performance on tests of bilateral finger agnosia compared with healthy age-matched controls. Finger agnosia was predictive of cognitive dysfunction on four of seven domains, including: Crystallized Language, Fluid Processing, Associative Learning, and Processing Speed. Results suggest that measures of finger agnosia, a short and simple test, may be useful in the early detection of AD.

  18. Predicting postoperative vomiting among orthopedic patients receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia using SVM and LR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Yun; Gong, Cihun-Siyong Alex; Lin, Shih-Pin; Chang, Kuang-Yi; Tsou, Mei-Yung; Ting, Chien-Kun

    2016-06-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been applied to reduce postoperative pain in orthopedic surgical patients. Unfortunately, PCEA is occasionally accompanied by nausea and vomiting. The logistic regression (LR) model is widely used to predict vomiting, and recently support vector machines (SVM), a supervised machine learning method, has been used for classification and prediction. Unlike our previous work which compared Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) with LR, this study uses a SVM-based predictive model to identify patients with high risk of vomiting during PCEA and comparing results with those derived from the LR-based model. From January to March 2007, data from 195 patients undergoing PCEA following orthopedic surgery were applied to develop two predictive models. 75% of the data were randomly selected for training, while the remainder was used for testing to validate predictive performance. The area under curve (AUC) was measured using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve (ROC). The area under ROC curves of LR and SVM models were 0.734 and 0.929, respectively. A computer-based predictive model can be used to identify those who are at high risk for vomiting after PCEA, allowing for patient-specific therapeutic intervention or the use of alternative analgesic methods.

  19. Lipid Profile among Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Ali A Muttalib

    2014-12-01

    Associations between hearing and blood lipids have been the focus of scientific inquiry for more than 50 years. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the association between hyperlipidaemia among patients presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss compared to normal controls. A case control study concerned with 22 patients presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss who underwent lipid profile evaluation. The lipid profile of these patients was compared with corresponding results of 55 age matched persons (volunteers) with normal hearing. These patients were collected from the Out Patient Department of ENT at Al-Jamhory Teaching Hospital, Mosul/Iraq and private clinic of the author for the period from February 2011 to July 2013. The average age of patients was 44.7 years with a range of 26-65 years. The peak age incidence was in the 5(th) decade of life. The study included 11 male patients (50 %) and 11 females (50 %). Meanwhile, the average age of the control group was 41.7 years with 25 (45.5 %) males and 30 (54.5 %) females. Statistical analysis showed that there was significant difference between the means of lipid profile and blood sugar of the patients and the control group apart from HDL where there was no significant difference. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia seems to be significantly associated with the occurrence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss according to this study.

  20. A case control study of environmental and occupational exposures associated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in patients admitted to a rural tertiary care hospital in a high density swine region

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Distinct strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been identified on livestock and livestock workers. Industrial food animal production may be an important environmental reservoir for human carriage of these pathogenic bacteria. The objective of this study was to investigate environmental and occupational exposures associated with nasal carriage of MRSA in patients hospitalized at Vidant Medical Center, a tertiary hospital serving a region with intensive livestock production in eastern North Carolina. Methods MRSA nasal carriage was identified via nasal swabs collected within 24 hours of hospital admission. MRSA carriers (cases) were gender and age matched to non-carriers (controls). Participants were interviewed about recent environmental and occupational exposures. Home addresses were geocoded and publicly available data were used to estimate the density of swine in residential census block groups of residence. Conditional logistic regression models were used to derive odds ratio (OR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Presence of the scn gene in MRSA isolates was assessed. In addition, multi locus sequence typing (MLST) of the MRSA isolates was performed, and the Diversilab® system was used to match the isolates to USA pulsed field gel electrophoresis types. Results From July - December 2011, 117 cases and 119 controls were enrolled. A higher proportion of controls than cases were current workforce members (41.2% vs. 31.6%) Cases had a higher odds of living in census block groups with medium densities of swine (OR: 4.76, 95% CI: 1.36-16.69) and of reporting the ability to smell odor from a farm with animals when they were home (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 0.80-2.86). Of 49 culture positive MRSA isolates, all were scn positive. Twenty-two isolates belonged to clonal complex 5. Conclusions Absence of livestock workers in this study precluded evaluation of occupational exposures. Higher odds of MRSA in medium swine density

  1. Temperament, character traits, and alexithymia in patients with panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Gültekin, Bulent Kadri; Saglam, Sema; Koc, Merve Iris; Zincir, Selma Bozkurt; Atmaca, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary aim of the present study was to compare temperament and character traits and levels of alexithymia between patients with panic disorder and healthy controls. Methods Sixty patients with panic disorder admitted to the psychiatry clinic at Fırat University Hospital were enrolled in the study, along with 62 healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV axis I (SCID-I), Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and Panic Agoraphobia Scale (PAS) were administered to all subjects. Results Within the temperament dimension, the mean subscale score for harm avoidance was significantly higher in patients with panic disorder than in controls. With respect to character traits, mean scores for self-directedness and cooperativeness were significantly lower than in healthy controls. Rates of alexithymia were 35% (n=21) and 11.3% (n=7) in patients with panic disorder and healthy controls, respectively. The difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was significantly higher in patients with panic disorder (P=0.03). A moderate positive correlation was identified between PAS and TAS scores (r=0.447, P<0.01). Moderately significant positive correlations were also noted for PAS and TCI subscale scores and scores for novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and self-transcendence. Conclusion In our study sample, patients with panic disorder and healthy controls differed in TCI parameters and rate of alexithymia. Larger prospective studies are required to assess for causal associations. PMID:24876780

  2. Microbiota of Demodex mites from rosacea patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Nathalia; Aubert, Jérome; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of Demodex mites is associated with rosacea. Furthermore, Demodex-associated bacteria were suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of rosacea. We decided to analyze Demodex microbiota. Mites were collected by standardized skin surface biopsies from patients with erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular rosacea or from control subjects. The microbiota from each mite was characterized by 16S rRNA clone library approach. The 16S rRNA clone library consisted of 367 clones obtained from 73 extracts originating from 5 samples per study group (ETR, PPR or healthy subjects). A total of 86 species were identified with 36 as Demodex-specific microbiota. In the papulopustular group, proportions of Proteobacteria and Firmicutes increased whereas proportion of Actinobacteria decreased. Here, we report preliminary results on the microbiota of Demodex mites based on a molecular approach showing an unexpected diversity. Differences according to the host status need to be confirmed but open new perspectives for diagnostic of rosacea.

  3. Orthostatic Challenge Shifts the Hemostatic System of Patients Recovered from Stroke toward Hypercoagulability

    PubMed Central

    Cvirn, Gerhard; Kneihsl, Markus; Rossmann, Christine; Paar, Margret; Gattringer, Thomas; Schlagenhauf, Axel; Leschnik, Bettina; Koestenberger, Martin; Tafeit, Erwin; Reibnegger, Gilbert; Trozic, Irhad; Rössler, Andreas; Fazekas, Franz; Goswami, Nandu

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The objective of our study was to assess the effects of orthostatic challenge on the coagulation system in patients with a history of thromboembolic events and to assess how they compared with age-matched healthy controls. Methods: Twenty-two patients with histories of ischemic stroke and 22 healthy age-matched controls performed a sit-to-stand test. Blood was collected prior to- and at the end of- standing in the upright position for 6 min. Hemostatic profiling was performed by determining thrombelastometry and calibrated automated thrombogram values, indices of thrombin generation, standard coagulation times, markers of endothelial activation, plasma levels of coagulation factors and copeptin, and hematocrit. Results: Orthostatic challenge caused a significant endothelial and coagulation activation in patients (Group 1) and healthy controls (Group 2): Plasma levels of prothrombin fragment F1+2 were increased by approximately 35% and thrombin/antithrombin-complex (TAT) increased 5-fold. Several coagulation variables were significantly altered in Group 1 but not in Group 2: Coagulation times (CTs) were significantly shortened and alpha angles, peak rate of thrombin generation (VELINDEX), tissue factor (TF) and copeptin plasma levels were significantly increased (comparison between standing and baseline). Moreover, the shortening of CTs and the rise of copeptin plasma levels were significantly higher in Group 1 vs. Group 2 (comparison between groups). Conclusion: The coagulation system of patients with a history of ischemic stroke can be more easily shifted toward a hypercoagulable state than that of healthy controls. Attentive and long-term anticoagulant treatment is essential to keep patients from recurrence of vascular events. PMID:28223937

  4. Optimal control based seizure abatement using patient derived connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter N.; Thomas, Jijju; Sinha, Nishant; Dauwels, Justin; Kaiser, Marcus; Thesen, Thomas; Ruths, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder in which patients have recurrent seizures. Seizures occur in conjunction with abnormal electrical brain activity which can be recorded by the electroencephalogram (EEG). Often, this abnormal brain activity consists of high amplitude regular spike-wave oscillations as opposed to low amplitude irregular oscillations in the non-seizure state. Active brain stimulation has been proposed as a method to terminate seizures prematurely, however, a general and widely-applicable approach to optimal stimulation protocols is still lacking. In this study we use a computational model of epileptic spike-wave dynamics to evaluate the effectiveness of a pseudospectral method to simulated seizure abatement. We incorporate brain connectivity derived from magnetic resonance imaging of a subject with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. We find that the pseudospectral method can successfully generate time-varying stimuli that abate simulated seizures, even when including heterogeneous patient specific brain connectivity. The strength of the stimulus required varies in different brain areas. Our results suggest that seizure abatement, modeled as an optimal control problem and solved with the pseudospectral method, offers an attractive approach to treatment for in vivo stimulation techniques. Further, if optimal brain stimulation protocols are to be experimentally successful, then the heterogeneity of cortical connectivity should be accounted for in the development of those protocols and thus more spatially localized solutions may be preferable. PMID:26089775

  5. Impulse control disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gescheidt, Tomás; Bares, Martin

    2011-03-01

    In patients with Parkinson's disease with higher prevalence than in current population there appear pathological behaviours characterized by compulsion, repetitiveness and impulsivity, which are connected with material profit or pleasurable experience. They are, in particular, pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping and compulsive eating (in the literature they are collectively referred to as impulse control disorders). Pathological preoccupation with repeated mechanical activities (so-called punding) and excessive compulsive intake of dopaminergic medication (so-called dopamine dysregulation syndrome or also syndrome of hedonistic homeostatic dysregulation) are of similar nature. The paper treats briefly the risk factors and prevalence of these pathological behaviours. In current clinical practice, these psychiatric complications frequently escape doctors' attention, they are underdiagnosed. Although no generally valid recommendations for their therapy are currently available, they can be influenced medically. Of advantage can be modified dopaminergic medication (usually dose reduction ofdopaminergic agonists); multidisciplinary approach to the problem is appropriate. The pathological behaviours given above can frequently lead to considerable material losses and markedly aggravate patients' handicap in the social sphere; it can be expected that in the future they can become a problem also from the ethical and legal points of view.

  6. [Clinical-electrophysiological characteristics of the cognitive sphere in patients in the acute period of the first cerebral ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Kispaeva, T T; Kichuk, I V; Shetova, I M; Memetova, D Sh; Gudkova, V V; Ivanova, G E; Skvortsova, V I

    2011-01-01

    A neuropsychological and neurophysiological study using computed EEG was carried out in 31 stroke patients who did not have a cognitive impairment according to MMSE. Thirty age-matched patients with the same risk factors without a history of stroke were included into the control group. The examination of the control group was performed only once. The examination of stroke patients was performed on days 1, 7 and 21. It was shown that cognitive neurodynamic disturbances (memory disorders and the visual memory decrease) and bioelectrical brain activity disturbances (the decrease in a- and beta band activities and the increase of theta-band power) occurred from the first day and lasted during the acute stroke period even after the improvement of neurological status.

  7. Skill learning in patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease: a prospective pilot-study of waltz-lessons.

    PubMed

    Rösler, Alexander; Seifritz, Erich; Kräuchi, Kurt; Spoerl, David; Brokuslaus, Ilona; Proserpi, Sara-Maria; Gendre, Annekäthi; Savaskan, Egemen; Hofmann, Marc

    2002-12-01

    The authors report the effect of a 12-day prospective, blinded dance-learning trial in 5 patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 5 age-matched depressed patients. Patients with AD showed a significant effect in procedural learning whereas depressed patients did not. These findings suggest potential implications for therapeutic interventions in patients with moderate AD.

  8. Association of hypothyroidism with unruptured cerebral aneurysms: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Atchaneeyasakul, Kunakorn; Tipirneni, Anita; Zhang, Tony; Khandelwal, Priyank; Ambekar, Sudheer; Snelling, Brian; Dharmadhikari, Sushrut; Dong, Chuanhui; Guada, Luis; Ramdas, Kevin; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Rundek, Tatjana; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2017-02-17

    OBJECTIVE Thyroid disorder has been known to affect vascular function and has been associated with aortic aneurysm formation in some cases; however, the connection has not been well studied. The authors hypothesized that hypothyroidism is associated with the formation of cerebral aneurysms. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective case-control study of consecutive patients who had undergone cerebral angiography at an academic, tertiary care medical center in the period from April 2004 through April 2014. Patients with unruptured aneurysms were identified from among those who had undergone 3-vessel catheter angiography. Age-matched controls without cerebral aneurysms on angiography were also identified from the same database. Patients with previous subarachnoid hemorrhage or intracranial hemorrhage were excluded. History of hypothyroidism and other risk factors were recorded. RESULTS Two hundred forty-three patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms were identified and age matched with 243 controls. Mean aneurysm size was 9.6 ± 0.8 mm. Hypothyroidism was present in 40 patients (16.5%) and 9 matched controls (3.7%; adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-7.8, p = 0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that men with hypothyroidism had higher odds of an unruptured cerebral aneurysm diagnosis than the women with hypothyroidism, with an adjusted OR of 12.7 (95% CI 1.3-121.9) versus an OR of 2.5 (95% CI 1.0-6.4) on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS Hypothyroidism appears to be independently associated with unruptured cerebral aneurysms, with a higher effect seen in men. Given the known pathophysiological associations between hypothyroidism and vascular dysfunction, this finding warrants further exploration.

  9. Reproductive risk factors differ among breast cancer patients and controls in a public hospital of Paraiba, northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sarmento de Almeida, Gibran; Leal Almeida, Layze Amanda; Rodrigues Araujo, Gilmara Marques; Weller, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rates of breast cancer in Northeast Brazil are increasing and little is known about prevailing reproductive factors contributing to this increase. A case-control study was conducted in a public hospital of Campina Grande, state of Paraiba, including 81 women with diagnosed invasive breast cancer and 162 age matched (±5 years) controls. Binominal logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) of risk factors. In this model, age at menarche≤12 (OR=2.120; CI: 1.043-4.308; p=0.038), single parity (OR=3.748; CI: 1.459- 9.627; p=0.06) and reproductive period>10 years (OR=3.042; CI: 1.421- 6.512; p=0.04) were identified as independent variables that significantly increased breast cancer risk of parous women. Compared to parous women who never practised breastfeeding, total breastfeeding time>24 months decreased the risk of breast cancer (OR=0.258; CI: 0.084- 0.787; p=0.017). The results indicated that modifiable reproductive factors contribute to breast cancer risk in women included in the present study. Women's knowledge about factors such as the protective effect of breastfeeding could reduce the risk of breast cancer.

  10. Swallowing in patients with Parkinson's disease: a surface electromyography study.

    PubMed

    Ws Coriolano, Maria das Graças; R Belo, Luciana; Carneiro, Danielle; G Asano, Amdore; Al Oliveira, Paulo José; da Silva, Douglas Monteiro; G Lins, Otávio

    2012-12-01

    Our goal was to study deglutition of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and normal controls (NC) using surface electromyography (sEMG). The study included 15 patients with idiopathic PD and 15 age-matched normal controls. Surface electromyography was collected over the suprahyoid muscle group. Conditions were the following: swallow at once 10 and 20 ml of water and 5 and 10 ml of yogurt of firm consistency, and freely drink 100 ml of water. During swallowing, durations of sEMG were significantly longer in PD patients than in normal controls but no significant differences of amplitudes were found. Eighty percent of the PD patients and 20 % of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 20 ml of water, while 70 % of the PD patients and none of the NC needed more than one swallow to consume 5 ml of yogurt. PD patients took significantly more time and needed significantly more swallows to drink 100 ml of water than normal controls. We conclude that sEMG might be a simple and useful tool to study and monitor deglutition in PD patients.

  11. Cutaneous Sensibility Changes in Bell's Palsy Patients.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas Palacio, Carlos Andrés; Múnera Galarza, Francisco Alejandro

    2017-02-01

    Objective Bell's palsy is a cranial nerve VII dysfunction that renders the patient unable to control facial muscles from the affected side. Nevertheless, some patients have reported cutaneous changes in the paretic area. Therefore, cutaneous sensibility changes might be possible additional symptoms within the clinical presentation of this disorder. Accordingly, the aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between cutaneous sensibility and facial paralysis severity in these patients. Study Design Prospective longitudinal cohort study. Settings Tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Twelve acute-onset Bell's palsy patients were enrolled from March to September 2009. In addition, 12 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers were tested. Cutaneous sensibility was evaluated with pressure threshold and 2-point discrimination at 6 areas of the face. Facial paralysis severity was evaluated with the House-Brackmann scale. Results Statistically significant correlations based on the Spearman's test were found between facial paralysis severity and cutaneous sensitivity on forehead, eyelid, cheek, nose, and lip ( P < .05). Additionally, significant differences based on the Student's t test were observed between both sides of the face in 2-point discrimination on eyelid, cheek, and lip ( P < .05) in Bell's palsy patients but not in healthy subjects. Conclusion Such results suggest a possible relationship between the loss of motor control of the face and changes in facial sensory information processing. Such findings are worth further research about the neurophysiologic changes associated with the cutaneous sensibility disturbances of these patients.

  12. Circulating lymphocyte and T memory subsets in glucocorticosteroid versus IVIG treated patients with CIDP.

    PubMed

    Klehmet, Juliane; Staudt, Max; Ulm, Lena; Unterwalder, Nadine; Meisel, Andreas; Meisel, Christian

    2015-06-15

    The present study compared lymphocyte and T memory subsets in currently untreated patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) to glucocorticosteroid (GS) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treated patients. Peripheral blood from 48 CIDP patients (21 untreated who were either treatment naïve or without treatment during the last 3 months, 17 IVIG and 10 GS treatment) and from 12 age-matched controls was evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. Our data demonstrate that long-term GS treatment is associated with reduced frequencies of total CD4+ T cells, CD4+ memory subsets and NK cells while long-term IVIG treatment is associated with alterations of the CD8+ memory compartment. Reduction of CD4+ naïve T cell counts may explain the observation that GS treatment induces prolonged clinical remission compared to IVIG treatment.

  13. Reconsideration of the concept of enhanced static fusimotor drive in rigidity in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Noth, J; Schürmann, M; Podoll, K; Schwarz, M

    1988-01-22

    The electromyographic responses elicited in the first dorsal interosseus muscle by small muscle stretches or by electrical stimulation of the median nerve were investigated in parkinsonian patients and in age-matched healthy subjects. Stimuli were applied during a steady level of contraction in the intrinsic hand muscle. This ensured comparable levels of excitability in the alpha-motoneurone pool in patients and normals. It was found that the normal short-latency stretch reflex was almost absent in rigid patients, while responses to electrical stimulation of low-threshold nerve fibres were of equal size in both groups. This result suggests that there is a change in fusimotor control of muscle spindles in Parkinson's rigidity without alteration of the central gain of the Ia-transmitted stretch reflex.

  14. Decreased iodine-123 IMP caudate nucleus uptake in patients with Huntington's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, J.S.; Johnson, K.A.; Ichise, M.; English, R.J.; Walshe, T.M.; Morris, J.H.; Holman, B.L.

    1988-07-01

    To determine whether I-123 isopropyl iodoamphetamine (IMP) uptake is reduced in the basal ganglia of patients with Huntington's disease compared with that in aged-matched normal and abnormal control subjects, a caudate ratio was defined that compared the average separation (in pixel units) between the midline and the left and right caudate heads to the width of the brain as measured on transaxial cross-sections of I-123 IMP SPECT brain images. For six patients with Huntington's disease, the average caudate ratio was 29.0% (SD +/- 2.7%), significantly higher than that for 12 normal volunteer subjects (average caudate ratio, 19.1% +/- 3.5%; p less than 0.001) and 13 patients with a variety of other neurologic disorders (average caudate ratio, 19.3 +/- 2.2%; p less than 0.001).

  15. Everyday cognitive failures and memory problems in Parkinson's patients without dementia.

    PubMed

    Poliakoff, Ellen; Smith-Spark, James H

    2008-08-01

    There is growing evidence that Parkinson's disease patients without dementia exhibit cognitive deficits in some executive, memory and selective attention tasks. However, the impact of these deficits on their everyday cognitive functioning remains largely unknown. This issue was explored using self-report questionnaires. Twenty-four Parkinson's patients and 24 age-matched controls rated how frequently they make particular cognitive errors, such as forgetting what they were about to say. In addition, a partner or significant other also rated each participant's propensity for making cognitive errors. Rather than simply rating themselves as making more of all types of errors, these results indicate that PD patients make more of specific types of error. Further analysis suggests that some of these errors are related to attentional processes (being more distractible) whereas others are related to retrieval processes (being unable to recall important details from the previous day).

  16. Mechanisms of blunted muscle vasodilation during peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Nazaré Nunes Alves, Maria Janieire; Alves, M J N N; dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Nobre, Thais Simões; Martinez, Daniel Godoy; Martinez, D G; Pereira Barretto, Antonio Carlos; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Rondon, Maria Urbana P B; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrão, Carlos Eduardo

    2012-09-01

    We described recently that systemic hypoxia provokes vasoconstriction in heart failure (HF) patients. We hypothesized that either the exaggerated muscle sympathetic nerve activity and/or endothelial dysfunction mediate the blunted vasodilatation during hypoxia in HF patients. Twenty-seven HF patients and 23 age-matched controls were studied. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was assessed by microneurography and forearm blood flow (FBF) by venous occlusion plethysmography. Peripheral chemoreflex control was evaluated through the inhaling of a hypoxic gas mixture (10% O(2) and 90% N(2)). Basal muscle sympathetic nerve activity was greater and basal FBF was lower in HF patients versus controls. During hypoxia, muscle sympathetic nerve activity responses were greater in HF patients, and forearm vasodilatation in HF was blunted versus controls. Phentolamine increased FBF responses in both groups, but the increase was lower in HF patients. Phentolamine and N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine infusion did not change FBF responses in HF but markedly blunted the vasodilatation in controls. FBF responses to hypoxia in the presence of vitamin C were unchanged and remained lower in HF patients versus controls. In conclusion, muscle vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia in HF patients is attributed to exaggerated reflex sympathetic nerve activation and blunted endothelial function (NO activity). We were unable to identify a role for oxidative stress in these studies.

  17. Lower Methylation of the ANGPTL2 Gene in Leukocytes from Post-Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Albert; Mamarbachi, Maya; Turcot, Valérie; Lessard, Samuel; Yu, Carol; Luo, Xiaoyan; Lalongé, Julie; Hayami, Doug; Gayda, Mathieu; Juneau, Martin; Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Lettre, Guillaume; Nigam, Anil; Thorin, Eric

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is believed to regulate gene expression during adulthood in response to the constant changes in environment. The methylome is therefore proposed to be a biomarker of health through age. ANGPTL2 is a circulating pro-inflammatory protein that increases with age and prematurely in patients with coronary artery diseases; integrating the methylation pattern of the promoter may help differentiate age- vs. disease-related change in its expression. We believe that in a pro-inflammatory environment, ANGPTL2 is differentially methylated, regulating ANGPTL2 expression. To test this hypothesis we investigated the changes in promoter methylation of ANGPTL2 gene in leukocytes from patients suffering from post-acute coronary syndrome (ACS). DNA was extracted from circulating leukocytes of post-ACS patients with cardiovascular risk factors and from healthy young and age-matched controls. Methylation sites (CpGs) found in the ANGPTL2 gene were targeted for specific DNA methylation quantification. The functionality of ANGPTL2 methylation was assessed by an in vitro luciferase assay. In post-ACS patients, C-reactive protein and ANGPTL2 circulating levels increased significantly when compared to healthy controls. Decreased methylation of specific CpGs were found in the promoter of ANGPTL2 and allowed to discriminate age vs. disease associated methylation. In vitro DNA methylation of specific CpG lead to inhibition of ANGPTL2 promoter activity. Reduced leukocyte DNA methylation in the promoter region of ANGPTL2 is associated with the pro-inflammatory environment that characterizes patients with post-ACS differently from age-matched healthy controls. Methylation of different CpGs in ANGPTL2 gene may prove to be a reliable biomarker of coronary disease. PMID:27101308

  18. Impaired Language Pathways in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, William W.; Sahin, Mustafa; Scherrer, Benoit; Peters, Jurriaan M.; Suarez, Ralph O.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Jeste, Shafali S.; Gregas, Matthew C.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Nelson, Charles A.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between language pathways and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). An advanced diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 42 patients with TSC and 42 age-matched controls. Using a validated automatic method, white matter language pathways were identified and microstructural characteristics were extracted, including fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Among 42 patients with TSC, 12 had ASD (29%). After controlling for age, TSC patients without ASD had a lower FA than controls in the arcuate fasciculus (AF); TSC patients with ASD had even a smaller FA, lower than the FA for those without ASD. Similarly, TSC patients without ASD had a greater MD than controls in the AF; TSC patients with ASD had even a higher MD, greater than the MD in those without ASD. It remains unclear why some patients with TSC develop ASD, while others have better language and socio-behavioral outcomes. Our results suggest that language pathway microstructure may serve as a marker of the risk of ASD in TSC patients. Impaired microstructure in language pathways of TSC patients may indicate the development of ASD, although prospective studies of language pathway development and ASD diagnosis in TSC remain essential. PMID:22661408

  19. CSF levels of DJ-1 and tau distinguish MSA patients from PD patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Megan K; Eeftens, Jorine M; Aerts, Marjolein B; Esselink, Rianne A J; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2014-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) is difficult, particularly at early disease stages, but is important for therapeutic management. The protein DJ-1 is implicated in the pathology of PD but little is known about its involvement in MSA. We aimed to determine the diagnostic value of CSF DJ-1 and tau proteins for discriminating PD and MSA. DJ-1 and total tau levels were quantified in the CSF of 43 PD patients, 23 MSA patients and 30 non-neurological controls matched for age and gender. Patients were part of a study with a 3-year prospective design with extended case-review follow-up of up to 9 years, ensuring maximum accuracy of the clinical diagnosis. Our results showed that CSF DJ-1 levels could distinguish MSA from PD with a 78% sensitivity and 78% specificity (AUC = 0.84). The combination of DJ-1 and tau proteins significantly improved this discrimination to 82% sensitivity and 81% specificity to identify MSA from PD (AUC = 0.92). Our results highlight the potential benefits of a combination of DJ-1 and total tau as biomarkers for differential diagnosis of MSA and PD.

  20. Body Image Disturbance in Acromegaly Patients Compared to Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenoma Patients and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Conaglen, Helen M.; de Jong, Dennis; Crawford, Veronica; Elston, Marianne S.; Conaglen, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Excess growth hormone secretion in adults results in acromegaly, a condition in which multiple physical changes occur including bony and soft tissue overgrowth. Over time these changes can markedly alter a person's appearance. The aim of this study was to compare body image disturbance in patients with acromegaly to those with nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs) and controls and assess the impact of obesity in these groups. Methods. A cross-sectional survey including quality of life, body image disturbance, anxiety and depression measures, growth hormone, and BMI measurement was carried out. Results. The groups did not differ with respect to body image disturbance. However separate analysis of obese participants demonstrated relationships between mood scales, body image disturbance, and pain issues, particularly for acromegaly patients. Conclusions. While the primary hypothesis that acromegaly might be associated with body image disturbance was not borne out, we have shown that obesity together with acromegaly and NFA can be associated with body image issues, suggesting that BMI rather than primary diagnosis might better indicate whether patients might experience body image disturbance problems. PMID:26078758

  1. Noninvasive assessment of coronary vasodilation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Patricia K; Meyer, Craig; Engvall, Jan; Yang, Phillip; McConnell, Michael V

    2008-01-01

    Background Impaired coronary vasodilation to both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent stimuli have been associated with atherosclerosis. Direct measurement of coronary vasodilation using x-ray angiography or intravascular ultrasound is invasive and, thus, not appropriate for asymptomatic patients or for serial follow-up. In this study, high-resolution coronary cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) was used to investigate the vasodilatory response to nitroglycerine (NTG) of asymptomatic patients at high risk for CAD. Methods A total of 46 asymptomatic subjects were studied: 13 high-risk patients [8 with diabetes mellitus (DM), 5 with end stage renal disease (ESRD)] and 33 age-matched controls. Long-axis and cross-sectional coronary artery images were acquired pre- and 5 minutes post-sublingual NTG using a sub-mm-resolution multi-slice spiral coronary CMR sequence. Coronary cross sectional area (CSA) was measured on pre- and post-NTG images and % coronary vasodilation was calculated. Results Patients with DM and ESRD had impaired coronary vasodilation to NTG compared to age-matched controls (17.8 ± 7.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%, p = 0.002). This remained significant for ESRD patients alone (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.003) and for DM patients alone (19.8 ± 6.3% vs. 25.6 ± 7.1%; p = 0.049), with a non-significant trend toward greater impairment in the ESRD vs. DM patients (14.8 ± 7.7% vs. 19.8 ± 6.3%; p = 0.23). Conclusion Noninvasive coronary CMR demonstrates impairment of coronary vasodilation to NTG in high-risk patients with DM and ESRD. This may provide a functional indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis and warrants clinical follow up to determine prognostic significance. PMID:18513419

  2. Evaluation of vertebrobasilar artery changes in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daopei; Zhang, Shuling; Zhang, Hongtao; Xu, Yuming; Fu, Shengqi; Yu, Meng; Ji, Peng

    2013-09-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) lesions in elderly patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) by magnetic resonance angiography. VBA lesions in patients older than 65 years of age with BPPV were prospectively investigated by magnetic resonance angiography. Vascular risk factors, blood vessel changes, and vertigo severity were recorded. Age-matched individuals without BPPV were included in the control group. Of 126 patients screened for this study, 104 were included. Relevant comorbidities included diabetes (12 patients), hypertension (23 patients), and dyslipidemia (20 patients). Findings included left or right vertebral artery (VA) stenosis or occlusion (22 patients, 21.2%), VA tortuosity (25 patients, 24.0%), VA dominance (20 patients, 19.2%), basilar artery (BA) stenosis or occlusion (nine patients, 8.6%), and BA tortuosity (12 patients, 11.5%). These abnormal vessels differed between BPPV patients and the control group (all P<0.05). The severity of Vertigo did not differ between the abnormal VA and abnormal BA groups (P>0.05), but did differ between the normal group and the abnormal VA or BA group (P<0.05). Vertigo severity correlated with VA stenosis or occlusion, VA dominance, and unilateral or bilateral VA tortuosity. VBA tortuosity and VA dominance were common in BPPV patients and may contribute toward BPPV.

  3. Evaluating the influence of perceived pain control on patient satisfaction in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Craig, Angela R; Otani, Koichiro; Herrmann, Patrick A

    2015-01-01

    The authors evaluated whether a patient's perceived pain control influenced the relationships between four attributes (nursing, physician, staff, and environment) and patient satisfaction. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine overall satisfaction and intention to recommend, controlling for race, gender, age, and education. The authors found that no matter the level of pain control, nursing was always the most influential attribute in patient satisfaction. The influence of the other attributes varied, depending on the patients' pain control. Hospital managers may improve patient satisfaction by focusing on pain management nursing care.

  4. Different patterns of oxidized lipid products in plasma and urine of dengue fever, stroke, and Parkinson's disease patients: cautions in the use of biomarkers of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Yung J; Seet, Raymond C S; Huang, Shan Hong; Long, Lee Hua; Halliwell, Barry

    2009-03-01

    Many products of lipid oxidation have been associated with human diseases. These include F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid products (HETEs), and cholesterol oxidation products (COPs). Here we present measurements of F2-IsoPs, HETEs, COPs, and arachidonate in single plasma samples of patients with acute (dengue fever and ischemic stroke) and chronic (Parkinson's) diseases, and in age-matched study controls. Urine samples were collected for F2-IsoPs analysis. Our analysis demonstrated elevated F2-IsoPs levels in ischemic stroke, HETEs in Parkinson's disease, dengue fever, and ischemic stroke, and COPs in Parkinson's disease and dengue fever patients, as compared with those in age-matched study controls. Strong but complex correlations were observed between levels of certain oxidized lipid products and age. The relations between various oxidized lipids and dengue fever, stroke, and Parkinson's disease are discussed in relation to the selection and application of biomarkers of oxidative lipid damage, in particular the need for corrections for age and lipid levels.

  5. Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Drug-Induced Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Dong-Woo; Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, Yang-Hyun; Park, Sung-Jin; Jeon, Kipyung; Lee, Jong-Yun; Ho, Seong Hee; So, Jungmin; Im, Jin Hee; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recent studies have shown that several nonmotor symptoms differ between Parkinson's disease (PD) and drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP). However, there have been no reports on cardiovascular autonomic function in DIP, and so this study investigated whether cardiovascular autonomic function differs between PD and DIP patients. Methods This study consecutively enrolled 20 DIP patients, 99 drug-naïve PD patients, and 25 age-matched healthy controls who underwent head-up tilt-table testing and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results Orthostatic hypotension was more frequent in patients with PD or DIP than in healthy controls. In DIP, orthostatic hypotension was associated with the underlying psychiatric diseases and neuroleptics use, whereas prokinetics were not related to orthostatic hypotension. The supine blood pressure, nighttime blood pressure, and nocturnal blood pressure dipping did not differ significantly between the DIP and control groups. Supine hypertension and nocturnal hypertension were more frequent in PD patients than in controls. Conclusions The included DIP patients frequently exhibited orthostatic hypotension that was associated with the underlying diseases as well as the nature of and exposure time to the offending drugs. Clinicians should individualize the manifestations of DIP according to underlying diseases as well as the action mechanism of and exposure time to each offending drug. PMID:27730767

  6. Microbial Dysbiosis in Pediatric Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Day, Andrew S.; Huinao, Karina D.; Leach, Steven T.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial dysbiosis has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD); however, many studies of gut microbial communities have been confounded by environmental and patient-related factors. In this study, the microbial flora of fecal samples from 19 children newly diagnosed with CD and 21 age-matched controls were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to determine differences in the microbial composition between CD patients and controls. Analysis of the microbial composition of specific bacterial groups revealed that Firmicutes percentages were significantly lower in CD patients than in controls and that this was due largely to changes in the class Clostridia. Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria percentages were higher and significantly higher in CD patients than in controls, respectively. Both the detection frequencies of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes correlated (positively and negatively, respectively) with the calculated pediatric Crohn's disease activity index scores of patients. Upon further analysis, differences in the microbial compositions of patients with mild disease and moderate to severe disease were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of different bacterial species or a dynamic interplay between individual species is important for disease and is consistent with the dysbiosis hypothesis of CD. PMID:22837318

  7. Electronically monitored single-use patient-controlled analgesia pumps in postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael; Friedrich, Karin; Kirchner, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The present study was performed to establish whether analgesic consumption in the first four postoperative hours is a suitable basis for selecting the demand dose and predicting the likely analgesic requirement over the next 20 hours with single-use patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps, and to establish whether this method provides effective pain control. Forty-two patients who had undergone a laparotic gynecological procedure (hysterectomy) were given an electronic PCA pump (Abbott Lifecare, Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) for four hours (phase I) with a demand dose of 1 mg piritramide and a lockout period of five minutes for dose titration. Piritramide's potency is comparable with that of morphine. The patients then received single-use PCA pumps (Baxter Infusor/Watch, Baxter, Deerfield, IL) for the next 20 hours (phase II) with a demand dose of 0.75 mg in Group A and 1.5 mg in Group B, depending on whether more or less than 10 mg pritramide had been consumed in phase I. A specially designed electronic recorder was used to measure the exact amount consumed and number of demands. Patients experiencing pain were free to receive additional piritramide at any time as rescue medication; however, these patients were withdrawn from the study. Ninety percent of the patients in group A said they were satisfied with or undecided as to the level of analgesia. The corresponding figure in group B was 95 percent. Piritramide consumption was significantly higher in group B than in group A. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding demographic data or duration of surgery, nor did either of these two parameters affect postoperative piritramide consumption. Significant alleviation of pain and improvement in visual analog scale scores from phase I [group A, 4.7 (range, 2.0 to 6.8); group B, 4.6 (range, 3.0 to 8.3)] to phase II [group A, 3.1 (range, 0.4 to 5.2); group B, 3.2 (range, 0.4 to 6.0)] was achieved in both groups. A significant difference

  8. Open Source Patient-Controlled Analgesic Pump Requirements Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Brian R.; Hatcliff, John; Chalin, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the medical domain is driving a need for continuous innovation and improvement in techniques for developing and assuring medical devices. Unfortunately, research in academia and communication between academics, industrial engineers, and regulatory authorities is hampered by the lack of realistic non-proprietary development artifacts for medical devices. In this paper, we give an overview of a detailed requirements document for a Patient-Controlled Analgesic (PCA) pump developed under the US NSF’s Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Scholar-in-Residence (SIR) program. This 60+ page document follows the methodology outlined in the US Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Requirements Engineering Management Handbook (REMH) and includes a domain overview, use cases, statements of safety & security requirements, and formal top-level system architectural description. Based on previous experience with release of a requirements document for a cardiac pacemaker that spawned a number of research and pedagogical activities, we believe that the described PCA requirements document can be an important research enabler within the formal methods and software engineering communities. PMID:24931440

  9. Open Source Patient-Controlled Analgesic Pump Requirements Documentation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brian R; Hatcliff, John; Chalin, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic nature of the medical domain is driving a need for continuous innovation and improvement in techniques for developing and assuring medical devices. Unfortunately, research in academia and communication between academics, industrial engineers, and regulatory authorities is hampered by the lack of realistic non-proprietary development artifacts for medical devices. In this paper, we give an overview of a detailed requirements document for a Patient-Controlled Analgesic (PCA) pump developed under the US NSF's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Scholar-in-Residence (SIR) program. This 60+ page document follows the methodology outlined in the US Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Requirements Engineering Management Handbook (REMH) and includes a domain overview, use cases, statements of safety & security requirements, and formal top-level system architectural description. Based on previous experience with release of a requirements document for a cardiac pacemaker that spawned a number of research and pedagogical activities, we believe that the described PCA requirements document can be an important research enabler within the formal methods and software engineering communities.

  10. Quality control and patient dosimetry in dental cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Stoyanov, D

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the initial experience in performing quality control and patient dose measurements in a cone beam computed tomography (CT) scanner (ILUMA Ultra, IMTEC Imaging, USA) for oral and maxillofacial radiology. The X-ray tube and the generator were tested first, including the kVp accuracy and precision, and the half-value layer (HVL). The following tests specific for panoramic dental systems were also performed: tube output, beam size and beam alignment to the detector. The tests specific for CT included measurements of noise and CT numbers in water and in air, as well as the homogeneity of CT numbers. The most appropriate dose quantity was found to be the air kerma-area product (KAP) measured with a KAP-metre installed at the tube exit. KAP values were found to vary from 110 to 185 microGy m(2) for available adult protocols and to be 54 microGy m(2) for the paediatric protocol. The effective dose calculated with the software PCXMC (STUK, Finland) was 0.05 mSv for children and 0.09-0.16 mSv for adults.

  11. CT Scan Does Not Differentiate Patients with Hepatopulmonary Syndrome from Other Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prabhudesai, Vikramaditya; Castel, Helene; Gupta, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is defined by liver dysfunction, intrapulmonary vascular dilatations, and impaired oxygenation. The gold standard for detection of intrapulmonary vascular dilatations in HPS is contrast echocardiography. However, two small studies have suggested that patients with HPS have larger segmental pulmonary arterial diameters than both normal subjects and normoxemic subjects with cirrhosis, when measured by CT. We sought to compare CT imaging-based pulmonary vasodilatation in patients with HPS, patients with liver dysfunction without HPS, and matching controls on CT imaging. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study at two quaternary care Canadian HPS centers. We analyzed CT thorax scans in 23 patients with HPS, 29 patients with liver dysfunction without HPS, and 52 gender- and age-matched controls. We measured the artery-bronchus ratios (ABRs) in upper and lower lung zones, calculated the “delta ABR” by subtracting the upper from the lower ABR, compared these measurements between groups, and correlated them with clinically relevant parameters (partial pressure of arterial oxygen, alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, macroaggregated albumin shunt fraction, and diffusion capacity). We repeated measurements in patients with post-transplant CTs. Results Patients had significantly larger lower zone ABRs and delta ABRs than controls (1.20 +/- 0.19 versus 0.98 +/- 0.10, p<0.01; and 0.12 +/- 0.17 versus -0.06 +/- 0.10, p<0.01, respectively). However, there were no significant differences between liver disease patients with and without HPS, nor any significant correlations between CT measurements and clinically relevant parameters. There were no significant changes in ABRs after liver transplantation (14 patients). Conclusions Basilar segmental artery-bronchus ratios are larger in patients with liver disease than in normal controls, but this vasodilatation is no more severe in patients with HPS. CT does not distinguish patients

  12. Obsessive–compulsive disorder patients have a reduced sense of control on the illusion of control task

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Claire M.; Morein-Zamir, Sharon; Durieux, Alice M. S.; Fineberg, Naomi A.; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2014-01-01

    There is disagreement regarding the role of perceived control in obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). The present study used a traditional illusion of control paradigm (Alloy and Abramson, 1979) to empirically test control estimation in OCD. Twenty-six OCD patients and 26 matched comparison subjects completed an illusion of control task wherein their goal was to attempt to exert control over a light bulb. The density of reinforcement (high, low) and the valence of trials (gain, loss) were experimentally manipulated within subjects. Unbeknownst to participants, the illumination of the light bulb was predetermined and irrespective of their behavior. OCD patients exhibited lower estimates of control compared with healthy comparison subjects. There were no interactions between group and outcome density or group and valence. We found that OCD patients endorse lower estimates of control than comparison subjects. This finding highlights a potential role for contingency learning in the disorder. PMID:24659974

  13. Telehealth for improved glycaemic control in patients with poorly controlled diabetes after acute hospitalization - a preliminary study in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Wai Leng, Chow; Jundong, Jiang; Li Wei, Cho; Joo Pin, Foo; Kwong Ming, Fock; Chen, Richard

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated a disease management and education programme delivered via telephone support (TS) to patients with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c >7%). All eligible patients were invited to participate in the programme, which involved education on lifestyle modification and disease management delivered via three scheduled monthly calls by trained nurses. Patients who declined or could not be contacted acted as the controls (usual care, UC). A per protocol analysis was conducted using a mixed effect model for two subgroups with different baseline HbA1c levels (i.e. baseline HbA1c <8.0% and HbA1c ≥8.0%). A total of 2646 patients with diabetes were eligible for enrolment. Of these, 1391 participants had HbA1c measurements available. The study comprised 633 patients (46%) who completed the programme (TS), 598 (43%) who were not contactable or refused to participate at the first telephone call (UC) and 160 patients who dropped out. In the patients with HbA1c ≥8%, TS reduced the adjusted mean HbA1c by 0.38% (P = 0.022) but the reduction in diabetes-related admissions (4.2% lower adjusted mean admission rate) was not significant. In patients with HbA1c <8%, TS had no additional effect on glycaemic control or diabetes-related admission. Telephone support appeared effective in improving glycaemic control in patients with poor diabetes control.

  14. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation causes a short-term increase in the duration of the cortical silent period in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Siebner, H R; Mentschel, C; Auer, C; Lehner, C; Conrad, B

    2000-04-28

    In ten patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and ten age-matched healthy controls, we applied 15 30-s trains of subthreshold 5-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the primary motor hand area. Ten minutes after rTMS, PD patients showed a significant prolongation of the transcranially evoked silent period (SP) in the contralateral first dorsal interosseus muscle, whereas the SP remained unchanged in healthy subjects. Since the duration of the transcranially evoked SP is a well-established measure of intracortical inhibition, this finding demonstrates that rTMS is capable of inducing a short-term increase in intracortical inhibition in PD. The lack of a prolongation of the SP in healthy controls suggests that PD patients may be particularly susceptible to modulatory effects of rTMS on motocortical inhibition.

  15. Infectious background of patients with a history of acute anterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Huhtinen, M; Laasila, K; Granfors, K; Puolakkainen, M; Seppala, I; Laasonen, L; Repo, H; Karma, A; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the infectious backround of patients with a history of acute anterior uveitis (AAU) and healthy control subjects. Methods: Sixty four patients with previous AAU and 64 sex and age matched controls were studied. Serum antibodies to Salmonellae, Yersiniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Campylobacter jejuni, and Borrelia burgdorferi were measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia pneumoniae by microimmunofluorescence test. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), separated by density gradient centrifugation, were studied for Salmonella and Yersinia antigens by means of an immunofluorescence test, and for C pneumoniae DNA with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Neither prevalence nor levels of single microbial antibodies studied differed between the patients and control subjects, or between subgroups of patients created on the basis of clinical characteristics. In logistic regression analysis, the high number of recurrences (>10) of AAU was independently related to the presence of single or multiple bacterial antibodies (p=0.04). None of the PBMC samples of the patients were positive for Yersinia or Salmonella antigens. C pneumoniae PCR was positive in a patient who was negative for C pneumoniae antibodies. Conclusion: Although neither the prevalence nor the levels of single microbial antibodies studied differed between the patients and the controls, current data suggest that the presence of single or multiple antibodies in patients with many recurrences of AAU compared with patients with none or few recurrences may be a sign of repeated infections, antigen persistence, or raised innate immune responsiveness. PMID:12379526

  16. Different gastoroesophageal reflux symptoms of middle-aged to elderly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Dobashi, Kunio; Kusano, Motoyasu; Mori, Masatomo

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic differences and the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have not been clarified in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study is to assess the differences of GERD symptoms among asthma, COPD, and disease control patients, and determine the impact of GERD symptoms on exacerbation of asthma or COPD by using a new questionnaire for GERD. A total of 120 subjects underwent assessment with the frequency scale for the symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire, including 40 age-matched patients in each of the asthma, COPD, and disease control groups. Asthma and control patients had more regurgitation-related symptoms than COPD patients (p<0.05), while COPD patients had more dysmotility-related symptoms than asthma patients (p<0.01) or disease control patients (p<0.01). The most distinctive symptom of asthma patients with GERD was an unusual sensation in the throat, while bloated stomach was the chief symptom of COPD patients with GERD, and these symptoms were associated with disease exacerbations. The presence of GERD diagnosed by the total score of FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD. GERD symptoms differed between asthma and COPD patients, and the presence of GERD diagnosed by the FSSG influences the exacerbation of COPD. PMID:22448100

  17. Heart rate dynamics in patients with stable angina pectoris and utility of fractal and complexity measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makikallio, T. H.; Ristimae, T.; Airaksinen, K. E.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic analysis techniques may uncover abnormalities in heart rate (HR) behavior that are not easily detectable with conventional statistical measures. However, the applicability of these new methods for detecting possible abnormalities in HR behavior in various cardiovascular disorders is not well established. Conventional measures of HR variability were compared with short-term (< or = 11 beats, alpha1) and long-term (> 11 beats, alpha2) fractal correlation properties and with approximate entropy of RR interval data in 38 patients with stable angina pectoris without previous myocardial infarction or cardiac medication at the time of the study and 38 age-matched healthy controls. The short- and long-term fractal scaling exponents (alpha1, alpha2) were significantly higher in the coronary patients than in the healthy controls (1.34 +/- 0.15 vs 1.11 +/- 0.12 [p <0.001] and 1.10 +/- 0.08 vs 1.04 +/- 0.06 [p <0.01], respectively), and they also had lower approximate entropy (p <0.05), standard deviation of all RR intervals (p <0.01), and high-frequency spectral component of HR variability (p <0.05). The short-term fractal scaling exponent performed better than other heart rate variability parameters in differentiating patients with coronary artery disease from healthy subjects, but it was not related to the clinical or angiographic severity of coronary artery disease or any single nonspectral or spectral measure of HR variability in this retrospective study. Patients with stable angina pectoris have altered fractal properties and reduced complexity in their RR interval dynamics relative to age-matched healthy subjects. Dynamic analysis may complement traditional analyses in detecting altered HR behavior in patients with stable angina pectoris.

  18. Gender differences in post-operative pain and patient controlled analgesia use among adolescent surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Logan, Deirdre E; Rose, John B

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore gender differences in anticipatory emotional distress, coping strategies, post-operative pain perception, and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) use among adolescent surgical patients. One hundred and two 12-18-year-old adolescents undergoing surgeries with overnight hospital stay were recruited. Participants completed pre-operative measures of anxiety and anticipated pain. Post-operatively, they reported on coping skills, post-operative anxiety, and pain. Data on PCA use were recorded from medical records. Girls reported higher levels of pre-operative state anxiety and anticipated more pain. After surgery, girls and boys differed on their lowest daily pain ratings and average daily pain ratings, with girls reporting more pain in both cases. Reports of highest daily pain were similar across genders. Gender was found to moderate the relationship between anticipatory distress and post-operative pain, such that higher anticipatory distress before surgery predicted more post-operative pain for girls, but not for boys. Patterns of PCA use did not vary by gender on post-operative days 0 or 1. Findings suggest that adolescent boys' and girls' pain experiences are different in several important respects, although somewhat less divergent than has been reported in samples of adult males and females. Results have implications for the development of targeted intervention strategies to help adolescents cope effectively with acute post-operative pain.

  19. Family functioning in families of first-episode psychosis patients as compared to chronic mentally ill patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Koutra, Katerina; Triliva, Sofia; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Stefanakis, Zacharias; Basta, Maria; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2014-11-30

    The present study aimed to investigate possible differences in family environment among patients experiencing their First Episode of Psychosis (FEP), chronic patients and controls. Family cohesion and flexibility (FACES-IV) and psychological distress (GHQ-28) were evaluated in families of 50 FEP and 50 chronic patients, as well as 50 controls, whereas expressed emotion (FQ) and family burden (FBS) were assessed in families of FEP and chronic patients. Multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusted for confounders, indicated impaired cohesion and flexibility for families of FEP patients compared to controls, and lower scores for families of chronic patients compared to those of FEP patients. Caregivers of chronic patients scored significantly higher in criticism, and reported higher burden and psychological distress than those of FEP patients. Our findings suggest that unbalanced levels of cohesion and flexibility, high criticism and burden appeared to be the outcome of psychosis and not risk factors triggering the onset of the illness. Furthermore, emotional over-involvement both in terms of positive (i.e. concern) and negative behaviors (i.e. overprotection) is prevalent in Greek families. Psychoeducational interventions from the early stages of the illness should be considered to promote caregivers' awareness regarding the patients' illness, which in turn, may ameliorate dysfunctional family interactions.

  20. Patient agenda setting in respiratory outpatients: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Early, Frances; Everden, Angharad Jt; O'Brien, Cathy M; Fagan, Petrea L; Fuld, Jonathan P

    2015-11-01

    Soliciting a patient's agenda (the reason for their visit, concerns and expectations) is fundamental to health care but if not done effectively outcomes can be adversely affected. Forms to help patients consider important issues prior to a consultation have been tested with mixed results. We hypothesized that using an agenda form would impact the extent to which patients felt their doctor discussed the issues that were important to them. Patients were randomized to receive an agenda form to complete whilst waiting or usual care. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of patients agreeing with the statement 'My doctor discussed the issues that were important to me' rated on a four-point scale. Secondary outcomes included other experience and satisfaction measures, consultation duration and patient confidence. There was no significant effect of agenda form use on primary or secondary outcomes. Post hoc exploratory analyses suggested possible differential effects for new compared to follow-up patients. There was no overall benefit from the form and a risk of detrimental impact on patient experience for some patients. There is a need for greater understanding of what works for whom in supporting patients to get the most from their consultation.

  1. Prospective, Controlled Study of Acyclovir Pharmacokinetics in Obese Patients.

    PubMed

    Turner, R Brigg; Cumpston, Aaron; Sweet, Michael; Briggs, Frank; Slain, Douglas; Wen, Sijin; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi; Petros, William

    2016-01-11

    The current recommendations for intravenous (i.v.) acyclovir dosing in obese patients suggest using ideal body weight (IBW) rather than total body weight (TBW). To our knowledge, no pharmacokinetic analysis has validated this recommendation. This single-dose pharmacokinetic study was conducted in an inpatient oncology population. Enrollment was conducted by 1:1 matching of obese patients (>190% of IBW) to normal-weight patients (80 to 120% of IBW). All patients received a single dose of i.v. acyclovir, 5 mg/kg, infused over 60 min. Consistent with current recommendations, IBW was used for obese patients and TBW for normal-weight patients. Serial plasma concentrations were obtained and compared. Seven obese and seven normal-weight patients were enrolled, with mean body mass indexes of 45.0 and 22.5 kg/m(2), respectively. Systemic clearance was substantially higher in the obese than normal-weight patients (mean, 19.4 ± 5.3 versus 14.3 ± 5.4 liters/h; P = 0.047). Area under the concentration-time curve was lower in the obese patients (15.2 ± 2.9 versus 24.0 ± 9.4 mg · h/liter; P = 0.011), as was maximum concentration (5.8 ± 0.9 versus 8.2 ± 1.3 mg/liter; P = 0.031). Utilization of IBW for dose calculation of i.v. acyclovir in obese patients leads to lower systemic exposure than dosing by TBW in normal-weight patients. While not directly evaluated in this study, utilization of an adjusted body weight for dose determination appears to more closely approximate the exposure seen in normal-weight patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01714180.).

  2. Arterial stiffness in periodontitis patients and controls. A case–control and pilot intervention study.

    PubMed

    Houcken, W; Teeuw, W J; Bizzarro, S; Alvarez Rodriguez, E; Mulders, T A; van den Born, B-Jh; Loos, B G

    2016-01-01

    Increased arterial stiffness (AS) is an important indicator for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). Epidemiologically, periodontitis and ACVD are associated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate AS in periodontitis patients and controls. In addition, we explored the effect of periodontal therapy on AS in a sub-group of cases. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV), a non-invasive chair-side function test for AS, was measured in periodontitis patients (n=57; mean age 46.6 years) and compared with a reference group (n=48; mean age 45.5 years). In addition, 45 cases (mean age 46.9 years) were 6 months followed after periodontal treatment, to explore a possible effect on arterial function. Periodontitis patients showed a significantly increased PWV compared with the reference group (8.01±0.20 vs. 7.36±0.22 m s(-1) respectively; P=0.029) and this remained significant after adjustments for ACVD risk factors (P=0.019). After periodontal therapy, no significant reduction in PWV was seen (8.00±1.8 to 7.82±1.6 m s(-1); P=0.13), but systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly reduced (119.8±14.6 to 116.9±15.1 mm Hg; P=0.040). It can be concluded that periodontitis is associated with increased AS. This confirms with a new parameter the association of periodontitis with ACVD. Although periodontal treatment did not lower AS significantly, a modest reduction of SBP after 6 months was observed.

  3. Kinetics of muscle deoxygenation are accelerated at the onset of heavy-intensity exercise in patients with COPD: relationship to central cardiovascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Gaspar R; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Ferreira, Leonardo F; Carrascosa, Claúdia; Oliveira, Cristino Carneiro; Maia, Joyce; Gimenes, Ana Cristina; Queiroga, Fernando; Berton, Danilo; Ferreira, Eloara M V; Nery, Luis Eduardo; Neder, J Alberto

    2008-05-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have slowed pulmonary O(2) uptake (Vo(2)(p)) kinetics during exercise, which may stem from inadequate muscle O(2) delivery. However, it is currently unknown how COPD impacts the dynamic relationship between systemic and microvascular O(2) delivery to uptake during exercise. We tested the hypothesis that, along with slowed Vo(2)(p) kinetics, COPD patients have faster dynamics of muscle deoxygenation, but slower kinetics of cardiac output (Qt) following the onset of heavy-intensity exercise. We measured Vo(2)(p), Qt (impedance cardiography), and muscle deoxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) during heavy-intensity exercise performed to the limit of tolerance by 10 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD and 11 age-matched sedentary controls. Variables were analyzed by standard nonlinear regression equations. Time to exercise intolerance was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in patients and related to the kinetics of Vo(2)(p) (r = -0.70; P < 0.05). Compared with controls, COPD patients displayed slower kinetics of Vo(2)(p) (42 +/- 13 vs. 73 +/- 24 s) and Qt (67 +/- 11 vs. 96 +/- 32 s), and faster overall kinetics of muscle deoxy-Hb (19.9 +/- 2.4 vs. 16.5 +/- 3.4 s). Consequently, the time constant ratio of O(2) uptake to mean response time of deoxy-Hb concentration was significantly greater in patients, suggesting a slower kinetics of microvascular O(2) delivery. In conclusion, our data show that patients with moderate-to-severe COPD have impaired central and peripheral cardiovascular adjustments following the onset of heavy-intensity exercise. These cardiocirculatory disturbances negatively impact the dynamic matching of O(2) delivery and utilization and may contribute to the slower Vo(2)(p) kinetics compared with age-matched controls.

  4. Anti-Müllerian hormone and antral follicle count reveal a late impairment of ovarian reserve in patients undergoing low-gonadotoxic regimens for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Rossana; Costantini, Claudio; Tecchio, Cristina; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montemezzi, Rachele; Perandini, Alessio; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Franchi, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The impact of cancer therapy on the reproductive potential of patients is increasingly recognized because survival rates of patients have clearly improved in recent years. Different fertility preservation methods, either generally accepted or still experimental, are currently available, and counseling of patients requires a delicate balance between the efficacy and side effects of the proposed method and the characteristics of both the tumor and the therapy. Deeper knowledge of the effects of cancer therapy on the reproductive potential of patients over time is required to identify the most appropriate fertility preservation method. In this paper, we report a case-control study in which female patients who were diagnosed with hematological malignancies and treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy were compared with age-matched controls in terms of ovarian reserve, as measured by ultrasound examination and hormonal status. By stratifying patients for gonadotoxicity of the therapy received and time elapsed from the end of the therapy, we report that patients treated with low gonadotoxic therapies, while being similar to age-matched controls in their ovarian reserve when evaluated within a few years from the end of the therapy, show a clear impairment over longer times. We also report that anti-Müllerian hormone is the most sensitive hormonal parameter in detecting changes in ovarian reserve when compared with follicle-stimulating hormone or inhibin-B. This study stresses the importance of accurate counseling at the time of diagnosis of cancer and emphasizes the risks of infertility with low gonadotoxic therapies that may reduce the reproductive window of survivors.

  5. Aberrant Effective Connectivity in Schizophrenia Patients during Appetitive Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Diaconescu, Andreea Oliviana; Jensen, Jimmy; Wang, Hongye; Willeit, Matthäus; Menon, Mahesh; Kapur, Shitij; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that schizophrenia involves dysfunction in brain connectivity at a neural level, and a dysfunction in reward processing at a behavioral level. The purpose of the present study was to link these two levels of analyses by examining effective connectivity patterns between brain regions mediating reward learning in patients with schizophrenia and healthy, age-matched controls. To this aim, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and galvanic skin recordings (GSR) while patients and controls performed an appetitive conditioning experiment with visual cues as the conditioned (CS) stimuli, and monetary reward as the appetitive unconditioned stimulus (US). Based on explicit stimulus contingency ratings, conditioning occurred in both groups; however, based on implicit, physiological GSR measures, patients failed to show differences between CS+ and CS− conditions. Healthy controls exhibited increased blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity across striatal, hippocampal, and prefrontal regions and increased effective connectivity from the ventral striatum to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC BA 11) in the CS+ compared to the CS− condition. Compared to controls, patients showed increased BOLD activity across a similar network of brain regions, and increased effective connectivity from the striatum to hippocampus and prefrontal regions in the CS− compared to the CS+ condition. The findings of increased BOLD activity and effective connectivity in response to the CS− in patients with schizophrenia offer insight into the aberrant assignment of motivational salience to non-reinforced stimuli during conditioning that is thought to accompany schizophrenia. PMID:21267430

  6. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Swedish patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Annelie; Löfberg, Robert; Sternby, Berit; Eriksson, Anders; Almer, Sven; Befrits, Ragnar; Fossum, Bjöörn; Karlén, Per; Broström, Olle; Tysk, Curt

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an increasing interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with chronic diseases, including those with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients may turn to CAM when conventional therapies are inadequate or associated with side effects for symptomatic relief or to regain control over their disease. The objectives were to explore CAM use and perceived effects in IBD patients in comparison with a control group. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter, controlled study was carried out. IBD patients were invited from 12 IBD clinics in Sweden. Controls were selected randomly from a residence registry. A study-specific questionnaire was used for data collection. Results Overall, 48.3% of patients with IBD had used some kind of CAM during the past year compared with 53.5% in controls (P=0.025, adjusted for age, sex, geographic residence, and diet). The most frequently used CAM among IBD patients was massage (21.3%), versus controls (31.4%) (adjusted P=0.0003). The second most used CAM was natural products, 18.7% in IBD patients versus 22.3% of the controls (unadjusted P=0.018). In all, 83.1% of the patients experienced positive effects from CAM and 14.4% experienced negative effects. Conclusion Overall, 48.3% of Swedish IBD patients used some kind of CAM and controls used CAM significantly more. Natural products were used by one-fifth of the patients and even more by controls. This is notable from a patient safety perspective considering the possible risks of interactions with conventional medication. In all, 40% of the patients reported adverse events from conventional medicine. Patients experienced predominantly positive effects from CAM, and so did controls. PMID:27472271

  7. Collagen cross-linking of skin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Collagen cross-links of skin tissue (left upper arm) from 11 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 9 age-matched control subjects were quantified. It was found that patients with ALS had a significant reduction in the content of an age-related, stable cross-link, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine, that was negatively correlated with the duration of illness. The contents of sodium borohydride-reducible labile cross-links, dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine, were significantly increased and were positively associated with the duration of illness (r = 0.703, p less than 0.05 and r = 0.684, p less than 0.05, respectively). The results clearly indicate that during the course of ALS, the cross-linking pathway of skin collagen runs counter to its normal aging, resulting in a "rejuvenation" phenomenon of skin collagen. Thus, cross-linking of skin collagen is affected in ALS.

  8. An assessment of driving fitness in patients with visual impairment to understand the elevated risk of motor vehicle accidents

    PubMed Central

    Kunimatsu-Sanuki, Shiho; Iwase, Aiko; Araie, Makoto; Aoki, Yuki; Hara, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Toru; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Itoh, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the driving fitness of patients with glaucoma by identifying specific areas and degrees of visual field impairment that threaten safe driving. Design Case–control study. Setting, and participants This prospective study included 36 patients with advanced glaucoma, defined as Humphrey field analyzer (HFA; 24-2 SITA standard program) measurements of mean deviation in both eyes of worse than −12 dB, and 36 age-matched and driving exposure time-matched normal subjects. All participants underwent testing in a novel driving simulator (DS) system. Participants were recruited between September 2010 and January 2012. Main outcome measures The number of collisions with simulated hazards and braking response time in 14 DS scenarios was recorded. Monocular HFA 24-2 test results from both eyes were merged to calculate the binocular integrated visual field (IVF). The position of the IVF subfields in which the collision-involved patients had lower sensitivity than the collision-uninvolved patients was compared with the track of the hazard. The cut-off value to predict an elevated risk of collisions was determined, as were its sensitivity and specificity, with the area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve. Results Patients with advanced glaucoma were involved in a significantly higher number of collisions in the DS than the age-matched and driving exposure time-matched normal subjects (119 vs 40, respectively, p<0.0001), especially in four specific DS scenarios. In these four scenarios, IVF sensitivity was significantly lower in the collision-involved patients than in the collision-uninvolved patients in subfields on or near the track of the simulated hazard (p<0.05). The subfields with the largest AUROC curve had values ranging from 0.72 to 0.91 and were located in the paracentral visual field just below the horizontal. Conclusions Our novel DS system effectively assessed visual impairment, showing that simulators may have future

  9. Increased risk of osteoporosis in patients with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Chai, Chee-Yin; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Tsai, Feng-Ji; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we aimed to investigate the risk of osteoporosis in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) by analyzing data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). From the Taiwan NHIRD, we analyzed data on 4460 patients aged ≥40 years diagnosed with ED between 1996 and 2010. In total, 17,480 age-matched patients without ED in a 1:4 ratio were randomly selected as the non-ED group. The relationship between ED and the risk of osteoporosis was estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. During the follow-up period, 264 patients with ED (5.92%) and 651 patients without ED (3.65%) developed osteoporosis. The overall incidence of osteoporosis was 3.04-fold higher in the ED group than in the non-ED group (9.74 vs 2.47 per 1000 person-years) after controlling for covariates. Compared with patients without ED, patients with psychogenic and organic ED were 3.19- and 3.03-fold more likely to develop osteoporosis. Our results indicate that patients with a history of ED, particularly younger men, had a high risk of osteoporosis. Patients with ED should be examined for bone mineral density, and men with osteoporosis should be evaluated for ED. PMID:27368024

  10. Unwanted control: how patients in the primary care setting decide about screening for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Steven H; Krist, Alex H; Johnson, Robert E; Stenborg, Pamela S

    2005-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend shared decision-making to determine whether the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test should be performed. At a large family medicine practice in suburban Washington, DC, we administered a sequence of patient and physician surveys to examine the desired and actual level of patient control over PSA screening decisions and the circumstances in which they occur. Both before and after visits, patients expressed a preference for a shared approach to the PSA decision, but the actual decision involved a significant shift toward greater patient control. Almost 25% of patients reported greater decisional control than they desired. Fully 30% of the men who wanted a shared approach made the actual decision themselves. Patients prefer a shared approach to the PSA decision but report greater personal control when the decision is actually made. Further research is needed to understand this phenomenon and to better accommodate patients' desire for shared decision-making.

  11. Lack of post-exercise depression of corticospinal excitability in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Khedr, E M; Galal, O; Said, A; Abd-elsameea, M; Rothwell, J C

    2007-07-01

    There is lack of clarity in the literature over whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) show the same post-exercise depression of corticospinal excitability as is usually observed in healthy control. This study set out to resolve the problem. Ten patients with idiopathic PD and 10 age-matched controls were included in this study. Each subject performed a submaximal sustained voluntary contraction of the right first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) for 10 min or until force could no longer be sustained. Resting motor threshold, motor-evoked potential (MEP), input-output curve, cortical silent period duration, interference pattern (IP) and M/F ratio were recorded at baseline, immediately after fatigue and after 20 min rest. Immediately after exercise, decreased MEP amplitude and increased cortical SP duration were observed in the control group whilst no such changes were observed in PD patients. The input-output curve was also significantly suppressed only in controls, but not in patients. The amplitude of IP was significantly reduced immediately after exercise in both PD patients and controls. Almost all these changes returned nearly to baseline values after 20 min rest. The amount of exercise was approximately equal in both groups because the effect on M-waves and EMG amplitude was similar. However, the expected decline in corticospinal excitability was absent in PD patients. The absence of this effect in PD patients may reflect reorganization of motor commands in response to basal ganglia deficit.

  12. Event-Related Potentials in Parkinson's Disease Patients with Visual Hallucination

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Li-Min

    2016-01-01

    Using neuropsychological investigation and visual event-related potentials (ERPs), we aimed to compare the ERPs and cognitive function of nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with and without visual hallucinations (VHs) and of control subjects. We recruited 12 PD patients with VHs (PD-H), 23 PD patients without VHs (PD-NH), and 18 age-matched controls. All subjects underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessment and visual ERPs measurement. A visual odd-ball paradigm with two different fixed interstimulus intervals (ISI) (1600 ms and 5000 ms) elicited visual ERPs. The frontal test battery was used to assess attention, visual-spatial function, verbal fluency, memory, higher executive function, and motor programming. The PD-H patients had significant cognitive dysfunction in several domains, compared to the PD-NH patients and controls. The mean P3 latency with ISI of 1600 ms in PD-H patients was significantly longer than that in controls. Logistic regression disclosed UPDRS-on score and P3 latency as significant predictors of VH. Our findings suggest that nondemented PD-H patients have worse cognitive function and P3 measurements. The development of VHs in nondemented PD patients might be implicated in executive dysfunction with altered visual information processing. PMID:28053801

  13. Electrocardiographic findings in Emergency Department patients with pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Richman, Peter B; Loutfi, Hassan; Lester, Steven J; Cambell, Patricia; Matthews, Jessica; Friese, Jeremy; Wood, Joseph; Kasper, David; Chen, Frederick; Mandell, Mark

    2004-08-01

    To assess the pre-study, null hypothesis that there is no difference in the electrocardiogram (EKG) findings for Emergency Department (ED) patients who rule in vs. rule out for suspected pulmonary embolism, a retrospective review of a cohort of patients with pulmonary embolism and their controls was conducted in an academic, suburban ED. Patients who were evaluated in the ED during a one-year study period for symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism were eligible for inclusion. All patients with pulmonary embolism and sex- and age-matched controls comprised the final study groups. Two board-certified cardiologists reviewed each patient's EKG. There were 350 eligible patients identified; 49 patients with pulmonary embolism and 49 controls were entered into the study. The most common rhythm observed in both groups was normal sinus rhythm (67.3% cases vs. 68.6 % controls; p = 1.0). Abnormalities believed to be associated with pulmonary embolism occurred with similar frequency in both case and control groups (sinus tachycardia [18.8 % vs. 11.8%, respectively; p = 0.40]), incomplete right bundle branch block (4.2% vs. 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.24), complete right bundle branch block (4.2% vs. 6.0, respectively; p = 1.0), S1Q3T3 pattern (2.1 vs. 0.0, respectively; p = 0.49), S1Q3 pattern (0.0 vs. 0.0), and extreme right axis (0.0 vs. 0.0). New EKG changes were identified more frequently for patients with pulmonary embolism (33.3% vs. 12.5% controls; p = 0.03), but specific findings were rarely different between cases and controls. In our cohort of ED patients, we did not identify EKG features that are likely to help distinguish patients with pulmonary embolism from those who rule out for the disease.

  14. [Basic policy towards patient's violation of drug control law].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Shinji

    2003-12-01

    All medical workers have a duty to protect a patient's privacy by law. Civil servants have a duty to prosecute anyone if a crime has been committed and others have the right to prosecute. When medical workers find their patient using illegal drugs, they are in a situation where any possible action they take is either a breach of one of the duties or an abandonment of the right to prosecute. Any worker in this situation should choose to do what will greater benefit society. Medical workers should avoid prosecuting a patient for illegal drug use, so that drug users can seek help. At the same time medical workers should try to put the patient in a situation where the patient's drug use in the future can be treated by the criminal justice system.

  15. Inhibitory motor control in apneic and insomniac patients: a stop task study.

    PubMed

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Philip, Pierre; Schwartz, Sophie

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess with a stop task the inhibitory motor control efficiency--a major component of executive control functions--in patients suffering from sleep disorders. Twenty-two patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) (mean age 46 +/- 9 years; mean apnea-hypopnea index, AHI = 30 +/- 20) and 13 patients with psychophysiological insomnia (mean age 47 +/- 12 years) were compared with individually matched healthy controls. Sleep disturbances in the patient populations were clinically and polysomnographically diagnosed. The stop task has a frequent visual 'Go' stimulus to set up a response tendency and a less frequent auditory 'Stop' signal to withhold the planned or prepotent response. The stop signal reaction time (SSRT) reflects the time to internally suppress the ongoing response. SSRT was slower for the apneic patients than for their respective controls (248 +/- 107 versus 171 +/- 115 ms, anova, P < 0.05) but not for the insomniac patients compared with their controls (235 +/- 112 versus 194 +/- 109 ms, NS). Moreover, in apneic patients, slower SSRT was associated with lower nocturnal oxygen saturation (r = -0.477, P < 0.05). By contrast, neither apneics nor insomniacs differed from their matched controls for reaction times on Go trials. To conclude, unlike insomniacs, OSAS patients present an impaired inhibitory motor control, an executive function which is required in many common everyday life situations. Inhibitory motor control relies on the integrity of the inferior prefrontal cortex, which could be affected by nocturnal oxyhemoglobin desaturation in apneic patients.

  16. Effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Han, Wen; Han, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to evaluate the effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia. A total of 90 patients, who underwent intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, were included into this study. All patients were randomly divided into 3 groups (each group, n=30): naloxone group (naloxone+fentanyl), tropisetron group (tropisetron+fentanyl), and fentanyl group (fentanyl). Patients in each group were given a corresponding dose of naloxone. Postoperative analgesia effect and the incidence of side effects such as nausea and vomiting were observed. Small doses of naloxone or tropisetron combined with fentanyl used for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia can significantly reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting. Six hours after surgery, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in patients that underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia using low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl compared with patients who received fentanyl alone; however, the postoperative analgesic effect of tropisetron was not observed. Compared with the combination of tropisetron and fentanyl, low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl can obviously reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and enhance the analgesic effect of fentanyl 6 hours after surgery. Low-dose naloxone can reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, and exhibits a certain synergic analgesic effect. PMID:27902584

  17. Effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Han, Wen; Han, Xiao-Dong; Ma, Xiao-Yuan; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of naloxone on intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia.A total of 90 patients, who underwent intravenous fentanyl patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, were included into this study. All patients were randomly divided into 3 groups (each group, n=30): naloxone group (naloxone+fentanyl), tropisetron group (tropisetron+fentanyl), and fentanyl group (fentanyl). Patients in each group were given a corresponding dose of naloxone. Postoperative analgesia effect and the incidence of side effects such as nausea and vomiting were observed.Small doses of naloxone or tropisetron combined with fentanyl used for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia can significantly reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting. Six hours after surgery, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were significantly lower in patients that underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia using low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl compared with patients who received fentanyl alone; however, the postoperative analgesic effect of tropisetron was not observed. Compared with the combination of tropisetron and fentanyl, low-dose naloxone combined with fentanyl can obviously reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and enhance the analgesic effect of fentanyl 6 hours after surgery.Low-dose naloxone can reduce the incidence of nausea and vomiting in patients who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy under total intravenous anesthesia, and exhibits a certain synergic analgesic effect.

  18. Sway patterns in orthostatic tremor: impairment of postural control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bacsi, Ann M; Fung, Victor S C; Colebatch, James G

    2005-11-01

    Sway parameters in orthostatic tremor (OT) patients were compared with age-matched controls. The effects of vision (eyes open or closed), stance width (feet apart or together), and external support (with or without) on sway and 14-18 Hz energy were measured. Sway in OT patients decreased in the presence of each of the stabilizing factors but the extent of benefit obtained by OT patients was significantly less than controls for support for the sagittal plane (22% vs. 42% decrease; P < 0.01) and feet apart in the mediolateral plane (38% vs. 65% decrease; P < 0.01). Three patients with proprioceptive loss also had a reduced response to these factors. Energy in the 14-18 Hz range did not always change in parallel with sway levels. Vision suppresses activity at the OT frequency in patients. Postural control mechanisms in OT remain responsive to postural conditions, but patients differ significantly from normals in the degree of their responsiveness. OT appears to have disruption of the normal generation or processing of proprioceptive signals as one of its important components.

  19. Contact isolation for infection control in hospitalized patients: is patient satisfaction affected?

    PubMed

    Gasink, Leanne B; Singer, Karyn; Fishman, Neil O; Holmes, William C; Weiner, Mark G; Bilker, Warren B; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2008-03-01

    The effects of contact isolation on patient satisfaction are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional survey and found that most patients lack education and knowledge regarding isolation but feel that it improves their care. In multivariable analysis, isolated patients were not less satisfied with inpatient care than were nonisolated patients.

  20. The computer-based Symbol Digit Modalities Test: establishing age-expected performance in healthy controls and evaluation of pediatric MS patients.

    PubMed

    Bigi, Sandra; Marrie, R A; Till, C; Yeh, E A; Akbar, N; Feinstein, A; Banwell, B L

    2017-04-01

    Decreased information processing speed (IPS) is frequently reported in pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The computerized version of the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (c-SDMT) measures IPS over eight consecutive trials per session and additionally captures changes in performance within the session. Here, we establish normative c-SDMT performance and test-retest reliability in healthy children (HC) and explore differences in the overall c-SDMT-performance between HC and MS patients. This cross-sectional study included 478 HC (237 female, 49.5%) divided into five age groups (2 years each), and 27 MS patients (22 female, 81.5%) aged 8-18 years. The average time to complete the c-SDMT increased with age (|r| 0.70, 95% CI -0.74, -0.64). Test-retest reliability was high (ICC = 0.91) in HC. The total time to complete the c-SDMT did not differ between children with MS and sex- and age- matched HC (p = 0.23). However, MS patients were less likely to show faster performance across all the successive eight trials compared to HC (p = 0.0001). Healthy children demonstrate faster IPS with increasing age, as well as during successive trials of the c-SDMT. The inability of pediatric MS patients to maintain the increase in processing speed over successive trials suggests a reduced capacity for procedural learning, possibly resulting from cognitive fatigue.

  1. Oncology patients pose challenge in choosing birth control method.

    PubMed

    Neinstein, L S; Katz, B

    1985-04-01

    Available information on the impact of radiation and chemotherapy on the fertility and pregnancy outcomes of oncology patients was briefly reviewed, and some suggestions for the contraceptive counseling of oncology patients were provided. Pregnancy generally has no adverse effect on nonhormonal dependent tumors, but the therapy used to treat the tumors may have an adverse effect on the patient's fertility and on the fetus. Studies indicate that radiation therapy can interfere with ovarian function. For example, in a study of 208 patients, under 18 years of age and with various types of cancers, 52% received radiation therapy and 47% received chemotherapy. None of the chemotherapy patients developed ovarian failure. Among radiated patients, ovarian failure developed in 68% of the women when the ovaries were in the treatment field, in 14% of those whose ovaries were at the border of the treatment field, and in none of the women whose ovaries were outside the treatment field. Other studies indicate that chemotherapy can destroy ovarian primordial follicles. The damage seems to be caused by the alkylating agents. Combination chemotherapy is especially damaging to the ovaries. 1 investigator found that among 35 leukemia patients who received chemotherapy, 1 of the 17 prepubertal women and 6 of the 18 pubertal or post pubertal women experienced either ovarian failure or hypothalamic pituitary dysfunction. Radiation therapy during the 1st trimester and radiation therapy which exposes the fetus to 10 or more rad increases the risk of fetal wastage and fetal malformation. The risk of these adverse effects for the fetus can be reduced by using a pelvis shield and by moving the ovaries to midline at staging laparotomy. There is considerable evidence that chemotherapy during the 1st trimester can produce abortion and fetal malformation. Most experts recommend avoiding chemotherapy during the 1st trimester, whenever possible, and many recommend therapuetic abortion for women

  2. The influence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy on local postural muscle and central sensory feedback balance control.

    PubMed

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Mohler, Jane; Armstrong, David G; Talal, Talal K; Najafi, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Poor balance control and increased fall risk have been reported in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Traditional body sway measures are unable to describe underlying postural control mechanism. In the current study, we used stabilogram diffusion analysis to examine the mechanism under which balance is altered in DPN patients under local-control (postural muscle control) and central-control (postural control using sensory cueing). DPN patients and healthy age-matched adults over 55 years performed two 15-second Romberg balance trials. Center of gravity sway was measured using a motion tracker system based on wearable inertial sensors, and used to derive body sway and local/central control balance parameters. Eighteen DPN patients (age = 65.4±7.6 years; BMI = 29.3±5.3 kg/m2) and 18 age-matched healthy controls (age = 69.8±2.9; BMI = 27.0±4.1 kg/m2) with no major mobility disorder were recruited. The rate of sway within local-control was significantly higher in the DPN group by 49% (healthy local-controlslope = 1.23±1.06×10-2 cm2/sec, P<0.01), which suggests a compromised local-control balance behavior in DPN patients. Unlike local-control, the rate of sway within central-control was 60% smaller in the DPN group (healthy central-controlslope-Log = 0.39±0.23, P<0.02), which suggests an adaptation mechanism to reduce the overall body sway in DPN patients. Interestingly, significant negative correlations were observed between central-control rate of sway with neuropathy severity (rPearson = 0.65-085, P<0.05) and the history of diabetes (rPearson = 0.58-071, P<0.05). Results suggest that in the lack of sensory feedback cueing, DPN participants were highly unstable compared to controls. However, as soon as they perceived the magnitude of sway using sensory feedback, they chose a high rigid postural control strategy, probably due to high concerns for fall, which may increase the energy cost during extended period of standing; the adaptation mechanism

  3. Comparison of Pain Scores in Postoperative Patients: Intravenous Morphine Patient-Controlled Analgesia vs Iontophoretic Transdermal Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Caram, Anthony M; Patel, Nirav; Sandler, Hayden M

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative management of pain has traditionally utilized intravenous (IV) morphine for pain control. An alternative approach to the invasive patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) system is the administration of transdermal analgesics, such as fentanyl. In 2006 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the fentanyl hydrochloride (fentanyl HCl) iontophoretic transdermal system (ITS), which utilizes iontophoretic technology to produce a controlled electrical current that propels ionized fentanyl molecules into the systemic vasculature. Transdermal fentanyl has been shown to be equivalent or superior to IV morphine PCA in a variety of postoperative settings with patients experiencing decreased pain scores and a favorable side effect profile. PMID:27688989

  4. Sentence Context Prevails Over Word Association in Aphasia Patients with Spared Comprehension: Evidence from N400 Event-Related Potential

    PubMed Central

    Khachatryan, Elvira; De Letter, Miet; Vanhoof, Gertie; Goeleven, Ann; Van Hulle, Marc M.

    2017-01-01

    Behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) studies on aphasia patients showed that lexical information is not lost but rather its integration into the working context is hampered. Studies have been conducted on the processing of sentence-level information (meaningful versus meaningless) and of word-level information (related versus unrelated) in aphasia patients, but we are not aware of any study that assesses the relationship between the two. In healthy subjects the processing of a single word in a sentence context has been studied using the N400 ERP. It was shown that, even when there is only a weak expectation of a final word in a sentence, this expectation will dominate word relatedness. In order to study the effect of semantic relatedness between words in sentence processing in aphasia patients, we conducted a crossed-design ERP study, crossing the factors of word relatedness and sentence congruity. We tested aphasia patients with mild to minimum comprehension deficit and healthy young and older (age-matched with our patients) controls on a semantic anomaly judgment task when simultaneously recording EEG. Our results show that our aphasia patient’s N400 amplitudes in response to the sentences of our crossed-design study were similar to those of our age-matched healthy subjects. However, we detected an increase in the N400 ERP latency in those patients, indicating a delay in the integration of the new word into the working context. Additionally, we observed a positive correlation between comprehension level of those patients and N400 effect in response to meaningful sentences without word relatedness contrasted to meaningless sentences without word relatedness. PMID:28119590

  5. Cardiac vagal control and dynamic responses to psychological stress among patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grossman, P; Watkins, L L; Wilhelm, F H; Manolakis, D; Lown, B

    1996-12-15

    Two groups of patients with coronary artery disease who differed in level of cardiac vagal control were compared in their cardiovascular responses to psychological stress. Patients with lower vagal control manifested increased reactions in diastolic blood pressure and rate-pressure product to mental stress and tended to have greater systemic vasoconstriction.

  6. Incidence of ectopic gray matter in patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects studied with MRI.

    PubMed

    Nopoulos, P; Swayze, V; Flaum, M; Andreasen, N C

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging scans were visually inspected to investigate the incidence of gray matter heterotopia (GMH) in a group of 55 schizophrenic patients and a group of 75 control subjects. No GMHs were found in the control subjects. In the patient group, 1 GMH was found, an incidence of 1.8%.

  7. Altered pain modulation in patients with persistent postendodontic pain

    PubMed Central

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Khan, Junad; Benoliel, Rafael; Feng, Changyong; Yarnitsky, David; Kuo, Fengshen; Hirschberg, Craig; Hartwell, Gary; Huang, Ching-Yu; Heir, Gary; Korczeniewska, Olga; Diehl, Scott R.; Eliav, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Persistent pain may follow nerve injuries associated with invasive therapeutic interventions. About 3% to 7% of the patients remain with chronic pain after endodontic treatment, and these are described as suffering from painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Unfortunately, we are unable to identify which patients undergoing such procedures are at increased risk of developing PTTN. Recent findings suggest that impaired endogenous analgesia may be associated with the development of postsurgical chronic pain. We hypothesized that patients with PTTN display pronociceptive pain modulation, in line with other chronic pain disorders. Dynamic (conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) and static (response to mechanical and cold stimulation) psychophysical tests were performed intraorally and in the forearm of 27 patients with PTTN and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. The dynamic sensory testing demonstrated less efficient conditioned pain modulation, suggesting reduced function of the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulatory system, in patients with PTTN, mainly in those suffering from the condition for more than a year. The static sensory testing of patients with PTTN demonstrated forearm hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation mainly in patients suffering from the condition for less than a year and prolonged painful sensation after intraoral cold stimulus mainly in patients suffering from the condition for more than a year. These findings suggest that PTTN is associated more with the inhibitory rather than the facilitatory arm of pain modulation and that the central nervous system has a role in PTTN pathophysiology, possibly in a time-dependent fashion. PMID:26098442

  8. Hepatitis B virus infection in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Permin, H; Aldershvile, J; Nielsen, J O

    1982-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-nine patients with different rheumatic diseases were investigated for serological markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. An increased prevalence of anti-HBs was found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The total prevalence of HBV markers in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica, temporal arteritis, juvenile and adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic sclerosis was not significantly different from age-matched controls. Remarkably, 6 patients were HBsAg-positive of whom 3 had RA (4%). Two patients with RA were "healthy' HBsAg carriers. The third patient had circulating HBeAg as well and had shown progression from acute hepatitis to cirrhosis during the time of observation. Three of 18 patients with polyarteritis nodosa were HBsAg- and HBeAg-positive, and all 3 were young men. Clinical improvement was seen in one of these patients and was associated with seroconversion from HBeAg to anti-HBe. Our data do not support the theory that HBV is an aetiological factor in rheumatic diseases except in some cases of polyarteritis nodosa. PMID:6127059

  9. The Philosophy and Practice of Patient Control in Hospice: The Dynamics of Autonomy versus Paternalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesler, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Based on nearly three years of participant-observation research in hospice settings, factors that interfere with the hospice philosophy of providing patient autonomy include efforts at symptom control, patient residence, patient disease state, and staff limit setting. Discusses examples, implications, and staff attempts at solutions. (JPS)

  10. Analysis of Retinal Peripapillary Segmentation in Early Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salobrar-Garcia, Elena; Hoyas, Irene; Leal, Mercedes; de Hoz, Rosa; Rojas, Blanca; Ramirez, Ana I.; Salazar, Juan J.; Yubero, Raquel; Gil, Pedro; Triviño, Alberto; Ramirez, José M.

    2015-01-01

    Decreased thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) may reflect retinal neuronal-ganglion cell death. A decrease in the RNFL has been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) in addition to aging by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Twenty-three mild-AD patients and 28 age-matched control subjects with mean Mini-Mental State Examination 23.3 and 28.2, respectively, with no ocular disease or systemic disorders affecting vision, were considered for study. OCT peripapillary and macular segmentation thickness were examined in the right eye of each patient. Compared to controls, eyes of patients with mild-AD patients showed no statistical difference in peripapillary RNFL thickness (P > 0.05); however, sectors 2, 3, 4, 8, 9, and 11 of the papilla showed thinning, while in sectors 1, 5, 6, 7, and 10 there was thickening. Total macular volume and RNFL thickness of the fovea in all four inner quadrants and in the outer temporal quadrants proved to be significantly decreased (P < 0.01). Despite the fact that peripapillary RNFL thickness did not statistically differ in comparison to control eyes, the increase in peripapillary thickness in our mild-AD patients could correspond to an early neurodegeneration stage and may entail the existence of an inflammatory process that could lead to progressive peripapillary fiber damage. PMID:26557684

  11. Emotional and physiologic responses to laboratory challenges: patients with temporomandibular disorders versus matched control subjects.

    PubMed

    Curran, S L; Carlson, C R; Okeson, J P

    1996-01-01

    This study explored psychologic and physiologic factors differentiating patients with temporomandibular disorders (n = 23) from sex-, age-, and weight-matched asymptomatic control subjects. Each subject completed several standard psychologic questionnaires and then underwent two laboratory stressors (mental arithmetic and pressure-pain stimulation). Results indicated that patients with temporomandibular disorders had greater resting respiration rates and reported greater anxiety, sadness, and guilt relative to control subjects. In response to the math stressor, patients with temporomandibular disorders reacted with greater anger than did control subjects. There were no differences between patients with temporomandibular disorders and control subjects on pain measures or any other measured variable for the pressure-pain stimulation trial. In addition, there were no differences in electromyography levels between patients with temporomandibular disorders and control subjects. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the etiology and treatment of this common and debilitating set of disorders.

  12. Postoperative Pain and Intravenous Patient-Controlled Analgesia-Related Adverse Effects in Young and Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jae Chul; Lee, Jinae; Kim, So Yeon; Choi, Sumin; Han, Dong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this retrospective analysis of 10,575 patients who used fentanyl-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) after surgery, we evaluated difference between young and elderly patients on their characteristic of adverse effects. We reviewed the data collected from the patients who were provided IV-PCA for pain control following elective surgery under either general or spinal anesthesia between September 2010 and March 2014. Postoperative pain, incidence of PCA-related adverse effects, and risk factors for the need of rescue analgesics and antiemetics for postoperative 48 hours were analyzed. Pain intensity (numerical rating scale [NRS]) at postoperative 6 to 12 hours (4.68 vs 4.58, P < 0.01) and incidence of nausea or vomiting (23.8% vs 20.6%, P < 0.001) were higher in young patients, while incidence of PCA discontinuation (9.9% vs 11.5%, P < 0.01) and sedation (0.1% vs 0.7%, P < 0.001) was higher in elderly patients. Despite larger fentanyl dose used, a greater proportion of young patients required rescue analgesics (53.8% vs 47.9%, P < 0.001) while addition of ketorolac was effective in reducing postoperative pain. Despite lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), a larger proportion of elderly patients required rescue antiemetics (10.1% vs 12.2%, P < 0.001) while addition of ramosetron was effective in reducing PONV. In conclusion, when fentanyl-based IV-PCA is used for postoperative pain control, a larger proportion of young patients may require rescue analgesics while elderly patients may require more rescue antiemetics. The addition of ketorolac or ramosetron to the PCA of young and elderly patients can be effective to prevent rescue analgesics or antiemetics use. PMID:26559296

  13. Association of serum Dkk-1 levels with β-catenin in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Xu, Xiao-juan; Shen, Lin; Yang, Yan-ping; Zhu, Rui; Shuai, Bo; Zhu, Xi-Wen; Li, Cheng-gang; Ma, Chen; Lv, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Wnt signaling plays an important role in the bone development and remodeling. The Wnt antagonist Dkk-1 is a potent inhibitor of bone formation. The aims of this study were firstly to compare the serum Dkk-1 levels in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients with age-matched healthy controls, and secondly, to assess the possible relationship between Dkk-1 and β-catenin, sclerostin, or bone turnover markers [CTX, PINP, N-MID-OT and 25(OH)D] in the setting of postmenopausal osteoporosis. A total of 350 patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and 150 age-matched healthy controls were enrolled, and the serum levels of Dkk-1, β-catenin, sclerostin, OPG, and RANKL were detected by ELISA, and bone turnover markers [CTX, PINP, N-MID-OT and 25(OH)D] were measured by Roche electrochemiluminescence system in two groups. Serum Dkk-1 levels were significantly higher in postmenopausal osteoporosis group than in control group (P<0.001). Univariate analyses revealed that serum Dkk-1 levels were weakly negatively correlated to β-catenin (r=-0.161, P=0.003) and OPG (r=-0.106, P=0.047), while multiple regression analysis showed a negative correlation between serum Dkk-1 levels with β-catenin (β=-0.165, P=0.009) and BMD (β=-0.139, P=0.027), and a positive correlation between serum Dkk-1 levels and CTX (β=0.122, P=0.040) in postmenopausal osteoporosis group. No similar correlations ware observed in control group. The results provided evidence for the role of Dkk-1 in bone metabolism and demonstrated the link of Dkk-1 and Wnt/β-catenin in some ways.

  14. Dysfunctional whole brain networks in mild cognitive impairment patients: an fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Bai, Lijun; Dai, Ruwei; Zhong, Chongguang; Xue, Ting; You, Youbo; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) was recognized as the prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent researches have shown that cognitive and memory decline in AD patients is coupled with losses of small-world attributes. However, few studies pay attention to the characteristics of the whole brain networks in MCI patients. In the present study, we investigated the topological properties of the whole brain networks utilizing graph theoretical approaches in 16 MCI patients, compared with 18 age-matched healthy subjects as a control. Both MCI patients and normal controls showed small-world architectures, with large clustering coefficients and short characteristic path lengths. We detected significantly longer characteristic path length in MCI patients compared with normal controls at the low sparsity. The longer characteristic path lengths in MCI indicated disrupted information processing among distant brain regions. Compared with normal controls, MCI patients showed decreased nodal centrality in the brain areas of the angular gyrus, heschl gyrus, hippocampus and superior parietal gyrus, while increased nodal centrality in the calcarine, inferior occipital gyrus and superior frontal gyrus. These changes in nodal centrality suggested a widespread rewiring in MCI patients, which may be an integrated reflection of reorganization of the brain networks accompanied with the cognitive decline. Our findings may be helpful for further understanding the pathological mechanisms of MCI.

  15. An artificial pancreas for automated blood glucose control in patients with Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Signe; Boiroux, Dimitri; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Madsen, Henrik; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Automated glucose control in patients with Type 1 diabetes is much-coveted by patients, relatives and healthcare professionals. It is the expectation that a system for automated control, also know as an artificial pancreas, will improve glucose control, reduce the risk of diabetes complications and markedly improve patient quality of life. An artificial pancreas consists of portable devices for glucose sensing and insulin delivery which are controlled by an algorithm residing on a computer. The technology is still under development and currently no artificial pancreas is commercially available. This review gives an introduction to recent progress, challenges and future prospects within the field of artificial pancreas research.

  16. A closed-loop controller for mechanical ventilation of patients with ARDS.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey R; East, Thomas D

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical ventilators are routinely used to care for patients who cannot adequately breath on their own. Management of mechanical ventilation often involves a careful watch of the patient's arterial blood-oxygen tension and requires frequent adjustment of ventilation parameters to optimize the therapy. This situation lends itself as a candidate for closed-loop control. This report describes a closed-loop control system based on well-established protocols to systematically maintain appropriate levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and inspired oxygen (FiO2) in patients with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). The closed-loop control system consists of an in-dwelling arterial oxygenation (PaO2) sensor (Pfizer Continucath), coupled to a Macintosh computer that continuously controls FiO2 and PEEP settings on a Hamilton Amadeus ventilator. The implemented protocols provide continuous closed-loop control of oxygenation and a balance between patient need and minimal therapy. The controller is based on a traditional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) approach. The idea is to control, or maintain, the patient's PaO2 level at a target value determined, or set, by the patient's physician. The controller also features non-linear and adaptive characteristics that allow the system to respond more aggressively to "threatening" levels of PaO2. Another benefit of the control system is the ability to display, monitor, record and store all system parameters, settings, and control variables for future analysis and study. The system was extensively tested in the laboratory and in animal trials prior to use on human subjects. The results of a small clinical trial indicated that the system maintained control of the patient's therapy nearly 84% of the time. During the remainder of this time, the controller was interrupted primarily for suctioning, PaO2 sensor calibration or replacement. The response of the closed-loop controller was found to be appropriate

  17. Cortisol reaction in success and failure condition in endogenous depressed patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Croes, S; Merz, P; Netter, P

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied differences in cortisol response to controllable and uncontrollable stress and its relationship to Seligman's theory of learned helplessness in hospitalized unipolar depressed patients (11 nontreated, acutely depressed; 11 treated patients) and 11 age and sex matched controls hospitalized for traumatic surgery. Control and lack of control were achieved by induction of success and failure in a simple number addition test and applied in balanced order on 2 consecutive days. Saliva cortisol samples were collected before and after the test. No group differences in baseline cortisol levels were observed. Cortisol increased after uncontrollable and decreased after controllable stress in control patients, whereas cortisol decreased after both conditions in the acutely depressed group and less so in the treated group, although they were as emotionally upset after failure as controls. Thus, the normally observed ability of the neuroendocrine system to discriminate between controllable and uncontrollable stress deteriorates with increasing severity of depression.

  18. The borohydride-reducible compounds of human aortic elastin. Demonstration of a new cyclic amino acid in alkali hydrolysate, and changes with age and in patients with annulo-aortic ectasia including one with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Halme, T; Jutila, M; Vihersaari, T; Oksman, P; Light, N D; Penttinen, R

    1985-01-01

    Human aortic elastin reduced with [3H]borohydride was analysed by ion-exchange chromatography after alkali or acid hydrolysis. Alkali hydrolysates of elastins contained a radioactive peak that was eluted between proline and leucine. This peak was not present in foetal elastin, but its proportion increased steadily during aging. Aortic samples from patients with annulo-aortic ectasia (aneurysm of the ascending aorta), including one with classical Marfan syndrome, contained less elastin (CNBr-insoluble material) than did the age-matched controls. The proportion of radioactivity in the new peak of all these aortas was low when compared with age-matched controls. Gas-chromatographic/mass-spectrometric analysis suggested that it contained a cyclic derivative of a hydrated aldol-condensation product. The concentration of the cross-link precursors, lysine aldehyde and aldol-condensation product (estimated from the acid-hydrolysis product 6-chloronorleucine and the acid-degradation product of reduced aldol-condensation product) was high in very young aortas but remained quite stable after childhood. No differences were observed in cross-link profiles of acid hydrolysates between pathological and control aortas. A low proportion of radioactivity in the new peak may indicate the presence of young or immature elastin in the pathological aortas. PMID:4084226

  19. Satisfaction with control of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Neelufar; Lobosco, Steve; Lu, Peng; Roughley, Adam; Alperovich, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patient satisfaction with disease control of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an important component of medical management. This analysis evaluated patient and physician satisfaction with disease control of SLE, factors associated with satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and the degree of physician–patient concordance of these parameters. Patients and methods Data were extracted from the US Adelphi Real World Lupus Disease Specific Programme®, a cross-sectional survey of 50 rheumatologists, 25 nephrologists, and their patients with non-nephritis SLE (NNSLE) or lupus nephritis (LN). Results Physicians reported moderate or severe disease activity in 25.0% of patients with NNSLE and in 50.5% of patients with LN, and were satisfied with disease control in 78.6% (132/168) and 73.8% (152/206) of patients, respectively. For patients, 75.8% (75/99) with NNSLE were satisfied with their current treatment, compared with 65.5% (74/113) with LN. Physician–patient agreement (70.7%) on the level of satisfaction was “slight” (kappa =0.1445) for NNSLE; patients were more frequently dissatisfied than physicians with regard to joint tenderness, fatigue, anxiety, pain on movement, malar rash, and photosensitivity. Physician–patient agreement (71.4%) on the level of satisfaction was “fair” (kappa =0.3695) for LN; patients expressed greater dissatisfaction than physicians for headache, photosensitivity, and anxiety, whereas physicians were more dissatisfied with regard to joint swelling, kidney function, and blood pressure control. In general, patients with NNSLE or LN who were dissatisfied (or whose physicians were dissatisfied) were more likely to have joint swelling, joint stiffness, malar rash, hair loss, depression, and fatigue, have moderate or severe disease, or to be currently experiencing disease flare. Conclusion These data highlight the patient and physician dissatisfaction with real-world disease control of SLE. PMID:27784995

  20. Cognitive emotion regulation strategies in patients with functional dyspepsia and healthy controls - A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Mina; Afshar, Hamid; Nikneshan, Shekoufeh; Adibi, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with functional dyspepsia (FD) may use specific coping strategies. Hence, the aim of the present study was to compare cognitive emotion regulation strategies in FD patients and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive observational study. The sample consisted of 86 individuals, 43 of whom were patients diagnosed with FD. The patients referred to the psychosomatic disorders clinic, Isfahan, Iran. The comparative sample included 43 healthy controls (without digestive diagnoses) matched with the patients by age and gender. Subjects completed data on demographic factors and cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire. Results: The results indicated that there are significant differences between patients with FD and healthy controls according to using cognitive strategies. Scores of healthy controls in positive reappraisal and acceptance were significantly more than FD patients, and inversely, scores of FD patients in rumination and other-blame were meaningfully more than healthy controls. Conclusion: FD patients apply less adaptive strategies and more maladaptive strategies. It is seemed psychological interventions that focus on reducing maladaptive strategies and increasing adaptive strategies could be effective for FD patients. PMID:28217634

  1. Transient dynamics in motor control of patients with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuter, Anne; Labrie, Christiane; Vasilakos, Konstantinon

    1991-10-01

    Experimental observations of movement disorders including tremor and voluntary microdisplacements recorded in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during a simple visuomotor tracking task are analyzed. The performance of patients with PD having a very large amplitude tremor is characterized either by the intermittent appearance of transient dynamics or by the presence of sudden transitions in the amplitude or frequency of the signal. The need to develop new tools to characterize changes in dynamics (i.e., transitions) and to redefine neurological degeneration, such as Parkinson's disease, in terms of qualitative changes in oscillatory behaviors is emphasized.

  2. Striatal Activity is Associated with Deficits of Cognitive Control and Aberrant Salience for Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ceaser, Alan E.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2016-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis has shown that a large dopamine abnormality exists in the striatum when comparing patients with schizophrenia and controls, and this abnormality is thought to contribute to aberrant salience assignment (or a misattribution of relevance to irrelevant stimuli). This abnormality may also disrupt striatal contributions to cognitive control processing. We examined the relationship between striatal involvement in cognition and aberrant salience symptoms using a task of cognitive control that involves updating, interference control, and simple maintenance. The current study included a sample of 22 patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls and used a slow event-related fMRI design. We predicted that (1) aberrant salience symptoms would be greater for patient's, (2) patients would demonstrate increased errors during interference control trials, given that patients may be inappropriately assigning salience to distracters, and (3) striatal activity during those errors would be correlated with aberrant salience symptoms. We found a trend toward a significant difference between patients and controls on aberrant salience symptoms, and a significant difference between groups on select task conditions. During interference control trials, patients were more likely to inappropriately encode distracters. For patients, both prefrontal and striatal activity was significantly greater when patients inappropriately identified the distracter as correct compared to activity during distracter rejection. During updating, patient prefrontal and striatal activity was significantly lower for incorrect than correct updating trials. Finally, as predicted, for patients the increase of activity during incorrect distracter trials was positively correlated with aberrant salience symptoms, but only for the striatal region. These relationships may have implications for treatments that improve cognitive function and reduce symptom expression. PMID:26869912

  3. In control?: Ukrainian opiate substitution treatment patients strive for a voice in their treatment.

    PubMed

    Golovanevskaya, Maria; Vlasenko, Leonid; Saucier, Roxanne

    2012-04-01

    This article explores the burgeoning advocacy movement for methadone and buprenorphine treatment by patients, parents, and doctors in Ukraine, and their efforts to remake a system that infantilizes and controls patients into one where patients have a voice in their treatment. Through a review of gray literature and in-depth interviews with 28 patient-advocates and doctors in five Ukrainian cities between October 2009 and July 2010, this piece chronicles the emergence of opiate substitution treatment in Ukraine, describes successes toward patient-friendly treatment, and explores the institutionalized barriers that have pushed the patients to become advocates for their own treatment.

  4. Programmed Instruction, Self-Control, and In-Patient Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layng, Terrence; And Others

    The extension of the instructional programming process, as outlined by Markle and Tiemann (1967), to the treatment of psychiatric in-patients is described. Three case studies are presented as examples of the application of the programming procedures as derived from the Constructional Model of Dr. Israel Goldiamond. The emphasis throughout all…

  5. Effect of continuous psoas compartment block and intravenous patient controlled analgesia on postoperative pain control after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Mi Kyoung; Lim, Byung Gun; Hur, Wonseok

    2012-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) generates severe postoperative pain in 60% of patients and moderate pain in 30% of patients. Because inadequate postoperative pain control can hinder early physiotherapy and rehabilitation, it is the most influential factor dictating a good outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous psoas compartment block (PCB) in comparison to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) in TKA patients. Methods 40 TKA patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group IVPCA (n = 20) received intravenous patient controlled analgesia (IVPCA) for 48 hours. Group PCB (n = 20) received continuous PCB for 48 hours at the fourth intertransverse process of the lumbar using the C-arm. Pain scores, side effects, satisfaction, the length of hospital stay, rescue antiemetics, and analgesics were recorded. Results Pain scores (VNRS 0-100) were higher in Group IVPCA than in Group PCB. Nausea and sedation occurred more frequently in Group IVPCA than in Group PCB. There were no differences between the groups in the length of the hospital stay, satisfaction scores, and the use of rescue antiemetics and analgesics. Conclusions Continuous PCB seemed to be an appropriate and reliable technique for TKA patients, because it provided better analgesia and fewer side effects such as nausea and sedation when compared to IVPCA. PMID:22323954

  6. The influence of levodopa and the COMT inhibitor on serum vitamin B12 and folate levels in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, N I; Kararizou, E; Angelopoulos, E; Tsounis, S; Boufidou, F; Evangelopoulos, M E; Nikolaou, C; Vassilopoulos, D

    2007-01-01

    Serum folate and vitamin B12 levels were measured in 67 consecutive Parkinson's disease patients treated either with levodopa + dopa decarboxylase inhibitor (DDC-i) plus catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors (COMT-i) or only with levodopa + DDC-i. The data were compared to 67 age-matched controls. Our findings show that levodopa-treated Parkinson's disease patients have low folate (p < 0.0007) and vitamin B12 levels (p < 0.0003). They also demonstrate that the addition of a COMT-i to levodopa + DDC-i treatment causes lower serum vitamin B12 (p < 0.03) and folate levels (p < 0.005) than levodopa + DDC-i treatment alone. We suggest supplementary treatment with vitamin B12 and folic acid in these situations.

  7. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  8. Study of Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Thickness in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Using Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Sonal; Gupta, Neeti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic retina undergoes degenerative changes in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in addition to vascular changes. Loss of RNFL with changes in inner retina and their association with metabolic control have been studied with varied results in diabetic patients. Aim To compare the RNFL thickness between diabetic patients and age matched healthy controls and to correlate the thickness to metabolic control. Materials and Methods One hundred and sixty five patients were enrolled in the study out of which 50 served as controls, 58 patients were diabetic without retinopathy and 57 patients had diabetic retinopathy. Both eyes of all patients underwent optical coherence tomography scans for RNFL and ganglion cell complex. Foveal and parafoveal thickness were also measured. All the parameters were compared to patient’s metabolic control. Results RNFL thinning was observed in superotemporal (p-value = 0.001) and upper nasal sectors (p-value = 0.031) around the optic disc in eyes with diabetic retinopathy. Ganglion cell complex also showed statistically significant thinning in diabetic patients. Creatinine levels showed a weak negative correlation to the RNFL. Conclusion This study positively concluded that neurodegeneration in an early component of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27630874

  9. Patient advocacy and patient centredness in participant recruitment to randomized‐controlled trials: implications for informed consent

    PubMed Central

    Tomlin, Zelda; deSalis, Isabel; Toerien, Merran; Donovan, Jenny L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Context  With the routinization of evidence‐based medicine and of the randomized‐controlled trial (RCT), more patients are becoming ‘sites of evidence production’ yet, little is known about how they are recruited as participants; there is some evidence that ‘substantively valid consent’ is difficult to achieve. Objective  To explore the views and experiences of nurses recruiting patients to randomized‐controlled trials and to examine the extent to which their recruitment practices were patient‐centred and patient empowering. Design  Semi‐structured in‐depth interviews; audio recording of recruitment appointments; thematic interactional analysis (drawing on discourse and conversation analysis). Setting and participants  Nurses recruiting patients to five publicly funded RCTs and patients consenting to the recording of their recruitment sessions. Main outcome measures  The views of recruiting nurses about their recruitment role; the extent to which nurse–patient interactions were patient‐centred; the nature of the nurses’ interactional strategies and the nature and extent of patient participation in the discussion. Results  The nurses had a keen sense of themselves as clinicians and patient advocates and their perceptions of the trial and its interventions were inextricably linked to those of the patients. However, many of their recruitment practices made it difficult for patients to play an active and informed part in the discussion about trial participation, raising questions over the quality of consent decisions. Conclusion  Nurses working in patient recruitment to RCTs need to reconcile two different worlds with different demands and ethics. Evidence production, a central task in evidence‐based medicine, poses a challenge to patient‐centred practice and more research and relevant training are needed. PMID:22712887

  10. [Psychosexual and psychosocial development of patients with hypospadias].

    PubMed

    Mureau, M A

    1997-01-25

    Recently results were published concerning the long-term effects of surgical correction of hypospadias on psychosexual and psychosocial development and on genital perception. Hypospadias patients (9-38 years) were compared with age-matched males operated for inguinal hernia. A semi-structured interview and standardised psychological questionnaires were used. Hypospadias patients did not show a disturbed psychosexual adjustment, but they reported significantly more inhibitions with seeking sexual contacts as a result of embarrassment about their penile appearance. Also, hypospadias patients were significantly less satisfied with their penile appearance, mostly because of the circumcised appearance and a smaller length. No differences were found between psychosocial functioning of hypospadias patients and the control males. Following the investigations 8% of the patients were reoperated because of a poor functional or cosmetic operative result. It is recommended that all hypospadias patients be seen at least once during adolescence as a standard therapeutic procedure, to give optimal care to the small group of patients with psychosexual or psychosocial problems.

  11. Breaking down patient and physician barriers to optimize glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stuart A

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) do not achieve globally recognized blood glucose targets, despite the availability of a wide range of effective glucose-lowering therapies. Failure to maintain good glycemic control increases the risk of diabetes-related complications and long-term health care costs. Patients must be brought under glycemic control to improve treatment outcomes, but existing barriers to optimizing glycemic control must first be overcome, including patient nonadherence to treatment, the failure of physicians to intensify therapy in a timely manner, and inadequacies in the health care system itself. The reasons for such barriers include treatment side effects, complex treatment regimens, needle anxiety, poor patient education, and the absence of an adequate patient care plan; however, newer therapies and devices, combined with comprehensive care plans involving adequate patient education, can help to minimize barriers and improve treatment outcomes.

  12. Putative transcriptomic biomarkers in the inflammatory cytokine pathway differentiate major depressive disorder patients from control subjects and bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Powell, Timothy R; McGuffin, Peter; D'Souza, Ursula M; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Hosang, Georgina M; Martin, Charlotte; Matthews, Keith; Day, Richard K; Farmer, Anne E; Tansey, Katherine E; Schalkwyk, Leonard C

    2014-01-01

    Mood disorders consist of two etiologically related, but distinctly treated illnesses, major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BPD). These disorders share similarities in their clinical presentation, and thus show high rates of misdiagnosis. Recent research has revealed significant transcriptional differences within the inflammatory cytokine pathway between MDD patients and controls, and between BPD patients and controls, suggesting this pathway may possess important biomarker properties. This exploratory study attempts to identify disorder-specific transcriptional biomarkers within the inflammatory cytokine pathway, which can distinguish between control subjects, MDD patients and BPD patients. This is achieved using RNA extracted from subject blood and applying synthesized complementary DNA to quantitative PCR arrays containing primers for 87 inflammation-related genes. Initially, we use ANOVA to test for transcriptional differences in a 'discovery cohort' (total n = 90) and then we use t-tests to assess the reliability of any identified transcriptional differences in a 'validation cohort' (total n = 35). The two most robust and reliable biomarkers identified across both the discovery and validation cohort were Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 24 (CCL24) which was consistently transcribed higher amongst MDD patients relative to controls and BPD patients, and C-C chemokine receptor type 6 (CCR6) which was consistently more lowly transcribed amongst MDD patients relative to controls. Results detailed here provide preliminary evidence that transcriptional measures within inflammation-related genes might be useful in aiding clinical diagnostic decision-making processes. Future research should aim to replicate findings detailed in this exploratory study in a larger medication-free sample and examine whether identified biomarkers could be used prospectively to aid clinical diagnosis.

  13. Bone mineral density in patients with hand osteoarthritis compared to population controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, I K; Slatkowsky‐Christensen, B; Ørstavik, R; Kvien, T K

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Several studies have revealed increased bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis, but few studies have addressed this issue in hand osteoarthritis (HOA). The aims of this study were to compare BMD levels and frequency of osteoporosis between female patients with HOA, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and controls aged 50–70 years, and to explore possible relationships between BMD and disease characteristics in patients with HOA. Methods 190 HOA and 194 RA patients were recruited from the respective disease registers in Oslo, and 122 controls were selected from the population register of Oslo. All participants underwent BMD measurements of femoral neck, total hip and lumbar spine (dual‐energy x ray absorptiometry), interview, clinical joint examination and completed self‐reported questionnaires. Results Age‐, weight‐ and height‐adjusted BMD values were significantly higher in HOA versus RA and controls, the latter only significant for femoral neck and lumbar spine. The frequency of osteoporosis was not significantly different between HOA and controls, but significantly lower in HOA versus RA. Adjusted BMD values did not differ between HOA patients with and without knee OA, and significant associations between BMD levels and symptom duration or disease measures were not observed. Conclusion HOA patients have a higher BMD than population‐based controls, and this seems not to be limited to patients with involvement of larger joints. The lack of correlation between BMD and disease duration or severity does not support the hypothesis that higher BMD is a consequence of the disease itself. PMID:17502356

  14. Enhanced sympathetic cardiac modulation in bruxism patients.

    PubMed

    Marthol, Harald; Reich, Sven; Jacke, Julia; Lechner, Karl-Heinz; Wichmann, Manfred; Hilz, Max Josef

    2006-08-01

    Sleep bruxism, an oral parafunction including teeth clenching and grinding, might be related to increased stress. To evaluate sympathetic cardiac activity in bruxism patients, we monitored cardiac autonomic modulation using spectral analysis of heart rate variability and compared results to those of age-matched healthy volunteers. In bruxism patients, sympathetic cardiac activity was higher than in volunteers. The increased sympathetic tone suggests increased stress and might be related to occlusal disharmonies.

  15. Increased frontal electroencephalogram theta amplitude in patients with anorexia nervosa compared to healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Hestad, Knut A; Weider, Siri; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø; Sand, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Objective To conduct a blind study of quantitative electroencephalogram-band amplitudes in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and healthy controls. Methods Twenty-one patients with AN and 24 controls were examined with eyes-closed 16-channel electroencephalogram. Main variables were absolute alpha, theta, and delta amplitudes in frontal, temporal, and posterior regions. Results There were no significant differences between the AN patients and controls regarding absolute regional band amplitudes in μV. Borderline significance was found for anterior theta (P=0.051). Significantly increased left and right frontal electrode theta amplitude was found in AN patients (F3, P=0.014; F4, P=0.038) compared to controls. Significant differences were also observed for secondary variables: lower values for relative parietooccipital delta and frontocentral alpha activity among AN patients than among controls. Conclusion We observed slight excess frontal theta and lower relative alpha and delta amplitudes among AN patients than among controls. This pattern is possibly related to a slight frontal lobe dysfunction in AN, or it may reflect increased attention/vigilance or another state-related change in patients with AN compared to healthy controls. PMID:27703359

  16. Postural control deficits in people with fibromyalgia: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Postural instability and falls are increasingly recognized problems in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether FM patients, compared to age-matched healthy controls (HCs), have differences in dynamic posturography, including sensory, motor, and limits of stability. We further sought to determine whether postural instability is associated with strength, proprioception and lower-extremity myofascial trigger points (MTPs); FM symptoms and physical function; dyscognition; balance confidence; and medication use. Last, we evaluated self-reported of falls over the past six months. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we compared middle-aged FM patients and age-matched HCs who underwent computerized dynamic posturography testing and completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR) and balance and fall questionnaires. All subjects underwent a neurological and musculoskeletal examination. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and explore the relationships between variables. The relationships between subjective, clinical and objective variables were evaluated by correlation and regression analyses. Results Twenty-five FM patients and twenty-seven HCs (combined mean age ± standard deviation (SD): 48.6 ± 9.7 years) completed testing. FM patients scored statistically lower on composite sensory organization tests (primary outcome; P < 0.010), as well as with regard to vestibular, visual and somatosensory ratio scores on dynamic posturography. Balance confidence was significantly different between groups, with FM patients reporting less confidence than HCs (mean ± SD: 81.24 ± 19.52 vs. 98.52 ± 2.45; P < 0.001). Interestingly, 76% to 84% of FM patients had gastrocnemius and/or anterior tibialis MTPs. Postural stability was best predicted by dyscognition, FIQR score and body mass index. Regarding falls, 3 (11%) of 27 HCs had fallen only once during the past 6 months, whereas 18 (72

  17. Altered Cortico-Striatal Connectivity in Offspring of Schizophrenia Patients Relative to Offspring of Bipolar Patients and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Solé-Padullés, Cristina; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; de la Serna, Elena; Romero, Soledad; Calvo, Anna; Sánchez-Gistau, Vanessa; Padrós-Fornieles, Marta; Baeza, Inmaculada; Bargalló, Núria; Frangou, Sophia; Sugranyes, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) share clinical features, genetic risk factors and neuroimaging abnormalities. There is evidence of disrupted connectivity in resting state networks in patients with SZ and BD and their unaffected relatives. Resting state networks are known to undergo reorganization during youth coinciding with the period of increased incidence for both disorders. We therefore focused on characterizing resting state network connectivity in youth at familial risk for SZ or BD to identify alterations arising during this period. We measured resting-state functional connectivity in a sample of 106 youth, aged 7–19 years, comprising offspring of patients with SZ (N = 27), offspring of patients with BD (N = 39) and offspring of community control parents (N = 40). We used Independent Component Analysis to assess functional connectivity within the default mode, executive control, salience and basal ganglia networks and define their relationship to grey matter volume, clinical and cognitive measures. There was no difference in connectivity within any of the networks examined between offspring of patients with BD and offspring of community controls. In contrast, offspring of patients with SZ showed reduced connectivity within the left basal ganglia network compared to control offspring, and they showed a positive correlation between connectivity in this network and grey matter volume in the left caudate. Our findings suggest that dysconnectivity in the basal ganglia network is a robust correlate of familial risk for SZ and can be detected during childhood and adolescence. PMID:26885824

  18. Observer-Based State Feedback for Enhanced Insulin Control of Type ‘I’ Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Ali; Wang, Le Yi

    2011-01-01

    During the past few decades, biomedical modeling techniques have been applied to improve performance of a wide variety of medical systems that require monitoring and control. Diabetes is one of the most important medical problems. This paper focuses on designing a state feedback controller with observer to improve the performance of the insulin control for type ‘I’ diabetic patients. The dynamic model of glucose levels in diabetic patients is a nonlinear model. The system is a typical fourth-order single-input-single-output state space model. Using a linear time invariant controller based on an operating condition is a common method to simplify control design. On the other hand, adaptive control can potentially improve system performance. But it increases control complexity and may create further stability issues. This paper investigates patient models and presents a simplified control scheme using observer-based feedback controllers. By comparing different control schemes, it shows that a properly designed state feedback controller with observer can eliminate the adaptation strategy that the Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers need to improve the control performance. Control strategies are simulated and their performance is evaluated in MATLAB and Simulink. PMID:22276077

  19. Observer-based state feedback for enhanced insulin control of type 'i' diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hariri, Ali; Wang, Le Yi

    2011-01-01

    During the past few decades, biomedical modeling techniques have been applied to improve performance of a wide variety of medical systems that require monitoring and control. Diabetes is one of the most important medical problems. This paper focuses on designing a state feedback controller with observer to improve the performance of the insulin control for type 'I' diabetic patients. The dynamic model of glucose levels in diabetic patients is a nonlinear model. The system is a typical fourth-order single-input-single-output state space model. Using a linear time invariant controller based on an operating condition is a common method to simplify control design. On the other hand, adaptive control can potentially improve system performance. But it increases control complexity and may create further stability issues. This paper investigates patient models and presents a simplified control scheme using observer-based feedback controllers. By comparing different control schemes, it shows that a properly designed state feedback controller with observer can eliminate the adaptation strategy that the Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controllers need to improve the control performance. Control strategies are simulated and their performance is evaluated in MATLAB and Simulink.

  20. The Feasibility of Health Trainer Improved Patient Self-Management in Patients with Low Health Literacy and Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Trishna; Rowlands, Gillian; Richardson, Gerry; Reeves, David

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is most prevalent in deprived communities and patients with low health literacy have worse glycaemic control and higher rates of diabetic complications. However, recruitment from this patient population into intervention trials is highly challenging. We conducted a study to explore the feasibility of recruitment and to assess the effect of a lay health trainer intervention, in patients with low health literacy and poorly controlled diabetes from a socioeconomically disadvantaged population, compared with usual care. Methods. A pilot RCT comparing the LHT intervention with usual care. Patients with HbA1c > 7.5 (58 mmol/mol) were recruited. Baseline and 7-month outcome data were entered directly onto a laptop to reduce patient burden. Results. 76 patients were recruited; 60.5% had low health literacy and 75% were from the most deprived areas of England. Participants in the LHT arm had significantly improved mental health (p = 0.049) and illness perception (p = 0.040). The intervention was associated with lower resource use, better patient self-care management, and better QALY profile at 7-month follow-up. Conclusion. This study describes successful recruitment strategies for hard-to-reach populations. Further research is warranted for this cost-effective, relatively low-cost intervention for a population currently suffering a disproportionate burden of diabetes, to demonstrate its sustained impact on treatment effects, health, and health inequalities. PMID:27833922

  1. Effects of a Patient-Provider, Collaborative, Medication-Planning Tool: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Michael S.; Kaiser, Darren; Morrow, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Among patients with various levels of health literacy, the effects of collaborative, patient-provider, medication-planning tools on outcomes relevant to self-management are uncertain. Objective. Among adult patients with type II diabetes mellitus, we tested the effectiveness of a medication-planning tool (Medtable™) implemented via an electronic medical record to improve patients' medication knowledge, adherence, and glycemic control compared to usual care. Design. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial in outpatient primary care clinics. 674 patients received either the Medtable tool or usual care and were followed up for up to 12 months. Results. Patients who received Medtable had greater knowledge about indications for medications in their regimens and were more satisfied with the information about their medications. Patients' knowledge of drug indication improved with Medtable regardless of their literacy status. However, Medtable did not improve patients' demonstrated medication use, regimen adherence, or glycemic control (HbA1c). Conclusion. The Medtable tool supported provider/patient collaboration related to medication use, as reflected in patient satisfaction with communication, but had limited impact on patient medication knowledge, adherence, and HbA1c outcomes. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01296633. PMID:27699179

  2. Patient-reported outcomes, patient-reported information: from randomized controlled trials to the social web and beyond.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Mike; Spong, Andrew; Doward, Lynda; Gnanasakthy, Ari

    2011-01-01

    Internet communication is developing. Social networking sites enable patients to publish and receive communications very easily. Many stakeholders, including patients, are using these media to find new ways to make sense of diseases, to find and discuss treatments, and to give support to patients and their caregivers. We argue for a new definition of patient-reported information (PRI), which differs from the usual patient-reported outcomes (PRO). These new emergent data from the social web have important implications for decision making, at both an individual and a population level. We discuss new emergent technologies that will help aggregate this information and discuss how this will be assessed alongside the use of PROs in randomized controlled trials and how these new emergent data will be one facet of changing the relationship between the various stakeholders in achieving better co-created health.

  3. Can the application of control theory assist patient management in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Mann, Cindy

    2010-09-01

    Supporting patient self-management is an important part of the care of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but patients vary in their capacity and willingness to manage their illness and may feel overwhelmed by the challenge of controlling the impact on their life. This paper discusses the value and importance of control theory and how it might be applied to enhance patients' self-management. Not only does it offer a means of identifying those who might have greatest difficulty in managing their illness, but it also points the way to effective interventions.

  4. [Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: the role of parent and teacher questionnaire in the assessment of patient's social-psychological adaptation].

    PubMed

    Zavadenko, N N; Lebedeva, T V; Schasnaia, O V; Zavadenko, A N; Zlobina, O M; Semenova, N A

    2009-01-01

    Parents and teachers of 342 school children, aged from 7 to 11 years, were questioned with the (SDQ) using non-randomized method. The following comparative analysis of SDQ items measured in parents and teachers of children with ADHD and age-matched controls was carried out. It has been shown that the spectrum of disturbances characteristic of ADHD is not confined only to main symptoms of ADHD. The results of questionnaire of both parents and teachers indicated the marked intensity of emotional disturbances, behavioral problems and difficulties in interactions with peers as well as the underdevelopment of social trends in behavior in children with ADHD compared to the controls. The data obtained confirm the necessity of treatment extension beyond the core symptoms with considering more general parameters of the patients quality of life.

  5. The biomechanical properties of the cornea in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, A T; Kara, N; Yüksel, K; Altinkaynak, H; Baz, O; Bozkurt, E; Demirok, A

    2011-01-01

    Pupose: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the cornea and intraocular pressure (IOP) between patients with systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) and age-matched controls. Patients and Methods: In this prospective study, 30 healthy individuals (control group) and 30 patients with SLE (study group) underwent Reichert ocular response analyzer (ORA) measurements. In the right eye of each participant, the corneal hysteresis (CH), corneal resistance factor (CRF), and Goldman-related IOP (IOPg) were recorded using the ORA. Results: Mean CH, CRF, IOPg were significantly different between groups. Mean CH was 10.2±0.6 mm Hg in the study group and 11.3±1.3 in the control group (P=0.02); mean CRF was 9.7±1.1 mm Hg and 11.9±1.5 mm Hg, respectively (P=0.001). Mean IOPg was 13.9±2.9 mm Hg in the study group and 16.9±2.6 mm Hg in the control group (P=0.001). Conclusion: The biomechanical properties of the cornea are altered in patients with SLE compared with normal controls. These findings should be taken into account when measuring IOP values in patients with SLE as IOP readings may be underestimated in SLE eyes. PMID:21546920

  6. Electromyography of the pubococcygeus muscles in patients with obstructed defaecation.

    PubMed

    Lubowski, D Z; King, D W; Finlay, I G

    1992-12-01

    The function of the pubococcygeus muscles during defaecation straining was compared in 10 women with obstructed defaecation and 12 age-matched control subjects. Video-proctography in each patient showed failure to evacuate the rectum and sagging of the pelvic floor during attempted defaecation. Trans-perineal concentric needle electromyography in the puborectalis muscle and transvaginal electromyography in the pubococcygeus muscle was carried out during defaecation straining and during attempted rectal balloon expulsion. Contraction of the pubococcygeus muscle was observed in 10 of the 12 control subjects and in 2 of the 10 patients with obstructed defaecation (P < 0.005). Virtually equal proportions of subjects in each group showed relaxation or contraction of the puborectalis muscle during straining. There was significant perineal descent on straining in the patient group (P = 0.005). This group of patients with obstructed defaecation showed failure of the pubococcygeus muscles to contract, perhaps due to neuropathic weakness of the muscles. The puborectalis muscle did not cause obstructed defaecation in these patients, and the concept of "paradoxical" contraction of this muscle is questioned.

  7. Patients with fibromyalgia display less functional connectivity in the brain’s pain inhibitory network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is evidence for augmented processing of pain and impaired endogenous pain inhibition in Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM). In order to fully understand the mechanisms involved in FM pathology, there is a need for closer investigation of endogenous pain modulation. In the present study, we compared the functional connectivity of the descending pain inhibitory network in age-matched FM patients and healthy controls (HC). We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 42 subjects; 14 healthy and 28 age-matched FM patients (2 patients per HC), during randomly presented, subjectively calibrated pressure pain stimuli. A seed-based functional connectivity analysis of brain activity was performed. The seed coordinates were based on the findings from our previous study, comparing the fMRI signal during calibrated pressure pain in FM and HC: the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and thalamus. Results FM patients required significantly less pressure (kPa) to reach calibrated pain at 50 mm on a 0–100 visual analogue scale (p < .001, two-tailed). During fMRI scanning, the rACC displayed significantly higher connectivity to the amygdala, hippocampus, and brainstem in healthy controls, compared to FM patients. There were no regions where FM patients showed higher rACC connectivity. Thalamus showed significantly higher connectivity to the orbitofrontal cortex in healthy controls but no regions showed higher thalamic connectivity in FM patients. Conclusion Patients with FM displayed less connectivity within the brain’s pain inhibitory network during calibrated pressure pain, compared to healthy controls. The present study provides brain-imaging evidence on how brain regions involved in homeostatic control of pain are less connected in FM patients. It is possible that the dysfunction of the descending pain modulatory network plays an important role in maintenance of FM pain and our results may translate into clinical implications by using the

  8. [Control of epilepsy in adult patients with tuberous sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Tur, Alejandro; García-Martín, Guillermina; Chamorro-Muñoz, María Isabel; Romero-Godoy, Jorge; Romero-Acebal, Manuel

    2013-06-01

    Introduccion. La esclerosis tuberosa es una enfermedad genetica cuyas manifestaciones principales son la formacion de tumores neuroectodermicos, que asocia epilepsia secundaria muy frecuentemente. Objetivo. Describir el perfil epileptico, el control, la frecuencia de crisis y la efectividad del tratamiento en pacientes adultos con esclerosis tuberosa. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio descriptivo en el que se han incluido pacientes adultos (mayores de 14 anos) con diagnostico confirmado de esclerosis tuberosa. Se ha analizado la frecuencia y tipos de crisis. Se ha realizado un estudio y contabilizacion de los diferentes farmacos antiepilepticos en cada paciente, la frecuencia de uso de cada principio activo y un estudio comparativo entre control de crisis y tipo de terapia. Resultados. De 19 adultos estudiados, tuvieron crisis epilepticas 16 (84%). Presentaron control de crisis completo, crisis esporadicas y crisis frecuentes el 44%, 25% y 31%, respectivamente. Hubo frecuencia de crisis focales, generalizadas y ambas en el 38%, 6% y 25%, respectivamente. Estaban en tratamiento con farmacos antiepilepticos en monoterapia, biterapia y triterapia el 38%, 44% y 19%, respectivamente. El mas consumido globalmente fue el levetiracetam, seguido de la carbamacepina y el acido valproico. En monoterapia, el mas frecuente fue la carbamacepina, con mayor proporcion de control completo. Conclusiones. La epilepsia en la esclerosis tuberosa es relativamente benigna, y se consigue un aceptable control en la mayoria de casos con un numero de antiepilepticos acorde con lo aconsejado en las guias de tratamiento. Se observa estabilidad de lesiones, y no hay malignizacion en nuestra serie. El bajo numero de la muestra limita el estudio, pero se observan proporciones similares de efectividad del tratamiento respecto a otra serie publicada.

  9. Asymmetries in reactive and anticipatory balance control are of similar magnitude in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Tjitske A; van Kordelaar, Joost; Engelhart, Denise; van Vugt, Jeroen P P; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Many Parkinson's disease (PD) patients show asymmetries in balance control during quiet stance and in response to perturbations (i.e., reactive balance control) in the sagittal plane. In addition, PD patients show a reduced ability to anticipate to self-induced disturbances, but it is not clear whether these anticipatory responses can be asymmetric too. Furthermore, it is not known how reactive balance control and anticipatory balance control are related in PD patients. Therefore, we investigated whether reactive and anticipatory balance control are asymmetric to the same extent in PD patients. 14 PD patients and 10 controls participated. Reactive balance control (RBC) was investigated by applying external platform and force perturbations and relating the response of the left and right ankle torque to the body sway angle at the excited frequencies. Anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) were investigated by determining the increase in the left and right ankle torque just before the subjects released a force exerted with the hands against a force sensor. The symmetry ratio between the contribution of the left and right ankle was used to express the asymmetry in reactive and anticipatory balance control; the correlation between the two ratio's was investigated with Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. PD patients were more asymmetric in anticipatory (p=0.026) and reactive balance control (p=0.004) compared to controls and the symmetry ratios were significantly related (ρ=0.74; p=0.003) in PD patients. These findings suggest that asymmetric reactive balance control during bipedal stance may share a common pathophysiology with asymmetries in the anticipation of voluntary perturbations during, for instance, gait initiation.

  10. Descending control of muscles in patients with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Tijssen, Marina A J; Münchau, Alex; Marsden, John F; Lees, Andrew; Bhatia, Kailash P; Brown, Peter

    2002-05-01

    It was reported recently that specific features in the frequency analysis of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and splenius (SPL) muscles were able to distinguish between rotational idiopathic cervical dystonia (CD) and voluntary torticollis in individual subjects. Those with CD showed an abnormal drive to muscles at 5 to 7 Hz and an absence of the normal 10 to 12 Hz peak in the autospectrum of SPL. We sought to determine whether the same abnormalities in the frequency domain are found in complex CD, in which the head is displaced in more than two planes. EMG activity was recorded in the SCM, SPL, trapezius, and levator scapulae muscles bilaterally in 10 patients with complex CD. Frequency analysis of EMG was compared with conventional clinical and polymyographic assessment. The autospectrum of SPL during free dystonic contraction showed an absence of a significant peak at 10 to 12 Hz in 8 of the 10 patients. The presence of a 5 to 7 Hz frequency drive showed a significant association with muscle pairs determined as dystonic by means of polymyography (P < 0.005). The neck posture predicted blindly, based on the low-frequency drive, correlated significantly with the clinical assessment of posture (P < 0.01). Conventional assessment and the results of frequency analysis correlated, suggesting that a low-frequency drive to neck muscle may be a general feature of simple rotational and more complex cervical dystonia. The pattern of coherence between the EMG in different neck muscles may provide a means of identifying leading dystonic muscles, especially in patients with complex cervical dystonia.

  11. Risk factors for silent myocardial ischemia in patients with well-controlled essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rendina, Domenico; Ippolito, Renato; De Filippo, Gianpaolo; Muscariello, Riccardo; De Palma, Daniela; De Bonis, Silvana; Schiano di Cola, Michele; Benvenuto, Domenico; Galderisi, Maurizio; Strazzullo, Pasquale; Galletti, Ferruccio

    2017-03-01

    Silent myocardial ischemia (SMI) is frequently observed in patients with essential hypertension (EH). The major risk factor for SMI is uncontrolled blood pressure (BP), but SMI is also observed in patients with well-controlled BP. To evaluate the prevalence of SMI and the factors associated with SMI in EH patients with well-controlled BP. The medical records of 859 EH patients who underwent simultaneous 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and 24-h ambulatory electrocardiogram recording (AECG) were retrospectively evaluated. Each SMI episode was characterized by: (a) ST segment depression ≥0.5 mm; (b) duration of ST segment depression >60 s; and (c) reversibility of the ST segment depression. Overall 126 EH patients (14.7 %) had at least one episode of SMI. The SMI events were more frequent among patients with poorly controlled compared to those with well-controlled BP [86/479 (17.95 %) vs. 40/380 (10.52 %), p < 0.01]. Among EH patients with well-controlled BP, current and past smoking as well as the presence of an additional metabolic syndrome (MetS) constitutive element (obesity, impaired fasting glucose level or dyslipidemia) were significantly associated with the occurrence of SMI. In all EH patients with well-controlled BP and AECG evidence of SMI, there were one or more coronary artery stenotic lesions greater than 50 % found at coronary angiography. In EH patients who are current smokers, or have one or more additional components of a MetS there is markedly reduced benefit associated with good BP control with regard to the occurrence of myocardial ischemia: in this patient category, an AECG may help detect this condition.

  12. Salt intake, knowledge of salt intake, and blood pressure control in Chinese hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yu; Li, Ting; Lou, Peian; Chang, Guiqiu; Zhang, Pan; Chen, Peipei; Qiao, Cheng; Dong, Zongmei

    2014-12-01

    A cross-sectional study involving 2502 subjects was conducted to evaluate salt intake, knowledge of salt intake, and blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. The blood pressure control rate was 33.5% among the hypertensive patients. Of the patients, 69.9% had salt intake higher than 6 g/d. Overall 35.0% knew the recommended salt intake, and 94.9% knew that "excess salt intake can result in hypertension." Altogether, 85.8% of patients had received health education related to a low-salt diet at some time. Patients who consumed less than 6 g/d of salt had a higher control rate than those who consumed more than 6 g/d (48.7% vs. 27.0%; χ(2) = 111.0; P < .001). Patients with knowledge of the recommended salt intake had a higher control rate than those without (45.8% vs. 26.9%; χ(2) = 91.3; P < .001). Our findings suggest a high salt intake and low blood pressure control rate among Chinese hypertensive patients. Knowledge of recommended salt intake is inappropriate for patients with education of a low-salt diet.

  13. Physician and patient management of type 2 diabetes and factors related to glycemic control in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Yurgin, Nicole Rae; Boye, Kristina Secnik; Dilla, Tatiana; Suriñach, Núria Lara; Llach, Xavier Badia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess current treatment patterns, blood glucose test strip usage, and treatment compliance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care centers in Spain, and to assess factors related to glycemic control. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with T2DM and measured treatment compliance using the Morisky-Green questionnaire. 294 patients were included in the study from a population of patients attending 30 primary care centers throughout Spain. Results showed that the majority of patients were treated with oral monotherapy (36%) and oral combination therapy (35%). Less than half of the patients had good glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 6.5%). Half of the patients treated pharmacologically reported good compliance with treatment. Logistic regression analyses performed to identify factors associated with glycemic control showed that high body mass index (BMI) and poor compliance were the strongest predictors of poor HbA1c control (OR: 2.198 and 1.789, respectively, p < 0.05). In conclusion, in the course of managing diabetes, physicians and patients should attempt to improve compliance and lower BMI, which could lead to better glycemic control. PMID:19920948

  14. Prevalence of illicit drug use in patients without controlled substance abuse in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Damron, Kim S; Beyer, Carla D; Barnhill, Renee C

    2003-04-01

    Drug abuse with illicit drugs and licit drugs has been increasing steadily over the past decade. A recent National Household Survey on Drug Abuse found statistically significant increases between 2000 and 2001 in the use of multiple drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, and non-medical use of pain relievers and tranquilizers. Prescription controlled substance abuse is a major issue in chronic pain management. Various means suggested to avoid or monitor abuse in patients in treatment include urine/serum drug screening whenever requested, along with other precautions including one prescribing physician and one designated pharmacy, etc. Based on the present evidence, physicians assume that patients adhering to controlled substance agreements and without obvious dependency behavior do not abuse either illicit or licit drugs. Thus, it is accepted that there is no necessity to perform routine urine/drug testing in this specific group of the patient population. One hundred patients undergoing interventional pain management and receiving controlled substances were randomly selected for evaluation of illicit drug abuse by urine drug testing. They were selected from a total of 250 patients who were identified as non-abusers of prescription drugs. Results showed that illicit drug abuse in patients without history of controlled substance abuse was seen in 16 patients. Thirteen of the 16 patients tested positive for marijuana and 3 patients tested positive for cocaine. Only one patient tested positive for a combined use of both marijuana and cocaine. This study showed that, in an interventional pain management setting, there is significant use of illicit drugs (16%) with 13% use of marijuana and 3% use of cocaine in patients who are considered as non-abusers of prescription controlled substances and those who are adherent to controlled substance agreements. However, if cocaine is considered as a hardcore drug in contrast to marijuana, abuse of hardcore illicit drugs is only 3%.

  15. Endurance training in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls: differences and similarities.

    PubMed

    Keller-Varady, Katriona; Hasan, Alkomiet; Schneider-Axmann, Thomas; Hillmer-Vogel, Ursula; Adomßent, Björn; Wobrock, Thomas; Schmitt, Andrea; Niklas, Andree; Falkai, Peter; Malchow, Berend

    2016-08-01

    The aims were to examine the feasibility of and adaptations to endurance training in persons diagnosed with schizophrenia and to address the question whether the principles and beneficial effects of endurance training established in the healthy population apply also to patients with schizophrenia. In this controlled interventional study, 22 patients with schizophrenia and 22 healthy controls performed a standardized aerobic endurance training on bicycle ergometers over 12 weeks. Another group of 21 patients with schizophrenia played table soccer. Endurance capacity was measured with incremental cycle ergometry before and after the intervention and 3 months later. A specific set of outcome parameters was defined. The training stimuli can be assumed to be similar in both endurance groups. Endurance capacity improved significantly in the endurance groups, but not in the table soccer group. Patients and healthy controls showed comparable adaptations to endurance training, as assessed by physical working capacity and maximal achieved power. Differences were found in changes of performance at a lactate concentration of 3 mmol/l. Endurance training was feasible and effective in both groups. The principles and types of training that are usually applied to healthy controls need to be verified in patients with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, patients benefited from endurance training in terms of improvement of endurance capacity and reduction in the baseline deficit in comparison with healthy controls. Therefore, endurance training should be implemented in future therapy programs. These programs need to pay special attention to the differences between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

  16. Massage Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Cancer: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Maria; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Davis, Roger B.; Walton, Tracy; Kahn, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The study objectives were to determine the feasibility and effects of providing therapeutic massage at home for patients with metastatic cancer. Design This was a randomized controlled trial. Settings/location Patients were enrolled at Oncology Clinics at a large urban academic medical center; massage therapy was provided in patients' homes. Subjects Subjects were patients with metastatic cancer. Interventions There were three interventions: massage therapy, no-touch intervention, and usual care. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were pain, anxiety, and alertness; secondary outcomes were quality of life and sleep. Results In this study, it was possible to provide interventions for all patients at home by professional massage therapists. The mean number of massage therapy sessions per patient was 2.8. A significant improvement was found in the quality of life of the patients who received massage therapy after 1-week follow-up, which was not observed in either the No Touch control or the Usual Care control groups, but the difference was not sustained at 1 month. There were trends toward improvement in pain and sleep of the patients after therapeutic massage but not in patients in the control groups. There were no serious adverse events related to the interventions. Conclusions The study results showed that it is feasible to provide therapeutic massage at home for patients with advanced cancer, and to randomize patients to a no-touch intervention. Providing therapeutic massage improves the quality of life at the end of life for patients and may be associated with further beneficial effects, such as improvement in pain and sleep quality. Larger randomized controlled trials are needed to substantiate these findings. PMID:23368724

  17. Dysbiosis and compositional alterations with aging in the gut microbiota of patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Takehiro; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Suda, Wataru; Saga-Kamo, Akiko; Shimizu, Yu; Yagi, Hiroki; Liu, Qing; Nomura, Seitaro; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Takeda, Norifumi; Harada, Mutsuo; Toko, Haruhiro; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Takimoto, Eiki; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Honda, Kenya; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Masahira; Komuro, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested a potential impact of gut microbiota on the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF). However, it is still unknown whether HF is associated with dysbiosis in gut microbiota. We investigated the composition of gut microbiota in patients with HF to elucidate whether gut microbial dysbiosis is associated with HF. We performed 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of fecal samples obtained from 12 HF patients and 12 age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects, and analyzed the differences in gut microbiota. We further compared the composition of gut microbiota of 12 HF patients younger than 60 years of age with that of 10 HF patients 60 years of age or older. The composition of gut microbial communities of HF patients was distinct from that of HC subjects in both unweighted and weighted UniFrac analyses. Eubacterium rectale and Dorea longicatena were less abundant in the gut microbiota of HF patients than in that of HC subjects. Compared to younger HF patients, older HF patients had diminished proportions of Bacteroidetes and larger quantities of Proteobacteria. The genus Faecalibacterium was depleted, while Lactobacillus was enriched in the gut microbiota of older HF patients. These results suggest that patients with HF harbor significantly altered gut microbiota, which varies further according to age. New concept of heart-gut axis has a great potential for breakthroughs in the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approach for HF.

  18. Dysbiosis and compositional alterations with aging in the gut microbiota of patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Kamo, Takehiro; Suda, Wataru; Saga-Kamo, Akiko; Shimizu, Yu; Yagi, Hiroki; Liu, Qing; Nomura, Seitaro; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Takeda, Norifumi; Harada, Mutsuo; Toko, Haruhiro; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Takimoto, Eiki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Honda, Kenya; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Masahira; Komuro, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested a potential impact of gut microbiota on the pathophysiology of heart failure (HF). However, it is still unknown whether HF is associated with dysbiosis in gut microbiota. We investigated the composition of gut microbiota in patients with HF to elucidate whether gut microbial dysbiosis is associated with HF. We performed 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of fecal samples obtained from 12 HF patients and 12 age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects, and analyzed the differences in gut microbiota. We further compared the composition of gut microbiota of 12 HF patients younger than 60 years of age with that of 10 HF patients 60 years of age or older. The composition of gut microbial communities of HF patients was distinct from that of HC subjects in both unweighted and weighted UniFrac analyses. Eubacterium rectale and Dorea longicatena were less abundant in the gut microbiota of HF patients than in that of HC subjects. Compared to younger HF patients, older HF patients had diminished proportions of Bacteroidetes and larger quantities of Proteobacteria. The genus Faecalibacterium was depleted, while Lactobacillus was enriched in the gut microbiota of older HF patients. These results suggest that patients with HF harbor significantly altered gut microbiota, which varies further according to age. New concept of heart-gut axis has a great potential for breakthroughs in the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approach for HF. PMID:28328981

  19. Electrophysiological and psychophysical flicker sensitivity in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Holopigian, K; Seiple, W; Mayron, C; Koty, R; Lorenzo, M

    1990-09-01

    Temporal sensitivity was assessed in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and ocular hypertension (OHT). Three measures of flicker sensitivity were obtained: psychophysical modulation thresholds, visual-evoked potentials (VEPs), and focal electroretinograms (FERGs). We found elevated psychophysical thresholds at higher temporal frequencies (30-50 Hz) in patients with POAG, relative to thresholds for age-matched controls. The OHT patients had elevated psychophysical thresholds only at 50 Hz. On the other hand, VEP amplitudes in POAG patients were reduced at all temporal frequencies, with the magnitude of the loss increasing with temporal frequency. The OHT patients, however, showed no reductions in VEP amplitude at any temporal frequency. Finally, POAG patients' FERG amplitudes were reduced at 30-50 Hz; whereas FERG amplitudes in the OHT patients were normal at all temporal frequencies. These results indicate that OHT patients can exhibit psychophysical threshold losses at high temporal frequencies which are not observed in the suprathreshold electrophysiological amplitude measures. On the other hand, patients with POAG show both psychophysical and VEP losses across a range of temporal frequencies. In addition, the decreases in FERG amplitudes in POAG patients suggest changes in the functioning of the outer retina in this disease.

  20. Graph analysis of functional brain networks for cognitive control of action in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Caeyenberghs, Karen; Leemans, Alexander; Heitger, Marcus H; Leunissen, Inge; Dhollander, Thijs; Sunaert, Stefan; Dupont, Patrick; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2012-04-01

    Patients with traumatic brain injury show clear impairments in behavioural flexibility and inhibition that often persist beyond the time of injury, affecting independent living and psychosocial functioning. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that patients with traumatic brain injury typically show increased and more broadly dispersed frontal and parietal activity during performance of cognitive control tasks. We constructed binary and weighted functional networks and calculated their topological properties using a graph theoretical approach. Twenty-three adults with traumatic brain injury and 26 age-matched controls were instructed to switch between coordination modes while making spatially and temporally coupled circular motions with joysticks during event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results demonstrated that switching performance was significantly lower in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with control subjects. Furthermore, although brain networks of both groups exhibited economical small-world topology, altered functional connectivity was demonstrated in patients with traumatic brain injury. In particular, compared with controls, patients with traumatic brain injury showed increased connectivity degree and strength, and higher values of local efficiency, suggesting adaptive mechanisms in this group. Finally, the degree of increased connectivity was significantly correlated with poorer switching task performance and more severe brain injury. We conclude that analysing the functional brain network connectivity provides new insights into understanding cognitive control changes following brain injury.

  1. Eculizumab in the management of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: patient selection and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ani, Fatimah; Chin-Yee, Ian; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a nonmalignant clonal disorder resulting from somatic mutation in the PIG-A gene leading to a deficiency of the membrane-anchoring molecule glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The lack of expression of two glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins involved in the regulation of the complement system renders PNH erythrocytes susceptible to complement-mediated lysis. Clinical manifestations include thromboembolic disease, chronic kidney injury, pulmonary hypertension, smooth muscle dysfunction, and chronic hemolysis. Until recently, treatment was mainly supportive with most patients suffering from significant morbidity and shortened survival compared to age-matched controls. The development of eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the terminal complement protein C5, has resulted in dramatic improvements of survival and reduction in complications. In this paper, we review some special considerations pertaining to the use of eculizumab for PNH. PMID:27536121

  2. [A nurse's experience applying Rotter's locus of control theory in a myocardial infarction patient].

    PubMed

    Shi, Meng-Ling; Ke, Ya-Ting

    2009-04-01

    This case report shares the experience of one nurse in applying Rotter's locus of control theory in her care of a myocardial infarction patient. Period of care ran from November 23 to December 1, 2007. The author collected subjective and objective data through observations and interviews with the patient in the ward. Data was analyzed to identify key healthcare problems. These included the inadequate information of the patient on his condition, which negatively influenced health behavior; inadequate health information available; and the flare-up of disease symptoms. Internal locus of control, as presented in Rotter's locus of control theory, was applied to the above nursing problems in order to deliver individualized nursing care to the patient based on mutual trust. Such enhanced patient disease cognition, facilitated his obtaining health information, helped him adjust to disease symptom episodes, and promoted his adjustment to the disease and adoption of more healthy behavior.

  3. Atypical task-invariant organization of multi-segment tremors in patients with Parkinson's disease during manual tracking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei-Shan; Lin, Chou-Ching K; Wang, Chun-Hou; Hwang, Ing-Shiou

    2009-06-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the interplay between involuntary tremulous activities and task performance under volitional control for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) during position tracking. A volunteer sample of nine untreated patients and nine age-matched healthy subjects participated in this study. They performed a sinusoidal tracking maneuver with a shoulder and a static pointing task; meanwhile, a position trace of the index and accelerometer data in the upper limb were recorded to characterize tracking performance and postural-kinetic tremors. In reference to postural tremor, the kinetic tremor of control subjects during tracking was considerably modulated, leading to a lower regularity and greater spectral deviation. In contrast, patients with PD demonstrated greater postural and kinetic tremors than control subjects, and tremulous movements of the patients were comparatively task-invariant. The prominent coherence peak, which occurred at 8-12 Hz in control subjects, was atypically presented at 5-8 Hz for PD patients with poorer tracking performance. Functionally, congruency of position tracking was related to amplitude of kinetic tremor after subtracting from amplitude of postural tremor. In conclusion, task-dependent organization of tremulous movements was impaired in patients with PD. The inferior tracking performance of the patients correlated implicitly with kinetic tremor, signifying some sharing of neural substrates for manual tracking and tremor generation.

  4. A BCI-based Environmental Control System for Patients with Severe Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Qihong; Li, Kai; He, Shenghong; Qin, Si; Feng, Zhenghui; Chen, Yang; Song, Pingxia; Yang, Tingyan; Zhang, Yuandong; Yu, Zhuliang; Hu, Yaohua; Shao, Ming; Li, Yuanqing

    2017-01-09

    This study proposes an event-related potential (ERP) BCI-based environmental control system that integrates household electrical appliances, a nursing bed, and an intelligent wheelchair to provide daily assistance to paralyzed patients with severe spinal cord injuries (SCIs).

  5. GPER Promoter Methylation Controls GPER Expression in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, Christine; Ignatov, Tanja; Nass, Norbert; Kalinski, Thomas; Dan Costa, Serban; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Ignatov, Atanas

    2017-02-07

    Recently, we found that G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) protein expression decreased during breast carcinogenesis, and that GPER promoter is methylated. Here we analyzed GPER promoter methylation in 260 primary breast cancer specimens by methylation-specific polymerized chain reaction. The results demonstrated that GPER protein down-regulation significantly correlated with GPER promoter hypermethylation (p < .001). Comparison of 108 tumors and matched normal breast tissues indicated a significant GPER down-regulation in cancer tissues correlating with GPER promoter hypermethylation (p < .001). The latter was an unfavorable factor for overall survival of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (p = .025). Thus GPER promoter hypermethylation might be used as a prognostic factor.

  6. HLA-B27 subtypes in Turkish patients with ankylosing spondylitis and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Acar, Muradiye; Cora, Tulin; Tunc, Recep; Acar, Hasan

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes frequency in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and related spondyloartropathy (SpA) patients. Therefore, we investigated the differences in HLA-B27 subtypes between HLA-B27-positive patients and controls. Sixty six patients were included in this study (51 AS and 15 SpA). Thirty-five individuals were diagnosed with leukemia or chronic renal failure, and their donors without any rheumatological problem (no SpA history) were selected as the control group. HLA-B27 subtyping was performed by PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer) method in serologically HLA-B27-positive 46 AS patients, 9 SpA patients and control group. When the frequency of HLA-B27 was 4.5% in Turkish population, this frequency was 90.2% in AS patients. Four different HLA-B27 subtypes found in AS patients were B 2705 (65.2%), B 2702 (26.1%), B 2704 (6.5%) and B 2707 (2.2%). In SpA patients, B 2705 and B 2702 found in equal frequency. Five B27 alleles were identified in our control group: B 2705 (54.3%), B 2702 (31.4) %, B 2703 (2.9%), B 2704 (2.9%) and B 2702/B 2705 (8.5%). Both in the patient group and in the control group, we also observed B 2705 as most frequent allele, and B 2702 was second common allele. Our results show that the frequency of HLA-B27 subtypes is not significantly different between patients and controls (P > 0.10).

  7. Cerebral Circulation Time is Prolonged and Not Correlated with EDSS in Multiple Sclerosis Patients: A Study Using Digital Subtracted Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Lucia; Donati, Donatella; Menci, Elisabetta; Cioni, Samuele; Bellini, Matteo; Grazzini, Irene; Leonini, Sara; Galluzzi, Paolo; Severi, Sauro; Burroni, Luca; Casasco, Alfredo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Piu, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Literature has suggested that changes in brain flow circulation occur in patients with multiple sclerosis. In this study, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to measure the absolute CCT value in MS patients and to correlate its value to age at disease onset and duration, and to expand disability status scale (EDSS). DSA assessment was performed on eighty MS patients and on a control group of forty-four age-matched patients. CCT in MS and control groups was calculated by analyzing the angiographic images. Lesion and brain volumes were calculated in a representative group of MS patients. Statistical correlations among CCT and disease duration, age at disease onset, lesion load, brain volumes and EDSS were considered. A significant difference between CCT in MS patients (mean = 4.9s; sd = 1.27s) and control group (mean = 2.8s; sd = 0.51s) was demonstrated. No significant statistical correlation was found between CCT and the other parameters in all MS patients. Significantly increased CCT value in MS patients suggests the presence of microvascular dysfunctions, which do not depend on clinical and MRI findings. Hemodynamic changes may not be exclusively the result of a late chronic inflammatory process. PMID:25679526

  8. Cerebral circulation time is prolonged and not correlated with EDSS in multiple sclerosis patients: a study using digital subtracted angiography.

    PubMed

    Monti, Lucia; Donati, Donatella; Menci, Elisabetta; Cioni, Samuele; Bellini, Matteo; Grazzini, Irene; Leonini, Sara; Galluzzi, Paolo; Bracco, Sandra; Severi, Sauro; Burroni, Luca; Casasco, Alfredo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Piu, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Literature has suggested that changes in brain flow circulation occur in patients with multiple sclerosis. In this study, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to measure the absolute CCT value in MS patients and to correlate its value to age at disease onset and duration, and to expand disability status scale (EDSS). DSA assessment was performed on eighty MS patients and on a control group of forty-four age-matched patients. CCT in MS and control groups was calculated by analyzing the angiographic images. Lesion and brain volumes were calculated in a representative group of MS patients. Statistical correlations among CCT and disease duration, age at disease onset, lesion load, brain volumes and EDSS were considered. A significant difference between CCT in MS patients (mean = 4.9s; sd = 1.27 s) and control group (mean = 2.8s; sd = 0.51 s) was demonstrated. No significant statistical correlation was found between CCT and the other parameters in all MS patients. Significantly increased CCT value in MS patients suggests the presence of microvascular dysfunctions, which do not depend on clinical and MRI findings. Hemodynamic changes may not be exclusively the result of a late chronic inflammatory process.

  9. The analgesic efficacy of patient-controlled ropivacaine instillation after Cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Fredman, B; Shapiro, A; Zohar, E; Feldman, E; Shorer, S; Rawal, N; Jedeikin, R

    2000-12-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of wound instillation of ropivacaine, when administered via a patient-controlled elastometric pump, 50 term parturients undergoing cesarean delivery were enrolled into this prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study. In all cases, a standard spinal anesthetic was administered. After the surgery, a multihole 20-gauge epidural catheter (B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) was placed above the fascia such that the tip was sited at the point that demarcated 50% of the length of the surgical wound. Thereafter, the catheter was connected to the elastometric pump. According to a computer-generated randomization schedule, the pump was filled with either ropivacaine 0.2% (Ropivacaine Group) or an equal volume of sterile water (Control Group). Postoperatively, patient-controlled analgesia was administered via the elastometric pump. During the first 6 postoperative hours, a coinvestigator administered "rescue" morphine (2 mg, IV). Thereafter, "rescue" dipyrone (1 g) was administered on patient request. In a subset of 10 patients, blood ropivacaine levels were assessed. Compared with the Control Group, significantly fewer patients in the Ropivacaine Group received "rescue" morphine (92% vs. 48%, respectively) (P<0.01). The total "rescue" morphine administered during the first 6 postoperative hours was 2+/-3 mg vs. 10+/-5 mg (P<0.01) for the Ropivacaine and Control Groups, respectively. Patient-generated resting pain scores were similar between the groups. However, pain scores generated after coughing and leg raise were significantly (P<0.04) less in the Ropivacaine Group. More patients in the Ropivacaine Group than in the Control Group described their analgesia as good or excellent. In the subset of patients (n = 10) studied, unbound ropivacaine blood levels were below the toxic threshold (600 ng/mL). However, blood ropivacaine accumulation was noted. All patients stated that the elastometric pump was easy to use. Ropivacaine wound

  10. Foetal alcohol syndrome: a cephalometric analysis of patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Sudeshni; Harris, Angela; Swanevelder, Sonja; Lombard, Carl

    2006-06-01

    Foetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) consists of multi-system abnormalities and is caused by the excessive intake of alcohol during pregnancy. The teratogenic effect of alcohol on the human foetus has now been established beyond reasonable doubt and FAS is the most important human teratogenic condition known today. The purpose of this study was to analyse the craniofacial parameters of children with FAS and compare them with matched controls. Ninety children diagnosed with FAS (45 males, 45 females) and 90 controls were matched for age, gender, and social class. The mean age of the FAS children was 8.9 years with the controls slightly older at 9.1 years. This age difference was not significant (P = 0.34). A standard lateral cephalometric radiograph of each subject was taken. The radiographs were digitized for 20 linear and 17 angular measurements. These 37 variables were formulated to assess the size, shape, and relative position of three craniofacial complexes: (1) the cranial base, (2) midface, and (3) mandible. In addition, nine variables were computed to compare the soft tissue profiles. The study showed that measurements related to face height and mandibular size appear to be the most important features when distinguishing FAS children. Overall, the FAS children in the present study presented with vertically and horizontally underdeveloped maxillae, together with features of long face syndrome with large gonial angles and a short ramus in relation to total face height. There was also a tendency for the development of an anterior open bite, which appears to be compensated for by an increase in the vertical dimension of the anterior alveolar process to bring the incisor teeth into occlusion. The latter adaptation occurred mainly in the mandible.

  11. Infection control practices in dental school: A patient perspective from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Baseer, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Ghousia; Yassin, Mona Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Routine use of gloves, masks and spectacles are important in infection control. Aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of infection control measures among the patients attending clinics of Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy (RCsDP) in Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods: It was a cross-sectional descriptive study of a convenient sample of dental patients attending dental clinics of RCsDP. A structured, close ended, self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 350 patients and a response rate of 86% was obtained. Questionnaireconsisted of series of queries related to knowledge and attitudes of patients towards infection control measures. Data analysis included frequency distribution tables, Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Final study sample included 301 patients (147 males and 154 females). Almost 99%, 93.7% and 82.7% of the patients agreed that dentist should wear gloves, face mask and spectacles while providing treatment. However, 60.1%, 30% of the patients said that HIV and hepatitis-B infections can spread in dental clinics. Half of the patients felt that they were likely to contract AIDS and 77.7% refused to attend clinics if they knew that AIDS and Hepatitis-B patients treated there. Only 25.2% said that autoclave is the best method of sterilization. A significantly higher knowledge of infection control was observed among the previous dental visitors compared to the first time visitors to the dental clinics (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients revealed adequate knowledge towards the use of gloves, face mask and spectacles by dentist. However, their knowledge regarding the spread of Hepatitis-B, HIV infection and use of autoclave was poor. Previous visitor of dental clinics showed higher knowledge of infection control as compared to the first time visitors. Many patients expressed their negative attitudes towards dental care due to AIDS and Hepatitis-B concerns

  12. Variability of tear osmolarity in dry eye patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Bunya, Vatinee Y.; Fuerst, Nicole M.; Pistilli, Maxwell; McCabe, Bridgette E.; Salvo, Rebecca; Macchi, Ilaria; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Massaro-Giordano, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Importance Knowledge about the variability of measurements using the TearLab™ osmolarity system is necessary when evaluating the clinical utility of readings. Objective To examine the variability of tear osmolarity, as measured by the TearLab™ system, in subjects with Sjogren's syndrome (SS), blepharitis and controls. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary care, academic center. Participants Seventy-four eyes of thirty-seven subjects from a volunteer sample (18 SS, 11 blepharitis, 8 controls) were evaluated using the TearLab™ osmolarity system with three consecutive osmolarity measurements taken at one-minute intervals in a session, and fifteen of these subjects had the same measurements taken by the same examiner in two additional sessions on the same day (9–10am, 12-1pm, or 3–4pm). The majority of SS and blepharitis subjects were on systemic or topical dry eye medications at the time of enrollment. Main Outcome Measures Mean osmolarity and its variability calculated from a linear mixed model for each disease group that accounts for the variations attributable to different subjects, eyes, and sessions, and measurement error specific to each disease group. Results Mean tear osmolarity was 307, 304, and 301 mOsm/L within the SS, blepharitis, and control groups, respectively (p=0.46). The error associated with repeated measurements within a session in the non-dry eye subjects (10.5 [95% CI 9.0, 12.4] mOsm/L) was significantly lower than in the blepharitis (14.6 [12.5, 17.5] mOsm/L, p=0.006) or SS (15.8 [14.2, 17.8] mOsm/L, p<0.0001) subjects, but a difference in the error of repeated measurements between blepharitis and SS subjects was not identified (p=0.46). Conclusions and Relevance There was increased variability attributable to error in repeated measurements among SS and blepharitis subjects compared to controls. The high variability of TearLab™ osmolarity readings in all groups makes clinical interpretation of measurements unclear. PMID

  13. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Lim, Lay Peng; Lim, Soo Kun

    2015-01-01

    Background Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established. Purpose This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients and methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7%) or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7%) based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association. Results Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%). Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9%) was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%). Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001), insulin therapy (P=0.005), and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038) were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004), comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024) and retinopathy (P=0.033), concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047), α-blockers (P=0.033), and antigouts (P=0.003) were also correlated with A1C. Conclusion Identification of factors that are associated with glycemic control is important to help in optimization of glucose control in T2DM patients with renal complication. PMID:26300627

  14. Serum zinc levels in 368 patients with oral mucosal diseases: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Wen; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the serum zinc levels in patients with common oral mucosal diseases by comparing these to healthy controls. Material and Methods A total of 368 patients, which consisted of 156 recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) patients, 57 oral lichen planus (OLP) patients, 55 burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients, 54 atrophic glossitis (AG) patients, 46 xerostomia patients, and 115 sex-and age-matched healthy control subjects were enrolled in this study. Serum zinc levels were measured in all participants. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA, t-test, and Chi-square test. Results The mean serum zinc level in the healthy control group was significantly higher than the levels of all other groups (p < 0.001). No individual in the healthy control group had a serum zinc level less than the minimum normal value. However, up to 24.7% (13/54) of patients with AG presented with zinc deficiency, while 21.2% (33/156) of patients with RAS, 16.4% (9/55) of patients with BMS, 15.2% (7/46) of patients with xerostomia, and 14.0% (8/57) of patients with OLP were zinc deficient. Altogether, the zinc deficiency rate was 19.02% (70/368) in the oral mucosal diseases (OMD) group (all patients with OMD). The difference between the OMD and healthy control group was significant (p <0.001). Gender differences in serum zinc levels were also present, although not statistically significant. Conclusions Zinc deficiency may be involved in the pathogenesis of common oral mucosal diseases. Zinc supplementation may be a useful treatment for oral mucosal diseases, but this requires further investigation; the optimal serum level of zinc, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucosal diseases, remains to be determined. Key words:Oral mucosal diseases, Zinc deficiency, pathogenesis. PMID:27031065

  15. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with peripheral vertigo: a prospective controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ozbay, Isa; Kahraman, Cuneyt; Balikci, Hasan Huseyin; Kucur, Cuneyt; Kahraman, Nilufer Kuzeyli; Ozkaya, Derya Pınar; Oghan, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the relationship between peripheral vertigo and inflammation by using the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as an inflammatory marker. We recruited 103 patients with peripheral vertigo (71 women, 32 men; mean age, 39.8 ± 14.7 years) who presented to the Otolaryngology Department of Dumlupinar University Hospital. Vertigo patients with systemic diseases, neurological disorders, malignancy or any inflammatory disease that could alter the NLR were excluded from the study. We also enrolled 103 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (controls; 82 women, 21 men; mean age, 36.7 ± 13.5 years) who underwent routine checkups in our hospital. The vertigo patients underwent full otolaryngologic and neurologic examinations and audiometric tests to rule out any other pathology causing the peripheral vertigo. NLR was calculated in all subjects and was compared between the patient and control groups. There were no significant differences between the study and control groups in terms of lipid profiles, liver-function tests, white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin level, mean platelet volume, and vitamin B12 and folate levels. The mean NLR was significantly higher in the patients than in the controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study, which was the first to investigate the relationship between the NLR and peripheral vertigo, found that the NLR is significantly higher among peripheral vertigo patients than among healthy controls. This result suggests that the NLR is a novel potential marker of stress in peripheral vertigo patients.

  16. Hydromorphone levels and pain control in patients with severe chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Reidenberg, M M; Goodman, H; Erle, H; Gray, G; Lorenzo, B; Leipzig, R M; Meyer, B R; Drayer, D E

    1988-10-01

    To better understand the use of narcotic analgesics, the hydromorphone concentration was measured in serum samples from 43 patients with chronic severe pain who were receiving this drug. At the time of blood sampling, pain intensity, mood, and cognitive performance were assessed. There was large individual variation in the dose-drug level relationship. Seven patients with bone or soft tissue pain and drug levels of greater than or equal to 4 ng/ml had good pain control, whereas 10 did not. None of 15 patients with levels less than 4 ng/ml had pain control, despite drug doses similar to those given patients with higher levels. Thus 60% of the patients without control of their pain had hydromorphone levels below the lowest level that produced pain control. No patient with pain from nerve infiltration or compression had good pain control, irrespective of the drug level or dose. Poor mood correlated with high pain intensity and low drug level. Impaired cognitive performance was not related to drug level. Knowing that there is a low concentration of narcotic in the blood of a patient with chronic severe pain who is receiving high drug doses and who shows lack of both efficacy and side effects may reassure health care professionals that further narcotic dosage escalation is appropriate.

  17. Using Standardized Patients in Continuing Medical Education Courses on Proper Prescribing of Controlled Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swiggart, William H.; Ghulyan, Marine V.; Dewey, Charlene M.

    2012-01-01

    Controlled prescription drug (CPD) abuse is an increasing threat to patient safety and health care providers (HCPs) are not adequately prepared nor do they routinely employ proper screening techniques. Using standardized patients (SPs) as an instructional strategy, the trained physicians on proper prescribing practices and SBIRT (Screening, Brief…

  18. Cardiovascular risk factor control is insufficient in young patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Jensen, Jesper Møller; Brøndberg, Anders Krogh; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf

    2016-01-01

    Background Control of cardiovascular risk factor is important in secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) but it is unknown whether treatment targets are achieved in young patients. We aimed to examine the prevalence and control of risk factors in this subset of patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional, single-center study on patients with documented CAD before age 40. All patients treated between 2002 and 2014 were invited to participate at least 6 months after the last coronary intervention. We included 143 patients and recorded the family history of cardiovascular disease, physical activity level, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, metabolic status, and current medical therapy. Risk factor control and treatment targets were evaluated according to the shared guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology. Results The most common insufficiently controlled risk factors were overweight (113 [79.0%]), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol above target (77 [57.9%]), low physical activity level (78 [54.6%]), hypertriglyceridemia (67 [46.9%]), and current smoking (53 [37.1%]). Almost one-half of the patients fulfilled the criteria of metabolic syndrome. The median (interquartile range) number of uncontrolled modifiable risk factors was 2 (2;4) and only seven (4.9%) patients fulfilled all modifiable health measure targets. Conclusion Among the youngest patients with CAD, there remains a potential to improve the cardiovascular risk profile. PMID:27307744

  19. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-07

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient's unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient's geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  20. Abnormal autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Rosano, G M; Ponikowski, P; Adamopoulos, S; Collins, P; Poole-Wilson, P A; Coats, A J; Kaski, J C

    1994-06-15

    Anomalies of autonomic control of the coronary circulation may play a role in the development of syndrome X (angina pectoris, ischemic-appearing results on exercise test, and normal coronary arteriograms). Twenty-six patients with syndrome X and 20 healthy sex- and age-matched control subjects were studied by means of analysis of heart rate variability during 24-hour Holter monitoring. Spectral and nonspectral parameters of heart rate variability were investigated. Mean heart rate was similar in patients with syndrome X and in control subjects. Patients with syndrome X had significantly lower standard deviation of all normal RR intervals, a lower percentage of adjacent normal RR intervals > 50 ms in difference (126.4 +/- 22 vs 149 +/- 43 ms, p < 0.05; 6.3 +/- 4 vs 11.2 +/- 7%, p < 0.05; respectively), and a trend toward lower values of time-domain parameters. Lower values of total power and low frequency were also observed in patients with syndrome X (1273 +/- 693 vs 1790 +/- 989 ms2, p < 0.05; 406 +/- 176 vs 729 +/- 455 ms2, p < 0.01, respectively). An inverse correlation between heart rate and measures of heart rate variability was found in syndrome X but not in control subjects. High- and low-frequency power showed a similar circadian pattern in syndrome X patients and control subjects. Patients and control subjects were then allocated into 2 groups according to the median RR duration: syndrome X1 and control 1 with high mean heart rate, and syndrome X2 and control 2 with low mean heart rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Evaluation of use of electronic patient controlled analgesia pumps to improve patient safety in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; Mcintosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine; Luppi, Carol; Bane, Anne; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps are methods of pain control with complex smart infusion devices and are widely used in hospitals. Smart PCA/PCEA pumps can be programmed with the dose and rate of medications within pre-set ranges. However, adverse effects have been reported associated with these pumps' use. In this paper, we describe a prevalence observational study where observers used an electronic data collection tool to record pump settings and medications with PCA pumps, corresponding medication orders to identify errors. The results showed that there were many labeling and tubing change tag errors, which were a violation of hospital policy. A few potential harmful medication errors were identified but no critical errors. Study results suggest the importance of a standard process of PCA pump use. Next steps include implementing a safety bundle for improving PCA practice to support safe and effective pain management.

  2. Is there a need for audiologic evaluation in patients with Behçet disease?

    PubMed

    Cinar, Saniye; Cinar, Fikret; Kiran, Sibel

    2012-03-01

    Behçet disease is known to be a multisystem condition. We conducted a study to determine the prevalence of hearing loss in patients with Behçet disease and to identify any associations between audiologic findings and other clinical manifestations and treatment. Our study group was made up of 41 adults with Behçet disease and 41 healthy sex- and age-matched controls. All patients and controls underwent a complete clinical otolaryngologic examination, which included pure-tone audiometry, acoustic impedance testing, and otoacoustic emissions testing. Audiology revealed that the prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) was significantly higher in the Behçet patients than in the controls-68.3 vs. 22.0% (p < 0.002). The duration of Behçet disease had no significant impact on whether patients did or did not experience hearing loss. Hearing loss was the fourth most common clinical finding in the Behçet group, after oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and skin lesions. We conclude that SNHL is present in a significant number of Behçet patients, and we suggest the need for an adequate investigation of hearing in the routine follow-up of these patients.

  3. Obstacle Avoidance amongst Parkinson Disease Patients Is Challenged in a Threatening Context.

    PubMed

    Doan, Jon B; de Bruin, Natalie; Pellis, Sergio M; Suchowersky, Oksana; Whishaw, Ian Q; Brown, Lesley A

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether people with Parkinson disease (PD) have difficulty negotiating a gait obstruction in threatening (gait path and obstacle raised above floor) and nonthreatening (gait path and obstacle at floor level) contexts. Ten PD patients were tested in both Meds OFF and Meds ON states, along with 10 age-matched controls. Participants completed 18 gait trials, walking 4.7 m at a self-selected speed while attempting to cross an obstacle 0.15 m in height placed near the centre point of the walkway. Kinematic and kinetic parameters were measured, and obstacle contact errors were tallied. Results indicated that PD patients made more obstacle contacts than control participants in the threatening context. Successful crossings by PD patients in the threatening condition also exhibited kinematic differences, with Meds OFF PD patients making shorter crossing steps, with decreased initiation and crossing velocities. The findings from this study lend support to the theory that PD patients rely on directed attention to initiate and control movement, while providing indication that the motor improvements provided by current PD pharmacotherapy may be limited by contextual interference. These movement patterns may be placing PD patients at risk of obstacle contact and falling.

  4. Iowa Gambling Task in patients with early-onset Parkinson's disease: strategy analysis.

    PubMed

    Gescheidt, Tomáš; Czekóová, Kristína; Urbánek, Tomáš; Mareček, Radek; Mikl, Michal; Kubíková, Radka; Telecká, Sabina; Andrlová, Hana; Husárová, Ivica; Bareš, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The aim of our study was to analyse decision making in early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD) patients performing the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). We compared 19 patients with early-onset PD (≤ 45 years) on dopaminergic medication (no evidence of depression, dementia, executive dysfunction according to the Tower of London test and the Stroop test, or pathological gambling) with 20 age-matched controls. A computer version of the IGT was employed. The PD patients achieved slightly lower IGT scores than the control group. A detailed analysis based on 'shift frequencies' between the individual decks showed that the patients tended to change their preferences for the decks more frequently, with a higher preference for the 'disadvantageous' deck B. Control subjects seemed to develop a more effective strategy. These differences could be caused by the poorer ability of the patients to develop any strategy at all. We observed changes in decision making during IGT performance in patients with early-onset PD, although they had no executive dysfunction as measured by established neuropsychological tests. The more detailed analysis employed in the present study could lead to a more accurate study of IGT performance and application of IGT in clinical practice.

  5. Enteric neurons from Parkinson’s disease patients display ex vivo aberrations in mitochondrial structure

    PubMed Central

    Baumuratov, A. S.; Antony, P. M. A.; Ostaszewski, M.; He, F.; Salamanca, L.; Antunes, L.; Weber, J.; Longhino, L.; Derkinderen, P.; Koopman, W. J. H.; Diederich, N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Based on autopsy material mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed being part of the pathophysiological cascade of Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, in living patients, evidence for such dysfunction is scarce. As the disease presumably starts at the enteric level, we studied ganglionic and mitochondrial morphometrics of enteric neurons. We compared 65 ganglia from 11 PD patients without intestinal symptoms and 41 ganglia from 4 age-matched control subjects. We found that colon ganglia from PD patients had smaller volume, contained significantly more mitochondria per ganglion volume, and displayed a higher total mitochondrial mass relative to controls. This suggests involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD at the enteric level. Moreover, in PD patients the mean mitochondrial volume declined in parallel with motor performance. Ganglionic shrinking was evident in the right but not in the left colon. In contrast, mitochondrial changes prevailed in the left colon suggesting that a compensatory increase in mitochondrial mass might counterbalance mitochondrial dysfunction in the left colon but not in the right colon. Reduction in ganglia volume and combined mitochondrial morphometrics had both predictive power to discriminate between PD patients and control subjects, suggesting that both parameters could be used for early discrimination between PD patients and healthy individuals. PMID:27624977

  6. Visual and Non-Visual Navigation in Blind Patients with a Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Sara; Petrini, Karin; Rubin, Gary S.; Da Cruz, Lyndon; Nardini, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Human adults with normal vision can combine visual landmark and non-visual self-motion cues to improve their navigational precision. Here we asked whether blind individuals treated with a retinal prosthesis could also benefit from using the resultant new visual signal together with non-visual information when navigating. Four patients (blind for 15-52 years) implanted with the Argus II retinal prosthesis (Second Sight Medical Products Inc. Sylmar, CA), and five age-matched and six younger controls, participated. Participants completed a path reproduction and a triangle completion navigation task, using either an indirect visual landmark and non-visual self-motion cues or non-visual self-motion cues only. Control participants wore goggles that approximated the field of view and the resolution of the Argus II prosthesis. In both tasks, control participants showed better precision when navigating with reduced vision, compared to without vision. Patients, however, did not show similar improvements when navigating with the prosthesis in the path reproduction task, but two patients did show improvements in the triangle completion task. Additionally, all patients showed greater precision than controls in both tasks when navigating without vision. These results indicate that the Argus II retinal prosthesis may not provide sufficiently reliable visual information to improve the precision of patients on tasks, for which they have learnt to rely on non-visual senses. PMID:26225762

  7. Mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomics revealed a distinct lipid profile in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yunping; Zhou, Bingsen; Su, Mingming; Baxter, Sarah; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Xueqing; Yen, Yun; Jia, Wei

    2013-04-12

    Breast cancer accounts for the largest number of newly diagnosed cases in female cancer patients. Although mammography is a powerful screening tool, about 20% of breast cancer cases cannot be detected by this method. New diagnostic biomarkers for breast cancer are necessary. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based quantitative metabolomics method to analyze plasma samples from 55 breast cancer patients and 25 healthy controls. A number of 30 patients and 20 age-matched healthy controls were used as a training dataset to establish a diagnostic model and to identify potential biomarkers. The remaining samples were used as a validation dataset to evaluate the predictive accuracy for the established model. Distinct separation was obtained from an orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) model with good prediction accuracy. Based on this analysis, 39 differentiating metabolites were identified, including significantly lower levels of lysophosphatidylcholines and higher levels of sphingomyelins in the plasma samples obtained from breast cancer patients compared with healthy controls. Using logical regression, a diagnostic equation based on three metabolites (lysoPC a C16:0, PC ae C42:5 and PC aa C34:2) successfully differentiated breast cancer patients from healthy controls, with a sensitivity of 98.1% and a specificity of 96.0%.

  8. Symptom prevalence and control during cancer patients' last days of life.

    PubMed

    Ventafridda, V; Ripamonti, C; De Conno, F; Tamburini, M; Cassileth, B R

    1990-01-01

    The lack of control of physical suffering among cancer patients in the last days or hours of life is a common medical problem but it is rarely discussed in an open fashion. We carried out a prospective study of the dying of 120 terminal cancer patients assisted by a home care team. We documented how long it was before death that physical symptoms, unendurable to the patient and controlled only by sedation-inducing sleep, appeared. In 63 patients (52.5%), unendurable symptoms due to tumor progression or irreversible acute organic phenomena appeared, on average two days before death. Of the 63 patients, 47 had only one uncontrollable symptom, 15 had two symptoms and one patient had three symptoms. The most common symptoms included dyspnea (33 patients), pain (31), delirium (11), and vomiting (5). The most frequent symptoms were dyspnea in lung and head and neck disease; pain in breast, gastrointestinal tract, colon-rectum, and male genitourinary tract cancer; and vomiting in female genitourinary tract malignancies. Data reported emphasize the clinical relevance of physical symptoms in the last days of life in terminal cancer patients and how these serve to indicate imminent death. More than 50% of these patients die with physical suffering that is controllable only by means of sedation.

  9. Effect of exercise on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Fagard, Robert H; Cornelissen, Véronique A

    2007-02-01

    Several large epidemiological studies have reported an inverse relationship between blood pressure and physical activity. However, longitudinal intervention studies are more appropriate for assessing the effects of physical activity. We performed meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials involving dynamic aerobic endurance training or resistance training. The meta-analysis on endurance training involved 72 trials and 105 study groups. After weighting for the number of trained participants, training induced significant net reductions in resting and daytime ambulatory blood pressure of, respectively, 3.0/2.4 mmHg (P<0.001) and 3.3/3.5 mmHg (P<0.01). The reduction in resting blood pressure was more pronounced in the 30 hypertensive study groups (-6.9/-4.9) than in the others (-1.9/-1.6; P<0.001 for all). Systemic vascular resistance decreased by 7.1% (P<0.05), plasma norepinephrine by 29% (P<0.001), and plasma renin activity by 20% (P<0.05). Body weight decreased by 1.2 kg (P<0.001), waist circumference by 2.8 cm (P<0.001), percentage body fat by 1.4% (P<0.001) and the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance by 0.31 units (P<0.01); high-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 0.032 mmol/l (P<0.05). Resistance training has been less well studied. A meta-analysis of nine randomized controlled trials (12 study groups) on mostly dynamic resistance training revealed a weighted net reduction in blood pressure of 3.2 (P=0.10)/3.5 (P<0.01) mmHg associated with exercise. Endurance training decreases blood pressure through a reduction in systemic vascular resistance, in which the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system appear to be involved, and favourably affects concomitant cardiovascular risk factors. The few available data suggest that resistance training can reduce blood pressure. Exercise is a cornerstone therapy for the prevention, treatment and control of hypertension.

  10. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Li, W.; Jennings, L.; Kearvell, R.; Bydder, S.

    2013-06-01

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  11. Induced sensorimotor brain plasticity controls pain in phantom limb patients

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Fukuma, Ryohei; Seymour, Ben; Hosomi, Koichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Shimizu, Takeshi; Yokoi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Masayuki; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Kamitani, Yukiyasu; Saitoh, Youichi

    2016-01-01

    The cause of pain in a phantom limb after partial or complete deafferentation is an important problem. A popular but increasingly controversial theory is that it results from maladaptive reorganization of the sensorimotor cortex, suggesting that experimental induction of further reorganization should affect the pain, especially if it results in functional restoration. Here we use a brain–machine interface (BMI) based on real-time magnetoencephalography signals to reconstruct affected hand movements with a robotic hand. BMI training induces significant plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex, manifested as improved discriminability of movement information and enhanced prosthetic control. Contrary to our expectation that functional restoration would reduce pain, the BMI training with the phantom hand intensifies the pain. In contrast, BMI training designed to dissociate the prosthetic and phantom hands actually reduces pain. These results reveal a functional relevance between sensorimotor cortical plasticity and pain, and may provide a novel treatment with BMI neurofeedback. PMID:27807349

  12. Physical and functional follow-up of tuberculosis patients in initial intensive phase of treatment in Cameroon using the 6-min walk test

    PubMed Central

    Guessogo, Wiliam R.; Mandengue, Samuel H.; Assomo Ndemba, Peguy B.; Medjo, Ubald Olinga; Minye, Edmond Ebal; Ahmaidi, Said; Temfemo, Abdou

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate functional capacities of Cameroonian tuberculosis (TB) patients in initial intensive phase of treatment using the 6-min walk test (6MWT) and to compare them to an age-matched healthy group. Twenty-eight TB patients newly diagnosed and 19 healthy age-matched peoples participated in the study. Performance parameters were determined using the 6MWT. Anthropometric and cardiorespiratory parameters were measured at baseline and after 6MWT. Two months later, TB patients were submitted to the same evaluation. We found significant differences in anthropometric parameters between the two groups. The baseline cardiorespiratory parameters and performance characteristics of TB patients were lower than control group (571.7±121.0 m vs 841.6±53.0 m, P<0.0001 for 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and 18.1±2.8 mL/kg/min vs 24.3±1.2 mL/kg/min, P<0.001 for mean VO2 peak (peak oxygen consumption). Two months after, significant improvements were noted in anthropometric, cardiorespiratory and performance parameters except for bone mass and FEV1/FEV6 (forced expiratory volumes in 1 second/6 seconds) ratio. Significant correlations were found between the 2-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.95), 4-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.97) and 6MWD. In conclusion, TB patients have impaired physical functional capacity but they improved after 2 months of treatment. 6MWT can be a useful tool in the assessment of physical parameters and cardiorespiratory functional capacity rehabilitation of TB patients during the treatment. PMID:27656631

  13. Physical and functional follow-up of tuberculosis patients in initial intensive phase of treatment in Cameroon using the 6-min walk test.

    PubMed

    Guessogo, Wiliam R; Mandengue, Samuel H; Assomo Ndemba, Peguy B; Medjo, Ubald Olinga; Minye, Edmond Ebal; Ahmaidi, Said; Temfemo, Abdou

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate functional capacities of Cameroonian tuberculosis (TB) patients in initial intensive phase of treatment using the 6-min walk test (6MWT) and to compare them to an age-matched healthy group. Twenty-eight TB patients newly diagnosed and 19 healthy age-matched peoples participated in the study. Performance parameters were determined using the 6MWT. Anthropometric and cardiorespiratory parameters were measured at baseline and after 6MWT. Two months later, TB patients were submitted to the same evaluation. We found significant differences in anthropometric parameters between the two groups. The baseline cardiorespiratory parameters and performance characteristics of TB patients were lower than control group (571.7±121.0 m vs 841.6±53.0 m, P<0.0001 for 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and 18.1±2.8 mL/kg/min vs 24.3±1.2 mL/kg/min, P<0.001 for mean VO2 peak (peak oxygen consumption). Two months after, significant improvements were noted in anthropometric, cardiorespiratory and performance parameters except for bone mass and FEV1/FEV6 (forced expiratory volumes in 1 second/6 seconds) ratio. Significant correlations were found between the 2-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.95), 4-min walked distance (P<0.0001, r=0.97) and 6MWD. In conclusion, TB patients have impaired physical functional capacity but they improved after 2 months of treatment. 6MWT can be a useful tool in the assessment of physical parameters and cardiorespiratory functional capacity rehabilitation of TB patients during the treatment.

  14. Event-related theta oscillations during working memory tasks in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Schmiedt, C; Brand, A; Hildebrandt, H; Basar-Eroglu, C

    2005-12-01

    Altered frontal lobe activity and executive control associated with working memory (WM) dysfunction are recognized as core deficits in schizophrenia. These impairments have been discussed as being associated with deficits in self-regulated action monitoring and anticipatory action plan generation. To study electrophysiological correlates of executive control -- specifically action monitoring and action rule switching -- under varying WM load, we used a paradigm derived from classic N-back (WM) tasks and requiring monitoring of simple actions. We focused on event-related changes in post-stimulus theta oscillatory activity during varying cognitive and WM demand in healthy controls and schizophrenia patients. The results show significant WM load and rule-switching-related increases of post-stimulus theta amplitude at fronto-central locations in controls. In patients with schizophrenia, there was no such modulation, but -- apart from an increased early theta at left temporal locations -- generally reduced late theta responses in all tasks and at all locations. Furthermore, the patients with schizophrenia showed significant differences in their error patterns, which imply differences in automation and anticipation of actions between controls and patients. These findings suggest that theta oscillations are involved in mediating frontal lobe activity and functions related to enhanced executive control. We conclude that the patients with schizophrenia showed deficits in acquiring a mental task set which appear to be associated with impairments in action monitoring and task-specific regulation of executive control.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Evaluating Portal-Systemic Encephalopathy in Patients with Chronic Hepatic Schistosomiasis Japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Mei, Lihong; Qiang, Jinwei; Ju, Shuai; Zhao, Shuhui

    2016-01-01

    Portal-systemic encephalopathy (PSE) is classified as type B hepatic encephalopathy. Portal-systemic shunting rather than liver dysfunction is the main cause of PSE in chronic hepatic schistosomiasis japonicum (HSJ) patients. Owing to lack of detectable evidence of intrinsic liver disease, chronic HSJ patients with PSE are frequently clinically undetected or misdiagnosed, especially chronic HSJ patients with covert PSE (subclinical encephalopathy). In this study, we investigated whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) could be a useful tool for diagnosing PSE in chronic HSJ patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MRS were performed in 41 chronic HSJ patients with suspected PSE and in 21 age-matched controls. The T1 signal intensity index (T1SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value were obtained in the Globus pallidus. Liver function was also investigated via serum ammonia and liver function tests. Higher T1SI and ADC values, increased lactate and glutamine levels, and decreased myo-inositol were found in the bilateral Globus pallidus in chronic HSJ patients with PSE. No significantly abnormal serum ammonia or liver function tests were observed in chronic HSJ patients with PSE. On the basis of these findings, we propose a diagnostic procedure for PSE in chronic HSJ patients. This study reveals that MRS can be useful for diagnosing PSE in chronic HSJ patients. PMID:27977668

  16. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Evaluating Portal-Systemic Encephalopathy in Patients with Chronic Hepatic Schistosomiasis Japonicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Mei, Lihong; Qiang, Jinwei; Ju, Shuai; Zhao, Shuhui

    2016-12-01

    Portal-systemic encephalopathy (PSE) is classified as type B hepatic encephalopathy. Portal-systemic shunting rather than liver dysfunction is the main cause of PSE in chronic hepatic schistosomiasis japonicum (HSJ) patients. Owing to lack of detectable evidence of intrinsic liver disease, chronic HSJ patients with PSE are frequently clinically undetected or misdiagnosed, especially chronic HSJ patients with covert PSE (subclinical encephalopathy). In this study, we investigated whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) could be a useful tool for diagnosing PSE in chronic HSJ patients. Magnetic resonance (MR) T1-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and MRS were performed in 41 chronic HSJ patients with suspected PSE and in 21 age-matched controls. The T1 signal intensity index (T1SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value were obtained in the Globus pallidus. Liver function was also investigated via serum ammonia and liver function tests. Higher T1SI and ADC values, increased lactate and glutamine levels, and decreased myo-inositol were found in the bilateral Globus pallidus in chronic HSJ patients with PSE. No significantly abnormal serum ammonia or liver function tests were observed in chronic HSJ patients with PSE. On the basis of these findings, we propose a diagnostic procedure for PSE in chronic HSJ patients. This study reveals that MRS can be useful for diagnosing PSE in chronic HSJ patients.

  17. Tight versus standard blood pressure control in patients with hypertension with and without cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Angeli, Fabio; de Simone, Giovanni; Staessen, Jan A; Verdecchia, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    An excessive blood pressure (BP) reduction might be dangerous in high-risk patients with cardiovascular disease. In the Studio Italiano Sugli Effetti CARDIOvascolari del Controllo della Pressione Arteriosa SIStolica (Cardio-Sis), 1111 nondiabetic patients with systolic BP ≥150 mm Hg were randomly assigned to a systolic BP target <140 mm Hg (standard control) or <130 mm Hg (tight control). We stratified patients by absence (n=895) or presence (n=216) of established cardiovascular disease at entry. Antihypertensive treatment was open-label and tailored to each patient's needs. After 2-year follow-up, the primary end point of the study, electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy, occurred less frequently in the tight than in the standard control group in the patients without (10.8% versus 15.2%) and with (14.1% versus 23.5%) established cardiovascular disease (P for interaction=0.82). The main secondary end point, a composite of cardiovascular events and all-cause death, occurred less frequently in the tight than in the standard control group both in patients without (1.47 versus 3.68 patient-years; P=0.016) and with (7.87 versus 11.22 patient-years; P=0.049) previous cardiovascular disease. In a multivariable Cox model, allocation to tight BP control reduced the risk of cardiovascular events to a similar extent in patients with or without overt cardiovascular disease at randomization (P for interaction=0.43). In conclusion, an intensive treatment aimed to lower systolic BP<130 mm Hg reduced left ventricular hypertrophy and improved clinical outcomes to a similar extent in patients with hypertension and without established cardiovascular disease.

  18. The ascites N-glycome of epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Biskup, Karina; Braicu, Elena I; Sehouli, Jalid; Tauber, Rudolf; Blanchard, Véronique

    2017-03-22

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is worldwide the sixth most lethal form of cancer occurring in women. More than one third of ovarian patients have ascites at the time of diagnosis and almost all of them have it when recurrence occurs. Although its effect on tumor cell microenvironment remains poorly understood, its presence is correlated with bad diagnosis. In previous studies, we proposed a novel glycan-based biomarker for the diagnosis of EOC, which showed an improved sensitivity and specificity at any stage of the disease and an improved discrimination between malignant and benign ovarian tumors. In this work, we report for the first time the N-glycome profiles of ascitic fluid from primary serous EOC patients and compare them with the serum N-glycomes of the same patients as well as of healthy controls. N-Glycans were digested from equivalent amount of ascites and serum from 18 EOC patients and from serum of 20 age-matched controls and measured by MALDI-TOF-MS. Ascites N-glycome showed increased antennarity, branching, sialylation and Lewis(X) motives compared to healthy serum. In addition, a correlation was established between ascites volume and degree of sialylation.

  19. Positron emission tomography in patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    McGeer, P L; Kamo, H; Harrop, R; Li, D K; Tuokko, H; McGeer, E G; Adam, M J; Ammann, W; Beattie, B L; Calne, D B

    1986-01-01

    Fourteen patients who had clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease with mild to severe dementia (mean age 69.1 years) were evaluated by calculation of local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMR-gl) based on uptake of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) detected with positron emission tomography (PET). PET scanning showed that the patients had significantly lower LCMR-gl values than 11 age-matched neurologically normal volunteers (mean age 66.3 years). The differences were most marked in the temporal cortex, followed by the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex. In each case the LCMR-gl value was below the lowest control value in at least one cortical area and usually in several; the reduction in LCMR-gl and the number of regions involved in the patients increased with the severity of the dementia. Deficits noted in neuropsychologic testing generally correlated with those predicted from loss of regional cortical metabolism. The patients with Alzheimer's disease were also examined with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography or both; the degree of atrophy found showed only a poor correlation with the neuropsychologic deficit. Significant atrophy was also noted in some of the controls. A detailed analysis of LCMR-gl values in selected cerebral regions of various sizes refuted the hypothesis that the reduction in cortical glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease is due to the filling by metabolically inert cerebrospinal fluid of space created by tissue atrophy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:3512063

  20. Conscious and unconscious performance monitoring: Evidence from patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Charles, Lucie; Gaillard, Raphaël; Amado, Isabelle; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Bendjemaa, Narjes; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2017-01-01

    The ability to detect our own errors is an essential component of action monitoring. Using a masking paradigm in normal adults, we recently discovered that some error-detection processes can proceed without awareness, while other markers of performance monitoring such as the Error-Related Negativity (ERN) are tightly linked to conscious perception. Interestingly, research on cognitive deficit in schizophrenia has shown that the ERN is altered in these patients. In the present study, we therefore tested if the error detection impairment in schizophrenia is specific to conscious perception or is also found under non-conscious conditions, probing whether these performance monitoring processes are truly distinct. Thirteen patients with schizophrenia and thirteen age-matched healthy control subjects performed a speeded number comparison task on masked stimuli while EEG and MEG signals were recorded. Conscious perception and error-detection were assessed on a trial-by-trial basis using subjective reports of visibility and confidence. We found that patients with schizophrenia presented altered cingulate error-detection responses in conscious trials, as reflected by a decreased ERN. By contrast, on unconscious trials, both controls and schizophrenia patients performed above chance in evaluating the likelihood of having made an error. This dissociation confirms the existence of two distinct performance monitoring systems, and suggests that conscious metacognition in schizophrenia is specifically altered while non-conscious performance monitoring remains preserved.

  1. Cortical damage in the posterior visual pathway in patients with sialidosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chin-Song; Ng, Shu-Hang; Lai, Szu-Chia; Kao, Ling-Yuh; Liu, Laura; Lin, Wey-Yil; Wu, Yi-Ming; Chen, Yao-Liang; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2016-02-03

    In order to identify the cortical changes in patients with Sialidosis type 1, diffusion tensor imaging and resting state fMRI were acquired from 11 patients and 11 sex/age matched normal controls after clinical evaluations. The neuroimages from each participant were normalized and parcellated according to the Automatic Anatomical Labeling. Both the mean diffusivity and the corresponding functional connectivity were calculated from each cortical region. The white matter tract integrity was examined. The difference between patients and controls was examined using Student's t-test and between patients with either homozygous or heterozygous mutations by Mann-Whitney U test, both at a threshold of 0.05. Increased mean diffusivity throughout the brain can be noticed in the patients, together with a compromised white matter tracts integrity. The most severely affected cortical regions are in the occipital lobe. Decreased functional connectivity was from the temporal and occipital lobes to the hippocampus and parahippocampus. In contrast, connectivity from thalamus was enhanced. Diffused cortical atrophy with posterior focal lesions was noticed. We concluded that MRI observed functional changes in the posterior cortical pathways in the patients with Sialidosis. The observation might be related to the cortical blindness due to an altered neural network and a compromised visual pathway in the patients.

  2. Impaired bactericidal but not fungicidal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Georgiadou, Sarah P; Wierda, William G; Wright, Susan; Albert, Nathaniel D; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael; Lewis, Russell E

    2013-08-01

    We examined the qualitative polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-associated immune impairment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) by characterizing phagocytic killing of key non-opsonized bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus) pathogens. Neutrophils were collected from 47 non-neutropenic patients with CLL (PMN count > 1000/mm(3)) and age-matched and young healthy controls (five each). A subset of patients (13%) had prior or subsequent infections. We found that the patients with CLL had diminished PMN microbicidal response against bacteria but not against fungi compared with the controls. Compared to patients with effective PMN responses, we did not identify differences of basal PMN pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor gene expression, soluble pathogen-associated molecular pattern gene expression or inflammatory cytokine signatures in patients with impaired PMN responses when PMNs were analyzed in multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. However, differences in PMN microbicidal response against A. fumigatus in patients with CLL were associated with the degree of hypogammaglobulinemia.

  3. Impaired bactericidal but not fungicidal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Georgiadou, Sarah P.; Wierda, William G.; Wright, Susan; Albert, Nathaniel D.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael; Lewis, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the qualitative polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN)-associated immune impairment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) by characterizing phagocytic killing of key nonopsonized bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungal (Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus) pathogens. Neutrophils were collected from 47 nonneutropenic CLL patients (PMN count > 1000/mm3), and age-matched and young healthy controls (five each). A subset of patients (13%) had prior or subsequent infections. We found that the CLL patients had diminished PMN microbicidal response against bacteria but not against fungi than did the controls. Compared to patients with effective PMN responses, we did not identify differences of basal PMN pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor gene expression, soluble pathogen-associated molecular pattern gene expression, or inflammatory cytokine signatures in patients with impaired PMN responses when PMNs were analyzed in multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. However, differences in PMN microbicidal response against A. fumigatus in CLL patients were associated with the degree of hypogammaglobulinemia. PMID:23163595

  4. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  5. Elevated Hair Cortisol Levels among Heroin Addicts on Current Methadone Maintenance Compared to Controls

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Li, Jifeng; Xu, Guanyi; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Zuhong; Deng, Huihua

    2016-01-01

    Whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can improve the basal function of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, which is suppressed by long-term heroin consumption, is a matter of debate. The stress state and depression and anxiety symptoms may affect the basal activity of the HPA axis in MMT patients. However, the effect of psychological factors on HPA activity was not simultaneously controlled in previous studies. This study investigated differences in HPA basal activity between MMT patients and controls using psychological variables as covariates. The participants included 52 MMT patients and 41 age-matched, non-heroin-dependent controls. Psychological states were self-reported with the Perceived Stress Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. The hair cortisol level was adopted as a biomarker of HPA basal activity and was determined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results revealed that MMT patients had significantly higher hair cortisol levels than the controls (p<0.05), but the difference was not significant (p>0.05) when the perceived stress, depression and anxiety scores were used as covariates. We concluded that patients with long-term MMT showed higher basal activity of the HPA axis. The high chronic stress state and increase in depression and anxiety symptoms may mask the suppression effect of methadone on the HPA activity. PMID:27010803

  6. Elevated Hair Cortisol Levels among Heroin Addicts on Current Methadone Maintenance Compared to Controls.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Li, Jifeng; Xu, Guanyi; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zheng; Lu, Zuhong; Deng, Huihua

    2016-01-01

    Whether methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) can improve the basal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is suppressed by long-term heroin consumption, is a matter of debate. The stress state and depression and anxiety symptoms may affect the basal activity of the HPA axis in MMT patients. However, the effect of psychological factors on HPA activity was not simultaneously controlled in previous studies. This study investigated differences in HPA basal activity between MMT patients and controls using psychological variables as covariates. The participants included 52 MMT patients and 41 age-matched, non-heroin-dependent controls. Psychological states were self-reported with the Perceived Stress Scale, Self-Rating Depression Scale and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale. The hair cortisol level was adopted as a biomarker of HPA basal activity and was determined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The results revealed that MMT patients had significantly higher hair cortisol levels than the controls (p<0.05), but the difference was not significant (p>0.05) when the perceived stress, depression and anxiety scores were used as covariates. We concluded that patients with long-term MMT showed higher basal activity of the HPA axis. The high chronic stress state and increase in depression and anxiety symptoms may mask the suppression effect of methadone on the HPA activity.

  7. Randomised controlled trial of graded exercise in patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, K. Y.; White, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of a graded aerobic exercise programme in the chronic fatigue syndrome. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with control treatment crossover after the first follow up examination. SETTING: Chronic fatigue clinic in a general hospital department of psychiatry. SUBJECTS: 66 patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome who had neither a psychiatric disorder nor appreciable sleep disturbance. INTERVENTIONS: Random allocation to 12 weeks of either graded aerobic exercise or flexibility exercises and relaxation therapy. Patients who completed the flexibility programme were invited to cross over to the exercise programme afterwards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The self rated clinical global impression change score, "very much better" or "much better" being considered as clinically important. RESULTS: Four patients receiving exercise and three receiving flexibility treatment dropped out before completion. 15 of 29 patients rated themselves as better after completing exercise treatment compared with eight of 30 patients who completed flexibility treatment. Analysis by intention to treat gave similar results (17/33 v 9/33 patients better). Fatigue, functional capacity, and fitness were significantly better after exercise than after flexibility treatment. 12 of 22 patients who crossed over to exercise after flexibility treatment rated themselves as better after completing exercise treatment 32 of 47 patients rated themselves as better three months after completing supervised exercise treatment 35 of 47 patients rated themselves as better one year after completing supervised exercise treatment. CONCLUSION: These findings support the use of appropriately prescribed graded aerobic exercise in the management of patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome. PMID:9180065

  8. Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients in the "Hiperdia Program": A Territory-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Clarita Silva; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Bastos, Gisele Alsina Nader; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic hypertension is highly prevalent and an important risk factor for cardiovascular events. Blood pressure control in hypertensive patients enrolled in the Hiperdia Program, a program of the Single Health System for the follow-up and monitoring of hypertensive patients, is still far below the desired level. Objective To describe the epidemiological profile and to assess blood pressure control of patients enrolled in Hiperdia, in the city of Novo Hamburgo (State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil). Methods Cross-sectional study with a stratified cluster random sample, including 383 adults enrolled in the Hiperdia Program of the 15 Basic Health Units of the city of Porto Alegre, conducted between 2010 and 2011. Controlled blood pressure was defined as ≤140 mmHg × 90 mmHg. The hypertensive patients were interviewed and their blood pressure was measured using a calibrated aneroid device. Prevalence ratios (PR) with 95% confidence interval, Wald's χ2 test, and simple and multiple Poisson regression were used in the statistical analysis. Results The mean age was 63 ± 10 years, and most of the patients were females belonging to social class C, with a low level of education, a sedentary lifestyle, and family history positive for systemic hypertension. Diabetes mellitus (DM) was observed in 31%; adherence to the antihypertensive treatment in 54.3%; and 33.7% had their blood pressure controlled. DM was strongly associated with inadequate BP control, with only 15.7% of the diabetics showing BP considered as controlled. Conclusion Even for hypertensive patients enrolled in the Hiperdia Program, BP control is not satisfactorily reached or sustained. Diabetic hypertensive patients show the most inappropriate BP control. PMID:25004419

  9. Acupressure in Controlling Nausea in Young Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    RATIONALE: Acupressure wristbands may prevent or reduce nausea and caused by chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether standard care is more effective with or without acupressure wristbands in controlling acute and delayed nausea. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying how well acupressure wristbands work with or without standard care in controlling nausea in young patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. |

  10. Quantitative EEG analysis for assessment to 'plan' a task in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a study of executive functions (planning) in ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Jayashree; Bhatia, Manvir; Sahu, Shweta; Anand, Sneh

    2004-12-01

    An attempt has been made to study the ability of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to 'plan' a task. Electroencephalogram (EEG) data corresponding to 'planning of a movement task' is analyzed in comparison with a normal relaxed state. The study was conducted on 12 patients with ALS (6 males, 3 females, mean age 46.75 years) and on same number of controls (10 males, 2 females, mean age 48.75 years) to evaluate a difference in the ability to 'plan' a movement task between them. Patients with ALS were divided in two groups defined by unclear/clear speech. It has been observed that patients with ALS having unclear speech (Group I) showed considerable reduction (p<0.0001) in 'planning' a movement task, whereas patients with ALS having clear speech (Group II) showed no deficit in 'planning' a movement task (p=0.0577), both in comparison with age-matched controls. Apart from supporting the earlier reports of a possible extended neuronal degeneration across wide area of the frontal lobes, the findings reveal a possible reduction in planning, an executive function of the prefrontal cortex of brain, and also reveal that speech impairment may be associated with cognitive deficits in patients with ALS.

  11. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  12. Calcium Stone Growth in Urine from Cystic Fibrosis Patients and Healthy Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSorley, Anita; Jones, Andrew M.; Webb, A. Kevin; Rao, P. Nagaraj; Kavanagh, John P.

    2007-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients have an increased risk of renal stone disease. There is some evidence that this may be related to a different excretory pattern of stone risk factors, but an alternative hypothesis, that the urine of cystic fibrosis patients is deficient in urinary inhibitors of crystallization and stone formation has not been tested. Here we have grown calcium stones, in vitro, in the presence of urine from healthy controls and compared this with growth in the presence of urine from cystic fibrosis patients. A stone farm was used to grow twelve calcium stones simultaneously, firstly in artificial urine for about 200 hours and then in 90% whole human urine for another 500 hours. Six of the stones received urine from healthy controls and six received urine from adult cystic fibrosis patients. There were no significant differences in stone mass at any of the key time points or in the overall growth pattern (p>0.05) between stones destined for, or treated with, urine from CF patients and the controls. Human urine greatly inhibited stone growth in vitro but there was no difference in the growth rate in urine from healthy controls and CF patients. This refutes the hypothesis that a tendency for a higher prevalence of urinary stones in CF patients is related to a deficiency in inhibitory activity.

  13. Transdermal nitroglycerin as an adjuvant to patient-controlled morphine analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Orbach-Zinger, Sharon; Lenchinsky, Artium; Paul-Kesslin, Lesley; Velks, Steven; Salai, Moses; Eidelman, Leonid A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitroglycerin (NTG) has been shown to be a useful adjunct for pain treatment without increasing adverse side effects. The effects of NTG on postoperative morphine consumption after knee replacement were evaluated. METHODS: After undergoing total knee replacement, patients receiving patient-controlled morphine analgesia were randomly assigned to receive either an NTG or a placebo patch. The blinded investigator assessed each patient using a visual analogue scale at rest and while moving, as well as the patient’s morphine requirements, sedation score, sleep quality, nausea and vomiting, vital signs and postoperative bleeding. RESULTS: Two of the patients in the NTG group suffered postoperative myocardial infarctions after removal of the patch. Because of these two serious adverse effects, the study was stopped prematurely. In the subset of patients studied, NTG conferred no advantage over placebo in pain control (visual analogue scale at rest or during movement) and in satisfaction scores. CONCLUSIONS: The use of NTG patches conferred no advantage over the use of placebo in patients receiving patient-controlled morphine analgesia after total knee replacement. Two myocardial infarcts occurred in this group. Therefore, the safety of postoperative NTG patch use for pain control must be questioned. PMID:19532851

  14. Excessive sleep need following traumatic brain injury: a case-control study of 36 patients.

    PubMed

    Sommerauer, Michael; Valko, Philipp O; Werth, Esther; Baumann, Christian R

    2013-12-01

    Increased sleep need following traumatic brain injury, referred to in this study as post-traumatic pleiosomnia, is common, but so far its clinical impact and therapeutic implications have not been characterized. We present a case-control study of 36 patients with post-traumatic pleiosomnia, defined by an increased sleep need of at least 2 h per 24 h after traumatic brain injury, compared to 36 controls. We assessed detailed history, sleep-activity patterns with sleep logs and actigraphy, nocturnal sleep with polysomnography and daytime sleep propensity with multiple sleep latency tests. Actigraphy recordings revealed that traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients had longer estimated sleep durations than controls (10.8 h per 24 h, compared to 7.3 h). When using sleep logs, TBI patients underestimated their sleep need. During nocturnal sleep, patients had higher amounts of slow-wave sleep than controls (20 versus 13.8%). Multiple sleep latency tests revealed excessive daytime sleepiness in 15 patients (42%), and 10 of them had signs of chronic sleep deprivation. We conclude that post-traumatic pleiosomnia may be even more frequent than reported previously, because affected patients often underestimate their actual sleep need. Furthermore, these patients exhibit an increase in slow-wave sleep which may reflect recovery mechanisms, intrinsic consequences of diffuse brain damage or relative sleep deprivation.

  15. Level of asthma control and its relationship with medication use in asthma patients in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Marchioro, Josiane; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Montealegre, Federico; Fish, James; Jardim, José Roberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess asthma patients in Brazil in terms of the level of asthma control, compliance with maintenance treatment, and the use of rescue medication. METHODS: We used data from a Latin American survey of a total of 400 asthma patients in four Brazilian state capitals, all of whom completed a questionnaire regarding asthma control and treatment. RESULTS: In that sample, the prevalence of asthma was 8.8%. Among the 400 patients studied, asthma was classified, in accordance with the Global Initiative for Asthma criteria, as controlled, partially controlled, and uncontrolled in 37 (9.3%), 226 (56.5%), and 137 (34.3%), respectively. In those three groups, the proportion of patients on maintenance therapy in the past four weeks was 5.4%, 19.9%, and 41.6%, respectively. The use of rescue medication was significantly more common in the uncontrolled asthma group (86.9%; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that, in accordance with the established international criteria, asthma is uncontrolled in the vast majority of asthma patients in Brazil. Maintenance medications are still underutilized in Brazil, and patients with partially controlled or uncontrolled asthma are more likely to use rescue medications and oral corticosteroids. PMID:25410836

  16. Domain-specific cognitive impairment in patients with COPD and control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cleutjens, Fiona AHM; Franssen, Frits ME; Spruit, Martijn A; Vanfleteren, Lowie EGW; Gijsen, Candy; Dijkstra, Jeanette B; Ponds, Rudolf WHM; Wouters, Emiel FM; Janssen, Daisy JA

    2017-01-01

    Impaired cognitive function is increasingly recognized in COPD. Yet, the prevalence of cognitive impairment in specific cognitive domains in COPD has been poorly studied. The aim of this cross-sectional observational study was to compare the prevalence of domain-specific cognitive impairment between patients with COPD and non-COPD controls. A neuropsychological assessment was administered in 90 stable COPD patients and 90 non-COPD controls with comparable smoking status, age, and level of education. Six core tests from the Maastricht Aging Study were used to assess general cognitive impairment. By using Z-scores, compound scores were constructed for the following domains: psychomotor speed, planning, working memory, verbal memory, and cognitive flexibility. General cognitive impairment and domain-specific cognitive impairment were compared between COPD patients and controls after correction for comorbidities using multivariate linear and logistic regression models. General cognitive impairment was found in 56.7% of patients with COPD and in 13.3% of controls. Deficits in the following domains were more often present in patients with COPD after correction for comorbidities: psychomotor speed (17.8% vs 3.3%; P<0.001), planning (17.8% vs 1.1%; P<0.001), and cognitive flexibility (43.3% vs 12.2%; P<0.001). General cognitive impairment and impairments in the domains psychomotor speed, planning, and cognitive flexibility affect the COPD patients more than their matched controls. PMID:28031706

  17. Quality of life in patients with hand eczema as health promotion: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Reza; Saadatjoo, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Health promotion has been defined by the World Health Organization's (WHO) 2005 Bangkok Charter for Health Promotion as "the process of enabling people to increase control over their health and its determinants, and thereby improve their health". One of the most important determinants of health is quality of life. Hand eczema is a common skin disease that can adversely affect the quality of life of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of life in patients with hand eczema. This case-control study was performed on 70 patients with hand eczema and 70 healthy controls. All the patients filled out two questionnaires: Short Form 36 (SF-36) and Dermatology Life Quality index (DLQI). The data were analyzed using the statistical software package for social sciences (SPSS). The mean score score of quality of life in dimensions of physical functioning, vitality, and general health in the SF-36 was lower compared to the control group. The mean score in DLQI in patients with hand eczema was 8.68. There was a significant negative correlation between the scores of different dimensions of QOL obtained in the two questionnaires (SF36 and DLQI). The study demonstrated that the quality of life in patients with hand eczema was lower than that of controls. It seems advisable that psychiatric consultations or psychotherapy be included in the treatment of chronic hand eczema.

  18. [Protein-calorie nutritional state in elderly patients hospitalized in Lomé Campus university hospital: pilot study about 33 patients versus 30 reference cases registered in three care units].

    PubMed

    Kouassi, K C; Lamboni, C

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the protein-calorie nutritional status of elderly hospitalized patients admitted to the hepato-gastroenterology, cardiology and internal medicine departments of the Lomé Campus University Hospital and identify the endogenous and mixed undernutrition to provide patients with better nutrition and assistance. Methodology. This cross-sectional study conducted between April 1 and July 31, 2009, included 33 hospitalized case patients aged at least 55 years and 30 age-matched outpatient control subjects. Patients were evaluated according to body mass index (BMI), the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and their serum albumin, serum prealbumin and orosomucoid levels. Results. Among the hospitalized case patients, 37% had protein-calorie undernutrition (low serum albumin), and 73% were at risk of this undernutrition (low serum prealbumin). Five patients (16%) were endogenously undernourished and 17 (57%) exogenously undernourished. Six to 13% of the oupatient controls were undernourished and 33% at risk of undernutrition according to the MNA scale. A significant difference existed between the mean albumin values of case patients and controls (38 ± 9 g/L vs 46 ± 7 g/L, p = 0.002). Conclusion. Our results confirm that the elderly inpatients were regularly malnourished. Knowledge of their nutritional profile has allowed us to launch an improved nutritional assistance program and to supervise it properly.

  19. Sensitivity to ionising radiation of lymphocytes from Huntington's chorea patients compared to controls

    SciTech Connect

    McGovern, D. ); Webb, T. )

    1982-06-01

    Blood samples were collected from 22 patients with Huntington's chorea and from 22 matched controls. Lymphocytes were separated from aliquots of each sample and cultures set up both from these and from further aliquots of whole blood. After 24 hours, half of each culture was subjected to X irradiation. Seventy-two hours later the percentages of live lymphocytes were estimated for each half of every culture and the viability ratio calculated for each sample. The lymphocytes derived from the patients with Huntington's chorea were found to be more susceptible to X irradiation than were the lymphocytes derived from controls. This was true both for whole blood and separated lymphocyte cultures. This susceptibility was found not to be the result of the main types of medication received by the patients. The small differences between viability ratios from patients and controls and the degree of overlap makes this test unsuitable for the prediction of asymptomatic carriers of the Huntington's chorea gene.

  20. Method for quality control of laboratory tests using histograms of daily patient data.

    PubMed

    Okada, M

    1990-01-01

    A method for controlling the quality of laboratory tests is proposed. Histograms of patients' daily results which fall within reference ranges of healthy individuals are used for estimating accuracy and precision of measurements. For the determination of accuracy, three methods are evaluated; computing an average of patients' results; determining the location of the peak of the histogram; approximating the histogram by an Erland distribution and determining the peak of the distribution. For precision control, standard deviations are calculated from patient data. We applied these methods to serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST or SGOT) and total cholesterol of patients in a general hospital. Averages, peaks of approximated Erland distribution, and standard deviations were found to be useful to daily quality control in laboratories of large hospitals.

  1. The control of equilibrium in Parkinson's disease patients: delayed adaptation of balancing strategy to shifts in sensory set during a dynamic task.

    PubMed

    De Nunzio, Alessandro M; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2007-09-28

    Processing of sensory information, timing operations and set-shifting can be affected in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We investigated their capacity and swiftness to pass from a kinaesthetic- to a vision-dependent behaviour during dynamic balancing on a continuously moving support base. Nineteen on-phase PD patients and 13 age-matched normal subjects stood on a platform continuously translating in the antero-posterior direction at 0.2 Hz. Body segment oscillations were identified by a stereophotogrammetric device and electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from tibialis anterior and soleus. Under constant visual conditions, both patients and normal subjects roughly stabilised head and trunk in space with eyes open (EO) but followed the platform displacement with eyes closed (EC). Amplitude and variability of the periodic EMG bursts were smaller with EO than EC. Constant visual-condition trials were intermingled with trials in which subjects opened (EC-EO) or closed (EO-EC) the eyes in response to an acoustic signal. Both patients and normal subjects changed kinematics and EMG patterns to those appropriate for the new visual condition. However, PD patients were slower in changing their behaviour under the EC-EO condition. These findings show abnormal temporal features in balancing strategy adaptation when shifting from kinaesthetic to visual reference in PD. The delay in the implementation of the vision-dependent behaviour was unexpected, given the advantage vision is supposed to confer to motor performance in PD. This condition may play a major role in the instability of patients performing dynamic postural tasks under changing sensory conditions.

  2. Altered Recruitment of the Attention Network Is Associated with Disability and Cognitive Impairment in Pediatric Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Strazzer, Sandra; Rocca, Maria A.; Molteni, Erika; De Meo, Ermelinda; Recla, Monica; Valsasina, Paola; Arrigoni, Filippo; Galbiati, Susanna; Bardoni, Alessandra; Filippi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We assessed abnormalities of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity during a sustained attention task (Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CCPT)) in 20 right-handed pediatric acquired brain injury (ABI) patients versus 7 right-handed age-matched healthy controls, and we estimated the correlation of such abnormalities with clinical and cognitive deficits. Patients underwent the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) evaluations. During fMRI, patients and controls activated regions of the attention network. Compared to controls, ABI patients experienced a decreased average fMRI recruitment of the left cerebellum and a decreased deactivation of the left anterior cingulate cortex. With increasing task demand, compared to controls, ABI patients had an impaired ability to increase the recruitment of several posterior regions of the attention network. They also experienced a greater activation of frontal regions, which was correlated with worse performance on FIM, WISC, and fMRI CCPT. Such abnormal brain recruitment was significantly influenced by the type of lesion (focal versus diffuse axonal injury) and time elapsed from the event. Pediatric ABI patients experienced an inability to optimize attention network recruitment, especially when task difficulty was increased, which likely contributes to their clinical and cognitive deficits. PMID:26448878

  3. Predictive factors of death in patients with tuberculosis: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moosazadeh, M; Nezammahalleh, A; Movahednia, M; Movahednia, N; Khanjani, N; Afshari, M

    2015-06-09

    Tuberculosis is one of the main causes of death worldwide. This study aimed to determine predictive factors for death in patients with tuberculosis to set priorities for public heath interventions to reduce mortality in these patients. This nested case-control study was carried out in Mazandaran province of Islamic Republic of Iran among tuberculosis patients who were treated during 2002-2009. Each deceased patient was individually matched with a control patient according to sex, age, area of involvement and time of follow-up. Potential risk factors for death were evaluated using multivariate conditional logistic regression models. From 2206 patients 376 cases and 376 matched controls were selected. Only positive serology for HIV (OR = 19.1), history of kidney disease (OR = 6.81) and use of immunosuppressant drugs (OR = 3.96) significantly increased the risk of death in tuberculosis patients. These potentially modifiable risk factors could be taken into account in preventive interventions for tuberculosis patients in our country.

  4. Role of health locus of control between uncertainty and uncertainty appraisal among patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Younhee

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of health locus of control in the model of uncertainty in illness among patients with atrial fibrillation. This study employed a descriptive, correlational survey. A total of 81 patients with atrial fibrillation were recruited from two large medical centers in the United States. Only the interaction term of uncertainty and internal health locus of control had a significant moderating effect on appraisal of danger. Greater internal health locus of control was associated with greater appraisal of danger at the given degree of uncertainty. Therefore, the internal health locus of control played a significant role in magnifying the relationship of uncertainty on appraisal of danger. However, health locus of control did not moderate the relationship between uncertainty and appraisal of opportunity. Finally, this study concluded that internal health locus of control had a moderating effect on the relationship between uncertainty and appraisal of danger.

  5. [Cooking as a therapy for dangerous mental health patients: controlled risk-taking].

    PubMed

    Geay, Janique; Schmitt, Stéphane; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Among the range of therapeutic mediators used with dangerous mental health patients in the unit for dangerous patients in Cadillac, cooking holds an important place. Led by caregivers, this activity has undeniable positive effects for the psychotic and non-psychotic patients taking part. These effects concern notably their capacities for conception, creation, organisation, execution, sensation, collaboration and socialisation. For some patients, it is also the opportunity to take the drama out of handling utensils which they previously used as weapons. As the risk factors are controlled before and during the activity, no dangerous acting out has ever occurred.

  6. A Distinct Urinary Biomarker Pattern Characteristic of Female Fabry Patients That Mirrors Response to Enzyme Replacement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, Andreas D.; Siwy, Justyna; Breunig, Frank; Jeevaratnam, Praveen; Scherl, Alexander; Mullen, William; Warnock, David G.; Wanner, Christoph; Hughes, Derralynn A.; Mischak, Harald; Wüthrich, Rudolf P.; Serra, Andreas L.

    2011-01-01

    Female patients affected by Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, exhibit a wide spectrum of symptoms, which renders diagnosis, and treatment decisions challenging. No diagnostic test, other than sequencing of the alpha-galactosidase A gene, is available and no biomarker has been proven useful to screen for the disease, predict disease course and monitor response to enzyme replacement therapy. Here, we used urine proteomic analysis based on capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry and identified a biomarker profile in adult female Fabry patients. Urine samples were taken from 35 treatment-naïve female Fabry patients and were compared to 89 age-matched healthy controls. We found a diagnostic biomarker pattern that exhibited 88.2% sensitivity and 97.8% specificity when tested in an independent validation cohort consisting of 17 treatment-naïve Fabry patients and 45 controls. The model remained highly specific when applied to additional control patients with a variety of other renal, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Several of the 64 identified diagnostic biomarkers showed correlations with measures of disease severity. Notably, most biomarkers responded to enzyme replacement therapy, and 8 of 11 treated patients scored negative for Fabry disease in the diagnostic model. In conclusion, we defined a urinary biomarker model that seems to be of diagnostic use for Fabry disease in female patients and may be used to monitor response to enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:21698285

  7. ZigBee-based wireless intra-oral control system for quadriplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiyu; Budinger, Thomas F

    2007-01-01

    A human-to-computer system that includes a wireless intra-oral module, a wireless coordinator and distributed wireless controllers, is presented. The state-of-the-art ZigBee protocol is employed to achieve reliable, low-power and cost-efficient wireless communication between the tongue, computer and controllers. By manipulating five buttons on the wireless intra-oral module using the tongue, the subject can control cursors, computer menus, wheelchair, lights, TV, phone and robotic devices. The system is designed to improve the life quality of patients with stroke and patients with spinal cord injury.

  8. Glucose control in critically ill patients in 2009: no alarms and no surprises.

    PubMed

    Pitrowsky, Melissa; Shinotsuka, Cassia Righy; Soares, Márcio; Salluh, Jorge Ibrain Figueira

    2009-08-01

    Glucose control is a major issue in critical care since landmark publications from the last decade leading to widespread use of strict glucose control in the clinical practice. Subsequent trials showed discordant results that lead to several questions and concerns about benefits and risks of implementing an intensive glucose control protocol. In the midst of all recent controversy, we propose that a new glycemic target -150mg/dl) should be aimed. This target glucose level could offer protection against the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia and at the same time keep patient's safety avoiding hypoglicemia. The article presents a critical review of the current literature on intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients.

  9. Attitudes toward Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials of Patients with Schizophrenia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Norio; Ishioka, Masamichi; Tsuchimine, Shoko; Tsuruga, Koji; Sato, Yasushi; Furukori, Hanako; Kudo, Shuhei; Tomita, Tetsu; Nakagami, Taku; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the use of placebo in clinical trials of schizophrenia patients is controversial because of medical and ethical concerns, placebo-controlled clinical trials are commonly used in the licensing of new drugs. Aims The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials among patients with schizophrenia in Japan. Method Using a cross-sectional design, we recruited patients (n = 251) aged 47.7±13.2 (mean±SD) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were admitted to six psychiatric hospitals from December 2013 to March 2014. We employed a 14-item questionnaire specifically developed to survey patients' attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials. Results The results indicated that 33% of the patients would be willing to participate in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Expectations for improvement of disease, a guarantee of hospital treatment continuation, and encouragement by family or friends were associated with the willingness to participate in such trials, whereas a belief of additional time required for medical examinations was associated with non-participation. Conclusions Fewer than half of the respondents stated that they would be willing to participate in placebo-controlled clinical trials. Therefore, interpreting the results from placebo-controlled clinical trials could be negatively affected by selection bias. PMID:26600382

  10. Total serum IgE concentration in patients with psoriasis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lajevardi, Vahideh; Ghiasi, Maryam; Goodarzi, Azadeh; Mohtasham, Sima; Ansari, Mahsa; Hedayat, Kosar; Nassiri, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves the skin, nails and joints. With regard to the role of the immune system in psoriasis, the current study compared serum IgE concentration in patients with psoriasis with control group. Current case-control study was conducted in Dermatology clinic of Razi hospital, Tehran University of medical sciences, Tehran, Iran in 2012. Fifty-eight patients with psoriasis e referred to the clinic were assigned as patient group and 58 healthy subjects with matched age and sex as a control group. Patient's history, family history and demographic characteristics such as age and sex, duration and severity of disease using PASI, were collected and entered into a form. Consent form was obtained from participants. Serum IgE concentrations of both study groups were measured by electrochemiluminescence assay in the laboratory A total number of 58 patients with psoriasis, mean age of 44.15 (19-76 years) and 58 controls with matched age and sex were studied. Mean average of serum IgE concentration in the control group was 115.13 versus 200/06 concentration in patients group (P=0.16). Serum IgE concentration in 22.4% of patients versus 17.2% in controls was greater than normal concentration (P=0.48). No significant correlation was between serum IgE concentration and disease severity using PASI (P=0.11, r=0.21), neither a significant correlation with disease duration, age and gender. According to the present study, serum IgE concentrations are not greater in patients with psoriasis. IgE concentration is also not associated with the severity of psoriasis based on the PASI score, therefore, the role of IgE in psoriasis can be considered insignificant as some previous studies indicate.

  11. T-wave morphology can distinguish healthy controls from LQTS patients.

    PubMed

    Immanuel, S A; Sadrieh, A; Baumert, M; Couderc, J P; Zareba, W; Hill, A P; Vandenberg, J I

    2016-09-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited disorder associated with prolongation of the QT/QTc interval on the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and a markedly increased risk of sudden cardiac death due to cardiac arrhythmias. Up to 25% of genotype-positive LQTS patients have QT/QTc intervals in the normal range. These patients are, however, still at increased risk of life-threatening events compared to their genotype-negative siblings. Previous studies have shown that analysis of T-wave morphology may enhance discrimination between control and LQTS patients. In this study we tested the hypothesis that automated analysis of T-wave morphology from Holter ECG recordings could distinguish between control and LQTS patients with QTc values in the range 400-450 ms. Holter ECGs were obtained from the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW) database. Frequency binned averaged ECG waveforms were obtained and extracted T-waves were fitted with a combination of 3 sigmoid functions (upslope, downslope and switch) or two 9th order polynomial functions (upslope and downslope). Neural network classifiers, based on parameters obtained from the sigmoid or polynomial fits to the 1 Hz and 1.3 Hz ECG waveforms, were able to achieve up to 92% discrimination between control and LQTS patients and 88% discrimination between LQTS1 and LQTS2 patients. When we analysed a subgroup of subjects with normal QT intervals (400-450 ms, 67 controls and 61 LQTS), T-wave morphology based parameters enabled 90% discrimination between control and LQTS patients, compared to only 71% when the groups were classified based on QTc alone. In summary, our Holter ECG analysis algorithms demonstrate the feasibility of using automated analysis of T-wave morphology to distinguish LQTS patients, even those with normal QTc, from healthy controls.

  12. Increasing Elbow Torque Output of Stroke Patients by EMG-Controlled External Torque

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- A control algorithm for using homogenic EMG to control external assisting torque is developed for improving the elbow capability of...sacrificing performance. Keywords - Elbow , EMG, assisting torque, stroke I. INTRODUCTION Hemiparesis, which means partial loss of muscle strength...system to increase the total torque capability of the elbow for this class of patients. The system was controlled by surface EMG of biceps and

  13. Clofibrate and diabetes control in patients treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Daubresse, J C; Daigneux, D; Bruwier, M; Luyckx, A; Lefebvre, P J

    1979-01-01

    1. Twenty-two maturity-onset type diabetics treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents entered a single-blind crossover study using placebo (periods A and C, 2 months each) and clofibrate (2 g/day; period B; 2 months). 2. In thirteen patients, under reasonably good control, clofibrate did not reduce fasting or post-prandial blood glucose, nor 24 h glycosuria; no improvement was noted in the M-value, an index of diabetes control. 3. In contrast, in nine patients, with poor diabetes control, clofibrate reduced 24 h glycosuria and significantly improved the M-value. 4. In all patients, clofibrate therapy was associated with a significant 19-23% reduction in plasma fibrinogen. 5. It is suggested that addition of clofibrate may be useful in maturity-onset diabetics not adequately controlled by diet combined with oral hypoglycaemic agents. PMID:380614

  14. Experience with modified remotely controlled fluoroscopic equipment for gastrointestinal examination in debilitated patients.

    PubMed

    Hayt, D B; Perez, L A

    1975-06-01

    The concept and realization of a highly automated remotely controlled fluoroscopic system, applicable to the examination of debilitated or uncooperative patients, have been described. The addition of a rotating cradle, remotely controlled barium administration, magazine-fed roll film camera, remotely inflated paddle for prone-pressure spot filming, and a vacuum restraining device have been described for the examination of uncooperative as well as cooperative patients. These patients can be examined with as high a degree of sophistication and automation as is now available. Future developments in this area may lie in the realm of multitable remotely controlled fluoroscopic rooms, operation of the above equipment by a super technologist, programmed gastrointestinal examinations utilizing the above equipment and automated programming, and teleremote controlled fluoroscopy from a centralized location with coaxial cable or microwave transmission.

  15. Effectiveness of Intravenous Infusion Algorithms for Glucose Control in Diabetic Patients Using Different Simulation Models

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Terry G.; Edgar, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of closed-loop insulin infusion algorithms is assessed for three different mathematical models describing insulin and glucose dynamics within a Type I diabetes patient. Simulations are performed to assess the effectiveness of proportional plus integral plus derivative (PID) control, feedforward control, and a physiologically-based control system with respect to maintaining normal glucose levels during a meal and during exercise. Control effectiveness is assessed by comparing the simulated response to a simulation of a healthy patient during both a meal and exercise and establishing maximum and minimum glucose levels and insulin infusion levels, as well as maximum duration of hyperglycemia. Controller effectiveness is assessed within the minimal model, the Sorensen model, and the Hovorka model. Results showed that no type of control was able to maintain normal conditions when simulations were performed using the minimal model. For both the Sorensen model and the Hovorka model, proportional control was sufficient to maintain normal glucose levels. Given published clinical data showing the ineffectiveness of PID control in patients, the work demonstrates that controller success based on simulation results can be misleading, and that future work should focus on addressing the model discrepancies. PMID:20161147

  16. Relationship between vitamin D and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Olt, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Herein I investigated the impact of vitamin D on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. 128 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled in this study (mean (S.D) age: 57.7±10 years, 26.6% were female). It was collected clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients from hospital records retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups according to the HBA1c values: good glycemic control (HbA1c≤7%) and poor glycemic control (HbA1c>7%). It was compared 25 hydroxyvitamin (OH) D and other collected laboratory parameters between the two groups. The vitamin D deficiency rate was 98.3%. In the result with ROC curve analyzes and Mann Whitney U test vitamin D was'nt significantly associated with glycemic control (P value >0.05). Among other parameters result with ROC curve analyzes and student t test RDW-CV was found to be significantly associated with glycemic control (P value <0.05). Although high level of vitamin D deficiency, present study indicated that vitamin D was'nt significantly related to glycemic control in type 2 diyabetes mellitus. Even so RDW-CV was significantly related to glycemic control.

  17. Sexual Well-Being in Patients with Blepharospasm, Spasmodic Torticollis, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Perozzo, Paola; Salatino, Adriana; Cerrato, Paolo; Ricci, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Mood, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospasm (BSP) and spasmodic torticollis (ST). Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N = 30), ST (N = 30), and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N = 30), undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory, a reduced form of the Golombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2) were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e., altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits). Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS, and comparable data are not available. PMID:27761118

  18. Sexual Well-Being in Patients with Blepharospasm, Spasmodic Torticollis, and Hemifacial Spasm: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Perozzo, Paola; Salatino, Adriana; Cerrato, Paolo; Ricci, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Mood, anxiety, and other psychological symptoms are common in dystonic patients suffering from blepharospasm (BSP) and spasmodic torticollis (ST). Since sexual well-being is an important aspect of mental health, here, we investigated whether these patients may also experience a worsening of their sexual life. In particular, quality of sexual life was evaluated in patients suffering from BSP (N = 30), ST (N = 30), and in a control group of patient with Hemifacial spasm (HFS; N = 30), undergoing botulinum toxin type A therapy. A group of 30 age-matched healthy volunteers constituted an additional control group. Patients were evaluated just before the periodic injection of botulinum toxin. Sexual functioning was assessed using the Sexual Functioning Inventory, a reduced form of the Golombok Rust Inventory, previously employed in patients with Parkinson's disease. Depression (Beck Depression Inventory) and anxiety (STAI-X1/X2) were also assessed. Results revealed that sexual functioning was significantly affected in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS with respect to healthy controls. Dystonic patients manifested more sexual dysfunction than patients with HFS. Overall, females had a poorer quality of sexual life than males and, among females, women with BSP were the most dysfunctional. Psychological symptoms were present in patients with dystonia, but not in patients with HFS. As discussed in the paper, several factors might be taken into account to explain worse quality of sexual life in patients with dystonia compared to patients with hemifacial spasm. Among them an important role might be played by the central origin of dystonia pathophysiology (i.e., altered activity of cortico-striato-thalamic-cortical circuits). Future investigations are necessary to further explore these preliminary findings, considering that this is the first time that sexual well-being is evaluated in patients with BSP, ST, and HFS, and comparable data are not available.

  19. Beyond Neglect: Preliminary Evidence of Retrospective Time Estimation Abnormalities in Non-Neglect Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients

    PubMed Central

    Low, Essie; Crewther, Sheila G.; Perre, Diana L.; Ben Ong; Laycock, Robin; Tu, Hans; Wijeratne, Tissa

    2016-01-01

    Perception of the passage of time is essential for safe planning and navigation of everyday activities. Findings from the literature have demonstrated a gross underestimation of time interval in right-hemisphere damaged neglect patients, but not in non-neglect unilaterally-damaged patients, compared to controls. This study aimed to investigate retrospective estimation of the duration of a target detection task over two occasions, in 30 stroke patients (12 left-side stroke 15 right-side stroke, and 3 right-side stroke with neglect) and 10 transient ischemic attack patients, relative to 31 age-matched controls. Performances on visual short-term and working memory tasks were also examined to investigate the associations between timing abilities with residual cognitive functioning. Initial results revealed evidence of perceptual time underestimation, not just in neglect patients, but also in non-neglect unilaterally-damaged stroke patients and transient ischemic attack patients. Three months later, underestimation of time persisted only in left-side stroke and right-side stroke with neglect patients, who also demonstrated reduced short-term and working memory abilities. Findings from this study suggest a predictive role of residual cognitive impairments in determining the prognosis of perceptual timing abnormalities. PMID:26940859

  20. Gray Matter Volume Decreases in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia: A Voxel-based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Caroline; Schuller, Anne Marie; Paulos, Carlos; Namer, Izzie; Pull, Charles; Danion, Jean Marie; Foucher, Jack René

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aged patients (>50 years old) with residual schizophrenic symptoms differ from young patients. They represent a subpopulation with a more unfavorable Kraepelinian course and have an increased risk (up to 30%) for dementia of unknown origin. However, our current understanding of age-related brain changes in schizophrenia is derived from studies that included less than 17% of patients who were older than 50 years of age. This study investigated the anatomical distribution of gray matter (GM) brain deficits in aged patients with ongoing schizophrenia. Methods: Voxel-based morphometry was applied to 3D-T1 magnetic resonance images obtained from 27 aged patients with schizophrenia (mean age of 60 years) and 40 age-matched normal controls. Results: Older patients with schizophrenia showed a bilateral reduction of GM volume in the thalamus, the prefrontal cortex, and in a large posterior region centered on the occipito-temporo-parietal junction. Only the latter region showed accelerated GM volume loss with increasing age. None of these results could be accounted for by institutionalization, antipsychotic medication, or cognitive scores. Conclusions: This study replicated most common findings in patients with schizophrenia with regard to thalamic and frontal GM deficits. However, it uncovered an unexpected large region of GM atrophy in the posterior tertiary cortices. The latter observation may be specific to this aged and chronically symptomatic subpopulation, as atrophy in this region is rarely reported in younger patients and is accelerated with age. PMID:21205677

  1. Circulating plasmalogen levels and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale–Cognitive scores in Alzheimer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Paul L.; Mankidy, Rishikesh; Ritchie, Shawn; Heath, Doug; Wood, Julie A.; Flax, John; Goodenowe, Dayan B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Plasmalogens, which are key structural phospholipids in brain membranes, are decreased in the brain and serum of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). We performed this pilot study to evaluate the relation between the levels of circulating plasmalogens and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale–Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) scores in patients with AD. Methods We evaluated participants’ ADAS-Cog scores and serum plasmalogen levels. For the 40 included AD patients with an ADAS-Cog score between 20 and 46, we retested their ADAS-Cog score 1 year later. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid plasmalogen were measured by use of liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results We found that the ADAS-Cog score increased significantly in AD patients with circulating plasmalogen levels that were ≤ 75% of that of age-matched controls at entry into the study. There was no change in score among participants with normal serum plasmalogen levels at baseline (> 75%). Limitations This was a pilot study with 40 patients, and the results require validation in a larger population. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that decreased levels of plasmalogen precursors in the central nervous system correlate with functional decline (as measured by ADAS-Cog scores) in AD patients. The use of both ADAS-Cog and serum plasmalogen data may be a more accurate way of predicting cognitive decline in AD patients, and may be used to decrease the risk of including patients with no cognitive decline in the placebo arm of a drug trial. PMID:20040248

  2. Changes in serum growth factors in stroke rehabilitation patients and their relation to hemiparesis improvement.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hideto; Beppu, Hidehiko; Mizutani, Kenmei; Okamoto, Sayaka; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    Predicting recovery from hemiparesis after stroke is important for rehabilitation. A few recent studies reported that the levels of some growth factors shortly after stroke were positively correlated with the clinical outcomes during the chronic phase. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between the serum levels of growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], insulin-like growth factor-I [IGF-I], and hepatocyte growth factor [HGF]) and improvement in hemiparesis in stroke patients who received rehabilitation in a postacute rehabilitation hospital. Subjects were 32 stroke patients (cerebral infarction: 21 and intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH]: 11). We measured serum levels of VEGF, IGF-I, and HGF and 5 items of the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS) for hemiparesis on admission and at discharge. Age-matched healthy subjects (n=15) served as controls. Serum levels of VEGF and HGF in cerebral infarct patients on admission were higher than those in control subjects, and the serum levels of IGF-I in stroke patients were lower than those in controls. The level of HGF in ICH patients on admission was negatively correlated with gains in SIAS, and higher outliers in HGF concentration were correlated with lower gains in SIAS. Focusing on the extremely high levels of these factors may be a predictor of the low recovery from hemiparesis after stroke.

  3. Impaired autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR) in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia and their family members.

    PubMed Central

    Lahat, N; Zelnik, N; Froom, P; Kinarty, A; Etzioni, A

    1988-01-01

    We used the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR) to test T cell function in four patients with Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), in 11 first-degree relatives and in 20 controls. There was a marked reduction of AMLR in the patients and in three relatives compared to the age-matched controls. In the AT patients the defect in AMLR was intrinsic to the CD4 subpopulation, since exogenous IL-2 did not improve the response of isolated CD4 cells. In contrast to normal controls, pre-incubation of autologous B cells with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) did not enhance the reduced AMLR in the AT patients and the three first-degree relatives. We conclude that in both patients with AT and in some of their family members there is an intrinsic defect in CD4 T cells. This defect leads to diminished reactivity to EBV infected autologous B cells, and may explain in part the high incidence of malignancies observed in such families. PMID:2851398

  4. Edema of the paretic hand in elderly post-stroke nursing patients.

    PubMed

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Baumoehl, Yehuda; Roginsky, Yelena; Glick, Zahava; Habot, Beni; Segal, Refael

    2007-01-01

    Post-stroke edema of the paretic hand constitutes an additional, functional, and esthetic nuisance for the patient. Although often encountered in daily practice, it is not even mentioned in the stroke chapters of the various textbooks. The phenomenon is far from being elucidated and various aspects are still obscure. In this study we tried to estimate the extent of post-stroke hand edema (PSHE) in a sample of elderly patients. The study group consisted of 188 elderly post-stroke nursing patients with hemi or only hand paresis. Seventy, age matched, non-paretic patients were examined as controls. The basis of comparison was the difference in circumference between the two arms at three sites: mid-finger, hand, and wrist as measured in the control group. Values above two standard deviations (S.D.) of the mean difference in circumference of the controls, at two or three sites, were considered as edema. Edema of the paretic hand was detected in 37% of post-stroke patients. Most (about three-quarters), could be classified as simple PSHE, while the rest may have had reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD).

  5. Genotyping of IL-4 −590 (C>T) Gene in Iraqi Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Saddam H.

    2017-01-01

    This study is the first investigation in Iraq dealing with genotyping of IL-4 −590 (C>T) gene, especially in Iraqi patients with asthma. We studied forty-eight blood samples collected from patients with asthma and compared with age-matched 25 healthy individuals as controls. The polymorphism results of IL-4 −590 (C>T) gene by using amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS-PCR) showed the presence of C and T alleles and three genotypes (CC, CT, and TT). Interestingly the frequency of C allele and CC genotype was higher in patients with asthma in comparison with the same allele and genotype in control (P 1 × 10−6). This increase was associated with an increased risk factor of asthma (odds ratio [OR] 9.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.58–23.71). Genotypes analysis by using Hardy-Weinberg distribution showed no significant differences between patients with asthma and healthy subjects. In conclusion, the increasing risk of asthma was associated with C allele and the CC genotype and these are revealed as etiological fraction with risk by having this disease, while the T allele percentage ratio in controls was higher when it is compared with asthma patients suggesting that these alleles have a protective effect (preventive fraction). PMID:28386156

  6. Evaluation of TKTL1 as a biomarker in serum of prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Thurn, Kristina; Juengel, Eva; Oppermann, Elsie; Nelson, Karen; Thomas, Christian; Bartsch, Georg; Oremek, Gerhard M.; Haferkamp, Axel; Rubenwolf, Peter; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Monocyte associated transketolase-like 1 (TKTL1) as a cancer biomarker has become popular with alternative practitioners, but plays no role in conventional medicine. This investigation evaluates the potential of serum TKTL1 as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Material and methods Patients (n = 66) undergoing curative radical prostatectomy (RPE) for biopsy-pro-ven PCa were included in the study. Controls (n = 10) were healthy, age-matched, male volunteers. 10 ml of peripheral blood was drawn from patients several days before surgery and from controls. Serum TKTL1 was measured using the ELISA method. Results The median age at tumor diagnosis was 66 years and median serum PSA was 8.0 ng/ml. Nearly 96% of PCas submitted to surgery were clinically significant. Compared to healthy controls, serum TKTL1 was significantly lower in PCa patients (p = 0.0001, effect size indicator r = Z/sqr(n) = 0.4179). No correlation was apparent between serum TKTL1 and serum PSA, Gleason sum, tumor stage or further clinical and pathologic parameters. Conclusions Reduced serum TKTL1 in PCa patients stands in opposition to TKTL1 epitope detection in monocytes (EDIM) based studies, whereby increased TKTL1 in monocytes of tumor patients has been reported. Since serum TKTL1 does not correlate with clinical parameters in the current investigation, further research is needed to clarify whether serum TKTL1 has potential as a biomarker for PCa. PMID:27729989

  7. Perceived patient control over personal health information in the presence of context-specific concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayakkara, Prabhashi A.

    Information privacy issues have plagued the world of electronic media since its inception. This research focused mainly on factors that increase or decrease perceived patient control over personal health information (CTL) in the presence of context-specific concerns. Control agency theory was used for the paper's theoretical contributions. Personal and proxy control agencies acted as the independent variables, and context-specific concerns for information privacy (CFIP) were used as the moderator between proxy control agency, healthcare provider, and CTL. Demographic data and three control variables-- the desire for information control, privacy experience, and trust propensity--were also included in the model to gauge the contribution to CTL from external factors. Only personal control agency and desire for information control were found to impact CTL.

  8. Serum Lipoprotein Abnormalities in Patients with Ischaemic Heart Disease: Comparisons with a Control Population

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, B.; Chait, A.; Oakley, C. M. O.; Wootton, I. D. P.; Krikler, D. M.; Onitiri, A.; Sigurdsson, G.; February, A.

    1974-01-01

    The frequency and nature of abnormalities of serum lipoproteins have been studied, using quantitative techniques, in 143 patients with ischaemic heart disease (I.H.D.). Rigorous selection criteria were used. The findings were related to the distribution of lipoprotein concentrations in a carefully screened control population. Hyperlipoproteinaemia occurred in 55% of patients and in 11 out of 15 patients aged less than 40 years. Raised triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations in very low density lipoprotein were the most frequent abnormalities followed by raised cholesterol content of low density lipoprotein. In young patients high density lipoprotein levels were subnormal. Hyperlipoproteinaemia of W.H.O. types IIa, IIb, III, IV, and V all seemed to be over-represented in I.H.D. I.H.D. patients with type IIa, IIb, and IV abnormalities were all significantly younger than I.H.D. patients with normal lipoprotein levels. PMID:4370367

  9. Validity of the Control Preferences Scale in patients with emotional disorders

    PubMed Central

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Peñate, Wenceslao

    2016-01-01

    Background The Control Preferences Scale (CPS) is the most frequently used measure of patients’ preferred roles in treatment decisions. The aim of this study was to provide data about the validity of CPS in psychiatric care of patients with emotional disorders. Methods The original CPS was translated to Spanish using the process of cross-cultural adaptation of self-reported measures as the methodological model for Spanish translation. The final version was tested in a convenience sample of 621 consecutive psychiatric outpatients (461 depressive and 160 anxiety disorders) that also completed the Shared Decision-Making Questionnaire, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, the Drug Attitude Inventory, and a questionnaire including sociodemographic and clinical variables. Results CPS showed a moderate internal consistency and a good convergent validity. Patients with collaborative and passive preferences expressed a greater reliance on psychotropics. Patients preferring a collaborative role self-reported greater perception of involvement in decision-making about their treatment. Patients preferring a passive role showed a greater external health locus of control. The most common preferred role was the collaborative–passive. Older patients and those under longer treatments preferred a passive role, while patients with higher levels of education preferred a collaborative role. Conclusion The CPS is a valid measure of the amount of control that psychiatric outpatients with emotional disorders want to assume in the process of making decisions about their treatment. PMID:27895470

  10. Sleep quality in patients with xerostomia: a prospective and randomized case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jornet, Pia; Lucero Berdugo, Maira; Fernandez-Pujante, Alba; C, Castillo Felipe; Lavella C, Zamora; A, Pons-Fuster; J, Silvestre Rangil; Silvestre, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate sleep quality, anxiety/depression and quality-of-life in patients with xerostomia. Materials and methods This prospective, observational, cross-sectional study was conducted among a group of xerostomia patients (n = 30) compared with 30 matched control subjects. The following evaluation scales were used to assess the psychological profile of each patient: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14), the Xerostomia Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Results The PSQI obtained 5.3 3 ± 1.78 for patients with xerostomia compared with 4.26 ± 1.01 for control subjects (p = 0.006); ESS obtained 5.7 ± 2.1 for test patients vs 4.4 0 ± 1 for control subjects (p = 0.010). Statistical regression analysis showed that xerostomia was significantly associated with depression (p = 0.027). Conclusions Patients with xerostomia exhibited significant decreases in sleep quality compared with control subjects.

  11. Intradialytic Massage for Leg Cramps Among Hemodialysis Patients: a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mastnardo, Diane; Lewis, Janice M.; Hall, Kristi; Sullivan, Catherine M.; Cain, Katrice; Theurer, Jacqueline; Huml, Anne; Sehgal, Ashwini R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients on hemodialysis often experience muscle cramps that result in discomfort, shortened treatment times, and inadequate dialysis dose. Cramps have been associated with adversely affecting sleep and health-related quality of life, depression and anxiety. There is limited evidence available about massage in dialysis; however, massage in cancer patients has demonstrated decreases in pain, inflammation, and feelings of anxiety. These correlations indicate massage may be an effective treatment modality for hemodialysis-related lower extremity cramping. Purpose To determine the effectiveness of intradialytic massage on the frequency of cramping among hemodialysis patients prone to lower extremity cramping. Participants 26 maintenance hemodialysis patients with frequent lower extremity cramps. Setting three outpatient hemodialysis centers in Northeast Ohio. Research Design randomized controlled trial. Intervention The intervention group received a 20-minute massage of the lower extremities during each treatment (three times per week) for two weeks. The control group received usual care by dialysis center staff. Main Outcome Measure change in frequency of lower leg cramping. Results Patient reported cramping at home decreased by 1.3 episodes per week in the intervention group compared to 0.2 episodes per week in the control group (p=.005). Patient reported cramping during dialysis decreased by 0.8 episodes in the intervention group compared to 0.4 episodes in the control group (p=0.44). Conclusion Intradialytic massage appears to be an effective way to address muscle cramping. Larger studies with longer duration should be conducted to further examine this approach. PMID:27257445

  12. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-11-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control.

  13. Effects of Rotator Cuff Pathology and Physical Therapy on In Vivo Shoulder Motion and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With a Symptomatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Baumer, Timothy G.; Chan, Derek; Mende, Veronica; Dischler, Jack; Zauel, Roger; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Siegal, Daniel S.; Divine, George; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical therapy (PT) is often prescribed for patients with rotator cuff tears. The extent to which PT influences strength, range of motion (ROM), and patient-reported outcomes has been studied extensively, but the effect of PT on in vivo joint kinematics is not well understood. Purpose: To assess the influence of symptomatic rotator cuff pathology and the effects of PT on shoulder motion, strength, and patient-reported outcomes. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-five patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear and 25 age-matched asymptomatic control subjects were recruited. Shoulder motion was measured using a biplane radiography imaging system, strength was assessed with a Biodex dynamometer, and patient-reported outcomes were assessed using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores. Data were acquired from the patients before and after 8 weeks of physical therapy. Data were acquired at 1 time point for the control subjects. Results: Compared with the control subjects, patients with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had significantly worse pain/function scores (P < .01); less ROM (P < .01); lower abduction (ABD), external rotation (ER), and internal rotation (IR) strength (P < .01); less scapulothoracic posterior tilt (P = .05); and lower glenohumeral joint elevation (P < .01). Physical therapy resulted in improved pain/function scores (P < .01), increased ROM (P < .02), increased scapulothoracic posterior tilt (P = .05), increased glenohumeral joint elevation (P = .01), and decreased acromiohumeral distance (AHD) (P = .02). Conclusion: Compared with age-matched controls, patients had worse pain/function scores, less ROM, and lower ABD, ER, and IR strength. Patients also had less scapulothoracic anteroposterior tilt, less glenohumeral joint elevation, and an altered glenohumeral joint contact path. PT resulted in improved pain/function scores, increased ROM, greater posterior

  14. Family caregiver preferences for patient decisional control among Hispanics in the United States and Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Yennurajalingam, Sriram; Noguera, Antonio; Parsons, Henrique Afonseca; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Duarte, Eva Rosina; Palma, Alejandra; Bunge, Sofia; Palmer, J. Lynn; Delgado-Guay, Marvin Omar; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding family caregivers’ decisional role preferences is important for communication, quality of care, and patient and family satisfaction. The family caregiver has an important role in a patient’s decisional role preferences. There are limited studies on family caregivers’ preferences of the patient’s decisional control at the end of life among Hispanics. Aims To identify Hispanic caregivers’ preferences of the decision control of patients with advanced cancer and to compare the preferences of caregivers in Latin America (HLA) and Hispanic American (HUSA) caregivers. Design We surveyed patients and their family caregivers referred to outpatient palliative care clinics in the United States, Chile, Argentina, and Guatemala. Caregiver preferences of patient’s decisional control were evaluated using the Control Preference Scale. Caregivers’ and patients’ socio-demographic variables, patient performance status, and HUSA patient acculturation level was also collected. Participants A total of 387 caregivers were surveyed: 100 (26%) in Chile, 99 (26%) in Argentina, 97 (25%) in Guatemala, and 91 (24%) in the United States. The median age was 56 years, and 59% were female. Results Caregiver preference of patients decisions control was passive, shared, and active by 10 (11%), 45 (52%) and 32 (37%) HUSA caregivers and 54 (19%), 178 (62%) and 55 (19%) HLA caregivers (p=0.0023). Caregiver acculturation level did not affect the preferences of the HUSA sample (p=0.60). Conclusions Most Hispanic family caregivers preferred the patient to make shared decisions. HLA caregivers preferred more frequently patients to assume a passive decisional role. Acculturation did not influence the preferences of HUSA caregivers. PMID:23670718

  15. A comparison of patient and anaesthetist controlled midazolam sedation for dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, M R; Tong, C K

    1994-03-01

    Thirty healthy Hong Kong Chinese patients between the ages of 15 and 31 years with bilaterally impacted lower third molar teeth, scheduled for surgical removal were studied. All the patients presented twice (for the right and left sides) and received, on separate occasions, patient or anaesthetist-controlled midazolam sedation allocated using a randomised, crossover design. Both techniques provided reliable sedation with verbal contact maintained, minimal changes in respiratory and cardiovascular function, good operating conditions and a high degree of patient satisfaction. The majority of patients (67%) thought they could sedate themselves better on a subsequent visit and were confident that they could do this more satisfactorily than the anaesthetist. An almost equal number preferred patient (n = 12) or anaesthetist (n = 13) controlled sedation, with the remainder having no preference. The total dose of midazolam was very similar in the two groups, 5.3 (SD 2.4) mg and 5.0 (SD 1.1) mg for patient and anaesthetist controlled sedation respectively.

  16. High Prolidase Levels may be a Marker of Irreversible Extracellular Matrix Changes in Controlled Acromegaly Patients?

    PubMed

    Tabur, S; Sezen, H; Korkmaz, H; Ozkaya, M; Akarsu, E

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the activity of prolidase in controlled acromegaly patients and its association with oxidative stress. 25 acromegalic patients in remission who were followed in our outpatient clinic and 31 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), total antioxidative status (TAS), total oxidative stress (TOS), total free sulfhydryl (-SH), paraoxonase (PON), arylesterase (ARE), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) and prolidase activity levels were measured. Percent ratio of TOS to TAS level was accepted as oxidative stress index (OSI). Serum prolidase activity, TOS, OSI, and LOOH levels were significantly higher in acromegaly patients compared to the healthy control group (p<0.001, p=0.001, p<0.001, and p<0.001, respectively). SH levels were significantly lower in the acromegaly patients compared to the healthy control group (p=0.002). Prolidase activity were positively correlated with TOS, OSI, LOOH and negatively correlated with -SH in patients with acromegaly (r=0.471, p<0.001; r=0.527, p<0.001; r=0.717, p<0.001; r=- 0.516, p<0.001, respectively). These associations were confirmed in the multiple regression analysis (R(2)=0.502, p<0.001). In conclusion, serum prolidase activity and oxidative stress levels were high in controlled acromegaly patients. These results suggest that extracellular matrix changes continue eventhough the disease is controlled, and elevated oxidative stress is involved in the increased prolidase activity in acromegaly patients.

  17. Insulin pump patient characteristics and glucose control in the hospitalized setting.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Subramanian; Satra, Ankita; Calogeras, Ellen; Lock, Patricia; Lansang, M Cecilia

    2014-05-01

    Patients' knowledge of their insulin pumps and glucose control during hospitalization has not been studied. The aim was to study the determinants of glycemic control in patients using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in the hospital. Three groups of patients were identified: those who did not need any inpatient education and continued on CSII (gorup A), those who received education then continued on CSII (group B), and those for whom CSII was not appropriate and were treated with multiple daily insulin injections (gorup C). We compared the measures of glycemic control between the 3 groups and analyzed which variables impacted glucose control. There were 50 patients, with 51 hospital admissions, 57% males, mean age 48 ± 13 years, 86% had type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The mean DM duration was 26 ± 14 years, mean duration of CSII use was 8.7 ± 6 years, and mean HbA1c was 7.6 ± 1.4%. The mean duration of hospital stay was 5.6 ± 4.6 days. Mean blood glucose (BG) and frequency of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemic events among the 3 groups adjusted for their duration of hospital stay were not statistically different. None of the patients developed diabetic ketoacidosis while using their pump. Stepwise multivariate analysis revealed knowledge of hypoglycemia correction was the single most important predictor of mean BG (P < .001). Patients who received inpatient education performed similarly to patients who did not need inpatient education. Patients who receive inpatient education on CSII fare similar as patients who did not require inpatient education.

  18. Efficacy and tolerability of oxycodone versus fentanyl for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after gastrointestinal laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhen; Wang, Kaiguo; Wang, Baosheng; Zhou, Naibao; Li, Hao; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: It has been suggested that oxycodone is effective in relieving acute postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of oxycodone (O) versus fentanyl (F), and the adequate potency ratio of oxycodone and fentanyl in patients with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after gastric laparotomy. Methods: In this double-blinded, randomized, controlled study, 60 patients undergoing elective gastric laparotomy were allocated to receive either oxycodone or fentanyl for postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (potency ratio 60:1). The patients received ketorolac 60 mg before the end of anesthesia and then continued with patient-controlled analgesia for 48 hours postsurgery. Pain severity, side effects and respiration rate were recorded 30 minutes, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after the surgery. Cumulative opioid requirements and patient satisfaction were also measured. Results: The median consumption more than 48 hours after operation of oxycodone was 50 mg (range: 40.0–62.4 mg) and fentanyl was 0.8 mg (range: 0.6–1.1 mg), and the percentage of patients requiring rescue medication was not statistically significant. Numeric rating scores at rest and upon movement were significantly lower in group O than in F (P < 0.05). Whereas the incidences of adverse events were similar between the groups (33.3% vs 27.6%, P = 0.64), a significant higher sedation scores were found in patients given fentanyl at 30 minutes after the surgery (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Oxycodone was comparable to fentanyl in the relief of postoperative pain following gastric laparotomy. Oxycodone not only provides better postoperative pain relief and less sedation, but also there was a tendency toward more side effects with oxycodone. PMID:27684835

  19. Anticoagulation control among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: A single tertiary cardiac center experience

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Shaban; Aljundi, Amer H. S.; Kasem, Mohamed; Alhashemi, Mohammed; El-Menyar, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    There is a limited knowledge about the predictors of anticoagulation control in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Furthermore, few reports addressed the role of time in therapeutic range (TTR) that could reflect the safety and efficacy of anticoagulation therapy. We aimed to assess factors that affect the quality of anticoagulation therapy utilizing TTR in patients with NVAF. A retrospective observational study was conducted for patients with NVAF who were maintained on warfarin >6 months at a tertiary cardiac care hospital. Patients were categorized according to the TTR status (≥65% vs. <65%). A total of 241 eligible patients were identified. A high-quality anticoagulation based on TTR values ≥65% was found in 157 (65.1%) patients; the remaining (34.9%) patients represented the low-quality anticoagulation group (TTR <65%). Demographics and clinical characteristics were comparable in the two TTR groups. Both groups were comparable in terms of warfarin dose and medications use. When compared to patients with high-quality anticoagulation, patients in the low-quality anticoagulation group were more likely to seek outpatient warfarin clinic visits more frequently (22.3 ± 5.5 vs. 18 ± 4.4, P = 0.001) and to have higher rate of polypharmacy (57.1% vs. 42%, P = 0.03). Of note, patients in both groups had similar major bleeding events (P = 0.41). After adjusting for age and sex, polypharmacy use was a predictor of poor coagulation control (odds ratio = 1.89, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–3.33; P = 0.03). In NVAF patients, TTR is generally high in our cohort. Patients with polypharmacy and frequent clinic visits have lower TTR. High-quality oral anticoagulation could be achieved through optimizing TTR without a significant risk of major bleeding. PMID:28217549

  20. Enablers of Physician Prescription of a Long-Term Asthma Controller in Patients with Persistent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Martha L.; Desplats, Eve; Ernst, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to identify key enablers of physician prescription of a long-term controller in patients with persistent asthma. Methods. We conducted a mailed survey of randomly selected Quebec physicians. We sent a 102-item questionnaire, seeking reported management regarding one of 4 clinical vignettes of a poorly controlled adult or child and endorsement of enablers to prescribe long-term controllers. Results. With a 56% participation rate, 421 physicians participated. Most (86%) would prescribe a long-term controller (predominantly inhaled corticosteroids, ICS) to the patient in their clinical vignette. Determinants of intention were the recognition of persistent symptoms (OR 2.67), goal of achieving long-term control (OR 5.31), and high comfort level in initiating long-term ICS (OR 2.33). Decision tools, pharmacy reports, reminders, and specific training were strongly endorsed by ≥60% physicians to support optimal management. Physicians strongly endorsed asthma education, lung function testing, specialist opinion, accessible asthma clinic, and paramedical healthcare professionals to guide patients, as enablers to improve patient adherence to and physicians' comfort with long-term ICS. Interpretation. Tools and training to improve physician knowledge, skills, and perception towards long-term ICS and resources that increase patient adherence and physician comfort to facilitate long-term ICS prescription should be considered as targets for implementation. PMID:27445537

  1. Immune responsiveness and lymphokine production in patients with tuberculosis and healthy controls.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, F O; Rodríguez, J I; Agudelo, G; García, L F

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the profile of immune responsiveness that differentiates patients with tuberculosis (TB) from healthy tuberculin-positive controls. Forty-five patients with pulmonary TB and 16 healthy tuberculin-positive controls, all human immunodeficiency virus negative, were studied. Patients had decreased reactivity to tuberculin, diminished proliferative response to purified protein derivative (PPD), lower concentrations of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon in PPD-stimulated cultures, no increase in the percentage of gamma/delta cells in PPD-stimulated cultures, and higher immunoglobulin G antimycobacterial antibodies compared with control subjects. Furthermore, controls exhibited decreased production of IL-4 by PPD-stimulated cells. Multivariate discriminant and factor analyses demonstrated divergent patterns of immune reactivity against mycobacterial antigens. The association of IL-4 and immunoglobulin G antibody levels in patients, in contrast to the high reactivity to tuberculin, increased proliferation to PPD, and higher levels of IL-2 and gamma interferon observed in healthy controls suggested that most TB patients exhibit a TH2 pattern of immune responsiveness while tuberculin-positive healthy individuals have a TH1 pattern. PMID:7960152

  2. Circadian Rhythms of Oxidative Stress Markers and Melatonin Metabolite in Patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a genetic disorder in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) with severe neurological disorders, in which oxidative stress and disturbed melatonin metabolism may be involved. Herein we confirmed the diurnal variation of melatonin metabolites, oxidative stress markers, and antioxidant power in urine of patients with XPA and age-matched controls, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The peak of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, a metabolite of melatonin, was seen at 6:00 in both the XPA patients and controls, though the peak value is lower, specifically in the younger age group of XPA patients. The older XPA patients demonstrated an increase in the urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, having a robust peak at 6:00 and 18:00, respectively. In addition, the urinary level of total antioxidant power was decreased in the older XPA patients. Recently, it is speculated that oxidative stress and antioxidant properties may have a diurnal variation, and the circadian rhythm is likely to influence the NER itself. We believe that the administration of melatonin has the possibility of ameliorating the augmented oxidative stress in neurodegeneration, especially in the older XPA patients, modulating the melatonin metabolism and the circadian rhythm.

  3. Stance control is not affected by paresis and reflex hyperexcitability: the case of spastic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, A; Galante, M; Lucas, B; Schieppati, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Spastic patients were studied to understand whether stance unsteadiness is associated with changes in the control of voluntary force, muscle tone, or reflex excitability, rather than to abnormal posture connected to the motor deficit itself.
METHODS—Twenty four normal subjects, 12 patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), seven by spastic paraparesis, and 14 by hemiparesis were studied. All patients featured various degrees of spasticity and paresis but were free from clinically evident sensory deficits. Body sway during quiet upright stance was assessed through a stabilometric platform under both eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. The sudden rotation of a supporting platform, in a toe up and toe down direction respectively, evoked short (SLR) and medium latency (MLR) reflex responses to stretch of the soleus or the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle.
RESULTS—No relation was found between clinical findings (tone, muscle strength, tendon reflexes, plantar response, and duration of disease) and body sway. On average, all patient groups exhibited a forward shift of the centre of foot pressure (CFP) with respect to normal subjects; in addition, paraparetic and to a much larger extent hemiparetic patients showed a lateral shift of CFP. Body sway area was significantly increased only in the hemiparetic patients. No relation was found between position of the CFP and sway within any patient group. Soleus SLR was increased in all patients with respect to normal subjects. TA SLR was often seen in both patients with ALS and paraparetic patients, but only rarely in normal subjects and hemiparetic patients. However, no relation was found between amplitude of soleus or TA SLRs and stabilometric variables. The frequency and size of soleus MLR and TA MLR were decreased in all patients. These responses were decreased in size and not modulated by background EMG in the affected leg of hemiparetic patients, suggesting a disturbed control of

  4. Prevalence of Intestinal Protozoa among Saudi Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hawash, Yousry A.; Dorgham, Laila Sh.; Amir, El-Amir M.; Sharaf, Osama F.

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that chronic renal failure (CRF) predisposes patients to infection with intestinal protozoa. We tested this hypothesis with a matched case-control study to determine the prevalence of these protozoa and their diarrhea associated symptoms among 50 patients with CRF (cases) from Taif, western Saudi Arabia. Fifty diarrheal patients without CRF were recruited in the study as controls. Participants were interviewed by a structured questionnaire and stool samples were collected. Samples were thoroughly examined with microscopy and three coproantigens detection kits. Enteric protozoa were detected in 21 cases and 14 controls. Blastocystis spp. were the most predominant parasite (16% in cases versus 8% in controls), followed by Giardia duodenalis (10% in cases versus 12% in controls) and Cryptosporidium spp. (10% in cases versus 6% in controls). Cyclospora cayetanensis was identified in two cases, while Entamoeba histolytica was described in one case and one control. Intestinal parasitism was positively associated with the male gender, urban residence, and travel history. Clinical symptoms of nausea/vomiting and abdominal pain were significantly varied between the parasitized cases and controls (P value ≤ 0.05). Given the results, we recommend screening all diarrheal feces for intestinal protozoa in the study's population, particularly those with CRF. PMID:26491455

  5. Comparative study of different control techniques for the regulation of blood glucose level in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ibbini, Mohammed S

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose regulation is of a great concern for insulin-dependant patients with excessive glucose in blood (hyperglycaemia), or low glucose profile (hypoglycaemia) due to excess insulin delivery. Both conditions can cause dangerous complications for diabetic patients, and hence glucose regulation in blood is of prime importance. Insulin pumps are used to deliver insulin in small quantities, allowing the glucose level to remain as close as possible to that of non-diabetics (near 100 mg dl(-1)). Different control techniques are used to maintain the glucose level and most of them depend on an exact mathematical or empirical model of insulin-glucose interaction. Recently, we have proposed different controllers that are based on fuzzy logic and so do not use mathematical modelling, which in general is nonlinear, complex and suffers from uncertainties. PI fuzzy controllers are physically related to classical PI and PID controllers, which are extremely popular. The parameter settings of classical and fuzzy logic controllers are based on deep common physical background. In this manuscript, a comparative study is proposed to evaluate the use of fuzzy logic controllers over other conventional controllers such as PI and PID controllers to maintain the blood glucose level within a normoglycaemic average especially when a diabetic patient is subjected to different conditions.

  6. Vitamin D status and distribution in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease versus healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Behzad; Javadian, Yahya; Monadi, Mahmoud; Dankob, Yahya; Firouzjahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D has a potential to modulate inflammatory response against noxious particles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The present study was conducted to determine the status of serum vitamin D in COPD versus healthy group. Methods: The patients presented to the outpatient pulmonary clinic of Ayatollah Rouhani Hospital, Babol Iran. Diagnosis of COPD was confirmed based on airflow limitation defined as FEV1/FVC ratio <70% and FEV1< 80% of predicted. All eligible patients aged ≥ 40 years old entered the study. Pulmonary infection, tuberculosis, pleural effusion, congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and embolism, restrictive airway disease, conditions leading changes in vitamin D metabolism and absorption were excluded. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) was determined by electrocheminluminescence method and levels <20, 20-29, and ≥30ng/ml were considered as deficiency, insufficiency, and sufficiency. In statistical analysis, the frequency of serum 25-OHD deficiency and insufficiency in patients were compared regarding age of ≤ 50 or >50 years old. All patients were males and age and sex-matched controls were selected among healthy subjects accompanied COPD patients. Results: Ninety patients and 100 controls with respective mean (±SD) age of 64.8±11.7 and 62.6±11.7 years old (P=0.19) were studied. Compared with control, proportions of serum 25-OHD deficiency and insufficiency in patients >50 years were higher and deficiency was lower (61.5% vs 87.5%, P=0.11). Conclusion: These findings indicate that a significant proportion of young COPD patients have insufficient serum 25-OHD. Regarding a positive relationship between 25-OHD and FEV1 in COPD, these findings highlight serum 25-OHD assessment in COPD for recognizing high risk patients. PMID:26221507

  7. Differentiating malingering balance disorder patients from healthy controls, compensated unilateral vestibular loss, and whiplash patients using stance and gait posturography.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Jaap; Horlings, Corinne G C; Allum, John H J

    2010-01-01

    Differentiating balance disorder patients who are malingering from those with organic balance disorders is difficult and costly. We used trunk sway measured during several stance and gait tasks in 18 patients suspected of malingering in order to differentiate these from 20 patients who had suffered unilateral vestibular loss 3 months earlier, 20 patients with documented whiplash injuries, and 34 healthy controls. Classification results ranged from 72 to 96% and were equally accurate for task or criteria variables based on 90% sway values. The tasks yielding the best discrimination were: standing with eyes closed on a foam and firm surface; standing with eyes open on a firm surface; standing on 1 leg; and walking tandem steps. The criteria yielding the best discrimination were: standing with eyes open on a firm surface; the difference between standing with eyes closed on foam and firm surfaces; the difference between walking tandem steps and standing on 1 leg with eyes open; and the difference between roll and pitch velocity when walking 8 tandem steps. We conclude that discriminating suspected malingering balance disorder patients is possible using variables or criteria based on objective measures of trunk sway during several stance and gait tasks.

  8. Parkinsonian deficits in context-dependent regulation of standing postural control.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lesley A; Doan, Jon B; Whishaw, Ian Q; Suchowersky, Oksana

    2007-05-18

    This study explored whether patients with Parkinson's disease alter the regulation of upright standing according to constraints imposed by the environmental context. The provision of context-dependent adaptations was inferred from the presence of adjustments to standing postural control that would serve to reduce fall risk when balance was challenged by a threatening environmental context. Participants were asked to stand as still as possible in two environmental context conditions that differed in the level of imposed postural threat: LOW threat and HIGH threat. Eight levodopa dependent patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and eight age-matched control subjects (CTRL) provided the subject sample. PD patients were tested following a 12-h withdrawal of anti-Parkinsonian medications and approximately 1h post-medication. The CTRL group showed altered postural control in the HIGH threat condition, in a manner that was indicative of appropriate context-dependent regulation of standing. PD patients, in the non-medicated or medicated states, did not modify stance regulation when the environmental context heightened postural threat. Our results extend the current understanding of Parkinsonian deficits in the context-dependent regulation of postural control to include upright standing.

  9. Biomarkers and Bacterial Pneumonia Risk in Patients with Treated HIV Infection: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjerk, Sonja M.; Baker, Jason V.; Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Angus, Brian; Gordin, Fred M.; Pett, Sarah L.; Stephan, Christoph; Kunisaki, Ken M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist. Methods We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases) and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls) were matched 1∶1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16), Surfactant Protein D (SP-D), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls. Results Cases (n = 72) and controls (n = 72) were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR) age was 45 (41, 51) years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690) cells/mm3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p = 0.02). IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively). Conclusions In